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JANUARY 2021


WELCOME, 2021! Happy New Year from everyone at Stride Bank!

1415 SE Washington Blvd., Bartlesville, OK 918-333-0380 | stridebank.com 2

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WHAT’S INSIDE

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Upfront

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Out & About: Photos from Around Town

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Profile: Sherri Smith

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Oh Baby!

On the Osage: Showing Off Our Mid-Section... ... In Pawhuska

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Baby New Year 2021 Take a Look at All the Cute Little Contestants

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Unplugged Play: The Little Lark Business Provides Refuge from Digital Landscape

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Feature Sponsor Story: Where Are They Now A Look at Handsome, Happy-Go-Lucky Levi Cruse

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Stars In Our Backyard: Joyce Sequichie Hifler Beloved Author Was an Inspiration to Many

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Swimming Safety: Infant Swim Resource Local Course Can Save Children from Drowning

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Make A Difference: Tru-ly Clean and Safe Support Local & American Businesses

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Funny You Should Ask: The List

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A New Year: What Will Bartlesville Be?

A Fresh Perspective: The Winter of Our Unsettled Season

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Kids’ Calendar

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A Good Word: Doing Push-Ups Make it a Priority to Work Out Your Positivity Muscle

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Chick-fil-A Events Calendar

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Hidden Gems: Sutton Center

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Business Spotlight: Cooper and Mill

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Profiles of the Past: Bob Kurland

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Looking Back: Keepsake Candles From Church Bazaars to an International Business

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City News: Protect Our Herd

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Meet Your Writer: Brent Taylor Writer Brings a “Fresh Perspective” to Bartlesville

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Knowing Nowata: Making History

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Once Upon A Time: Sir Winston Churchill

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From the Heart: Pay Attention to the Nudge That Still, Small Voice can Lead to Big Things

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Education Opportunities: OK EAT Oklahoma Energy and Agriculture Training

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Now You Know: Bartlesville’s Glass & Bottling Bartlesville Boasted State’s First Glass Factory

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Let Freedom Ring: White House Traditions 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on New Year’s Day JANUARY 2021

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UPFRONT

upfront Thank the Lord that the year 2020 is over ... Welcome to January 2021, friends! I cannot begin to tell you how over with the year 2020 Christy and I are! We are so ready to move on to a new year, a new hope, a new love, a new journey, a new vision, a new grace, a new dream, a new life, but most importantly, a fresh start — a new beginning for all of us. I cannot think of a better way to start off the year than by bringing you 92 of the cutest babies in the Bartlesville area. This is our fourth year to do the “Baby New Year” contest, and every year since 2018, it has become the biggest and most popular issue we print. We are so proud to introduce you to the  “Baby New Year 2021” cover winner Bjorn Taylor, who is a 6-month old beautiful and handsome little boy — our first boy winner since 2015. I tell people all the time that this issue becomes a second job for me when it comes to our Facebook page. (By the way, if you don't follow us, then you need to go to BartlesvilleMonthlyMagazine on Facebook and join 24,000 other followers.) The numbers this year are staggering. For all our “Baby New Year'' posts, we had over a quarter of a million people view them during the month-long event. We had votes come in from all 50 states and over a hundred votes came in from six different countries. There were over 2,500 comments and over a 1,000 shares. What I love about all the numbers is that it brings the spotlight to Bartlesville, Oklahoma and her people. It also brings her future to the forefront on Facebook for so many people to see what a great community we work and live in.     Our very popular  “People's Choice” winner on Facebook receives a full page layout in the magazine. Capturing more votes than any year before with over 1,600 votes ... and the winner is Millie Lee Condry. I can honestly say that if she was not the  “People's Choice”  winner, then you would be looking at the cover winner. What a pose! We want to sincerely thank all the moms and dads who came out and shared their sweet babies with thousands of people this year. You are all winners to Christy and me! We always take ourselves out of the voting because we just love all these precious little littles!

We love to do our photo shoot with these babies and it was so crazy when Karsyn counted down ... 3,2,1, GO! The moms and dads start handing us babies, and before you know it, we are holding and surrounded by 15 precious babies. Thank you to Karsyn Shalae Photography  for the four days you spent photographing 92 babies with over a thousand pictures taken. We want to especially say thank you to  Trevor Sutterfield of Sutterfield Financial Group Inc. for sponsoring this special event once again. Christy and I are so excited about 2021 and the upcoming issues. I truly believe most, if not all, of you know what this magazine means to us. When you open the magazine and read the stories, you see and feel the love and passion we have for this community. We are all part of the stories that make Bartlesville an extraordinary city! For the hurt, the grieving, the lost, the lonely, the desperate, and the hungry ... hold on with all you have. Stay strong, set your compass to Him, keep moving forward, and believe that God will see you through. Every victory we have, no matter how big or small, makes a difference in our lives. I know that to be true because when you see me, you see the evidence of God's Goodness, Grace, and Mercy all over me. God Bless and Happy New Year. Keith and Christy   

Volume XII Issue I Bartlesville Monthly Magazine is published by

ENGEL PUBLISHING

Offices located in Downtown Bartlesville in the historic Price Tower 510 Dewey Ave, Suite 400, Bartlesville, OK 74003 P.O. Box 603, Bartlesville, OK 74005

www.bartlesvillemonthly.com facebook.com/bartlesvillemonthly Publisher

Brian Engel brian@bartlesvillemonthly.com Art Direction

Copper Cup Images design@coppercupimages.com Director of Sales & Marketing

Keith McPhail keith@bartlesvillemonthly.com Community Liaison

Christy McPhail christy@bartlesvillemonthly.com Project Manager

Andrea Whitchurch andrea@bartlesvillemonthly.com Administration

Shelley Greene Stewart Delivery and Distribution

Julie Drake Calendar/Social Media

calendar@bartlesvillemonthly.com Contributing Writers Debbie Neece, Kay Little, Jay Webster, Maria Gus, Tim Hudson, Lori Just, Lori Kroh, Brent Taylor, Kelly Bland, Rita Thurman Barnes, Keith McPhail, Alexis Hallum , Jay Hastings, Carroll Craun, Mike Wilt, Sara Leslie Gagan Contributing Photographers Alexis Hallum, Kathy Peaster, Bartlesville Area History Museum, Nowata History Museum, Jay Hastings, Karsyn Shalae, Dan Reinking Kids Calendar

Jessica Smith

All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, copied or otherwise, without prior permission of Bartlesville Monthly, Inc.

ABOUT THE COVER Cover photo taken by Karsyn Shalae is Bjorn Taylor, winner of Judge’s Choice in the Baby New Year 2021 Contest Creative Concept by Keith and Christy McPhail

bmonthly managing editors Keith & Christy McPhail.

Design by Copper Cup Images

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PROFILE

Sherri Smith by Sarah Leslie Gagan Bartlesville is not without its population of hungry, hurting, and homeless. Our community contains many who have unspoken, basic needs that often go unmet without the gracious intervention of others. Over 20 years ago, Sherri Smith felt the calling and with the help of God, her church, and others, she started one of the greatest movements of missionary service within our community. Agape Mission opened its doors February 1, 2000 serving hot meals, six days a week, free of charge, to anyone who needed them. After growing up in Grove, Oklahoma, Sherri moved to Bartlesville in December of 1978 at the age of 18, and immediately fell in love with the community. She soon met and married her husband, Mike, and began to raise a family. The Smith’s have two sons and one daughter, and four grandchildren. Sherri enjoyed a successful career as a commodity broker and banker, but it was service to others that held her heart.  In her young adult years, Sherri volunteered with several Bartlesville charities, and over time she became very familiar with the needs of the community — watching the need steadily grow. She was active with her church, First Assembly of God — now known as Spirit Church — and over lunch one day, she had the thought to ask her pastor if the church had ever considered a feeding ministry. When the conversation was over, it was agreed Sherri would put together a presentation to bring before the church board. The church accepted the proposal, and Sherri began employment with the church on January 17, 2000. Starting from scratch with nothing, God put it all together, and everything fell into place in quick order, from equipment to volunteers. Agape Mission opened its doors two weeks later, on February 1, 2000, in a 3,000-square-foot building, partnering with First Assembly of God for the first 14 months until their own 501c3 could be established.

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PROFILE For the first three-and-a-half years, Sherri was the cook, and many days, the janitor. Sherri gives all the credit to God, and jokingly recalls, “From February to November that first year I really thought God was trying to kill me, I’d go home and rub liniment on my legs every night they hurt so bad, but we made it through.” Sherri admits she learned so much in those early years, especially from fellow church member (the late) Naomi Reeder, who was a retired cafeteria cook. In fact, the name Agape began with the Reeder family, who had started a fund at their church for the needy, calling it The Agape Fund. In addition to onsite meals, Agape Mission prepares food for the elderly, handicapped, and homebound, for a total of approximately 300 meals daily. The mission also prepares sacks of food for school-age children through their Food-for-Kids program, which right now serves about 600 weekly, down from around 700 each week due to online schooling resulting from the Coronavirus pandemic.  The Food-for-Kids program at Agape helps to ensure children don’t go hungry during the weekends and holidays, when they don’t have access to their school’s free and reduced-price breakfasts or lunches. Agape currently serves children in 14 area schools. Although Sherri is the executive director and founder, she is most proud of the staff and volunteers. They demonstrate God’s love to those who are hungry, hurting, and homeless, serving them with dignity and respect. Agape workers understand they influence others positively or negatively every day, and want to let people know they are important to God and to others. The

The New Agapé Mission

overarching message of the mission is that God loves people so much that he feeds them every day. In August 2001, Agape Mission received its 501c3 designation as a non-profit organization, and continues to receive support from local churches, businesses, civic organizations, and individuals throughout the community. The mission was blessed to receive a matching funds grant in 2001 from Phillips Petroleum Company and the Lyon Foundation. In January 2007, Agape Mission joined the Bartlesville Regional United Way. The 3,000-square-foot building served the mission for a little over 18 years. Under the skilled leadership of Sherri, a massive fund-raising undertaking began for a new building. That new facility became a reality and opened its doors in October of 2018. She is proud of the fact that all $1.6 million of the cost is fully paid for. In addition to meeting the physical and spiritual needs of people in the community, Agape Mission is one of the area’s largest active avenues for those who need to perform community service. Whether it be through the Department of Corrections, or honor society, or a college scholarship requirement, Agape provides a Christian environment for people to complete their service and get letters of recommendation.  The Agape Mission continues to support our community through their meal ministry. Without their daily contribution, many citizens — young and old alike — would go to bed hungry. Sherri is working out her legacy of caring and serving for those who are hurting. She encourages the staff to follow the motto shared by inspirational writer and speaker John Maxwell, “People don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care.”  She acknowledges it isn’t always easy for people to show others how much you care. She states, “Jesus said ‘Love the Lord with all your heart, soul, and strength and love your neighbor as yourself.’ I’m nowhere near perfect, I have a lot of faults, but I hope people remember how much I care. I can’t do it without God, I tell people, ‘I’m just the garden hose.’”

Sherri Smith’s Grandchildren.

The community of Bartlesville is richer for having Sherri Smith as a resident. She tirelessly continues to pour herself out for others, allowing God’s love to flow through her hands into the hearts of those who are hurting.

Sherri and husband, Mike. JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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918-766-3812 GCPetCremation@aol.com

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BABY NEW YEAR 2021

Oh b

aby

!

Thank you to all the moms and dads who signed up and made this year's New Year Baby competition a record, with over 49,000Â votes cast for these 92 cuties. Bartlesville undoubtedly has some of the cutest babies around, which always makes choosing just one for the cover almost impossible for our judges! Thank you to our sponsor, Sutterfield Financial Group; our photographer, Karsyn Shalae; and Johnstone Sare Building for providing the space to hang out with all these cuties! Thank you!

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BABY NEW YEAR SPONSOR

NEW YEAR

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Whatever 2021 Throws Your Way,

WE ARE THERE FOR YOU Investment Planning • Tax & Accounting • Retirement Planning • Business & Estate Planning • Insurance

501 E Fourth Street Bartlesville, OK 74003 918.338.2255

@sutterfieldfg Investment advisory services are offered through Sutterfield Financial Group, Inc., a SEC Registered Investment Advisor.


BABY NEW YEAR

HAPPY NEW YEAR! Millie Lee Condry, a smalltown girl from Ramona, was born on New Years Eve of 2019, at 6:41 p.m. She weighed 9 lbs-11oz and was 2 feet long when she was born. This girl has a wild and spunky attitude and has never met a stranger. She loves llamas, golf balls, mac and cheese, and being ornery. In her free time she enjoys sharing donuts with her Papa at Forever 8, giving “love pats” to any animal in sight, and keeping her Mama and Dada on their toes!

PEOPLE’S CHOICE WINNER

Millie

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BABY NEW YEAR

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Ainsley

Alera

Amora

Angelina

Anna & Mae

Aria

Armani

Asher

Aspen

Audrey

Austin

Baylor

Benjamin

Bentley

Bjorn

Blakeleigh

Brooke

Brooklyn

Brooklyn

Camille

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BABY NEW YEAR

Charley

Claire

Cooper

Cora

Daylin

Eizley

Eli

Ellie

Ellis

Elowyn

Ember

Emerson

Everett

Everleigh

Everly

Gracelyn

Grayson

Gunner

Hadleigh

Hope JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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BABY NEW YEAR

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Jace

JaNyla

Kallen

Kayden

Kenlyn

Kinzlee

Lane

Levi

Liam

Liam

Lucas

Lucy

Lyric

Mabel

Magnolia

Makauley

Mateo

Micah

Michael

Millie

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BABY NEW YEAR

Nash

Nevaeh

Noelle

Nolan

Nova

Oliver

Oliver

Oliver

Olivia

Ollie, Eliza & Luna

Opal

Owen

Phil

RaeLee

Scout

Serenity

Solomon

Teagan Ann

Teighan

Theodore JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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BABY NEW YEAR

Tommy

Tripp

Tyler Dylane

Valentina

Vivian

Weston

Wilder

William

Willow Beth

Willow Jane

Wyatt

Zachary

Congratulations to all of our 2021 Contestants! See you next year! Thank you to our sponsor,

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW

Flash Back to 2015 A Look at Handsome, Happy-Go-Lucky Levi Cruse by Mike Wilt Levi Cruse is like many six-year-old boys — energetic, rambunctious, and really into sports. However, in January of 2015, Levi was an adorable seven-month-old who graced the cover of the bmonthly Magazine’s annual Baby New Year issue.  “He was just the sweetest little thing,” beams momma Tressa Cruse. “He had the cutest smile and a twinkle in his eyes.”  Anyone who saw the cover that year would be hard-pressed to disagree.  “He also was the happiest baby. He just smiled and laughed during the entire photo shoot.”  Upon learning of the contest, Tressa didn’t think twice about entering Levi. But what did daddy, Ryan, think?  “Probably what any man would think,” laughs Tressa. “He wasn’t against it, but he wasn’t necessarily for it.”

Voting was a little different five years ago, but that didn’t stop Tressa from going “full-blown mommy manager,” and reaching out to everyone she knew right up to the midnight deadline. She didn’t know the results until the magazine came out. “I was so stoked. It was a good day for mama.”  Because the voting was so close, Levi appeared on the cover of half the printed issues while another boy appeared on the other half. A significant percentage of Levi’s issues are stockpiled in the Cruse home.  Today, Levi is a handsome, happy-go-lucky first-grader at Wayside Elementary. Quite the charmer, he is a very good student who excels at math, but whose favorite subject is lunch.  “I look cute and I have no teeth,” Levi says when asked what he thinks upon seeing himself on the magazine cover.  He is also friends with many of the babies who appeared in the magazine that year.  Levi’s older brother, 11-year-old Aven, was two when the Cruses moved to Bartlesville, so he was too old for the contest. Any jealously Aven may have harbored disappeared when he appeared on a billboard. Levi’s two younger siblings, ages four and two, could have been in the contest as babies. “But I just couldn’t put myself through the process again,” Tressa sighs.  Having just started playing the sport, Levi wants to be a basketball player when he grows up. He also enjoys playing video games and building with LEGOs, eating pancakes, and watching Christmas movies … all year.  He was asked what he would say to his sevenmonth-old self.  “When you grow up you can be anything you want, with God's help. You can be the president of the United States of America or you could move to Asia and speak Asian.”  Now, that is adorable. 

JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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SURVIVAL SWIM LESSONS FOR CHILDREN 6 MONTHS AND UP

Jessie DeHerrera - Certified ISR Instructor

(505) 215-2704 www.infantswim.com


SWIMMING SAFETY

Infant Swim Resource

Bartlesville Course Can Save Children from Drowning by Lori Just “I only looked away for a second.” Sometimes, that’s all it takes. In a matter of seconds, a child can drown — even in two inches of water. Beth Sanders lives on over 80 acres in Osage County. Her toddler son, Taw, loves water as much as he loves being a cowboy. One day while fishing in one of their ponds, Beth walked down the bank when she heard the splash behind her. Her son had fallen in; cowboy hat and all. Fortunately, her son had completed a self-rescue course and within a few seconds, he was floating on his back and swimming to the bank. “According to the CDC, drowning is the number one cause of accidental deaths in children ages 1-4,” said Jessie DeHerrera, operator of Infant Swim Resource (ISR) in Bartlesville. “Measures toward prevention such as a permanent barrier, alarms, adult supervision are available and are of absolute necessity. However, when layers of protection fail, your child’s ability to self-rescue is the only thing that will save their life — which is why I started offering these courses here.” When DeHerrera moved to Oklahoma from New Mexico in 2012, she also found herself in a place where she had to do something to address the risk of her ten-month-old twins drowning. Her family had rented a house with a pool with no fence. DeHerrera started researching and came across an ISR course offered in Tulsa. ISR provides life-saving swim and self-rescue skills for children six months to six years old. ISR’s unique results are achieved through customized, one-on-one lessons with only the child and instructor in the water during a session. ISR prioritizes safety first and emphasizes competence, leading to confidence and providing a foundation for a lifetime of safe enjoyment in and around the water. “It is so important we have as many layers of protection as possible when it comes to our children’s safety,” she added. “Drowning is preventable. Survival swim lessons are the only portable layer of protection a child can have that will be with them wherever they go.” She enrolled her twins, and they successfully obtained the self-rescue skillset. After her own positive experience with the program, DeHerrera knew Bartlesville parents needed these selfrescue lessons as an additional peace of mind to protect their children around water. She became a certified ISR instructor in 2018 after an intense six-week, hands-on training with a master instructor, and continued education with annual refreshers. Courses last four to six weeks, depending on the child’s natural progression, five days a week for ten minutes a lesson. After years

of research, ISR has determined that to be best practice for the short attention span and endurance of babies and young children. “This is really the best way for them to cling to the skills they have learned and retain muscle memory,” she said. “Children this young learn best through daily consistency and repetition.” Once skilled, DeHerrera recommends parents bring their child back for maintenance lessons to keep their skills sharp. She explained that as their body changes from infant to toddler to child, their buoyancy in the water also changes, so they need to maintain the skill throughout the growth of their bodies. Children are trained to perform the skillset fully clothed, since drowning accidents can occur when they are not prepared to be in the water, similar to Taw’s experience. ISR skills training has been proven 100% effective as a life-saving measure for children against accidental drowning in all scenarios. While a matter of seconds could change the course of your and your child’s life for the worst, 10 minutes a day for six weeks can change it for the better. “I can’t say enough about Jessie’s ability and the amazing job she did working with my son,” Sanders said. “She’s a bright spot in our community. Jessie made sure we were all comfortable. It was hard at times, but it was worth every tear shed.” DeHerrera is starting courses after the New Year. For more information on water safety and demo videos, visit her FB page: Infant Swim Resources-Bartlesville or infantswim.com.

JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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FUNNY YOU SHOULD ASK

by Jay Webster

Good reading friends. It’s nice to see you back here. I’m sure no one needs to tell you we’ve finally reached 2021. That’s right, if you’re just waking up — it’s January. And you know what that means … Tis’ the Season for Lists. For the next four weeks, every TV magazine, website, and publication will be mad with lists. Lists of the top 10 movies you didn’t see. Twenty things we won’t miss from 2020. Seven ways to keep your New Year’s Resolutions. The top five vacation spots to chill those winter blues. And my personal favorite … 10 things you can do right now to live in the moment while

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you reach for the stars and achieve your five-year plan. Don’t you just love listing things? For the last couple years, I’ve offered a sorta antibody for the bleak mid-winter by listing the top things I am specifically thankful for going into this new year. These are the things that rose to the top this year: Note: Each year I have to give this disclaimer when I release this list: “Obviously at the top of my list are God, Family, and ‘Merica. But for the purposes of this column, let’s believe these truths to be self-evident and list a few of the other gratitudes in no specific order.”


FUNNY YOU SHOULD ASK Okay, let’s get started then. Iced Coffee: A funny thing happens when the world celebrates another birthday — we get older too. That’s meant moderating my intake of certain things as I get less young. If I want my arteries to avoid a traffic jam, I have to limit red meat (which is a crying shame). To keep my liver from walking out on me, I’ve had to negotiate “rest days” when it comes to Scotch and beer. And, because I want to keep both my feet and avoid the “sugar-betes,” I’ve had to learn to ignore most sweets. All of those resolutions were nearly impossible to keep in the early days of the quarantine. (It’s hard not to reach out for a comfort whiskey, when you’re home and the world is apparently ending.) Fortunately, I found a few alternatives. For example, almost every evening now the wife and I will play barista and blend ice coffee (from Aldi) with a little whole cream and spray whip and just a subtle dusting of cinnamon. It has all the preparation and sophistication of a cocktail, but with none of the intoxicating side effects. Which is unfortunate. Pace: Speaking of pandemics, one of the things I appreciated most in 2020 was the change of pace. As the economy made clear over and over again, I am the definition of “NonEssential.” But here’s the thing … I found the sudden halting of my life to be extraordinarily refreshing. It’s amazing how much you can get done when you’ve got nothing else to get done. I pretty much spent the quarantine test driving retirement. And I liked it (apparently much more than my bank did. They still want their money …) So, while I have not been able to stay completely unbridled, I have remained under-employed and that’s kept the hamster wheel I usually run on moving at a more livable pace. I’ll take what I can get. Schitt’s Creek: When the world stopped briefly in 2020, all the shows we watched did too. That forced us to scramble for other viewing options, lest we become Little House on the Prairie and start reading by candlelight and learning fiddle tunes and talking to each other before going to bed at 8:30. Fortunately, friends of ours strongly recommended the series Schitt’s Creek (pronounced as you would suspect). To say the show became vital would be an understatement. Now our days are filled with passive-aggressive banter we’ve adopted from the show. It should be required viewing in the spirit of Seinfeld. School: In 2018, we hit a legislative crossroads over teacher pay in our state. After much campaigning, educating, and finally — striking — it was clear that education as a whole, and teachers’ salaries specifically, had faced years of neglect. But I don’t know that even 2018 could have shown us how invaluable schools and the angels that work there are quite like 2020. Do you know how hard it is to homeschool your child while both parents are pretending to work? NO child’s education should be left in my hands. To prove my point, my wife and I elected to substitute teach this year. (I know. I was alarmed too.) My most recent assignment ended with two calls to the office, three kids in the hall, one student in the “Opportunity

Room” (whatever that is) and a note from a student to me which simply read I don’t like you. All I can say is, when they announced school was back in for the Fall Semester, we danced like they had just liberated France. There was an actual ticker tape parade. (I broke my Scotch ban for the day … twice!) The other parents on my block honked their horns and shot off fireworks. Someone even fired a gun into the air … I assumed they were celebrating schools. Outdoors: Finally, I don’t know where I would have been this year without the outdoors. Our year was littered with state parks and hiking trails and outside movies and social distancing circles in the shade of wind-swept trees. From there we celebrated the completion of Unity Square, our own urban oasis in Bartlesville’s Arts district. As someone who’s been fortunate to see a lot of the US, I can say this is the sorta thing they have in so many of my favorite places. It’s an outside living room for concerts, movies, and events that’s big enough to invite everyone you know. In just these few short months, we participated in exercise classes and street parties, live music, and even one funeral for a dear friend. We sat at the Price Tower Plaza, sipping drinks and telling stories while we watched our kids annoy other people with the loud freestanding instruments. It was magical. It’s such an enjoyable addition to our city, that I have literally rerouted my way home each night from my pretend office, just so I can drive by Unity Square (with the Community Center as a backdrop) and watch other people exercise … so I don’t have to. What a wonderful thing! As usually happens when you start listing things you’re grateful for, it’s hard to stop once you start. I can’t even get into my friends, tuna steaks, Mars, Venus & Saturn, and tacos. That’s for another month, I guess. What about you? What’s on your list of things you’re currently most thankful for? Make your own list. I promise you’ll be glad you did. I have no idea what 2021 will bring. I sure couldn’t have predicted 2020. But I do know this: Regardless of what happens, there will be things to be grateful for and to celebrate. So, here’s to those things. Cheers my friends. See you next month. JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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We’ve always been here, so

WE KNOW BARTLESVILLE! Whether you are buying or selling, trust the team that knows Bartlesville best! srussell@mcgrawrealtors.com

918-213-5943

THEN

THEN

NOW


A NEW YEAR

What Will Bartlesville Be? by Jay Hastings

The beginning of a new year is typically a time to reflect and plan our new year’s resolutions, right? I have to confess; I have never set a new year’s resolution in my life. With that being said, let me talk about a resolution I would like for our community to embrace as we move into the new year ahead of us.

up their main streets, giving them names and establishing district identities. While similar locations, improvements, or repurposing may make Bartlesville more appealing, what we really need is new, stable, more diversified employment opportunities — and dare I suggest not strictly those related to the oil and gas industries.

I have been thinking about Bartlesville and what the future holds for our community. We all know these are challenging times for many locations across the nation, and the economy seems to be changing day by day. The year 2020 was uniquely crazy and will probably result in some permanent change in how business is done.

Oil and gas have been good for Bartlesville in its first 100 years and will continue to be a major player. What are we doing, though, to achieve more employment diversity? How are we planning for sustainability when the economy struggles? What will Bartlesville be in the next 100 years?

I believe Bartlesville’s leaders and planners have done an excellent job promoting our city in years past. They have really worked hard to bring business back to downtown. We have seen several new shopping centers constructed recently, and space for new retail is present. Much has been done to strengthen our existing foundation. What I am suggesting, though, is that we look further ahead and also think outside the box. Bartlesville is unique compared to our sister cities throughout Oklahoma. Can we compete with Tulsa and OKC? Should that even be our goal? Often, it seems we’re trying to be like other communities throughout Green Country. That’s great, but we should take it a step further. We have a rich history in Bartlesville, and not many towns our size has such a large downtown business district. You may have noticed many of the small suburbs of Tulsa are now trying to build

There was recently a documentary released on the life of singer-songwriter Harry Chapin titled When in Doubt, Do Something. The lesson is to never just be idle. Bartlesville has always been a very generous community. The local United Way raises donations every year to help fund specific community programs. Donating money is a great way to help in the bettering of our community. Other necessary donations include that of time and personal connection. What can you do to help make your community a better place to live? I often see chatter on social media about what new restaurants or retail stores we want to bring to town. If we could just get a Target in Bartlesville it would save everything, right? If not Target, then maybe Red Lobster? Nothing is wrong with either of those well-known and respected establishments. What I’m suggesting, though, is that line of thinking is putting the proverbial cart before the horse. Instead, how can we grow Bartlesville so the name brands are asking to move into our community? JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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JANUARY CALENDAR SPONSORED BY 5

7

15

Conoco/Arvest Basketball Tournament TBA; Bruin Fieldhouse The tournament runs January 7-9.

Jane and the 12 Days of Christmas 6 PM; On Zoom or Library Meeting Room A. Presented by BPL Literacy Services. In January, we will be discussing "Jane and the 12 Days of Christmas" by Stephanie Barron. This month's Free Book Club - Johnstone Irregulars - will meet virtually using Zoom and sociallydistanced in person in Meeting Room A of the Library. To join the online Zoom meeting, please call 918.338.4179.

6

12

Bruin Basketball vs. Booker T. Washington

Distance Learning Day No School All Day; District-Wide

18

4 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (JV/G) 5 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (JV/B) 6:30 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (V/G) 8 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (V/B)

13

OKWU Basketball vs Bethel TBA; OKWU Gym (W) 8 PM; OKWU Gym (M)

OKWU Women’s Basketball vs Ottawa 5 PM; OKWU Gym

Martin Luther King Day No School All Day; District-Wide 26

bmonthly | JANUARY 2021


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Bruin Basketball vs Ponca City

29

ACT Prep Course 9 AM; Rogers State University

30

4 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (JV/G) 5 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (JV/B) 6:30 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (V/G) 8 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (V/B)

20 St. John Catholic School Annual Gala — A Virtual Fundraiser CMT: The Music Man

OKWU Basketball vs St. Mary TBA; OKWU Gym (W) 8 PM; OKWU Gym (M)

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Bruin Basketball vs. Broken Arrow 4 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (JV/G) 5 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (JV/B) 6:30 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (V/G) 8 PM; Bruin Fieldhouse (V/B)

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OKWU Basketball vs. Kansas Wesleyan TBA; OKWU Gym (W) 8 PM; OKWU Gym (M)

7 PM; Bartlesville Community Center The Music Man is an award winning, critically acclaimed Broadway classic that follows fast talking traveling salesman Harold Hill as he cons the people of River City, Iowa into buying instruments and uniforms for a boys band he vows to organize – this despite the fact he doesn’t know how to play any instruments. His plan to skip town with the cash is foiled when he falls for Marion, the librarian who transforms him into a respectable citizen by curtains fall. The show’s popularity is due to quirky characters, charming dramatic situations, and one of a kind nostalgic score of rousing marches, barbershop quartets, and sentimental ballads that have become popular standards. There will also be showings on January 30 and 31, with both performances at 2 p.m. See more information about Children’s Musical Theatre of Bartlesville at www.cmtonstage.comville.

5 PM; Online EMPOWERING MINDS – ENRICHING THE SPIRIT! Support St John’s Catholic School’s annual Gala as a sponsor for the virtual nonevent on Saturday, January 30, 2021, with Gala Co-Chairs, Brian & Regina Kennedy and Dan & Janie Keleher Jr. Try your luck at five exciting items in the Online Raffle, or the School Online Auction, which will be open from January 23 thru February 6. This benefit is a special time for celebrating and honoring St. John Catholic School families, patrons, and community members. For event updates, please visit St. John’s website at https://www.sjcsok.org/annual-gala or call 918.336.0603.

Weekly Virtual Storytime 10:30 AM Every Wednesday on Bartlesville Public Library's Facebook page.

JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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bmonthly | JANUARY 2021


JANUARY EVENTS CALENDAR

Know of an upcoming event you would like to see on our calendar? Visit us at www.bartlesvillemonthly.com to submit a free listing!

Fri, Jan 1

Sat, Jan 2

Mon, Jan 4

12 PM

9:15 AM

6 PM

Bartlesville Artisan Market

Morning Stretch & Flow Yoga with Bee

Watch it Grow Rodeo Series

Washington Park Mall

Tower Center at Unity Square

Osage County Fairgrounds

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218

300 SE Adams Blvd.

320 Skyline Dr, Pawhuska

See January 1 event for information.

Class will be outside on the stage at Tower Center at Unity Square. If the temperature is lower that 50 degrees class will be held via Facebook Live via the Bartlesville Public Library. 

1 PM

Christmas in the Ville Final Weekend 201 S Keeler Ave. The ice rink will be open from 1-9 p.m. Admission is $10 per person, which includes ice skate rental.

Sun, Jan 3

Bartlesville Artisan Market Washington Park Mall

1 PM

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218 Indoor market where you can shop locally, stay warm, get fresh baked goods, homemade products and more. Enjoy your Saturday mornings in a warm place.

Fri, Jan 8 12 PM

Bartlesville Artisan Market Washington Park Mall

Downtown Depot

12 PM

Thu, Jan 7

Christmas in the Ville Final Day Downtown Depot 201 S Keeler Ave. See January 2 event for information.

Wed, Jan 6

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218

11 AM

See January 1 event for information.

Tai Chi with Bee Tower Center at Unity Square

Sat, Jan 9

300 SE Adams Blvd.

12 PM

Morning Tai Chi w/ Bee is held outside at the Tower Center at Unity Square, which is next door to the Library. If Temperatures are below 50 degrees, the class will be held via Facebook Live on the Bartlesville Public Library's page. The class is free and open to the public. Tai Chi will help improve your balance and wellness. Please bring your own water bottle. For your safety, be sure to put 6 feet between you and other participants.

Bartlesville Artisan Market Washington Park Mall 2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218 See January 1 event for information.

New Year’s Savings! Eastland Center H 918-335-2940

Valentine’s Dinner & Concert at Copper Restaurant

Saturday, Feb. 13th

bartlesvillesymphony.org

Tickets on sale at the BSO office: 415 S. DEWEY, STE. 201 (918) 336-7717

3-COURSE MEAL PLUS A DRINK, A ROSE FOR THE LADY! JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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EVENTS CALENDAR Mon, Jan 11

Mon, Jan 18

Mon, Jan 25

Sat, Jan 30

9:15 AM

9:15 AM

9:15 AM

12 PM

Morning Stretch & Flow Yoga with Bee

Morning Stretch & Flow Yoga with Bee

Morning Stretch & Flow Yoga with Bee

Bartlesville Artisan Market

Tower Center at Unity Square

Tower Center at Unity Square

Tower Center at Unity Square

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218

300 SE Adams Blvd.

300 SE Adams Blvd.

300 SE Adams Blvd.

See January 4 event for information.

See January 4 event for information.

See January 4 event for information.

Wed, Jan 13

Wed, Jan 20

Wed, Jan 27

Washington Park Mall

See January 1 event for information. 2 PM

The Music Man Bartlesville Community Center

11 AM

11 AM

Women in Business: It Is What It Is

Tai Chi with Bee

Hillcrest Country Club

Tower Center at Unity Square

1901 Price Rd.

300 SE Adams Blvd.

300 SE Adams Blvd. See January 29 event for information.

See January 6 event for information.

11 AM

Thu, Jan 28

Tai Chi with Bee Tower Center at Unity Square

6 PM

300 SE Adams Blvd.

Watch it Grow Rodeo Series

See January 6 event for information.

Osage County Fairgrounds

Thu, Jan 14

320 Skyline Dr, Pawhuska

6 PM

Fri, Jan 29

Watch it Grow Rodeo Series

9 AM

Osage County Fairgrounds 320 Skyline Dr, Pawhuska

Fri, Jan 15

11 AM

ACT Prep Course

Tai Chi with Bee

Rogers State University

Tower Center at Unity Square

401 S Dewey Ave

5 PM

12 PM

St. John Catholic School Annual Gala — A Virtual Fundraiser

300 SE Adams Blvd. See January 6 event for information.

Bartlesville Artisan Market Washington Park Mall

Thu, Jan 21

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218 6 PM

Watch it Grow Rodeo Series

See January 1 event for information.

Osage County Fairgrounds 320 Skyline Dr, Pawhuska

Fri, Jan 22 12 PM

12 PM

Bartlesville Artisan Market

Bartlesville Artisan Market

Washington Park Mall

Washington Park Mall

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218

See January 1 event for information.

See January 1 event for information.

Sat, Jan 23 Sat, Jan 16

7 PM 12 PM

12 PM

Bartlesville Artisan Market

Bartlesville Artisan Market

Washington Park Mall

Washington Park Mall

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218

2350 SE Washington Blvd., Ste. 218

See January 1 event for information.

See January 1 event for information.

Online EMPOWERING MINDS – ENRICHING THE SPIRIT! Support St John’s Catholic School’s annual Gala as a sponsor for the virtual non-event on Saturday, January 30, 2021, with Gala Co-Chairs, Brian & Regina Kennedy and Dan & Janie Keleher Jr. Try your luck at five exciting items in the Online Raffle, or the School Online Auction, which will be open from January 23 thru February 6. This benefit is a special time for celebrating and honoring St. John Catholic School families, patrons, and community members. For event updates, please visit St. John’s website at https://www.sjcs-ok.org/annual-gala or call 918.336.0603.

Sun, Jan 31

The Music Man

2 PM

Bartlesville Community Center

The Music Man

300 SE Adams Blvd.

Bartlesville Community Center

Presented by Children’s Musical Theater, the Music Man is a Broadway classic that follows fast talking traveling salesman Harold Hill as he cons the people of River City, Iowa into buying instruments and uniforms for a boys band he vows to organize – this despite the fact he doesn’t know how to play any instruments.

300 SE Adams Blvd. See January 29 event for information.

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bmonthly | JANUARY 2021


Closed January 1-15, Re-opening January 16

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JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

Cooper and Mill

One of Bartlesville’s Newest Businesses Fast Becoming a Hot Spot by Tim Hudson If you’re not hanging out at Cooper and Mill Brewing Company — you should be. It’s got all the makings of a legendary Bartlesville destination. You know the theme song to the TV show Cheers goes “you wanna go where everyone knows your name” ... Cooper and Mill is kinda like that, and these are the cool kids, too. You probably already know the specifics: downtown on the corner of Dewey and 2nd, new beers about every time you go in, and best of all, it’s not an actual tavern but a Brew Company, so you can bring your kids in — but more on that later. “Our immediate goal was to open and run a successful production brewery in Bartlesville and give to our community. We have all been out and visited similar breweries in other cities and felt like it was missing in Bartlesville, so we wanted to bring that home to our community,” said John Kane, of Cooper and Mill’s opening in May of this year. Kane owns Cooper and Mill with fellow Bartians Kaci Fouts, Jack Alley, and brewmaster Shawn Childress. According to the owners, each generation of community members “continues our positive trajectory while standing on the shoulders of previous generations.” In this case, Frank Phillips served as the inspiration, as his professional career began as a barber at a barbershop on the corner of Cooper Avenue and Mill Street in Aspen, Colorado. So Cooper and Mill had a name, and one that resounds with Bartlesville history.

we have boards that play on the weekend, for people that are into football. We’ve got shuffleboard, corn hole, and pool tables, and every table has a couple of different games on it so you can come in and play with your kids and have a beer.” While 2020 has been challenging to say the least for many small businesses, Cooper and Mill has a floorpan that’s conducive to social distancing. “Our space is very open, so it allows people to come in and enjoy our spot and have plenty of space,” Kane said. “Our community has been awfully supportive of us, even during some difficult times, and we recently started distributing to a few restaurants that feature us on tap. Many people from the community have been coming in and getting beer to go and spending a couple of minutes chatting, giving us a lot of really great feedback and giving us a chance to kind of grow into what we want to become. We’ve been very blessed by our community.” You can find out more about Cooper and Mill by visiting their website at www.cooperandmill.com or searching for “Cooper and Mill” on Facebook.

According to Fouts, the concept of starting a brewing company began at Leadership Bartlesville. “We had just done Hops for Hope, and there was this citywide survey that came out asking people that were our age and millennials what was lacking here, and the answer was predominantly nightlife,” she said. “We were like okay, we have bars, but nobody really wants to go to a bar. What are we lacking? A brewery was the response.” She said the team’s original goal was to have something community-focused where we could bring our families and bring our kids. “More like other breweries you see in Texas or Denver, where they are family-oriented. Gluten free and nonalcoholic options were really important for us,” she said. “We wanted something that would be fun for us and where we would be able to bring our kids and families. That’s why JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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Free furnace allowance

With the purchase of a qualifying Trane outdoor unit and Nexia Control, homeowners are eligible to receive an entry-level indoor unit at a discount based on the dealer’s regular retail price. Offer valid November 17, 2020 - March 31, 2021. See your local participating independent Trane dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Valid on qualifying products only. Void where prohibited.

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Honey's Flowers for all your special events! JOHNSTONE SARE BUILDING 100 SW Frank Phillips Blvd, Bartlesville www.honeyshouseofflowers.com 918-333-8181 Hours: Monday - Friday 8:30 am - 5:30 pm Saturday 8:30 am - 12:00 pm Sun Closed

JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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LOOKING BACK SPONSOR

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The Perfect Venue for Beautiful Weddings • 2 separate floors available for rent, each can hold 300 people • Lobby • Great downtown views  • Restrooms on each floor  • ADA compliant • Elevator  • Elegantly industrial Chicago school style building • Building originally built in 1910, and was completely restored after a devastating fire in 2010.  

Luxurious On-site Lodging at Jewel Box • 5 unique one bedroom hotel apartments • In the heart of downtown   • Laundry room with washers and dryers- free for tenant use  • All utilities included: electric, water, trash, internet & wi-fi  • Fully furnished • Stainless steel appliances  • Smart TV in each apartment

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bmonthly | JANUARY 2021


LOOKING BACK

Keepsake Candles From Church Bazaars to an International Business

by Kay Little, Little History Adventures When I moved to Bartlesville in 1976, I kept hearing about Keepsake Candles and was excited when my aunt took me. I immediately fell in love with the store. My first candle was one with the Bartlesville seal on it. I was also excited to learn that the store and factory were located in one of the former Air Force radar buildings, because my dad helped to build the radar base in the early 1950s, shortly after he joined the Air Force. In 1969, Ed and Alice Ririe wanted to make a unique item for their church’s Christmas Bazaar fundraiser. So, they made five dozen candles in their kitchen and sold every one at the bazaar. They used some of their antique glassware as patterns and created molds for the candles. They soon decided to make more candles, and started selling them at a local downtown store. As sales increased, they had to find better methods to increase production. Ed perfected a special wax that kept the candle shell from melting. That shell allowed the candle inside to burn down, so the shell could be filled with a votive, or have it refilled with candle wax. That allowed the candle to be used used over and over — to become a keepsake. In fact, the Riries chose the name ‘Keepsake Candles’ because the patterns and the candle itself are a keepsake. In 1975, the candle-making business outgrew their home, so Keepsake Candles moved west of Bartlesville to Radar Hill, in the former Air Force gymnasium. The business kept growing, and soon filled the whole building. Alice started

adding other fun gift items to complement the candles, including many kitchen items. The highlight of each year was the Keepsake Christmas Open House, held the first weekend in November. The whole place became a winter wonderland and customers were excited to get the new collectible Christmas candle, Christmas cookies, and hot cranberry tea! At the height of Keepsake’s popularity, they produced 300500 candles weekly and shipped almost 30,000 annually. They sold candles to all 50 states, including Disneyland and Silver Dollar City. Sales were also made to multiple foreign countries. Alice laughingly said, “I never started out to have a business. It came and it grew. It’s like having a baby; it gets bigger and bigger and you can’t get rid of it.” Ed used to refer to the business as the “church bazaar project that got out of hand.” In 2014, the Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce named Keepsake Candles the Small Business of the Year. January 2017 changed everything when Ed died unexpectedly. The family decided that the 2018 Christmas Open House would be their last one, and closed their retail doors. Fortunately, they still operate the factory and sell their candles online at www.keepsakecandles.com In 2019, Keepsake celebrated its 50th anniversary by selling candles where it all started, at the Oak Park United Methodist Church Christmas Bazaar.

JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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LIVING HISTORY ESCAPE THE CROWDED FOREST

Located in the historic downtown area of Bartlesville, Price Tower offers guests a getaway destination that includes both ďŹ ne dining and boutique hotel rooms . With the completion of the neighboring Unity Square urban green space, it has never been a better time to experience Price Tower.

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918.336.1000 510 SOUTH DEWEY AVE. BARTLESVILLE, OK. 74003


MEET YOUR WRITER

Brent Taylor Popular Writer Brings “A Fresh Perspective” to Bartlesville by Tim Hudson Certainly one of the favorite columns around town is A Fresh Perspective, by Brent Taylor. He’s constantly coming up with good stuff to share every month — stories which Taylor describes as “eclectic.” “I would just say it’s eclectic, just whatever I feel like writing about. Often I will ask Christy [McPhail] about what the theme of the magazine is for a particular month, and once it was Frank Phillips,” he said. “I wrote a little bit about nature, and the land that I live on being attached to the Phillips’ family and how they loved the animals and land, and my connection to the land also.” He said that sometimes his column is a theme, and other times it’s whimsical. “Sometimes I decide a day before the deadline ‘oh I’ve got to write something, so I just write something,’” he said with a laugh. His writing started with bmonthly in the summer of 2019. “Keith and Christy came into my office and were selling me an ad as I remember, although they may have a different story, he laughed. “They were looking for me to buy an ad, which I bought, and it was about Bruce Goff homes in Bartlesville. I still have a flier from all the Bruce Goff homes from that edition.

Fresh Perspectives was their idea. That’s kinda how I got started.”

Taylor said Keith and Christy called him back and said that they would like him to write the next guest column. “I said sure, and so I did that. Subsequently, the next month they asked if I would take a title for my column and do it every month. I said “ohhhh let me think about that,’ and I finally just said ‘sure.’”

In addition to his monthly column, Taylor has also self published a couple of books, one of which is a family anthology. “That’s not just my writing but my brothers, and sister, and some cousins. My uncle and one of my cousins is Rudy and Andy Taylor, and they are from Caney, Kansas. Rudy is part of seven local newspapers in Southeastern Kansas, so he is a person I’ve looked up to in the writing game,” he said. “He’s a really good writer and editor. My brother, who is also in the business with me, Taylor homes, he’s an author and has written some books. He’s also been an editor down through the years with different publications. I’ve looked to him for inspiration, too.”

“I couldn’t think of a name. They actually came up with a name for my column.

In addition to the writing, the Taylor brothers are woking on a non-profit. “My

“We just got to talking and I didn’t know much about the magazine. I mentioned that I had a blog, and as they sat at my desk they looked at it and I think a couple of days later, they had read one or two of my blog posts.”

brother and I are working on an organization we formed called 1256 LLC ... The 1256 Movement. It’s the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, and so we are working through that non-profit 501c3 currently with the city of Tulsa. It is intended to help African-Americans find quality housing at an affordable price,” he said. “That’s been something we’ve had a lot of passion about in the last six months, and we are looking forward to working on that in the next 10 years. We are looking for ways to expand any opportunities that arise in Bartlesville.” While that sounds like a worthy endeavor, Taylor said that he’s going to continue with his other vocations. “As I kinda change gears a little bit, I’m not going to quit doing what we do, buildingwise. Our family is involved in that, and we are excited to get going with that,” he said. JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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bmonthly | JANUARY 2021

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FROM THE HEART

Pay Attention to the Nudge Sometimes that Still, Small Voice can Lead to Big Things by Lori Kroh I had this overwhelming feeling to call a person I had only met once. I was working on goals and dreams for 2021, and at least three times she came to my mind. I wrote her name down. I then wrote it in cursive. I then colored in all the bubbles of her name. I stared at her name for a long time. After a few hours, I called her and blurted, “Hi, remember me? I cannot get past this feeling that we are supposed to connect. I can’t help but think you have a message to me from God and it’s going to be life changing.” Then, I let out a big sigh and said, “I’m ready for whatever you need to tell me.” Crickets. There was silence. Real silence. Almost as if no sound silence. Uh oh. It was going to be huge. I bet angels gathered around and stars leaned forward to hear. She said, “I don’t have any words. I have absolutely nothing. I am so sorry. Are you sure you have the right person? I barely know you.” I was flabbergasted and actually kind of embarrassed. An urge to just say goodbye came, and yet somehow I felt deep down that nudge was true. I then said, “No. I am sure we are supposed to connect and I cannot shake it. I have to just ask you again.” She pretty much told me that she had absolutely nothing for me and she was sorry.  I sat there for a moment and then I said, “Well, maybe I am supposed to tell you what is going on in my life.” She laughed and listened as I began to tell her what I foresaw for my future and what I felt I should be doing for the next few years. I felt somewhat vulnerable, seeing as I had only met her one time and here I am going on about my hopes and dreams to basically a stranger.  It was then at that moment she said, “You know what? You aren’t going to believe this, but I know someone who could help you.”  We continued to talk, and each time another new dream came out of me she knew someone who had done it and been successful with that endeavor. I was seriously astounded at how every single time I mentioned what I wanted to do, she not only supported me, she also connected with me on how I could get to the next level with my dreams for my life.  I learned that on the other side of the phone was a bridge for my path. She knew the ones I needed to know and committed to helping me meet them. I was so encouraged in my heart and for the new year that I cried. What if I hadn’t paid attention to that nudge?  I would have missed out. 

After such an uncertain year for all, I want to encourage everyone to consider the idea of asking questions of what you are worried or wondering about and write them down. We have had so much noise this past year. It’s so difficult to be quiet sometimes, and surrender to what could be when all we crave is what was, what should have been, and what may never happen. Is there anything that comes to mind to do or act upon? Find a quiet place and close your eyes and wait. Then, stare at the words you wrote and ponder.  Are there any ideas that bubble up to the top for you? Any names that seem to come out of nowhere, and although it doesn’t make sense, you perhaps feel a nudge? Those are moments to instill courage within you, little whispers for your heart.  I have found that when I am most uncertain, one thing that remains is my steadfast faith. My nudge was a lesson in grace, a confession for connection, and the ticket for admission to run my race. I pray 2021 brings us all closer to our true calling and that we have courage to cross each bridge as we feel the nudge and answer the call for our best life. 

JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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of Exceptional Senior Living Green Country Village has helped seniors in Bartlesville enjoy private, maintenance-free residences with exceptional services and great hospitality for the last 30 years. Whether you or someone you love is considering independent living, assisted living or memory care, Green Country Village is the place to live, connect, grow.

Call (918) 335-2086 to schedule an appointment. GreenCountryVillage.com 1025 Swan Drive • Bartlesville, OK 74006 Not-For-Proć˜€t Organization

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bmonthly | JANUARY 2021


NOW YOU KNOW SPONSOR


NOW YOU KNOW

Bartlesville’s Glass and Bottling Works

by Debbie Neece, Bartlesville Area History Museum In 1902, word was buzzing in Bartlesville about the possibility of a glass factory arriving, drawn by the abundance of natural gas. The Great Western Glass Factory was organized December 26, 1903 and began manufacturing April 1904 with W.F. Lytle as president; D.A. Lytle, secretary; J.J. Campbell, vice president; and William Jarskouw, manager. Representing the first glass factory in Oklahoma, by 1905, 100 employees were involved making lamp chimneys, flasks, goblets and other items. The glass factory was located at 122 S. Park with a blow-house, finishing shop and warehouse onsite.

John Pemberton was gravely injured but survived with a dependency on morphine. After the war, he established his own pharmacy so he could have a personal supply of morphine. After years of morphine addiction, Pemberton found Coca Wine, a cure-all mixture of wine, caffeine and cocaine. From that idea, about 1886, he developed Pemberton’s French Wine Coca Nerve Tonic. When prohibition arrived, Pemberton reformulated his “tonic” into a non-alcoholic beverage however the cocaine content was extremely low at that point and non-existent after 1903. Upon Pemberton’s morphine overdose death, his partner Asa Candler, took over the company in The Great Western Glass Fac1891 and began a massive advertisBy 1860, there were 123 soft drink bottling plants in tory left Bartlesville early in 1907 ing campaign including having the United States; by 1870, there were 387; and by 1900, seeking cheaper natural gas in the painters plaster the iconic Cocathere were 2,763 different plants. Blackwell area and taking with it Cola logo on barns, buildings and glass contracts from Old Mexico billboards throughout the country. and across the U.S. The factory saw inactivity until August 17, 1910 when oilman H.V. Foster joined J.W. Lynch, George Crawford, R.D. In 1893, North Carolina pharmacist Caleb Bradham created Cleary and others to incorporate the Bartlesville Bottle and Glass “Brad’s Drink,” a mixture of sugar, water, caramel, lemon oil, nutCompany. This firm produced the first glass bottle in Oklahoma on meg, and cola nuts. In 1898, Brad’s Drink was renamed September 1, 1910 and George Crawford was credited with inventing Pepsi-Cola as a healthy digestion aide. Although Bradham their first glass mold. With 24 men in employment, their initial glass passed the Food and Drug Administration test with flying colors, order was for 27 carloads of Coca-Cola bottles and pint bottles for WWI sugar shortages bankrupted his company, forcing him to a Dallas distillery. By 1913, this business closed. However, there was sell the Pepsi-Cola Company. a need for glass bottles before the glass factory and the need conMost of the syrupy drinks were sold in pharmacies with soda tinued afterwards. fountains until bottling operations Some of our most popular sodas spread across the United States. In carry deep history roots…some medicMarch 1902, L.C. Moses organized the inal. For instance, did you know Dr. Bartlesville Bottling Works producing Pepper was first served at the 1885 ginger ale, soda pop and Champagne Louisiana Purchase Exposition and Cider. About 1906, a Virginia father and marketed as a “brain tonic?” It was not son team named Martin bought the until 1904 that the “elixir” of 23 flavors company and bottled beverages at 308 was marketed nationally at the World’s S. Osage Avenue offering kegs of cider, Fair Exposition in St. Louis. extracts and a full line of carbonated drinks…including Dr Pepper. And did you know Coca-Cola had Inside the Bartlesville Bottle and Glass Company Civil War roots. Confederate Colonel 44

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NOW YOU KNOW

Bartlesville Boasted State’s First Glass Factory

GREAT WESTERN GLASS FACTORY Between 1912-1913, John C. Gray established the Crystal Bottling Works at 108 Delaware, which he operated about four years. In 1916, he purchased the Bartlesville Bottling Company and produced Coca-Cola at the Osage address. Then, about 1924, Gray’s CocaCola Bottling plant moved to 105 S. Park Ave. and he sold to John Culver in 1928. In 1930, there were three bottling companies in Bartlesville: The Coca-Cola Bottling Company, 105 S. Park; Love Bottling, 409 S. Jennings; and Nehi Bottling, 108 S. Park. Coca-Cola moved to 420 S. Keeler in 1959 and to 340 NE Washington Blvd. about 1961. The Oklahoma City Coca-Cola Bottling Company was established in 1903. In 1922, the Browne family purchased the business and continued the operation until 1980 when the Great Plains CocaCola Bottling Company was formed by Robert Browne. The Love Bottling Company was woven into the fabric of Oklahoma. Brothers, John H. and Kit Carson Love founded Love Bottling in 1919 at Eufaula and secured a Coca-Cola franchise at Quinton, OK with a Dr Pepper franchise at Muskogee. Carrying over 100 beverages, the company moved to Muskogee in 1926. Two years later, the brothers dissolved the partnership and John formed a new partnership in Bartlesville as “Love” Beverages retaining the original trademark; while K.C. remained in Muskogee and bottled under K.C. Beverages. In 1964, J.H. Love sold his business and its goodwill to the Oklahoma Beverage Company.

The Bartlesville-based Oklahoma Beverage Company was owned by Kenneth G. Adams and had been operated by the Adams family since the 1960s. In 1988, Oklahoma City-based Great Plains Coca-Cola Bottling Co. acquired all the stock of Oklahoma Beverage Co. of Bartlesville. Then, in October 2011, the Coca-Cola Company bought Great Plains for a reported 360 million USD and held the company until 2017 when Coca-Cola sold the company to Mexico-based Arca Continental, who continues to serve Texas, part of New Mexico, Oklahoma and Arkansas.

Did You Know? In May 1899, two young maidens boating on the Caney River launched a “message in a bottle” dreaming Prince Charming would find the bottle, propose marriage and they would live happily ever after. Years sailed by, the maidens were wed and the message in the bottle had faded into their memories, when a letter arrived from Prince Charming. David Allan had found their message two-hundred miles south on July 3, 1902…too late to secure a bride. Now You Know *

Looking for a “day trip?” Just two hours southwest on nostalgic Route 66 is Pops 66 Soda Ranch in Arcadia with 700 sodas to pick from and a complete restaurant menu, seven days a week. Crystal Bottling Works

Coca-Cola Plant on Washington Blvd JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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OUT & ABOUT

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ON THE OSAGE

Showing Off Our Mid-Section . . . . . . In Pawhuska by Kelly Bland Wish you had a mid-section you’d feel confident showing off? Well girlfriend, let me tell you, we definitely do in the Osage — and it’s about time we showed it off! Take The Tourism Gal by the arm and let me stroll you right on down to the mid-section of Kihekah Avenue to The Honey Pot Kids. This little mid-section on the main drag in Pawhuska is pretty shiny. You’ll recognize it for sure if you happen to see two miniature cowboys with their lids and spurs on out on the sidewalk roping a dummy. Hank and Huck Hurd have become the icons for their mom’s venture into the children’s clothing business, and when they’re not in school or in the pasture somewhere, you’re likely to find them building their loops out in front of the store. “I’m a boy mom,â€? Amber Hurd told me as we sat in a backroom in the store, talking about how it all began. She said her desire was to stock her store with affordable quality clothing for kids — especially for boys. Now, before you think it’s ALL for boys, let me just tell you that this Pigeon (that’s what my grandkids call me) has purchased adorable outfits for my granddaughter, Lilly Boss, at The Honey Pot Kids. So, it may have begun with boys in mind, but little girls have their own section filled with bows, dresses, and more! While The Honey Pot Kids truly is the sweetest spot for your busy bee, there’s more to this store. Thanks to Honey herself, The Honey Pot Kids now also has women’s fashion, as well. “Honeyâ€? is the name the Hurd boys call Amber’s mom, Penny “Honeyâ€? Johnson, and the store is actually named after her. Now that’s my kind of grandma!! From Lilly Boss’s Pigeon to the Hurd boys’ Honey — We’re too young to be called “grandmaâ€? in my books. Go girl! đ&#x;˜‰ To kick off this endeavor, Amber opened the doors of The Honey Pot Kids in May of 2019, and Honey joined her in the spring of 2020 — bringing women’s fashion with her. This mother-daughter duo (that could be mistaken for a sister-sister duo) have their finger on the pulse of fashion with a good eye for originality. They are quickly becoming trendsetters and fashion influencers in the Osage. Honey Johnson is the wife of a cowboy, so it’s no surprise that her daughter followed in her footsteps. Amber and Corey Hurd met when Amber was just 14, and had their first date when she was 17. Give them just a few more years, add in some college sports, and top it off with an OKC Thunder mid-court proposal — and this puncher’s sweetheart said “yesâ€? to her cowboy. While the Johnsons make

their home in Hominy, the Hurds make theirs just west of Pawhuska, making The Honey Pot Kids truly an Osage County owned-and-operated business. I’d encourage you to make a trip over to check out The Honey Pot Kids at 600 Kihekah Avenue — just up the street from The Pioneer Woman Mercantile and down from Sunset Ridge Gallery, directly across the street from Mariposa Pawhuska, Simply Jane, The Turquoise Lilly Boutique, and the Krazy Kow — and when you do, tell Amber and Honey that Pigeon sent you. You’ll find affordable, adorable clothing for the kids, and fashion for mom (or grandma) too! Y’all come see us in the Osage where #TheSmilesAreAlwaysFree and where #TheCowboyNeverRidesAway, and we’ll show you our shiny mid-section when you do! Check us out TheOsage.com.

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UNPLUGGED PLAY

The Little Lark

Business Provides Refuge from Constant Digital Landscape

by Maria Gus These days, everyone needs some time to unplug, especially children. That’s the idea behind The Little Lark Shop and The Mud Kitchen — unplugged play. Both of these fun and educational experiences are located south of Bartlesville on Rice Creek Road, but world’s away from the constant digital landscape. Proprietors Sylvia McFarland and Maureen McQuillen are not only savvy business women but, as long-time educators, they are especially purposeful in their mission. Both women knew they wanted to provide something fun and meaningful for children and parents outside the classroom. For McFarland, however, there was another motivation. “Well, we were talking and I needed a purpose for retirement,” said McFarland with a laugh. “I needed a reason to retire, because otherwise I might have just kept working.” McFarland and McQuillen spent a lot of time planning their business venture, looking for the perfect place to have both a shop and outdoor play. When they couldn’t find the right spot, McFarland literally looked in her own back yard. With an extra bedroom with an outdoor entrance and an old barn that was perfect for renovation, The Little Lark opened in November of 2019, with The Mud Kitchen opening in the Spring of 2020. In just one year, The Little Lark has already earned a reputation for unique items and outstanding customer service. Their inventory has nothing that requires a battery or needs to be plugged in. Their bright and colorful books, puzzles, games, and crafts are geared towards children 10 and under.

“I love The Little Lark,” said Landelle Steanson, customer and fellow educator. “They have gifts that promote play and independent thinkers — and they deliver!” Customer Lisa Martinez agrees, “I go in and tell them age, gender, and price range and they always rock it. Maureen and Sylvia are so sweet and helpful, always going above and beyond.” With The Mud Kitchen just outside, McFarland and McQuillen’s cute customers can step outside, roll up their sleeves, and get their hands dirty — in a fun way. With the help of Eduardo Valensuela, McFarland was able to transform an old horse barn into an experiential playground full of magic. “He [Valensuela] came in and did the work, he just transformed it,” said McFarland. “I told him I wanted to use and repurpose everything he could, he was willing and created some wonderful things.” Everything in The Mud Kitchen has a charming simplicity perfect for teaching children how to slow down in a fast-moving world. They found a water well and installed an old fashioned pump for children to explore. McQuillen’s husband, Dr. Paul McQuillen, constructed homemade activities, as well. Inside the barn there are painting, puzzles, a woodworking station, and many other hands-on experiences. “It’s all about nature, rock, sand, dirt, and helping children play with their parents in an unplugged way,” said McFarland. “We focus on little people and there are a lot of fun things to find.” Mud Kitchen sessions are $8 per child for four hours and are dependent on weather. Those interested in learning more about The Little Lark and The Mud Kitchen can find store hours and prices at facebook.com/thelittlelarkok. The store provides a “toy fairy” service with front porch and no-contact delivery. Customers can also place orders through facebook.

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STARS IN OUR BACK YARD

Joyce Sequichie Hifler Beloved Author Was an Inspiration to Many by Debbie Neece, Bartlesville Area History Museum The more we learn, the more we yearn to learn. In as many notable people as I have met and the history I have learned, a woman of great depth slipped away from me in 2019. A woman I wish I had had the opportunity to share a sun porch conversation. Joyce Sequichie was born in 1925 to William Perry Shipley and Nellie Leah Sequichie in Nowata County where she experienced a poverty stricken but fulfilled childhood. Close to her heart, she held her Cherokee heritage and the determination of the family matriarch, Ah-yau-sti Tobacco Juice, who traveled to the Cherokee Nation on the Trail of Tears.

From her daily newspaper column sprang 9 books, some translated into German and Italian. Thirty-thousand copies of her first book (1966), Think on These Things were sold to Tupperware as employee Christmas presents and her second book, To Everything a Season, was selected as a book club staple. Joyce was an executive secretary at Phillips Petroleum Company in charge of Minority Enterprises while her writings drew praise and recognition from around the globe. But, she stayed grounded in her Oklahoma roots. She married Charlie Jacob Zofness, of Zofness Men’s Wear in Bartlesville. He was not only the love of her life but her “best critic and supporter.” She drew inspiration from the home she and Charlie shared south of Bartlesville, surrounded by wildlife and the wind-tossed leaves that whispered to her deepest soul. It was receiving the whisper that moved Joyce to share her daily motivation with readers.

Joyce grew up reading “Emerson” who inspired her to write to herself for the enjoyment of others. Her writing began as a child; then, she took a creative writing course which “When we have someone that stands with us in silent comopened possibilities. She submunication, it becomes a quiet and peaceful, long-lasting mitted her work to the Nowata relationship that never gets old and never comes to an end. Star in 1960 and the editor liked Having such a friend is a priceless possession. Being one is her writing…so did others. Her a sweet responsibility.” column of spiritual wisdom — Joyce Sequichie Hifler became published in the Parsons Sun, Claremore Daily And for all her fame, her private life was her sancProgress, and the Tulsa World before becoming syndicated and tuary. I attempted to contact her in life but now gracing the pages of the New York News, idolize her in passing. Joyce died quietly on Chicago Tribune, and others. Soon her humble February 10, 2019 at Dewey… writings were a household staple across the no mention in the United States, Germany, and Italy. local newspaper… Her goal was to inspire people to think outside just a final breath of their box…to think for themselves…and she kept her inspirational sunwritings short so people could “gobble and go” each shine left on earth for morning over breakfast. Never compared to Ann Lanher countless daily ders or Dear Abby, Joyce offered a moment of spiritual readers. uplifting from her Cherokee soul leaving readers with ~ Thank you Lisa “food for thought” for their day. Schmitz! ~

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MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Tru-ly Clean and Safe Shoppers Urged to Support Local & American Businesses by Maria Gus With a new year comes new year's resolutions and Tritanium Labs Managing Director Jeff Lozinski has a great suggestion for the community — ask the companies you support to also support your community and its workforce. Tritanium Labs is a Bartlesville-based supply chain technology company and the manufacturer of consumer products available at Costco Warehouse Clubs and other fine retailers across the United States. The TriCleanz, TruCleanz, and TruSafe brands of sanitizers, disinfectants, sanitizing wipes, and personal protective equipment (PPE) are manufactured in the United States with transparency, trust, and traceability. For Lozinski, however, it’s not just about hand sanitizers and personal protective equipment — it’s about ensuring that customers know what is in their products and where they came from. For Tritanium Labs, 2020 was certainly a year where they rose to the challenge. When the pandemic began affecting the supply chain for consumers, hand sanitizer was one of the hardest items to find. Not only because retailers couldn’t meet the demand, but overseas manufacturers also needed the product available in their home countries. While consumers may enjoy the affordability of products made overseas, 2020 demonstrated that customers also need well-made and easily-accessible Americanmade products. For Lozinski, the goal is to not only create a successful company in Bartlesville, but to encourage more Americans to buy local and demand their retailers carry those products, as well.

biggest issues that happened was that there was a need for these types of products in the United States. When they started closing the markets we were stuck without product.” The goal of Tritanium Labs is to not only manufacture product, but to also help consumers trace where their product is coming from and ensure those three T’s — trust, transparency, and traceability. This is a vision that has the potential to be applicable to various products to ensure safety and quality. Lozinski says it’s how they guarantee their products, and it’s something consumers should begin to consider as they shop. For Lozinski, it’s about consumer awareness and consumer confidence. “Consumers have an immense amount of influence over their retailers. When a store you visit stops carrying a product, stop at the customer service desk and ask them why,” adds Lozinski. “It’s a new year, let’s make resolutions,” says Lozinski, “Let’s fix the things that were broken that we didn’t even know were broken. Be informed and support the brands that give you a reason to trust them.” For Tritanium Labs, trust and accountability is where it all begins, and they hope to not only provide a quality product, but help consumers encourage a culture of American-made products that support our communities.

“What we’re trying to do, it’s a grander vision than just moving to Bartlesville and starting a business,” said Lozinski. “I saw that during the pandemic, one of the

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A FRESH PERSPECTIVE

Winter of Our Unsettled Season What Will Arise from the Fertile Soil of a Suffering Year? by Brent Taylor It was a tough year to be human in 2020. I mentioned this in passing to our cat, Boo, and she looked at me with cold green eyes, blinked, and walked away unfazed by the concerns of her bipedal servant. Oh to be so carefree. Alas, I’m feeling more Jimmy Buffett these days, when he sings about taking off for a weekend just to recall the whole year with it’s changes in latitudes which resulted in nothing remaining quite the same. New Years is a time of reflection for me, a time to consider the old and the new, the year past and the year to come. Here is the good news: The wisdom of the past, along with futuristic technology, helped hold it all together in 2020. To be an American during 2020 required the genius of our founders and our own Constitutional fortitude. It required the power of American ingenuity that helped create multiple vaccines. Peggy Noonan recently wrote about this coming together when the electoral college affirmed the presidential election on a Monday in December, a day that also saw the first Covid vaccines administered. “We were like America of old ... on that day our Constitution did what it was built to do, prevail. And our scientific genius and spirit of invention asserted themselves as national features that still endure. So here’s to you, December 14, 2020. You provided a very good ending to a very bad year,” wrote Peggy Noonan. I’m an eternal optimist, but as Yogi Berra once said, “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” So, we dig deep in this unsettled season, waiting for the green shoots of spring, waiting expectantly on a new president, and a vaccine to gain traction and give us hope for better days. One day, we'll look back at 2020 alongside the likes of 1863 and 1929 and 2001. But for now, we press onward with hope because, well, this is the indomitable American spirit. I lost my Dad in April of 2020. It was a difficult time to appropriately say goodbye. I’m thinking about him this year as the calendar turns, because he always loved new beginnings. I remember his perseverance when he struggled in life. He would shrug his shoulders and say, “You can’t just quit.” Just before he died, Dad would humor his healthcare friends, pushing his wheelchair by and serenading them with

the Willie Nelson song, On the Road Again. In other words, he may have been in dire straits, but with the help of others, he was moving down the road. He acknowledged this pain in his last days and weeks, but he didn’t dwell too much on it, choosing instead to see the road before him as hopeful. My wife Karen is also hopeful. Her greenhouse contains rows of thriving plants. Soon, the days will lengthen and the earth will begin to warm, and Karen will move her plants to the rich soil of her spring garden. There she will tend cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, sunflowers, and zucchini. She knows the time to plant and the time to sow and the rhythms of sun and moon. She will pray and tend in the hope that a bud will appear and a stalk will arise from the musky dark soil. This is the ritual of life that keeps us moving forward. And while Karen didn’t create the miracle of generation — the genetic composition of order blending with physical elements — she did buy into the miracle, believing in the miracle of birth and growth, the very hope that beauty could arise from the earth. The miracle of birth and growth often requires endurance and suffering and patience. Patience, after all, comes from a root that means to suffer or endure. It is painful waiting on something unwanted to pass, like a tough task or a wound — or a virus. What will arise from the fertile soil of a suffering year? The winter of our unsettled season holds in tension the now and the not yet, our longing and our hope, our sowing and our reaping. We wear masks and keep distance. We isolate, we suffer, we endure. And we long for the better days of human intimacy. In the meantime, we plant our garden and wait for spring.

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A GOOD WORD

Doing Push-Ups Make it a Priority to Work Out Your Positivity Muscle by Alexis Hallum I have had my share of hard knocks. You know what? I call them all good. I have learned a lot from the tough parts of life. It’s called doing push-ups. Makes you stronger and more agile. It defines you. If positivity were a muscle, how often would you work it? Hard times get us fit enough to become someting hybrid. Something we would never be strong enough to be, without the training. I am thankful for it all. Who knows who I will be when I'm 100. I do know she will be strong and wise. The year 2020 was challenging. It was hard for me to find the good at times. I know, in some situations there is no good. I promise you that there is collateral goodness, if you look hard enough. You can find good things in bad situations. A call from a friend checking up on you. A warm meal. A thoughtful compliment. An embrace. The words “I love you” whispered through tears. These are the the things I have learned to cling to. I lost a lot in 2020. I even lost hope a time or two — but I searched my soul and found it again. I’ve lost someone I loved deeply. I’ve lost income. I’ve lost patience. I’ve lost my happiness. I’ve had to fight harder than I thought I could to find joy. In life, you lose sometimes. Winning comes when you find a way out of the loss. Some things, you never get back. Learning how to cope with what you lose is also called winning. It all depends on how you spin it. Can you imagine what life would be like if everything was always perfect and lovely, all beauty with no ashes? I think it wold be level, a life without any heights. The hard times make the good times better. They carry us to places we could never see without them. I have found more good than I know how to carry. Sometimes I forget though, and I have to search for it. When my basket is full and I’m focused on the good, I don’t have time to feel sorry for myself. I blow out the ugly, like the wind takes away the dust when it settles. Sometimes this takes days or weeks, but it gets done because I wouldn’t let the negative come for me. I fight it like an attacker.

six children. With these painful experiences, still comes the sunrise, music, and friendships that bloomed in a garden of thorns. Want to know something? I’m making it. God has given me just enough to survive, and that is the best part of all. I am content with what I have right now, in this season. I’m learning to live in the moment. That’s the thing, isn’t it? Grow. Blossom in the thorns. Be the beauty in the drudgery of the pain that is life. Be that for others. It is possible. Negativity is the worst. The literal worst. What is good? Get a pen and paper and write it down. Write it on a post it and hang it on your dresser, write it in lipstick on your mirror. Focus on it.

Run. Walk. Do yoga. Dance. Pray. Love harder. Listen better. Ask youself, what can I do for the ones I love, for my community? Then go do those things. That is the key to shaking off the blues. Sometimes you try and you try and you need medication. That is good, too.

Good is a game I play with my children. Good is getting up to watch the sunrise after a sleepless night. Good is the perfect song at just the right time. Good is stopping to take their little hand in mine, because it won’t be that little forever. Good is looking someone with a will work for food sign in the eyes, even if all you have to offer is a smile. Good is saying goodbye to someone who can’t love you the healthy way. Good is drawing boundaries. Good is finding out how to truly love yourself.

I have found the good in divorce, heartache, sadness, quarantine, inability to work, single parentng, distance learning with

My fight in life is to find the good. And so, life is good my friends. JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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HIDDEN GEMS

Sutton Center Saving Endangered Birds by Maria Gus Imagine endangered species as the stars of the animal world. They are rarely seen, they may be a bit shy, and often people are fascinated with all their comings and goings. For Bartlesville, the George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center could be considered one of the most exclusive celebrity (bird) retreats in the area. The George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center (Sutton Center) was founded in 1983 with the mission of finding cooperative conservation solutions for birds and the natural world through science and education. What many don’t know is that this private, nonprofit organization is located near Bartlesville. Long-time residents may recall the Sutton Center for its efforts to help restore the Bald Eagle. Senior Biologist Donald Wolfe Jr. said that when their work began at Sutton Center, they had not seen any bald eagles in the area since 1950. In the early 80s there was great concern for their survival.  “There were less than 450 pairs at the time,” said Wolfe. “We were so close to losing our national bird. At the time, we had hoped to get 100 and were able to gain over 250.” Wolfe added that there are tens of thousands nesting Bald Eagles all through the United States, and well over half of that population started here. The notoriety of this “celebrity” in the United States helped the Sutton Center receive much attention for their bird research and conservation. Many local residents had heard of the Sutton Center, knew about their good work, and were aware of the help they provided to the Bald Eagle population. However, the Sutton Center is so much more than its tremendous Bald Eagle history. Wolfe said Sutton Center is an organization that area residents should be proud to have in the area.  Today, the Sutton Center has three main aspects of their work, as well as other smaller projects. They continue to help monitor Bald Eagle nests and have a team of 50 volunteers across the state who are trained to survey for nests and monitor and record outcomes. In addition, they are doing great work to help with other endangered birds

Saving the Masked Bobwhite Currently classified as a distinct subspecies of Northern Bobwhite, the Masked Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi) is found only in the Sonoran Desert and semi-desert regions of extreme southern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico. Although they were originally described as a separate species, they were reclassified in 1947 as a subspecies based on what were deemed significant vocal and plumage overlaps with the Northern Bobwhite. Regardless of the classification, the Masked Bobwhite is certainly a unique and irreplaceable thread 62

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HIDDEN GEMS of nature that is in great need of intense conservation efforts to save it from outright extinction. Wolfe said that in more recent years, the Sutton Center has been working with the Masked Bobwhite as well as Attwater’s Prairie Chicken (found only on the gulf coast of Texas) in an endangered species recovery program. The reason, in part, is due to the Sutton Center’s success with the Bald Eagle. The Masked Bobwhite breeding program began in 2017, and since that time they have produced 2,500 birds for release. “It sounds big but they’re quail,” said Wolfe. “Only about 250 become breeding adults.” To grow this population in Arizona by the work done in Oklahoma is just one critical piece of the conservation puzzle. Wolfe said the project is important for many reasons, and to have two of the rarest birds being recovered in Oklahoma is significant. “We’re well on our way to establishing sustainable populations of critically-endangered species,” said Wolfe.

Attwater’s Prairie-Chicken Endangered Species Recovery In 2020, the Sutton Center has released 49 Attwater’s PrairieChickens, one of the most endangered birds in North America. The Sutton Center believes it is essential to increase captive production of this species in order to provide enough birds that sustainable populations can be re-established in the wild. This bird has been nearing extinction for decades due to the loss of grasslands along the Gulf Coast and up to 75 miles inland. Many of these grasslands were lost for various reasons, including human settlements, industries, and possibly pesticide on rice crops. A main objective in the Attwater’s Prairie-Chicken Recovery Plan is to increase propagation and release efforts to boost wild populations to self-sustaining levels. Due to the expertise of the Sutton Center and its commitment to preservation, there is a lot of hope left for these prominent avian superstars. "I moved all the way from the east coast to work with these birds. They are fascinating creatures and most Americans don't even know they exist! They’re one of the most endangered avian species in the world, and yet so few people have heard of them,”

said Ariel Wapnik, aviculturist. “They are a symbol of our American prairies. And, they should be valued and protected for generations to come." Other projects of the Sutton Center include working with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife performing extensive surveys for the threatened Lesser Prairie Chicken. The Sutton Center also helps coordinate an Oklahoma breeding bird atlas through a partnership with citizens and amateur birders. “Citizens survey a particular area and volunteers help monitor,” said Wolfe. With 586 survey blocks around the state, the Sutton Center helps document what birds are in the area. “It’s a pretty large and important project.” The best way that the community can support the Sutton Center is through donations. The majority of funding comes from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, but the organization also greatly relies on private support and some grants require a match. Volunteers are also needed at the Sutton Center, and those interested do not need to be an avian expert. Wolfe said volunteers are needed for things like maintenance, cleaning, education, feeding, and training.  The Sutton Center is an Oklahoma stand-out in working to give back to the land and maintain the circle of life. The responsibility of humankind to repair and maintain the earth is a large part of the Sutton Center’s work to prevent species from becoming extinct or endangered. “There’s always value in preserving species, especially those that humans have impacted,” said Wolfe. He added that birds can often be the warning we need or a clue of how to help humankind and the effects of the environment. “I personally feel like we’re a leader within our profession.” The leadership of Sutton Center is one that is important, not only for Oklahoma and the Southwest, but for the most important aspects of science and nature. Their efforts support the delicate and critical role these birds play in our ecosystem and world. JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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PROFILES OF THE PAST

A Giant Personality Bartlesville’s 7-Foot Bob Kurland Cast a Big Shadow on Both Basketball and Phillips 66 by Mike Wilt What do Missouri, Stillwater, Bartlesville, and the Olympics all have in common? If you answered “Bob Kurland,” give yourself a high-five. Born in St. Louis two days before Christmas in 1924, Robert Albert Kurland would eventually grow to a height of seven feet and cast a long shadow — both literally and figuratively — on Oklahoma A&M, two Summer Olympics, and Phillips Petroleum Company. Having participated in basketball and track at Jennings (MO) High School, Kurland considered attending the University of Missouri. However, legendary A&M basketball coach Henry Iba invited Kurland to dinner after a game against Saint Louis University. Iba offered him a scholarship. Mizzou could only offer him a job. Many of Kurland’s family members had not finished high school, making him the first to attend college. In 1945 and 1946 while playing for what is now Oklahoma State University, Kurland led the team to consecutive NCAA titles and was named Most Outstanding Player both times. Tall with long arms, Kurland could easily jump to grab opponents’ shots above the rim. This led the NCAA to ban defensive goaltending. He’s also credited with being the first player to dunk during a game. Kurland also excelled off the court. He served as president of the student council in 1945 and 1946, and graduated with a bachelor of science in education. His four years in Stillwater over, Kurland’s next stop would be Bartlesville where he became a salesman for Phillips and played for the 66ers, the company’s amateur basketball team. Kurland was a sixtime All-American and led the team to three amateur titles. Since he did not play professionally, Kurland was eligible to play in the Olympic Games. He won gold medals in 1948 and 1952.

Afterwards, he settled into a long marketing career for Phillips. However, settling into office furniture wasn’t so easy. To accommodate his towering frame, Kurland’s desk was placed on blocks. One somewhat diminutive retiree recalled sitting in a chair with his nose barely above Kurland’s desk. “He was a unique individual,” said former Phillips executive Charlie Bowerman, who was Kurland’s superior in the early-tomid 1980s. “I had an excellent relationship with him, but for those who were not well-acquainted with Bob he could come across as a bit volatile.” Bowerman chalked it up to Kurland’s competitiveness carrying over to the workplace. “He had quite a career. He was an excellent businessman.” Kurland was also a popular speaker both inside and outside the company. “He was very entertaining,” Bowerman said. Kurland reveled in touting that he had been the tallest basketball player, and not professional George Mikan. “He’s only six-ten,” Kurland would laugh. As in college, Kurland was active elsewhere, serving several years on the city council, including a stint as vice-mayor. After retiring in 1985, Kurland and his wife, Barbara, split their time between homes in Bartlesville and Sanibel Island, Florida. He passed away in his sleep on September 29, 2013. He was 88. Wilt Chamberlain, the sevenfoot one-inch NBA Hall of Famer, once said that “Nobody roots for Goliath.” However, when it comes to Bob Kurland, folks in Missouri, Stillwater, and Bartlesville might disagree.

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THANK YOU! FOR

PROTECTING OUR HERD While we wait for widespread distribution of vaccines, we can avoid getting and spreading the virus by following a few simple steps: • Wash your hands often • Wear a mask or face covering in public • Maintain 6 feet of distance between you and others • Avoid large gatherings, especially indoors • Don’t go to work or school if you’re sick • Get tested if you have symptoms or have been exposed

Let’s work together & knock out COVID-19!

For more information on how you can protect yourself and others... VISIT www.cdc.gov

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VISIT www.cityofbartlesville.org

CALL 918-338-4132


CITY NEWS

Protect Our Herd

City Campaign Aims to Do Just that by Stopping COVID-19 by David Austin Meet B’ville Bill.

He’s not your average buffalo. He stands on two legs as opposed to four hooves; wears boots, gloves, and a cape; and seems to have a more regimented fitness routine than most of his ilk. Oh yeah, and he wears a mask. B’ville Bill is the mascot of a new communications campaign made possible through federal stimulus funds awarded to the City of Bartlesville earlier this year. He is front and center on three primary messages, also known as the “three W’s”: Wash Your Hands, Watch Your Distance, and Wear Your Mask. But as cool as he looks — with his hands on his hips in a classic superhero pose and his stylish COVID-19 busters belt buckle — B’ville Bill is not the most important part of the city’s campaign. The messages are. Bartlesville officials, including city management and the city council, hope the “three W’s” evolve into a general practice in the community, which helps keep people healthy while ultimately saving lives.

particular moment in time, the global pandemic known as COVID-19 is a public health hazard. The vast majority of medical professionals note that the most effective way to stay safe is by practicing the ‘Three W’s.’” The “Three W’s” encourage each individual to… • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use a hand sanitizer — especially after you have been in a public place or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. • Watch your distance. Put six feet of space between yourself and other people who don’t live in your household. • Wear a mask or face covering when in public or when around people who don’t live in your household — especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. The slogan of the city’s campaign is “Protect Our Herd,” which conceivably becomes easier as more people follow these recommended health and safety guidelines. The communications campaign is expected to span approximately four months, from mid-December into March.

“One of the primary charges of a government is to protect its citizenry,” said Bartlesville Mayor Dale Copeland. “And in this JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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KNOWING NOWATA

Making History Nowata General Hospital has a Place in American History by Carrol Craun On October 10, 1948 the Nowata General Hospital opened, making history. It was the first hospital to be built in the United States, from start to finish, under the Hill-Burton Hospital Aid Act. How did this come about? There had already been hospitals in Nowata. An early hospital was called the Nowata Sanatorium. It was owned by Dr. R. L. Kurt, and was located in the Lawson Building in 1917. The Brady house on Locust became a hospital with beds for 20 to 25 patients in 1926, and the hospital was moved to the Savoy Hotel in the early 1940s. The other hospital in town was the Clinic Hospital, privately owned by several doctors. In 1971, the Clinic Hospital became the home of the new Nowata County Historical Society Museum. The County was growing and there was a need for a larger facility, and also one that would attract and keep physicians in the area. A chance discussion in a local barber shop in the fall of 1946 led to the creation of a citizens committee composed of 19 local citizens. Their task was to promote donations of funds and land to build a new hospital. Fifteen thousand dollars was initially raised, and the committee believed that a hospital could be built for approximately $30,000. The committee incorporated with the title of Nowata Hospital Incorporated on December 9, 1946 and immediately set about trying to bring the dream of having a modern facility to fruition. Under the leadership of Charles A. Whitford, president, the committee soon realized they faced a major hurdle — money. While the members had many opinions on how to proceed, they did agree that it would take the help of the entire county to get the structure built. The committee was further hindered by the fact that none of them had any experience in designing and building a hospital, but they were willing to learn.

A variety of options were tried to acquire funds. The Catholic Church organization was approached to see if it would be interested in operating and equipping the hospital. This fell through, and the committee approached a Tahlequah hospital to provide the needed equipment under a lease agreement. This also fell through. By now the Committee was getting desperate; every step forward seemed to result in two steps back. At this time the group had raised over $34,000. Enter the Hill-Burton Hospital Aid Act. Plans were finalized for a 32-bed hospital with the design to adhere to the federal specifications, and this time success was in sight. The design and plans were turned over to the Tulsa firm of Black and West with the shocking proposed amount now $90,000 to complete. With federal approval of the project, bids were secured and the lowest one was $169,800. Realizing this was not going to be acceptable; the Nowata Building Committee submitted its own bid for $104,500, basing it upon lots of donations of labor and materials from the residents of the county. This was accepted and construction work began. To provide the needed matching funds, many fundraising events took place with county residents digging deep into their own pockets. Donations poured in — anywhere from $5,000 to $1 at a time — and the goal was reached. One of the most

successful fundraisers was the adoption of rooms in the new hospital as memorials. Funds to equip a room, along with the building supplies needed, were donated by individuals and organizations. The final cost for the hospital came in at $144,770. This amount included a refurbished home for nurses and traveling physicians. The hospital itself had a fullyequipped lab and all the necessary equipment to run a modern hospital. Opening day saw over 2,500 visitors touring the site. Ward charges at the time were: Four-bed ward: $5 per day Two-bed ward: $6.50 per day without bath Two-bed ward: $7.50 with bath Private ward: $8 per day without bath Private ward: $10 per day with bath Changes have occurred over the years and additions have been made. The J. Wood Glass maternity wing was added in 1958, a wing for chronic patients in 1962, and in 1972 the facility was remodeled to a 42-bed hospital. There is a helicopter pad, and in 1972 a doctors building with offices for three physicians was added to the campus. The hospital name and ownership have also changed over time. Originally owned by Nowata, the hospital is now part of the Ascension organization.

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What A Year! Be watching our Facebook page to vote for the Best Cover of the Year and have a chance to win some really cool prizes!

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ONCE UPON A TIME

Sir Winston Churchill Thinking About Old Dogs and Children and Watermelon Wine by Rita Thurman Barnes Seems everything I look at these pandemic days reminds me of an old memory. Every song I hear brings something back from the past and ignites a spark of recollection. Quite a while back there was a very successful country song called Old Dogs and Children and Watermelon Wine written and sung by Tom T. Hall. It’s a song that is talked more than sung and once you’ve heard it — it’s very hard to forget. Songs that tell a story always are. The dog you see in the picture was young at the time. The little boy was our neighbor and is a grown man now and we miss both of them. I’ve known a few old dogs in my time but the one in the photo lived to the ripe old age of 14. His name was Bear when we got him at the SPCA back when we were still a family of four including two rambunctious sons. We always said the dogs were for the boys but I think we really got them for ourselves. The Shelter had named him Bear but that didn’t stick very long for he was much too noble an animal to live out his days with such a common name. He was re-christened Sir Winston Churchill and called Winston and Winnie for short. He lived with us in the country lo those many years and loved everything but the spring and summer thunderstorms that skirted the rim of the hill we lived on. He loved running on our almostthree acres and he could run like the wind. He was a mix of sheep dog and golden retriever and when someone threw a ball or a Frisbee he took off like a champion quarter horse on race day. He ran like the dickens after whatever you threw but he never retrieved it. Not once. He just ran for the joy of running — kind of like Forrest Gump. He didn’t know when to quit either. He loved everyone and everything except the portable cement mixer that passed our house when there was new construction in the neighborhood. I was always able to control him when he was outside of the dog-run by himself. But on one particular day he was free in the yard with Sugar, our German Shepherd. Winston evidently wanted to show off this day for his lady friend. I heard the cement mixer coming up the road and I knew at once that the jig was up. Winston took off after the clattering cement mixer and Sugar took off after Winston and the rest is history. What do you do with a cement mixer when you catch it? We finally got the two of them back but it was an amazing chase I’m sure our rural neighborhood didn’t soon forget. Winston and Sugar are both gone now. Sugar died of a brain aneurysm as our older son was practicing his golf swing in the back yard. Everything possible was done to save her but she was too far gone. She was less than two years old but we remember her fondly. Sir Winston Churchill went on to live another 12 or 13 happy and productive years and enjoyed his time immensely — never again to our knowledge chasing a cement mixer. We started noticing at some point that Winston didn’t seem as chipper as usual. The vet found a melanoma on his chest and removed it hoping that was the extent of the disease and that it wouldn’t come back. However, it did return and very slowly and

precisely drained the life out of this wonderful old dog. When we finally decided that we needed to let him go to his reward, we called him one last time to go for a ride in the car with us. It was his favorite thing in the world to do next to chasing cement trucks. He got up from his sick bed and ran as fast as he could to the open back door of our car. He had the happiest look on his face because he thought he was just going for a ride. And he was. But it would be the last ride he would ever take. He knew the way to the vet and when we turned left at Frank Phillips and Washington Blvd the look on his old face changed. I personally believe he knew he was headed for something other than a regular visit to the vet or to be boarded for a few days while we took a short trip. He kept his eyes on me and I can still see the look in those big sad eyes that had loved our family for so long. One of the hardest things I’ve ever done in my life was to walk him into the vet’s office and leave him there alone — for you see, I was the disloyal one. I couldn’t stay by his side while he entered into his final rest. My dog, however, would have stayed with me to the end and I’ll never forgive myself for it. I’ll use this opportunity to say to him how very sorry I am that I loved him so much but didn’t have the courage to stay and hold him. I do believe that dogs have hearts as big as all outdoors and for my own peace of mind, I have to think that Winston understood. His photo still stands in a special place in our house and not a day goes by that I don’t look at that photo and tell him what a good friend he was and how very sorry I am I didn’t live up to the bargain I had made with him so long before. We’ve had several pets since those days when Winston was with us but none more loyal than he was. We were lucky enough to find a little lap dog about ten years ago who is still with us and I think she and Winston would have been good friends. My husband of 52 years and I have held onto her like glue during the pandemic and we have both learned once again that the words of Tom T. Hall’s song ring truer now than they did back then — "There ain't but three things in this world that's worth a solitary dime, but old dogs and children and watermelon wine." JANUARY 2021 | bmonthly

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EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES

OK EAT

Oklahoma Energy and Agriculture Training by Sarah Leslie Gagan

January weather may be cold and dreary in Northeast Oklahoma, but it’s the warm and glowing days of summer that have entrepreneur Kelly Goetz-Zimmerman dreaming. Originally from Bartlesville, the founder of Oklahoma Energy and Agriculture Training (OK EAT) has brought a unique learning opportunitybusiness venture to Bartlesville for ages three to 100. Oklahoma is well known for both its oil and gas industry and for its agriculture. Kelly has brought the two industries together in a way that equips and educates participants, meeting them at their level of learning. OK EAT is a 501(c)(3) public charity that provides a fun and relaxed farm atmosphere within the city limits of Bartlesville. It is the first agriculture attraction of its kind in the area that combines agricultural learning with equipment training and familiarization necessary for proper equipment use and maintenance, providing a well-rounded view of the industries. Preschool and elementary-age children can experience the fun of agriculture equipment training with battery powered 12v ride-on tractors, gators, and ground loaders, as they navigate the farm terrain, driving the equipment throughout the safe and supervised training area. Kids will also have opportunity to harvest produce from hoop houses, learning how vegetables are grown and cared for. OK EAT provides a structured training environment for junior high and older participants to learn to operate equipment required for tackling oil and agriculture chores, and learn about necessary agriculture equipment by providing a time and place to experience hands-on learning. OK EAT provides training on access to an inventory of the newest compact equipment and implements used for ground preparation and maintenance, tilling, raking, and other tasks important for keeping oil and agriculture operations efficient and profitable. Since 1966, the Goetz family has utilized the property for oil and agriculture activities. During the business develop-

THE KELLY GOETZ-ZIMMERMAN FAMILY

ment stage, it was important to Kelly to continue providing training and learning experiences while including individuals who may not otherwise have agriculture exposure. Along with encouraging interest in agriculture, the farm provides students a view of various farming and agriculture paths and direction for those who may consider an agriculture career. Kelly also saw the need for teens as well as adults to learn basic skills that include lawn mowing and maintenance to advanced skills of operating a tractor and implements. OK EAT will meet these needs with specialized training sessions and hands-on exposure to the working environment practice time. The farm’s wide-open spaces provide a unique place for family fun. Everyone is welcome to enjoy the recently-planted wildflower fields and green grasses, which make for the perfect picnic spot or photo shoot backdrop. Sand and dirt piles are available for play and earthing activities for kids of all ages. The farm is a place for young and old to get curious about nature and enjoy all that country life, in the city, can offer, and to dream of what the future of agriculture can become. Part of Kelly’s vision for OK EAT is bringing education to the community that promotes participation in educational programs, while educating participants on available government opportunities that provide financial support and economic assistance through agriculture. Her goal, with her team and the community, is for OK EAT to provide the experience, information and support required to effectively launch productive producers. The farm had a successful “soft opening” in the fall of 2020, and plans a full season of farming activities from May through October 2021. Booking will be available for groups, field trips and birthday parties, and individuals are always welcome. More information can be found on the Farm’s Facebook page Oklahoma Energy & Agriculture Training — aka "OK EAT."

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LET FREEDOM RING

White House Traditions

The History of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on New Year’s Day

by Jay Hastings Construction of the Executive mansion began in 1792. After eight years of construction, the nation’s second leader, President John Adams, and family moved into the unfinished mansion in 1800. On January 1, 1801 President John Adams opened the doors of the Executive Mansion, welcoming in folks from all walks of life to offer a greeting into the New Year. President Adams’ hospitality was genuinely afforded to “the people,” including high-ranking officials, diplomats, and common folks from the general public. In what turned out to be a major social event in the Nation’s capital city, the newspapers of the time covered the event. Printed articles included reports and descriptions of the grand floral decorations, musical performances from the United States Marine Band, and visitors’ choices of fashion. What President Adams may not have intended, or seen coming, was the event of 1801 becoming a long-standing tradition, occurring over the next 130 years. There were a few years the event was canceled due to war, illness, or the sitting president’s travel schedule. During the Great Depression, one man mistook the line of people waiting to enter the Executive mansion gates for a bread line. President Abraham Lincoln and First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln welcomed the first African American visitor into the Executive Mansion on New Year’s Day, 1864. The occasion was exactly one year to the day after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. In 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt officially changed the name from Executive Mansion to the White House.

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By the 20th century, crowds had swelled to more than six thousand people and lines extended around the block. In 1927, there were a recorded 3,303 men, women, and children who stood in line for hours in the cold weather for a chance to shake the President’s hand. President Herbert Hoover held the last New Year reception in 1932. On January 1, 1934 J.W. Hunefeld, a man who had previously attended many of the receptions, showed up at the White House gates and waited patiently “because he wanted to make sure the President hadn’t changed his mind.” In fact, the President had not.


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