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BARNABY ROW YEAR 3 DESIGN PORTFOLIO Unit J Tutored by Sara Shafiei & Aleks Rizova

U30074 & U30092 Submitted 8th May 2014


0.1

PLAYGROUND IN FES: SITE ANALYSIS Project Three, Semester Two

“A little imagination goes a long way in Fes.” T. Shah, ‘Travels With Myself ’ (2011)


THE CONCEALED RIVER Finding a way over the fence, onto the site

A high fence around the Fes river merely provides visual confirmation that a dirty secret lies behind it. My initial glimpses were through gate gaps and the holes left by missing screws.

10% A. Wire mesh fencing (transparent barrier) 90% B. Steel hoarding (opaque barrier)

A.

B.


DETERMINING SITE LOCATION BASED ON RIVER HEIGHT CHANGES

Exposed part of the medina river.

Water filtration systems require vertical space

The ideal site is the part of the exposed river with the greatest change in height over the shortest distance, maximising vertical space.

Exposed part of the medina river - 440m.

Scale 1:2000

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The most substantial height drop occurs in the red zone. This is the outer fringe of the abandoned Fes river development.

Nat u r a l t o p o g r ap h i c

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a l c u r ve of the hillside

11.4m drop

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APPROACHING THE SITE FROM BAB RCIF PLAZA Custodian leaning on bridge handrail

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Selected site for proposal

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Site continues downriver

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Selected site for proposal Photograph location indicated on opposing page

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CURRENT CONNECTIVITY OF SPACES Extent of the indefinitely suspended existing river development

Car park

Completed public space, awaiting opening Razed area, now wasteland

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Buildings razed for the development

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Razed buildings

Metal artisan working riad

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Sluice gate

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Location of opposing photograph

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Waterfall drop

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Sluice gate machinery room

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Direction of flow

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Date palms

Derelict ruins (hatched)

Houses which border the site (filled)

Incomplete paving

Bab Rcif plaza

Scale 1:1000

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PANORAMIC SITE SURVEY PHOTOGRAPHS Urban fringe between the developed and the uninhabited

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Photos A and B were taken from the rooftops. A local artisan showed us the way up.


MATERIALITY STUDY: BUILDING ELEMENTS

Iron bars

Concrete paving

Clay bricks

Cement render

Corrugated iron

Timber

Fibreglass

Commonly occuring materials around the site

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Popular internal wall construction Clay bricks, panelled with wood and skimmed with stucco or plaster, then pigmented if colour desired.

Material comparison with berber mountain dwellings Berber houses are constructed with a mix of loam, straw and water. Sand

40%

Silt

40% Loam mix

Clay

20% Straw

Water


SITE SAMPLES Key colours and textures through collected material

Rusty metal - an indication of passed time Scraps of rusted metal were dotted all over the site, particularly in the urban wasteland. This is a materiality I may adopt in the design process, due to the synonymity of the rusted texture with the crumbling facades of the surrounding buildings.

Cigarette stub & metal fitting

Blue paint chippings

Speed sketching the urban wasteland which adjoins the site. Recent development work has seen huge amounts of waste excavated to make space for a new concrete channel.

Sandstone fragment


SKETCH ELEVATION OF THE ADJOINING DWELLINGS Mapping and deconstructing the facade

Salvaged wood offcuts assembled haphazardly to form a platform for growing potted plants.

Pencil transect drawing of the Northern facade, including the working riad for metal artisams (red).

Area of facade studied in the drawing above Top layer of render (cement skim)

Metal artisan working riad

Course mortar mix

Brick laying A

I observed that many buildings with exposed brickwork had diagonally aligned clay bricks.

B

I believe this is due to material cost efficiency by laying bricks as in sketch A, more inexpensive mortar is used and less costly clay bricks.

Underlying clay brick layer


1. Camera setup.

2. Guidebook on site.

3. Untie string knot.

4. Open guidebook.

5. Insert cloth into glass funnel.

6. Add charcoal.

7. Add sand.

8. Add aggregate.

9. Lift guidebook into upright position.

10. Lower collection device into river.

11. Lift device out when full.

12. Pour contaminated water into filter.

13. Wait 45secs/1ml.

14. Water now potable.

USING THE GUIDEBOOK ON SITE

Filtering the water of the Fes river

The device allows its user to drink the water of Fes river by folding out the two wings to create a stand, and emptying the charcoal, sand and gravel into the glass funnel.


TESTING WATER QUALITY ALONG THE RIVER pH analysis at six locations F

Selected site for proposal Existing exposed river

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Tannery

pH Downriver

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Summary of findings A slight decrease in alkalinity from 7.8pH to 7.7pH between sites E and F is probably due to the acidic pigeon excrement and other chemicals used in the tannery.

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Direction of flow B

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Bab Rcif plaza

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MASSING THE AVAILABLE CONSTRUCTION SPACE Exploded axonometric and physical model

South facade

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North facade H

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The site presents a linear void with two opposing facades flanking either side of the Fes river (marked N and S).

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These two facades peel away from each other where the current development meets the urban wasteland.

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These models visualize eight North-South sections which were surveyed on site at even intervals of eight metres. G

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RIVER BOUNDARY The void between al-Andalous and al-Qarawiyine

In limbo The site is in a state of limbo between two opposing quarters, part of a negative dialogue that fills the void where the river is focal point; boundary. Access routes peel off into deep cuts of semi-dark space between tightly packed buildings.

Two opposing quarters Negative space: void Extent of current development Wasteland (uninhabited space) Bridge connections over the river

Here I rendered open public space at night to highlight the site connectivity.

Al-Andalous

Al-Qarawiyine


I propose two connections, marked A and B, which would provide access to the site directly from each side of the river (the opposing Fes quarters).

Extracting the surrounding circulation network to identify primary routes.

Primary access routes determined by the river

ALTERATIONS TO SITE ACCESS

A B


LIGHT AND SHADOW ANALYSIS Daily shadow path diagrams

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Spring equinox (March 20th 2014) N

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Typical weather conditions: sunny

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Selected site for proposal

South-East side of the wasteland receives direct sunlight until 4pm on a sunny day in March.

Main public space within the current development receives direct sunlight all day long.

09:00-17:00 Butterfly diagram overlay

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LIGHT AND SHADOW ANALYSIS Annual shadow path diagrams

January 20th

February 20th

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Annual shadow paths (9am) Typical weather conditions: sunny

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The sun casts longer shadows in the summer months.

Selected site for proposal

Shadow mapping simulation for the spring equinox (March 20th 2014) at 9am in the morning.

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Lighting overlay using highest and lowest sun angle, and a relative comparison with an Oxford house studied in project one.

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ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS: WIND Analysis and project relevance

Average weekly wind speeds over the course of a year in Fes (m/s)

km/ h Wk 52 50

48 44 40

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Project relevance The peak wind speed periods over the summer months may lead to higher evaporation rates during the filtration process, which could potentially be a problem.

Annual wind rose Frequency (hrs)

Average speed

Project relevance

Fes

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A v e ra g e W in d T e mp e ra tu re s

A v e ra g e R e la tiv e H u mid ity

W in d Fre q u e n c y (H rs)

5-6 m/s 6-7 m/s

However, the difference is not drastic enough to warrant designing for wind temperature (for example roof elements that align with the South East to collect warm air).

7-8 m/s > 8 m/s

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Unfortunately, the wind speeds in Fes are too low to justify the integration of sustainable wind power generators into my proposal.

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Moroccoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential wind energy capacity is generally quite good, approximately 3750-5000kwh/kw. 25

4-5 m/s

The lighter orange segment indicates that the warmest winds tend to come from the South East.

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ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS: SOLAR IRRADIATION AND TEMPERATURE City statistics and site-specific calculated irradiation grid

Geographically advantageous The topographical position of Fes within a river valley running South to North provides sufficient wind passage that the effect of solar heat on the skin may be mitigated by light breezes.

Map legend: Red highlight = main valley

A solar irradiation map for the African continent shows that Fes receives around 1800 kWh/m2 as an average statistic. A site-specific grid shows that cooler areas (dark orange) are found directly next to the facades.

Site location

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0.2

PUBLIC WATER FACILITY: BRIEF & INITIAL IDEAS Project Three, Semester Two

“A little imagination goes a long way in Fes.” T. Shah, ‘Travels With Myself ’ (2011)


EXISTING WORKPLACE FOR METAL ARTISANS ADJOINING THE SITE Acoustic analysis of ambient noise

X

Above: the facade of the metal artisansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; riad is peppered with small windows and faces onto my selected site. Left: location of the workplace in relation to the site. Below: completed artisan ware.

Every space in the building is functional, from the central courtyard (above) to the individual workshops (right).

Looking out of the artisan workshop onto the site, through window X.

Acoustic analysis

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Metal artisansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; working riad

Sound recording from the site shows that the main source of noise is the hammering and engraving of nearby metal artisans. This will determine the selection of materials and thickness of insulation for the proposal. Each wave peak is the sound of a hammer making contact with metal.

Hammering period

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Experience of sound around the souks of Fes.

About 6 seconds is required to turn the metal product around slightly.


THE NEED FOR A CLEAN WATER SUPPLY Brief development: the artisans communal water facility

Filtration building for river water A program of filtration spaces with the lowmaintenance of the well is required.

The existing well in the courtyard is contaminated by the polluted river running just 8m away. Artisans require water for their work and for their families, who inhabitat the first floor.

It is important that these spaces operate as naturally as possible, minimising electric consumption and cost to the artisans by using gravity alone.

Artisan families enter through the top levels of the structure to collect water. Water flows through the building by extending the level of the existing channel. Black arrows: water movement Red arrows: artisan movement

Free water shortage Citizens who cannot afford property with a water supply must buy bottled tap water from street vendors.

Designated artisan men maintain the filter and mechanisms periodically.


THE FRINGE BETWEEN URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURAL WASTELAND Where the inhabited meets the uninhabited

T h re sho

ld li n e

Incomplete paving marks the outer limit of the current urban development, creating a threshold between the inhabited and the uninhabited - the new and the old.

Aerial view of the North edge of the medina, where urban enclave meets the natural landscape.

Satellite image of Montreal at night, showing through light pollution where the inhabited meets the uninhabited.


INITIAL SPATIAL PROGRAMMING AROUND THE URBAN FRINGE Linear arrangement of 4 key areas along the river

Potable water filtration system Water aeration and dispenser Public water collection space Retail cubicles for metal artisans

Filtration, aeration and public collection must exist in said order: retail space adjoins public area to maximise footfall and sales.

Retail space moved upstream of fringe line to connect with the artisan riad (red); public space rotated to minimise river footprint.

Retail space enlarged; public space lifted to allow pedestrian connections to both hillside quarters via raised walkways.

Water aeration space raised to a height that increases fall distance, improving filtered water freshness for Fes inhabitants (inspired by mint tea poured from height).

Precedent observation in Marrakesh Mint tea is aerated by pouring from a considerable height above the glass. This is said to improve the flavour. I have brought this idea into the project by increasing the fall of the filtered water to improve its freshness. Fr i n ine ge l

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MASSING MODEL DEVELOPMENTS Meeting spatial demands as efficiently as possible

Potable water filtration system Water aeration and dispenser Public water collection space Retail cubicles for metal artisans

Initial masses based on established programming of the 4 key spaces.

‘Pinching’ / ‘splaying’ over the fringe translated from model below.

Filtration space split into three component parts; retail enlarged.

Aeration and filtration structures orientated parallel to the river flow.

re-

This maximises the surface areas of both steps, increasing capacity.

Water movement across the urban fringe, squeezed through a narrow channel and dispersed after the height drop.


SPATIAL PROGRAMMING THROUGH PAPER MODELLING Establishing a planar architectural language

Polluted river water is passively filtrated through the building. In times of high flow rate after rainfall, channel A copes with excess water. Walkway B provides public access to the facility, connecting the opposing hillsides.

D i re

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FUSING THE PLANAR LANGUAGE WITH THE LINEARITY OF THE EXISTING CHANNEL Further developments through modelling

Current massing iteration

Existing channel Filtration levels

Public collection space A B Connection between retail and collection

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Retail cubicles

A: negative - retail space interferes with East-West circulation (white line). B: positive - view of overlapping levels from public space shows honest processes. C: positive - folded louvres provide hanging space for artisan wares.

Preceding mass model

Linearity of existing river channel


PRECEDENT STRUCTURE FOR URBAN CONNECTION Høse bridge by Rintala Eggertsson Architects

This bridge in Norway connects the town of Høse to a vast woodland that was previously unaccessible. Though not a wasteland in the same sense as the Fes site, this woodland once shared the quality of emptiness despite its position on an urban fringe. My proposal in Fes will also make a previously uninhabited space accessible.

Town of Høse

Newly connected woodland

Town of Høse Newly connected woodland Høse bridge by Rintala Eggertsson

Zaragoza bridge by Zaha Hadid

The Zaragoza bridge is clearly a much larger structure, designed to accommodate a greater footfall. As such it introduces the ideas of multiple levels within one envelope. This is an idea I will carry across into the connections of my proposal.


FINALISED BRIEF: THE ARTISAN PUBLIC FILTRATION FACILITY Providing water to the citizens of Fes at no cost

Gravel replaced with perforated metal to reduce weight.

Filthy water of the Fes river Sand filtration level

Filtration technology adapted for large scale intervention

Charcoal filtration level

Public collect free drinking water

Stinking pits of household waste

Filtered water falls from height to aerate (like Moroccan mint tea)

Surplus water feeds public garden Filtration technology adopted The proposal uses a modified version of the traditional aggregatesand-charcoal filtration method, to make the water of Fes river suitable for oral consumption. Filtered water will be available freely to the citizens of Fes medina. The facility will be maintained by the metal artisans adjoining the site, who get a number of purpose-built retail units as their pay-off.


THE ARTISAN PUBLIC FILTRATION FACILITY Social relationship between metal artisans and public created

Forming a new connection The proposed scheme would see a mutually beneficial relationship established between the general public and the metal artisans who work next to the site. A government body would fund the scheme through the design and build stages.

Existing problem

Proposed solution

Desired result

The artisans will continue to manufacture metal wares in their existing riad, for the majority of their time.

Metal artisans

In return for their labour, the artisans are provided with a set of retail units in an excellent location next to the filter site, with high footfall.

The well in the courtyard of the artisansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; riad is contaminated.

Metal artisansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; working riad

Metal artisansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; working riad

New artisan retail premises

Tourists buy metal wares from these outlets.

The artisans make a profit.

One weekend every 2 months they must rake fresh sand and charcoal over the public filtration system.

Gravity-filtered water available for collection

General public Citizens who cannot afford property with a water supply must buy bottled tap water from street vendors.

Artisans then spread used charcoal over the oasis garden as natural fertiliser.

Some citizens buy everyday metal wares from the outlets at lower prices.

Surplus filtered water is gravity fed into a public oasis, similar to this citrus garden.

All citizens leave with fresh drinking water regardless of whether they entered the shops.

Some citizens use the garden as a resting and meeting place.

All citizens are funnelled through the retail space to increase footfall.


0.3

WATER FILTER LEVELS: DESIGN EVOLUTION Project Three, Semester Two

“A little imagination goes a long way in Fes.” T. Shah, ‘Travels With Myself ’ (2011)


STRUCTURAL MATERIAL RESEARCH FOR WATER-BASED BUILDINGS Resistance to water

Alternative wood treatment Creosote is applied to railway sleepers to make them more water resistant. Though creosote is used for some wood-clad buildings, thick black paint has been found to be more effective and makes a stronger aesthetic statement.

30 secs

18 mins

64 mins

Clay bricks are not appropriate for the water-based programme of my building, since they are prone to damp issues due to high porosity (see testing experiment above).

This house in Normandy by Beckmann-N’Thépé Architects uses blackened timber cladding. The problem is, blackened timber is only used for cladding purposes, not structural elements. A material of high structural performance is needed that is naturally water resistant (or can be treated against water intrusion). Therefore, concrete may be a more appropriate structural material as it can descend into water without compromising structural integrity.

Clay bricks used on site.

Reliability? Wooden foundation post after 15 years of weathering, despite CCA waterproofing treatment. Timber is not an appropriate choice for the water-bearing elements of my design.

Visual compatability with context? No. Traditional in-situ cast concrete is too textureless to complement the crumbling buildings of Fes.

Architecture that deals with water works well with concrete, as shown by the work of Tadao Ando, who is perhaps most successful at combining the two.

CCA treatment (chromated copper arsenate) turns timber a greenish colour and improves its resistivity to weathering. It is the most widely used form of wood preservative. Timber construction elements observed on site.

Water temple, 1991

Sayamaike Historical Museum, 2001


SANTIAGO CALATRAVAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S USE OF CONCRETE STRUCTURAL MEMBERS Preceding structural configurations

Weight efficiency achieved through hollow profile of heavy concrete structural members.

Santiago Calatrava uses diagonally curved concrete elements in his public architecture, such as the Oriente station in Lisbon pictured above.

Outside the Oriente station.

Calatravaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interpretation of the traditional column is both organic and artificial at once.

It simultaneously hints at the form of a tree whilst maintaining the perfect symmetry associated with the products of artificial processes - quite a unique attribute.

Weight and weather condition loads passed to the ground

Primary structural elements Secondary structural elements


SUPPORTING THE FILTRATION LEVELS: STRUCTURAL MODEL TESTING Exploring the visual qualities of different vertical and diagonal members

All of the forms investigated had the similar quality of linear repetition, which produced beautiful instances of light and shadow for each iteration. This linear repetition correlates strongly with Le Corbusierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ideas of regulating lines. Le Corbusier, Vers Une Architecture, p.3

1. Basic pilotis (the term used by Le Corbusier in Vers Une Architecture for columns set back from the slab edge).

2. An inverted barrel vault roof truss applied to a column.

3. Calatrava-inspired column with three contact points, spreading loads.

ve Ri

rl

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4. Diagonal truss that projects out from under the slab and connects to the ground on the other side of the Fes river. This support represents the rocky bank into which the beams would connect.


Simulates the river bank.

Simulates the rocky bank that the beams would be set into.

1. Basic pilotis

2. Inverted barrel truss

3. Calatrava-inspired columns

Video analysis of comparitive strength For a fair test, the same books were stacked in the same order for each structural model, until the model failed.

A traditional barrel truss, inverted for model 2.

4. Curved diagonal truss


SUPPORTING THE FILTRATION LEVELS: STRUCTURAL MODEL SELECTION Projecting reinforced concrete diagonal truss

Oriente Station in Lisbon by Santiago Calatrava

Slab

Structural precedent Construction of the Leigh Technology Academy in London (by BDP), which has a similar primary structural profile.

Curv ed truss

Area of particular strain where compressive forces make the structure self-strengthen by pushing inwards on itself. River Compression loads transmitted to the ground .

Selected structural configuration

Connection to the ground The curved reinforced concrete members will descend as diagonal trusses into the ground, where they then perform as a pile. Piles are a form of frictional foundation that stabilise the structure if topsoil is weak.

Piles cast in-situ with a bell bottom and rebar mesh: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Centering Starting drilling Inserting stand pipe (steel) Feeding bentonite Drilling to specified depth Inserting belling bucket Reaming bore hole bottom

8. Measuring depth 9. Setting up rebar cage 10. Inserting tremie tube 11. Removing slime with an air lift 12. Pumping concrete from the base 13. All bentonite now displaced 14. Concrete pile fully cured

Custom rebar pile mesh welded beforehand.


TEXTURING CONCRETE: PERSONAL OBSERVATION IN OSLO METRO STATIONS Deliberate emphasis on shuttering impressions

When in Oslo in 2013 I noticed that many of the recently refurbished metro stations were made using predominantly shuttered concrete.

What struck me was the roughness of the timber boards that had been used for shuttering. It had left a distinctive texture that gave the walls of the stations a tactile, accessible quality - and an agelessness. I believe a concrete building in Fes medina would more fittingly complement its visual context with rough-cut shuttering as above, rather than standard smoother shuttering.

Aesthetic role The planks of this concrete texture visually divide the planar elements into smaller, digestible parts. Its aesthetic role therefore equates to the crumbling brickwork of Fes, which also divides the facades.

Building facades adjoining the site (metal artisan working riad) - typical textures throughout the Fes medina.


DEVELOPING THE STRATEGIC PLAN Building up layers of space with filtration constraints and circulation routes

Oasis concept Surplus filtered water from the facility will feed an oasis of citrus trees, creating a biotic haven for the inhabitants of Fes.

Filtration precedent A water purification skyscraper in Jakarta designed by four Indonesians. This project uses filtered water to grow lush vegetation around its inhabitants.

The biotic gardens in my proposal link to the khettara desert wells in my research project. An oasis grows beyond a khettara by feeding off the surplus water from the reservoir.


PERMEABLE FRAMEWORKS THAT PERMIT VIEWING Three basic spatial arrangements

Robert Venturi Learning From Las Vegas, p.89 A ‘decorated shed’ has unnecessary decorative elements visible on the exterior, such as the facade building marked ‘b’.

‘Levels’ language precedent structure by Gijs Van Vaerenbergh

Steel layers that make up the spire, prior to construction and subsequent oxidisation. ‘Reading Between The Lines’ by Gijs Van Vaerenbergh

Angular structures such as this roof over the Waterloo Oval skate park are a less organic, less random version of option 2. However, option 3 will be explored further as it more closely ties in with the concept of filtration levels driving this project.


INITIAL PROPOSAL - SPATIAL OCCUPATION ON SITE Planar architectural language with structural elements bridging the vertical direction

b il t e r s la Sand f

Rain room

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Charcoal filter slab

C

E

A

D

F

Rain room The river water permeates the sand filter slab and falls as rain onto the charcoal underneath. Citizens and donkeys walk over the charcoal-filled slab on this level and experience the filtration process through total immersion; though there is the possibility to block a particular strip of the ceiling holes to allow people to pass and stay dry. Feet and hooves will compact the charcoal as they walk over it, making the filter more effective.

Legend

The louvred organic element that sits between the two slabs allows limited light into the semi-internal space behind it.

Filtered waterfall A

Floating rubbish drops off here

B

Sand filter level

C

Charcoal filter level

D

Walkway for water collection

E

Room for water aeration hand pumps

F

Main bridge, connecting two quarters

Structural dialogue across the river


ENRIC MIRALLESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ARCHITECTURAL LANGUAGE Translating the filleted curve into other structural elements

Torre de Gas building, Barcelona

Plan drawings by Enric Miralles

Influence on the proposal

Mirallesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; designs use a simple fillet to connect converging lines without a sharp point, whilst maintaining their formal integrity to the plan. The result is an evasion of both the awkward pointed corner and overorganic formless architecture.

The architectural language of a water-based building should be fluid, reflecting its purpose. In lay terms this means using curves rather than points. I have brought the filleted curve that Miralles used in his projects into the filtration level ramps and the projecting structural supports.

Filleted converging lines

Eurhythmic sports centre, Alicante

Tir amb arc (olympic archery range), Barcelona


IMPROVING THERMAL EFFICIENCY WITH PRIMARY STRUCTURAL ANGLE Environmental conditions in the water aeration pump room

Link to design project one: I could use angled reflective members to bring cold indirect sunlight into the louvred semi-open rain space as we did in our group project.

Thermal mass graph for concrete This graph shows the ability of concrete to create a time lag in temperature dropping, and reduce overall artificial heating consumption by inducing a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;dampingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ratio.

Lowering the angle of the facade as in option B increases the area of internal concrete surface exposed to the sun. The thermal mass of concrete will retain this warmth into the late evening, when the facility closes.

Concrete base slab (excellent heat retention ability)


VENTILATING THE CURRENT WORKING DESIGN Different strategies divided by purpose

Fresh air in the enclosed space The ventilation strategy for the aeration mesh room, which houses a number of hand-operated filtration devices, is completely different. The space is fully enclosed, and has one main facade with ample glazing. I considered two fundamental approaches to circulation in this space, labelled A and B, and then I realised they could be combined into third permutation. Both are diagrammed in section and plan. Red arrows are exhaust air, blue arrows are fresh.

Fringe wall

A

B

C

Device room

A The movement of water down the filtration part of the building will enourage a degree of air circulation. However, ventilation on the filtration levels is not an issue, since the structure is not enclosed by an envelope.

B

C

Fes is located in a valley that funnels Northerly winds, which means the aeration room will often be in the lee of the wind hidden behind the huge concrete fringe wall.


1:100 SECTION THROUGH INITIAL WATER FILTRATION FACILITY Drawn at the scale and nature of 1:50

Circulation The vertical separation of the filtration stages is unified through the use of connecting ramps with the curvature of Mirallesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; designs. The journey of the citizens through the building mirrors the journey of the river water.

Legend A

Sand filtration slab

B

Charcoal filtration slab

C

Walkway for water collection

D

Room for water aeration hand pumps

E

Fes river

F

Rain room (filtration experience)

D


A

F

C

B

E


INITIAL CONSTRUCTION DETAILS Location within main section

Detail A Connection between old and new

Drawing the section at 1:50 (Scale 1:200 printed here)

Detail B Roof of aeration mesh room

Detail C Lower walkway collection edge

Detail D Top level walkway

Detail E Edge of sand channel


Details A-E & 1:20 section

Scale 1:5 printed at A3

Steel stanchion

Scale 1:5 printed at A3

Refined: Detail C Lower walkway filtered water collection edge

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Steel eyelet brackets

Slight canver to drain rainwater away from wooden elements, into the channel

Steel wire

Clay bricks

Balustrade

Sandy mortar

Floorboards

Cross-directional wood batons supported by steel brackets

Detail A Connection between old and new

Precast concrete slabs made in sections and assembled on site

Drilled holes for rainwater drainage

Steel rebar mesh for structural integrity

Steel rebar cage

Cast peripheral gutter to channel water away from the surfaces on which people walk.

Timber floor joists

This is A development of the previous drawing to address the emotive/experiential problem highlighted previously, in that people may not want to lean over the edge.

The elephant house has a raised lip like the one here to stop its inhabitants from positioning their centre of gravity too far forward.

Solution (in progress!): I have adapted an architectural element I read about when researching the Tecton buildings at London Zoo.

I would like to test this further with human subjects and see if its a feature I can rely on.

See annotations for section detail F.

In-situ cast concrete

Detail D Top level walkway with balcony and channel

Load path

Timber mounting plate

Evenly spaced notches in this lipped concrete detail would allow water to drain into the river Compacted earth/ rubble hardfill

Water runoff due to canver

The slab of the new building extends very close to the walls of the existing house to give an impression of support, when in fact the column set back is taking all of the load. This idea of seeming weightlessness is carried across the proposal.

Cor-ten steel plates

Concrete column

Scale 1:5 printed at A3

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Upwards-facing square steel extrusions rather than H or I extrusions for greater strength

Scale 1:5 printed at A3

Scale 1:5 printed at A3

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1:20 Section through both filter levels and translucent cor-ten structure

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Detail B Roof of aeration mesh room

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Detail E Northern edge of household waste disposal channel Varnished wooden banister

Load path

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In-siu cast concrete

Steel rebar cage

Triple glazed balustrade, for strength and insulation at night

Waterproofing dotted area: Needs to be removable so that sand can be replenished periodicly

- Concrete slab has a slight canver, so rainwater runs away from the connection.

Inidivual cor-ten sheets made up of several parts welded together.

- Rubber buffer creates tight seal where steel bracket meets concrete slab.

The elephant house at Whipsnade Zoo had a raised lip like the one in detail C to stop its inhabitants from positioning their centre of gravity too far forward.

Perhaps silicon sealant needed at point X where the galvanized bracket meets the glulam truss?

Square extrusions are positioned either side of the weld joins to increase stability.

Perforated steel sheets - water passes through, rubbish carrys on

Locating pin

Waterproof

Steel rebar cage Water runoff due to canver

This is a principle I have used to inform the collection walkway design, which has a lipped edge to minimise discomfort.

X

Load path

Curved glulam structural beam

Elephant house by Berthold Lubetkin

Sand tank

Rebar grid with drilled holes within each grid square, allowing water to pass through and fall

Screwjack fitting to open window with a extension stick Cavity for services Direction of load transfer

Suspended wood panel ceiling supported by T-beams

Wooden baton for screwjack fitting

Hinge

Sand mesh filters necessary in each depression? This would retin the sand fror longer.

Water passes through perforated slab

Scale 1:20 printed at A3

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800 1000


WEATHERED STEEL LAYERED FACADE: MATERIAL EXPLORATION Spot welding oxidised steel brackets

Left: Rusty steel clamped in place. Above: Welded joint before and after removing the slag with a wire brush.

I found that the weld smoke marks actually created beautiful colours, so didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t brush them off.

Key material precedent Depending on the position of the viewer, this church designed by Gijs Van Vaerenbergh is either perceived as an opaque building, or dissolves into the landscape almost completely.

Immediate left: weathered steel in my proposal, forming the rain room.

Smoke marks

Weld deposit

Rust build-up


SEMI-PERMEABLE WEATHERED STEEL FACADE Spatial occupation within proposed scheme

Scale 1:500 M

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30

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50

Caravaggio - lighting the space from the side The crisp shaft of light found in The Calling of St Matthew by Caravaggio is something I hope to replicate through my louvred facade, but many times over since the sunlight is split by the layers.

Axonometric view looking South, up river. Clear structural dialogue between the two building elements.

Glulam trusses form the aeration device space - this must be braced laterally against high wind loads.

Weathered steel panels welded on site from several smaller parts.

Primary reinforced concrete structural members descend into the bank 4m and behave as piles would. These mitigate against the poor (and unreliable) soil quality around the river.

Turning this model from project one onto its side shows how the louvred steel facade has the potential to create the sharp chiaroscuro rays in the Caravaggio painting above.


0.4

PUBLIC WATER FACILITY: FINAL DEVELOPMENTS Project Three, Semester Two

“A little imagination goes a long way in Fes.” T. Shah, ‘Travels With Myself ’ (2011)


FINAL STRATEGIC MODEL A multi-purpose public facility that makes connections across the river

Metal artisan shops Metal artisan working riad Riad observation walkway Top filter level (grille and sand) - large waste separation Lower filter level (charcoal) - purification

Connection bridge for al-Qarawiyine and al-Andalous quarters Water aeration rooms - mesh filters for safe drinking Biotic gardens fed by surplus filtered river water

Testing required for top filter level Large items of household waste floating down the river will fall off the end of the top channel after the water has been extracted by the sand. However, as of yet this is theoretical; an element with a metal grille that I have designed to allow water through without rubbish. Though my experiments with charcoal, sand and gravel leave no doubt that those elements of the building will function as intended, the perforated metal grille needs exploration.

Free water provided to the public by the metal artisans Each axiom serves a specific purpose, making connections between filter and river, rubbish grill and sorting centre, artisan shops and working riad. The project strategy is to form a mutually beneficial relationship between the public and metal artisans.


TESTING THE WASTE-SORTING CHANNEL Simulation of the top filtration level (containing sand under a perforated membrane)

How the system works This is a perforated liquid separation device to test the ideas developed for household waste separation. All items of waste cannot pass through the sand, so gradually pile up on top of it until pushed off the end of the channel by the build-up of more items upstream.

Location of simulated channel

Polystyrene pieces used like-for-like to simulate the household waste floating down the river channel.


PROPOSED MATERIALITY FOR PUBLIC SPACE AND THOROUGHFARES: WOOD Key precedent: Yokohama ferry terminal by Foreign Office Architects

Guiding landscape The landscape guides the visitor in predetermined directions, creating obvious points of entry through sunken voids. Model made with stained wooden matchsticks, grouted with plaster, at a scale of 1:50.

Plans and photos of the Yokohama terminal by FOA, which uses a sculpted landscape of wood to guide passengers through the building and over the rooftop areas. This is an important precedent for my building in terms of its approach to visually implied circulation.


DEVELOPING KEY ROUTES THROUGH EXPERIENTIAL CHANGE Modelling the various stages of the primary thoroughfare

D i re c t i

on of d e s c e nt

Descending walkway A ramp suitable for the passage of all pedestrians people, donkeys, carts - will pass through the site under the retail area.

Walkway narrows as it descends into tunnel.

Location of route studied.

Unlit tunnel begins.

Tunnel banks to the left, internal light increases.

Louvres hint at the new surroundings.


WALKWAY CONSTRUCTION MODEL Using wood to create defining lines

Yokohama ferry terminal Plans and photos of the Yokohama terminal by FOA, which uses a sculpted landscape of wood to guide passengers through the building and over the rooftop areas.

Scale 1:5 Creating a shadow gap to enhance experience The landscape of my proposal guides the visitor in predetermined directions, creating obvious points of entry through sunken voids. The definition of these cuts into the landscape is enhanced by darking the walkway edges using a shadow gap.

Plan extract 1:200

Physical model of anticipated architectural language 1:200


RELATIONSHIP OF HUMAN SCALE TO THE WOODEN WALKWAYS Extract of the main walkway at full 1:1 scale

Fragmenting materials This model explored an area of my proposal where one material disintegrates into another (as can be observed in the plan, left). In this particular location, wooden decking disintegrates into charred decking, which in turn fragments and becomes the crushed charcoal of the water filtration level. Here there is a poetry of material process: charcoal is, after all, simply incinerated wood.

Scale 1:1000

Location of studied walkway

Experiential analysis The walkways create a record of the footsteps of people who pass over them by the displacement of soot off the charred planks.

Burning the charred decking

Over time, the intensity of the footsteps around the final charred planks would blend them into the rest of the landscape more fluidly. Footstep record intensity increases nearer the charred planks.


ARTISAN SHOP SPATIAL PROGRAMME Hand-drawn plan at scale 1:200


Sec tion c ut for foll ow ing p ag e

M

l eta

ar t

i

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s w san

ork

r ing

iad

Filtration levels

R Fe s

i

ver

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er

el to

m pro

en

Unit 1

ade

t i on f i lt r a

Unit 2

e r â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eep hall tek Ga rance e nt

ow f fl o i on ect r i D

Unit 3 Unit 4

tt e r s h o p s B o w l & p la

le ve

ls

Lantern square

Unit 5

Up to shop terraces

Key:

N

Stepped descent to water collection point. Ramped descent to water filtration levels. Stairs connecting retail area with tunnel.

Unit 6 Down to tunnel

Unit 7

ern L a nt

shop

s Scale 1:200 M

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ARTISAN SHOP SPATIAL PROGRAMME Hand-drawn section at scale 1:200


Lantern shops

Artisan riad

Bowl & platter shops Bridge

Pulley connection

Unit 7

Unit 2 Shopkeeper toilets Overflow channel

Fes River

Gatekeeper living quarters

Key: Stepped descent to water collection point. Ramped descent to water filtration levels. Stairs connecting retail area with tunnel.

Scale 1:200 M

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CLAY RENDERED AERIAL SITE OVERVIEWS Including potential route for tourist walkway

N

N

Retail area overview from North West.

Aerial perspective looking upriver from the North East. N

Tourist viewing platform The mass that forms the main artisan shop building for bowls and platters is cut through at the northeastern end. This is to allow for a planned walkway that will connect tourists to the rooftop of the metal artisan workshops. Planned connection walkway This idea came from the viewing platforms surrounding the Chouwara tannery just down the river from the site.

Roof of the artisan shops viewed from the South East.


MATERIAL DISINTEGRATION ACROSS THE SITE Descending walkway precedent study: Igualada cemetery by Enric Miralles

Changing landscape material The texture and response of the landscape will change underfoot for a citizen passing through the site. Concrete pavers will be easy to walk on; charcoal raked out by the metal artisans will be comparatively more difficult, as the material is more absorbent.

Concrete paving

Wood decking

Charcoal filtration level

I began to explore the idea of material disintegration in this earlier model.

Reflective courtyard

Wood decking

Rou

te

of

s de

ce

nt

Note the inset planks of wood that coax the visitor into the descent and splay out into the lower courtyard space.

The Igualada cemetery was designed by the late Enric Miralles, studied previously for his use of filleted curvature in plan and section. In his project, a walkway descends into a land of the dead, a public space designed to make the visitor feel closer to those who have passed away.


LIGHT RAYS AND APERTURES: SPATIAL QUALITY 1:20 DRAWING Hi g

Zooming in on one retail unit

hest sun ang le

Scale 1:500

Studied area

L o w es t su n a n g le

Concept sketch By lifting one side of each roof plane, I can create a narrow strip aperture that has two functions: 1. Atmospheric internal lighting 2. Ventilation (openable window)

Pulley platform connecting to artisan riad

The openings should cast a ray of light into the space, in the same way light rays are visible in the souks (below).

Light ray photos I took on the field trip

Retail space

Basement (storage room)

Scale 1:20


ROOF DESIGN TO ALLOW FOR APERTURES: KEY JUNCTION Vertical-horizontal junction between wall, window and roof

Drainage strategy The structural plywood fixed to the secondary beams creates a smooth, rigid roof surface. A damp-proof membrane is laid on top of this, and then square cuts of timber are used to lift the tile batens structure off the membrane, allowing rainwater to drain in all directions underneath.

Classic green Moroccan roof tiles

Timber tile batens

Timber square spacers

Waterproof membrane

Structural plywood panels

Timber joists Timber beams

Reinforced concrete wall Sketch of finished configuration

Plywood layer to avoid deflection The use of a structural plywood layer not only allows the drainage technique above, but also strengthens the roof construction under lateral forces. These models demonstrate the effect of plywood panels versus the traditional timber baten lattice structure. As you can see, the lattice is far more prone to deflection when force is applied from either side of it.

Construction precedent Safe Haven Library by TYIN Tegnestue Architects uses both similar construction techniques and a similar material palette.


LIGHT DISPERSAL EXPLORATION AND OVERALL LIGHTING STRATEGY Clouds of light

Dispersal transition By changing the angle of the reflective panel I was able to manipulate the lighting effect cast on the table of shiny metal objects. Over the course of the day, I would like the sun to have this effect in the retail units of my proposal for Fes.

These ideas relate to the light experiments from my first project, in semester one. Concept from an observation A mosaic plate on our windowsill transforms the room with rays of sunlight every day. The technology - essentially a concave grid arrangement of small reflective tiles - is beautifully simple.

Natural lighting strategy By designing a series of reflecting panels on the opposite wall, sunlight will enter the shop in a bright souk-like ray and bounce back onto the opposite wall in hundreds of smaller rays. This will be an advantageous lighting arrangement for the shopkeeper, whose metal products lining the wall will reflect beautifully around the space.

S u n p ath

Artificial lighting strategy Just as Peter Zumthor realised he could use the natural daylight system in Vals thermal baths for artificial lighting at night (below), so can we. The reflecting panels will work with artificial spotlights too, and these could be mounted behind each concrete upstand (marked ).

Spotlight locations


0.5

THE ARTISAN PUBLIC FILTRATION FACILITY: RESOLUTION Project Three, Semester Two

“A little imagination goes a long way in Fes.” T. Shah, ‘Travels With Myself ’ (2011)


PLANS: LEVEL BY LEVEL Roof to ground level, progressing South West to North East

1st floor

Rooftops

Ground floor

Basement

Charcoal filter level

Connection bridge

Scale 1:2500 M

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Morphological changes by height

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Aerial overview The mass of the main building aligns with the existing river channel.

Public water collection level

Biotic garden walkway


PLANS: MAIN BUILDING Roof to ground level, progressing South West to North East

Artisan riad

P

at y pl ulle

Artisan riad for m

s ai Ret

li P ub

Lantern shop roof

1st floor

Ground floor

Scale 1:1000 M

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it s l un Bas

ua c sq

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re Split-level retail units

Basement


MAIN BUILDING SECTION (NORTH-SOUTH) Scale 1:200

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1. Existing metal artisan riad 2. Retail unit 3. Pulley balcony (connects over river to artisan riad) 4. Retail storage 5. Toilet / washroom 6. Outdoor awning for temporary stalls 7. Top filter level (grille, sand) 8. Bottom filter level (charcoal) 9. Water collection walkway 10. Bridge connecting two quarters 11. Biotic oasis garden fed by surplus filtered water Light strategy for each retail unit. Scale 1:200 M

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SITE PLAN OF WHOLE FACILITY Scale 1:200

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Fes River 10. 2.

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Section cut line (opposing page)

2. 2.

4. 7.

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Key 1. Existing metal artisan riad 2. Retail units for bowls and platters - main building 3. Retail units for metal lanterns 4. Descending ramp to charcoal filter level 5. Descending stairs to water collection point (covered) 6. Charcoal filter level 7. Overflow channel 8. Biotic oasis garden fed by surplus filtered water 9. Bridge connecting two quarters 10. River promenade

3.

3.


STRUCTURAL STRATEGY Physical model at 1:100 scale

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0 Scale 1:200 -1

A

B

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G

Structural grid arrangement Concrete structural walls A-G project perpendicular to the river, forming the backbone of the building and creating 7 bays for the retail units. The ground and first floors, and the basement, are then supported by these vertical elements. Thus the grid above becomes apparent, reflected in the 1:100 model below.

Structural model 1:100 The main slabs, the parallel concrete walls, and the secondary structural elements (timber) are all identifiable in this model.

Shear wall for stability Changing the direction of the primary wall with this additional element cross braces the entire structural in the perpendicular direction. This makes it more resistant to lateral forces such as wind.


LOAD TRANSFER ANALYSIS Incremental weight testing Prevailing wind direction Primary structure Parallel concrete shear walls create a backbone to the structure perpendicular to the river.

Secondary structure

Horizontal load path (live/dead)

Large timber beams span the bays formed between each shear wall.

Vertical load path (live/dead) Resistant force from ground (dead) Tertiary structure

Lateral wind loads (live)

Timber joists span the distance between beams, and will support the tile batens.

Elevated walls in compression

It even passed the tortoise test, whose wriggling represents the omni-directional forces of wind. Structural testing The structural model did not show any signs of buckling despite 16 lb (7.3kg) of kitchen weights, demonstrating the strength of a shear wall structural arrangement. Greyboard is a reasonable indication of concrete behaviour because it is similarly strong in compression.

0 lb

7 lb

11 lb

13 lb

14 lb

15 lb

15 lb 8 oz

15 lb 12 oz

16 lb

Approx 6 lb


GROUND RELATIONSHIP: FOUNDATIONS Connecting the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s structure from ground to walls

Current configuration

Structural loading

Gravity wall

Though they are connected to the slabs above, this is not sufficient force to prevent bowing.

A gravity retaining wall does not need reinforcement; the weight of the concrete mass is sufficient to prevent movement.

Cantilever wall

Counterfort wall

Area in stress

Scale 1:500

Studied area

At the moment, the structural walls that provide the backbone to my proposal are at risk of caving inwards at the basement level.

Heel

Toe

Stem

For a cantilevered wall, the force created by the weight of the soil on the heel is greater than the horizontal pushing force.

Counterfort walls combine the principals of the cantilevered and gravity systems, requiring less reinforcement bars.

This means the wall cannot fail unless by some act of God. Site ground conditions The soil around the river is very poor quality, easily eroded, and quite likely prone to water saturation. Bedrock on a river site like this cannot be relied on - therefore pad foundations are more suitable than piles. Reason for selection TOPSOIL

BACK FILL

HARD GROUND

Compressive effect of building foundations on poor quality soil with low bearing capacity.

BEDROCK

ROCK DEPTH VARIES

SOIL

The cantilevered wall system is most sustainable - requiring less concrete (more cost effective), and reducing encroachment onto the underground biological environment.


GROUND RELATIONSHIP: FOUNDATIONS Cantilevered retaining wall

3D construction axonometric The cantilevered retaining wall is cast with several shear keys to improve the footing stability.

Scale 1:500

Studied area

A

Damp-proof membrane wraps around the top of the cantilevered wall.

Proposed construction To allow for fair-faced concrete surfaces within the building, the insulation is moved underneath the slab, and protected from moisture ingress by a continuous damp-proof membrane.

Exterior: Void under ground slab

Drainage pipe at the base of the backfilled zone carries rain and groundwater away from the building.

B Rigid insulation arrangement.

C Primary structural concrete wall

Shop basement

B

Rigid insulation Damp-proof membrane Backfill

Basement floor slab (rests on cantilevered wall) Cantilevered retaining wall

Sloped retaining wall for drainage

Rigid insulation Backfill

Waterproof / insect repellent insulation Steel reinforcement bars

C A

Shear key


ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY: VENTILATION Using the advantageous geographical position of the site

Geographical location Fes lies within a river valley running from South to North, creating a cut in the landscape that attracts predominant Northerly winds. Therefore, the main shops are naturally ventilated, and due to the warm Moroccan climate, not heated.

Annual wind rose for Fes Fequency (hrs)

The downwards movement of water through the filtration levels will encourage a degree of air circulation, not to mention the exposure of the levels to the wind.

Location of proposal Roof design The roof sections for each retail unit are lifted on one side, to allow the prevailing Northerly winds to draw exhausted air out of the space.

Pulley room Pulley room Pulley room to metal artisan riad

Unit 1

Unit 2

Overflow channel control room Air quality strategy for the shops Hot weather: Prevailing wind draws exhaust air out of the roof window, thereby bringing fresh air through the open doorways. Ample solar shading keeps the heat of the sun out of the building. Cold weather: The climate in Fes does not drop to a temperature sufficient to warrant heating. Therefore on cold days, the shop environment is also cool, but customers are already appropriately dressed for the outdoor streets.

Storage room

Scale 1:100 Fresh air Mechanised air - heated only in winter months

Pulley room

Unit 3

Unit 4

Shared toilet

Storage room

Unit 5

Circ. Toilet


INSIDE-OUTSIDE RELATIONSHIP: LOUVRED STEEL FACADE Thermal considerations

1.

2. Internal, controlled environment

External, uncontrolled environment Corten steel louvres (200mm wide)

3.

Steel box section (100mm) Triple glazing unit Standardised steel rope Galvanised steel stanchions

Iron grille with perforations Galvanised steel support brackets

Thermal bridging The risk of thermal bridging through the corten steel louvres has been partially mitigated through the use of triple-glazing. This will not solve the problem altogether, but the thermal controls at the shopkeepers disposal (opening/closing the doors and skylights) should suffice. Thermal bridging weakness

Promenade material selection An iron grille will dominate the constructive ensemble that forms the riverside promenade. The holes of the grille allow the user to enjoy a physical connection with the water running below their feet.

Construction process The glazing units can be slid into the louvre facade (1 & 2) and sealed in place with a silicone adhesive (3). Each unit is identical so can be batch produced.


WATER FILTRATION LEVEL: MATERIAL RELATIONSHIPS Concrete, steel and charcoal model at scale 1:5

Scale 1:1000

Location of studied slab detail

Physical model of the charcoal level edge This model looks at the relationship of charcoal and weathered steel to the concrete slab which supports the filtration tank.

Left: Skewers within drinking straws formed the exit holes for filtered water. Below: Removing the cast from the formwork.


WATER FILTRATION LEVEL: MATERIAL RELATIONSHIPS Concrete, steel and charcoal model at scale 1:5 - detail photographs

Model conclusions Through making this model I learnt that a tightly perforated mesh is needed to create a peripheral gutter. This prevents charcoal from clogging up the exit holes.

‘Reading Between The Lines’ by Gijs Van Vaerenbergh


WATERFALL ANALYSIS Affect of flow rate on aesthetic quality

The setup prior to pouring water into the perspex tank.

A new form of water clock? The waterfall that cascades out of the charcoal filtration slab is an indicator of the weather in the surrounding mountainous areas. A citizen might compare it to a watch or clock for the countryside.

Low flow rate - no rainfall in the mountains

Medium flow rate - average quantity of water

High flow rate - after rainfall (overflow channel open)

The waterfall of the artisan public filtration facility is at its most impressive during times of higher rainfall. In such instances, the system has to cope with the increased rate of flow by opening an overflow channel (see plans that follow).


Water movement thread axonometric The passage of water through the site has defined the entire scheme since the brief. This drawing shows progressive section cuts perpendicular to the water flow. The red line indicates the location of the concrete detail model (opposing page).


FINAL ORTHOGRAPHIC SERIES: WATER FILTRATION SECTION Collection facility in use (weekday; high rainfall)

M

0

4

8

Legend A

Sand filtration slab

B

Charcoal filtration slab

C

Walkway for water collection

D

Bridge under the waterfall

E

Rain room (filtration experience)

F

Metal artisan workshops

G

Metal artisan retail units


G F

A

E

B

C

D


FINAL ORTHOGRAPHIC SERIES: METAL ARTISAN SHOPS SECTION Retail units in use (low rainfall therefore low footfall for water collection)

M

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Legend A

Metal lantern shop

B

Lantern public square

C

Landscaped seating

D

Walkway descends to filter levels

E

Metal bowl and platter shop

F

Shop basement - storage and WC

G

Metal artisan workshops

H

Contaminated well (redundant)


G E B C A D

F H


FINAL MODEL OF PROPOSED FACILITY Watercolour paper and thread, scale 1:200

Unfolded landscape The final form that I have reached after months of development has a clear dialogue with the linearity of the river. The main building, walkways and promenades all have the appearance of being unfolded out of the landscape along invisible lines that run parallel to the river.

Disintegrating walkway that passes under the retail units onto the charcoal filter level.

Filtered waterfall to be collected by the people of Fes medina.

Landscaped step seating inspired by the FOAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Yokohama terminal.

Tourist peers into metal artisan workshop from above, similar to the Chouwara tannery.


Overflow channel control room

This drawing elucidates the layering of the two overlapping programmes: public water collection and metal artisan shops.

Artisan public filtration facility, exploded

Public thoroughfares

Water filtration areas

Metal artisan retail areas

Colour coded by use: filtration, retail and public access

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC DRAWING OF COMPLETE FACILITY

River bridge connecting two opposing quarters

Charcoal filter level and adjoining ramps

Artisan shops basement

Descending walkway to charcoal filter level

Artisan shops ground floor

Artisan shops first floor


Existing buildings (metal artisan riad dotted)

Direct steps to waterfall walkway

Public water collection area


WATER FACILITY IN THE EVENING LIGHT January 1st 2014, 5pm

OPPOSITE PAGE: FINAL EXTERNAL RENDER LOOKING UPSTREAM Highlighting the overlapping of water filtration levels with public thoroughfares


0.6

ONE YEAR LATER: ANTICIPATED IMPACT Project Three, Semester Two

“A little imagination goes a long way in Fes.” T. Shah, ‘Travels With Myself ’ (2011)


MICRO SCALE: CHANGES TO THE BUILDING Self-integration of wooden walkways into the fabric of Fes

1:1 walkway from Chapter 3.4

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Walkingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the essence of the drawing after a basic CAD print.

Walking drawing, 1:1 scale Chapter 3.4 saw me build a 1:1 prototype of a wooden walkway, through which I learnt that the inhabitants of my proposal will leave traces of their crossing as their feet spread charcoal onto unburnt wood. Therefore the building will dissolve into its own materials over time, the charcoal staining the boundary between new facility and old medina streets until the start of one and beginning of the other is indeterminable.

Axo

nom

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MACRO SCALE: CHANGES TO THE LANDSCAPE Scale 1:10,000

The Artisan Public Filtration Facility

Expected increase in biodiversity and green vegetation.

Purifying the river downstream from the site Surplus filtered water feeds the public garden, and then leaches back into the river, improving water quality below the medina and into the landscape.

Guidebook link There is a clear visual parity with the inset map of the guidebook.


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Profile for Barney Row

Barney Row – Bachelor's Portfolio  

Barney Row – Bachelor's Portfolio  

Profile for barneyrow
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