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MWR’s Summer Splash, Sesame Street ... NASP MWR is pulling out all the stops tomorrow, Aug. 6, for Summer Splash at the Barrancas Sports Complex from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. The event is free to all authorized MWR patrons and children of all ages are invited. The USO will be giving out free school supplies to all military dependents. Sesame Street: Come out Aug. 8 for The Sesame Street / USO Experience at the Schools Command Theater (Bldg. 633) on Chambers Avenue. This free event features the Muppets in two shows with a young girl named Katie and her experiences as a military child. The first show, “Moving,” begins at 3:30 p.m. and the second show, “Transition,” begins at 6 p.m. This is open to all MWR patrons and doors open 30 minutes before the show begins, so go early for good seating. For more information, call 452-3806.

Vol. 80, No. 31

VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: www.gosportpensacola.com

August 5, 2016

IWTC students participate in interactive SAPR training Story, photo by MC3 Taylor L. Jackson CIWT Public Affairs

Students assigned to Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Corry Station engaged in interactive Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) training in the chapel at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola’s Corry Station July 26-27. Pensacola’s NAS SAPR team at Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) arranged for workshops with Pure Praxis, a socially adaptive theater group contracted by the Department of the Navy’s SAPR office. The actors use improvisational theater to encourage involvement and intervention in real-world situations.

“The training provided to our IWTC staff and students was not your typical SAPR general military training, but rather an empowerment training for service members of all pay grades,” said ITC(IW/SW) Bryan Hamel, SAPR point of contact for IWTC Corry Station. “Our students away walked from the training with new tactics on combating reprisal and condemnation. They learned they have a voice that can change lives.” Throughout the performances, Navy, Army and Air Force students were asked to give their thoughts on the situations portrayed and occasionally joined Praxis actors on stage to show how they would respond to potentially harmful behavior by

Teams from the Institute of Marine Mammal Studies keep a pygmy killer whale hydrated while they prepare it for release into the Gulf of Mexico July 11. Personnel from NOAA, Navy Marine Mammal program and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Cypress (WLB 210) participated in the mammal’s release. Photo by PO3 Lexie Preston

USCGC Cypress crew, NOAA, IMMS release pygmy killer whales From http://www.uscgnews.com/

NEW ORLEANS – Crewmembers of the Coast Guard Cutter Cypress (WLB 210) assisted the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies (IMMS) and National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in releasing two pygmy killer whales more than 60 miles off the coast of Gulfport, Miss., July 11. The two male pygmy killer whales were found stranded in a marsh near Waveland, Miss., by an an-

gler last year. They were rescued and transported to IMSS for rehabilitation. During rehabilitation, scientists learned about their health, behavior and how to care for this species in the future. “We are delighted to assist NOAA and IMMS in this release,” said Lt. j.g. Summer Dupler, CGC Cypress operations officer. “Assistance to wildlife in distress is part of the mission of the Coast Guard.” For more photos, go to https:// www. dvidshub. net/ image/ 2717663/pygmy-killer-whale-releases.

See SAPR on page 2

EBOA returns to the Navy’s only boot camp Story, photo by Scott A. Thornbloom Naval Service Training Command Public Affairs

GREAT LAKES, Ill. – Some of the U.S. Navy’s top senior enlisted leaders returned to Recruit Training Command (RTC) to tackle training issues, new innovations at the Navy’s only boot camp and determine how recruits can be developed into basically trained Sailors for a 21st Century Navy. The senior enlisted leadership return to boot camp was part of a two-day Enlisted Board of Advisors (EBOA) Conference July 19-20. The conference, hosted by Naval Service Training Command (NSTC) in the USS Iowa RTC headquarters complex, was an opportunity for the fleet, force and command master chiefs to return to boot camp and observe current recruit training. They also discussed policies, man-

Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) FORCM Mamudu Cole, observes recruits becoming familiar with the Navy’s 9mm Beretta pistol in the USS Missouri small arms marksmanship trainer at Recruit Training Command (RTC) July 20. Cole was visiting RTC as part of an Enlisted Board of Advisors (EBOA) Conference.

ning, military training, enlisted learning and development strategies for RTC. “It’s been over seven years since we have been able to get the Enlisted Board of Advisors in one place,” said Manpower,

Personnel, Training and Education FLTCM April Beldo. “This was an opportunity to reestablish it (EBOA) and give the senior enlisted leadership a chance to return to boot camp to see what is going on at RTC.”

U. S. Fleet Forces Command FLTCM Paul Kingsbury said the 2016 EBOA was being held because of NSTC’s initiative to create an online, crowd-sourcing interactive website game called “Recruit Reboot” using Massive

Multi-player Online War-game Leveraging the Internet (MMOWGLI). Recruit Reboot was open for three weeks in April-May 2016 to get input from the fleet on basic military training at RTC. “This one (EBOA) was obviously driven by MMOWGLI,” said Kingsbury. “I see some potential for this and future EBOAs. There are a few things I would like to discuss further at these EBOAs. I do like coming up here periodically to see the training being conducted and I like seeing how RTC is doing what they need to do in preparing the Sailors to be ready for warfighting scenarios at sea.” The master chiefs came from numerous commands in the Navy from the Atlantic and Pacific fleets to Naval Education and Training, Navy recruiting and the Navy Bureau See EBOA on page 2

Published by Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements constitute Department of the Navy, NAS Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing’s endorsement of products or services advertised.


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August 5, 2016

SAPR from page 1

Actors from Pure Praxis, a theater group contracted by the Department of the Navy’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO), perform for Sailors and Soldiers assigned to Information Warfare Training Command Corry Station during SAPR training aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola Corry Station. Photo by MC3 Taylor L. Jackson EBOA from page 1

of Medicine and Surgery. As part of her duties as president of the board, Beldo also represented the Chief of Naval Personnel. “It was an honor to host the EBOA Fleet and Force Master Chiefs. The time was extremely valuable to help with the continual process improvement that is a constant at RTC,” said RTC CMDCM Shawn Isbell. “The recommendations made at the EBOA were extremely constructive and I am confident that they will positively impact the future of our fleet.” The group was welcomed by the commanding officer of RTC, Capt. Doug Pfeifle, who asked the board to take back to the fleet and share with fleet and force commanders ways to improve the training of RTC and help further determine what is needed by the fleet when training and turning civilians into basically trained Sailors. “We must always be mindful of who we are bringing here, because we are the quarterdeck of the Navy and we have got to get it right the first time, every time,” Pfeifle said. The board was also welcomed by the NSTC commander, Rear Adm. Stephen C. Evans, via teleconference while on travel. “For you to take the time to do this important mission of taking a look at basic training is huge,” Evans said, who asked the board to really take a look at how RTC develops a basically trained Sailor. “Our customer is the fleet. You represent the fleet. Your feedback is truly valuable to us as far as how we are doing in finishing the product we are charged with producing.” Before sitting down and discussing any recommendations they would take back to the fleet and force commanders, the board had a chance to tour RTC and see the training. The first event was to witness recruits conducting the final evolution of their boot camp training – Battle Stations 21. Battle Stations 21 incorporates lessons learned from actual events, attacks and mishaps at sea. It is conducted on board USS Trayer (BST 21), a 210-foot-long Arleigh Burke-class destroyer simulator. Trayer was commissioned in 2007 and has been called the “E-ticket ride” at boot camp. It has stood ready, embarking more than 38,000 recruits each year, as the centerpiece of Battle Stations 21. The ship has never been to sea, never been on deployment or been in combat. But on many nights during the week, Navy engineers work to sink the ship while the Navy’s newest recruits fight to save it. Battle Stations is 12 hours and consists of 17 different scenarios of anything that can happen aboard a ship at sea from missile attacks that can cause fires to flooding caused by exploding undersea mines. There are also watches on the bridge and engineering scenarios, lookout scenarios, and mass casualty drills. While Battle Stations uses Navy history as a tool, today’s newest recruits understand the importance of the training they receive throughout their eight weeks at RTC. They also understand the training is preparing them for their night aboard Trayer and for later in the fleet. “I’m always fascinated when I come to Great Lakes,” said Naval Education and Training Command (NETC)

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fellow service members. “I thought the training was both informative and appealing,” said SA Felix Castillo, who actively participated in the training performance. “We got to see firsthand what could potentially happen when you step in and learn what techniques work best for you.” Anne Ballensinger, sexual assault response coordinator for FFSC, said they presented a total of nine shows in three locations over three days, including NAS Pensacola, Naval Hospital Pensacola and NASP Corry Station. “Events like this increase individual and collective awareness about how we can support survivors of sexual assault,”

FORCM Mamudu Cole. “We’re doing great stuff here. The instructors are all motivated and they are doing what is necessary to send a basically qualified Sailor out to the fleet.” The group also toured the USS Missouri small arms marksmanship trainer, the USS Wisconsin live fire indoor range and the USS Indianapolis combat training pool to see how the third class swim qualifications are conducted. They received an overview of recruit in-processing and toured uniform issue. They also toured many of the recruit barracks, set up like a ship with berthing compartments, classrooms, offices and galleys. “I love seeing and visiting with the recruits,” said Beldo. “I like to share with them the decision they made to join the Navy was definitely the right decision. The things that they will experience after they leave boot camp I tell them to take advantage of those experiences and the opportunities the Navy will have for them.” One of the newer training devices the board got to observe was a division of recruits working with e-tablets as part of their daily training curriculum. The e-tablets are part of an NSTC and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy initiative called eSailor. Currently the initiative is in an ongoing beta test that introduces e-tablets to a recruit division and allowing the recruits to use the devices to supplement their classroom training at RTC. The etablets contain RTC curriculum, training videos, Navy customs and traditions, Navy history, military ranks, Navy rates and access to professional development websites. “I was very impressed with the e-tablets,” said Navy Recruiting Command FORCM Eddie Knight. “We are definitely going in the right direction. I’m a big proponent of the e-tablets. I would like to see some of the programs

August 5, 2016

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community Commanding Officer — Capt. Christopher T. Martin Public Affairs Officer — Patrick J. Nichols The Gosport nameplate pays homage to the 100th anniversary of naval aviation in 2011: the Centennial of Naval Aviation, or CONA. The image on the left side of the nameplate depicts Eugene Ely taking off in a Curtiss pusher bi-plane from the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 18, 1911. While Ely had taken off from the USS Birmingham two months earlier after his plane had been loaded on the ship, the USS Pennsylvania event was the first time a plane landed on and then took off from a U.S. warship.

said Ballensinger. “This focus on recognizing retaliation, reprisal, and ostracism and the active participation in how to intervene in these situations that our service members practiced during these shows is what is needed for more survivors to come forward.” Cassandra Babcock, a Pure Praxis actor-advocate, said that engaging in the topic of sexual assault as a conversation rather than a lecture helps to break down the taboo surrounding the subject and allows for more open communication about what can be done to prevent sexual assault and improve advocacy for victims. “The interactive aspect of the training is key to its success,” said Cmdr. Christopher Eng, commanding officer of

The image on the right side is the Navy’s most modern fighter aircraft, the F-18 Super Hornet. Established in 1921 as the Air Station News, the name Gosport was adopted in 1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by flight instructors in the early days of naval aviation to give instructions and directions to their students. The name “Gosport” was derived from Gosport, England (originally God’s Port), where the voice tube was invented. Gosport is an authorized newspaper published every Friday by Ballinger Publishing,

GOSPORT

IWTC Corry Station. “By immersing the junior Sailors into the scenarios with the actors, it tested their techniques and allowed everyone to evaluate their approach to the situation.” Information Warfare Training Command Corry Station, as part of the Center for Information Warfare Training, provides a continuum of training to Navy and joint service personnel that prepares them to conduct information warfare across the full spectrum of military operations. For more news from Center for Information Warfare Training enterprise, visit www. navy. mil/ local/ cid/, www. netc. navy. mil/centers/ceninfodom/, www.facebook.com/NavyCIWT, or www.twitter.com/ NavyCIWT.

on the e-tablets as an app that Navy Recruiting can provide to the young men and women joining the Navy. To get them ready for boot camp.” Many of the board members were very excited to talk with the recruits, answer their questions and hear their opinions. “We have a lot of hospital corpsman recruits going through here,” said the Bureau of Navy Medicine FORCM Terry Prince. “It’s fun to just talk to them. We’re the biggest rate (hospital corpsman) in the Navy and the chance to meet them here at boot camp is pretty exciting.” The board also got to see RTC’s largest structure, the 173,000-square-foot, three-story Freedom Hall physical fitness facility. Freedom Hall is where recruits train and take their three Physical Fitness Assessments (PFAs) during boot camp. The group also observed where the recruits learn to fight fires, stop flooding and properly wear a gas mask in the appropriately named USS Chief fire fighter trainer. “It’s really important to have the EBOA here periodically,” said Prince. “It gets the fleet in here and gets them to understand what RTC is doing and then we can take it back to our superiors and tell them what is going on and also we get a chance to make inputs in the training.” The inputs and discussions came in afternoon sessions on both days. The group agreed to take many things back to their parent commands to discuss with their superiors and with their senior enlisted. For more news from Naval Service Training Command, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/greatlakes/, http://www.netc.navy.mil/nstc/ or http://www.facebook.com/NavalServiceTraining/. For more news from Naval Service Training Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/greatlakes/.

314 N. Spring St.- Suite A, Pensacola, Fl. 32501, in the interest of military and civilian personnel and their families aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Saufley Field and Corry Station. Editorial and news material is compiled by the Public Affairs Office, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-1051. All news releases and related materials should be mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hallford@navy.mil. National news sources are American Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News Service (NNS), Air Force News Service (AFNS), News USA and North American Precis Syndicate (NAPS). Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Defense, United States Navy, officials of the Naval Air Station Pensacola, or Ballinger Publishing. All advertising, including classified ads, is arranged through Ballinger Publishing. Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to rank, rate, race, creed, color, national origin or sex of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection of this policy of equal opportunities by an advertiser will result in the refusal of future advertising from that source.

For classified ads, call: (850) 433-1166, ext. 29 For commercial advertising: Becky Hildebrand (850) 433-1166, ext. 31 Becky@ballingerpublishing.com Visit Us On The Web At: Ballinger Publishing.Com Mail To: Gosport, NAS Pensacola, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, Pensacola, FL 32508-1051

Gosport Editor

Scott Hallford 452-4466 scott.hallford@navy.mil Gosport Associate Editor

Mike O’Connor 452-2165 michael.f.o’connor.ctr@navy.mil Gosport Staff Writer

Janet Thomas 452-4419 janet.thomas.ctr@navy.mil


August 5, 2016

GOSPORT

COMMENTARY

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Frazzled retirement event planner deserves a kiss By Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist

M

y husband, Francis, is truly extraordinary. And no one knows it better than he does.

Some men humbly avoid excess attention and accolades of praise. But not Francis. He prefers the limelight, and finds no shame in celebrating himself. So, several months ago, when he announced that he would transition out of the military after 28 years of service, he knew he wanted to plan a spectacular retirement event that would match his exceptional personality. While I expected Francis to dictate the details of the program for the retirement ceremony, I thought that he would naturally want to leave much of the minutia of the after-party – food, drink, decorations, music, etc. – to me as his more domestic partner. But early on, when I suggested a modest guest list and affordable catering at our house, Francis scoffed. I soon realized that, although he would stand before the throngs of well wishers at

How to submit a commentary

the retirement ceremony and tell them “we are a team,” he had no intention of leaving any of the planning to me. I would have been perfectly happy setting up borrowed folding tables in our back yard, but before I knew it, Francis had signed a contract with a professional company for a 60-foot rental tent that included lights, a dance floor and tables. He met with musicians, security personnel, caterers, photographers, bartenders for hire and the members of a steel drum band. He stayed up late night after night, picking the format for the program, selecting photographs for a slideshow, writing his speech, and going over the 10-page guest list spreadsheet. As if a one-day retirement event wasn’t enough, Francis also rented three tailgating spaces and two shade tents at the local polo

About the columnist Lisa Smith Molinari, mother of three, has been a military spouse for more than 20 years. She also writes columns for Military Spouse magazine and a blog at w w w. t h e m e a t a n d potatoesoflife.com. She and her family are currently stationed at Naval Station Newport in Rhode Island. grounds, and invited our guests to continue the celebration at the polo match the next day. While worrying that Francis was draining our chil-

dren’s college accounts to pay for everything, I began to realize that planning his military retirement event was very similar to planning a wedding. I warned our youngest daughter, Lilly, who was turning 16 a few days before the ceremony, that she might get overlooked. “Go watch the movie ‘Sixteen Candles’…” I told her, “… you’re Molly Ringwald and your dad is the bride.” And just like a bride to be, Francis soon became frazzled with all the details. A cousin said she would cancel unless Francis could find a suitable kennel for her dog, friends announced they were bringing uninvited guests, no one ordered bowls for the bisque, the tent company needed more electrical outlets, the caterers asked that we provide a floral arrangement for the dessert table, and the weather report called for thunderstorms. The most popular lastminute questions that came in from guests were “What the hell is ‘business casual’ anyway?” and, even though detailed maps went out with the invitations, “Can you

give me directions to the event?” “I have got to get my hair cut,” Francis barked the morning before the event while I tried to keep up with him on a power-walk around the base. “And please do not let me forget to ask the caterers if they are supplying the cutlery. I still need to wrap the highball glasses I bought for Father Joe, and borrow two more chest coolers for the polo match. Do you think I should play the slideshow before or after my speech? ” When I asked him what I could do to help, he gave me the following list: “1. Charge the camcorder, and 2. Pick out your outfit.” Fortunately, I really don’t mind that Francis is planning the entire event without me. In fact, as long as we don’t go broke, I am pleased as punch about it. Besides, unlike some weddings, a military retirement ceremony only happens once in a lifetime, and after 28 years of dedication, sacrifice and service to our country, Francis deserves to have the celebration he has always dreamed about. And I will be the first one to kiss the bride.

Commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as official government, Navy or command policy statements. Reader submissions are welcome but should not exceed 800 words. Submissions must be bylined and include a daytime phone number or e-mail contact for the writer. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with policy and standards. Send commentary submissions to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil.


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August 5, 2016

GOSPORT GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE NAS Pensacola Emergency Management Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785 For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; 911 for NASP Police; non-emergency 452-8387

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida 432-7601 http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy http://www.Ready.Navy.mil

NAS Whiting Field 911 for Emergency Center Emergency Management (850) 623-7324

Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/

NASP Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618

Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/

NETPDTC Saufley Field Main gate 452-1628

Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Florida Division of Emergency Management (850) 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.myescambia.com/beready Santa Rosa County Emergency Management (850) 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

HURRICANE CATEGORIES TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph NAS Pensacola

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.fl.gov Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/ 474-5300 to report gas leak/emergency Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com

August 5, 2016

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The time for hurricane preparedness is now: #ItOnlyTakesOne #HurricaneStrong From http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com

It only takes one storm to change your life and community, as it did in 2004 for NAS Pensacola, with Hurricane Ivan’s strike on the Gulf Coast. “NOAA pointed out the forecast uncertainty,” NASP Emergency Manager Burt Fenters said earlier in the season. “This year could be problematic. Early storm development (such as Tropical Storm Bonnie) makes you wonder how this season will go.” Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destructive phenomena. If you live in an area prone to tropical cyclones, you need to be prepared. Even areas well away from the coastline can be threatened by dangerous flooding, destructive winds and tornadoes from these storms. The National Hurricane Center issues watches, warnings, forecasts, and analyses of hazardous tropical weather. Hurricane hazards: The primary hazards from hurricanes are storm surge flooding, inland flooding from heavy rains, destructive winds, tornadoes, and high surf and rip currents. While hurricanes pose the greatest threat to life and property, tropical storms and depressions can also be devastating. Flooding from heavy rains can cause extensive damage and loss of life. For example, Tropical Storm Allison produced more than 40 inches of rain in the Houston area in 2001, causing about $5 billion in damage and taking the lives of 41 people. Storm surge has the potential to cause the largest loss of life in hurricanes. Since 1963,

storm surge has caused nearly half of the deaths in the United States in tropical cyclones. Water, not wind, has accounted for nearly 90 percent of all tropical cyclone deaths in the U.S. during that time. Storm surge is dangerous because a mere six inches of fast-moving flood water can knock over an adult. It takes only two feet of rushing water to carry away most vehicles – including large pickup trucks and SUVs. Tornadoes are also common with landfalling tropical systems. In recorded history, almost every tropical storm and hurricane that has come onshore in the U.S. has produced a tornado. These tornadoes most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in the storm’s rainbands, well away from the center of the hurricane. Strong winds of a tropical cyclone can also cause dangerous waves that pose a significant hazard to mariners and coastal residents and visitors. When the waves break along the coast, they can produce deadly rip currents – even at large distances from the storm. In 2008, despite the fact that Hurricane Bertha was more than a 1,000 miles offshore, the storm resulted in rip currents that killed three people along the New Jersey coast and required 1,500 lifeguard rescues in Ocean City, Md., during a one week period. The time to prepare is now: What should you do to prepare for a hurricane? Get a plan. The most important step is to identify your hurricane risk. Do you live in an evacuation zone? If so, you need to plan on where you and your family would ride out the storm if you are told to evacuate.

Most people only need to evacuate a few miles from the coast to avoid the dangers of storm surge. Find a friend or relative that lives outside the storm surge evacuation zone and have a plan to ride out the storm with them. You should also establish a family communications plan in case you are not together when you need to evacuate. Once a person understands their risk for hurricane impacts, an appropriate disaster safety plan should be developed to help ensure an individual’s and a family’s safety. A disaster safety plan is a comprehensive plan that identifies all of the steps a family needs to take before, during and after a disaster to ensure maximum personal safety and property protection. For a step-by-step guide on creating a family disaster plan see Florida’s “Get a Plan” guide. Citizens should also visit their State Emergency Management Agency websites for family disaster plan templates that may be more suited to a local area. Coastal residents should go to their local emergency managers for evacuation zone information. This information is typically available online. A county-by-county list of evacuation zone resources is available at: http://flash.org/ hurricane-season/ evacuation-zones/ Evacuation_Zone_Identification_Survey.pdf. Vital resources to help you prepare include: Hurricanes.gov, which provides critical hurricane advisories and marine forecasts. Weather.gov for the latest forecasts for your part of the country. And Ready.gov for additional preparedness information.

Storm names for 2016 Alex Bonn ie Colin Danielle Earl Fion a Gaston Herm ine Ian J ulia Ka rl L is a Matth ew Nico le Otto Pau la Ric hard Sh ar y Tob ias Virgin ie Walter

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August 5, 2016

GOSPORT GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE NAS Pensacola Emergency Management Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785 For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; 911 for NASP Police; non-emergency 452-8387

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida 432-7601 http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy http://www.Ready.Navy.mil

NAS Whiting Field 911 for Emergency Center Emergency Management (850) 623-7324

Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/

NASP Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618

Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/

NETPDTC Saufley Field Main gate 452-1628

Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Florida Division of Emergency Management (850) 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.myescambia.com/beready Santa Rosa County Emergency Management (850) 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

HURRICANE CATEGORIES TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph NAS Pensacola

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.fl.gov Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/ 474-5300 to report gas leak/emergency Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com

August 5, 2016

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The time for hurricane preparedness is now: #ItOnlyTakesOne #HurricaneStrong From http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com

It only takes one storm to change your life and community, as it did in 2004 for NAS Pensacola, with Hurricane Ivan’s strike on the Gulf Coast. “NOAA pointed out the forecast uncertainty,” NASP Emergency Manager Burt Fenters said earlier in the season. “This year could be problematic. Early storm development (such as Tropical Storm Bonnie) makes you wonder how this season will go.” Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destructive phenomena. If you live in an area prone to tropical cyclones, you need to be prepared. Even areas well away from the coastline can be threatened by dangerous flooding, destructive winds and tornadoes from these storms. The National Hurricane Center issues watches, warnings, forecasts, and analyses of hazardous tropical weather. Hurricane hazards: The primary hazards from hurricanes are storm surge flooding, inland flooding from heavy rains, destructive winds, tornadoes, and high surf and rip currents. While hurricanes pose the greatest threat to life and property, tropical storms and depressions can also be devastating. Flooding from heavy rains can cause extensive damage and loss of life. For example, Tropical Storm Allison produced more than 40 inches of rain in the Houston area in 2001, causing about $5 billion in damage and taking the lives of 41 people. Storm surge has the potential to cause the largest loss of life in hurricanes. Since 1963,

storm surge has caused nearly half of the deaths in the United States in tropical cyclones. Water, not wind, has accounted for nearly 90 percent of all tropical cyclone deaths in the U.S. during that time. Storm surge is dangerous because a mere six inches of fast-moving flood water can knock over an adult. It takes only two feet of rushing water to carry away most vehicles – including large pickup trucks and SUVs. Tornadoes are also common with landfalling tropical systems. In recorded history, almost every tropical storm and hurricane that has come onshore in the U.S. has produced a tornado. These tornadoes most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in the storm’s rainbands, well away from the center of the hurricane. Strong winds of a tropical cyclone can also cause dangerous waves that pose a significant hazard to mariners and coastal residents and visitors. When the waves break along the coast, they can produce deadly rip currents – even at large distances from the storm. In 2008, despite the fact that Hurricane Bertha was more than a 1,000 miles offshore, the storm resulted in rip currents that killed three people along the New Jersey coast and required 1,500 lifeguard rescues in Ocean City, Md., during a one week period. The time to prepare is now: What should you do to prepare for a hurricane? Get a plan. The most important step is to identify your hurricane risk. Do you live in an evacuation zone? If so, you need to plan on where you and your family would ride out the storm if you are told to evacuate.

Most people only need to evacuate a few miles from the coast to avoid the dangers of storm surge. Find a friend or relative that lives outside the storm surge evacuation zone and have a plan to ride out the storm with them. You should also establish a family communications plan in case you are not together when you need to evacuate. Once a person understands their risk for hurricane impacts, an appropriate disaster safety plan should be developed to help ensure an individual’s and a family’s safety. A disaster safety plan is a comprehensive plan that identifies all of the steps a family needs to take before, during and after a disaster to ensure maximum personal safety and property protection. For a step-by-step guide on creating a family disaster plan see Florida’s “Get a Plan” guide. Citizens should also visit their State Emergency Management Agency websites for family disaster plan templates that may be more suited to a local area. Coastal residents should go to their local emergency managers for evacuation zone information. This information is typically available online. A county-by-county list of evacuation zone resources is available at: http://flash.org/ hurricane-season/ evacuation-zones/ Evacuation_Zone_Identification_Survey.pdf. Vital resources to help you prepare include: Hurricanes.gov, which provides critical hurricane advisories and marine forecasts. Weather.gov for the latest forecasts for your part of the country. And Ready.gov for additional preparedness information.

Storm names for 2016 Alex Bonn ie Colin Danielle Earl Fion a Gaston Herm ine Ian J ulia Ka rl L is a Matth ew Nico le Otto Pau la Ric hard Sh ar y Tob ias Virgin ie Walter

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August 5, 2016

GOSPORT

NASWF commissary named top small commissary in U.S. By Jay Cope NAS Whiting Field PAO

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aval Air Station Whiting Field’s (NASWF) commissary recently earned recognition as the top small commissary in the United States from the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA). The Richard M. Paget Award honors the best small commissary in the armed forces across a selection of grading criteria – customer satisfaction, sales, safety and more. Commissary Directory Joseph H. Jeu praised the team for their superior performance. “Considering the hard work you put forth to achieve this award, your efforts are truly commendable,” he said in his letter congratulating the staff. “Thank you for all you do on a daily basis to ensure the military community in your area receives the highest quality service from the commissary benefit.” The crystal trophy will maintain a place of honor in the commissary in the trophy case next to the exit. Additionally, next to the display behind Register One the commissary staff will post the congratulatory letter from Jeu. Receiving the award was bitter-sweet due to the recent passing of the store manager under whose leadership the award was earned. The commissary staff created the

NAS Whiting Field commissary employees celebrate their recent Richard M. Paget Award win for best small commissary. Photo courtesy of NAS Whiting Field commissary.

display of photographs to honor Kristen Linn’s memory and will keep the letter with the display to recognize her dedicated leadership to the team. “It is very exciting for the store to earn the award,” Grocery Department Manager Dawn Schultz stated. “The saddest part is that it would have been great to celebrate with (Kristen). She did a lot of work to prepare the award.” Schultz emphasized that the comments on the action

line were undoubtedly one of the key reasons the staff was chosen. According to her, at most stores, the line is used to make complaints, but the Whiting Field store gets three or four comments a week, and they are nearly all positive. “We are here for our patrons and we work hard to provide great service,” she said. The commissary last earned the Paget Award in 2004.

Sailor is first to meritoriously advance to next rank at NASWF Story, photo by Ens. Marissa Tungjunyatham NASWF Public Affairs

AB2 Corey Montford’s hard work came to fruition when the Naval Air Station Whiting Field (NASWF) Commanding Officer Capt. Todd Bahlau, awarded him with immediate advancement to first class petty officer through the Meritorious Advancement Program (MAP) at the installation’s Midfield Hangar July 6. Montford was the very first Sailor at NAS Whiting Field to promote through this program. MAP is designed to give commanding officers the authority to recognize the superior work of their best Sailors and advance eligible Seaman, petty of-

AB2 Corey Montford receives his official promotion to first class July 6. He is the first Sailor at Naval Air Station Whiting Field to receive a promotion through the Meritorious Advancement Program. He stands with AB1 Terrance Wever, left, who pinned on his first class collar devices, and NAS Whiting Field Commanding Officer, Capt. Todd Bahlau, right.

ficer third class, and petty officer second class Sailors to the next higher paygrade. Previously only available to operational commands, the Navy announced policy updates April 19 expanding program eligibility to shore

commands. “I’m proud of him,” Bahlau stated to Montford’s assembled shipmates, “This just shows what hard work will do for you. (He) is mentor you need to latch onto.” Montford has proven to

be an exceptional manager. As the assistant training officer, he spearheaded about 1,100 professional training hours, inputted more than 2,500 reports in the National Fire Incident Reports System (NIFRS), and documented more than 100 respirator user training requirements into the Enterprise Safety Applications Management System (ESAMS) completely error free. He managed and traced 135 Department of Defense (DoD) certification packages for 102 firefighters and facilitated almost 900 live fire exercise hours, meeting 100 percent command readiness. He also has made a huge impact on the command. As a certified fire inspector, he assisted in the command zone inspec-

tions and enforced state code and National Fire Protection Association standards. In addition, he worked as an assistant command fitness leader, in which he personally directed 12 command Fitness Enhance Program (FEP) sessions, decreasing Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) failures by six percent. As the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) manager, his diligence and attention to detail led to the command raising funds for the program, exceeding region goals. To further help his fellow Sailors, Montford also devoted almost 100 hours with the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response victim’s advocate helpline. During his off-duty hours, Montford assisted in operation of the city’s

youth basketball program at the Milton Community Center. He also volunteered to help the community in beautification projects and fundraising to give back to the local people. This dedication to the public strengthened the command and local community bond. On top of his work on and off duty, Montford earned an associate’s degree in fire science with honors while attending Columbia Southern University. For all that he has accomplished, Montford was most thankful for his peers. “I appreciate you all pushing me,” Montford said to them, “Without you all, I couldn’t have done this. Don’t let anybody tell you ‘no’ − Just keep trying.”

www.gosportpensacola.com


August 5, 2016

PARTYLINE

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GOSPORT

School physicals available at NHP

In preparation for the beginning of the school year, Naval Hospital Pensacola (NHP) will present its final School/Sports Physical Rodeo from 8 a.m. to noon tomorrow, Aug. 6, at the NHP Family Medicine Clinic. Appointments are needed and can be made by calling NHP Family Medicine at 505-7120. The rodeo is available to anyone enrolled to NHP’s Family Medicine Clinic and is an easy and convenient way to complete school and sports physicals. Physical exams are available for children ages 4 and older and any school-age children including students new to the area. For more information, call 5057120.

Marines visit to focus on manpower

The annual Manpower Management Officer Assignments (MMOA) branch visit to the Marine Corps’ major commands has kicked off. The Pensacola area will be the second stop on the tour throughout the United States and Japan. Area stops for the MMOA Roadshow are scheduled for Aug. 8 at NAS Whiting Field (NASWF) and Aug. 9 at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Each visit begins with an all-officer manpower overview brief to provide commanders and officers with the most up-to-date information on assignments, retention, career designation, promotions and command selection. The briefing is scheduled for 8 a.m. Aug. 8 at the NASWF base auditorium. Immediately following the all-officer brief, personal interviews will be conducted by aviation and ground monitors. To schedule interviews at NASWF, Marines should e-mail Sonja. presley@navy.mil or call (850) 623-7147.

Relationship training program available The NAS Pensacola chaplain’s office is offering the Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program (PREP) 8.0 training designed to teach couples communication skills and ground rules for handling conflict; it also promotes intimacy. Training sessions are scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. today, Aug. 5, at the J.B. McKamey Center, Bldg. 634, NAS Pensacola. The sessions are open to any active duty member and spouse or fiancée. Civilian DoD employees and retired military are also welcome. For more information, call 452-2093, or e-mail CREDO facilitator Tony Bradford at tony.bradford.ctr@navy.mil.

Fill a bag with books at library sale

The Friends of West Florida Public Library will present a $5 Blowout Bag Sale at the main library, 239 North Spring St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow, Aug. 6. For $5 you can take home all the books you can fit inside a brown paper bag. You can buy as many bags as you want. Contributions will support the West Florida Public Library’s efforts to build the community and improve literacy. For more information, go to http://friendsofwfpl.org/.

Antarctic explorers scheduled to meet

Members of the Gulf Coast Group Chapter of the Old Antarctic Explorers Association (OAEA) will meet at noon tomorrow, Aug. 6, at Rico Mexican restaurant, 830 North Navy Blvd. All members, family, or interested parties who have been to Antarctica or who may have an interest in Antarctica are welcome. For more information, call 456-3556.

Food donation campaign underway

The 2016 Feds Feed Families started June 1 and continues through Aug. 31. Non-perishable food donations can be placed in collection boxes around the base and at the NASP Commissary, 5800 West Highway 98, and at various commands around the base. Donation boxes are located at NAS Pensacola Command Headquarters, Naval Air Technical Training Center, Naval Hospital Pensacola and NASP Corry Station. For more information on the campaign, go to www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid= feds-feed-families. For details on drop-off locations or other local information, contact the NASP Chaplain’s Office at 452-2341.

Series includes three bridge runs

Pensacola Sports, along with the Capt’n Fun Runners (Bushwacker 5K) and the Bridge to Bridge 5K, is presenting the 850 Bridge Run Series for a second year. The series kicks off with the Bushwacker 5K, benefiting Big Brothers Big Sisters, tomorrow, Aug. 6. The Bridge to Bridge 5K is scheduled for Oct. 15. The final event is the Pensacola Double Bridge Run, which is scheduled for Feb. 4, 2017. For more information and to register for each event, go to www.850bridgeseries.com.

Partyline submissions

Vet outreach campaign continues Department of Veterans Affairs Vet Center staff members along with the Mobile Vet Center outreach vehicle, will offer free readjustment counseling services to interested veterans and active duty during August. Here are the dates and locations of events in the Pensacola area (times are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. unless otherwise denoted): • Aug. 10-11: Blue Angels practice, 1750 Radford Blvd., NAS Pensacola. • Aug. 25: University of West Florida, Back to School Event, Military and Veterans Resource Center, 11000 University Parkway. • Aug. 25: Heroes Among Us speaker series, Pensacola Veterans Memorial Park, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information on services, call the Pensacola Vet Center at 456-5886 or go to www.vetcenter.va.gov.

Two school employees to be roasted

Escambia Christian School, 3311 West Moreno St., has scheduled a Roast & Toast event tomorrow, Aug. 6, in honor of two longtime employees, Robert and Karen Akers. All profits will go to the launching of the Akers’ Scholarship Fund. In August, Robert Akers will begin his 38th year and Karen Akers will begin her 36th year at the school. The event will be held in the school gym. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. and dinner will be served at 6 p.m. Tickets are $25 per person. Make checks payable to: Escambia Christian School and mail to 906 West Michigan Ave., Pensacola, FL 32505. The deadline for reservations is July 30. For more information, contact Billy Morris at 417-2919.

Jacksonian ceremony being conducted

The inaugural Jacksonian Guard Colors Ceremony will be conducted each Saturday through Sept. 3 in Plaza Ferdinand. A student-only re-enactment group has been assembled to perform the ceremony, which will features soldiers, fifers and drummers performing in period 1821 uniforms. For more information, call 466-5220.

Jazz event includes special honors

Where Are My Sisters (WAMS) is presenting an Inspired to Inspire Evening of Honors and Jazz at 4 p.m. Aug. 27 at the Mustin Beach Club at Naval Air Station Pensacola. “American Idol” finalist La Porsha Renae will be the keynote speaker and she is scheduled to perform. Other performers will include the local jazz band Groove Symphony and Alicia Waters. Heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served. Ladies and organizations scheduled to be honored include Mamie Hixon, Rishy Studer, Sarah Banner and the Junior League of Pensacola. Tickets are $45, and a portion of the proceeds will benefit Favor House or Northwest Florida, a domestic violence center. For more information, contact Terri Marshall at 554-4942 or go to https://www.facebook.com/ Where-Are-My-Sisters-119884781415419.

Small business workshop announced

The Florida Small Business Development Center at (FSBDC) at the University of West Florida (UWF) is presenting “Business Planning for Success” from 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 16 at the Greater Pensacola Chamber, 117 West Garden St. Attendees will discover the key components and the basics of writing a business plan. Fee is $40 for the public. Pre-registration is recommended. To register, call 474-2528. For more information, go to www. sbdc.uwf.edu and click on “training opportunities.”

Workshops teach suicide prevention

A SafeTALK workshop is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Aug. 18 at the J.B. McKamey Center classrooms, Bldg. 634. The workshop prepares helpers to identify persons with thoughts of suicide and connect them to first aid resources. The workshops feature videos that illustrate responses. Participants will be better able to: • Move beyond common tendencies to miss, dismiss or avoid talking about suicide. • Identify people who have thoughts of suicide and talk to them about suicide. • Apply the TALK steps (Tell, Ask, Listen, and Keep Safe) to connect to a person with thoughts of suicide to a first aid intervention caregiver. The workshops are open to active-duty, DoD and civilian employees at NAS Pensacola, NASP Corry Station, Saufley Field and NAS Whiting Field.

For more information or to register, call the NAS Pensacola Chaplain’s office at 452-2093 or e-mail CREDO facilitator Tony Bradford at tony.bradford.ctr@navy.mil.

Troy University registration underway

Registration for classes for Term I (Aug. 15 to Oct. 16) at Troy University ends Aug 14. The application deadline is today, Aug. 5. The school offers a variety of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs online as well as a classroombased master of science of counseling and psychology in class at the Pensacola Support Center, 2114 Airport Blvd., Suites 1150/1250. For more information on classes and military and family scholarships, call 287-4102 or e-mail Rob Morrison at jrmorrison@troy.edu.

DoD planning virtual education fair

The Department of Defense (DoD) Voluntary Education Program will present its second pilot DoD virtual education fair from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 11 in an effort to help make higher education more accessible to service members, veterans and family members. Registration is required to participate and is open at www.dodeducationfair.com. Registration will be open throughout the event providing participants anywhere in the world access to benefits and information necessary to reach their educational goals. To ensure connectivity, participants are encouraged to use mobile devices, if unable to access the event via government computers.

CREDO resiliency workshop offered

A Personal Resiliency Workshop is being offered Aug. 25 by the Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) Southeast. The workshop will help foster your personal holistic growth including physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual aspects. The workshop will take place at the J.B. McKamey Center classrooms, Bldg. 634. Active-duty service members (including reservists in active status) and their spouses are eligible to attend. For more information or to register, contact CREDO facilitator Tony Bradford at 452-2093 or by e-mail at tony.bradford.ctr@navy.mil.

Students can register for fall at PSC

Registration is open for fall term at Pensacola State College (PSC). Classes begin Aug. 15. Students may register online at www.pensacola state.edu or visit any PSC location. Fall term options include: Session A, Aug. 15Dec. 9; Session B, Aug. 15-Oct. 10; Session C, Sept. 6-Dec. 9; and Session D, Oct. 11-Dec. 9. For more information, call the PSC Admissions and Information Center at 484-2544.

Golf tournament scheduled for Aug. 13 The John Barrett Memorial Golf Tournament is scheduled for Aug. 13 at Indian Bayou Golf Club in Destin. Registration begins at 11 a.m. and lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. A shotgun start (four-person scramble) is scheduled for 1 p.m. Cost is $125 each or $500 for team of four. Proceeds will benefit the William Gabriel Barrett Scholarship Fund. For more information or to register, contact Matt Williams at (850) 598-6461 or jbgolftournament@gmail.com.

Japanese celebration to be Sept. 10

The 2016 Bon Fest is scheduled for noon to 4 p.m. Sept. 10 at Booker T. Washington High School, 6000 College Parkway. The event will feature Japanese food, dancing, fun and activities. The Matsuriza Taiko Drummers from EPCOT Center are scheduled to perform. Admission is free. For more information, contact Kumiko Curtis at 452-9599 or 501-1705 (e-mail, Kumiko.curtis@nexweb.org) or Hatsue Miki at 6024385 (e-mail, hatsuemiki@gmail.com).

NASP luncheon to honor ombudsmen

Ombudsman Appreciation Day is Sept. 14 and the NAS Pensacola Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) has planned a luncheon to recognize the spouses who volunteer their time in support of military families. The ombudsman appreciation luncheon is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 21 at Mustin Beach Club. Tickets are $14 at the door. Reservation deadline is Sept. 13. For more information or to make reservations, call Paul Maxwell at 452-5618.

USS Lexington reunion in September

The annual reunion for the USS Lexington (CV 16) is scheduled for Sept. 12-15 in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. All past ship’s company, air wings, Marines and their families are welcome. For more information, go to usslexington cv16.com or contact Bob Dimonte by e-mail at bobdimo@cox.net or by phone at 492-3483.

You can submit information for possible publication in Partyline by sending an e-mail to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil. Submissions must include the organization’s name and details about events including times, dates, locations and any costs involved. Contact information also is required. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with established standards. Items should be submitted at least one week in advance. The deadline is noon Friday for the next week’s publication.


August 5, 2016

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WHAT ARE YOU MADE OF? Teens have the power to create impact beyond themselves. What will you discover in the process? Visit MYCHAINREACTION.ORG

RYAN [16] PSC KIDS COLLEGE SUMMER CAMP


SECTION

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August 5, 2016

GOSPORT

UWF Military and Veterans Resource Center establishes new scholarships; See page B2 Spotlight

Children will begin classes Aug. 10

Ready, set, GO ... Back to school School zones surround NASP: slow down, watch for children From National Safety Council

chool buses are one of the safest forms of transportation on the road today. In fact, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, riding a bus to school is 13 times safer than riding in a passenger vehicle and 10 times safer than walking to school.

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The reality of school bus safety is that more children are hurt outside the bus than inside as passengers. Most of the children who lose their lives in bus-related crashes are pedestrians, 4 to 7 years old, who are hit by the bus or by motorists illegally passing a stopped school bus. For this reason, it is necessary to know the proper laws and procedures for sharing the road safely with school buses: • All 50 states have a law making it illegal to pass a School buses and children are sharing the roadways in Escambia county starting Aug. 10 – slow down and be on school bus that is stopped to load or unload children. the lookout for them. • School buses use yellow flashing lights to alert moSharing the road safely with child pedestrians torists that they are preparing to stop to load or unload • Children are the least predictable pedestrians and the children. Red flashing lights and an extended stop sign All drivers need to recognize the special safety needs most difficult to see. Take extra care to look out for chilarm signals to motorists that the bus is stopped and chil- of pedestrians, especially those that are children. Young, dren not only in school zones, but also in residential areas, dren are getting on or off the bus. elderly, disabled and intoxicated pedestrians are the most playgrounds and parks. • All 50 states require that traffic in both directions stop frequent victims in auto-pedestrian collisions. Generally, • Don’t honk your horn, rev your engine or do anything on undivided roadways when students are entering or ex- pedestrians have the right-of-way at all intersections; how- to rush or scare a pedestrian in front of your car, even if iting a school bus. ever, regardless of the rules of the road or right-of- you have the legal right-of-way. Sharing the road safely with child bicyclists • While state laws vary on what is required way, you as a driver are obligated to exercise on a divided roadway, in all cases, traffic begreat care and extreme caution to avoid strikOn most roadways, bicyclists have the same rights and hind the school bus (traveling in the same ing pedestrians. responsibilities as other roadway users and often share the direction) must stop. • Drivers should not block the crosswalk same lane, but bicycles can be hard to see. The riders are • The area 10 feet around a school bus is when stopped at a red light or waiting to exposed and easily injured in a collision. Oncoming biwhere children are in the most danger of make a turn. Do not stop with a portion of cycle traffic is often overlooked and its speed misjudged. being hit. Stop your car far enough from the your vehicle over the crosswalk. Blocking the Children riding bicycles create special problems for drivbus to allow children the necessary space to crosswalk forces pedestrians to go around your ers because they are not capable of proper judgment in safely enter and exit the bus. vehicle and puts them in a dangerous situation. determining traffic conditions. • Be alert. Children are unpredictable. Children walk• In a school zone when a warning flasher or flashers When passing a bicyclist proceeding in the same diing to or from their bus are usually very comfortable with are blinking, you must stop to yield the right-of-way to a rection, do so slowly and leave at least a distance between their surroundings. This makes them more likely to take pedestrian crossing the roadway within a marked cross- you and the bicycle of no less than three feet. Maintain risks, ignore hazards or fail to look both ways when cross- walk or at an intersection with no marked crosswalk. this clearance until you have safely passed the bicycle. ing the street. • Always stop when directed to do so by a school pa• The most common causes of collisions are drivers • Never pass a school bus on the right. It is illegal and trol sign, school patrol officer or designated crossing turning left in front of an oncoming bicycle or turning could have tragic consequences. guard. right, across the path of the bicycle. • When your vehicle is turning left and there is a bicyclist entering the intersection from the opposite direction, you should wait for the bicyclist to pass before making From NAPS work. the turn. 4. Review your notes nightly. This reinforces • If your vehicle is turning right and a bicyclist is apIf you’re among the 37 million the Census Bureau what you’ve learned, so you’ll need less time and ef- proaching on the right, let the bicyclist go through the insays has a family member in school or the roughly 6 fort right before a test. You’ll also be ready if you get tersection first before making a right turn. Remember to million with one in college, these tips could help im- called on in class or have to take a pop quiz. always use your turn signals. prove your student’s chances of making the grade. 5. Get homework help. There are many apps out • Watch for bicycle riders turning in front of you withHigh school and college students should: there that can help students solve the toughest home- outlooking or signaling, especially if the rider is a child. 1. Make a to-do list every day. Put things that are work problems. Dictionary and atlas apps are also • Take extra precautions in school zones and neighmost important at the top, do them first and check great resources. Got deadlines? There are apps for borhood areas where children and teenagers might be ridthem off. mangaing those, too. ing. 2. Use spare minutes wisely. Get some reading 6. Maximize current programs: Many comput• Watch out for bikes coming out of driveways or from done while you’re standing in a line, commuting on ers come with online safety programs. Parents can behind parked cars or other obstructions. a bus or train or waiting for something to start. use “Parental Controls” in Windows and Mac oper• Check side mirrors for bicyclists before opening the3. Find the right time to study. You’ll work more ating systems and the like for monitoring and man- door. Some communities may fine drivers for collisions efficiently if you figure out when you do your best aging what children view online. caused by opening a vehicle door in the path of a bicyclist.

A quick study guide for better grades

Word Search ‘Summer grilling’ H F M L W A R M X E A W A A L D B A U M V E N A K R W H K Y

M V M U L Y S I J O E J G O J

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T N Y C Y L D E S R C R A D P

W R E B R S E Q X E N P A R J

BURGERS CHARCOAL CHICKEN CORN FLAME

K G C K U W J Y R P Z L A H Z

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Gosling Games Color Me ‘On the bus’

Jokes & Groaners A new crop of bad jokes, part II ... You can't come in here without a tie: A man walked into a restaurant and was stopped immediately by the manager. “I’m sorry, sir,” he said, “but we have a dress code. You can’t come in here without a tie.” The man was stunned. “I don’t think I have a tie with me.” The manager responded, “I’m sorry, sir, but you can’t come in.” The man went out to his car and looked to see if he had left a tie in it. He hadn’t. In fact, the only thing even vaguely resembling a tie was his jumper cables. He took them on and tied them around his neck, and went back in. The manager saw him again, looked him over, and said, “All right, you can come in, but don’t start anything.” White boards are one of the greatest things ever: They’re remarkable. Chemists never get anything wrong: They know all the solutions.


PA G E

B2 GOSPORT

SPOTLIGHT

August 5, 2016

UWF Military and Veterans Resource Center establishes two new scholarships, recognizes 10 students Story, photo from Megan Gonzalez Executive Director University Marketing and Communications

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he University of West Florida (UWF) Military and Veterans Resource Center (MVRC) awarded scholarships to 10 students at its fifth annual scholarship luncheon held July 21. The luncheon recognizes military veterans and dependents or family members of an active or retired military service member who are awarded the Brig. Gen. and Mrs. Michael Ferguson Scholarship, Navy Federal Credit Union Scholarship, Buzz and Larue Ambersley Scholarship or the newly established Gulf Power Company Scholarship. For the first time, the MVRC also sponsored its own scholarship this year. “Going to school is a big deal,” said MVRC Director Marc Churchwell. “Any sort of springboard or help we can provide, we certainly want to do that. It’s not just our veterans, but their dependents who get to go. This is part of their career path and it’s helping them move forward.” Gulf Power provided more than $30,000 to the MVRC in December 2015 to recognize the center for its support of wounded military members and their families. Part of this gift was used to

establish the Gulf Power Company Scholarship, presented to Bria Banner, a junior communication arts major, as a tribute to her brother, Pfc. Brandon Banner, who was among the nine soldiers killed in the Texas floodwaters in June. Their mother, Sarah Banner, has been a UWF employee with Continuing Education for more than 25 years. “When I give Bria this scholarship, we are beginning with the end in mind,” said retired Navy Capt. Keith Hoskins, major accounts and military affairs manager for Gulf Power, as he presented the scholarship on the company’s behalf. “She’s very focused and I know that this scholarship is going to lead to something great.” Brig. Gen. and Mrs. Michael Ferguson were also present to award scholarships to five students in the College of Business. In 2001, the couple created an endowment to provide support for

UWF scholarship recipients pause for a group photo July 21.

military veterans and their dependents who demonstrate leadership capability and commitment to service. This year’s recipients include: • Gunnar Bowling, senior, business administration – finance major, Army veteran dependent. • Alesha Davis, senior, psychology major, Navy veteran dependent. • Ricardo Hidalgo, sophomore, international business major, Air Force veteran dependent. • Marcus Young, senior, supply chain logistics management major, Army veteran dependent. • Thomas Owens, sophomore, business administration major, Marine Corps veteran dependent. Haoting Tiedemann – senior, biochemistry major and Navy veteran spouse – and Rebecca Juntunen – senior, English major and Air Force veteran dependent

– were awarded the Navy Federal Credit Union Scholarship, established in 2013 to provide assistance to military veterans and their dependents. Tiedemann said the support was unexpected and invaluable. After receiving a degree from Yangtze University in Hubei, China, she became a dental hygienist with dreams of being a dentist. When Tiedemann enrolled in dental school prerequisites at UWF, she realized her previous degree rendered her ineligible for aid. The scholarship provides support for application expenses and tuition costs. “We couldn’t believe it,” said Tiedemann, whose husband served in the Navy for 20 years. “It was perfect timing. I’m taking the Dental Admission Test and applying for dental school this spring so we had begun saving

for interview travel costs and application fees. This will be a tremendous help with expenses and minimizing loans.” The Buzz and Larue Ambersley Scholarship was established in 2012 with the UWF Foundation Inc. to provide assistance to a dependent child or spouse of a veteran, deceased or active duty, non-commissioned officer who is a resident of Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa or Walton counties. The scholarship is renewable and applied until the recipient graduates. Tyler MilkerisZellar, a sophomore physics major and Air Force veteran dependent, was presented the award at the 2015 luncheon and returned this year to share how it has impacted her experience at UWF. “The scholarship has given me the opportunity to live on campus, which has allowed a more integrated college lifestyle and community with my peers,” she said. “It has broadened my horizons and allowed me to attend out-of-state conferences and visit other university’s physics graduate programs.” The MVRC is committed to serving the educational and training needs of prospective and currently enrolled service members, veterans, their dependents, their survivors and others eligible to receive educational benefits under the various Department of Veteran Affairs programs. For more information about the MVRC, visit uwf.edu/mvrc.

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THE MOVIE MUSIC OF JOHN WILLIAMS 2.11.2017 • 7:30PM

BERNSTEIN & BEETHOVEN 4.29.2017 4.29.2017 • 7:30PM

with Frank Almond, violin DANIELPOUR Celestial Night BERNSTEIN Serenade after Plato’s Symposium BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7

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GOSPORT

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Retired ‘Sesame Street’ cast member to speak Story, photo from WSRE-TV

S

onia Manzano has affected millions of parents and children since 1971 when she joined the cast of “Sesame Street,” where 44 years as Maria afforded her a unique look at how children’s television has evolved. The WSRE Public Square Speakers Series will present a free lecture by Manzano about educational children’s television at 7 p.m. Sept. 13 in WSRE’s Jean & Paul Amos Performance Studio. Admission is free. Manzano retired from “Sesame Street” last year as one of its most recognizable faces and a role model for generations of young girls and women. She had won 15 Emmy Awards for her writing on the show and was nominated twice for her role as Maria. In May, the

National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences honored her with the Emmy for Lifetime Achievement. Raised in the South Bronx, her acting career was inspired by teachers who encouraged her to audition for the High School of the Performing Arts. That is where she got her start, and while a junior on scholarship to Carnegie Mellon University, she starred in the original off-Broadway production of “Godspell.” Within a year, she joined the production of “Sesame Street,” where she

eventually became the first leading Latina woman on TV and began writing scripts. She also has written for the AwardPeabody winning children’s series, “Little Bill,” Manzano and for Sesame Workshop with the online parenting column, “Talking Out Loud.” Her 2004 children’s book, “No Dogs Allowed!,” was turned into a children’s musical and followed by “A Box Full of Kittens” in 2007. Other books include her first young adult novel, “The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano,” in 2014, and both her memoir, “Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx,” and picture book, “Miracle on 133rd

Veranda

Street,” released in 2015. This Public Square Speakers Series presentation will include Manzano’s thoughts on the way children are taught cognitive skills, the impact of how children are depicted on television and how 9/11 affected children’s educational curriculum on “Sesame Street.” This event is sponsored in-part by Gulf Power Company and has been scheduled in conjunction with WSRE’s participation in American Graduate – public media’s long-term commitment to supporting community-based solutions to help keep youth on the track to a high school diploma and beyond. The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required, but reservations are encouraged. To make reservations, go to wsre.org/speakers. For more information, call 484-1200.

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GOSPORT

August 5, 2016

Morale, Welfare and Recreation The NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department has a number of upcoming events and activities. For more information, call 452-3806, ext. 3100, or go to the MWR website at www.navymwrpensacola.com.

A band entertains the crowd at a recent Blues on the Bay concert at the Community Maritime Park.

By Janet Thomas Gosport staff writer

Summer is prime time for local music fans, and there are a number of free outdoor concert series to keep everybody happy in the Pensacola area. One popular concert series is the Blues Angel Music Blues on the Bay summer concert series, which takes place on select Sundays at Community Maritime Park’s Hunter Amphitheater. The New Orleans-style funk band Boukou Groove is scheduled to perform 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 7. Hailing from Miramar Beach, will perform songs from its album, “A Lil’ Boukou In Your Cup.�

Coolers and lawn chairs are welcome. Concessions are available. Do not bring pets or glass containers into the park. Concerts begin at 6 p.m. and are free and open to the public. Other concerts in the series are scheduled for Aug. 21 and Sept. 4. For more information about the Blues on the Bay concert series, go to http://pensacolacommunitymaritimepark.com/ 1161/Blues-on-the-Bay. Bands on the Beach draws a big crowd at 7 p.m. each Tuesday from April through October at Gulfside Pavilion at Pensacola Beach. Chloe Channell, a 14-yearold from Pace, is scheduled to perform Aug. 9. Channell started performing

at 7 at the Farmers Opry. She has opened at the Bonfire Jam, and has performed at the Pensacola Interstate Fair and at Radio City Music Hall in New York City at the quarterfinals for “America’s Got Talent� in 2013. Recently, she performed for the Grand Ole Opry with Billy Dean at the Ryman Auditorium. Spectators are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets to the pavilion area. No pets are allowed and glass is prohibited. Concerts are provided and organized by the Santa Rosa Island Authority. For more information, call 932-2257 or go to http:// www.visitpensacolabeach. com/events/bands-on-thebeach.php.

At the movies

• Family Summer Splash: The free event is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow, Aug. 6 at the Barrancas Sports Complex. Come celebrate before the school year begins. There will be wet and dry games. There also will be kiddie pools with age appropriate water play as well as a water gun play area for the older children. The event is open to all MWR authorized patrons and there will be food and beverages available for purchase. For more information, call 452-3806. • Movies by the • Movies on the Bay: “Captain Lawn: “The Angry America,â€? rated Birds Movie,â€? rated PG-13, is sched- PG., is scheduled for uled for tomorrow, Aug. 13 at dusk in front Aug. 6. Blue Angel of the Portside Gym, Recreation Park Bldg. 627. It is the last will present movies of the free summer at dark, on the first family movie sessions. and third Saturday You can also enjoy of each month some free popcorn. through August. In Bring your lawn chair, case of rain blankets and coolers. In movies will be can- case of rain, movie will celled. For infor- be canceled. For information, go to mation, call 452-2372. https://www.facebook.com/mwrpensacola. • Sesame Street performances: Two free shows are scheduled for Aug. 8 at the NASP Schools Command Theater, Bldg 633. The show highlights military families and experiences that children may encounter. Times are 3:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. The shows are open to all authorized MWR patrons. For more information, call 452-3806. • Navy Youth Sports Fall Soccer: Registration open through Aug. 12 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at NASP Youth Center. $50 fee. Open to all dependents ages 4 to 14 of active-duty and retired military, reservist, DoD and contractors. Mandatory skills event is scheduled for Aug. 13 at the Sports Complex off Highway 98: 9 a.m. for ages 4 to 5, 10 a.m. for ages 6 to 8 and 11 a.m. for ages 9 to 14. Parents must complete annual PAYS (Parent Association of Youth Sports) training prior to registration. Log on ay www.nays.org/parents. Coaches are always needed. For more information, call 453-3490 or 293-0547. • Karate Class: NASP School of Karate, Shotokan Karate classes are offered at Portside Gym, Bldg. 627. Karate-Do, the Japanese method of self defense, uses unarmed capabilities of the human body. Classes are open to active-duty, retirees, reservists, DoD and family members ages 9 and older. Cost is $20 ($22 for DoD) per month. For more information or to register, call 291-0940, 452-7810 or 452-7813.

FRIDAY

“Independence Day: Resurgence� (2D), PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates,� R, 8 p.m.; “The Secret Life of Pets� (2D), PG, 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY

“The Secret Life of Pets� (3D), PG, noon; “Finding Dory� (3D), PG, 2 p.m.; “Independence Day: Resurgence� (3D), PG-13, 4:30 p.m.; “The Legend of Tarzan� (3D), PG13, 7:30 p.m.; “The BFG� (2D), PG, 1 p.m.; “The Secret Life of Pets� (2D), PG, 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.;“Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates,� R, 8 p.m.

SUNDAY

“The Secret Life of Pets� (2D), PG, noon and 2 p.m.; “The Legend of Tarzan� (2D), PG-13, 4 p.m.; “Free State of Jones,� R, 6:30 p.m.; “The BFG� (2D), PG, 12:30 p.m.; “The Shallows,� PG-13, 3 p.m.; “Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates,� R, 5 p.m.; “The Purge: Election Year,� R, 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY

“The Secret Life of Pets� (2D), PG, 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.; “The Legend of Tarzan� (2D), PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates,� R, 7:30 p.m.

Liberty activities

TUESDAY

“The Secret Life of Pets� (3D), PG, 5 p.m.; “Independence Day: Resurgence� (3D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; The BFG� (2D), PG, 5:10 p.m.; “The Purge: Election Year,� R, 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

Free admission to all movies on Wednesdays: “Finding Dory� (2D), PG, noon, 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; “Central Intelligence,� PG-13, 1 p.m., 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.

THURSDAY

“The Secret Life of Pets� (2D), PG, 5 p.m.; “Free State of Jones,� R, 7 p.m.; “The BFG� (2D), PG, 5:10 p.m.; “The Purge: Election Year,� R, 7:30 p.m.

Liberty program events at NAS Pensacola and Corry Station target young, unaccompanied active-duty military. Hours are 10:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday. Regular events are scheduled at the main Liberty Center in the Portside Entertainment Complex. You must sign up in advance for off-base trips. For more information, call 452-2372 or go to http://naspensacola-mwr.com.

COST Regular: $4 adults, $2 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

3D shows: $5 adults, $3 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

Details: 452-3522 or www.naspensacola-mwr.com

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August 5, 2016

COMMAND LINES

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GOSPORT SAPR

Fleet and Family Support Center

Worship schedule

If you are a victim of sexual assault, it is not your fault. Help for victims of sexual assault in the DoD community is a call, click or text away: The SafeHelpline provides live, one-on-one crisis support and information by trained staff. Call: (877) 995-5247; click: www.SafeHelpline.org; or text: 55-247, CONUS; (202) 470-5546, OCONUS (may be extra charges for OCONUS). The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program provides prevention, intervention and a 24/7/365 response to non-intimate partner adult victims of sexual assault. Active-duty and adult family member sexual assault victims have a choice of reporting options, unrestricted and restricted. Unrestricted reporting allows victim to have an advocate, seek medical care, counseling, legal services, safety interventions and/or transfer, etc. To access an unrestricted report, the victim may report to his/her chain-ofcommand, security/law enforcement, NCIS, SAPR VA, SARC, or others. NCIS shall be notified by the CO and/or the VA/SARC in unrestricted cases to begin investigation. Investigation results are provided to the offender’s CO for appropriate action/disposition. Restricted reporting allows a victim to have a confidential report, which does not trigger command or law enforcement notification and the victim may have a SAPR VA and seek medical care and/or counseling. To access restricted reporting, the victim may disclose his/her sexual assault only to the SARC, a current SAPR VA, a health care professional and/or a chaplain. To contact the NASP 24/7 Victim Advocate, call 449-9231/2. For the Civilian Victim Advocate, call 293-4561. To contact the duty SARC, call the SARC cell at 554-5606.

NAS Pensacola Protestant • Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Chapel choir, 12:30 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Contemporary service, 6 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Training Air Wing Six Bible Study, 11:15 a.m. Tuesday, Griffith Hall student lounge. • Bible study, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, J.B. McKamey Center. Roman Catholic • Sunday Mass, 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Daily Mass, 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Our Lady of Loreto Chapel. • Confessions: 30 minutes before services. Latter Day Saints • Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Meeting: 6 p.m. Monday and 6 p.m. Thursday, J.B. McKamey Center. For information, call 452-2341. NASP Corry Station Protestant • Adult Bible study, 9 a.m. Sunday, fellowship hall vice conference room. • Chapel choir, 9 a.m. Sunday, choir room vice sanctuary. • Worship service, 10 a.m. Sunday. • Fellowship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday.

• Contemporary worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, followed by fellowship at 7:30 p.m. • Bible study and dinner, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, fellowship hall. Latter Day Saints • Service, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Roman Catholic • Mass, noon Sunday and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For information, call 452-6376. NAS Whiting Field Chapel Roman Catholic • Mass, 11 a.m. Friday. Protestant • Bible study, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. • Weekly chapel service, 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For information, call 623-7212. More services Jewish • B’nai Israel Synagogue, 1829 North Ninth Ave., services 7 p.m. Friday and 9:30 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 433-7311. • Temple Beth El, 800 North Palafox St., services 7 p.m. Friday (6 p.m. first Friday of each month). For information, call 438-3321 or go to http://templebethelof pensacola.org. Seventh-day Adventist • Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1080 North Blue Angel Parkway, Bible studies at 9:30 a.m. and services at 11 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 4533442.

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The NASP Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), 151 Ellyson Ave., Bldg. 625, is offering the following: • EFMP Ribbon Cutting: 11 a.m. today, Aug. 5, Naval Hospital Pensacola, Deck 7, EFMP Office. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) has a new office at the Naval Hospital Pensacola. Reservations requested. For more information, contact Rita Lung, EFMP liaison, at 505-6822 or rita.h.lung.ctr@mail.mil. • Training positions open: Are you a military spouse looking for a part time position? The Military Child Education Coalition is hiring trainers for the Parent to Parent program in the Pensacola area. If you would like more information on family employment, call 452-5990. • Time Management: 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Aug. 30 and Sept. 20. You have all the time you need to get done what you want. The secret is not more time: It’s using your time more effectively.

To register or for more information, call 452-5609. • Stress Management Workshop: 10 a.m. to noon, every first and third Thursday of month. While eliminating stress is unrealistic, managing stress is an attainable goal that can be achieved with a number of techniques. For information or to register, call 452-5609. • Personal Financial Management: A series of classes are offered throughout the year on topics such as car buying, using credit cards, developing a budget and spending plan and how to build your savings. Seating is limited and reservations are required. To register or for more information, call 452-5609. • Move.mil Assist: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday. FFSC provides Move.mil assistance to transferring personnel. You must have a login name and password created in advance. Open to all branches. For more information or to register, call 452-5609.

Community Outreach If you are interested in participating in some volunteer activities, contact the NASP Community Outreach office. The Community Outreach office also keeps track of volun-

teer hours. You need to report any hours of volunteer work to receive due recognition. For more information, call 452-2532 or e-mail nasp_ comm_outreach@Navy.mil.


August 5, 2016

page

15th Annual

In memory of John Ryan Peacock

Sept. 29 - Oct. 1, 2016 THURSDAY FORE! Charity Tee Off Par-Tee & Silent Auction Sanders Beach Corrine Jones Community Center

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P R O C E E D S B E N E F I T L O CA L C H A R I T I E S Including Child Guardians, Inc • Gulf Coast Kid’s House Council on Aging of West Florida Ashley Lauren Offerdahl Endowment for Children’s Home Society of Florida

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Sheriff David Morgan Your Life...Your Community • No Place for Drugs www.escambiaso.com

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Ads placed by the Military are free To place an ad go online at www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext.29

MARKETPLACE Publication date every Friday except Christmas and New Years Deadline to place an ad is noon Monday, the week of the publication. Place your ad online at www.gosportpensacola. com Place your ad by phone at 850-433-1166 ext. 29 Mon - Fri 8:30am to 5:00pm

motor • merchandise • employment • real estate • and more! Articles for Sale

Articles for Sale

Articles for Sale

S C U B A . Powerhead bang stick. Dacor. Factory stainless steel. Uses 4-10 gauge shotgun or 41 mag. pistol shell. Stops any Announcements shark cold. $100. Announcements 417-1694. Quality furnished short term mili- F r e e tary homes and d i s a s s e m b l e d rooms in prime lumber from downtown areas. large deck. All Discounted per sizes and lengths. diem, rented by Treated. You the room. Go to: haul. North of emeraldquarters. Navy Hospital. com. Call 970- 850-453-9291. 420-8216. Hurry: 2 available now. New women’s maxi dresses. CaArticlesfor forSale Sale pris. Yoga pants. Articles Sizes mediumTree stand. large. $8 each. Field & Stream All must go. 850climber. 1 year 458-3821. old. Rock solid. Perfect in all re- New women’s spects. $65. 454- size 11 sandals, 9486. name brand sneakers, and C r o s s b o w . handbags. $10Horton. 150lb. $15 each. All pull with scope, must go. 850quiver and bolts. 458-3821. Retail $600, sell $150. 497-1167. New in box: Back-to-Life got something to portable spinal sell? decompression call 850.433.1166 unit as seen on ext. 29 TV. $95. Must for more info go. 850-4583821.

Vintage twin bedroom set. Includes 2 dressers, 2 beds, 2 nightstands and assorted wall hangings. 850-458-9797.

Oak Bunk beds. Desk Dresser. $100 each. Chairs cherry antiques: Highchair, new uphols lounge chair. 850-3800195.

Wanted Condo cleaner needed in the Perdido Key and Orange Beach area. Primarily weekend work. (850)723-3668

Loveseat leather. $200 in excellent condition. Call 850-607-2294 for more information. Bed Sleigh California king with Beauty Rest mattress set and bedding $750 call Christa @ 850261-0700. Wing chair dark aqua marine leather like new $300 call Christa @ 850-261-0700. TV 32” excellent condition $50. Chair office suede $12. Call Christa @ 850-261-0700. For sale: Queensized bed, table, and dresser with hutch and mirror. Pine. Very good condition. $375. 850-572-0433 or email tmcd263@ gmail.com.

Articles for Sale

2 plots, Memory Park Cemetery in the Garden of Honor II spaces #145C 1 and 2. Valued $6445, asking $5500 OBO. 850-6264710 for more Briggs & Strat- information. ton. Portable generator. Elite series. Auto Auto Be prepared for hurricane season. 08 Acura TLS Model 030209. 109k mi. Nav, Starting 8500W, Fosgate Stereo, running 5500W. sunroof Lethe, Like new, unused. backup cam. Uses LPG/natural LOADED. Fresh gas. $600 cash. service. $13,500 850-497-9780. OBO. 850-4182951. Honey-local, pure raw honey. Misc Misc 850-492-8040. Ling Tower Full length H&H a l u m i n u m . box. Brand new 93.5’ tall. condition, never 7 6 x 7 5 x 7 1 x 7 5 . been used. $235. Platform 57” 850-455-2482. high. $300. 850221-4399. 4-Burner Gas Stove, like new C a t a m a r a n $250; Two pairs mast. Aluminum inline skates, size 35ft. $100. 85011 and size 13 $15 221-4399. each; One pair professional roller Boat 18’ Lund. skates $45. 850- 50 HP motor. 341-2731. Trailer. $2500, sold as is. 850Dining Room 221-4399. Table, 8 chairs, pads. Thomasville Elysee. $750. 850-327-3079.

TOO MUCH STUFF? HERE’S THE BEST AND CHEAPEST WAY TO CLEAR OUT THE GARAGE. LIST YOUR STUFF IN A GOSPORT CLASSIFIED. RATES ARE $9 FOR THE FIRST TEN WORDS AND FIFTY CENTS FOR EACH ADDITIONAL WORD. OVER 25,000 PEOPLE SEE THE GOSPORT EVERY WEEK. GO ONLINE TO GOSPORTPENSACOLA.COM OR CALL 433-1166 EXT. 29 TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY!

Misc 2013 Aspen Trail RV 2710BH. $14000. Lots of storage, sleeps 9. Hook ups included. Water heater electric/ propane. UVW is 4749lbs. jfour@ bellsouth.net. http://northmiss. c r a i g s l i s t . o rg / rvs/5656807152. html. RealESTATE Estate REAL Rentals Rental Beautiful Pace upgraded brick home. 3BR/2BA. Between Pensacola and Whiting Field. Excellent for flight students. Hardwood, granite, new paint and appliances, upgraded carpet. 1440sqft. Text/call 850723-7431.

got something to sell? call 850.433.1166 ext. 29 for more info

Real Estate

Real Estate

VA ASSUMPTION.

1BR/1BA. Newly renovated, furnished 671sqft. condo. Numerous amenities. $95,000. Near Navy base and downtown. Assigned garage parking. 825 Bayshore Dr.#205. 850375-0446; rclaudet@aol.com.

Qualified Veteran/Nonveteran can assume my VA Loan balance of $111,000 @3.25%, 22yrs. w/$7,800 down payment. PITI is $804.30/mo. Mortgage company approval required. Northpointe Subdivision. Text or leave message @850-332-5367. Beautiful Gulf Breeze brick 4/2. 2047sqft w/many upgrades. Porcelain floors, woodfloor bedrooms, granite kitchen/ bath, stainlesssteel appliances, large masterbath w/glass-stone shower, Whirlpool tub, 12ft ceilings. 850380-1193. 5BR/4BA, 4000sqft. 5 min NASP backgate. Heron’s Forest. High-end appliances, pool, water access. Rental ($2550/mo), or sale ($529.9K). Info/appointment, call/text Kevin @904742-3607.

Lots Lots Horse farm w/lighted riding arena. 4.9 acres. Renovated 2/2 mobile home. Elberta, AL. 850455-5031. Info/ pics. $167,000.

To advertise in the GOSPORT call Becky Hildebrand

at 433-1166 ext. 31

all classified ads placed by military are free


August 5, 2016

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Gosport - August 05, 2016  
Gosport - August 05, 2016  

Weekly newspaper for Naval Air Station Pensacola