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Red, White and Blues on the beach ... The Pensacola Beach Air Show is coming July 11-12, featuring the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels. Gary Ward, Team Aerodynamix and Skip Stewart will also be performing. The action starts July 9, with “Breakfast with the Blues” and a circle-and-arrival overhead around 8 a.m. July 10, a Blues practice demonstration is scheduled to take place around 2 p.m. July 11 is the “dress rehearsal,” with the Blues performing along with the civilian acts. The Pensacola Beach Air Show goes on July 12; July 13 is reserved for a rain date. For more information and a trolley schedule, go to http://www.visitpensacolabeach. com/events/pensacola-beach-air-show.php.

Vol. 78, No. 26

VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: www.gosportpensacola.com

July 3, 2014

SAPR milestone: 100th certified victim advocate at NASP Story, photo by Katelyn Barton PAO Intern

SH2 Andrew Hanson has recently been approved as the 100th D-SAACP (Department of Defense Sexual Assault Advocate Certification Program) victim advocate (VA) onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP). Hanson, who was born in Superior, Wisc., has been in the Navy for nine years. Hanson served on the USS Nimitz (CVN68) for four years during this time. He currently serves as the assistant coordinator for the urinalysis program onboard NASP. Hanson explained that volunteering to be a D-SAACP VA is a good feeling because it is part of something that is continually growing and becoming more recognized throughout the military. “I wanted to become certified because I feel like it’s a very important command program and that we should always have resources available to assist service members who are affected by sexual assault,”

NAS Pensacolaʼs 100th anniversary F/A-18 unveiled at front gate ... (Above) Andrew Harris, facility management specialist at Public Works Department (PWD) Pensacola; and Steven Granger, head of the restorations and maintenance Department at the National Naval Aviation Museum, unveil a newly painted F/A-18 July 1 near the base’s front gate. The aircraft’s tail features a logo which commemorates the 100th anniversary of NAS Pensacola. Photo by Katelyn Barton

SH2 Andrew Hanson is the 100th certified victim advocate in the base’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program.

Hanson said. Hanson needed to complete 40 hours of training to become a D-SAACP VA. Though the training is not too hard in Hanson’s opinion, he said there was a lot of information to absorb in a short amount of time. Hanson recommends the program to people who are patient, have good listening skills and the ability

See 100th VA on page 2

‘Tour for the Troops’ brings Chris Young to NASP July 9 From NASP MWR

Country music star Chris Young is scheduled to take the stage for a July 9 “Tour for the Troops” concert on Portside Lawn at Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP). The concert also will feature special guest Josh Thompson. Presented by the Air Force Reserve and NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR), the

“Tour for the Troops” concert is expected to be a fun-filled night for the whole family. In the past, country music concerts at NASP have drawn large crowds. About 20,000 people turned out for last year’s Nov. 8 “Tour for the Troops” concert featuring Brantley Gilbert. A Grammy-nominated recording artist, Young has been recognized as a performer and songwriter.

He has had five No. 1 songs – “You,” “Voices,” “The Man I Want To Be,” “Tomorrow” and “Getting’ You Home.” His fourth album, “A.M.,” debuted in September 2013 at No. 3 on the Billboard 200 chart. Known for his classic baritone and ballads, Young revealed himself to also be king of a good time last year when his single, “Aw Naw,” stormed up the charts.

Young, who is performing on the road with Dirks Bentley’s Summer 2014 tour, has had many career highlights including receiving the 2013 CMA Triple Play Award, being named the 2011 American Country Awards Breakthrough Artist of the Year, receiving a 2011 Grammy nomination for Best Male Country Vocal Performance for his No. 1 hit “Getting’ You

NHP corpsmen salute ʻDocʼ Eagles at Veterans Memorial Park ... Corpsmen from Naval Hospital Pensacola attended an event honoring Navy corpsmen hosted by the Marine Corps League at the Pensacola Veterans Memorial Park June 27. The guest speaker for the event was Thomas “Doc” Eagles, a retired master chief who served three tours in Vietnam as a corpsman. The event, part of the “Heroes Among Us” speaker series, features people from all branches of the military service who distinguished themselves in combat operations. All are residents of the Pensacola area. The goal is to let those people share their experiences with others, both civilians and military veterans as well as active-duty members. This year’s series kicked off May 30 and continues through October. Other programs on the schedule include: • July 25: Military Assistance Command-Vietnam, Studies and Observation Group Month featuring Sgt. Maj. Herman Spencer and Capt. William Clark. • Aug. 29: World War II Family Month featuring members of the Dungan family, who had six family members in combat operations during World War II. • Sept. 14: Pearl Harbor Month featuring members of the Pearl Harbor Servicemen Club of Pensacola. For more information, go to www.veteransmemorialparkpensacola.com. Photo by Jason Bortz

Chris Young

Home” and being named People Maga-

zine’s 2012 “Sexy Man of the Week.” Other presenting sponsors of this year's “Tour for the Troops” concert include the KIA Autosport of Pensacola and Pen Air Federal Credit Union. MWR will be providing food and beverages for sale on the Portside Lawn starting when the gates open at 5 p.m. The concert

See Concert on page 2

Feds Feed Families campaign kicks off From NASP Chaplain’s Office

Local food banks need your help. The annual Feds Feed Families campaign has kicked off; children and families are in need of donated food this summer. B r i n g your nonperishable food items during July and August to the following drop-off locations: • NAS Pensacola

Chaplain’s Office, Bldg. 634. • NAS Pensacola Command Headquarters (Richardson Building) quarterdeck. • Naval Hospital Pensacola Pharmacy. • NASP Commissary. To learn more, visit www.fedsfeedfamilies.org. Contact NASP Chaplain’s Office at 452-2341, ext. 5, for more drop-off locations and information.

Published by Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements constitute Department of the Navy, NAS Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing’s endorsement of products or services advertised.


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July 3, 2014

GOSPORT

Longtime NAS Pensacola Public Affairs Officer Harry White retires By Katelyn Barton PAO Intern

A well-known representative with a booming voice, Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) Public Affairs Officer (PAO) Harry White retired June 30 after 25 years of service. White said he will miss being part of the NASP team, but he has many fond memories and he is looking forward to having some fun. “One cannot spend 25 years doing something that is so much fun and important, then walk away and not miss it,” White said. “I will miss it dearly, but there is no doubt in my mind that retirement will be just as much fun.” White, who grew up on a farm in Elsinore, Ala., got some valuable career experience before landing at NASP. After dropping out of college, he joined the Air Force. But he was able to finish two degrees before retiring from the Air Force in 1984 after 21 years of service. After a short time working as the executive vice president for a chamber of commerce in South Alabama, White applied for and was happy to be selected to be a

NAS Pensacola Commanding Officer Capt. Keith Hoskins presents base Public Affairs Officer Harry White with a signed photo montage June 26. Photo by Janet Thomas

public affairs specialist at NASP in 1989, because “once you get the military in your blood, you don’t get it out.” White explained that his 25 years at NAS Pensacola grew on him. He said making a difference, having fun and being in great health is what let him work in the same job for so long. “It is a very important job, (public affairs) I think. We are the face, the voice, of NAS Pen-

sacola. We are the public affairs staff, and so there is a lot of opportunity to advance the image of the Navy and the Department of Defense,” White said. NAS Pensacola is an extremely unique installation, White said, with the distinction of having almost every naval aviator come here to train in some way. Many of these people come back and want to see the base, and in order to be suc-

cessful as the PAO of NASP, one must be in tune with the needs of the people first off, White said. NAS Pensacola has always offered a daily challenge, he said. White explained that the great thing about public affairs is that every day is different. There is no cookie-cutter form of the public affairs job. Public affairs is always one phone call away from being in a crisis, he said. In looking back, White said his biggest disappointment from a public affairs standpoint was dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Ivan in 2004. As a result of the category three storm, many buildings were destroyed and the entire base was in horrible shape. White feels he could have done a better job of providing public affairs coverage of what was going on at NASP post-Ivan. White said he experienced rewarding moments as well. The biggest accomplishment, in White’s opinion, was being a part of the Naval Aviation Depot transition team in the mid-’90s when the depot closed down. The team put together a plan for how the employees were to be taken care of after the closure.

Fourth of July safety message from CNIC “CNIC Team, I wanted to send this message before folks depart on well-deserved vacations and time off. (As we) mark the 238th year of our nation’s independence, hang bunting and flags, fire up the grill, and enjoy the time off, I ask that you remember that our independence and the freedoms we enjoy today came at a price of blood and treasure. There are many – military and civilian – who came before us to fight for our independence and defend it during the past two centuries. So, on this Independence Day, I’d ask that you remember those who have gone before but I’d also ask you to reflect on our freedoms and our country has earned and maintained them. As recent world events show us, freedoms like ours are neither permanent nor guaranteed but they are always precious. Also, I’d ask you to remember that this holiday weekend there will be dedicated service members and civilians working hard and standing watch in defense of our country and all it stands for. Keep them in your thoughts and prayers and, if you have the opportunity, thank them. Lastly, holidays bring risk. Whether you’re on the road, in the swimming pool, at the beach, hiking in the mountains, or just relaxing at home, please put safety first. Be thoughtful around the grill, designate a driver if you plan to drink, lather on the sunscreen, and stay safe out there. I am very proud of each and every one of you for the great work you do in support of the ‘Fleet, Fighter and Family.’ Each of you make a difference every day as part of our global shore enterprise team. I am continually impressed by your professionalism and dedication. I wish you and your family a safe and relaxing holiday. Happy Independence Day.” All the best, Vice Adm. Bill French

Vol. 78, No. 26

Blue Angels community outreach ... U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, maintenance and support team member AO1 Jared Heathcote helps a young girl make a paper airplane at the Fort Walton Beach Public Library June 20. The Blue Angels are scheduled to participate in numerous community outreach events as well as fly in 68 performances at 35 locations this year. Photo by MC2 Kathryn E. Macdonald

100th VA from page 1

Concert from page 1

to be empathetic. He said he learned that sexual assault can happen to anyone regardless of race or gender and there always needs to be people with the resources and assistance to help service members that may be affected by sexual assault. “Being a D-SAACP VA is definitely not for everyone,” Hanson said. “Once you become certified you have to be willing to be flexible and available to service members who may be potential victims of sexual assault. I believe that the more people that get involved and certified will help us reduce these numbers drastically.” To report a sexual assault, call Safe Helpline (877-995-5247), Victim Advocate 24/7 phone (449-9231), or the Civilian Victim Advocate phone (293-4561) as resources for victims.

is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. Concertgoers are encourage to bring chairs and/blankets, but you should leave your coolers and outside food and drinks at home. Admission to the show is free, but tickets are required. Tickets are open to all DoD ID holders for themselves, family members and invited guests. DoD ID holders will need to show their IDs to pick up the free tickets at MWR ITT, MWR Administration Office (Bldg. 4143) or at Liberty centers at NAS Pensacola or NASP Corry Station. For more information, go to http://naspensacola-mwr.com or call 452-3806, ext. 3100. Security note: All personnel attending the “Tour for the Troops” concert will need to comply with NAS Pensacola security regulations. All personnel will need a ticket and a valid ID, along with a valid driver’s license for the driver of the vehicle coming into the installation. Personnel could be required to have their vehicle inspected at the gate when accessing the base. Weapons are prohibited on the installation. Even personnel with a valid carry permit are not allowed to bring weapons on the installation. Obey all driving regulations. Cell phones are not to be used by drivers while onboard any NAS Pensacola installation.

July 3, 2014

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community Commanding Officer — Capt. Keith Hoskins Interim Public Affairs Officer — Patrick J. Nichols The Gosport nameplate pays homage to the 100th anniversary of naval aviation in 2011: the Centennial of Naval Aviation, or CONA. The image on the left side of the nameplate depicts Eugene Ely taking off in a Curtiss pusher bi-plane from the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 18, 1911. While Ely had taken off from the USS Birmingham two months earlier after his plane had been loaded on the ship, the USS Pennsylvania event was the first time a plane landed on and then took off from a U.S. warship.

Many employees were able to retire or move to other locations. White looks back with great pride on the all the work the transition team did with the Naval Aviation Depot. The team became a model for the closure process in the Navy because of the way they took care of business, White said. “Retirement is going to be an absolute wonderful experience, but I can tell you now I’m going to wake up (my first day of retirement) and wonder why I am not heading to NAS Pensacola to do my job,” White said. White has a great desire to spend time with his family, especially his grandchildren, during his retirement. During his final department head meeting at NASP, White was presented with a custommade fishing rod from the wardroom team and a reel from public affairs staff members. Though White has retired, he plans to keep contributing to the base by working with volunteer organizations, writing a book of the NAS Pensacola history and recording a historical self-tour for future visitors. Patrick J. Nichols is the interim PAO; he can be reached at 452-4436.

The image on the right side is the Navy’s most modern fighter aircraft, the F-18 Super Hornet. Established in 1921 as the Air Station News, the name Gosport was adopted in 1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by flight instructors in the early days of naval aviation to give instructions and directions to their students. The name “Gosport” was derived from Gosport, England (originally God’s Port), where the voice tube was invented. Gosport is an authorized newspaper published every Friday by Ballinger Publishing,

The Rhodes Building, 41 North Jefferson Street, Suite 402, Pensacola, FL 32504, in the interest of military and civilian personnel and their families aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Saufley Field and Corry Station. Editorial and news material is compiled by the Public Affairs Office, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-1051. All news releases and related materials should be mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hallford@navy.mil. National news sources are American Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News Service (NNS), Air Force News Service (AFNS), News USA and North American Precis Syndicate (NAPS). Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Defense, United States Navy, officials of the Naval Air Station Pensacola, or Ballinger Publishing. All advertising, including classified ads, is arranged through Ballinger Publishing. Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to rank, rate, race, creed, color, national origin or sex of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection of this policy of equal opportunities by an advertiser will result in the refusal of future advertising from that source.

For classified ads, call: (850) 433-1166, ext. 24 For commercial advertising: Simone Sands (850) 433-1166, ext. 21 Simone@ballingerpublishing.Com Visit Us On The Web At: Ballinger Publishing.Com Mail To: Gosport, NAS Pensacola, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, Pensacola, FL 32508-1051

Gosport Editor

Scott Hallford 452-4466 scott.hallford@navy.mil Gosport Associate Editor

Mike O’Connor 452-2165 michael.f.oʼconnor.ctr@navy.mil Gosport Staff Writer

Janet Thomas 452-4419 janet.thomas.ctr@navy.mil


July 3, 2014

GOSPORT

COMMENTARY

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I’m dreaming of a summer with teens who have jobs By Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist

D

espite the fact that the school year has ended for our children, I started my normal morning routine this week on autopilot – scrambling eggs, fluffing laundry, mopping the kitchen floor and microwaving the same cup of coffee three times. I darted out to the base commissary at about 10 a.m., in desperate need of paper towels and lunchmeat, completely forgetting that the children were still upstairs slobbering into their pillows. It wasn’t until I sunk my teeth into a leftover leg of chicken to quell a pang of hunger at 11:45 a.m., that I remembered. “Do you realize that it is almost noon?” I blasted across the rumpled bed containing my 19-year-old son. His hairy leg was hiked over a pile of dirty clothes tangled in his comforter. The floor was littered with headphones, magazines, discarded school papers, dropped pretzels and empty soda cans. “Huh .... wha?” he said as the brain under his crazy hair

How to submit a commentary

tried to process the scene. While he smacked his lips and stretched, I ranted. “Have you followed up on those job applications yet? Well, mister, if you’re dreaming of lounging around the house for the next three months, not earning any spending money for college next year, you’ve got another thing coming.” After making the rounds to each of our three children’s rooms, I stormed downstairs, grumbling to myself, “Why are kids today so daggone lazy? Sleeping into the afternoon, no sense of responsibility. That sort of thing was not allowed in my day. Hrmph.” While stuffing the washer with cold darks, I thought of my summers as a teen. My father had brainwashed me into

About the columnist Lisa Smith Molinari, mother of three, has been a military spouse for 20 years (and running). She also writes columns for Military Spouse magazine and a blog at www.themeat andpotatoesoflife.com. She and her family are stationed at Naval Station Newport in Rhode Island. believing that, if I did not work over the summer, the planet might implode. I had to make money, and a lot of it, to ensure my financial survival

over the next year of school. I cut three acres of grass with a tractor for $20 bucks a week. I sold garden vegetables on the side of the road. I did office work. I painted houses. I bar tended at a golf club. I worked at a bank. And one stressful summer, I took a job as a traveling salesperson for my father’s chemical company even though I knew nothing about the products or how they worked. I had a little time to lay out, go to the drive-in theater, or hang out at the mall – all the things we did in small towns in the 1980s – but I always made enough spending money to last me through the next school year. I dreamt of a summer job waitressing at the beach. Living in a seaside shack with other waitresses, not saving much money but having the time of our lives. I thought the beach job could be a lifechanging experience, turning me into one of those cool, mature, sun-kissed girls with long flowy skirts and dangly earrings shaped like dolphin tails. Who cares about the money ... I could transform my life. But my father’s warnings always prevailed. I certainly

didn’t want the Earth to implode, so I never got that dream beach job. I wondered, should I allow my children to follow their dreams, or insist that they get to work? I set the washer for permanent press and gathered my semi-conscious teens in the kitchen under the guise of pancakes. “Hey guys, listen,” I cajoled, “maybe I over-reacted. You can lounge around the house and make money for school, because there are plenty of things you can do here for me. I’ll give you 20 whole bucks each week to scrub the toilets and sinks, but don’t forget to pull those gooey hair clogs out of the drains. And there’s always the basement to be cleaned out. Just watch for those fuzzy wolf spiders, they love to jump right in your hair. Oh, and I was thinking that all the garbage cans could use a good scrubbing because they smell like rotten meat ... ” I went on for another 20 minutes or so, while the children stared like deer caught in headlights. My prediction: the Earth will remain intact, because they will have summer jobs within a week.

Commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as official government, Navy or command policy statements. Reader submissions are welcome but should not exceed 800 words. Submissions must be bylined and include a daytime phone number or e-mail contact for the writer. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with policy and standards. Send commentary submissions to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil.


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July 3, 2014

GOSPORT GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE NAS Pensacola Emergency Managment Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785 For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; non-emergency 452-8378 911 for NASP Police; non-emergency 452-8387 NAS Whiting Field 911 for Emergency Center Emergency Management 623-7612 Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618 NETPDTC Saufley Field Main gate 452-1628 Florida Division of Emergency Management 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy http://www.Ready.Navy.mil Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/ Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/ Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.fl.org Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/ 474-5300 to report gas leak/emergency

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.myescambia.com/beready

Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com

Santa Rosa County Emergency Management 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

AT&T http://www.att.com

HURRICANE CATEGORIES

July 3, 2014

PA G E

NOAA 2014 Atlantic hurricane forecasters predict near- or below-normal season El Niño expected to develop and suppress the number and intensity of tropical cyclones From http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov

In its 2014 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued May 22, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center predicted a near-normal or below-normal season. The main driver of this year’s outlook is the anticipated development of El Niño this summer. El Niño causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Niño can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms. The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season and only a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season. For the six-month hurricane season, which began June 1, NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of eight to 13 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which three to six could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including one to two major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). These numbers are near or below the seasonal averages of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, based on the average from 1981 to 2010. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. “Thanks to the environmental intelligence from NOAA’s network of earth observations, our scientists and meteorologists can provide

life-saving products like our new storm surge threat map and our hurricane forecasts,” said Kathryn Sullivan, NOAA administrator. “And even though we expect El Niño to suppress the number of storms this season, it’s important to remember it takes only one landfalling storm to cause a disaster.” Humberto was the first of only two Atlantic hurricanes in 2013. It reached peak intensity, with top winds of 90 mph, in the far eastern Atlantic. Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, said the Atlantic – which has seen above-normal seasons in 12 of the last 20 years – has been in an era of high activity for hurricanes since 1995. However, this highactivity pattern is expected to be offset in 2014 by the impacts of El Niño, and by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures than we’ve seen in recent years. “Atmospheric and oceanic conditions across the tropical Pacific are already taking on some El Niño characteristics. Also, we are currently seeing strong trade winds and wind shear over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAA’s climate models predict these conditions will persist, in part because of El Niño,” Bell said. “The expectation of near-average Atlantic Ocean temperatures this season, rather than the above-average temperatures seen since 1995, also suggests fewer Atlantic hurricanes.” NOAA is rolling out new tools at the National Hurricane Center this year. An experimental mapping tool will be used to show communities their storm surge flood threat.

The map will be issued for coastal areas when a hurricane or tropical storm watch is first issued, or approximately 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. The map will show land areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas. Early testing on continued improvements to NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model (HWRF) shows a 10 percent improvement in this year’s model compared to last year. Hurricane forecasters use the HWRF along with other models to produce forecasts and issue warnings. The HWRF model is being adopted by a number of Western Pacific and Indian Ocean rim nations. NOAA’s seasonal hurricane outlook is not a hurricane landfall forecast; it does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts will be provided throughout the season by NOAA’s National Hurricane Center. “It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall to have disastrous impacts on our communities,” said Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate administrator for Response and Recovery. He noted Pensacola experienced severe flooding from five inches of rain in 45 minutes – without a tropical storm or hurricane – April 30. “We need you to be ready. Know your risk for hurricanes and severe weather, take action now to be prepared and be an example for others in your office, school or community. Learn to prepare for hurricanes at www.ready.gov/ hurricanes.”

Storm names for 2014 Arthur Bertha Cristobal Dolly Edouard Fay Gonzalo Hanna Isaias Josephine Kyle Laura Marco Nana Omar Paulette Rene Sally Teddy Vicky Wilfred

“We’re looking at the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Ivan ... (and) past history shows this installation has somewhat of a pattern with tropical storms.” – NAS Pensacola Emergency Manager Burt Fenters

TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph

For more, visit http://www.ready.navy.mil/

Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph NAS Pensacola

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July 3, 2014

GOSPORT GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE NAS Pensacola Emergency Managment Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785 For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; non-emergency 452-8378 911 for NASP Police; non-emergency 452-8387 NAS Whiting Field 911 for Emergency Center Emergency Management 623-7612 Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618 NETPDTC Saufley Field Main gate 452-1628 Florida Division of Emergency Management 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy http://www.Ready.Navy.mil Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/ Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/ Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.fl.org Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/ 474-5300 to report gas leak/emergency

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.myescambia.com/beready

Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com

Santa Rosa County Emergency Management 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

AT&T http://www.att.com

HURRICANE CATEGORIES

July 3, 2014

PA G E

NOAA 2014 Atlantic hurricane forecasters predict near- or below-normal season El Niño expected to develop and suppress the number and intensity of tropical cyclones From http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov

In its 2014 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued May 22, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center predicted a near-normal or below-normal season. The main driver of this year’s outlook is the anticipated development of El Niño this summer. El Niño causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Niño can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms. The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season and only a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season. For the six-month hurricane season, which began June 1, NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of eight to 13 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which three to six could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including one to two major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). These numbers are near or below the seasonal averages of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, based on the average from 1981 to 2010. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. “Thanks to the environmental intelligence from NOAA’s network of earth observations, our scientists and meteorologists can provide

life-saving products like our new storm surge threat map and our hurricane forecasts,” said Kathryn Sullivan, NOAA administrator. “And even though we expect El Niño to suppress the number of storms this season, it’s important to remember it takes only one landfalling storm to cause a disaster.” Humberto was the first of only two Atlantic hurricanes in 2013. It reached peak intensity, with top winds of 90 mph, in the far eastern Atlantic. Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, said the Atlantic – which has seen above-normal seasons in 12 of the last 20 years – has been in an era of high activity for hurricanes since 1995. However, this highactivity pattern is expected to be offset in 2014 by the impacts of El Niño, and by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures than we’ve seen in recent years. “Atmospheric and oceanic conditions across the tropical Pacific are already taking on some El Niño characteristics. Also, we are currently seeing strong trade winds and wind shear over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAA’s climate models predict these conditions will persist, in part because of El Niño,” Bell said. “The expectation of near-average Atlantic Ocean temperatures this season, rather than the above-average temperatures seen since 1995, also suggests fewer Atlantic hurricanes.” NOAA is rolling out new tools at the National Hurricane Center this year. An experimental mapping tool will be used to show communities their storm surge flood threat.

The map will be issued for coastal areas when a hurricane or tropical storm watch is first issued, or approximately 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. The map will show land areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas. Early testing on continued improvements to NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model (HWRF) shows a 10 percent improvement in this year’s model compared to last year. Hurricane forecasters use the HWRF along with other models to produce forecasts and issue warnings. The HWRF model is being adopted by a number of Western Pacific and Indian Ocean rim nations. NOAA’s seasonal hurricane outlook is not a hurricane landfall forecast; it does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts will be provided throughout the season by NOAA’s National Hurricane Center. “It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall to have disastrous impacts on our communities,” said Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate administrator for Response and Recovery. He noted Pensacola experienced severe flooding from five inches of rain in 45 minutes – without a tropical storm or hurricane – April 30. “We need you to be ready. Know your risk for hurricanes and severe weather, take action now to be prepared and be an example for others in your office, school or community. Learn to prepare for hurricanes at www.ready.gov/ hurricanes.”

Storm names for 2014 Arthur Bertha Cristobal Dolly Edouard Fay Gonzalo Hanna Isaias Josephine Kyle Laura Marco Nana Omar Paulette Rene Sally Teddy Vicky Wilfred

“We’re looking at the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Ivan ... (and) past history shows this installation has somewhat of a pattern with tropical storms.” – NAS Pensacola Emergency Manager Burt Fenters

TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph

For more, visit http://www.ready.navy.mil/

Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph NAS Pensacola

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July 3, 2014

GOSPORT

Mutual aid agreements benefit base, counties By Ens. Joshua Lamb NAS Whiting Field Public Affairs

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ire and Emergency Services Gulf Coast (F&ESGC) Station 1 located onboard Naval Air Station Whiting Field (NASWF) has long-standing mutual aid partnership agreements with Santa Rosa and Escambia counties in Florida; and Escambia, Baldwin and Conecuh counties in Alabama that allow for joint training events and improved emergency response. Such mutual aid partnerships are one element of the department’s outreach to the community that mirrors the installation’s “good neighbor” philosophy. Responding to more than 980 combined on- and off-base emergencies last year, F&ESGC plays a key support role in the local community’s response to all types of emergency’s. F&ESGC responds to the offbase calls to foster better relationships between the military airfields amid the two state and five county region F&ESGC supports. Fire Chief Frank Barrow emphasized that this relationship is “crucial to Santa Rosa County because many of the fire departments in the county are understaffed and rely on our mutual aid partners to support us.” Firefighters go above and beyond to protect Santa Rosa County; however, due to staffing shortfalls, they at times are unable to place the number of personnel on the scene to meet the needs of the emergency at hand. This is where the dedicated firefighters (military and civil service) onboard NASWF and the outlying fields are able to offer a helping hand. Military firefighters at nine of 13 NASWF’s Outlying Fields (OLFs) are on station when the fields are open to flight operations. The mutual aid agreements allow, military firefighters while traveling to and from an OLF, to provide the first response to emergencies that occur as they travel to and from the OLF or when they are closer to an incident than the local emergency response teams. Once the local

team arrives, the military firefighters would then act in a supporting role as needed. The local fire departments are able to assist F&ESGC across 4,500 nautical miles of airspace for which Station 1 and the outlying field crash teams are responsible. For example, if an aircraft were to go down outside an OLF perimeter, one of the mutual aid fire departments would likely provide additional support. F&ESGC and NASWF mutual aid partners would work together to respond to the mishap. Emergency response personnel rely heavily on each other during these events to improve services to the local community and NASWF. According to Assistant Chief of Operations Glen Greenough, the station averages about one

Firefighters from Fire and Emergency Services Gulf Coast respond to a fire at the Mount Carmel United Methodist Church, located north of Jay, May 14.

deserve recognition for the services our station provides on a daily basis, as they are the ones that go out and handle these situations,” he said. These calls have included situations such as residential and commercial fires, motor vehicle accidents, and hazardous material spills. Additionally F&ESGC actively supports the ongoing training requirements of firefighters by assisting with programs like the Wildland Fire Training Conference and

Firefighters from Fire and Emergency Services Gulf Coast get the May 14 church fire under control.

mutual aid request per week. This type of cooperation often requires the juggling of two sets of radios and phones to keep up communications with both the military and civilian dispatching systems, but Greenough asserts that managing multiple agency responders helps to saves lives and protects property. “The F&ESGC firefighters

through the use of mobile and fixed training aids. The Wildland Fire Training conference is unique to the Munson District of Division of Forestry and was held in March this year. F&ESGC assisted this event with planning support and by providing a live fire trainer which simulates helicopter fires. Support of this and other pro-

grams helps improve the lines of communication among mutual aid partners. Another advantage of the conference is the networking opportunities made available with some non-traditional partners such as law enforcement and emergency management. While helping to support and coordinate with such a conference is time consuming, the station was encouraged to pursue the efforts as another way of partnering with the community. Not only did the chain of command support the endeavor, but the commanding officer participated in the Wildland Training Conference’s opening ceremony by addressing the local responders of Northwest Florida. The intentions of both the installation and the fire station would be to continue participation with this event in the future. “I couldn’t ask for a more supportive commanding officer than Capt. Matthew Coughlin,” Greenough said. Training events with off-base agencies are becoming more frequent and encouraged by Navy leadership. These events not only help maintain the readiness of the departments but also help to strengthen the relationship that the base has with the local community. While mutual aid responses

and cooperative training evolutions form a very tangible presence for the citizenry, it is equally important for the team to encourage a presence that is not affiliated with tragic circumstances. Firefighters are the “good guys” and they reinforce that reality through volunteerism. Members of the F&ESGC team help strengthen community relationships activities such as: CPR and first responder training, Toys for Tots, food drives, Pilot for a Day and Fire Prevention Week. “I’m glad I can help teach these classes and (I) approach them with the attitude that they could be providing CPR to one of my family members,” Fire Lt. Stephen Hudson said about one of his volunteer efforts. He has been a member of F&ESGC for 14 years and teaches CPR in Santa Rosa County, coaches tball and soft ball, and is a coordinator for the Safe Haven for New Born program. Firefighter Antonio Jackson serves as a deacon for his church in addition to his duties with the fire station, and he enjoys speaking to elementary students during Fire Prevention Week. “It’s a great organization, and it’s exciting that there is something new each and every day requiring us to be so versatile,” he said.

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS


July 3, 2014

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GOSPORT

NHP offering school physical exams

Partyline submissions

Officials at Naval Hospital Pensacola (NHP) are planning several school/sports physical rodeos to assist parents who need to get physicals for their children before school starts. The physical exams are available for children 4 and older who are enrolled in the family medicine or pediatrics clinics. Rodeos are scheduled for for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 12, July 26 and Aug. 9 at NHP, 6000 Highway 98 West. Appointments are required for physicals. For more information or to make an appointment, call 505-7121.

You can submit information for possible publication in Partyline by sending an e-mail to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil. Submissions must include the organization’s name and details about events including times, dates, locations and any costs involved. Contact information also is required. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with established standards. Items should be submitted at least one week in advance. The deadline is noon Friday for the next week’s publication.

Chaplain’s office schedules retreat

The Command Chaplain’s Office for Naval Air Station Pensacola is offering a marriage enrichment retreat (MER) July 25-July 27. For information or to register for the retreat, call 452-2341, ext. 5, and ask for AOAR Emily Saladine. VFW Post 706, 5000 Lillian Highway, is presenting The Fourth at the “V” from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. today. The event is open to the public, veterans and all service members. The After Midnight Band will perform dance music and there will be a fireworks display. An all-you-can-eat buffet is scheduled to start at 5 p.m. A $6 donation is requested for the buffet. For more information, call 455-0026.

graduation at Ski Beach. Open positions for mentors include: female and male staff youth mentors, medical corpsman and qualified bus drivers for a few planned field trips. Mentors (staff) can be active-duty military or DoD civilians. A mentors training day is scheduled for July 7 and parent orientation is that evening. Mentors will gather July 18 for staff cleanup day and phase-one reports. For applications, contact AMC William Goldacker at William.Goldacker@navy.mil or William Kington at William.Kington@navy.mil to get an application. For more information, call 554-5716.

Thrift shop getting ready to reopen

Time to check your voting status

VFW Post 706 schedules July 4 event

The Navy-Marine Coprs Relief Society (NMCRS) Thrift Shop, Bldg. 3736, at NASP Corry Station, plans to re-open at 9 a.m. July 8. The store has been closed for the past few weeks due to the lack of power. To celebrate the reopening, the shop will be holding a blow-out sale, with a 50 percent off of the prices on clothing and shoes for men, women, children and infants. The thrift store offers a wide selection of household goods, kitchenware, athletic equipment, fashion accessories and uniform items. All thrift shop proceeds benefit the NMCRS. For more information, call the NMCRS office at 452-2300.

DEFY summer camp announced

The NAS Pensacola Drug Education For Youth (DEFY) program is taking applications for campers and mentors for the 2014 phase-one summer camp. The camp is open to children of active-duty military and DoD civilians ages 9 to 12. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided daily. The camp starts July 8 and ends July 17 with

Is your voter registration information up to date? Florida voters can go to http://registration.elections.myflorida.com/CheckVoterStatus to verify that they are registered to vote and their voter registration information is correct. If you are registered to vote in another state and need assistance with determining your voter status, contact the NASP Voting Assistance Office. For most states, the voter registration deadline for the general election is in October. Don’t wait until that last minute to register. For election information and deadlines, go to http://www.fvap.gov/vao/vag/chapter2 and click on your state. If you have any questions about vosting, contact Lt. Selma Guice at the NASP Voting Assistance Office at 452-4244 or YNC Justen Davis by phone at 452-2615 or by e-mail at Justen.davis@navy.mil.

Water quality reports available

The annual drinking water quality reports for NAS Pensacola/NASP Corry Station and Saufley Field are available on the NAS Pensacola website

at http://www.cnic.navy.mil/pensacola/index.htm. Copies can be obtained by contacting Integrated Science Solutions Inc. Environmental at 452-3908. NAS Pensacola routinely monitors for contaminants in drinking water according to federal and state laws, rules and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of monitoring for the period of Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2013. Data obtained before Jan. 1, 2013, and presented in the report are from the most recent testing done. For more information about the reports or water utility, contact Joelle O’Daniel-Lopez at 452-3131, ext. 3027.

Teams racking up miles for challenge

The 1914 Mile Challenge to commemorate the 100th year anniversary of NAS Pensacola is under way. The race, which began Jan. 17, is being put on by the NASP Air Operations Department. Teams of no more than seven individuals are competing to finish a total of 1,914 miles by Nov. 14. As of June 26, six teams are in the race: The Blue Ducks, 2,128.25 miles; Misfits, 1,492.24 miles; Illist, 727.33 miles; Kassie Long’s Team, 646.89 miles; German Eagles, 391.3 miles; and The German Group, 122.7miles. The Blue Ducks recently met the 1914 mile marker for first but will continue to rack up mileage. Participants leading the event are: Wayne Boulanger (Misfits), 880.5 miles; Robert Sass (Blue Ducks), 768.5 miles; Stephanie Oram (Blue Ducks), 610.1miles. Teams can still register at the Radford Fitness Center. The race is open to all MWR patrons. Miles can be completed by doing cardio exercise, i.e. running, rowing, elliptical, ARC machine, stairmaster, etc … The only piece of equipment not allowed is the bike. For more information, contact AZ2 Christopher McDonald at 452-4333 by or e-mail at christopher.p.mcdona@navy.mil.

Memorial service planned for Denton

A Jeremiah Denton Day is scheduled for July 15 at Battleship Park. Denton, who grew up in Mobile, died March 28. July 15 was his birthday and he would have been 90 years old this year. A former U.S. senator, Denton was a rear admiral and naval aviator who survived more than seven years as a prisoner of war (POW) in North Vietnam. A memorial service is scheduled for 10 a.m. July 15 at the pavilion. Denton’s airplane and mementos will be on display. For more information, contact retired Navy Capt. Hal Pierce by phone at (251) 626-4743 or by e-mail at Capthal@bellsouth.net.

Free consultations. Call 456-5779 PAYING ATTENTION TO CLIENT EXPECTATIONS Have you read enough advertisements that are all fluff and buzz words? Maybe they all read alike because they are all written by Marketing Gurus. I, Steven W. Bowden, a lawyer with 30 years of experience, wrote the contents of the webpage. Almost all of that experience involves depositions, trials, hearings or representing clients in court. This firm represents clients throughout Florida with client contact in person or by email. If you are in the Military, there are particular things you must know if involved in a court in Florida. This firm has the knowledge and experience required to address the special needs of its Military clients. We have many Military clients since we are located one mile outside of Corry Station entrance off New Warrington Road and near NAS Pensacola. The firm has also represented service members and spouses stationed on NAS Pensacola, Hurlburt Field, Fort Walton Beach and Eglin Air Force Base among others. My firm’s practice areas are listed at the bottom of this page. The information included on each one is intended to give you a start as to what you need to know regarding each subject matter. Maybe it will help you get through the night or weekend, or save you from making a mistake. It is written for you. If you need more information, call or make a free appointment to discuss your situation with me. If you come in, I will discuss your problem with you and give you experienced advice regarding the issue and the expectations of what is going to happen next. I won’t tell you “what you want to hear" or offer a low price just to get your business. You may not like what you are told, but it will be realistic and what you need to hear. You will get my best effort, expertise and experience with aggression and maybe a little attitude! My staff will treat you like your Grandmother might. They will listen to you and help you get through tough times in The Law Firm of Steven W. Bowden a comforting manner. We make a good team to represent you. 4502 Twin Oaks Drive If you need help after reading our practice area content, call or come in. It is free for the initial consultation.

Pensacola, FL 32506 Respectfully Yours, Phone: Steven W. Bowden, Esq. (850) 456-5779

PRACTICE AREAS Divorce Alimony

Child Support Military Divorce Criminal Defense DUI

Military Divorce Active Duty or Retired

We are located near Corry Station and NAS Pensacola. As a result, for 30 years we have handled problems that are unique to active duty and retired military service members. We are able to handle most issues where Florida has jurisdiction, which may include Initial Divorce proceedings, Spousal Support, Child Support, Modification, Visitation or Custody issues Contempt, E-mail or Teleconferencing. In cases of deployment, regarding court appearances, many occasions relevant to these issues (pursuant to the other sides agreement when necessary), you can testify by telephone and never have to physically be in Florida for the proceeding. Set forth below are a few of the issues that you may question regarding, whether you are active

Sexual Assault Domestic Violence Injunction Drug Trafficking

duty, retired or the spouse of active duty or retire military. Child Support In calculating Child Support, in addition to your regular or retirement pay, the following pay is included: 1. Housing Allowance 2. Sea or Flight Pay 3. Retirement Pay 4. Social Security 5. V.A. Benefits (Yes, despite what others have told you, VA pay is included in child support calculations. Some of you will argue this point. Make an appointment and I will show you why it is included). You will still be governed by the child support requirements under the general Divorce/Child Support for the state of Florida. FYI: Based on the child support formula, it is almost always cheaper, if possible, to use day care.

E-mail: sbowdenlaw@gmail.com For more information about Steven Bowden’s areas of practice, go to http:// pensacola-lawyer.com

A major problem which can affect both the payor and recipient of child support is when the support should begin. If you are involved in the initial Divorce proceeding the payor’s obligation begins, at the minimum, when the divorce is filed and/or you no longer live together with the child/children. The separation date may predate the filing of the divorce petition. You need an attorney’s advice to ascertain your obligation. If you wait until the final hearing, you may have to pay ongoing child support plus a court ordered amount each month to satisfy an arrearage plus interest. If you are active duty military, the JAG manual (navy page) will specify what you must pay to continue to support your family until further court order. A temporary hearing could reduce the amount of child support that you have been direct to may pay military orders or rules. If you are the spouse of an active duty military member, reservist or retiree, see Spouse/Military

or call for an appointment regarding the questions you may have. Retirement Alimony/Spousal Support In Florida, military retirement funds are an asset which is treated differently than other income related to Alimony/Spousal Support. The spouse of retired military personnel receives a pro rata share of the retirement funds. If the spouse remarries, the awarded share is still paid. If the military retiree dies, and an SBP is elected, it is still paid. You must make sure your lawyer uses the correct formula in order to establish the amount owed. DFAS has particular guidelines that must be met in order to accomplish the correct payment of spousal support.

For more information on these and other issues handled by the Steven Bowden Law Firm, go to http://pensacola-lawyer.com.


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July 3, 2014

GOSPORT


SECTION

LIFE Fourth of

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CID CO passes along family tradition of naval service;

July 3, 2014

See page B2 Spotlight

GOSPORT Inspiration from the Declaration of Independence Excerpts from http://www. archives.gov/exhibits/charters/ declaration_transcript.html

IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the 13 United States of America, When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed ... The history of the present king of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over these states ... In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury ... We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America, in general congress, assembled, appealing to the supreme judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the name, and by authority of the good people of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united Colonies are, and of right ought to be free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved ... And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.

See page 4B for a list of area fireworks shows

Fireworks: It’s better and way safer to go to the show From National Fire Protection Association

Permanent scarring, loss of vision, dismemberment – these are too often the harsh realities of amateur fireworks use. To keep the public safe from fireworksrelated injuries and deaths, the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) urges everyone to treat fireworks, whether legal or illegal for consumers, as suitable only for use by trained professionals. According to NFPA, amateur fireworks use endangers not only the users, but also bystanders and surrounding property and structures. Pyrotechnic devices ranging from sparklers to aerial rockets cause thousands of fires and serious injuries each year. “Safe and sane fireworks don’t exist,” said John Hall, NFPA’s division manager of fire analysis and research. “When things go wrong with fireworks, they go very wrong, very fast, far faster than any fire protection provisions can reliably respond.” In recent years, fireworks have been one of the leading causes of injuries serious enough to require hospital emergency room treatment. Fireworks can result in severe burns, fractures, or scars or even death or disfigurement that can last a lifetime. The thousands of serious injuries each year typically harm the eyes, head, or

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hands, and are mostly reported in states where fireworks are legal. Even sparklers, which are considered by many to be harmless, reach temperatures of more than 1,000 degrees. Wooded areas, homes, and even automobiles have become engulfed in flames because of fireworks. Fireworks-related fires have typically caused at least $20 million in property loss (not adjusted for inflation) each year in recent years. A substantial portion of the structure fire property loss due to fireworks typically involves bottle rockets or other fireworks rockets. These rockets can land on rooftops or wedge within certain structures and still retain enough heat to cause a fire. Public fireworks displays are a safer alternative. Conducted by trained professionals, these displays are the smartest and safest choice for anyone because they are established under controlled settings and regulations. After these displays, or any other time, children should never pick up fireworks that may be left over. Fireworks that have been ignited and fail to immediately explode or discharge can cause injury because they may still be active. Children should always tell an adult if they find fireworks rather than picking up smoking or charred fireworks themselves, which is just too risky.

From NASP Safety Department

The Fourth of July holiday is a celebration of who we are as Americans. As we prepare to honor our national identity with parades, fireworks and backyard barbecues, it’s important to remember risk management. The American people rely on the Navy and Marine Corps to make it back to work after the holiday in one piece. • If you hit the water, make sure you know how to swim. Pay attention to posted signs and lifeguards. If, despite your best efforts, you get caught in a rip current, swim parallel to the shore until you’re out of the current. Trying to swim against it will only tire you out. Keep a close eye on small children.

A reminder from Fire & Emergency Services Gulf Coast: NASPNCLAInst 11320.1H. states “Fireworks: The sale, use or storage of fireworks of any kind (to include sparklers) on the naval reservation, including Navyowned housing areas, are strictly prohibited.”

Gosling Games Color Me ‘Firecracker’

Bring plenty of sunscreen and non-alcoholic beverages. Boating? Make sure everyone onboard has a personal floatation device and knows how to use it. • Planning a party? Be a responsible host. If you’re planning to serve alcohol, provide plenty of food and non-alcoholic beverage options as well. Make sure you limit your own consumption of alcohol so you can ensure none of your guests drink too much, get out of hand, or attempt to drive home under the influence. Stop serving alcohol at least an hour before the scheduled end of the party and be willing to provide a bed, couch, or piece of floor to anyone who needs to sleep it off. Think: Don’t let a poor decision ruin a good time.

Jokes & Groaners Ten Fourth of July jokes that misfired (10) What’s red, white, blue and green? A patriotic turtle. (9) What did one flag say to the other flag? Nothing. It just waved. (8) Why did Paul Revere ride his horse from Boston? Because the horse was too heavy to carry. (7) How is a healthy person like the United States? They both have good “constitutions.” (6) What dance was very popular in 1776? The Indepen-dance. (5) What would you get if you crossed George Washington with cattle feed? The Fodder of Our Country. (4) Teacher: “Where was the Declaration of Independence signed?” Student: “On the bottom.” (3) Q: “Did you hear the one about the Liberty Bell?” A: “Yeah, it cracked me up.” (2) What did King George think of the American colonists? He thought they were revolting. (1) Do they have a Fourth of July in England? Yes. That’s how they get from July 3rd to July 5th.


PA G E

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SPOTLIGHT

July 3, 2014

CID CO Capt. Susan K. Cerovsky passes along family tradition of naval service Story, photo by Gary Nichols CID Public Affairs

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ASP Center for Information Dominance (CID) Commanding Officer Capt. Susan K. Cerovsky commissioned her nephew into the Navy Reserves June 9. Standing in front of a World War I-era field ambulance at the National Museum of Naval Aviation, onboard NAS Pensacola. Cerovsky, who has served in the U.S. Navy for nearly 29 years, passed on a Cerovsky family tradition of military service when she swore her nephew, Christopher Michael Cerovsky, into the U.S. Navy Reserves as a future medical corps officer. “I’m so proud of him,” Capt. Cerovsky said. “He is so smart, so squared away and so motivated. I’m sure he will make an outstanding naval officer.” Ens. Cerovsky, 21, graduated from Mississippi State University magna cum laude this past spring with a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences and a

minor in microbiology. He also is a member of the prestigious Shackouls Honors College. Ens. Cerovsky will be attending Temple University School of Medicine at Philadelphia, Penn., this fall. His medical education will be fully paid for thanks to his recent acceptance into the Navy’s Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP) in exchange for service as a commissioned medical corps officer. Navy Officer Recruiting Station Pensacola Medical Officer Recruiter Lt. Juan Serrato, explained that the HPSP is a highly competitive program. “It’s really a proud moment when you see fine young men and women enter the Navy

NASP Center for Information Dominance (CID) Commanding Officer Capt. Susan K. Cerovsky commissioned her nephew, Christopher Michael Cerovsky, into the U.S. Navy Reserves as a future medical corps officer June 9 at the National Naval Aviation Museum.

through the HPSP scholarship program,” Serrato said. “The academic excellence that this young man displayed helps ensures the future success of Navy medicine.” Upon graduation from medical school in four years, Cerovsky will be promoted to an active-duty lieutenant, and he will serve in the Navy for eight years. Not only has Capt. Cerovsky passed along her tradition of naval service, she also presented what will undoubtedly become a family heirloom, the Naval Education and Training Support

Command training manual, “Useful Information for Newly Commissioned Officers,” which she received when she was sworn into the Navy nearly three decades ago, to Ens. Cerovsky. “I don’t think they publish this manual in printed form anymore,” Capt. Cerovsky said. “But it still contains useful information for newly commissioned officers.” Ens. Cerovsky said he was humbled to be presented with such a thoughtful gift along with the honor of being sworn in by his aunt, the CID commanding officer.

“I am just overwhelmed,” Ens. Cerovsky said. “I’m grateful to be able to carry on our family tradition of naval service. Thank you all for being here today. I’ll do my duty to the best of my abilities, and I won’t let any of you down.” Also present during the ceremony was Ens. Cerovsky’s father, Roger Cerovsky; his mother, Alison; his brother, Brian; his grandparents, Shirley and George Cerovsky; and uncle, Cmdr. Evan Hipsley. For more information about CID, visit http:// www. netc. navy.mil/centers/ceninfodom.


GOSPORT

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July 3, 2014

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5 books added to Navy reading program From U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs

NEWPORT, R.I. (NNS) – An update to the Chief of Naval Operation Professional Reading Program (CNO-PRP) was recently announced in NavAdmin 121/14. The update serves to keep the CNO-PRP fresh and relevant and will include five new titles, which focus on professional development of Sailors throughout the fleet, to accompany the current 18 CNO-PRP books. Titles included in this update are: “Cyber Security and Cyber War,” by P. W. Singer and A. Friedman; “Leading With the Heart,” by Mike Krzyzewski and D. Philips; “The Trident,” by

Jason Redman and J. Bruning; “Turn the Ship Around,” by retired Capt. David Marquet; and “The Twilight War,” by David Crist. A kit containing the new titles is being shipped to commands throughout the fleet. Large commands will receive multiple copies of each title. Commands with existing reading program libraries will integrate the new titles into legacy collections. Books from previous lists will be retained to build a lending library for the command. A number of current and previous CNO-PRP titles are available for free loan as eBook or digital audio downloads from the Navy library e-content within the Navy General Library Program portal,

Your City, Your Magazine

which is accessible through Navy Knowledge Online. Active participation in the CNO-PRP is highly encouraged for all Sailors. The intent of this program is to serve as a tool to help extend Sailors’ personal and professional growth beyond their day-to-day duties. The CNO-PRP selections are designed to improve critical thinking skills and help Sailors become better citizens and leaders. For more information on CNOPRP or to replace worn, damaged, and missing books, contact the CNO-PRP management office at http://navyreading.dodlive.mil. For more news from Naval War College, go to www.navy.mil/ local/nwc/.

Cmdr. Daniel Dolan, deputy program manager for the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Professional Reading Program, program manager professor John Jackson and Rear Adm. Walter E. “Ted” Carter Jr., president of the U.S. Naval War College, gather around a collection of books on the Navy’s list of recommended reading for all Sailors. Photo by MCC James E. Foehl


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GOSPORT

July 3, 2014

Morale, Welfare and Recreation

The Sertoma Fouth of July Celebration in downtown Pensacola includes a fireworks display over Pensacola Bay. Photo from pensacolafireworks.com

By Janet Thomas Gosport Staff Writer

Red, white and blue will be the uniform of the day for the Fourth of July. Here is a list of local events and fireworks displays: • Pensacola: The Sertoma Fourth of July Celebration features a full day of activities from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. in Seville Square. For the 25th year, area Sertoma organizations are coordinating the event. Activities will include a children’s area, arts and crafts vendors, live entertainment and a hot dog eating contest at noon. The festivities will culminate with the 9 p.m. fireworks show over Pensacola Bay, synchronized with music broadcast on Cat Country FM 98.7. Admission is free. Spectators should not bring dogs or

their own fireworks. For more information, go to http://pensacolafireworks.com. • Pensacola Beach: A fireworks display is scheduled to start at 8:30 p.m. July 4 over Santa Rosa Sound, offshore from Quietwater Beach. Admission is free. For more information, call 932-1500, or go to www.pensacolabeachchamber.com. • Milton: Riverfest 2014 will be a “Celebration of Freedom” in downtown Milton. Festivities start at 9 a.m. July 4 and continue through the day. Bring blankets and lawn chairs and enjoy food and fun. Activities will include a bike show, a car show, a children’s play area, music and a salute to veterans. The Great Mill Town Duck Race will take place at 5 p.m., and there will be a fireworks display over the Blackwater River at dark. Admission is

free. For more information, call (850) 623-2339 or go to www. srcchamber.com. • Navarre Beach: A July 4 fireworks display will be shot off at dusk in the Navarre Beach Marine Park, 8740 Gulf Blvd., near the Sandpiper Pavilion. For more information, go to www.floridasplayground.com/ index.cfm/news/events. • Gulf Shores: The City of Gulf Shores will celebrate the Fourth of July with a fireworks display beginning at 9 p.m. Carnival-like activities will kick off at 6 p.m. at the public beach area. The fireworks will be shot off a barge south of the West Second Street beach access. Sunny 105.7 FM will be broadcasting patriotic music to coincide with the show. For more information, call (251) 968-1172 or go to www.gulfshoresal.gov.

At the movies FRIDAY

“Edge of Tomorrow” (3D), PG-13, 5 p.m. 7:30 p.m.; “Maleficent” (2D), PG, 6 p.m.; “22 Jump Street,” R, 8:20 p.m.

SATURDAY

“X Men: Days of Future Past” (3D), PG-13, 1:30 p.m.; “Edge of Tomorrow” (3D), PG-13, 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m.; “Edge of Tomorrow” (2D), PG-13, noon; “Maleficent” (2D), PG, 2:30 p.m.; “X Men: Days of Future Past” (2D), PG-13, 5 p.m.; “22 Jump Street,” R, 7:40 p.m.

SUNDAY

“Godzilla” (3D), PG-13, 1 p.m.; “Edge of Tomorrow” (3D), PG-13, 3:30 p.m.;“X Men: Days of Future Past” (3D), PG-13, 6 p.m.; “X Men: Days of Future Past” (2D), PG-13, noon; “Maleficent” (2D), PG, 2:20 p.m.; “22 Jump Street,” R, 5 p.m.; “Edge of Tomorrow” (2D), PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY

“Maleficent” (2D), PG, 5 p.m.; “Edge of Tomorrow” (3D), PG-13, 7:10 p.m.; “Blended,” PG13, 5:10 p.m.; “22 Jump Street,” R, 7:30 p.m.

TUESDAY

“Maleficent” (2D), PG, 5 p.m.; “X Men: Days of Future Past” (3D), PG-13, 7:10 p.m.; “Edge of Tomorrow” (2D), PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “A Million Ways to Die in the West,” R, 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

Note: Portside Cinema will be closed July 9 for Chris Young concert on Portside Lawn.

THURSDAY

“Maleficent” (2D), PG, 5 p.m.; “X Men: Days of Future Past” (2D), PG-13, 7:10 p.m.; “Million Dollar Arm,” PG, 5:10 p.m.; “22 Jump Street,” R, 7:30 p.m.

COST Regular: $3 adults, $1.50 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger 3D shows: $5 adults, $3 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

Advertise with us. Call Simone Sands at 433-1166 ext. 21

Details: 452-3522 or www.naspensacola-mwr.com

The NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department has a number of upcoming events and activities. For more information, call 452-3806, ext. 3100, or go to the MWR website at www.naspensacola-mwr.com. • Chris Young concert: NASP MWR and the Air Force Reserve are presenting a “Tour for the Troops” concert featuring Chris Young with special guest Josh Thompson July 9 on the lawn at NASP Portside. Gates will open at 5 p.m. and concert will start at 6 p.m. The concert is open to all DoD personnel, their families and guests. Admission is free, but tickets are required. Tickets are available at MWR ITT, MWR administration office (Bldg. 4143) or at the Liberty Center at NASP or NASP Corry Station. Food and beverages will be on sale. Fans are encouraged to bring chairs and blankets. No coolers or outside food and drinks allowed. • Movies on the Lawn: Family movies shown at dusk (about 7:45 p.m.) the second and fourth Saturday of month through August in front of Portside Gym, Bldg. 627, at NASP. Door prizes for children. Admission is free. For information, call 452-3806, ext. 3140. • Summer aquatics: Mustin Beach Pool, Bldg. 3201, and Mustin Beach are open for the season. The Corry Station pool is closed for repairs. Swimming lessons and aquatic camps are scheduled. For details, go to http://nas pensacola-mwr.com/water/aquatics.html or call 452-9429. • Water Babies: 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. July 12. Other classes are July 19, July 26 and Aug. 2. For ages 6 months to 3 years. Open to military, DoD and contractors. $30. For more information, call 452-9429. • Kayak Camp: At Bayou Grande Family Picnic Center (Ski Beach). Sessions for ages 10 to 16 are 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Aug. 4 to Aug. 8. Sessions for ages 7 to 9 are 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 14 to July 18. Military $6; DoD, contractor $65. For information, call 452-9429. • Sailboat races: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. each Thursday at Sherman Cove Marina. Two divisions – 14 foot Sunfish and 18 foot Hunter. Cost is $10 per person (includes rental of boat to race and gear). For more information or to register for the race, call 452-4152. • Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling: Register for NOFFS performance training. One-day course will teach you how to execute NOFFS exercises. Classes 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 7 and Oct. 2 at Radford Fitness Center. To register, e-mail Brian Hannah at brian.hannah@navy.mil. For more information, call 452-6198. • Summer Reading Program: The “Paws to Read” summer reading program is being held 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday through Aug. 7 at the NASP Library, Bldg. 634. For more information or to register, call 452-4362. • Outdoor gear rental: The NASP Outpost at the Bayou Grande Family Recreation Area at the end of John Tower Road has canoes, kayaks and camping gear for rent. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Monday. For more information, call 452-9642 or 336-1843 (to make reservations).

Liberty activities Liberty program events target young, unaccompanied active-duty military. New hours are 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday. Regular events are scheduled at the main Liberty Center in the Portside Entertainment Complex. You must sign up in advance for off-base trips. For more information, call 452-2372 or go to http://naspensacolamwr.com/singsail/liberty.htm.


July 3, 2014

COMMAND LINES

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Help for victims of sexual assault in the DoD community is a call, click or text away. The SafeHelpline provides live crisis support and information by trained staff. Call (877) 9955247; go to www.SafeHelpline. org; or text: 55-247 CONUS; (202) 470-5546 OCONUS (may be additional charges for OCONUS). The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program provides prevention, intervention and a 24/7/365 response. Activeduty and adult family member sexual assault victims have a choice of reporting options, unrestricted and restricted. To access an unrestricted report, the victim can report to his/her chain-of-command, security/law enforcement, NCIS, SAPR Victim Advocate (VA), SARC, and his/her CO shall commence an investigation. To access restricted reporting, the victim can disclose his/her sexual assault only to the SARC, a current SAPR VA, a health care provider and/or a chaplain. To contact the NASP 24/7 VA, call 449-9231/2. To contact the SARC during working hours, call 452-5990, ext. 0; during and after working hours, call the SARC cell phone number at 554-5606.

Fleet and Family Support Center The NASP Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), 151 Ellyson Ave., Bldg. 625, is offering the following: • Parenting Workshop – Ages Zero to Two Years Old: 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. July 9. This is for expectant parents, new parent and parents of toddlers-up to 2 years of age. For more information or to register, call 452-5990. • First Time Dads Class : 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. July 9. Topics include diaper changing, feeding, swaddling and more. For more information or to register, call 452-5609. • Sun and Splash Playgroup: 10 a.m. to noon July 17 at Lighthouse Ter-

race Community Center, 1 Price Ave. It’s summer and Balfour Beatty and the FFSC’s New Parent Support Program are presenting a day of fun in the sun. Wear bathing suits and bring sunscreen and learn about water and sun safety. Water shoes must be worn on splash pad. Event open to toddlers and preschoolers.To register, call 452-5609. • Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Command POC Training: 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. July 25. Command POCs are a valuable part of the Navy’s EFMP team. Updated information and resources will be covered. To register, call 452-5618 or e-mail rachel.wolf.ctr@navy.mil.

Community Outreach NASP Community Outreach has volunteer opportunities including: • Special Olympics: This group provides year-round sports training and competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for local individuals with intellectual disabilities. Coaches are needed for aquatics, golf, tennis and sailing. • Pensacola Habitat For Humanity: Building, painting, framing and some clerical needs. Group assists lower income and/or disabled people by building and restoring homes. • Pensacola Lighthouse and Museum: There are numerous opportunities such as helping with events and maintenance and grounds upkeep of the quarters.

• Pensacola Humane Society: 5 North Q Street. Groom and exercise cats and dogs, clean cages and dog runs, process adoptions, feed the animals, launder towels and bedding and with office tasks. Single volunteers can volunteer at any time, groups will need to set up a time. • Clean up project: 8 a.m. first Thursday of every month, Lexington Terrace Park. Help members of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) pick up trash. The NASP Community Outreach office tracks volunteer hours. Report any volunteer hours to receive due recognition. For more information on volunteer activities, call 452-2532.

Worship schedule NAS Pensacola Protestant • Communion service, 8 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Sunday School, all ages, 9 a.m. Sunday, Bldg. 634, back classrooms. • Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Chapel choir, 12:30 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Contemporary service, 6 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Womenʼs Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Bldg. 634, back classrooms. • Training Air Wing Six Bible Study, 11:15 a.m. Tuesday, Griffith Hall student lounge, second deck. • Bible study (for all), 7 p.m. Tuesday, Bldg. 634, back classrooms. • Bible study, 5 p.m. Wednesday, J.B. McKamey Center.

Roman Catholic • Sunday Mass, 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Daily Mass, 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the All Faiths Chapel. • Confessions: Scheduled 30 minutes before services.

Jewish • Bʼnai Israel Synagogue, 1829 North Ninth Ave., conducts services at 7 p.m. Friday and

9:30 a.m. Saturday and military personnel are welcome. For more information, call 433-7311.

Latter Day Saints • Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. For NAS Pensacola worship information, call 452-2341.

NASP Corry Station Protestant • Adult Bible study, 9 a.m. Sunday, chapel conference room. • Chapel choir, 9 a.m. Sunday, sanctuary. • Worship service, 10 a.m. Sunday. • Fellowship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday. • Praise and worship, 7:30 p.m. Sunday. • Bible study and dinner, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, fellowship hall.

Roman Catholic • Mass, noon Sunday and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For NASP Corry Station worship information, call 452-6376.

NAS Whiting Field Chapel Roman Catholic • Mass, 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Friday.

Protestant • Bible study, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. • Weekly chapel service, 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For NASP Whiting Field worship information, call 623-7212.

Northwest Florida’s Business Climate Magazine For Today’s Business and Tomorrow’s www.nwflbusinessclimate.com


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July 3, 2014

GOSPORT


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July 3, 2014

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To place an ad go online at www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext.24.

Marketplace

★ Motor ★ Merchandise ★ Employment ★ Real Estate ★ and more

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★ Place your ad online at www.gosportpensacola.com

★ Place your ad by phone at 850-433-1166 Ext. 24 Monday-Friday 8:30 am5:00 pm

Motor

Merchandise Employment

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Merchandise

Announcements

Articles for sale

Kane Educational Seminars IV Certification RN/LPN Clinical Skills Refresher Workshop will be in Pensacola July 12 and 13 Call 800-677-5224 NurseRefresher.c om BON Approved

Maytag laundry washer, cleans good, sell $75 firm. (850) 4653809 D O U B L E D R AW E R pedestal queen size bed. All wood. Headboard included. 2 large drawers on each side with 4 smaller drawers on the end. Lots of storage space. Asking $500.00. Very good condition. Call 2939446 to see.

Guam Liberation Day celebration picnic at NAS Pensacola on July 19. Looking for people from Guam to celebrate Liberation Day 1944. 455-2966 or 291- A DYNASTY 0891 like new womens bicycle and helEmployment met. Color is called Cashmere Catering at the Metallic. Very University of good condition. West Florida is Asking $75. 293looking to hire a 9446. Banquet Captain. The Banquet Family fun Styx Captain is re- River Resort, sponsible for su- $1,000. Rafting, pervising and s w i m m i n g , assisting with the camping, chilset-up, service dren’s playand clean-up of g r o u n d . all assigned ban- 251-213-8293 quet functions. Prior experience 6000 watt generis required for ator, APG 3009, c o n s i d e r a t i o n . All Power AmerPlease send re- ica, $375. 492sume to cater- 3574 ing@uwf.edu. Nikon D3000 Dining Services camera with 18at the University 55mm lens. Viviof West Florida is tar HD 0.43X seeking a quali- Wide angle fied candidate for W/Macro Cona Lead Cook. verter and HD Ability to work 2.2X Telephoto well in a group Converter. With and must be able camera bag $250. to perform in 450-6106 or 452fast-paced col- 2247 lege environment. 3+ years of Solid teak wood hands on cooking end table set, experience and solid hardwood culinary certifi- rocking chair cate/degree de- from Turkey with sired. Full brass inlay. Sevb a c k g r o u n d eral antique lamp check will be stand. Other furc o m p l e t e d . niture items too. Please apply in All priced to sell. person in the 453-4721 UWF Dining Services office, Stationary exerbuilding 22 room cise bike, like 133. new, $50. 251747-7056

Merchandise Entertainment center, beautiful 3 piece, oak, glass doors, $550, 4789321

Merchandise Project car— 1968 Cadillac Coupe Deville convertible, customer interior, runs/needs Salt water equip- r e s t o r a t i o n . ment: Loomis $3,995 obo. 48411” rod & Penn 3284 750 SSM reel, $100. St Croix 2013 Nissan Alrod 8”6” & Van tima, 2.5SL. Staal reel. $100. $24,999. Storm 9440485 blue exterior, charcoal leather PILATES ma- interior, fully chine $175, mat, loaded. One CDs, red/black owner, no accicords. 453-9341 dents. 12,000 miles. Warranty Samsung refrig- good until 35,000 erator, bottom miles. 723-8517 freezer, ice maker, great con- 1978 Mercedes dition. $150. 450, 124,000 Reason for sale, miles. 12k obo. upgraded all ap- 293-2292 pliances. 4928040 2012 Toyota Prius 2 HatchB u t c h e r back, $18,000. block/wine rack, 24,666 miles. In$150. 492-0025 cludes transferable 7 year/ Maytag washer 70,000 mile warand dryer. Great ranty. 50 MPG. condition! Pur- Black with beige chased set new. interior. One$250. 492-8040 owner, garage kept. 473-5657 2 cemetery plots for sale @ Mem- 2008 Toyota ory Park Ceme- Avalon, 102,000 tery in Milton, miles, seafoam FL. 626-4710 green, sunroof, very nice car. 492Shark fishing 5806. $15,800. from shore. Penn heavy duty 114H 1995 Z28 Careel and US made maro, 90,302 star 10 ft. rod. original miles, 500 yards of line. auto transmission, $100. 497-1167 AC, clean, sharplooking, extras, Rifle, muzzle asking $4,900. loader, 50 caliber, 332-5098 inline ignition, Pontiac new, never fired. 2006 Retails $339. Sell Grand Prix with for $165. 454- CD player and 9486 moon roof. Great condition. We are Rifle scope lau- selling due to uppaold VX III 3.5 coming PCS. We x 10 x 50 with are asking $8,200. original box. 375-0001 and talk $325. 417-1694 to Brandon Motors Autos for sale 1995 red Corvette convertible hardtop, 6-speed 5.7 liter, garaged, excellent condition, 100,000 miles, $11,500. Call 850-375-0201

2005 Corvette LS2 Coupe. 35,000 miles. AT. Cold AC. Very good condition. Photos, books, manuals, receipts, and records. Nonsmoker. Clear FL rebuilt title. 3243763. $19,999 will negotiate.

Motors 2009 Toyota Camry with 2.4L (4 cylinder), 30+ MPG!,5-Speed automatic, remote keyless entry. 74,000 miles. Immaculate condition! 418-2951 Trucks/Vans /SUV’s

Ford Escape 2005. Like new, 12,000 miles. $8,995. 456-8356

Motorcycles 2009 H-D Triglide Ultra Classic 1600cc, 8700 miles, stereo w/CD, CB, cruise, reverse, garage kept. $25,000. 2218100 2007 1300 Yamaha V-star, fully dressed with lots of extras, garage kept. $8,000 obo. A little over 12,000 miles. 458-5323

Real Estate

Motors 2005 Yamaha YZ85 dirtbike runs great, fast and fun. Cranks on the first kick. A s k i n g $ 1 , 2 0 0 / o f f e r. 380-0968

Real Estate Large home in Milton. 5200 sqft, 5/4. 2-car garage. Ready in July. $1,800 a month. Beautiful home on 6 acres. 1 year lease. Prefer active miliMisc Motors tary. 554-9411 or roybodale@bell2012 1960 south.net Blazer Bay CC 115 Yamaha Furnished 2/1 on Beach GPS TMotor 20 Gulf hours loaded. Hwy., $750; $725 $21,995. 458- for military with water and 1230 garbage. 3/2, priReal Estate vacy fence all the way around. Homes for rent Closed-gate comNicely redone m u n i t y . 2/2, lots of stor- $1,000/month, age space. 2,000 sqft., 5 $800/month plus minutes from deposit. 484- NAS. 712-2340 3284 Nice 4/2 house in Near NAS, 2/1, clean, safe, desircarport, new able subdivision. kitchen and bath. $1,050/month. $700/month plus 7194 Rampart deposit. 484- Way, Pensacola, 3284 FL 32507. 5305594

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Real Estate Roommates

1 room is available for rent in Shorewood. Most ideal for person relocating to Pensacola for Aviation Preflight Indoctrination or SNA or NFO training. 586-746-6894 Mature, clean laid-back to share a 1,000 sq ft on west side of town near Navy b a s e . $400/month, cable and internet included. 458-5323 Homes for sale

3/2.5 house with basement, waterfront, open floor plan. Call Becky Youngs 251-2138293. MLS# R211181A. $469,500

Services Beautiful attached Garden Home in the Atrium. Lovely home features covered front porch w/swing and a rear patio area. Nicely landscaped with a fenced backyard. $95,900. 4536488.

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July 3, 2014

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Gosport - July 03, 2014  

Weekly newspaper for Naval Air Station Pensacola.