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Vol. 79, No. 22

VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: www.gosportpensacola.com

June 5, 2015

Ceremony celebrates Pensacola’s ties to Spain Elcano crew, Spanish and NAS Pensacola officials honor Gen. Bernardo de Galvez By Bridgette Williams NASP PAO Intern

Sailors and Marines from Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) lined up with crewmembers from the Spanish training ship the Juan Sebastian de Elcano May 28 at Fort George in downtown Pensacola during a wreath laying ceremony to honor Gen. Bernardo de Galvez. A wreath was placed in front of a bust of Galvez by NASP Commanding Officer Capt. Keith Hoskins and Ambassador of Spain Ramon GilCasares, and city and military officials were amongst the onlookers at the ceremony. Guest speakers reflected on Galvez’s history and how important the ceremony was to the community. “Gen. Bernardo de Galvez played a pivotal role not only in Pensacola’s history, but in the history of the U.S.,” said Pensacola Mayor Ashton Hayward. “We’re so proud of that legacy, ambassador, and of the fact that Gen. Galvez is one of only eight

foreign nationals who have been granted honorary U.S. citizenship.” The United States Congress conferred honorary citizenship on Galvez in December 2014, citing him as a hero of the Revolutionary War. Galvez’s siege of Pensacola on May 8, 1781, marked the turn of the war. The victory shut off British access to the Gulf of Mexico and Spain regained Pensacola. An account read by U.S. Navy Ens. Emily Wilkins filled in some of the details for those in attendance. “In 1781, following the renewed hostilities between Spain and England, he successfully took control of Mobile and Pensacola. Shortly after, he seized the island of New Providence in the Bahamas, ruining the last British resistance plan and guaranteeing strong Spanish rule over the Caribbean. He was awarded the rank of field marshal and lieutenant general governor of the conquered territory. King

(Above) Junior naval officers of the United States and Spain salute NAS Pensacola Commanding Officer Capt. Keith Hoskins and Ambassador of Spain Ramon Gil-Casares at a wreath-laying ceremony for Revolutionary War hero Gen. Bernardo de Galvez May 28. Photo by Janet Thomas (Left) Service members of the two nations salute at the presentation by NASP CO and the Spanish ambassador. Photo by Bridgette Williams

See Wreath on page 2

Cyber hygeine: Social media and your ethical responsibilities By Kim E. Dixon Attorney-Adviser U.S. Army Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command, Office of the Staff Judge Advocate

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. – As the use of social media grows, so do the opportunities for federal employees to run afoul of a variety of ethics rules in their personal use of different social media venues. A recent legal advisory from the United

States Office of Government Ethics (OGE) seeks to expand upon and clarify existing rules for a number of situations. Reference to government title or position and appearance of official sanction: You’re creating your first social media account so you can keep up with your friends and family. And the site is asking for

personal and professional information about you, including your official title, position, and employer. You fill it in, but all you can do is think about that ethics briefing at work last week where you were reminded of the standards of conduct prohibiting federal employees from sanctioning or endorsing private organizations. Specifi-

cally, you remember you can’t use your official title, position, or any association with your public office for private gain. You also remember you have to avoid using your title or position in a manner that would create an appearance that the government sanctions or endorses your activities. Your first social media challenge – You’re planning a trip to Orlando next week and you want to tell the world through

your social media page that you’re “going to ...” ahem, a certain theme park. Would that announcement, and subsequently posting those pictures, imply that you, a federal employee as identified on your social media page, endorse that theme park? Ordinarily, an employee’s use of personal social media will not create the impermissible appearance of governmental sanction

See Cyber on page 2

Five questions Sailors are asking about Military Star card now welcome NEX gas pumps the Navy’s upcoming personnel changes at NEX Pensacola,perks and lower interest. As with most From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

A major rollout of new personnel initiatives that provide greater choice, flexibility and transparency in everything from career path, promotions and advancements, to GMT and even body composition assessment (BCA) was announced by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus May 13. As these initiatives move forward, the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel has responsibility for fleet communication and implementation. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, had the opportunity to discuss these initiatives with the Fleet last week, and answered Sailors’ questions about the changes. Here are the top five questions you’re

asking in all hands calls and on social media: 1. Why are we making all of these changes to the Navy’s personnel system? “We’ve got a great Navy. Sailors today are high quality. Recruiting is successful and the quality of kids we’re bringing in today is wonderful. “The economy is always our biggest competitor for attracting good people, and keeping good people, so we want to put things in place today, get authority on the shelf that allows us to deal with any changes in the economic situation when the time comes.” 2. Are we really getting rid of mandatory Navy GMT? “We are coming up with better ideas and better

See CNP on page 2

CTT1 Ryan Fickett fills up at NEX. Photo by Omar Banmally By Andrea Beck NEX Special Events Coordinator

Furthering its strategy of celebrating the military and their families, the Navy Exchange (NEX) Pensacola Car Care Center gasoline pumps can now accept the Military Star Card. The Military Star Card is like a typical credit card, but with more

credit cards, users can check their statement and make payments online. “This long-awaited initiative offers a great convenience at the gas pump plus the Military Star Card features,” said Michael Oatman, NEX Pensacola operations services manager. The features of the Star Card also include: • No annual fee. • 10 percent off your first day’s purchases. • A 25-day interest-free grace period to help you avoid extra expenses. • A low interest rate (10.24 percent for most purchases). • An even lower rate during deployment or military activation. • Zero APR for military clothing purchases. • Access to limited promotions, both in store or online, that are restricted to cardholders.

Published by Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements constitute Department of the Navy, NAS Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing’s endorsement of products or services advertised.


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June 5, 2015

CNP from page 1

training over time ... we are giving this back to COs to determine when they think their crew, their squadron, their unit, is in need of that kind of training.” 3. What do the Navy Fitness changes mean for Sailors? “The PFA as we institute it today is really not measuring health or encouraging better health, it is simply a test. We’re partnering with BuMed to figure out what defines better health and then use the standards we have to get more people to take the test … really giving them more latitude to pay most attention to doing the right things to be healthier.” 4. Why is CAP changing to the Meritorious Advancement Program? “Nobody knows their Sailors better than our COs in the fleet, the command master chief and the chief’s mess. We want to give them more opportunity to recognize the best of the best inside their units by expanding the opportunity to meritoriously advance Sailors. We’ve also heard from multiple units and COs around the fleet that all of our great Sailors aren’t only at sea, we have some great Sailors ashore as well.” 5. How are you going to provide greater career path flexibility? “I think we’re trying to find more than one path to milestone achievement and success for people who are talented. Today it’s defined as the golden career path because it’s pretty rigid. You don’t have opportunities to try something different or to maybe get off track for whatever reason, we want to be able to give people off ramps that have a great deal of talent and are very skilled and want to come back and serve.”

GOSPORT

AOC reunion includes choir performances By Janet Thomas Gosport Staff Writer

Memories of Aviation Officer Candidate School (AOCS) and the Naval Air Training Command Choir at Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) will be shared during reunion gatherings that are kicking off today, June 5. More than 300 people signed up for the AOC reunion and 40 choir members will attend including seven former directors, according to Richard Fry of Windermere, Fla. A series of events are on the schedule for the inaugural Aviation Officers Candidate School All Hands reunion. The schedule includes a memorial Cyber from page 1

or endorsement. Additionally, neither will merely identifying an official title or position in the biographical information of the personal social media account. However, the employee should be more cautious if referencing position, title, or agency, in the body of a social media posting. In determining if that reference violates the standards of conduct, the agency’s friendly neighborhood ethics attorney would consider the totality of the circumstances to determine if the “reasonable person” would consider that use inappropriate. If you think there might be confusion, you are encouraged to include a disclaimer clarifying that your social media communication reflects only your personal views and not necessarily those of SDDC, the Army, or the United States. Recommending and endorsing others on social media: You received an e-mail today from a networking social media site asking you to provide a recommendation or endorse skills for a friend. Your own personal page on that site includes your official title and position as part of your biographical information, so if you provide the recommendation, your official title and position will be part of it. Since you are current on your ethics training, you immediately think about the prohibition against using public office for private gain. You would like to be able to help your friend who is ac-

golf tournament, a meet and greet event, tours of the National Naval Aviation Museum and Flight Academy and a dinner. Flight training at NASP dates to 1914, but AOC training didn’t start until 1936, and it stopped at NASP in 2007, when the program was consolidated at Newport, R.I., under military realignment plans. Former members of the Naval Aviation Cadet Choir are also planning two performances at NASP, Fry said. The first will be at 4 p.m. tomorrow, June 6, in the Blue Angels Atrium at the National Naval Aviation Museum. Another performance is scheduled for 10:15 a.m. June 7 at the

tively seeking employment, but there is no way to disassociate your name from your title on the networking social media site. Can you provide the recommendation or endorsement? Yes, you can. The standards of conduct permit federal employees to use social media to make these types of recommendations or endorsements in their personal capacities and it is not considered a misuse of position simply because their official title and position are part of the biographical information on the site. The Office of Government Ethics is aware of at least one social media site that automatically adds the user’s name, title, and employer to any recommendation. This is not considered a misuse of position because the recommendation is readily understood to be personal, rather than official, in nature. Make the recommendation, but do not include a reference to your title, position, or employer in the body of your recommendation, except in limited circumstances. Consult your local friendly neighborhood ethics attorney for guidance on when you can. Seeking employment through social media: Sure, you love your job for Uncle Sam, but maybe it’s time to explore life somewhere over the rainbow. Besides, with these social media networking sites, it is easy to look around at what’s outside the base gates without violating any of the ethics rules, right? It’s not as if you are actually holding employment

Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg 1982. The Naval Aviation Cadet Choir was initially organized to sing for Sunday services at the chapel and was developed into an a cappella ensemble in 1949. In the 1960s, the group became known as the Naval Air Training Command Choir the repertoire was expanded. During its 50-plus year run, several thousand men and women participated in the choir while training to support the Navy mission. Choir members performed on national TV shows and at major events, and the choir received numerous awards including a commendation from the Secretary of the Navy. For more information on the AOC reunion, go to www.aocsreunion.com. For more information on the choir reunion, contact Richard Fry at RLFry@aol.com.

negotiations, otherwise known as “seeking employment,” with a prospective employer that would violate that criminal statute you remember from ethics training (that would be 18 U.S. Code section 208, if you’re curious). Not so fast. While simply posting a resume or a summary of professional experience to an employee’s personal social media account, where it is viewed by prospective employers, is acceptable, it does become “seeking employment” if the employee responds to a message from the employer with anything that isn’t a rejection. An employee will also be “seeking employment” if he or she contacts the prospective employer. There are myriad types of communication that would be considered contact, thereby triggering the “seeking employment” rules; such as sending a message directly to someone in the organization, uploading a resume or application to the prospective employer’s social media account for recruiting employees, or otherwise targeting the employer through social media. Don’t forget, if you are seeking employment or negotiating for employment, whether through social media or in person, you must comply with disqualification requirements that might apply because of the nature of your government job. Personal fundraising: Ice bucket challenge? Go ahead and jump right into that ice bucket with both feet because you may

use your personal social media account to fundraise for nonprofit charitable organizations in a personal capacity. Brrrrrr! There, you’ve done it; now all that’s left is to tag people you know to contribute to the cause. Stop right there and pour that ice bucket over your head again – this time to cool your jets because you should know a few rules before you start naming your teammates at work or that contractor you’ve been speaking with for years. As a general rule, fundraising over social media is permissible so long as the employee does not “personally solicit” funds from a subordinate or a known prohibited source. Just posting or publishing a general fundraising request over social media does not mean an employee has “personally solicited” from a subordinate or known prohibited source simply because they are connected on social media, even if the subordinate or prohibited source views, comments on, or responds to the post. However, an employee may not respond to those inquires in reference to the fundraising request nor may the employee specifically reference, link to, or otherwise target a subordinate or prohibited source. In other words, no tagging allowed. It also goes without saying that you may not use your official title, position, or authority associated with your position to further fundraising efforts, either on social media or in person.

Wreath from page 1

Carlos III granted him the title of count of Galvez, and allowed him to write on his coat of arms the motto: Only I, in recognition of taking Pensacola.” Dedicated in 1981, the Galvez bust at Fort George was a gift from the Spanish government to mark the 200th anniversary of the 1781 siege of Pensacola. At the base of the sculpture is the Spanish phrase “Yo Solo” (“I alone”). The ceremony also featured the Elcano and the NASP Corry Station bands, and members of the MATSG-23 Funeral Detail Honor Guard fired a 21-volley salute. “It was a great time, reflecting on the history and relationship of Spain and Pensacola, very important for the community,” said Pensacola City Councilman Gerald Wingate. “The mayor is doing a great job keeping things going.” The Elcano, which departed June 1, was in Pensacola Spanish, base and city officials also participated in a wreath ceremony at sea May 29. Photos by Malcolm for the annual Fiesta of Five Flags celebration. Ballinger (left) and Cathy Whitney (right).

Vol. 79, No. 22

June 5, 2015

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community Commanding Officer — Capt. Keith Hoskins Public Affairs Officer — Patrick J. Nichols The Gosport nameplate pays homage to the 100th anniversary of naval aviation in 2011: the Centennial of Naval Aviation, or CONA. The image on the left side of the nameplate depicts Eugene Ely taking off in a Curtiss pusher bi-plane from the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 18, 1911. While Ely had taken off from the USS Birmingham two months earlier after his plane had been loaded on the ship, the USS Pennsylvania event was the first time a plane landed on and then took off from a U.S. warship.

The image on the right side is the Navy’s most modern fighter aircraft, the F-18 Super Hornet. Established in 1921 as the Air Station News, the name Gosport was adopted in 1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by flight instructors in the early days of naval aviation to give instructions and directions to their students. The name “Gosport” was derived from Gosport, England (originally God’s Port), where the voice tube was invented. Gosport is an authorized newspaper published every Friday by Ballinger Publishing,

The Rhodes Building, 41 North Jefferson Street, Suite 402, Pensacola, FL 32504, in the interest of military and civilian personnel and their families aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Saufley Field and Corry Station. Editorial and news material is compiled by the Public Affairs Office, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-1051. All news releases and related materials should be mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hallford@navy.mil. National news sources are American Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News Service (NNS), Air Force News Service (AFNS), News USA and North American Precis Syndicate (NAPS). Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Defense, United States Navy, officials of the Naval Air Station Pensacola, or Ballinger Publishing. All advertising, including classified ads, is arranged through Ballinger Publishing. Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to rank, rate, race, creed, color, national origin or sex of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection of this policy of equal opportunities by an advertiser will result in the refusal of future advertising from that source.

For classified ads, call: (850) 433-1166, ext. 24 For commercial advertising: Simone Sands (850) 433-1166, ext. 21 Simone@ballingerpublishing.Com Visit Us On The Web At: Ballinger Publishing.Com Mail To: Gosport, NAS Pensacola, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, Pensacola, FL 32508-1051

Gosport Editor

Scott Hallford 452-4466 scott.hallford@navy.mil Gosport Associate Editor

Mike O’Connor 452-2165 michael.f.oʼconnor.ctr@navy.mil Gosport Staff Writer

Janet Thomas 452-4419 janet.thomas.ctr@navy.mil


June 5, 2015

GOSPORT

COMMENTARY

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Take my advice: Percolate, don’t procrastinate By Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist

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everal days a week, I drop the children at school, and head downtown to one of my secret haunts. No, it’s not a bingo hall or a betting room, and I haven’t drained our meager savings in a slot machine. It’s not a watering hole, and I don’t sit at a bar with a Jack-n-Coke and a pack of smokes. It’s not a local flea market, and I don’t have a penchant for collecting wagon-wheel lamps. Truth be told, I go to coffee shops. I’m a big fan of coffee, but I’m not there for the brew. Simply put, it’s the only place I seem to get any work done. I became a freelance writer in 2010, while our Navy family was stationed in Stuttgart, Germany. After 15 years of being a stay-athome mom to our three children, I was looking for work that was more stimulating than clearing the lint trap in the dryer. Freelance writing seemed the perfect solution, and I quickly committed to churning out weekly

How to submit a commentary

columns for a stateside newspaper. Each morning, I would walk the children to school, then sit at our home computer for a few hours of writing. Sometimes, I would tap away all day and forget to eat lunch, and if you could only see my paunch, you would know how rarely this happens. But most days, I found it hard to focus. Multitasking seemed mandatory, so I would put a load of laundry in before sitting down to write. And while I was at it, I would fill the dishwasher, defrost a roast, and vacuum, because I wouldn’t want those tasks nagging at me when I was trying to concentrate. Inevitably, the dryer would buzz, and folding would occur in front of the television. I would tell myself it’s time to get serious, but the closer my deadline loomed, the greater the chance that I would spend the afternoon

About the columnist Lisa Smith Molinari, mother of three, has been a military spouse for 20 years (and running). She also writes columns for Military Spouse magazine and a blog at www.themeat andpotatoesoflife.com. She and her family are stationed at Naval Station Newport in Rhode Island. cleaning out the junk drawer. I knew I needed an outside office, where I couldn’t convince myself that dusting the ceiling fan was more important than writing my column.

At our next duty station in Florida, I tried Starbucks in downtown San Marco. Other than the bone-chilling air conditioners and questionable bathrooms, I loved my new workspace. By the end of our two-year tour, I was spending entire days in my coffee shop office, taking a break mid-day to powerwalk along the water or eat my packed lunch on a sunny park bench. The only distraction was people watching, which ironically provided endless fodder for my writing. The Starbucks employees, riddled with piercings and tattoos, made me think deep thoughts about youth, and what I would do to my daughter if she ever came home with a bolt through her tongue. And the eclectic patrons, whose willingness to stand in long lines for overpriced coffee never ceased to fascinate me. There were caddy stroller moms, gruff construction workers, corporate types talking to hidden devices in their ears, and loners like me. After PCSing to Rhode Island, I scoped out the Starbucks on Thames Street in Newport. Considering that

there is a Dunkin Donuts drive-through every half mile in New England, I knew the Starbucks would have an more eccentric crowd. Preppy yachtsmen whose boats are docked at the nearby wharf, throngs of cruise ship tourists wearing fanny packs, busy working stiffs ordering lattes to go, couples who argue in hushed tones, and others like me who eavesdrop. In this little microcosm of society, I’ve formed relationships. There’s Kip the friendly retiree, who tries to convince me to do transcendental meditation. There’s Lori the working mom, who stops to chat before running to the office. There’s Tom the construction worker, who thinks I know more about football than I really do. We are a family of sorts, and without knowing it, they support me in my endeavor to write, and I appreciate them for inspiring me with wacky ideas. For moms who work from home, procrastination can be a constant battle. I’ve found that coffee shops keep me on track. After all, a day at the office should always involve a good cup of coffee.

Commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as official government, Navy or command policy statements. Reader submissions are welcome but should not exceed 800 words. Submissions must be bylined and include a daytime phone number or e-mail contact for the writer. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with policy and standards. Send commentary submissions to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil.


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June 5, 2015

73th anniversary of the

Battle of

T U R N I N G

GOSPORT GOSPORT

June 5, 2015

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MIDWAY

P O I N T

I N

T H E

P A C I F I C

“Midway thrust the warlords back on their heels, caused their ambitious plans ... to be canceled, and forced on them an unexpected, unwelcome, defensive role.” – Samuel Elliot Morison, the United States Navy's official historian of World War II, on the battle in June 1942 From http://www.navy.mil/midway/midway.html

Midway’s strategic lessons

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n June 1942, a month after the decisive U.S. victory in the Coral Sea, Japan, was dealt a fatal blow at Midway Island – a blow that would turn the course of World War II in favor of the Allies. In August 1942, All Hands, then known as the “Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin,” published the following account of the Battle of Midway – the beginning of the end of the fight in the Pacific. Early in June, near the island of Midway, about 1,100 miles to the west of Pearl Harbor, units of our Army, Navy, and Marine Corps joined action with a strong Japanese invasion fleet which was approaching our Midway outpost. At about 9 a.m. June 3, Navy patrol planes reported a strong force of enemy ships about 700 miles off Midway, proceeding eastward. Nine U.S. Army B-17 Flying Fortresses based on Midway immediately were ordered to intercept and attack the approaching enemy. The Japanese force was approaching in five columns and was composed of many cruisers, transports, cargo vessels, and other escort ships. The Army bombers scored hits on one cruiser and one transport. Both ships were severely damaged and left burning. About dawn on June 4, several groups of Army medium and heavy bombers and U.S. Marine Corps dive bombers and torpedo planes took to the air from Midway to attack the approaching enemy. Four Army torpedo bombers attacked two enemy aircraft carriers through a heavy screen of enemy fighter protection and a curtain of antiaircraft fire. One torpedo hit on a carrier is believed to have been made. Two of the four bombers failed to return. Six Marine Corps torpedo planes attacked the enemy force in the face of heavy odds. It is believed this group scored one hit on an enemy ship. Only one of the six planes returned to its base. Sixteen Marine Corps dive bombers attacked and scored three hits on a carrier, which is to have been the Soryu. Only half of the attacking planes returned. Another group of 11 Marine Corps dive bombers made a later attack on enemy ships and reported two bomb hits on an enemy battleship, which was left smoking and listing. A group of 16 U.S. Army Flying Fortresses carried out high-level bombing attacks, according three hits on enemy carriers. One carrier was left smoking heavily. Shortly after the Marine Corps planes had left Midway, the island itself was attacked by a large group of carrier-based enemy planes. They were engaged by a badly outnumbered Marine Corps fighter force, which met the enemy in the air as he arrived. These defending fighters, aided by anti-aircraft batteries, shot down at least 40 of the enemy planes. As the result, the material damage to shore installations, though serious, was not disabling. No plane was caught grounded at Midway. Meanwhile, U.S. Naval forces afloat were being brought into position. Our carrierbased aircraft were launched and were proceeding to the spot where the enemy’s previous course and speed would have placed him had he chosen to continue the assault. Unaware of the enemy’s course, one group of Navy fighters and dive bombers searched

A Dauntless SBD dive bomber lands onboard USS Yorktown (CV 5) after attacking the Japanese carrier Kaga June 4, 1942. Note battle damage to the tail. Naval History and Heritage Command photo

along the reported track to the southeast until shortage of gas forced them to abandon the search. Some were forced down at sea when they ran out of gas. Most were later rescued. A different flight composed of fighters, dive bombers, and torpedo planes concluded that the enemy was retreating. Fifteen torpedo planes from this group, located the enemy westward and proceeded to attack at once without protection or assistance of any kind. Although some hits were reported by radio, and although some enemy fighters were shot down, the total damage inflicted in this attack may never be known. None of the 15 planes returned. The sole survivor of the 30 officers was Ens. G.H. Gay Jr., who scored one torpedo hit on an enemy carrier before he was shot down. Other torpedo planes proceeded to press the attack after the enemy had been located. In spite of heavy losses during these attacks, the torpedo planes engaged the attention of the enemy fighters and anti-aircraft batteries to such a degree that our dive bombers were able to drop bomb after bomb on the enemy ships without serious interference. Navy dive bombers scored many hits and inflicted upon the enemy the following damage: The Kaga, Akagi and Soryu, aircraft carriers, were severely damaged. Gasoline in

planes caught on their flight decks ignited, starting fires which burned until each carrier had sunk. Two battleships were hit. One was left burning fiercely. One destroyer was hit and is believed to have sunk. Shortly after this battle, a force of about 36 enemy planes from the damaged carrier Hiryu attacked the U.S. aircraft carrier Yorktown and her escorts. Eleven of 18 Japanese bombers in this group were shot down before their bombs were dropped. Seven got through our fighter protection. Of the seven, one was disintegrated by a surface ship’s anti-aircraft fire; a second dropped its bomb load into the sea and plunged in after it; while a third was torn to shreds by machine gun fire from U.S. fighter planes. Four enemy bombers escaped after scoring three hits. Shortly afterward, 12 to 15 enemy torpedo planes escorted by fighters attacked Yorktown. Five succeeded in launching torpedoes, but were destroyed as they attempted to escape. Yorktown was hit and put out of action. The damage caused a list which rendered her flight deck useless. Her aircraft, however, continued operating from other U.S. carriers. While this attack on Yorktown was in progress, some of her own planes located the carrier Hiryu in company with battleships, cruisers, and destroyers. Our carrier planes immediately attacked this newly-located force. Hiryu was hit repeatedly and left blazing from stem to stern. She sank the following morning. Two of the enemy battleships were pounded severely by bombs and a heavy cruiser was damaged severely. During the same afternoon (June 4), a U.S. submarine scored three torpedo hits on the smoking carrier Soryu as the enemy was attempting to take her into tow. Soryu sank during the night. Just before sunset (June 4) U.S. Army bombers delivered a heavy bomb attack on the crippled and burning ships. Three hits were scored on a damaged carrier (probably Akagi); one hit was scored on a large ship; one hit on a cruiser was left burning; and one destroyer was believed sunk. By sundown on June 4 the United States forces had gained mastery of the air in the region of Midway. At dawn (June 5) our forces were marshalling their strength for further assaults against the enemy fleets which by now had separated into several groups, all in full retreat. In the afternoon of June 5, Army Flying Fortresses attacked enemy cruisers again and scored three direct hits upon one heavy cruiser. One the return ship, one of these planes was lost; a second was forced down at sea 15 miles from the Midway. All except one of the crew of the second plane were rescued. Early on June 6 an air search discovered two groups of enemy ships, each containing cruisers and destroyers. Between 9:30 and 10 a.m., U.S. carrier planes attacked one group which contained the heavy cruisers Mikuma and Mogami and three destroyers. At least two bomb hits were scored on each Japanese cruiser. One of these destroyers was sunk. The attacks were carried on until 5:30p.m. Mikuma was sunk shortly after noon. Mogami was gutted and subsequently sunk. Another enemy cruiser and a destroyer also were hit during these series of attacks. It was during this afternoon (June 6) that the U.S. destroyer Hammann was torpe-

doed and sunk by an enemy submarine. Most of her crew were rescued. Repeated attempts were made to contact the remainder of the Japanese invasion fleet but without success. The battle was over. The following is a recapitulation of the damage inflicted upon the enemy during the battle of Midway. Four Japanese aircraft carriers, the Kaga, Akagi, Soryu, and Hiryu were sunk. Three battleships were damaged by bomb and torpedo hits, one severely. Two heavy cruisers, Mogami and Mikuma were sunk. Three others were damaged, one or two severely.

U.S. Navy Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers fly over the burning Japanese cruiser Mikuma June 6, 1942. U.S. National Archives

One light cruiser was damaged. Three destroyers were sunk and several others were damaged by bombs. At least three transports or auxiliary ships were damaged, and one or more sunk. The Battle of Midway was a complex and widespread action involving a number of engagements lasting more than three days and nights. Even our active participants in the numerous attacks and counter-attacks are unable to give an accurate account of the damage inflicted by any group in the many individual and unified attacks of our Army, Navy, and Marine Corps personnel. Reprinted from August 1942, All Hands

Area Midway vet Chuck Wheeler recounted battle’s moments from service on USS Enterprise By Mike O’Connor Gosport Associate Editor (Editor’s note: Sadly, Charles “Chuck” Wheeler passed away earlier this year on April 22, 2015. There were many brave men at the Battle of Midway and Wheeler was certainly one of them. His recollections of the battle bear repeating). As ceremonies to commemorate the anniversary of the Battle of Midway were held throughout the Navy and the nation, Charles “Chuck” Wheeler, a former chief aviation ordnanceman onboard USS Enterprise (CV 6), shared his thoughts in 2011 on the anniversary of the battle. Wheeler, who had volunteered as a tour guide at National Naval Aviation Museum aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola, had vivid recollections of the events of June 4-7, 1942, from his viewpoint on Enterprise. “There have been a million words and articles written about the Battle of Midway,” Wheeler said, “and whenever I talk about the battle, I want to make sure that the people realize that the good old American Navy was the only military powerful enough to put a stop to the Japanese aggression. They could have taken the British navy, the French navy, the Italian navy and the Russian navy and put them all together – and the Japanese would have wiped them out. No doubt about it. “The Japanese were extremely skillful and the only reason we did so well at the Battle of Midway is the fact that we had the determination; we had broken the Imperial Japanese Navy secret codes; we knew what

Battle of Midway veteran Charles “Chuck” Wheeler recalled a moment onboard USS Enterprise at an exhibit dedicated to the ship at the National Naval Aviation Museum. File photo by Emily Benner

they were talking about before they did it,” he said. “And of course, we had our guys. You might say, we knew that if we didn’t do it (stop the Japanese), nobody would be able to do it and America would have been in deep trouble.” Wheeler paused for a moment. “I could tell you that if I ever did anything I was proud of in my entire life – and I don’t talk about myself very much when I do interviews or presentations – I think the proudest days of my life were when I served aboard the carrier USS Enterprise and I had the opportunity to help load the

bombs on our dive bombers that sank every Japanese ship during the battle. And that was four aircraft carriers, a heavy cruiser and a (damaged) destroyer. “At Pearl Harbor, the Japanese killed about 2,400 of our people. But at the Battle of Midway, the low end of the estimate of Japanese casualties were pretty close to 3,800. And I’ve had people ask me over the years, ‘how did you feel about doing it?’ I always tell them, ‘I thought it was the greatest thing in the world that we wiped out the Japanese navy at Midway,’ and how lucky we were.” Wheeler believed at Midway, there were no specific heroes – only heroic deeds. But one group he singled out for their efforts was USS Hornet’s (CV 8) Torpedo Squadron 8 (VT 8). “We had three aircraft carriers to go against the four Japanese carriers ... Yorktown (CV 5), the Enterprise and the Hornet. One of our air groups, VT 8, aboard the Hornet, everybody knows that they were sacrificed, so to speak, at Midway ... The Japanese concentrated on shooting down these torpedo-dropping aircraft and they shot them all down,” he said. All 15 planes were lost and 29 of 30 men killed. The only survivor of Torpedo Squadron 8 was Ens. George H. Gay Jr., who was wounded in action during the mission. “However, on the carriers Yorktown and Enterprise, our dive bombers, SBDs, dived on the four Japanese carriers,” he recalled. “It’s hard to believe, but we had three pilots off the Enterprise that, in the morning (of June 4), on the first run over the (enemy) bombed the flagship Akagi then in the afternoon, those same three

Enterprise reunion, we’d ask him, ‘tell us how you found the Japanese carriers again.’ And this is his story,” Wheeler said. When McClusky left the carrier Enterprise, he had with him about 25 SBD dive bombers, which had come off of the Yorktown and the Enterprise. He had been given a positioning report, which listed what type of enemy ships, how many, longitude and latitude, and speed. “When he got to where they were supposed to be, over the open sea – there was nothing there. So what does he do?” Wheeler asked. With gas gauges fluttering downward toward empty – and the nagging fear that he could lose his own ship to a Japanese attack through his own inaction, McClusky was in a quandary. “And then he said he heard a voice in his ear,” Wheeler said. “You can call it ‘divine intervention,’ or you can call it ‘luck of the Irish,’ but he said, that little voice told him, ‘turn to the right. And he didn’t pay much attention to it. However, it came on again and Battle of Midway veteran Charles “Chuck” Wheeler volunteered as a tour guide at the National Naval Aviation this time it was loud and clear. So he turned to the Museum. Photo by Mike O’Connor right. “After turning to the right and running for about 15 guys got over the Hiryu. One was shot down and the panse of the Pacific Ocean when “intel” failed – and or 20 minutes, he thought, ‘I don’t know what to do.’ one man’s intuition took over. other two (bombed) the Hiryu. “There was another incident that has been talked Then, he said, ‘what’s that down there?’ And it was a “So the heroic deed was two Navy pilots in one day bombed three Japanese carriers. And it will never, about many times but has never really been related 100 ship, and he knew that it had to be a Japanese ship.” McClusky followed the ship’s direction and after a never, in the history of the United States Navy, be re- percent correct as far as I’m concerned,” Wheeler said, few minutes – far ahead, there was the Japanese fleet. “and that was ‘the McClusky Turn.’ peated.” The dive bombing attack that followed heavily “What they’re talking about is Lt. Cmdr. Wade McWheeler also touched upon one of the great riddles of the Battle of Midway; how the Enterprise dive Clusky was our air group commander at Midway. He damaged and left sinking the Japanese carriers Akagi, bomber group located the Japanese fleet in the vast ex- was a real honorable man and whenever we had an Kaga and Soryu.


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June 5, 2015

73th anniversary of the

Battle of

T U R N I N G

GOSPORT GOSPORT

June 5, 2015

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MIDWAY

P O I N T

I N

T H E

P A C I F I C

“Midway thrust the warlords back on their heels, caused their ambitious plans ... to be canceled, and forced on them an unexpected, unwelcome, defensive role.” – Samuel Elliot Morison, the United States Navy's official historian of World War II, on the battle in June 1942 From http://www.navy.mil/midway/midway.html

Midway’s strategic lessons

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n June 1942, a month after the decisive U.S. victory in the Coral Sea, Japan, was dealt a fatal blow at Midway Island – a blow that would turn the course of World War II in favor of the Allies. In August 1942, All Hands, then known as the “Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin,” published the following account of the Battle of Midway – the beginning of the end of the fight in the Pacific. Early in June, near the island of Midway, about 1,100 miles to the west of Pearl Harbor, units of our Army, Navy, and Marine Corps joined action with a strong Japanese invasion fleet which was approaching our Midway outpost. At about 9 a.m. June 3, Navy patrol planes reported a strong force of enemy ships about 700 miles off Midway, proceeding eastward. Nine U.S. Army B-17 Flying Fortresses based on Midway immediately were ordered to intercept and attack the approaching enemy. The Japanese force was approaching in five columns and was composed of many cruisers, transports, cargo vessels, and other escort ships. The Army bombers scored hits on one cruiser and one transport. Both ships were severely damaged and left burning. About dawn on June 4, several groups of Army medium and heavy bombers and U.S. Marine Corps dive bombers and torpedo planes took to the air from Midway to attack the approaching enemy. Four Army torpedo bombers attacked two enemy aircraft carriers through a heavy screen of enemy fighter protection and a curtain of antiaircraft fire. One torpedo hit on a carrier is believed to have been made. Two of the four bombers failed to return. Six Marine Corps torpedo planes attacked the enemy force in the face of heavy odds. It is believed this group scored one hit on an enemy ship. Only one of the six planes returned to its base. Sixteen Marine Corps dive bombers attacked and scored three hits on a carrier, which is to have been the Soryu. Only half of the attacking planes returned. Another group of 11 Marine Corps dive bombers made a later attack on enemy ships and reported two bomb hits on an enemy battleship, which was left smoking and listing. A group of 16 U.S. Army Flying Fortresses carried out high-level bombing attacks, according three hits on enemy carriers. One carrier was left smoking heavily. Shortly after the Marine Corps planes had left Midway, the island itself was attacked by a large group of carrier-based enemy planes. They were engaged by a badly outnumbered Marine Corps fighter force, which met the enemy in the air as he arrived. These defending fighters, aided by anti-aircraft batteries, shot down at least 40 of the enemy planes. As the result, the material damage to shore installations, though serious, was not disabling. No plane was caught grounded at Midway. Meanwhile, U.S. Naval forces afloat were being brought into position. Our carrierbased aircraft were launched and were proceeding to the spot where the enemy’s previous course and speed would have placed him had he chosen to continue the assault. Unaware of the enemy’s course, one group of Navy fighters and dive bombers searched

A Dauntless SBD dive bomber lands onboard USS Yorktown (CV 5) after attacking the Japanese carrier Kaga June 4, 1942. Note battle damage to the tail. Naval History and Heritage Command photo

along the reported track to the southeast until shortage of gas forced them to abandon the search. Some were forced down at sea when they ran out of gas. Most were later rescued. A different flight composed of fighters, dive bombers, and torpedo planes concluded that the enemy was retreating. Fifteen torpedo planes from this group, located the enemy westward and proceeded to attack at once without protection or assistance of any kind. Although some hits were reported by radio, and although some enemy fighters were shot down, the total damage inflicted in this attack may never be known. None of the 15 planes returned. The sole survivor of the 30 officers was Ens. G.H. Gay Jr., who scored one torpedo hit on an enemy carrier before he was shot down. Other torpedo planes proceeded to press the attack after the enemy had been located. In spite of heavy losses during these attacks, the torpedo planes engaged the attention of the enemy fighters and anti-aircraft batteries to such a degree that our dive bombers were able to drop bomb after bomb on the enemy ships without serious interference. Navy dive bombers scored many hits and inflicted upon the enemy the following damage: The Kaga, Akagi and Soryu, aircraft carriers, were severely damaged. Gasoline in

planes caught on their flight decks ignited, starting fires which burned until each carrier had sunk. Two battleships were hit. One was left burning fiercely. One destroyer was hit and is believed to have sunk. Shortly after this battle, a force of about 36 enemy planes from the damaged carrier Hiryu attacked the U.S. aircraft carrier Yorktown and her escorts. Eleven of 18 Japanese bombers in this group were shot down before their bombs were dropped. Seven got through our fighter protection. Of the seven, one was disintegrated by a surface ship’s anti-aircraft fire; a second dropped its bomb load into the sea and plunged in after it; while a third was torn to shreds by machine gun fire from U.S. fighter planes. Four enemy bombers escaped after scoring three hits. Shortly afterward, 12 to 15 enemy torpedo planes escorted by fighters attacked Yorktown. Five succeeded in launching torpedoes, but were destroyed as they attempted to escape. Yorktown was hit and put out of action. The damage caused a list which rendered her flight deck useless. Her aircraft, however, continued operating from other U.S. carriers. While this attack on Yorktown was in progress, some of her own planes located the carrier Hiryu in company with battleships, cruisers, and destroyers. Our carrier planes immediately attacked this newly-located force. Hiryu was hit repeatedly and left blazing from stem to stern. She sank the following morning. Two of the enemy battleships were pounded severely by bombs and a heavy cruiser was damaged severely. During the same afternoon (June 4), a U.S. submarine scored three torpedo hits on the smoking carrier Soryu as the enemy was attempting to take her into tow. Soryu sank during the night. Just before sunset (June 4) U.S. Army bombers delivered a heavy bomb attack on the crippled and burning ships. Three hits were scored on a damaged carrier (probably Akagi); one hit was scored on a large ship; one hit on a cruiser was left burning; and one destroyer was believed sunk. By sundown on June 4 the United States forces had gained mastery of the air in the region of Midway. At dawn (June 5) our forces were marshalling their strength for further assaults against the enemy fleets which by now had separated into several groups, all in full retreat. In the afternoon of June 5, Army Flying Fortresses attacked enemy cruisers again and scored three direct hits upon one heavy cruiser. One the return ship, one of these planes was lost; a second was forced down at sea 15 miles from the Midway. All except one of the crew of the second plane were rescued. Early on June 6 an air search discovered two groups of enemy ships, each containing cruisers and destroyers. Between 9:30 and 10 a.m., U.S. carrier planes attacked one group which contained the heavy cruisers Mikuma and Mogami and three destroyers. At least two bomb hits were scored on each Japanese cruiser. One of these destroyers was sunk. The attacks were carried on until 5:30p.m. Mikuma was sunk shortly after noon. Mogami was gutted and subsequently sunk. Another enemy cruiser and a destroyer also were hit during these series of attacks. It was during this afternoon (June 6) that the U.S. destroyer Hammann was torpe-

doed and sunk by an enemy submarine. Most of her crew were rescued. Repeated attempts were made to contact the remainder of the Japanese invasion fleet but without success. The battle was over. The following is a recapitulation of the damage inflicted upon the enemy during the battle of Midway. Four Japanese aircraft carriers, the Kaga, Akagi, Soryu, and Hiryu were sunk. Three battleships were damaged by bomb and torpedo hits, one severely. Two heavy cruisers, Mogami and Mikuma were sunk. Three others were damaged, one or two severely.

U.S. Navy Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers fly over the burning Japanese cruiser Mikuma June 6, 1942. U.S. National Archives

One light cruiser was damaged. Three destroyers were sunk and several others were damaged by bombs. At least three transports or auxiliary ships were damaged, and one or more sunk. The Battle of Midway was a complex and widespread action involving a number of engagements lasting more than three days and nights. Even our active participants in the numerous attacks and counter-attacks are unable to give an accurate account of the damage inflicted by any group in the many individual and unified attacks of our Army, Navy, and Marine Corps personnel. Reprinted from August 1942, All Hands

Area Midway vet Chuck Wheeler recounted battle’s moments from service on USS Enterprise By Mike O’Connor Gosport Associate Editor (Editor’s note: Sadly, Charles “Chuck” Wheeler passed away earlier this year on April 22, 2015. There were many brave men at the Battle of Midway and Wheeler was certainly one of them. His recollections of the battle bear repeating). As ceremonies to commemorate the anniversary of the Battle of Midway were held throughout the Navy and the nation, Charles “Chuck” Wheeler, a former chief aviation ordnanceman onboard USS Enterprise (CV 6), shared his thoughts in 2011 on the anniversary of the battle. Wheeler, who had volunteered as a tour guide at National Naval Aviation Museum aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola, had vivid recollections of the events of June 4-7, 1942, from his viewpoint on Enterprise. “There have been a million words and articles written about the Battle of Midway,” Wheeler said, “and whenever I talk about the battle, I want to make sure that the people realize that the good old American Navy was the only military powerful enough to put a stop to the Japanese aggression. They could have taken the British navy, the French navy, the Italian navy and the Russian navy and put them all together – and the Japanese would have wiped them out. No doubt about it. “The Japanese were extremely skillful and the only reason we did so well at the Battle of Midway is the fact that we had the determination; we had broken the Imperial Japanese Navy secret codes; we knew what

Battle of Midway veteran Charles “Chuck” Wheeler recalled a moment onboard USS Enterprise at an exhibit dedicated to the ship at the National Naval Aviation Museum. File photo by Emily Benner

they were talking about before they did it,” he said. “And of course, we had our guys. You might say, we knew that if we didn’t do it (stop the Japanese), nobody would be able to do it and America would have been in deep trouble.” Wheeler paused for a moment. “I could tell you that if I ever did anything I was proud of in my entire life – and I don’t talk about myself very much when I do interviews or presentations – I think the proudest days of my life were when I served aboard the carrier USS Enterprise and I had the opportunity to help load the

bombs on our dive bombers that sank every Japanese ship during the battle. And that was four aircraft carriers, a heavy cruiser and a (damaged) destroyer. “At Pearl Harbor, the Japanese killed about 2,400 of our people. But at the Battle of Midway, the low end of the estimate of Japanese casualties were pretty close to 3,800. And I’ve had people ask me over the years, ‘how did you feel about doing it?’ I always tell them, ‘I thought it was the greatest thing in the world that we wiped out the Japanese navy at Midway,’ and how lucky we were.” Wheeler believed at Midway, there were no specific heroes – only heroic deeds. But one group he singled out for their efforts was USS Hornet’s (CV 8) Torpedo Squadron 8 (VT 8). “We had three aircraft carriers to go against the four Japanese carriers ... Yorktown (CV 5), the Enterprise and the Hornet. One of our air groups, VT 8, aboard the Hornet, everybody knows that they were sacrificed, so to speak, at Midway ... The Japanese concentrated on shooting down these torpedo-dropping aircraft and they shot them all down,” he said. All 15 planes were lost and 29 of 30 men killed. The only survivor of Torpedo Squadron 8 was Ens. George H. Gay Jr., who was wounded in action during the mission. “However, on the carriers Yorktown and Enterprise, our dive bombers, SBDs, dived on the four Japanese carriers,” he recalled. “It’s hard to believe, but we had three pilots off the Enterprise that, in the morning (of June 4), on the first run over the (enemy) bombed the flagship Akagi then in the afternoon, those same three

Enterprise reunion, we’d ask him, ‘tell us how you found the Japanese carriers again.’ And this is his story,” Wheeler said. When McClusky left the carrier Enterprise, he had with him about 25 SBD dive bombers, which had come off of the Yorktown and the Enterprise. He had been given a positioning report, which listed what type of enemy ships, how many, longitude and latitude, and speed. “When he got to where they were supposed to be, over the open sea – there was nothing there. So what does he do?” Wheeler asked. With gas gauges fluttering downward toward empty – and the nagging fear that he could lose his own ship to a Japanese attack through his own inaction, McClusky was in a quandary. “And then he said he heard a voice in his ear,” Wheeler said. “You can call it ‘divine intervention,’ or you can call it ‘luck of the Irish,’ but he said, that little voice told him, ‘turn to the right. And he didn’t pay much attention to it. However, it came on again and Battle of Midway veteran Charles “Chuck” Wheeler volunteered as a tour guide at the National Naval Aviation this time it was loud and clear. So he turned to the Museum. Photo by Mike O’Connor right. “After turning to the right and running for about 15 guys got over the Hiryu. One was shot down and the panse of the Pacific Ocean when “intel” failed – and or 20 minutes, he thought, ‘I don’t know what to do.’ one man’s intuition took over. other two (bombed) the Hiryu. “There was another incident that has been talked Then, he said, ‘what’s that down there?’ And it was a “So the heroic deed was two Navy pilots in one day bombed three Japanese carriers. And it will never, about many times but has never really been related 100 ship, and he knew that it had to be a Japanese ship.” McClusky followed the ship’s direction and after a never, in the history of the United States Navy, be re- percent correct as far as I’m concerned,” Wheeler said, few minutes – far ahead, there was the Japanese fleet. “and that was ‘the McClusky Turn.’ peated.” The dive bombing attack that followed heavily “What they’re talking about is Lt. Cmdr. Wade McWheeler also touched upon one of the great riddles of the Battle of Midway; how the Enterprise dive Clusky was our air group commander at Midway. He damaged and left sinking the Japanese carriers Akagi, bomber group located the Japanese fleet in the vast ex- was a real honorable man and whenever we had an Kaga and Soryu.


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June 5, 2015

GOSPORT

Sailors wearing new ranks at NASWF Story, photo by Jay Cope NASWF Public Affairs

N

aval Air Station Whiting Field (NASWF) recognized the accomplishments of soon-to-be-advanced Sailors during a frocking ceremony May 28 in the installation’s operations auditorium. Nineteen Sailors were all smiles as they were able to wear the new collar devices for the first time. The frocking ceremony is a Navy tradition that provides the selected Sailors an opportunity to wear the uniform and take on the responsibilities of their new rank before they are formally advanced. Second class petty officers were frocked to first class, third class petty of-

ficers were frocked to second class and Airmen frocked to third class. Each Sailor received a frocking letter from Capt. Todd Bahlau, NAS Whiting Field commanding officer, which reads in part, “Your appointment carries with it the obligation that you exercise increased authority and willingly accept greater responsibility. Occupying now a position of greater authority, you must strive

with a renewed dedication toward the valued ideal of service with honor.” Sailors from NAS Whiting Field selected for advancement with their new ranks were: MA1 Daniel Devine, AC1 Aaron Fizur, AC1 Daniel Haupt, AC1 Mario Santis, AC2 John Arnold, AC2 Brittany Gansmann, AC2 Jason Meinhardt, AC2 Chelsea Morgan, AC2 Jordan Neal, ABH2 Dane Powell, ABH2 Derrick

Rogers, AC2 Suffa Starke, AC2 Darren Williams, AC3 Lukas Astrauskaas, AC3 Amanda Gonzales, AC3 Tinea Lewis, AC3 Matthew Peters and AC3 Cleveland Smith Jr. Bahlau praised the Sailors on their accomplishment and expressed his excitement at seeing so many family members in the audience. “It is truly a great occasion to have you all wear

NASWF Commanding Officer Capt.Todd Bahlau presents a frocking letter to AC1 Mario Santis. The ceremony marks the first time Sailors can wear their new rank insignia.

your new ranks today, and it is nice to see the families here. Sailors can’t advance without the help of

each and every one of you. Today is a great day, so enjoy your achievement,” Bahlau said.

NASWF recognizes Asian-American history By Jay Cope NASWF Public Affairs

The strong ties between Japan and America took the forefront at the Naval Air Station Whiting Field Asian-American Pacific Islander Heritage luncheon May 20 at the installation’s auditorium. The hard-won but enduring peace between the two nations was emphasized during the hour-long ceremony by featured speaker Shigeko Honda, the executive director of the Japan-America Society of Northwest Florida. Honda stressed the ties between the countries by reiterating the words of Japan’s Prime Minister Shinz Abe when he addressed the members of Congress just two weeks ago. “March 11, 2011, a big quake, a tsunami, and a nuclear accident hit the northeastern part of Japan. The darkest night fell upon Japan,” he said. “But it was then we saw the U.S. armed forces rushing to Japan to the rescue at a scale never seen or heard before. Lots and lots of people from all corners of the U.S. extended the hand of assistance to the children in the disaster areas. Yes, we’ve got a friend in you. Together with the victims, you shed tears. You gave us something, something very, very precious. That was

hope, hope for the future. Ladies and gentlemen, the finest asset the U.S. has to give to the world was hope, is hope, will be, and must always be hope.” Military service members were part of the solution then in maintaining friendships between the two nations, and have been for most of the 70 years since the ending of World War II. Northwest Florida is home to a number of military communities. Honda asked the audience how many people there had been stationed in Japan, and nearly half raised their hands. Far from breeding contempt as the saying goes, familiarity has instituted a mutual respect that would have been impossible to foresee 70 years earlier. She spoke about how, once learning she was Japanese, former service members would come up to her and tell her how many happy memories they had from their times in Japan. “There are so many people like them in this community,” she said. The abundance of military and former military families in Northwest Florida is at least partially why the area has started to form an active Japan-America Society. Honda related that the Pensacola area is well known in Japan due to its large military infrastructure, the world-famous

Blue Angels, and the beautiful, whitesand beaches. She has been working to bring a little more of Japan to the local community. Initiatives like the Japan House, the only such facility at a university in Florida; the Japanese New Year celebration every January; and an active exchange program of students who travel to each country every year hosted by families in the respective cities. There is even a sister city relationship with Gero which is celebrating its 10th anniversary although the association goes back more than 20 years. Asian-American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month is recognized in May due to the completion of the transcontinental railroad, which was largely completed with labor from China; and the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States. In his annual proclamation, President Barack Obama stated that “we honor the perseverance of those who courageously reached for their hopes and dreams in a new land, and we celebrate the important impact the AAPI community has made on our nation’s progress.” Perhaps no other impact is as powerful as the military service provided by Japanese-Americans in World War II at

the same time as many of their loved ones were confined in camps. NASWF Executive Officer Cmdr. Donald Gaines II emphasized that point in his welcoming remarks. He spoke about the 442nd Infantry Regiment which was formed mostly from Japanese-Americans. “It was the most decorated unit of its size,” he said. “Out of the 14,000 men who served in this unit there were nearly 9,500 purple hearts issued and 21 Medal of Honors awarded.” With the nickname, Go For Broke, the unit was formed entirely of volunteers and was renowned for its bravery during battle. The government’s disestablishment of the internment camps was likely due, in part, to the successes of the regiment. Speaking after the luncheon, Honda observed that the 70 years of peace and prosperity Japan has achieved is in large measure due to the service of American military personnel. The Japan-America Society is seeking to honor military personnel, especially those who were stationed in Japan, Sept. 4 at the National Naval Aviation Museum. “We want to connect with those who served and express our appreciation for their service,” she said.

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS


June 5, 2015

PARTYLINE

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GOSPORT

Buy, sell and trade coins at show

The Pensacola Numismatic Society (Coin Club) has scheduled its 40th Annual Coin & Currency Show for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow, June 6, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 7 at the Pensacola Interstate Fairgrounds, Bldg. 1 (Expo Hall). Dealers will be buying, selling and trading coins, currency, stamps, pocket watches, jewelry, sports cards, comic books, tokens and other collectibles. There will be a drawing for three Gold American Eagles and 10 2015 Silver Eagles. Food and drinks will be available. For more information, contact Arnie Rosenbleeth, show chairman, at 982-4364 or go to www. PensacolaCoinClub.com.

Navy Ball fundraising event planned

The 2015 Pensacola Area Navy Ball Committee is conducting a series of fundraisers for the 240th Navy Birthday Ball, which is scheduled for Oct. 3 at the National Naval Aviation Museum. Fishing on the Pier is scheduled from 6 p.m. to midnight today, June 5, and 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow, June 6. Gas ’n’ Glass events are scheduled for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 12, July 17, Aug. 14 and Sept. 4 at the NEX Corry Station Gas Station. Committee members will wash your windshield and pump your gas while you wait. Donations will be accepted at all events. For more information, contact Lt. Cmdr. Tatana Olson, chairman for the 2015 Pensacola Area Navy Ball at 452-3938 or by e-mail at tatana.olson @med.navy.mil.

Father/Daughter Dance to be June 19

The NASP First Class Petty Officer Association has scheduled a Father/Daughter Dance for 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. June 19 at Mustin Beach Club ballroom. The event is for daughters of all ages and fathers of all kinds. Moms are welcome too. Ticket are $15 for adults and $5 for children. You can pay at the door, however, it is recommended that tickets be purchased in advance from your department representative. If you do not have a representative or you need more information, contact LN1 Theresa Patterson at 452-4321 or by e-mail at theresa. patterson@navy.mil. Another contact is MA1 Robert Donald at robert.donald@navy.mil.

DoD observing LGBT Pride Month

During the month of June, the Defense Department (DoD) is joining the nation in celebrating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month. Throughout the month, the department will recognize lesbian, gay and bisexual service members and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civilians for their dedicated service to both the DoD mission and to the nation. For more information, go to www.defense. gov/home/features/2015/0615_pride.

Newcomers Club meeting for lunch Newcomers Club of Greater Pensacola meets at 9 a.m. on the second Wednesday (June 10) of the month at the Pensacola Yacht Club for games and a luncheon/meeting. The $14 cost includes lunch. Newcomers is open to all women who have resided in Pensacola two years or fewer. Monthly activities include a book club, bridge, Bunco, bowling, chef’s night out, movie afternoon, and more. For more information, call Anne Martin @ 432-1826 or e-mail famartin39@cox.net. You can also go to www. pensacolanewcomers.com.

School celebrating 50th anniversary

Escambia Christian School will celebrate its 50th anniversary with a dinner event June 20 at the school gymnasium. Doors open at 4 p.m. and a social hour will begin at 4:30 p.m. A buffet dinner will be served at 5:30 p.m. The guest speaker will be Andrew Ellis, a former teacher and coach. Cost is $25. For more information and reservations, call 417-2919 or e-email escambiachristian school50@gmail.com.

Trolley tours add Gulf Breeze route

The Red Trolley Trolley Tours will feature tours of Pensacola and Gulf Breeze. Tours begin and end at the Visitor Information Center. The season will include a new tour of Gulf Breeze haunt sites where UFOs were once spotted. The pirate tours take about 90 minutes are scheduled for 6:30 p.m. June 13, June 27, July 18, Aug. 1 and Aug. 15. The UFO tours begin at 7:30 p.m. June 20, July 11, July 25 and Aug. 8. Tickets cost $5 for children and $20 for adults. The family-friendly trolley tours are part of Winterfest of Pensacola, a non-profit group which holds a children’s parade the day after Thanksgiving and other holiday events at Christmas. For more information on the pirate tour, go to http://piratetrolley.com. For information on the UFO tour, go to http://ufotrolley.com.

Partyline submissions

School physicals to be offered Several dates have been announced for the Naval Hospital Pensacola’s annual summer School/Sports Physical Rodeo. The first event it scheduled for 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. June 27 at the Family Medicine Clinic. Other dates for the rodeo will be July 11, July 18 and July 25. The rodeo offers an easy and convenient way to complete school and sport physicals for families enrolled in the hospital’s Family Medicine Clinic. Appointments are needed and can be made by calling Family Medicine at 505-7120.

CREDO enrichment retreats offered

Three retreats are being offered in Pensacola by the Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) Southeast: • June 26-28: Personal Resiliency Retreat is designed to foster personal growth and empower a better state of positive self-regard using proven resiliency skills. • July 24-26: Family Enrichment Retreat is designed to help military families increase positive functioning by strengthening individual and family resiliency. Your family will learn family wellnesslife skills through interactive exercises, creative activities and group discussion. • Aug. 21-23: Marriage Enrichment Retreat can assist married couples in developing and strengthening a healthy marriage. Active-duty and family members are eligible for retreats (including reservists in an active status). Marriage and family retreat participant couples must be legally married when registering. All of the retreats start at 7 p.m. Friday and end around noon Sunday at Hampton Inn Pensacola Airport, 2187 Airport Blvd. The retreats are free. All lodging and meal expenses are paid. Transportation is not provided. To register, contact the NAS Pensacola Chapel at 452-2341, ext. 5, or e-mail tony.bradford.ctr@ navy.mil.

Classes scheduled for military spouses

Lifestyle, Insights, Networking, Knowledge, Skills (L.I.N.K.S.) for Spouses training classes are scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. June 27 and Aug. 29 in the Commanding Officer’s Conference Room at MATSG-21 Headquarters, Bldg. 3450. Classes are free and all military spouses are welcome. L.I.N.K.S. for Spouses training provides an overview of the Marine Corps structure, services and benefits. Participants also get to meet other spouses, participate in activities and learn about resources available. The training also includes an introduction to what the local area has to offer. Preregistration is required. To register, contact Lisa Duvall, MCFTB trainer, by phone at 452-9460, ext. 3012, or by e-mail at lisa.duvall@usmc.mil.

Suicide prevention workshop planned

Two Suicide SafeTALK workshops will be presented from 8 a.m. to noon June 11 and June 24 at the All Faiths Chapel, Bldg. 634. The workshops prepare helpers to identify persons with thoughts of suicide and connect them to resources. The workshops are open to active-duty, DoD and civilian employees from NAS Pensacola, NASP Corry Station, Saufley Field and NAS Whiting Field. You must be able to participate in the entire workshop. For more information, the NASP Chaplains office at 452-2341, ext. 5, or e-mail tony.bradford.ctr@navy.mil.

Suicide intervention training available An Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) Workshop is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 28-29 at the J.B. McKamey Center, Bldg. 634, NAS Pensacola The ASIST workshop is for anyone who wants to feel more comfortable, confident and competent in helping to prevent the immediate risk of suicide. The workshop is open to active-duty, DoD and civilian employees from NAS Pensacola, NASP Corry Station, Saufley Field and NAS Whiting Field. Participation in the full two days is required. For more information, contact the NASP Chaplain’s office at 452-2341, ext. 5, or e-mail tony.bradford.ctr@navy.mil.

Leadership-Mentor Camp planned

Charlie Ward, 1993 Heisman Trophy recipient, will present his second annual Leadership-Mentor Camp from 8 a.m. to noon June 20 at Booker T.

Washington High School’s Sherman Robinson Stadium. The camp provides a morning where a father/mentor and son/mentee work together while forming a strong bond. Each station will combine football fundamentals along with leadership life lessons in a fun, supportive environment. The camp is open to campers ages 8-13 years old with their father or mentor. The cost is $50 for the pair and includes a T-shirt for each person. Following the camp, Ward will sign T-shirts and take pictures with each participant. For campers not able to be joined by their father or mentor, a volunteer mentor from one of the armed forces will be waiting to partner up with that camper. To register, go to www.btwfootball.org and click on the Charlie Ward Camp tab to download forms. While pre-registration is preferred, walk-up registration will begin at 7 a.m. prior to the beginning of the camp and payments can be taken at that time including credit cards. For more information, call 473-8119 or e-mail BTWQBC@gmail.com.

Battleship plans living-history event

The USS Alabama Living History Crew will bring the ship berthed at Battleship Memorial Park in Mobile, Ala., to life June 13-14. Donning authentic World War II uniforms and equipment, the crew will demonstrate what it was like to serve as a Sailor or Marine aboard the ship for park visitors. A weapons briefing will be held on the fantail explaining the types of weapons used aboard the battleship. Weather permitting, guests will witness a general quarters rush to battle stations as “enemy” aircraft simulate an air attack. Sailors will man the guns and repel the assault. Damage control teams will perform a fire suppression drill as corpsmen evacuate “wounded” sailors in Stokes litters. Anyone interested in joining USS Alabama Living History Crew can contact Tony Watson at (256) 630-9634 or Chip Dobson at (251) 476-3448.

Music event to be June 27 at stadium

Music On The Mound is scheduled for 7 p.m. June 27 at Pensacola Blue Wahoos Stadium. The Canton Spirituals, a gospel quartet, is scheduled to perform. Other performers will include the jazz band Cat Rhodes and The Truth, singer-songwriter Jackie Clowe and Go Get’Em Entertainment. Admission is $15 in advance and $20 the day of the show. Discount rates are available for groups of 10 or more. Tickets can be purchased at the Blue Wahoos Stadium Box Office and Mr. Wings, 3507 North Pace Blvd. For more information, call 934-8444 or Linda “Sonshine” Moorer at 748-7040.

MOAA members offering scholarships

The Pensacola Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) will be awarding scholarship grants to children, stepchildren, spouses or grandchildren of both officer and enlisted activeduty or retired military personnel. To be eligible, applicants must be a resident, dependent of a resident or grandchild of a resident of Escambia or Santa Rosa counties in Florida or Baldwin Count in Alabama and must have completed a minimum of one year at a college/university with at least a 3.0 GPA if an undergraduate, or 3.5 if a graduate student, for the two preceding semesters as a full-time student. Applications must be submitted no later than June 15, and may be downloaded at www.pmoaa.org. For more information or to request assistance in applying, contact retired Cmdr. Vann Milheim at 969-9715 or vann.milheim@att.net.

Children can attend free tennis clinics

The Pensacola Sports Association (PSA) has announce the following dates and locations for the 2015 Pensacola Racquet Round Up, a series of free tennis clinics for area youth: • June 8, Naval Air Station Pensacola Tennis Courts. • June 10, Hollice T. Williams Park (under I-110). • June 17, University of West Florida. • June 18-19, Shoreline Park, Gulf Breeze. Times for all clinics are 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. for ages 4-8 and 10 a.m. to noon for ages 9-12. All skill levels are welcome. The clinics will introduce the game to tennis in a fun, relaxed, and learning environment. Area tennis professionals will lead the instruction. Participants are encouraged to bring a racket if they have one as well as appropriate tennis shoes and clothes, a water bottle and sun screen. Free racquets will be available to use during the clinic. Parents can register their children several ways including online at www.pensacolasports.com or at local tennis centers and pro shops.

You can submit information for possible publication in Partyline by sending an e-mail to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil. Submissions must include the organization’s name and details about events including times, dates, locations and any costs involved. Contact information also is required. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with established standards. Items should be submitted at least one week in advance. The deadline is noon Friday for the next week’s publication.


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June 5, 2015

GOSPORT

List your stuff in a Gosport Classified. Rates are $9 for the first ten words and fifty cents for each additional word. Over 25,000 people see the Gosport every week. Classified ads are free for the Military. Go online to www.gospo rtpensacola. com or

call 433-1166 ext. 24 to place your ad today.


SECTION

LIFE

B

June 5, 2015

Training center recognizes outstanding staff; See page B2 Spotlight

GOSPORT

NOAA: Below-normal Atlantic hurricane season is likely Hurricane forecasting evolving with new storm surge products, upgraded modeling From NOAA http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/

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OAA’s Climate Prediction Center said the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season will likely be below-normal, but that’s no reason to believe coastal areas will have it easy.

For the hurricane season, which officially runs from June 1 – Nov. 30, NOAA is predicting a 70 percent likelihood of six to 11 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which three to six could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including zero to two major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). While a belownormal season is likely (70 percent), there is also a 20 percent chance of a nearnormal season, and a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season. “A below-normal season doesn’t mean we’re off the hook. As we’ve seen before, below-normal seasons can still produce catastrophic impacts to communities,” said NOAA Administrator Kathryn Sullivan, referring to the 1992 season in which only seven named storms formed, yet the first

was Andrew – a Category 5 major hurricane that devastated South Florida. “The main factor expected to suppress the hurricane season this year is El Niño, which is already affecting wind and pressure patterns, and is forecast to last through the hurricane season,” said Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center. “El Niño may also intensify as the season progresses, and is expected to have its greatest influence during the peak months of the season. We also expect sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic to be close to normal, whereas warmer waters would have supported storm development.” Included in the outlook is Tropical Storm Ana, but its pre-season development is not an indicator of the overall season strength.

BRACE: Hurricane prep day June 13 Who: Be Ready Alliance Coordinating for Emergencies (BRACE), Community Maritime Park, Mayor Ashton Hayward and the City of Pensacola will participate in the third annual citywide Hurricane & Disaster Preparedness Day event. What: BRACE and its partners are striving to make the local community the most disaster resilient in America. To prepare the Pensacola community for the upcoming hurricane season and other disasters, BRACE has partnered with the Community Maritime Park and City of Pensacola to host the third annual citywide Hurricane & Disaster Preparedness Day event. When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 13 Where: The Vince J. Whibbs Sr. Community Maritime Park, 301 West Main St. Participants will have the opportunity to meet city and county public safety partners, local disaster response and relief agencies, as well as emergency education and training partners to gather information on how to properly prepare for a disaster.

Ana’s development in warnings for these two cane preparedness tips, May was typical of pre- hazards should provide along with video and season named storms, emergency managers, the audio public service anwhich often form along media, and the general nouncements at www. hurfrontal boundaries in asso- public better guidance on ricanes.gov/prepare. “It only takes one hurriciation with a trough in the the hazards they face when jet stream. This method of tropical cyclones threaten. cane or tropical storm Also new this season is making landfall in your formation differs from the named storms during the a higher resolution version community to signifipeak of the season, which originate mainly from low-pressure systems moving westward from Africa, and are independent of frontal boundaries and the jet stream. With the new hurricane season comes a new prototype storm surge watch/warning graphic from NOAA’s National Hurricane Center, intended to highlight areas along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of the United States A new NOAA storm surge watch/warning graphic has that have a significant risk been introduced for 2015 to aid coastal dwellers. of life-threatening inunda- of NOAA’s Hurricane cantly disrupt your life,” tion by storm surge from a Weather Research and said FEMA Deputy AdForecasting model ministrator Joseph Nimtropical cyclone. The new graphic will (HWRF), thanks to the up- mich. “Everyone should introduce the concept of a grades to operational com- take action now to prepare watch or warning specific puting. A new 40-member themselves and their famto the storm surge hazard. HWRF ensemble-based ilies for hurricanes and Storm surge is often the data assimilation system powerful storms. Develop greatest threat to life and will also be implemented a family communications property from a tropical to make better use of air- plan, build an emergency cyclone, and it can occur at craft reconnaissance-based supply kit for your home, different times and at dif- tail Doppler radar data for and take time to learn ferent locations from a improved intensity fore- evacuation routes for your storm’s hazardous winds. casts. Retrospective testing area. Knowing what to do In addition, while most of 2015 HWRF upgrades ahead of time can literally coastal residents can re- demonstrated a five per- save your life and help you main in their homes and be cent improvement in the bounce back stronger and safe from a tropical cy- intensity forecasts com- faster should disaster strike in your area.” clone’s winds, evacuations pared to last year. NOAA will issue an To help those living in are often needed to keep people safe from storm hurricane-prone areas pre- updated outlook for the surge. Having separate pare, NOAA offers hurri- Atlantic hurricane season

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Gosling Games Color Me ‘Really windy’

in early August, just prior to the historical peak of the season. NOAA also issued its outlook for the Eastern Pacific and Central Pacific basins. For the Eastern Pacific hurricane basin, NOAA’s 2015 outlook is for a 70 percent chance of an above-normal hurricane season. That outlook calls for a 70 percent probability of 1522 named storms, of which 7-12 are expected to become hurricanes, including 5-8 major hurricanes. For the Central Pacific hurricane basin, NOAA’s outlook is for a 70 percent chance of an above-normal season with 5-8 tropical cyclones likely. NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join NOAA on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social media channels. Onboard NAS Pensacola, predictions for the 2015 season are being viewed with caution. “Mixed signals for amount of hurricanes this season; bottom line: be prepared,” said NASP Emergency Manager Burt Fenters.

Jokes & Groaners Top 10 reasons hurricane season is like Christmas 10. Decorating the house (boarding up windows). 9. Dragging out boxes that haven’t been used since last season (camping gear, flashlights). 8. Last minute shopping in crowded stores. 7. Regular TV shows pre-empted for “specials.” 6. Family coming to stay with you. 5. Family and friends from out-of-state calling. 4. Buying food you don’t normally buy ... and in large quantities. 3. Days off from work. 2. Candles.

1. And the number one reason hurricane season is like Christmas ... At some point, you know you’re going to have a tree in your house.


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B2 GOSPORT

SPOTLIGHT

June 5, 2015

Training center recognizes outstanding staff Story, photo by Lt. Cmdr. Sven Sharp Naval Air Technical Training Center Public Affairs

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aval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) announced its top instructors, Sailors and Marines for the second quarter of fiscal year 2015 during a ceremony onboard NAS Pensacola May 22. Cmdr. Scott Sherman, NATTC executive officer, congratulated the awardees and noted that the competition was keen. “There are so many quality Sailors and Marines at this command that it is very, very tough to choose the winners,” Sherman said. “You represent the top one percent of nearly 700 active-duty staff members at NATTC, so you should be proud of your selection. Congratulations and well done.” AE2(AW) Christopher D. Miller and AE1(AW) Andrew J. Gerber were announced as the Junior and Senior Sailors of the Quarter, and Sgt. Matthew D. Bruce was selected as the Marine Noncommissioned Officer of the Quarter. The Junior Instructor of the Quarter was AT2(AW) James F. Jones, the Mid-Grade Instructor of the Quarter was AWO1(AW/NAC) John D. Robb, the Senior Instructor of the Quarter was

AWOC (AW/NAC) Michael M. Anderson, and the Marine Instructor of the Quarter was Staff Sgt. Nicholas K. Pape. Scott also took a moment to speak to family and friends present at the ceremony. “Thank you for taking time out of your schedules to help us recognize these outstanding Sailors and Marines,” he said. “Our military is not successful because of service members alone, but because of behindthe-scenes efforts by our spouses, civilian support staff, and community at large that truly makes our military great. The Sailors and Marines being recognized today would not be standing in front of you now if it hadn’t been for your support. This is not an easy job and your support is so important to enable them to accomplish what they have. The encouragement and dedication you provide translates into improved performance while at work.”

AWOC(AW/NAC) Michael M. Anderson accepts the Senior Instructor of the Quarter award from Cmdr. Scott Sherman, executive officer, Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC).

Anderson described how it felt to be selected and the impact instructors have on young Sailors. “It’s an honor to have even been considered as Senior Instructor of the Quarter let alone win amongst such a group of professionals at NATTC. I truly enjoy being able to work next to these individuals and to be part of this team. We only make each other stronger every day. The most rewarding aspect of this recognition is the impact we have on our junior Sailors on a daily basis as we prepare them for their transition to the fleet.” As a naval aircrewman instructor, Anderson led 32 instructors training 128 students across three “A” Schools,

achieving a combined grade point average of 89.62 percent resulting in a 100 percent course graduation rate. Additionally, he graduated one class of 14 aircrewmen with a 92.25 percent grade point average. For more than 70 years NATTC has been providing training and increasing readiness within the Naval Aviation Enterprise. NATTC graduates approximately 15,000 Navy, Marine and international students annually. The majority of the student body is comprised of enlisted personnel attending “A” schools, where they gain the knowledge and skills required to perform in the fleet as technicians at the apprentice level.

Advanced schools provide higher level technical knowledge for senior petty officers and specialty schools offer specific skills not particular to any one rating, such as airman apprentice training, maintenance, personal financial management and shipboard aircraft firefighting. NATTC also conducts technical training for officers in aviation fuels, carrier air traffic control center operations, aircraft launch and recovery equipment, shipboard aircraft fire fighting and amphibious air traffic control center operations. For more information about Naval Air Technical Training Center, visit its website at https://www.netc.navy.mil/centers/cnatt/nattc/Default.aspx


GOSPORT

PA G E

June 5, 2015

B3

Navy Cup sailing competition scheduled for June 12-14 From Navy Yacht Club

Sailboat races hosted by the Navy Yacht Club of Pensacola are scheduled for June 12-14 in Bayou Grande and in Pensacola Bay with onshore race activities being held at the Navy Yacht Club facility at the Bayou Grande Marina on Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP). The Navy Yacht Club is marking its 84th birthday along with the 52nd year of hosting the “Navy Cup,” a sailboat competition that features matches between local yacht clubs in a team challenge for the Navy Cup Trophy. In addition, the Navy Yacht Club will be commemorating the 70th anniversary of the ending of World War II and role that NASP – the Cradle of Naval Aviation – had in the war effort and pro-

moting “Victory Florida,” the Viva Florida initiative promoting Florida’s history and culture. Individual PHRF (Performance Handicap Racing Formula) sailboats from the local area yacht clubs (any yacht club in the Gulf Coast area that may have an interest in the competition team sailing is invited to sail) will be competing in various class divisions such as: spinnaker and non-spinnaker – cruiser fleets out in the bay June 13. Various small one-design sailboats such as Hunter 18s and Sunfish will be sailing in the confines of the bayou on June 14. The format for the Navy Cup race will include team racing with each yacht club competing against each other for the Navy Cup Trophy.

This event is open to all sailors (whether they belong to a yacht club or not). Special trophies will be given to the top 3 winners in each class division. Free dock space at the marina will be available for all participants throughout the weekend. Registration check-in and skipper’s meeting for the Navy Cup event will be from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. June 12, with the skipper’s briefing at 6 p.m. at the Navy Yacht Club facility aboard the NASP (enter the Navy base from Navy Boulevard, front gate entrance). Race day check-in for the PHRF spinnaker and non spinnaker – cruiser classes will befrom 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. June 13 at the Navy Yacht Club facility with the first race scheduled to

start at noon. All one-design racing is scheduled for June 14 in Bayou Grande and can be seen from the observation deck at the Navy Yacht Club facility. The June 14 race day registration check-in will be held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. with a noon race start. Sailors will tentatively be back on shore by 4 p.m.each day for the after-race party that will be held following each day’s competition. The presentation of the Navy Cup Trophy and class awards will be held after the last race is completed June 14. Notices about the race can be found on the Navy Yacht Club website at www.navypnsyc.org. For more information, contact Sue Stephenson, Navy Yacht Club fleet captain, at 458-1903 or by e-mail at ssteph7@juno.com.


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OFF DUTY

B4

GOSPORT

June 5, 2015

Morale, Welfare and Recreation

From University of West Florida Historic Trust

The University of West Florida Historic Trust has scheduled Historic Pensacola’s 25th annual open house for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 6. In conjunction with Viva Florida’s Victory Florida campaign, the free event will commemorate the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. Guests will have the opportunity to participate in swing dancing, dress up in a provided costume as Rosie the Riveter for their own “We Can Do It!” photograph, write a message of thanks to our service men and women, past and present, on a “Wall of Thanks” and search for clues in the “Passport to the Past” scavenger hunt. Guests will also learn about life in Pensacola during the war, Victory Gardens, the many roles women played in the war and how scrap metal materials were gathered and used to support the war effort. The open house includes free admission to the Historic Pensacola Village, the T.T. Wentworth Jr. Museum, the Pensacola Children’s Museum and Voices of Pensacola presented by Gulf Power as well as guided tours of many of the Historic Pensacola Village properties.

The “We Can Do It!” poster created in 1942 by artist J. Howard Miller for the Westinghouse Company’s War Production Coordinating featured an image of Rosie the Riveter.

Climmie the Clown will be visiting the Pensacola Children’s Museum and special programming is planned throughout the day at Voices of Pensacola, including the presentation “The S. S. San Pablo, A Brief History” by Stewart Hood at noon and a screening of “Pearl Harbor: One Last Goodbye” at 1 p.m. In addition, guests can explore the museums and participate in directed learning activities that will focus on Florida’s water resources and ecosystem in WaterVenture Florida’s Learning Lab, a 53-

foot semi-trailer that has been customized as a state-of-the-art traveling science center. Other organizations participating in the open house include Northwest Florida USO, American Red Cross, UWF Alumni Relations, the UWF Archaeology Institute, the Pensacola Archaeological Society and Next Exit History. For more information, go to www.historicpensacola.org or contact Jeff Nall, UWF Historic Trust chief community officer, by phone at 595-5985, ext. 110, or by e-mail at jnall@uwf.edu.

At the movies

The NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department has a number of upcoming events and activities. For more information, call 452-3806, ext. 3100, or go to the MWR website at www.navymwrpensacola.com. • Radfordʼs Mind and Body Workshop: 9 a.m. to noon June 27 at Radford Fitness Center. Focus on your mind and body during a morning of rejuvenation with the Gulf Coast’s best mind and body experts in tai chi, Pilates, foam rolling and yoga. For more information, call 452-9845. • Free movies: Free movies will be featured each Wednesday all summer long at Portside Cinema, Bldg. 606. For more information, see the weekly schedule below or call 452-3522. • Summer reading Program: “Read to the Rhythm,” June 16 to Aug. 6, at the NASP Library, Bldg. 634. Reading, singing, dancing and crafts. Sessions are 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday for ages 3 to 6 and 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday for ages 7 and older. For more information, or to register, call 452-4362. • Audition notice: The NASP Child and Youth Program has announced upcoming auditions for the Missoula Children’s Theater production of “Rapunzel.” Auditions are scheduled to start at 9 a.m. July 6 at the NASC auditorium. Rehearsals will be from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily until the performance, whic is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. July 15. For more information, call 452-2417. • Movies on the Lawn: The summer series will be presented through August at dusk on the second and fourth Saturday of each month in front of Portside Gym, Bldg. 627. “Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit” is scheduled for June 13 and “Cinderella” is scheduled for June 27. Free popcorn. Bring coolers, snacks, chairs and blankets. For more information, call 452-3806, ext. 3140. • Rent a bike: Rental bikes are available at Blue Angel Naval Recreation Area Outpost Marina. Half day (four hours), $10; full day (eight hours), $15. Deposit and military ID required. For more information, call 453-4530. • Auto repairs: NASP Corry Station, Bldg. 1006. Do vehicle repairs yourself. The Auto Skills Center has tools, manuals (online), equipment, lifts and stalls, as well as knowledgeable staff to assist. Motorcycle and ATV lifts now open. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday, Monday and holidays. Lift rates $6 an hour, $30 a day. For information, call 452-6542. • Danger Zone Paintball: Play paintball at Blue Angel Naval Recreation Area. Open until 5 p.m. Monday and Friday for challenge events. Cost is $20 for active-duty and $30 for civilians and includes full equipment rental, 500 rounds of paint and free air refills. Reservations required two weeks in advance. For details, call 281-5489. • Boat rentals: Sherman Cove Marina, NASP. Pontoon boats hold 10-12 people and can be reserved up to 30 days in advance for half or full days. Cape Horn and Whaler Skiff also available. Marina also offers bait, fuel, ice, snacks, two launch ramps and a wash bay. For more information or to make a reservation, call 452-2212.

FRIDAY

“Avengers: Age of Ultron” (3D), PG-13, 5 p.m.; “The Water Diviner,” R, 8 p.m.; “Hot Pursuit,” PG-13, 5:30 p.m.; “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (2D), PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY

“Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2,” PG, 12:30 p.m.; “Hot Pursuit,” PG-13, 2:30 p.m.; “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (3D), PG-13, 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.; “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (2D), PG-13, noon, 3 p.m.; “The Water Diviner,” R, 6 p.m.; “Ex Machina,” R, 8:30 p.m.

SUNDAY

“The Age of Adaline,” PG-13, 1 p.m.; “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (3D), PG-13, 3:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m.; “Little Boy,” PG-13, noon; “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (2D), PG-13, 2:30 p.m.; “Hot Pursuit,” PG-13, 5:30 p.m.; “Ex Machina,” R, 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY

“Hot Pursuit,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (3D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “The Age of Adaline,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “The Water Diviner,” R, 7:30 p.m.

Liberty activities

TUESDAY

“Hot Pursuit,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (2D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “Little Boy,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “Ex Machina,” R, 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

“Big Hero 6,” PG, noon; “How to Train a Dragon 2,” PG, 3 p.m.; “Gone Girl,” R, 6 p.m.; “Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2,” PG, 1 p.m., 4 p.m.; “Unfriended,” R, 7 p.m. (free admission for all movies scheduled for Wednesday)

THURSDAY

“Hot Pursuit,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (2D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “Little Boy,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “The Water Diviner,” R, 7:30 p.m.

Liberty program events target young, unaccompanied active-duty military. New hours are 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday. Regular events are scheduled at the main Liberty Center in the Portside Entertainment Complex. You must sign up in advance for off-base trips. For more information, call 452-2372 or go to http://naspensacolamwr.com/singsail/liberty.htm.

COST Regular: $3 adults, $1.50 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger 3D shows: $5 adults, $3 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

Place your classified ad today and it will be seen by over 25,000 potential customers

To advertise in the GOSPORT, call Becky Hildebrand at 433-1166 ext. 31

Details: 452-3522 or www.naspensacola-mwr.com


June 5, 2015

GOSPORT

COMMAND LINES

SAPR

Worship schedule

If you are a victim of sexual assault, it is not your fault. Help for victims of sexual assault in the DoD community is a call, click or text away: The SafeHelpline provides live, one-on-one crisis support and information by trained staff. Call: (877) 995-5247; click: www.SafeHelpline.org; or text: 55-247, CONUS; (202) 470-5546, OCONUS (may be extra charges for OCONUS). The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program provides prevention, intervention and a 24/7/365 response to non-intimate partner adult victims of sexual assault. Active-duty and adult family member sexual assault victims have a choice of reporting options, unrestricted and restricted. Unrestricted reporting allows victim to have an advocate, seek medical care, counseling, legal services, safety interventions and/or transfer, etc. To access an unrestricted report, the victim may report to his/her chain-ofcommand, security/law enforcement, NCIS, SAPR VA, SARC, or others. NCIS shall be notified by the CO and/or the VA/SARC in unrestricted cases to begin investigation. Investigation results are provided to the offender’s CO for appropriate action/disposition. Restricted reporting allows a victim to have a confidential report, which does not trigger command or law enforcement notification and the victim may have a SAPR VA and seek medical care and/or counseling. To access restricted reporting, the victim may disclose his/her sexual assault only to the SARC, a current SAPR VA, a health care professional and/or a chaplain. To contact the NASP 24/7 Victim Advocate, call 449-9231/2. For the Civilian Victim Advocate, call 293-4561. To contact the duty SARC, call the SARC cell at 554-5606.

B5

Fleet and Family Support Center

NAS Pensacola Protestant • Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Chapel choir, 12:30 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Contemporary service, 6 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Training Air Wing Six Bible Study, 11:15 a.m. Tuesday, Griffith Hall student lounge. • Bible study, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, J.B. McKamey Center. Roman Catholic • Sunday Mass, 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Daily Mass, 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Our Lady of Loreto Chapel. • Confessions: 30 minutes before services. Latter Day Saints • Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Meeting: 6 p.m. Monday and 6 p.m. Thursday, J.B. McKamey Center. For information, call 452-2341. NASP Corry Station Protestant • Adult Bible study, 9 a.m. Sunday, fellowship hall vice conference room. • Chapel choir, 9 a.m. Sunday, choir room vice sanctuary. • Worship service, 10 a.m. Sunday.

• Fellowship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday. • Contemporary worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, followed by fellowship at 7:30 p.m. • Bible study and dinner, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, fellowship hall. Latter Day Saints • Service, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Roman Catholic • Mass, noon Sunday and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For information, call 452-6376. NAS Whiting Field Chapel Roman Catholic • Mass, 11 a.m. Friday. Protestant • Bible study, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. • Weekly chapel service, 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For information, call 623-7212. More services Jewish • Bʼnai Israel Synagogue, 1829 North Ninth Ave., services 7 p.m. Friday and 9:30 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 433-7311. • Temple Beth El, 800 North Palafox St., services 7 p.m. Friday (6 p.m. first Friday of each month). For information, call 438-3321 or go to http://templebethelof pensacola.org. Seventh-day Adventist • Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1080 North Blue Angel Parkway, Bible studies at 9:30 a.m. and services at 11 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 4533442.

The NASP Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), 151 Ellyson Ave., Bldg. 625, is offering the following: • Healing the Angry Brain: Six weekly sessions begin 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. June 9. Program offers a neuropsychological approach to understanding anger. It will be presented by Mario Campa, clinical counselor, and Susan Rivazfar, family advocacy program case manager. Pre-registration is required; contact Rivazfar at susan.rivazfar@navy.mil or 452-5611. • Time to move: If you want help with your PCS

move stop by the FFSC. Move.mil assist workshops are available at 4 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday. This is the program which must be completed and submitted for transferring individuals/families which have household goods to move. Prior to coming to the class/workshop you must have a login name and password created. Open to all branches. For information or to reserve a seat, call 4525609. • AmVets ... Understanding Your VA Benefits: Workshop is offered every month. To register or for more information, call 452-5609.

Community Outreach NASP Community Outreach volunteer opportunities: • Mentoring: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at Child Development Center at NASP Corry Station. Mentor children after school. Volunteers/mentors assist with homework and study strategies, as well as being a good role model to the children. • Pensacola Lighthouse and Museum: There are numerous opportunities such as hosting tours or helping with special events and maintenance and grounds upkeep.

• Meals on Wheels: Council on Aging of West Florida needs volunteers to deliver meals to homebound elderly citizens throughout Escambia County. Flexible schedules. For more information, call 432-1475 or e-mail bmcleroy@coawfla.org. The NASP Community Outreach office tracks volunteer hours. Report any hours you work to receive due recognition. For information on volunteer activities, call 452-2532 or e-mail SH2 Patricia Cooper at patricia.cooper@Navy.mil.

For Today’s Business

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Portable full-size sewing machines. $150 each. Ashley furniture wine glass holder, $150. 850-450-4467

New round table with four chairs, $350. Wing back upholstered chair, $35. Rocker, seat, $65. 206-6436

The Pensacola Lighthouse and Museum is looking for guest services position. The position is part time and seasonal, at this time, but may be kept after the season. Please apply in person at the lighthouse, or for more information contact Glenda, at G.King@pensacolalighthouse.org or 850 393-1561 Field Tech, some PVC pipe, and elect experience, outdoor physical work for engineering Co. For interview call 484-2700 Wanted helper general maintenance, pickup truck desired. 4842700

Garage Sales Neighborhood Yard Sale Sat. June 6, 7am-1pm. Cantonment area 1371 Woodfield Dr.

Super cute kittens – four black, one marble - need forever homes. They've been weaned and are lit- Have to move and ter box box trained. just bought this set Call 733-9583. of white Whirlpool washer/ dryer from Articles for sale Lowes 1 month ago. Purchased Cub Cadet 1040 them for $1,277 rising mower, new but need to sell. engine, starter, bat- Asking price is tery, coil ready to $800 for both. Very start cutting. $850. nice! 512-8380 for 492-4659 photos Craftsman lawn tractor model 917258524 Briggs/Stratton Motor 15.5HP. 42” deck. Needs engine rebuilt. Everything else works fine. $225. 255-5591

Crimson Trace laser grip for Ruger .44 Magnum Superhawk. New in box. $150.00 Firm. (850) 484-8998

Kimball piano with padded bench, very good Sofa sleeper, queen condition, $295. Size, excellent con418-4614 or 944dition, $99. 8508886 449-1675 or 850-261-9323 Nice upright refrigerator, top Designer women’s freezer, just needs shoes, size 11, new coach, Nike, repair, $50. 850Birkenstock, Polo, 438-6129 Skechers sneakers. 50% off retail. Women’s size 1112 shoes, over 60 pairs, new, $2-10. Choose or take all. 458-3821

End tables, oval, cherry and wrought iron, excellent condition. 2 for $150. 418-4614 or 944-8886

Motor

1999 Honda Accord EX loaded tan on tan leather, power windows, seats, sunroof, mirrors. AM/FM CD. Crossbow, carbon $3,200. Cordova express, latest Park. 418-3444 technology, new, 175 lb. pull, 330 ft. 1968 Camaro tper second, comes 10 4 speed many parts, with quiver, two new cockers, ten bolts, $16,500. Contact a mounted rifle 850-208-1525. scope, case. Retail value over $750. 2008 BMW 335i Sell for 250. 497- Coupe, twin turbo, 6 speed, metallic 1167 black w cocoa Cast iron cook- leather seats, sunware, 3 skillets and roof, new tires and only 1 muffin pan, all battery, are 50+ years old, 44,120 miles, one Lodge brand with o w n e r / B M W heat rings. $40 for dealer maintained miles. Always all. 417-1694 garaged, nonTen fishing rods smoker, mint conwith reels for fam- dition. 637-1876. ily fishing on Pen- $19,750 sacola bridge, tackle box in- 2008 Silver Can cluded. $45 for all. Am Spyder RS A 1 8 L 0 0 , 454-9486 $12,900.Pristine Motors condition/garage Autos for sale kept, many extras. 994-0324 2007 red Monte Call Carlo SS, 10,700 433-1166 original miles, immaculate, even ext. 24 and this spot smells new. could be $15,500. 850-982yours. 0365

Real Estate

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Beautiful 3 bed, 2 bath, 1,841 sq ft brick home for sale in Pace. Wood & tile floors. 251269-3577

2003 Kawasaki 1600 Vulcan Motorcycle. 17,488 miles. Bags, locking trunk, w/s & lots more. Very good condition. Garage kept. $4500. 255-5591.

5/5.5 house comes with a slip with boat lift, which is directly in the intercoastal waterway. It will be available to rent starting Aug. 1. http://www.militarybyowner.com/h omes/FL/PenHarley Sportster sacola/Key_Largo_ 2011 XL883L. Low miles. 572- Place/MBO343649 .aspx. Listing code: 1546. $5,500 MBO343649

Misc Motors 32’ Travel Line TT. 2000. Slide out, W/D, large fridge/freezer, large bath/tub. $5,900. 748-7361. 2005 Sunnybrook Solanta 27’ travel trailer $7,000 obo. Pictures available upon request Call or text. Rob 850-377-0184 Sea Ray Weekender 225 Boat. 2003. $17,500. 400 hours. 850-5254631. Great condition. Very clean. 27’ Sportscraft Cabin Cruiser needs engine and transmission, hull good. Kept in dry dock. $2500. 2555591

Very clean 3 bedroom, 1 bath brick home with large shady backyard. Central heat and air, carpeting, tile, large laundry/ bonus room, 8 minutes to NAS Correy Station, convenient to I-110 and downtown area, close to Baptist Hospital. $700/month, $700 deposit. Ready to rent now. Pets negotiable or outside only. 850-438-6129

Room fully furnished, in home of retired Navy chief, $500 a month. Nice location, $250 deposit, utilities included. Male or female. 776-5274 Furnished room: male or female roommate seeking small room for rent, $250 a month includes everything. Pets ok. Kitchen/washer/dr yer privileges. Close to base. 455-2590

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Cheap houses for sale near NAS Pensacola. Negotiable, 228 Betty Rd. 2,450 sqft., $70,000. 4/4. Attached mother in law studio. 209 Marine Dr. 1,296 sqft., $50,000. 1 bedroom apart- 572-6700 ment, walking distance from NAS Efficiency condo, Main Gate. 515 everything refinPalomar Drive. ished, overlooking Hardwood floors, outside pool and w/d in each unit. heated inside pool $725/month. $300 on Garden St. deposit. No pets. $38,000 206-6436 456-5432

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