Page 1

Hurricane season begins June 1 ... “Enhanced activity (this year) means the more likely the chances are that a hurricane is going to make landfall this season,” NAS Pensacola Emergency Manager Burt Fenters said recently. “NASP personnel need to make sure you don’t let your guard down; stay prepared.” See pages A45 in today’s Gosport for a hurricane tracking map, contact information and more.

Vol. 77, No. 22

VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: www.gosportpensacola.com

May 31, 2013

Navy Region Southeast prepares for hurricane season Story, photo by MC1 (SW) Greg Johnson Navy Region Southeast Public Affairs

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) – Navy Region Southeast participated in the annual hurricane preparedness exercise HURREX/Citadel Gale 2013 on May 23. The U.S. Fleet Forces Command/Commander, Navy

Members of the media interview Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. during HURREX/Citadel Gale 2013 onboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville.

Installations Command exercise tested the region's ability to track, prepare for and respond to hurricanes should they threaten Southeastern facilities. “In the Southeast Region, it’s not a matter of ‘if’ a hurricane will strike, it’s a matter of ‘when’ and ‘where,’ ” said Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. “Since last year’s HURREX, we have had five named storms impact our region, so it is imperative that we train so we are ready when they strike. Each year, this exercise gives us an excellent opportunity to test our skills through authentic, challenging scenarios that go a long way to ensure we are ready in the event of an actual hurricane.” During recent years, numerous major storms have affected regional installations. Joint Reserve Base New Orleans remembers the damage caused by Katrina in 2005. Less than a year ago, Hurricane Sandy made landfall just west of Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

See HURREX on page 2

Soil excavation to cause minor traffic detours From NASP PAO

NAS Pensacola’s Public Works Department will be conducting a soil excavation project adjacent to Taylor Road and Murray Road, June 10-24, Monday-Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. During this time, Murray Road will be closed at Taylor Road, and Taylor Road will be narrowed to two lanes in the vicinity of the project. Personnel driving aboard the air station are asked to anticipate these detours and plan accordingly. For a map of the affected area, see page A2. Petty officers frocked at NAS Pensacola ... Surrounded by friends and family, a group of NASP petty officers put on new ranks May 24. In the front row (leftright) first class insignia is pinned on MA1 Joseph Paladino and IT1 Ronald Romer. Three NASP secondclass petty officers were selected for first class; 12 third-classes made second-class petty officer and 16 more Sailors made third-class petty officer. Frockees get to carry the responsibility and privileges of higher rank while actual promotion catches up. Photo by Mike O’Connor

ABH3 Leti Seloti and civilian Mark Gonzales perform a Fijian dance at the AsianPacific American Heritage Celebration hosted at the Naval Aviation Schools' Command Auditorium May 22.

Asian-Pacific American heritage celebrated at NASP Story, photo by Jennifer Eitzmann NASP PAO Intern

As part of AsianPacific American Heritage Month, NAS Pensacola’s Diversity Committee invited Pensacola City Council President, Dr. P.C. Wu, to be guest speaker at a presentation held at the Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC) auditorium May 22. In addition to being Pensacola City Council

president, Wu is a professor emeritus at the University of West Florida and a first-generation Chinese-American. The theme of this year’s event was “Building Leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion.” The presentation included dances performed by Asian-Pacific American dancers. They performed traditional moves from Fiji, Japan, Hawaii and Samoa. One of the Japanese dances, called

Ifu Duo Duo, was performed by local children and depicted a story of how to treat others as you would like to be treated. After the children finished their performance on how to treat others, Wu told a story about how he was treated as a Chinese-American growing up in the 1960s. In 1969, Wu was attending Florida State University (FSU). “In that time if an alien had

See Event on page 2

All bark and bite: NASP police dog gets new crown By Jason J. Bortz NHP PAO

For five-year-old Csapage, loosing part of a tooth did not earn him a visit from the Tooth Fairy, but he did get a bright and shiny new tooth from a Navy dentist. Csapage, a Czech Shepherd, is a military working dog (MWD) assigned to Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP). During training, Csapage broke one of his lower canine teeth and was taken to the NASP veterinarian treatment facility where the MWDs are cared for. “I knew he needed a crown, but I needed assistance with doing that,” said Army Capt. Michael Bellin, the veterinarian assigned to NASP veterinarian treatment facility. “It’s not typical that (Army veterinarians) ask Navy doctors for help, but I was thinking of what was best for Csapage.” Bellin contacted Naval Branch Health

Clinic NASP and Cmdr. Grace Dorangricchia, department head for the Dental Clinic at NBHC NASP, made the easy decision to help. Dorangricchia, besides being a dentist, is also a dog lover. She currently has three dogs, but she

See Crown on page 2

NASP military working dog Csapage undergoes surgery to replace a broken tooth.

Published by Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements constitute Department of the Navy, NAS Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing’s endorsement of products or services advertised.


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May 31, 2013

GOSPORT

Target date for vehicle decals to be eliminated: July 1 From NASP PAO

Vehicle decals may soon become a thing of the past. A NavAdmin message is soon expected to announce the elimination of base vehicle decals, effective July 1. The elimination of the use of Navy vehicle decals for vehicle registration, in order to access Navy installations, was directed by the ASN (EI&E) memorandum dated March 18, 2011. The vehicle decal program registration

process provided a simple way for base security to verify the vehicle had been properly registered with the state, confirm the driver had adequate liability insurance, and confirm the driver was authorized to operate the vehicle. Navy regions and installations have been provided guidance to develop implementation plans of the new policy and associated policies for vehicle base access, parking, etc. Implementation of those new policies will take effect across the entire CNIC enterprise upon receipt of

HURREX from page 1

before moving toward the northeast. During this year’s HURREX scenario, the NRSE Crisis Action Team (CAT) tracked two fictitious hurricanes, Kirk and Lay, from the Regional Operations Center at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville. Kirk crossed over NS Guantanamo Bay and eventually made landfall as a category two hurricane near the Georgia-South Carolina border, and Lay made landfall as a category four hurricane near NAS Pensacola. The CAT consists of nearly 50 personnel, each with specific roles ranging from planning and logistics to family support services. In addition to the CAT, the region also deploys a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT)/Damage Assessment Team (DAT), led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command, which assesses damage after the storm, as well as an Emergency Family Assistance Center, which provides support to families. Throughout HURREX, the teams coordinated their efforts with local authorities and civilian agencies like they would in the event of a real hurricane. “HURREX is essential training,” said Scott Crossley, NRSE regional emergency manager. “We get lots of tropical storms, but as often as we get landfall, we still see far too many casualties from people forgetting some of the lessons we’ve learned in the past. We’ve learned that too many injuries occur, even with lesser storms, after the storm has passed because people are trying to drive through flooded roads or trying to repair storm damage. By doing these exercises, it helps reinforce the message that this is a real hazEvent from page 1

landed and you put it next to me, there would be more people looking at me then the alien,” he said. While at FSU, Wu was presented with his first ethical dilemma. A professor in one of his classes asked to speak with him and during the conversation the professor spoke very slowly and enunciated his words. The professor told Wu that he

the CNIC EXORD and NavAdmin. Some have viewed the decal as a credentialing for base access. Credentialing for base access has always been based on individuals having proper identification, such as a Department of Defense-issued identification card. • Eliminating the vehicle decal requirement will improve security posture by providing electronic credentialing and/or increased scrutiny in the manual verification of an authorized credential or identification card.

ard.” During an actual storm, NRSE personnel coordinate with Fleet Weather Center Norfolk to track potential hurricanes and tropical storms from the beginning stages of the weather system. Once a tropical storm is identified, its course and intensity are monitored. As the storm approaches an installation, the CAT must decide what actions to take based on a variety of factors. The Navy classifies storms in terms of Conditions of Readiness (COR), which indicate the proximity of a storm and the likelihood that it will hit a given installation. At the beginning of the hurricane season, each installation is set to COR five. As storms approach, that condition will change at an installation based on when destructive winds are projected to hit. Installations set COR four when onset of destructive force winds is within 72 hours, COR three at 48 hours, COR two at 24 hours and COR one at 12 hours. Once a storm is projected to make landfall at an installation, the decision must be made to evacuate or shelter in place. That decision is made based on a number of factors related to the intensity of the storm. It is essential for both personnel and dependents to be aware of advisories and instructions as a storm approaches. Once a storm passes, the CAT shifts its focus to providing whatever kind of support is needed to get the installation running at full capacity based on reports from the CERT and DAT. “The first step is a health and welfare check to make sure that everyone is safe and accounted for,” Crossley said. “Step two is initial damage assessment of the installation. We need to ensure we have main-

knew the class would be difficult for him but they would work together and he would pass. What the professor did not know was that Wu spoke perfect English. “Did I want a social life, or did I want to keep my mouth shut and graduate magna chum laude?,” Wu asked himself. In addition to his own experiences, Wu touched on the many accomplishments made by other Asian-Pacific

NASP traffic detour map: June 10-24

approached Csapage the same way she would any patient. “(Putting a crown on a dog) is the same exact procedure I would do on a human, except the tooth is longer and curved,” said Dorangricchia. “I treated him like any other patient. I even explained the surgery to him.” The first step in the procedure was to fit Csapage for a crown. After the 80-pound MWD was completely sedated, a mold of the tooth was made and a crown was created. For

Vol. 77, No. 22

May 31, 2013

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community Commanding Officer — Capt. Keith Hoskins Public Affairs Officer — Harry C. White The Gosport nameplate pays homage to the 100th anniversary of naval aviation in 2011: the Centennial of Naval Aviation, or CONA. The image on the left side of the nameplate depicts Eugene Ely taking off in a Curtiss pusher bi-plane from the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 18, 1911. While Ely had taken off from the USS Birmingham two months earlier after his plane had been loaded on the ship, the USS Pennsylvania event was the first time a plane landed on and then took off from a U.S. warship.

The image on the right side is the Navy’s most modern fighter aircraft, the F-18 Super Hornet. Established in 1921 as the Air Station News, the name Gosport was adopted in 1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by flight instructors in the early days of naval aviation to give instructions and directions to their students. The name “Gosport” was derived from Gosport, England (originally God’s Port), where the voice tube was invented. Gosport is an authorized newspaper published every Friday by Ballinger Publishing,

tained command and control capability and find out if the installation utilities are still functioning or if they are affected to some degree. We try to start with mission-critical facilities, utilities and fleet support requirements and we go on from there.” One of the most important things for people to keep in mind about the hurricane process is to be prepared for a storm well before it even happens. “As the regional emergency manager, clearly our focus is regional planning and installation planning, but none of that works if the Sailors and individuals don’t have a family plan,” Crossley said. “You have to prepare as a person and as a family. If your family or you are not prepared, you’re not going to be able to be part of the team’s supporting response.” Some important preparations include ensuring important documents are in a safe location, making sure family members have contact information in case of an evacuation, making sure prescription medications are readily available, and ensuring the special needs of family members can be taken care of. If a hurricane hits an installation and residents are not evacuated, they should be prepared to operate independently for a period of three to five days, which would include a gallon of water per person per day and food that does not require refrigeration. Residents should also expect to be without electricity and should make sure they have flashlights and batteries. For more information about tropical storm and hurricane preparedness, visit https://www.cnic.navy.mil/ cnrse/RegionOperationsandServices/Operationsand Management/EmergencyManagement/index.htm.

Americans. The story that really captivated the audience was one about the Army 442nd Regimental Combat Team. The unit, composed mostly of Japanese-Americans, fought to rescue a group of American fighting men – the “Lost Battalion” – from German forces during World War II. The men of the 442nd performed their duty as Soldiers even while their parents were being held in internment camps by the very Crown from page 1

• The new policy will result in cost savings and a reduction in administrative tasks. • Savings realized with the new policy will be diverted to critical anti-terrorism and force protection programs. • Vehicle decal elimination at Navy installations aligns base access policies with other military services. • Elimination of the vehicle decal requirement does not eliminate the requirement for an individual to properly register and insure their vehicle.

country they were fighting for. When these Soldiers returned to the states they were ordered to tell no one about the things that they had done during the war, and some were treated unfairly by their fellow Americans. Other speakers at the event included NASP Commanding Officer Capt. Keith Hoskins and NASP Public Affairs Officer Harry White. There were more than 300 guests in attendance.

Csapage, the crown was made out of high noble metal, which is better than a porcelain one. “I don’t compromise on care,” said Dorangricchia. Once the crown was made, Csapage was brought back in and the crown was placed. Dorangricchia even gave him a complimentary cleaning. Despite this being her first four legged patient, Dorangricchia showed no signs of nerves and instead, relished in the opportunity to help. “I just wanted to do my job,” said Dorangricchia. “I think it was a unique experi-

The Rhodes Building, 41 North Jefferson Street, Suite 402, Pensacola, FL 32504, in the interest of military and civilian personnel and their families aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Saufley Field and Corry Station. Editorial and news material is compiled by the Public Affairs Office, 150 Hase Road, Ste.A, NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-1051. All news releases and related materials should be mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hallford@navy.mil. National news sources are American Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News Service (NNS), Air Force News Service (AFNS), News USA and North American Precis Syndicate (NAPS). Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Defense, United States Navy, officials of the Naval Air Station Pensacola, or Ballinger Publishing. All advertising, including classified ads, is arranged through Ballinger Publishing. Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to rank, rate, race, creed, color, national origin or sex of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection of this policy of equal opportunities by an advertiser will result in the refusal of future advertising from that source.

ence and even more special because he is a military working dog.” Military working dogs are treated very similarly to active-duty personnel. They even earn promotions for hard work. Csapage is a master-at-arms first class (MA1) and has deployed to Afghanistan. Most MWDs will remain in service until they are eight years old, which mean Csapage has a few more years of service left before he retires. Would Dorangricchia perform another surgery on a dog? “I would do another one in a heartbeat,” she said.

For classified ads, call: (850) 433-1166, ext. 24 For commercial advertising: Simone Sands (850) 433-1166, ext. 21 Simone@ballingerpublishing.Com Visit Us On The Web At: Ballinger Publishing.Com Mail To: Gosport, NAS Pensacola, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, Pensacola, FL 32508-1051

Gosport Editor

Scott Hallford 452-4466 scott.hallford@navy.mil Gosport Associate Editor

Mike O’Connor 452-2165 michael.f.oʼconnor.ctr@navy.mil Gosport Staff Writer

Janet Thomas 452-4419 janet.thomas.ctr@navy.mil


May 31, 2013

GOSPORT

COMMENTARY

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Dinghy the dog and military family thrive on routine By Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist

In the fragile darkness of morning, birds chirp outside our bedroom window, heralding the start of another day. I hear my husband snort, scratch, then hit a couple of buttons on his bedside clock to ward off the inevitable alarm bells. My sports Swatch emits a beep, but I slap my wrist to make it stop and curl onto my side, snuggling into my pillow. Just 10 more minutes. From under the foot of our bed, comes an elongated yawn, beginning deep and low, and finishing with a high-pitched squeal and a few jaw-smacking clucks. It’s Dinghy, our aging Labradoodle, whose 110-pound body clock is now considerately working in tandem with ours. A bit of a late bloomer, Dinghy took his sweet time maturing, despite the fact that everyone told us that “dogs take two years to settle down.” We picked him out of a litter of fat pups on a farm in rural North Carolina in 2006, and named him Dinghy – an homage to our life as a Navy family. Although a bit naughty – stealing socks, sampling toilet water and turning the back yard into Swiss cheese – Dinghy became our constant companion, comforting and entertaining us through deployments and PCSes. Now, in his eighth year,

About the columnist Lisa Smith Molinari, mother of three, has been a military spouse for 20 years (and running). Her humor column, “The Meat and Potatoes of Life,” appears weekly in newspapers and on Stripes Military Moms, a website associated with Stars and Stripes newspaper. She also writes columns for Military Spouse magazine and a blog at www.themeat andpotatoesoflife.com. Dinghy is technically as old as my husband and me, and we’re all showing our age. Like us, Dinghy no longer faces each day with unbridled enthusiasm and spontaneity, but instead, thrives on routine. As we drag our weary bones out of bed and to the bathroom to wash and brush, Dinghy begins each day with his own morning self-

cleaning ritual. As a male dog, he starts with the unmentionable area that males find most important. After spending what seems to be an inordinate amount of time licking that general location, he comically turns himself into a pretzel in order to scratch inside his ears with his long, awkward hind feet. Inevitably, he misses the first few times, haphazardly wapping his neck and the back of his head, until he finally finds that sweet spot under his floppy ear. Without looking, we know he’s found it when we hear him grumble deeply as if to say, “Oh yeah, that’s the ticket.” Once done scratching, he cleans his paws in preparation for what is arguably one of the cutest things you’ll ever see. Alternating each enormous front foot, Dinghy wipes his own face over and over, then with paws daintily crossed, he licks them one last time. Despite this elaborate cleaning ritual, Dinghy faces each day looking like a dirty bath-

room rug, with shaggy legs and a perpetually dripping, foul-smelling beard. Once downstairs, we pour coffee, as Dinghy slurps water from his nearby dish, waiting for the subtle signals that we’re ready to take him on a walk: putting on our shoes, filling a travel mug with coffee, grabbing his leash from the hook in the garage. For that moment, he turns into an adolescent again, excited to experience the sights, sounds and flavors outside. Every morning, he marks the same trees, nibbles the same grass patches, and makes his daily deposit conveniently close to the neighborhood pet waste bin. Once home, Dinghy takes inventory of the family, and then eats his breakfast. Between chomps, he slurps water, then lopes out of the laundry room to make sure we’re all still there. By the time he’s done, there’s a path of slimy drips and food shards trailing out of the laundry room.

Belly full, he licks his chops and belches, before finding a suitable spot to sleep the remainder of the day. Usually, he prefers to climb slowly onto the couch in the den and circle around for what seems like forever before lowering is body in one slow, groaning plop. Other than a brief frisky period when the children get home from school, Dinghy’s middle-aged eat-walk-sleep routine continues late into the evening, when he follows us back upstairs for the night. As my husband and I nestle into the well-worn spots in our bed, Dinghy plops down with one final groan as if to say, “Whew, these dogs are barking.” As a Navy family still on the move after more than 20 years, we couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

Commentary rules Commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as official government, Navy or command policy statements. Reader submission are welcome but should not exceed 800 words. Submissions must be bylined and include a daytime phone number or e-mail contact for the writer. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with policy and standards. Address Commentary submissions to Janet.Thomas. ctr@navy.mil.

ADVERTISE WITH US! CALL SIMONE SANDS AT 850-433-1166 EXT.21


PA G E

4

May 31, 2013

GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE

NAS Pensacola Emergency Managment Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785 For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; 911 for NASP police NAS Whiting Field Emergency Center 623-7333 Emergency Communication Center 623-7193 (business/non-emergency) Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618 NETPDTC Saufley Field Main Gate 452-1628

Florida Division of Emergency Management 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy: http://www.Ready.Navy.mil Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/

Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.org

Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/

Santa Rosa County Emergency Management 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

PA G E

May 31, 2013

Hurricane season for 2013: tropics expected to heat up From http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu

“We anticipate that the 2013 Atlantic basin hurricane season will have enhanced activity compared with the 1981-2010 climatology,” Philip J. Klotzbach and William M. Gray, Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University, stated in a recent report. “The tropical Atlantic has anomalously warmed over the past several months, and it appears that the chances of an El Niño event this summer and fall are unlikely. We anticipate an above-average probabil-

ity for major hurricanes making landfall along the United States coastline and in the Caribbean. Coastal residents are reminded that it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season for them, and they need to prepare the same for every season, regardless of how much or how little activity is predicted.” Probabilities for at least one major (category 3-45) hurricane landfall on each of the following coastal areas: • Entire U.S. coastline – 72 percent (average for last century is 52 percent).

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org

Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.bereadyescambia.com/

GOSPORT

Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com AT&T http://www.att.com

Marines, mostly students from NAS Pensacola’s Naval Air Technical Training Center, gather before boarding buses for evacuation due to 2012’s Hurricane Isaac. Photo by Mike O’Connor

• U.S. East Coast including peninsula Florida – 48 percent (average for last century is 31 percent). • Gulf Coast from the Florida Panhandle westward to Brownsville, Texas – 47 percent (average for last century is 30 percent). Information obtained through March 2013 indicates that the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season will have more activity than the median 19812010 season. “We estimate that 2013 will have about nine hurricanes (median is 6.5), 18 named storms (median is 12.0), 95 named storm days (median is 60.1), 40 hurricane days (median is 21.3), four major (category 3-4-5) hurricanes (median is 2.0) and nine major hurricane days (median is 3.9). The probability of U.S. major hurricane landfall is estimated to be about 140 percent of the longperiod average. We expect Atlantic basin Net Tropical Cyclone (NTC) activity in 2013 to be approximately 175 percent of the long-term average. “This forecast is based on a new extendedrange early April statistical prediction scheme that was developed utilizing 29 years of past data. Analog predictors are also utilized. We anticipate an above-average Atlantic basin hurricane season due to the combination of an anomalously warm tropical Atlantic and a relatively low likelihood of El Niño. Coastal residents are reminded that it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season for them, and they need to prepare the same for every season, regardless of how much activity is predicted.”

Hurricane names for 2013 Andrea Barr y Chantal Dorian Erin Fernand Gabrielle Humberto Ingrid Jerr y Karen Lorenzo Melissa Nestor Olga Pablo Rebekah Sebastien Tanya Van Wendy

HURRICANE CATEGORIES “Enhanced activity (this year) means the more likely the chances are that a hurricane is going to make landfall this season. NASP personnel need to make sure you don’t let your guard down; stay prepared.” – NAS Pensacola Emergency Manager Burt Fenters

TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph

For more, visit http://www.ready.navy.mil/

Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph

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May 31, 2013

GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE

NAS Pensacola Emergency Managment Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785 For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; 911 for NASP police NAS Whiting Field Emergency Center 623-7333 Emergency Communication Center 623-7193 (business/non-emergency) Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618 NETPDTC Saufley Field Main Gate 452-1628

Florida Division of Emergency Management 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy: http://www.Ready.Navy.mil Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/

Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.org

Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/

Santa Rosa County Emergency Management 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

PA G E

May 31, 2013

Hurricane season for 2013: tropics expected to heat up From http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu

“We anticipate that the 2013 Atlantic basin hurricane season will have enhanced activity compared with the 1981-2010 climatology,” Philip J. Klotzbach and William M. Gray, Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University, stated in a recent report. “The tropical Atlantic has anomalously warmed over the past several months, and it appears that the chances of an El Niño event this summer and fall are unlikely. We anticipate an above-average probabil-

ity for major hurricanes making landfall along the United States coastline and in the Caribbean. Coastal residents are reminded that it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season for them, and they need to prepare the same for every season, regardless of how much or how little activity is predicted.” Probabilities for at least one major (category 3-45) hurricane landfall on each of the following coastal areas: • Entire U.S. coastline – 72 percent (average for last century is 52 percent).

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org

Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.bereadyescambia.com/

GOSPORT

Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com AT&T http://www.att.com

Marines, mostly students from NAS Pensacola’s Naval Air Technical Training Center, gather before boarding buses for evacuation due to 2012’s Hurricane Isaac. Photo by Mike O’Connor

• U.S. East Coast including peninsula Florida – 48 percent (average for last century is 31 percent). • Gulf Coast from the Florida Panhandle westward to Brownsville, Texas – 47 percent (average for last century is 30 percent). Information obtained through March 2013 indicates that the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season will have more activity than the median 19812010 season. “We estimate that 2013 will have about nine hurricanes (median is 6.5), 18 named storms (median is 12.0), 95 named storm days (median is 60.1), 40 hurricane days (median is 21.3), four major (category 3-4-5) hurricanes (median is 2.0) and nine major hurricane days (median is 3.9). The probability of U.S. major hurricane landfall is estimated to be about 140 percent of the longperiod average. We expect Atlantic basin Net Tropical Cyclone (NTC) activity in 2013 to be approximately 175 percent of the long-term average. “This forecast is based on a new extendedrange early April statistical prediction scheme that was developed utilizing 29 years of past data. Analog predictors are also utilized. We anticipate an above-average Atlantic basin hurricane season due to the combination of an anomalously warm tropical Atlantic and a relatively low likelihood of El Niño. Coastal residents are reminded that it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season for them, and they need to prepare the same for every season, regardless of how much activity is predicted.”

Hurricane names for 2013 Andrea Barr y Chantal Dorian Erin Fernand Gabrielle Humberto Ingrid Jerr y Karen Lorenzo Melissa Nestor Olga Pablo Rebekah Sebastien Tanya Van Wendy

HURRICANE CATEGORIES “Enhanced activity (this year) means the more likely the chances are that a hurricane is going to make landfall this season. NASP personnel need to make sure you don’t let your guard down; stay prepared.” – NAS Pensacola Emergency Manager Burt Fenters

TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph

For more, visit http://www.ready.navy.mil/

Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph

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May 31, 2013

GOSPORT

HT-18 brings home marksmanship trophies Story, photo by Ens. Joelle Olson NASWF PAO

Lt. Col. Robert White, commanding officer, Helicopter Training Squadron 18 (HT-18) could not be prouder of his command’s recent performance at the 2013 Fleet Forces Command (LANT) Rifle and Pistol Championships. The team brought home top honors from the prestigious marksmanship competition. “See those,” White commented, as he pointed out the two enormous additions to the HT-18 trophy case, “There are a lot of repeat offenders listed there and our guys beat ’em all.” The two tropies that now adorn the case are HT-18’s for the year, and will be engraved with their accomplishments before they have to travel back for next year’s event when the team hopes to defend their titles. HT-18’s championship marksmanship team consisted of three instructor pilots: Lt. Cmdr. Larry Spurlin, Maj. Thomas Addison and Lt. Jeffrey Robeson; and AWC Steven Bean. The four “Vigilant Eagles” formed the “Factory Hand” team that went in as unknowns and surprised many of the established teams. “We were the first team we know of that any command from CNATRA has ever sent,” Spurlin said “We participated in two, one-week competitions and were shooting every day.” The focus of the marksmanship program is to enhance the small arms training of military personnel in both rifle and pistol capabilities. Much of the time during the competition is spent in training to help improve the participants’ skills. The rules even require that each team have at least one “rookie” as a member of the team. The program has been in existence for more than 90 years, and has helped prepare several Navy personnel for Olympic competitions over the years. “It’s also a train-the-trainer program,” Bean said while emphasizing that the competition is for all interested military personnel. “It’s actually better in some cases to have someone not firmly established. New shooters are like a sponge. The soak up the information and don’t have any bad habits. Established shooters may need to break bad habits first.” In addition to the marksmanship competition, training was given on basic marksmanship skills, firearms safety, and weapons proficiency. Bean also described other categories of training that took place

Lt. Jeffrey Robeson, AWC Steven Bean, Maj. Thomas Addison and Lt. Cmdr. Larry Spurlin hoist their Atlantic Fleet Navy Marksmanship team trophy as well as a few of the other accessories they earned during the shooting tournament.

in the week’s events, to include security and watch standing qualifications for use aboard ships. Approximately 50 people left the tournament fully qualified to return to their home base or ship and train the next generation of shooters. Historically, MWR had funded the competition and orders were cut to spare the participants from personal expense. That was not the case this year. The team drove themselves to Quantico, Va., and paid all their own expenses from April 518. Their participation wouldn’t have been possible though if other pilots had not helped cover their work load for two weeks. That enabled the team to accept the no-cost temporary orders to the event. The magnitude of training and ammunition quality assurance from such a competition cannot easily be quantified. According to Spurlin, approximately 65,000 rounds were expended by all competitors during the two weeks. “Military, civilians, retired military, police, anyone that’s a shooter gets to do it,” Spurlin explained. “We’re all basically validating the quality of the ammunition for the SEALs. We shoot so much over a short time … we can ensure the guys using it down range have good ammo.” “Participation was self-funded and dependant on how much time we could get off,” Bean said. “We drove, paid for lodging, entry fees, gas – everything but ammo.” The challenges HT-18’s team needed to

overcome were significant. Other services have designated specialty UIC’s for their teams to ensure their attendance complete with paid orders for the event. “It’s just a big hobby for us (flyers),” Addison added. “Prior to the competition, I didn’t even pull the trigger.” He explained. “But Spurlin had been (to the competition) before, and chief is already a distinguished shooter.” Bean is a “Distinguished Pistol” shooter, indeed. This year he claimed an Excellence in Competition award, a SecNav Trophy Award rifle, and a trophy pistol for “Top Shooter, Grand Aggregate.” Currently his scores are competing against the West Coast shooters for over-all grand aggregate scores. Bean humbly passed on the accolades to his team’s newest addition, Robeson. Robeson was presented a SecNav M1 Garand match-grade trophy rifle in recognition of his “High New Shooter, Pistol” achievement. “He was a new shooter that just showed interest,” Bean said. “We went to the local ranges for courses of fire training about three times.” Attempting to schedule events more than 12 hours in advance is often next to impossible for aviators. “It was difficult to train together,” Spurlin noted. “We kept getting rained out or schedules wouldn’t align.” On top of scheduling, the nation-wide ammunition shortage presented another hurdle in training. “It’s hard when you can’t just go to the store and find ammo to prac-

tice with,” Spurlin said. Bean added that for the preparation they were able to do in advance, the team performed “really well.” The team offered camaraderie. The energy and support this team shared with each other proved critical for their sustainment over the duration of the tournament. “Twelve days is a long time to shoot.” Addison said. “They were 10-12 hour days for only one or two matches.” The matches involve differing courses of fire at different distances from the target, requiring time for moving equipment and repairing targets in between each stage. “As you move between the various yard-lines, changing stances and carrying all your rifle equipment becomes very labor intensive,” Bean seconded. Despite the personal sacrifice required of HT-18’s Marksmanship Team, they all agreed the experience was well worth it. “There is no other opportunity in the Navy to meet that many people with shared interest in competitive shooting. It’s a great way to network and we encourage anyone regardless of experience level to participate, gain experience and compete,” Bean explained. HT-18’s Marksmanship Team is seeking new participants, no experience necessary. Interested parties may contact Spurlin at: Lawernce.Spurlin@navy.mil For updates on official standings and future U.S. Navy Marksmanship Team events, individuals may visit the official website at www.USNST.org.

Support Our Troops


May 31, 2013

PARTYLINE

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GOSPORT

Monthly gatherings planned at park

A series of events at Pensacola’s Veterans Memorial Park will focus on the “Heroes Among Us.” The series will begin at 6 p.m. today, May 31, with remarks by World War II veteran U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Hardy N. “HN” Eubanks, who served in the amphibious assault on Iwo Jima and in the occupation of Japan. Sponsored by the local Marine Corps League J.R. Spears Detachment 066, the events are scheduled for the last Friday of each month from May through October. Members of all military branches are invited to participate. The informal gatherings are free and open to the public. Veterans Memorial Park is between Bayfront Parkway and Ninth Avenue in downtown Pensacola. Donations will be accepted for the Marine Corps League’s Marines in Distress fund. For more information, go to www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/ edwardrouse/MarineInDistressFundraisingPage.

Go for a walk for charity at state park

A family walk is scheduled for tomorrow, June 1, at Big Lagoon State Park. Registration and start time is between 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. at Triggers, 12700 Gulf Beach Highway. The walk, which is being sponsored by Perdido Key Rotary and the Perdido Key Chamber of Commerce, is a non-competitive event, similar to a German-style Volksmarch. Walkers (or runners) can choose to finish a 5K or 10K route. Participants must start by 11 a.m. and finish by 2 p.m. Registration fee is $15. Participants with military ID and children younger than age 12 will have the option of walking the course for free. For more information, call retired Coast Guard Capt. Rod Powell, with the Perdido Key Volksmarch Club, at 637-1876.

Technology expo scheduled for June 3

The annual NASP Technology Exposition is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 3 at the Mustin Beach Club. The free event is open to all personnel. More than 25 vendors will be showcasing the newest solutions related to cyber security, ruggedized equipment, cloud computing, communication solutions, data encryption, mobile devices, audiovisual technology, information assurance, systems integration, desktop virtualization and more. To check out the list of exhibitors or to register for the event, go to www.FederalEvents.com. For more information, contact Julia Banks by e-mail at Banks@ncsi.com.

Bloodmobile to visit military bases

Officials at Northwest Florida Blood Services are preparing for hurricane season by building up the supply of blood, and the schedule announced for the Bloodmobile includes two stops at military bases: • 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 4 at NASP Air Traffic Control, 281 Farrar Road. • 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. June 5 at NASP Corry Station, 640 Roberts Ave. For more information, call 473-3853 or go to www.nfbcblood.org.

Memorial golf tournament to be June 8

The 24th annual Bonnie and Cliff Jernigan Memorial Golf Tournament is scheduled for June 8 at Cypress Lake Golf Club. Proceeds support Escambia Christian School. Cost is $65 per player (includes green fees, cart, range balls). There will be $10,000 cash and other major prizes. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. Tee time is 8:30 a.m. with a shotgun start. An awards lunch will follow play. For details, call 456-5045 or 288-1263.

Budget for Baby classes scheduled

Officials at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society are offering Budget for Babies classes. Classes at NAS Pensacola are scheduled for 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 13 and June 27 at the NMCRS facility in Bldg. 191 at 91 Radford Blvd. A class at NAS Whiting Field is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon June 22 in the atrium building. For more information or to make reservations, call 452-2300.

Association running concession stand

Members of the First Class Petty Officers Association will be running the concession stand at the Barrancas ballpark for the remainder of the Captain’s Cup softball games. The concession stand will be open from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday through June 11 when games are being played. For more information, contact BM1 Tarnisha Jenkins by phone at 452-3995 or by e-mail at tarnisha.jenkins@navy.mil.

Summer basketball camps announced

The 34th Chip Boes Championship Basketball Camp sponsored and hosted by the City of Pensacola Department of Leisure Services and the City of Gulf Breeze Department of Recreation will conduct three summer sessions for boys and girls ages 7 to 13. Brochures and information can be obtained regarding the June 24-28, July 15-19 and July 22-26 sessions at the Vickery Community Center in Pensacola and the South Santa Rosa Recreation

Submission guide You can submit information for possible publication in Partyline by sending an e-mail to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil. Submissions must include the organization’s name and details about events including times, dates, locations and any costs involved. Contact information also is required. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with established standards. Items should be submitted at least one week in advance. The deadline is noon Friday for the next week’s publication. Center in Gulf Breeze. For more information, call 968-9299 or send an e-mail to chipboes@gmail.com.

STARBASE planning summer sessions

STARBASE Atlantis is accepting applications and military volunteers for the summer program. Students who will complete the 4th and 5th grade during the 2012-2013 school year are eligible. The program focuses on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. Among other things, students will build and launch a rocket, visit aviation training centers, meet the Blue Angels, conduct chemistry experiments and learn about navigation and mapping. Sessions are scheduled for June 10-13, June 1720, June 24-27 and July 8-11. The classroom is located at NASP Bldg. 1907, 461 San Carlos Road. Cost is free. Parents are required to fill out a program application, pick-up and drop-off students, provide a sack lunch, snack and drink. Volunteers also are needed to help with the program. For more information, call 452-8287 or go to www.netc.navy.mil/community/starbase/pensacola.

Gathering planned to mark Juneteenth

The 10th annual Sankofa Juneteenth Heritage Gathering is scheduled for 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. June 15 at The Belmont Building, 432 West Belmont Street. The theme is “Restoring the Forgotten Heritage to the Forgotten People.” The event will feature music, displays, dance presentations, a storyteller, youth activities, a heritage market and food vendors. For more information, contact Elder Columbus Thompson or Ima Linda Thomas at 316-0376 or send an e-mail to talindas1@aol.com.

Coin show scheduled for June 15

Pensacola Numismatic Society Coin & Currency Show is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 15 and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 16 at the Hadji Shrine Temple, 800 West Nine Mile Road. Admission will be $1 for adults and free for children 12 and younger. There will be hourly door prizes and raffles for two gold American Eagles and 10 Silver Eagles. For more information, contact the show chairmen Bud Cooly or Steve Gerlach by phone at 473-1515 or by e-mail at steve@emeraldcoastcoins.com.

Coin collectors to meet June 20

Members of the Pensacola Numismatic Society, a coin collecting club, will meet at 6:30 p.m. June 20 at Sonny’s Real Pit Bar-B-Q restaurant, 630 North Navy Blvd. There will be a presentation on Mexican currency. A coin auction will be held after completion of the meeting. There is no cost to attend unless you plan to have dinner. For information, call Mark Cummings at 332-6491.

Enter your team in the Doggie Bowl

Individuals, teams and sponsors are invited to participate in the Humane Society of Pensacola’s Doggie Bowl, which is scheduled for 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. June 29 at Cordova Lanes. The Humane Society of Pensacola is a no-kill shelter for cats and dogs located at 5 North Q Street. Teams of four to six people cost $20 per person with shoe rental and five door prize tickets included. The grand prize is a trophy and a $100 gift certificate for a team dinner. Other activities include a team costume contest. Sponsorships are also available. Deadline for sponsor sign up is June 12. For details or entry forms, go to www.humane societyofpensacola.org and click on News and Events. You can also send an e-mail to kim@matheselectric.com.

Students can sign up for film camp

Registration is ongoing and continuing until June 14 for the second annual Lights, Camera, Discover Summer Film Camp. The cost is $200 per person. The program runs from June 17-29 and the goal is to teach children discipline and self-respect while learning the craft of movie making. Adult classes are also offered. Students learn about directing, acting, screenwriting, film editing and cinematography from film industry professionals with roots in the Pensacola community. At the end of the program, students view their own work with friends, family and peers.

For more information, contact Michael Diggs at 748-0129 or go to www.lightscameradiscover.org.

Two events mark National Trails Day

The Western Gate Chapter of the Florida Trail Association has scheduled two public events tomorrow, June 1, to celebrate National Trails Day. The hiking/walking events highlight sections of the Florida National Scenic Trail. The events include: • A six-mile hike along Jackson Trail in Blackwater River State Forest starting at 8 a.m. at the Munson Forestry Center, 11650 Munson Highway (Highway 191). Participants should wear appropriate footwear (no open-toed shoes) and bring water. Swimming and picnicking will follow at Krul Lake. • A one-mile sunset hike at Gulf Islands National Seashore starting at the Fort Pickens parking lot at 7 p.m. A ranger will lead a hike to Battery Worth. For more information about National Trails Day go to http://www.americanhiking.org/nationaltrails-day/. For more information on the Western Gate events go to http://www.meetup.com/fta westerngate/events/109091692/ or contact Helen Wigersma at (850) 484-0528.

Newcomer’s Club offers games, lunch

Members of the Newcomer’s Club of Greater Pensacola gather monthly on the second Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the Pensacola Yacht Club for games and a luncheon/meeting. The cost is $14 and includes lunch. The club is open to all women who have resided in Pensacola two years or less. The monthly activities include a book club, Bunco, bowling, chef’s night out and other events. For more information, call Valerie Zubke at 530-3926 or e-mail her at vzubke@yahoo.com. For more details about the club, go to www.pensacolanewcomers.com.

Free tennis clinics being offered

The Pensacola Sports Association (PSA) has announced the following dates and locations for the 2013 Pensacola Racquet Round Up, a series of free tennis clinics for area youth: • June 3-5, at the Roger Scott Tennis Center. Ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10 a.m.) and ages 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). • June 14 at University of West Florida tennis courts. Ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10a.m.) and ages 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). • June 26 at Hollice T. Williams Park (under I110). Ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10a.m.) and ages 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). • July 25-26 at Gulf Breeze Recreation Center. Ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10a.m.) and ages 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). • July 29 at Naval Air Station Pensacola tennis courts. Ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10a.m.) and ages 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). All skill levels are welcome. Area tennis professionals will lead the instruction. Participants are encouraged to bring rackets if they have them, appropriate tennis shoes and clothes, water bottle and sun screen. Racquets will be available to use during the clinic. Parents can register their children online at www.pensacolasports.com or by visiting tennis centers or pro shops to fill out a paper form.

Skaters announce two-day scrimmage

Emerald Coast Roller Derby will present Part 1 of a mixed scrimmage roller derby weekend starting at 7 p.m. June 8 at Skateland, 6056 Stewart St. in Milton. Doors will open at 6 p.m. Pensacola Roller Gurlz will present Part 2 of the series on June 9 at Dreamland Skate Center, 2607 East Olive Road, in Pensacola. The event will feature local skaters as well as teams from around the Southeast region. Tickets are $10 in advance and available from skaters, at Skateland, or at brownpapertickets.com. Cost at the door is $12. Admission is free for children younger than 10. For more information, contact Sarah Tavares, by phone at 602-7107 or by e-mail at Emerald CoastRollerDerby@yahoo.com.

Learn about e-mail marketing

The Small Business Development Center at the University of West Florida (401 E. Chase St., Suite 100) is presenting a free brown-bag lunch seminar from noon to 1 p.m. June 5. Jeff Martin, author of “Double Your RMR and Three Easy Ways to Build Your Client Base,” will present a program on e-mail marketing. Pre-registration is recommended. For more information or to register, call 595-0063 or go to www.sbdc.uwf.edu.

DFC Society plans to meet June 13

The Pensacola Chapter of the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) Society will meet at Franco’s restaurant, 523 East Gregory St., at 11:30 a.m. June 13. The military award of the DFC is made to aviators and crew members of all services and civilians for heroism and achievement during aerial flight. Meetings are open to members, active duty and retired, spouses, significant others and those interested. Meetings are the second Thursday of every other month. For more information, call Joe Brewer at 453-9291 or go to www.dfcsociety.net.


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May 31, 2013

GOSPORT


SECTION

LIFE

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May 31, 2013

NHP personnel walk for SAAPM See page B2 Spotlight

GOSPORT

Incredible victory at

By Mike O’Connor Gosport Associate Editor

Veterans, cryptographers and historians will take time this week to recall World War II’s Battle of Midway, considered to be the turning point in the battle for the Pacific. Midway. A catastrophic defeat for Japan, and a desperately needed victory for America, the Battle of Midway destroyed the illusion of Japanese invincibility and set the stage for their inevitable defeat. More than a halfway point, it was the turning point for World War II in the Pacific. A string of quick victories had led to overconfidence in the Japanese admiralty, a condition they later termed “victory disease.” Their forces had run up success after success in the Pacific after the Dec. 7 attack on United States forces at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The British battleship Prince of Wales and cruiser Repulse had been sunk on Dec. 10. Guam and Wake Island were seized, the Philippines invaded. Hong Kong and Singapore, too, fell into Japanese hands. By June 1942, Japan was in uncontested possession of the whole of Southeast Asia. Japanese Naval General Staff strategic planner Fleet Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto had sought to strike a decisive blow that would knock America out of the

Pacific once and for all. By attacking Midway Island, an atoll actually consisting of two islands, Sand and Eastern Island – and also in the Aleutian Islands off Alaska – he hoped to draw the American carrier forces into a trap. If Japanese fleet forces succeeded in destroying the U.S. Navy’s carrier forces, which were untouched by the attack at Pearl Harbor, Yamamoto reasoned Japan would have a free hand in the Pacific for years. Yamamoto was a wellknown gambler, but in his bid to take Midway he could not have known the deck was stacked against him. American cryptologic efforts, under the direction of Cmdr. Joseph Rochefort at Pearl Harbor’s Station Hypo, had made significant progress against the Japanese naval code then in use, called JN-25. The Navy’s radio intelligence organization was able to decipher an increasing percentage of enemy radio traffic and was beginning to offer clues to America’s military planners about Japan’s intentions. In the months leading

up to the Midway battle, the Station Hypo team was putting together a puzzle based on the information they knew. A large-scale Japanese naval offensive was in the making against a target they called “AF” but the focus of the attack was unclear. The staff of Adm. Chester Nimitz, commander of the U.S. fleet in the Pacific, needed to be sure. Rochefort’s team, along with Capt. Edwin Layton, Nimitz’s fleet intelligence officer, had a clue that “AF” might be Midway, so a ruse was developed. The radio operator at Midway was instructed to broadcast in the clear a message that the installation’s fresh water distillation plant had broken down and that fresh water was needed at once. Soon after, monitored Japanese radio traffic passed along a message, “AF is short of water.” With the enemy intentions in hand, Nimitz drew up his own plan of attack. Three American aircraft carriers, USS Enterprise (CV 6), USS Yorktown (CV 5) and USS Hornet (CV 8) faced four large

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Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) carriers — Akagi, Kaga, Hiryu and Soryu at Midway. Accompanying the IJN carriers were no less than seven Japanese battleships; the Americans had none at Midway. And supporting the powerful IJN fleet were about 150 supporting ships of various kinds; the United States had about 50. The date of the intended offensive was known – June 3. Though American naval forces were far less numerous than the opposing force, Nimitz was able to position his strength to his best advantage. Patrols made contact and on June 4, in the space of a few amazing minutes, three Japanese carriers were hit and left ablaze by American dive bombers.

Gosling Games

Word Search ‘Safe summer’ D H S C T Q W V W D X H C Q D

A Dauntless SBD dive bomber lands onboard USS Yorktown (CV 5) after attacking Japanese carrier Kaga, June 4, 1942. Note battle damage to tail. Naval History and Heritage Command photo

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Color Me ‘Shells’

Later that day the fourth Japanese carrier was located, hit and later sunk. Though Yorktown was lost – bombed, then torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese submarine – the damage to the Japanese fleet was thorough. The Japanese carriers which had attacked Pearl Harbor were lost, along with a cruiser, 256 aircraft and 3,057 personnel. American losses in addition to Yorktown were one destroyer, 145 aircraft and 307 personnel. The battle was won due to a combination of factors in which courage, skill, fortune and timing all played a part, but the value of the naval intelligence which indicated Japanese intentions is undeniable. The victory was a need-

ed shot in the arm to an anxious America at war. Before the Battle of Midway, Japanese military power in the Pacific did nothing but advance. After Midway, they did nothing but retreat. In the words of author and historian Walter Lord, the Americans at Midway “had no right to win. Yet they did, and in doing so they changed the course of the war. More than that, they entered the name ‘Midway’ into that small list that inspires men by example – like Marathon, the Armada, the Marne. Even against the greatest of odds, there’s something in the human spirit – a magic blend of skill, faith and valor – that can lift men from certain defeat to incredible victory.”

Jokes & Groaners Points to ponder I planted some bird seed. A bird came up. Now I don’t know what to feed it. I had amnesia once ... or twice. I can’t remember. All I ask is a chance to prove that money can’t make me happy. What’s a “free” gift? Aren’t all gifts free? They told me I was gullible ... and I believed them. Teach a child to be polite and courteous in the home and, when he grows up, he’ll never be able to merge his car onto the freeway. Experience is the thing you have left when everything else is gone. My weight is perfect for my height ... which varies. I used to be indecisive. Now I’m not sure. How can there be self-help “groups?” Is it me, or do buffalo wings taste just like chicken?


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B2 GOSPORT

SPOTLIGHT

May 31, 2013

NETC chief operating officer honored by the Taft School By Ed Barker NETC PAO

The Chief Operating Officer (COO) for the Naval Education and Training Command was honored by the Taft School May 10 with the Horace D. Taft Medal, recognizing significant achievements of alumni who have consistently gone beyond the call of duty to serve others. Rear Adm. (Select) Cynthia Thebaud received the Taft medal at the Old Guard dinner during alumni weekend for the school in Watertown, Conn. The Taft Medal is the school’s highest alumni honor and is bestowed annually to a person whose life’s work best typifies the school motto: Not to be ministered unto but to minister. The recipient’s life and actions must demonstrate something humanitarian apart from their vocation or service; he or she must have gone above the ordinary demands of life or occupation. Success in a chosen field does not necessarily qualify a person for the honor. “From the time Cindy enrolled at the Taft School, attended the Naval Academy and served in the U.S. Navy, she has consistently been diligent in all endeavors while exemplifying the Taft School’s motto of service,” said Rafe de la Gueronniere, chair of the

Horace D. Taft Alumni Medal Committee. “Cindy’s depth and breadth of service in military and humanitarian undertakings in today’s complex and challenging geo-political environment makes her contribution to our country and the international community particularly important.” Thebaud was also featured in the Taft Bulletin, the school’s magazine, and interviewed about her time at the Taft School, the Naval Academy and experiences as a surface warfare officer, including deployments during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Middle East and a number of humanitarian and maritime security capacity-building efforts in Haiti and Africa. “It never even crossed my mind that I’d been nominated, let alone selected for the award,” said Thebaud. “Also, the fact that I’m the only female graduate to ever be so recognized is even more hum-

bling. The school’s motto, loosely translates from Latin to ‘Not to be served, but to serve,’ and I’ve always kept that motto in mind during my time in the Navy. This recognition is an incredible honor.” Thebaud credits the school’s academic rigor, sports and team focus, and leadership opportunities for preparing her for the future. She notes that the character development, particularly the emphasis on honor, integrity and personal responsibility and accountability served her exceptionally well at the Naval Academy. “The academics during my plebe year at the academy

were almost easier than my academics my senior year at Taft,” said Thebaud. “Although I was already a bit independent when I started Taft, the support I got there for forging my own road ultimately set me on the path that enabled me to succeed as a female surface warfare officer in the fairly early days of the women-at-sea program, and on to where I am now.” As the commanding officer of USS Decatur (DDG 73), the second female to command a U.S. Navy destroyer, Thebaud deployed to the Middle East in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring

Freedom. As the commodore of Destroyer Squadron 60, the second female destroyer squadron commodore, she not only conducted traditional 6th Fleet missions, but also led two multi-national Africa Partnership Station deployments to the Gulf of Guinea. As the NETC COO, Thebaud oversees the operation of learning centers and training support centers within the training domain with a continual focus on production management. She works to align training initiatives and professional development of Sailors, supporting the education and training mission of enabling the Navy to be ready anytime, anywhere. For more information on the Naval Education and Training Command, visit the NETC website: https://www. netc. navy.mil.

NHP personnel “walk a mile” for SAPR ... Sailors from NHP and Naval Branch Health Clinic Corry Station participated in an event in April to raise awareness for Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. HM3 Tracy Blackmond and HN Vaughnyetta Parker, both with NBHC Corry Station, organized the event titled “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes.” The event started with an introduction by Lt. Cmdr. John Zalar, officer in charge, NBHC Corry Station, about the importance of Sexual Assault Awareness Month and featured a 100meter sprint and a one-mile walk with participants wearing shoes of the opposite sex. Photo by Jason Bortz


GOSPORT

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May 31, 2013

B3

Navy personnel in Oklahoma offer support to community From Commander, Navy Region Midwest Public Affairs

MOORE, Okla. (NNS) – Navy service members and family members, civilian personnel and reservists stationed or living in the vicinity of the Moore, Okla. tornado are being asked to account for their status via the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). More specifically, this applies to Cleveland, Oklahoma and Pottawatomie counties and impacts an estimated 5,600 people, of which approximately 42 percent had

reported in by May 23. Those affected are asked to either report in through their chain of command, or, if that is not possible, to log into NFAAS at https://navyfamily.navy.mil and check in on the Navy family members site. If unable to log on to NFAAS, members can call the NFAAS help desk at (866) 946-9183. Navy families who were severely impacted by the Oklahoma tornado are strongly encouraged to log into NFAAS, https://navyfamily. navy.mil, to update contact information and complete a needs assessment form at their earliest convenience after

storm passage. For further assistance after a needs assessment form has been submitted, members can email Navy Personnel Command Emergency Coordination Center (NPC ECC) at mnpc.cat.captain@navy.mil or call (877) 414-5358. While minimal, there has been a long-standing Navy presence in the area that includes nearly 1,500 active duty service members and their families attached to Strategic Communications Wing One (SCW-1) at Tinker Air Force Base, as well other active duty members attached to the Navy Operational

Support Center (NOSC) in Oklahoma City, the local recruiting district and numerous reserve personnel who live and work in the community. Minor injuries to some family members have been reported and damage reports so far show that 11 homes were destroyed and 34 suffered significant damage. Additionally, there are many more Sailors and families that have homes surrounding the impact area who have not been allowed to return to their homes until damage assessments are complete. Displaced families are being housed and supported by other families, the U.S. Air

Force, and the Tinker AFB support group, Tinker Family. Navy members are volunteering from NOSC Tulsa while Seabees assigned to Tinker Air Force Base are being deployed into the affected areas. More Navy involvement in the recovery efforts is expected in the coming days. Updates will follow as new information becomes available. Those affected are encouraged to follow the Facebook pages for SCW-1 https://www.facebook.com/CS CW1 or Tinker Air Force Base https://www.facebook.com/Tin kerAirForceBase for current information.


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GOSPORT

May 31, 2013

Morale, Welfare and Recreation

The Miss Geico offshore powerboat zooms along during one of the past Thunder on the Gulf events. The powerboats race through the waves at speeds up to 200 mph. Photo from www.thunderonthegulf.com.

Boats turn on the speed Big crowd of race fans expected to be hanging out in Orange Beach, Ala. By Janet Thomas Gosport Staff Writer

Fast boats are expected to bring another big crowd to hang out at Orange Beach, Ala., this weekend. The four-day Thunder on the Gulf speedboat racing event, which offers free public viewing, kicked off with welcome parties May 30 and continues through June 2. The offshore power boats race through the waves just off the beach at speeds up to 200 mph. Thurnder on the Gulf draws teams from around the country, and it was named a Southeast Tourism Society’s top 20 event for 2010. This is the 10th year for the

event, which got started in 2003 when Gary Nichols and other local business owners formed the Gulf Coast Powerboat Association, a non-profit organization comprised of local business people promoting the race. The races have been on hold since 2011, but an infusion of money from a BP grant brought the event back to life. And this year the event is being held early in the important summer tourist season, the weekend after Memorial Day. The start and finish line for the course is the Island House Hotel. The Race Village at The Wharf, which will be open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. today through June 2, will

feature dry pits, race boats, race merchandise, entertainment, concessions, vendors and a play area for children. Associated festivities include parties, a bikini contest, food and entertainment. The races are scheduled to start at 1 p.m. June 2 and the awards ceremony is scheduled for 5 p.m. June 2 at the Compleat Angler at The Wharf. Free viewing areas are scattered along the public beaches along the race course. Spectators who want to sit in special viewing areas or attend events can purchase VIP packages. For more information, call (251) 980-7223 or go to www.thunderonthegulf.com/.

At the movies FRIDAY

“Mud,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Iron Man 3” (2D), PG-13, 8 p.m.; “Iron Man 3” (3D), PG-13, 5:30 p.m., 8:30 p.m.

SATURDAY

“42,” PG-13, noon; “Oblivion,” PG-13, 2:40 p.m.; “Iron Man 3” (3D), PG-13, 5:30 p.m., 8:10 p.m.; “Scary Movie 5,” PG-13, 12:20 p.m.; “Iron Man 3” (2D), PG-13, 2:20 p.m.; “Mud,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Pain & Gain,” R, 7:40 p.m.

SUNDAY

“Oblivion,” PG-13, noon; “The Big Wedding,” R, 2:30 p.m.; “Iron Man 3” (3D), PG-13, 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.; “Mud,” PG-13, 12:10 p.m.; “Iron Man 3” (2D), PG-13, 2:50 p.m.; “Evil Dead,” R, 5:30 p.m.; “Pain & Gain,” R, 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY

“Scary Movie 5,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Iron Man 3” (3D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “Evil Dead,” R, 5:10 p.m.; “Pain & Gain,” R, 7:20 p.m. (Note: Portside Cinema is now open every Monday.)

TUESDAY

“Iron Man 3” (3D), PG-13, 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m.; “The Big Wedding,” R, 5:10 p.m.; “Oblivion,” PG-13, 7:10 p.m.

WEDNESDAY “Iron Man 3” (3D), PG-13, 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m.; “Evil Dead,” R, 5:10 p.m.; “Mud,” PG-13, 7:10

p.m. THURSDAY COST

“Mud,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Iron Man 3” (2D), PG-13, 7:30 p.m.; “Scary Movie 5,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “42,” PG-13, 7:10 p.m.

Regular: $3 adults, $1.50 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger 3D shows: $5 adults, $3 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

Details: 452-3522 or www.naspensacola-mwr.com

The NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department has a number of upcoming events and activities that the whole family can participate in. For more information, call 452-8285 or visit the MWR website: www.naspensacola-mwr.com. • Aquatics: Outdoor pools are open at Mustin Beach and Corry Station. Admission is free for active duty and dependents, military retirees and children younger than 5. Cost is $2 for retiree dependents, $3 for DoD employees (one guest only) and $4 for guests (limit of five per ID). Patrons must present valid ID cards. Pool passes are available at the Aquatic Office, Bldg. 3203, behind Mustin Beach Club. For more information, call 452-9429. • Movies on the Lawn: Movies begin at dusk on second and fourth Saturday of month through August on the lawn in front of Portside Gym, Bldg. 627. Bring blankets, chairs and coolers. Movies and popcorn are free. Check MWR website for notices in case of rain. For information, call 452-2372. • Discount tickets: Sam’s Fun City and Surf City is offering summer discounts. Stop by the Information, Tickets and Travel (ITT) office at the NEX Mall on Highway 98 and save $116.43 on Family of Four Pack Annual Pass, which includes 10 percent off on food and guest passes. ITT also offers savings on Catalina, Keys to the City and Wet & Wacky passes. While you are there, check out the discounts available for other vacations and attraction. For information, call 452-6354. • Intramural Sports: NAS Pensacola office open 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, in Bldg. 627. Call 452-4391. Racquetball, 11:15 a.m. June 3. There are entry deadlines for each event. NASP Corry Station office open 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, in Bldg. 3738. Call 452-6520. Swimming, 5 p.m. June 13. There are entry deadlines for events. For more information about Intramural Sports, e-mail john.russo@navy.mil or go to www.captainscup.org. • Summer Day Camp: 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 3 to Aug. 16 at the NASP Youth Center, Bldg. 3690. Weekly fees based on total family income. Breakfast, lunch, afternoon snack and field trips included in weekly fee. To register, call Nancy Kilgo at 293-5843. • British soccer camps: June 10-14 at the Navy Youth Sports Complex on Highway 98. Four age groups. Register before April 26 and receive a British soccer jersey. Register online at www.challengersports.com. For more information, call 452-3810 or 452-2417. • “Pinocchio” auditions: 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. June 24 at NASP Schools Command Theater. For ages 13-18. Rehearsals will be 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. June 25 to 28. Performance will be 5:30 p.m. June 29. For more information, call 452-2417. • Youth bowling camps: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 26-28, July 16-18 and Aug. 14-16 at Corry Bowling Center. For ages 5 to 18. Cost is $60. Each camp includes bowling, lunch and learning sections with coach. For more information, call 452-6380.

Liberty activities Liberty program events target young, unaccompanied active-duty military. Regular events are scheduled at the main Liberty Center in the Portside Entertainment Complex. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and holidays and 10:30 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday. Off-base trips leave from the NASP Liberty Center, but you must sign up in advance. For more information, call 452-2372 or visit www.naspensacolamwr.com/singsail/liberty. htm.

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS!


May 31, 2013

COMMAND LINES

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B5

GOSPORT SAPR

Help for victims of sexual assault in the DoD community is a call, click or text away. The SafeHelpline provides live, one-on-one crisis support and information by trained staff. Call (877) 995-5247; go to www.SafeHelpline.org; or text: 55-247 CONUS; (202) 470-5546 OCONUS (may be additional charges for OCONUS). The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program provides prevention, intervention and a 24/7/365 response to adult victims of sexual assault. Active-duty and adult family member sexual assault victims have a choice of reporting options, unrestricted and restricted. Unrestricted reporting allows a victim to have an advocate, seek medical care, counseling, legal services and safety interventions such as a Military Protective Order (MPO), separation from offender, expedited transfer, etc. To access an unrestricted report, the victim may report to his/her chain-of-command, security/law enforcement, NCIS, SAPR VA, SARC, and his/her CO shall commence an investigation. Restricted reporting allows a victim to have a confidential report, which does not trigger either command nor law enforcement notification and the victim may have a SAPR VA, and seek medical care and/or counseling. To access restricted reporting, the victim may disclose his/her sexual assault only to the SARC, a current SAPR VA, a health care provider and/or a chaplain. To contact the NASP 24/7 Victim Advocate, call 449-9231/2. To contact the SARC during working hours, call 452-5990 x0; or during and after working hours, call the SARC cell at 554-5606.

Fleet and Family Support Center The Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), 151 Ellyson Ave., Bldg. 625, is offering the following classes: • Personal Financial Management Program: Offering “How to Come Up With that 20 Percent; Surviving a Furlough.” Class is open to all active duty, retirees, family members and DoD and contract employees. For information or to register, call 452-5609. • Stress management: Stress can damage your health, both physically and mentally. Learn how to rec-

ognize stress and become more productive, happier and healthier. Classes scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon on first and third Thursday of each month. For details, call 452-5990. • Suicide awareness and prevention: This class will acquaint you with the facts on suicide in the military, warning signs, risks factors, intervention techniques. This is General Military Training (GMT) facilitated by each command; however, if there is a special request, call 452-9022 to schedule training.

Community Outreach NASP Community Outreach is seeking volunteers for opportunities including: • USO Northwest Florida: The USO is seeking volunteers that are committed to supporting America’s troops and their families. If you are interested, contact Faye White at 4558280, option 4. • Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northwest Florida: Youth mentoring organization matches screened adult volunteers with children ages 6 through eighth grade who come primarily from single parent homes. For more information, go to www.bbbsnwfl.org.

• Pensacola Habitat for Humanity: Volunteers are need to help build houses. You must be at least 16 years old and be willing to work an 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. shift. For dates, times and locations or any other information, call 434-5456, ext. 140. • Learn to Read of Northwest Florida: Volunteers needed to help with adult literacy program. For more information, call 432-4347 or e-mail info@learntoreadnwf.org. For more information, contact NASP Community Outreach at 452-2532 or e-mail NAS PensacolaCommunityOutreach@ Facebook.com.

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS!

Worship schedule The Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel and the Lady of Loreto Chapel are closed for renovations. During renovations, Sunday services are being held at the auditorium at Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC), Bldg. 633. NAS Pensacola Protestant

•Communion service, 8 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Protestant Sunday School, 9 a.m. Sunday, J.B. McKamey Center. • Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, NASC auditorium. • Contemporary service, 6 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Women’s Bible study, 9 a.m. Tuesday, J.B. McKamey Center. • Fellowship dinner, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. • Bible study, 6 p.m. Wednesday, J.B. McKamey Center. Roman Catholic

• Sacrament of Penance, 3:45 p.m. Saturday, All Faiths Chapel. • Mass, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, All Faiths Chapel. • Mass, 8:30 a.m. Sunday, NASC auditorium.

• Mass, noon Monday, Thursday, and Friday, All Faiths Chapel. Latter Day Saints

• Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. NASP Corry Station Protestant

• Adult Bible study, 9 a.m. Sunday, chapel conference room. • Chapel choir, 9 a.m. Sunday, sanctuary. • Worship service, 10 a.m. Sunday. • Fellowship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday. • Praise and worship, 7:30 p.m. Sunday. • Bible study and dinner, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, fellowship hall. Roman Catholic

• Mass, noon Sunday. • Mass, 11 a.m. Tuesday, small chapel. Whiting Field Chapel Roman Catholic

• Mass, 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Friday. Protestant

• Bible study, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. • Weekly chapel service, 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For more information, call 452-2341.


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May 31, 2013

GOSPORT

To place an ad go online at www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext.24.

Military Marketplace ★ Motor ★ Merchandise ★ Employment ★ Real Estate ★ and more

Announcements

Real Estate

Real Estate

PENSACOLA PARACON: A Sci-Fi, Anime, G a m i n g , Costuming & H o r r o r Convention Aug 17, 18. 941-4321. Pensacolaparac on.com

Plan for retirement!!! Small business for sale, Orange Beach, Ala. Turnkey neighborhood s h i p p i n g business in same great location for 20+ years. S t r o n g gift/retail sales. Inventory conveys/no real estate conveys. Lease available to new owner. $129,000. Surf Song Realty LLC. (251) 9 8 0 3000Buying/Se lling

Wa t e r f r o n t condos. For sale or rent. 1/1 o w n e r financed. 5 minutes from downtown. 10 minutes from NAS. 9829800 or 6371555. Sale prices starting at $69,500, rentals starting at $575.

Garage Sales Yard sale Friday May 31 - Saturday June 1. 0730 8205 Li Fair Dr. Moving everything priced to sell. No early birds Lillian Woods Subdivision Yard Sale: Saturday, June 1, 2013, 8-1. Lillian Hwy, 200 yards west of Blue Angel Pkwy

20% rebate r e a l t o r commission to m i l i t a r y members. Resort Realty, 850-221-8024

Home for sale

3/2 space on water w/dock, close to NAS, $95,500. Chris, 850-375-4201 Roommates

C a r e e r minded female to be roommate near NAS, west Pensacola. $400/month + utilities. 850677-0409

Merchandise Pets

Computer P r i n t e r , I t a l i a n HP3200, $35. G r e y h o u n d 476-4604 pups. All shots, excellent Kirby G4 champion v a c u u m , background, male $300, n u m e r o u s females $400. a t t a c h m e n t s , $200. Aero 981-0228 Pilates cardio Articles for sale rebounder, 2 DVDs, $200. Wooden bunk 453-9341 bed with m a t t r e s s e s , New wedding e x c e l l e n t gown, small c o n d i t i o n , train, lots of $170. 805-248- beads. 4569479 1368 1.27ct. 14K white gold diamond ring. M i n t condition, $1,850. Have all paperwork and receipts. Originally $3,400. David, 619-7560

Merchandise

Merchandise

Merchandise

• GE Stove with over the range vent hood, $100 and GE Dishwasher, $40 OBO. Call Mac, 850-2321068

Leather G-1 navy flight jacket, original 1944 pattern, government issued, mouton collar, new cuffs and waistband. No squadron patches. Size 42. Great soft condition. $150. 497-9780

Orbitrek elliptical glider e x e r c i s e machine. $40, 607-2012

Merchandise

• New Model R u g e r Blackhawk, .357, Blued Finish, Asking $400. If interested call 850-232-2612. Ask for Jason.

Advertise with us! Call

• GE older model electric stove, $30. K e n m o r e electric dryer, older model but works great $40. Kenmore D i s h w a s h e r, older model but works great $20. Call Kathy 850-453-3775.

JVC VHS video tape player, VCR Plus with cable channel changer, ultraspec drive, dual quickset, hifi, $25. 497$ 5 , 5 0 0 / o b o 9780 Beautiful back walnut satin High chair, S t e i n w a y office upright piano black vinyl, with and w/bench. Model arms 1098. Excellent a d j u s t a b l e condition & features, swivels must see and with four to appreciate. casters, nice, 261-9121 $25. 497-9780

Merchandise

R i f l e , Wi n c h e s t e r, early model, 94 lever action, 30/30. Real Coffee table walnut stock. and 2 end W i t h tables. $100. sidemount and scope. $325. 607-2012 454-9486 Antique gate leg table, walnut O f f s h o r e wood. $300, fishing Islander 607-2012 and Braid lures. M i s t r a l New monoliter, Wi n d S u r f e r. wire liter, belt, Board, sail, gap, etc. $125 boom, has for all. 497c e n t e r b o a r d , 1167 perfect for the bay, excellent Black powder condition, $300. rifle, CVA, 492-5967 Optima 50 Samsung 25.7 caliber, inline cubic foot i g n i t i o n , French door s t a i n l e s s , r e f r i g e r a t o r Bergara barrel (white) with 4- and camo year warranty. stock, new, Bought new never fired, Sept. 2012. $150. 417-1694 $1,000. 9418556

Gosport mailed to your door $60 per year for 50 issues Fill out the form below and drop off or mail to: Ballinger Publishing 41 N. Jefferson St. Suite 402 Pensacola, FL 32502

Name and address where you want Gosport delivered. Please print clearly.

Simone Sands at 433-1166 ext. 21 Payment: Cash Card Number Exp. Date

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GOSPORT

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May 31, 2013

B7

Ads placed by the Military are FREE To place a FREE Military Marketplace classified ad

go online at www.gosportpensacola.com

Military Marketplace ★ Motor ★ Merchandise ★ Employment ★ Real Estate ★ and more

Merchandise

Motor

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

5’ table & chairs, new in Carson, $125. 2 table lamps, $50. Matching glass top coffee table and 2 end tables, $175, Milton. 6236737

Misc. Motor

Homes for rent

Roommates

Roommate to share large 2 story home near base. $495/month. Utilities included. For m o r e information call 206-3331

N e w l y renovated 3/2, 1,225 sqft., new roof, paint, carpet/vinyl f l o o r s , kitchen/bath cabinets, interior doors, d i s h w a s h e r, stove, ceiling fans, window blinds. Almost new AC. F e n c e d backyard. $53,000. 108 To m a h a w k Trail, 456-2303

1990 Sea Ray 270, 486 hours, sleeps 6, air conditioned, d i n e t t e , microwave, s t o v e , r e f r i g e r a t o r, stand-up Motor head/shower, VAutos for sale 8, 310 hp, none cleaner under Black 1998 $15K. 346-0605 Ford Mustang, 5 speed V6, • 1991, 23 ft. p o w e r Fish Hawk with w i n d o w s , walk-around power locks, cuddy cabin. cruise control, NEWER Vortec 150,000 miles. 350 Engine & Car runs great, Outdrive doesn’t need engine has less anything. Great has 300 hours. on gas. $2,800. Asking $5,200. Looks great, 291-4627 runs great. Just in time for Place your boating season. ad today Call Mac at 850-232-1068.

F o x r u n Townhome for rent -2/1.5, 2 story, W/D connection, ceramic tile, fenced yard, nice, safe neighborhood. $695/month, 968-0342 4/2 1,653 SqFt Victorian Village Gulf Breeze. New paint & carpet. 2 car garage $1,300, 9342822 3/1 central heat/air, fenced yard, recently renovated. $795/ month, $795 deposit. Lease required. 206-3331

Housemate to share 4/3 home with pool in Gulf Breeze. 10 minutes to the beach, dog o k a y . $550/month, plus utilities. Homes for sale 207-9361 Roommate, no smoker, one furnished room in apartment, $395 per m o n t h , i n c l u d e s everything. Near NAS Fairfield and Mobile. 2924 6 6 2 . Background c h e c k , reference required.

3/2 house, open floor plan, lots of upgrades. Call K a r e n K r a s n o s k y, 748-4144, newly MLS# 444121 4/2 remodeled B e a u t i f u l home, fenced home for sale, yard, all 4/3 2,343 sqft. electric, FP, BlackberryRid inside laundry, ge Subdivision g o o d MLS# 421178. n e i g h b o r s . 525-7932, 4 6 2 1 $219,900 Bridgedale, $74,900 2914591

Misc.

Misc.

Misc.

Too much stuff? Here’s the best and cheapest way to clear out the garage. List your stuff in a Gosport Classified. Rates are $9 for the first ten words and fifty cents for each additional word. Over 25,000 people see the Gosport every week. Go online to www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext. 24 to place your ad today.


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May 31, 2013

GOSPORT

Gosport - May 31, 2013  

Weekly newspaper for Naval Air Station, Pensacola