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Battle of Midway observance at NAS Pensacola ... The 72nd anniversary of the Battle of Midway will be observed with a ceremony onboard NAS Pensacola June 4, 8 a.m., at the Five Flags Pavilion. Guests are asked to be in their seats by 7:45 a.m. as the ceremony’s start will coincide with “Colors.” Guest speaker for the event will be NETC Commanding Officer Rear Adm. Mike White. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will be moved to the National Naval Aviation Museum. For more information, call Patrick Nichols at 452-4436.

Vol. 78, No. 21

VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: www.gosportpensacola.com

May 30, 2014

NASP a finalist for prestigious recreation award By Janet Thomas Gosport Staff Writer

Senior enlisted adviser to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (SEAC) Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan Battaglia addresses questions from service members in Naval Air Technical Training Center’s (NATTC) Charles Taylor Hangar during a town hall meeting onboard NAS Pensacola. Photo by AWF2 Jessica Tenney

Senior enlisted adviser to Joint Chiefs of Staff visits NASP By Lt. Jonathan Bacon NATTC PAO

The senior enlisted adviser to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan Battaglia, conducted a town hall meeting for more than 1,000 Sailors, Marines and Airmen as part of a visit to NAS Pensacola May 20. Speaking in the Naval Air Technical Training Center’s (NATTC) Charles Taylor Hangar,

Battaglia covered numerous issues challenging today’s service members and discussed how although technology and conflict has changed, the basics of leadership and honorable service have remained constant. Battaglia addressed the diversity in generations within the military as he spoke about “getting back to the basics.” He explained that, especially now in times of transition and change,

“We can’t get away from our foundations and our basics.” He said that “Technology may change, streamline processes and make our processes easier, but we must always remember how it was done before modern technology, in case we ever find ourselves without it.” Acknowledging that most of the audience members were in the

See Visit on page 2

Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) is one of two bases in Navy Region Southeast (NRS) that will compete for a prestigious honor in the parks and recreation field. “We are certainly proud and honored to be selected as one of four finalists from all of DoD for this very prestigious award,” said Kerry Shanaghan, director of NASP’s Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department. “This is really an installationwide recognition as it highlights the outstanding efforts in master base planning and environmental by NASP Public Works Department, command leadership’s support and guidance, continuing efforts to ensure a healthy work and recreational environment by the safety department, our partnerships with the Navy Exchange and the Pensacola community and the personal efforts of all NAS Pensacola military and civilian employees that make this

an outstanding place to work and play.” Shanaghan said that it is of note that two of the four finalists are Navy installations – the other is Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. – and both are part of Navy Region Southeast (NRS) of Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) and both are CNIC five-star accredited programs. The other two 2014 Gold Medal finalists in the armed forces recreation category are Fort Carson in Colorado and Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in California. The winner of the 2013 Gold Medal in the armed forces recreation category was directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Fort Knox, Ky. The American Academy for Park and Recreation Administration (AAPRA), in partnership with the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), recently announced the finalists for the 2014

See MWR on page 2

Annual NASP Technology Exposition June 2 From Federal Events Division National Conference Services Inc.

The NAS Pensacola Technology Exposition will be held June 2 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Mustin Beach Club. All

military, civilian and contractor personnel are invited to attend for free. This event has been taking place onsite at NAS Pensacola for more than 15 years. Visitors can discover solutions for every mis-

sion; more than 20 exhibitors will provide

See Expo on page 2

NIOC Pensacola receives EIDWS pennant By NIOC Pensacola PAO

Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Pensacola was recently awarded the Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialist (EIDWS) pennant by Commander, U.S. Navy Cyber Forces Command, becoming part of a small group of the 135 eligible units to achieve this milestone. Cmdr. Pat Count, commanding officer of NIOC Pensacola, presented the command with the EIDWS pennant during the monthly command awards ceremony last month. U.S. Navy Cyber Forces policy stipulates that for a command to display the EIDWS pennant, all eligible Sailors must be enrolled in the warfare qualification program, and among those enrolled, qualification must be achieved within a limited time-

frame and without delinquency. “I’m extremely proud of our team and their accomplishment,” Count said before the pennant was raised. “The award of the EIDWS pennant is a direct result of our Sailors’ commitment to advancing our collective and individual ability to achieve Information Dominance for our Navy. “It is a testament to NIOC Pensacola Sailors’ warfighting culture and desire to fight and win in this challenging new warfare area,” Count continued. Attaining the EIDWS Pennant is a commandwide achievement resulting from the active commitment of NIOC Pensacola Sailors and chief petty officers from multiple rates. “I give the credit to the Sailors receiving the qualification because they have worked

so hard to get it done early or on time,” said CTNC Mike Martinez, NIOC Pensacola’s EIDWS program coordinator. “A large majority of them will then turn around and continue to train and help others receive

their pins as well.” In addition to active deckplate-level involvement, mentoring across the command was also recognized as a source of NIOC Pensacola’s success. “For me, this (receiving the

EIDWS pennant) is not about a pin or a flag; it’s about teamwork and seeing Sailors helping Sailors learn and receive their qualifications,” said CTRCS

See NIOC on page 2

NHP Weekend Clinic moving June 1 Story, photo by MC1 James Stenberg NHP Assistant PAO

Naval Hospital Pensacola’s (NHP) Weekend Clinic will be moving from the hospital to Naval Branch Health Clinic Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) June 1. Active-duty service members in need of nonemergent healthcare will be able to utilize the weekend clinic instead of NHP’s Urgent Care Center, which also opens June 1. Naval Branch Health Clinic NATTC is located on the east side of NAS Pensacola near the Navy Exchange. The weekend clinic provides primary care services and ancillary services ordered during the course of the visit to include X-rays, prescriptions and laboratory work. Common symptoms that are seen at the clinic include fever, cough and sore throat.

HN Mitchel Harris, a corpsman with Naval Branch Health Clinic NATTC, checks the blood pressure of a patient during a visit to the weekend clinic.

“The purpose of the weekend clinic is to ensure that nonemergent healthcare is accessible on the weekends for the active duty population in the

See Clinic on page 2

Published by Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements constitute Department of the Navy, NAS Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing’s endorsement of products or services advertised.


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GOSPORT

NCO Pensacola celebrates as Navy VolEd turns 40 By Ed Barker NETC PAO

Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) joined Navy College Offices around the world as they celebrated 40 years of Voluntary Education (VolEd) history May 14. The Navy’s VolEd program officially launched in 1974 and since then, more than 130,000 Sailors have taken advantage of educational opportunities to reach their goal of a professional credential and/or a college degree. Schools offering degrees through Navy VolEd that first year included Pensacola Junior College (now

Pensacola State College) and the University of West Florida. One of those successful students attending the NASP NCO anniversary was the Naval Education and Training Command Chief of Staff, Capt. John Jones. Jones enlisted in the Navy in 1978 and credits education with much of his success. “If it weren’t for Navy College and being able to complete my associate degree while on active duty, I’d never have

been selected for the limited duty officer program,” said Jones. “I was able to use tuition assistance to help fund both my bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business management.” Ken Spradlin, educational specialist for the NASP NCO, said that although the Pensacola office has seen many changes over the years, their core mission has not varied. “Our NCO team has always sought to provide service members with outstanding customer support and great educa-

tional counseling,” said Spradlin. “Quality educational opportunities enable the development of strong analytical skills, and that has a direct link to Navy mission readiness and accomplishment.” Since 1974, the Navy has spent more than $1.5 billion in tuition assistance (TA) funding for nearly 5 million course enrollments. TA is the Navy’s most popular VolEd program, with approximately 15 percent of Sailors (around 45,000) participating at any given time. For more information on the Navy College Program, visit: https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/

MWR from page 1

National Gold Medal Awards for Excellence in Parks and Recreation Management. Founded in 1965, the Gold Medal Awards program honors communities in the U.S. that demonstrate excellence in parks and recreation through long-range planning, resource management, volunteerism, environmental stewardship, program development, professional development and agency recognition. Applications are separated into seven classes, with five classes based on population, one class for armed forces recreation communities and the state park system class awarded during odd-numbered years. Agencies are judged on their ability to address the needs of those they serve through the collective energies of citizens, staff and elected officials. Four finalists in each class are chosen to compete for grand honors each year. A panel of five park and recreation professionals reviews and judges all application materials. Judges are chosen for their considerable experience and knowledge in parks and recreation on both the local and national levels. This year’s finalists will compete for Grand Plaque Award honors this summer, and the six Grand Plaque recipients will be announced live during the 2014 NRPA Congress Oct. 14-16 in Charlotte, N.C. For more information on the Gold Medal Awards, visit www.nrpa.org/goldmedal or www.aapra.org. Visit from page 1

“sunrise of their careers,” as they attend “A” schools, Battaglia reminded the crowd that, the “transition to being a veteran will come to everyone at some point,” and he added that, “The best thing you can do to prepare for your transition from active duty to veteran is to do everything possible to get an honorable discharge.” To those in the crowd who were more senior, and

perhaps closer to separation or retirement, he reminded them that, “It is never too early to capture your military job skills and transfer them to a resumè for use on the outside.” Battaglia also reminded those in the crowd of how seriously he takes the transition from service member to veteran. “I don’t want you to have difficulty finding a job, starting a business, or starting college,” he said. “If you end up unemployed as a vet-

NHPʼs Rock N Fly benefits NMCRS... Commanding Officer Naval Hospital Pensacola (NHP) Capt. Maureen Padden (second from left) presented a check on behalf of the Blue Angels Rock N Fly Half Marathon and 5K for $40,000 to the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) May 15. Also present were Cmdr. Mike Kohler, director for the race (left); ShelleyMarshall, chief development and communications officer, NMCRS; and Mark Harden, director, NAS Pensacola NMCRS (right). The race was held March 29 aboard NASP and attracted approximately 2,500 runners. It was one of the largest ever inaugural races in the Southeast. NMCRS provides financial assistance and education, as well as other programs and services, to members of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, their eligible family members, widows and survivors. Photo by Jason Bortz

eran, it means that I’ve failed you.” Battaglia encouraged the assembled Sailors to get a copy of the book “The Noncommissioned Officer and Petty Officer: Backbone of the Armed Forces.” He told the assembled group that this was a book about them. It describes what being an enlisted leader is about, defines the expectations of enlisted leadership, and expands upon the various services leadership manu-

Expo from page 1

NIOC from page 1

hands-on demonstrations of various technologies including: • Information technology solutions, information security, signal processing, control systems, storage solutions, video conferencing, mobility solutions, video-centric communications and more. Complimentary refreshments will be available while supplies last. To pre-register, visit www.FederalEvents.com, click on the “NAS Pensacola” link and select the pre-register button.

Joseph Cantu, NIOC Pensacola’s senior enlisted leader. “I had a lot of help from other people. I had help from new accessions as well as Chief Washington, who has been out on a ship and could give real-world examples – he put it (Information Dominance Warfare) into real life,” said CTNSN Francis Cooke, who was one of three Sailors receiving his EIDWS pin at the April 11 ceremony. Cooke also remarked that his leading petty officer, department chief petty officer and others actively worked with and mentored him and others through the qualification process. The EIDWS insignia signifies the Sailor is competent in his or her rating and has acquired additional general knowledge to enhance his or her understanding of the

local area,” said Cmdr. Amy Branstetter, director of Branch Health Clinics, NHP. The weekend clinic will continue to be open Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m.-noon at the new location and appointments will not be needed. Active-duty servicemembers

May 30, 2014

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community Commanding Officer — Capt. Keith Hoskins Public Affairs Officer — Harry C. White The Gosport nameplate pays homage to the 100th anniversary of naval aviation in 2011: the Centennial of Naval Aviation, or CONA. The image on the left side of the nameplate depicts Eugene Ely taking off in a Curtiss pusher bi-plane from the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 18, 1911. While Ely had taken off from the USS Birmingham two months earlier after his plane had been loaded on the ship, the USS Pennsylvania event was the first time a plane landed on and then took off from a U.S. warship.

After taking a few questions, Battaglia closed by encouraging the crowd to “stay fit, stay strong and stay resilient.” NATTC Command Master Chief, CMDCM Kirk Klawitter, said that his students and staff were very impressed with Battaglia’s taking the time to share his insights and experience with them. “Sgt. Maj. Battaglia provided my junior Sailors with a unique glimpse into how much they matter to

role of the Information Dominance Corps (IDC) as it pertains to warfighting, mission effectiveness, and command survivability. Sailors receive the EIDWS pin only after they complete a challenging qualification process consisting of a personnel qualification standard (PQS), a written test, and a comprehensive oral examination by a qualification review board. “The board process was rigorous in that, you had to know the information and put it into a real-world situation,” said Cooke. “I learned the technical side and what the other rates do. It showed me what the other rates can accomplish.” Count echoed the observations of Sailors, such as those of Cooke, noting that receiving the EIDWS recognizes a Sailor’s ability to tangibly contribute warfighting capacity in the Navy’s newest warfare area.

Clinic from page 1

Vol. 78, No. 21

als. His final topic was resiliency. He explained that the Department of Defense programs on resiliency are for not only the service member, but for their unit and their families. Battaglia described resiliency as “the strength, physical, psychological and spiritual, to maneuver and navigate through adversity and stress with minimal impact, and return to an optimal level of operations afterward.”

The image on the right side is the Navy’s most modern fighter aircraft, the F-18 Super Hornet. Established in 1921 as the Air Station News, the name Gosport was adopted in 1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by flight instructors in the early days of naval aviation to give instructions and directions to their students. The name “Gosport” was derived from Gosport, England (originally God’s Port), where the voice tube was invented. Gosport is an authorized newspaper published every Friday by Ballinger Publishing,

the senior enlisted leadership in the DoD,” said Klawitter. “The messages of service with honor, and enlisted leadership across the generations he presented should serve well to reinforce our Sailorization and professional pride training; we strive to instill in them on a daily basis.” For more information about Naval Air Technical Training Center visit https:// www. netc. navy. mil/centers/cnatt/nattc/Default.aspx .

“The EIDWS pin is more than just a uniform device and the pennant is more than just a piece of cloth to hang from the yardarm,” said Count. “They are visible manifestations of our deliberate effort to achieve minimum proficiency in our warfare area and a commitment to advancing our doctrine, tactics, techniques and procedures.” Additionally, the EIDWS program ensures that Sailors understand not only the pillars of Information Dominance, but also Navy heritage, operations, command and control and safety. Receiving the EIDWS pennant is a coveted honor for IDC commands and illustrates the level of significance and investment the Navy’s senior leadership now attaches to information-centric operations and the development of information dominance warfighting capacity.

in a student status needing transportation can contact their duty driver for transportation to and from the clinic. “We still encourage members that are able to wait to see their primary care provider to do so because their Medical Home Team knows them best,” said Branstetter. “However, if they need to be seen on the weekend, the clinic will be there for them.” The Rhodes Building, 41 North Jefferson Street, Suite 402, Pensacola, FL 32504, in the interest of military and civilian personnel and their families aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Saufley Field and Corry Station. Editorial and news material is compiled by the Public Affairs Office, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-1051. All news releases and related materials should be mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hallford@navy.mil. National news sources are American Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News Service (NNS), Air Force News Service (AFNS), News USA and North American Precis Syndicate (NAPS). Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Defense, United States Navy, officials of the Naval Air Station Pensacola, or Ballinger Publishing. All advertising, including classified ads, is arranged through Ballinger Publishing. Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to rank, rate, race, creed, color, national origin or sex of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection of this policy of equal opportunities by an advertiser will result in the refusal of future advertising from that source.

For classified ads, call: (850) 433-1166, ext. 24 For commercial advertising: Simone Sands (850) 433-1166, ext. 21 Simone@ballingerpublishing.Com Visit Us On The Web At: Ballinger Publishing.Com Mail To: Gosport, NAS Pensacola, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, Pensacola, FL 32508-1051

Gosport Editor

Scott Hallford 452-4466 scott.hallford@navy.mil Gosport Associate Editor

Mike O’Connor 452-2165 michael.f.oʼconnor.ctr@navy.mil Gosport Staff Writer

Janet Thomas 452-4419 janet.thomas.ctr@navy.mil


May 30, 2014

GOSPORT

COMMENTARY

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DoD steps up battle against mental health issues By Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press Service

Nearly one million cases of mental health conditions in service members were documented between 2000 and 2011, according to a senior psychologist with the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel to mark Mental Health Awareness Month, Navy Capt. (Dr.) Anthony Arita, Deployment Health Clinical Center director, said the 1 million cases recorded by the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center show that mental health conditions are “quite common.” A Rand Corp. study in 2008 on the invisible wounds of war, such as post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries found one in five deployed service members returned home with significant psychological health and TBI (traumatic brain injury) symptoms “at a level warranting medical attention,” Arita said. Recognized each May since 1949, DoD is promoting Mental Health Awareness Month this year to show that psychological health is “critical to one’s overall health,” Arita said, noting that sound psychological health is critical to military readiness. “Psychological health permeates all aspects of our ability to function optimally to carry out our mission, to function at our best cognitively, to really give it (our) best,” he said.

How to submit a commentary

Army 1st Sgt. Aaron Tippett sustained posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and multiple concussions from explosions during combat deployments. Although he initially ignored the symptoms, Tippett eventually sought help and is now helping others. His story is featured in a Real Warriors Campaign video profile at www.realwarriors.net. Photo courtesy of Dick Phillips

The Defense Centers of Excellence (DCoE) is leveraging this month’s recognition to relay four key messages: “Psychological health is essential to one’s health, prevention works, treatment is effective and people recover,” Arita noted. “We have very effective treatments. (Patients) can expect their lives (to) noticeably get better, (and they) can return to active duty at a fuller level of function,” he added. It’s also vital for people with mental health symptoms to recognize they are not alone in their struggle, Arita said.

“We recognize when people have concerns about their psychological symptoms, there is a reluctance to step forward and seek care,” Arita said. “We see it in people who need it most.” The Defense Department has come far in its understanding and treatment of psychological illnesses, he said. “We’ve been able to answer a lot of questions about psychological health to promote normalization and seeking care. But there’s still more to be done. While we’ve done much to combat the stigma around seeking treatment, we still have significant challenges ahead of us,” he said. Arita said key to meeting the challenges is to understand the stigma against psychological conditions and treatment. “There’s a need to address the stigma at a cultural level, and getting at the biases, prejudice and discrimination is tough to do to gauge progress,” he said, “Yet DoD is taking this on.” Resources abound in the area of military mental health. One such outlet is a “living blog” appearing this month on DCoE’s website (www.dcoe.mil). Service members, veterans and families can post questions about mental health, and psychology experts provide answers within 24 hours, Arita said. Questions have so far have included identifying the signs and symptoms of PTSD, how it impacts deployment, and moral injury. Launched in 2009 as a help-seeking resource, the Real Warriors Campaign features success-story vignettes of people of all ranks and demographics who faced tough challenges and sought the

care they needed, he noted. The vignettes, Arita said, “highlight how care and recovery made a difference in their lives. They have given people the ease of thinking, ‘If they can do it, I can do it too.’ ” In one of its newest initiatives to diagnose and treat psychological ills during early onset, DoD is placing behavioral health specialists in military primary care facilities for use by service members, families and retirees. A range of issues such as depression, PTSD, anxiety, stress, grief, relationship problems, sleep difficulties, obesity, chronic pain, diabetes, tobacco use and other substance challenges often can be treated effectively in primary care, Arita said. Because some people might not feel comfortable approaching mental health specialists, they often are at ease with their primary doctors, and by staffing such specialists, the military health system is making dramatic changes in the way behavioral health concerns are identified, assessed and treated within the primary-care setting, he said. “As part of the DoD Primary Care Behavioral Health initiative, all three services have implemented or greatly expanded programs that integrate behavioral health services into primary care,” Arita said. To learn about the signs, symptoms and treatment of psychological ills, contact the DCoE Outreach Center at 1 (866) 966-1020. Anyone in a psychological crisis should call the Military Crisis Line at 1 (800) 273-TALK (8255).

Commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as official government, Navy or command policy statements. Reader submissions are welcome but should not exceed 800 words. Submissions must be bylined and include a daytime phone number or e-mail contact for the writer. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with policy and standards. Send Commentary submissions to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil.


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May 30, 2014

GOSPORT GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE

NAS Pensacola Emergency Managment Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785

For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; non-emergency 452-8378 911 for NASP Police; non-emergency 452-8387 NAS Whiting Field 911 for Emergency Center Emergency Management 623-7612 Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618 NETPDTC Saufley Field Main gate 452-1628 Florida Division of Emergency Management 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy http://www.Ready.Navy.mil Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/ Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/ Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.fl.org Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/ 474-5300 to report gas leak/emergency

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.myescambia.com/beready

Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com

Santa Rosa County Emergency Management 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

AT&T http://www.att.com

HURRICANE CATEGORIES TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph NAS Pensacola

May 30, 2014

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NOAA 2014 Atlantic hurricane season predicts near-normal or below-normal El Niño expected to develop and suppress the number and intensity of tropical cyclones From http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov

In its 2014 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued May 22, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a near-normal or below-normal season. The main driver of this year’s outlook is the anticipated development of El Niño this summer. El Niño causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Niño can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms. The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season and only a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season. For the six-month hurricane season, which begins June 1, NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of eight to 13 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which three to six could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including one to two major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). These numbers are near or below the seasonal averages of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, based on the average from 1981 to 2010. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. “Thanks to the environmental intelligence from NOAA’s network of earth observations, our scientists and meteorologists can provide

life-saving products like our new storm surge threat map and our hurricane forecasts,” said Kathryn Sullivan, NOAA administrator. “And even though we expect El Niño to suppress the number of storms this season, it’s important to remember it takes only one landfalling storm to cause a disaster.” Humberto was the first of only two Atlantic hurricanes in 2013. It reached peak intensity, with top winds of 90 mph, in the far eastern Atlantic. Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, said the Atlantic – which has seen above-normal seasons in 12 of the last 20 years – has been in an era of high activity for hurricanes since 1995. However, this highactivity pattern is expected to be offset in 2014 by the impacts of El Niño, and by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures than we’ve seen in recent years. “Atmospheric and oceanic conditions across the tropical Pacific are already taking on some El Niño characteristics. Also, we are currently seeing strong trade winds and wind shear over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAA’s climate models predict these conditions will persist, in part because of El Niño,” Bell said. “The expectation of near-average Atlantic Ocean temperatures this season, rather than the above-average temperatures seen since 1995, also suggests fewer Atlantic hurricanes.” NOAA is rolling out new tools at the National Hurricane Center this year. An experimental mapping tool will be used to show communities their storm surge flood threat.

The map will be issued for coastal areas when a hurricane or tropical storm watch is first issued, or approximately 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. The map will show land areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas. Early testing on continued improvements to NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model (HWRF) shows a 10 percent improvement in this year’s model compared to last year. Hurricane forecasters use the HWRF along with other models to produce forecasts and issue warnings. The HWRF model is being adopted by a number of Western Pacific and Indian Ocean rim nations. NOAA’s seasonal hurricane outlook is not a hurricane landfall forecast; it does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts will be provided throughout the season by NOAA’s National Hurricane Center. “It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall to have disastrous impacts on our communities,” said Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate administrator for Response and Recovery. “Just last month, Pensacola, Fla., saw five inches of rain in 45 minutes – without a tropical storm or hurricane. We need you to be ready. Know your risk for hurricanes and severe weather, take action now to be prepared and be an example for others in your office, school or community. Learn more about how to prepare for hurricanes at www.ready.gov/hurricanes.”

Storm names for 2014 Arthur Bertha Cristobal Dolly Edouard Fay Gonzalo Hanna Isaias Josephine Kyle Laura Marco Nana Omar Paulette Rene Sally Teddy Vicky Wilfred

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May 30, 2014

GOSPORT GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE

NAS Pensacola Emergency Managment Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785

For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; non-emergency 452-8378 911 for NASP Police; non-emergency 452-8387 NAS Whiting Field 911 for Emergency Center Emergency Management 623-7612 Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618 NETPDTC Saufley Field Main gate 452-1628 Florida Division of Emergency Management 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy http://www.Ready.Navy.mil Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/ Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/ Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.fl.org Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/ 474-5300 to report gas leak/emergency

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.myescambia.com/beready

Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com

Santa Rosa County Emergency Management 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

AT&T http://www.att.com

HURRICANE CATEGORIES TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph NAS Pensacola

May 30, 2014

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NOAA 2014 Atlantic hurricane season predicts near-normal or below-normal El Niño expected to develop and suppress the number and intensity of tropical cyclones From http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov

In its 2014 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued May 22, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a near-normal or below-normal season. The main driver of this year’s outlook is the anticipated development of El Niño this summer. El Niño causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Niño can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms. The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season and only a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season. For the six-month hurricane season, which begins June 1, NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of eight to 13 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which three to six could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including one to two major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). These numbers are near or below the seasonal averages of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, based on the average from 1981 to 2010. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. “Thanks to the environmental intelligence from NOAA’s network of earth observations, our scientists and meteorologists can provide

life-saving products like our new storm surge threat map and our hurricane forecasts,” said Kathryn Sullivan, NOAA administrator. “And even though we expect El Niño to suppress the number of storms this season, it’s important to remember it takes only one landfalling storm to cause a disaster.” Humberto was the first of only two Atlantic hurricanes in 2013. It reached peak intensity, with top winds of 90 mph, in the far eastern Atlantic. Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, said the Atlantic – which has seen above-normal seasons in 12 of the last 20 years – has been in an era of high activity for hurricanes since 1995. However, this highactivity pattern is expected to be offset in 2014 by the impacts of El Niño, and by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures than we’ve seen in recent years. “Atmospheric and oceanic conditions across the tropical Pacific are already taking on some El Niño characteristics. Also, we are currently seeing strong trade winds and wind shear over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAA’s climate models predict these conditions will persist, in part because of El Niño,” Bell said. “The expectation of near-average Atlantic Ocean temperatures this season, rather than the above-average temperatures seen since 1995, also suggests fewer Atlantic hurricanes.” NOAA is rolling out new tools at the National Hurricane Center this year. An experimental mapping tool will be used to show communities their storm surge flood threat.

The map will be issued for coastal areas when a hurricane or tropical storm watch is first issued, or approximately 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. The map will show land areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas. Early testing on continued improvements to NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model (HWRF) shows a 10 percent improvement in this year’s model compared to last year. Hurricane forecasters use the HWRF along with other models to produce forecasts and issue warnings. The HWRF model is being adopted by a number of Western Pacific and Indian Ocean rim nations. NOAA’s seasonal hurricane outlook is not a hurricane landfall forecast; it does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts will be provided throughout the season by NOAA’s National Hurricane Center. “It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall to have disastrous impacts on our communities,” said Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate administrator for Response and Recovery. “Just last month, Pensacola, Fla., saw five inches of rain in 45 minutes – without a tropical storm or hurricane. We need you to be ready. Know your risk for hurricanes and severe weather, take action now to be prepared and be an example for others in your office, school or community. Learn more about how to prepare for hurricanes at www.ready.gov/hurricanes.”

Storm names for 2014 Arthur Bertha Cristobal Dolly Edouard Fay Gonzalo Hanna Isaias Josephine Kyle Laura Marco Nana Omar Paulette Rene Sally Teddy Vicky Wilfred

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May 30, 2014

GOSPORT

Navy pilot from TraWing-5 performs on national country music TV special By Jay Cope NASWF PAO

A

n instructor pilot from Training Air Wing Five (TraWing-5) at Naval Air Station Whiting Field recently received the rare opportunity to fly to Las Vegas, perform in front of 14,000 people, rub elbows with country music stars and more thanks to the Academy of Country Music (ACM). Lt. Chelsea Brunoehler was one of 12 service members selected to participate in the ACM “AllStar Salute to the Troops” show, which aired May 20 on CBS. “It was an incredible time,” she said about her experience. “They took great care of us. I felt like a celebrity too. Everything was amazing, they treated us like royalty.” ACM’s idea of care for the 12 “celebrities” entailed accommodations at the Mandalay Bay resort on the Vegas strip, flights out to Vegas for them and their families, food vouchers and per diem for the military members, access to the charity party Saturday night, VIP backstage passes for the ACM Country Music Awards and opportunities to perform on stage for the “All-Star Salute to the Troops” special – all of which took place during April 4-7. Brunoehler and two other service members were selected to sing the national anthem, which opened the show with a number sung by George Strait and Merle Haggard. Other military performers actually sang duets with various artists such as Keith Urban, Hunter

Hayes, Lady Antebellum, Rascal Flatts and more. All the military members were on stage for the finale – Toby Keith’s “American Soldier.” “It felt like I had my 15 minutes of fame, and I’ll be happy with that,” Brunoehler said. “I just enjoyed being able to represent the Navy.” Brunoehler met many of the performers and took pictures to capture the moment. She emphasized that they were very genuine, and sometimes even seemed a little shy, but all expressed appreciation for her service. However, meeting Kimberly Perry from The Band stood out among all the other moments. “I got the chance to tell her that their song ‘All My Life’ is what inspired me to pick up an acoustic guitar,” Brunoehler said. Though her experience with a guitar is recent, Brunoehler has been performing for a long time. Music has been with her most of her life. She began singing very young in elementary school and continued through high school singing in a group called Allegro in local festivals and for area organizations. Heading to the Naval

Academy in Annapolis didn’t inhibit her passion for music as she sang in the women’s glee club, touring Italy and England with the unit. She even met her husband, Matt, while performing. A former Marine artillery officer, Matt was a guitar player and songwriter even then. Now, they have formed a band with another friend, calling themselves Critical Incident. “We love music and it is a hobby that we share. We both enjoy performing in front of an audience. Practice is fun, but when you have an audience that enjoys your music, it is really rewarding,” she said. It is safe to say that 14,000 people was a little beyond her dreams when she first submitted her application. Beginning in late January, the Navy began soliciting nominations from Sailors who wished to perform in the program. Potential participants had to submit a link to a video of them performing a country song, a biography and a recommendation letter from their chain of command. Out of more than 40 applications, Brunoehler was one of two

(Above) Lt. Chelsea Brunoehler with American country music singer, actor and music producer George Strait; (below) with country singer Toby Keith.

Navy candidates selected for participation. She chose Tammy Wynette’s “Stand By Your Man” as her video, which she and Matt put together on short notice with a smart phone. The video is available to view online at https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=oDhOcXF7nKk. By the time she heard back about her package a month later, she had forgotten about the submission. When the chief staff officer from TraWing-5 contacted her, she had no idea what it pertained to. “I was in shock. I think I had put the package out of my mind. I know I was just really excited to have a chance to meet some of my favorite artists,” she said. Now that the taping is over, she is anxious to see the final result on tape. Being part of the program was a new experience and

seeing the backstage work that went into the show gave her a new appreciation for the dedication and effort that go into coordinating such an event. Combined with the fact that travelling to Las Vegas was a dream for her and Matt, the opportunity was a once-in-a-lifetime event.

“The experience makes us want to support country music even more. Their support for the military is so important,” Brunoehler emphasized. “I was just grateful to be there.” For more news from Naval Air Station Whiting Field, visit www. navy .mil/ local/naswf/.

Support Our Troops


May 30, 2014

PARTYLINE

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GOSPORT

Military blood donors being honored

OneBlood is saluting military donors during May for Military Appreciation Month. A limited-edition military T-shirt is being distributed to donors at OneBlood centers and at the OneBlood Bloodmobile drives. Donors also will receive a wellness check and a cholesterol screening. OneBlood serves as one of the seven military hubs throughout the country and holds blood drives at bases in Pensacola, Fort Walton and Panama City and provides blood to patients at Naval Hospital Pensacola and Eglin Air Force Base hospital. Generally healthy people age 16 or older who weigh at least 110 pounds can donate blood. For more information, call 473-3853 or go to www.oneblood.org.

Cain first in line for ‘Heroes Among Us’

Dan “Darth” Cain served as a U.S. Marine in Vietnam. After graduating from college, he became a pilot in the U.S. Navy, where he logged 6,700 hours in various military fighter aircraft. A resident of Molino, he retired from the Navy as a captain in 2004 after 36 years of military service. Cain will be honored at 6 p.m. today, May 30, as part of the Heroes Among Us series at the Veterans Memorial Park. The series, now in its second year, is held on the last Friday of each month from May through October. It is presented by the local Marine Corps League, J.R. Spears Detachment 066. Admission is free, although donations will be accepted for the Marines in Distress Fund. For more information, go to www.veterans memorialparkpensacola.com.

Pirates to be the stars on trolley tour

You can climb aboard a trolley today, May 30, for a tour that will bring you face-to-face with pirates, mermaids, monsters and other characters. The Blood Red Trolley showcases local actors performing “The Curse of Don Tristan de Tuna,” which plays out over several stops and celebrates a cockeyed view of Pensacola history. Other dates that pirate trolley will operate include June 13, June 17, July 11, July 25, Aug. 8, Aug. 22 and Sept. 5. You can board the trolley at the Pensacola Visitor Information Center, 1401 East Gregory St. Tickets cost $5 for children, $20 for adults. For information or tickets, go to http://piratetrolley.com.

Event focuses on hurricane preparation

The second annual Hurricane Citywide Disaster Preparedness Day is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. tomorrow, May 31, at the Vince J. Whibbs Sr. Community Maritime Park, 301 West Main St. Greg Strader, executive director for Be Ready Alliance Coordinating for Emergencies (BRACE), urges residents to take advantage of this opportunity to learn how to be ready for emergencies of all kinds. Participants will have the opportunity to meet city and county emergency management partners, and gather information on how to properly prepare for a disaster. You can sponsor an emergency preparedness kit for a family, donations are welcome toward the purchase of disaster kits for individuals and families. Participants must register and be at the event to receive a free kit. For sponsorship information, contract Henry Hawkins at 232-3230, Dianne Pugh at 450-3640 or Darryl Hawkins at 748-3138.

Learn about D-Day at museum event

Oz Nunn is scheduled to present “D-Day –The Last Great Crusade” at 10 a.m. June 7 at the National Naval Aviation Museum as part of the museum foundation’s Discovery Saturday series. The D-Day invasion took place 70 years ago on June 6, 1944. The public is invited to attend and learn about the planning and execution of the military operation. Nunn is an Air Force veteran of the Korean War. He is a tour guide at the museum and past chairman of the museum’s volunteer advisory board. He also teaches history at the University of West Florida’s Leisure Learning Center. Discovery Saturday presentations are free. The museum features free admission and a variety of events throughout the year. For more information go to NavalAviationMuseum.org or call the Naval Aviation Museum Foundation at 453-2389.

Rugby players can try out for team

Navy and Marine Corps service members have been invited to participate in the Commonwealth Navies Rugby Cup’s new Four Nation’s Maritime Cup Tournament in Auckland, New Zealand, Sept. 18 to Oct. 5. All-Navy Sports is seeking applications for tryouts to be held at Camp Pendleton, Calif., beginning Aug. 18. Applications are due to All-Navy Sports no later than June 15 and can be found at: http://www.navyfitness.org/all-navy_sports.

Partyline submissions

There’s an app for base guide If you need at Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) facility phone number or a building address, you can now forego the mad hunt for your copy of the base guide. MARCOA Publishing, which publishes base guides and telephone directories for NASP and military stations nationwide, now has a free smart phone application. The app, for iPhone and android users, includes base guide information and phone numbers for all bases covered by MARCOA. The location service will automatically open the base guide for your area, and users can change the location to research other base guides. NASP receives periodic shipments of the printed base guides, which are available at the NASP Public Affairs Office. For more information, call 452-2552.

Sea Scout unit seeking new members

The Sea Scout unit that is sponsored by the NAS Pensacola Chapel congregation is seeking new scouts and prospective adult leaders. Sea Scouts are part of the BSA Venturing program, with a focus on boating. Membership is open to boys and girls ages 14 through 20, including active duty. The local unit is Sea Scout Ship 609. It meets at 2 p.m. every Saturday at Landfall Marina, 4029 Landfall Drive, just west of the NAS Pensacola back gate. For more information, contact retired Navy Cmdr. Mark Wenzel by e-mail to skipper@ship609.org and/or mark.wenzel@navy.mil.

Register to play in Golf for Heroes

Early registration is under way for the third annual Golf for Heroes Tournament scheduled for June 13 at Osceola Municipal Golf Course. Space is limited for the four-person scramble tournament with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. All proceeds will benefit USO programs and services in Northwest Florida. Registration fees are $75 per person ($70 for active-duty) and include a continental breakfast, greens fee, range balls, cart, goodie bag and post-tournament lunch. The deadline to register is June 6. To register online, go to www.golfforheroes.com. For more information, contact USO Operations Manager Dana Cervantes at dcervantes@uso.org or 455-8280, option 4.

Junior Ranger camps announced

Dan Brown, the superintendent of Gulf Islands National Seashore, has announced the summer schedule for the Junior Ranger camps. Beginning in June, children ages 3-5, 6-8 and 9-11 can participate in a one- to three-hour day camp that explores the biology and history of Gulf Islands National Seashore. Reservations are required and can be made by calling Ranger Beckie Mims at 934-2631. The programs are free, but there is an $8 entrance fee to the Fort Pickens. For additional information about the camps or others offered at the park, call the Naval Live Oaks Visitor Center at 934-2600 or go to www.nps.gov/guis.

Coin collectors plan show June 7-8

The Pensacola Numismatic Society has scheduled its 39th annual Coin & Currency Show for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 7 and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 8 at the Pensacola Fairground, Bldg. 1, 6655 West Mobile Highway. Buy, sell, trade coins, currency, stamps, sports cards, jewelry, watches, tokens and other collectibles. Food and drinks will be available. Admission is $1 for the public and free for club members with club ID card and children. Parking is free. For more information contact: George Grant at 932-4252 or Danny Hayes at 206-3592. You can also go to www.pensacolacoinclub.com.

Special races to be held at Yacht Club

The Navy Yacht Club is celebrating numerous occasions in 2014 – the club is marking its 83rd birthday along with the 51st year of hosting the “Navy Cup,” a local area sailboat competition. In addition, the club will be commemorating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) with a Cradle of Naval Aviation Cup Centennial Regatta to be held in conjunction with the Navy Cup competition and the Viva Florida initiative promoting Florida’s history and culture. Sailboat races will be held June 6-8 in Bayou Grande and in Pensacola Bay with onshore race activities at the Navy Yacht Club facility at the Bayou Grande Marina. Sailboats from the local area yacht

clubs will compete in various class divisions. Early registration check-in and skipper’s meeting for the Navy Cup event will be from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. June 6 at the Navy Yacht Club facility. Race day registration for the spinnaker and nonspinnaker classes will be 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. June 7 at the Navy Yacht Club facility with the first race starting at noon. June 8 registration will be from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. for the One Design Fleet with a noon race start. The centennial regatta registration will be from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., with a skipper’s briefing at 11:30 a.m. and a 1 p.m. start. Races are expected to be over by 4 p.m. each day. Trophies will be presented June 8 after the last race is completed. For more information, contact Jim Parsons, fleet captain, Navy Yacht Club, at 384-4575 or by e-mail at jimparsons@bellsouth.net. Race information is also available at www.navypnsyc.org.

Evening services available at PSC salon

Summer evening hours specials are being offer for barbering, nails and massage therapy at Pensacola State College’s Cosmetology Salon, Bldg. 12, on the Pensacola campus. Barbering is open for drop-ins or appointments from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Haircuts are $3 with free cuts on Fridays. Nail services are available by appointment at 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. Standard manicures are $5 and pedicures are $20. Massage therapy sessions are available by appointment at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays. Patrons need to arrive by 5:45 p.m. Chair massages are $12 for 30 minutes. Table massages are $30 for one hour. Full cosmetology services also are available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For appointments or information, call 484-2567.

Camp scheduled at Leaning Post Ranch

A Painted Pony Summer Camp for children ages 8 to 12 is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 9 to June 13 at the Leaning Post Ranch, 4150 Cedar Springs Road, in Molino. Students will learn horsemanship skills, horseback riding, and art to include painting on canvas. Art supplies will be provided. The is cost is $400 and payment is due by June 2. A $100 deposit is required to reserve a spot. Children must bring their own lunches; drinks will be supplied. Camp ends with a horse show. For more information and reservations, call 5875940 or go to www.theleaningpostranch.org.

Antarctic explorers scheduled to meet

The Gulf Coast Group Chapter of the Old Antarctic Explorers Association (OAEA) will meet at noon June 7 at the Shrimp Basket Restaurant, 709 North Navy Blvd. All interested parties are welcome. For more information, call 456-3556.

City plans summer basketball camps

The 35th Chip Boes Championship Basketball Camp sponsored and hosted by the City of Pensacola Department of Neighborhood Services will conduct three summer camps sessions for boys and girls ages 7 to 13. Brochures are available regarding the June 2-6, June 23-27 and July 21-25 sessions at the Malcom Yonge Community Center. To pick up a brochure stop by any of the City of Pensacola recreation centers during business hours. For more information, call 968-9299 or e-mail chipboes@gmail.com.

Free tennis clinics being offered

The Pensacola Sports Association (PSA) has announce the following dates and locations for the 2014 Pensacola Racquet Round Up, a series of free tennis clinics for area youth. • June 3-5: Roger Scott Tennis Center, ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10 a.m.) and 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). • June 11: Hollice T. Williams Park (under I110), ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10a.m.) and 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). • June 19: University of West Florida, ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10 a.m.) and 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). • June 23: Naval Air Station Pensacola Tennis Courts, ages 6-8 (8 a.m. to 10 a.m.) and 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). • July 17-18: Gulf Breeze High School, ages 68 (8 a.m. to 10 a.m.) and 9-12 (10 a.m. to noon). Children ages 6-12 are invited to attend. All skill levels are welcome. The clinics are intended to introduce the game in a fun, relaxed environment. Area professionals will lead the instruction. Local sponsors provide a free gift and free instruction. Participants are encouraged to bring their own rackets, appropriate tennis shoes and clothes, water bottle and sun screen. In the event a child does not have a racquet, free racquets will be available to use. Parents can register their children several ways including online at www.pensacolasports.com or by visiting local tennis centers and pro shops and filling out a paper form.

You can submit information for possible publication in Partyline by sending an e-mail to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil. Submissions must include the organization’s name and details about events including times, dates, locations and any costs involved. Contact information also is required. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with established standards. Items should be submitted at least one week in advance. The deadline is noon Friday for the next week’s publication.


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May 30, 2014

GOSPORT

Smart Ways to Spend the Summer: Keep Kids Off the “The Summer Slide” Teachers routinely get a shock when they return to their classrooms in the Fall and see the first test scores of their new students. The initial reaction is generally, “What in the world did they do last year?” In reality, it’s not what they spent the previous year doing – it’s what they spent the summer not doing: EXERCISING THEIR BRAINS. It’s a phenomenon so well known it’s often called “The Summer Slide.”

Studies confirm it:

According to The U.S Department of Education, on average, children are set back by 25% in reading skills each summer. The average student loses approximately 2.6 months of grade-level equivalency in mathematical computation skills over the summer months and ALL young people experience learning losses when they do not engage in educational activities during the summer. Teachers typically spend four weeks re-teaching or reviewing material that students have forgotten over summer break, according to John Hopkins Center for Summer Learning. But, it doesn’t have to be that way. Think of it like this: The brain is like the body. If you exercise it, you improve it, but if you let it sit idle, it’s going to lose ability. In other words: Use it or lose it. The best way to avoid the summer slide is with brain games and exercises that build cognitive skills. Cognitive skills are the underlying mental abilities that we all need to read, think, remember, reason and pay attention. These types of brain-building games are readily available. Many are free, easy to use at home, in the car, on vacation and even online. Often they’re so much fun, your kids won’t even realize they’re getting a mental workout!

Here are just a few:

Mental Tic Tac Toe: Similar to traditional Tic Tac Toe, this game uses a ‘mental’ grid numbered 1 to 9. Players remember where their opponent has already been and call out an unoccupied space. The player who calls an occupied space loses. What it helps: Attention, logic and reasoning, and working memory. Needle in a Haystack: Take a page from a newspaper and time your child as she circles all occurrences of a specific letter. Focus on increasing both accuracy and speed. What it helps: Visual processing speed 20 Questions: Think of a person or object and give your child 20 chances to narrow down what you’re thinking of by asking yes or no questions. To help them improve their logic and reasoning, teach them to strategize by using questions that will significantly narrow down the categories, such as “Are they alive?” or “Is it bigger than you?” What it helps: Logic, reasoning, memory Poetry: Have your child choose four words that rhyme and then ask him to use those words to create a poem or a rhyming song. Or say a word, then have him come up with another that rhymes. Keep this pattern going as long as possible, then start with a new word. What it helps: Auditory analysis, verbal rhythm, memory Simply getting your child to read every day is another powerful way to slow the summer slide. According to Scholastic Parents Online, research shows that reading just six books during the summer can keep a struggling reader from regressing. Still not exactly sure how to engage the brain this summer? LearningRx offers a free, no obligation 5-page “Brain Game Pack” that includes dozens of games and exercises that build cognitive skills, along with tips on how to incorporate brain building into every day activities. If your child can do a few of these each day, it will make a big difference. Your kids will notice it in the Fall. And so will their teachers. For a free copy of the “Brain Game Pack”, simply send us an email at Pensacola.fl@learningrx.com or call the LearningRx Pensacola Brain-Training Center at 850-466-4999. For more information about Brain Training go to www.learningrx.com/pensacola. FREE ASSESSMENTS FOR MILITARY FAMILIES IN THE MONTH OF MAY!


SECTION

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May 30, 2014

GOSPORT

NETC IG Team conducts area visit at Great Lakes See page B2 Spotlight

When

takes wing

By Mike O’Connor Gosport Associate Editor

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e r m i t e s . That single word should send a shiver up your spine. If it doesn’t, here’s a phrase that will: “It’s swarming season right now.”

Here on the Gulf Coast, we are home to several species of the destructive house-eating insects. In the spring, established colonies of termites send out reproductive alates or “swarmers,” so named since they can cover a home in thousands. When termites swarm, they are drawn to lights, many times the porch or security lights of a home. Shedding their wings, the termites find their way into the structure. If undiscovered, they will eat wood until it is just a lightweight shell. Frequently the damage goes unnoticed until it is severe – even support beams can become as light as balsa wood, eventually causing structures to fail. Unfortunately, Gulf Breeze and Pensacola are home to an especially devastating species of termite, the Formosan. An established Formosan colony – consisting of millions of workers, soldiers and reproductives – can eat up to a pound of wood a day. Originally from mainland China, Formosans have been established in the United States for about 50 years. They have been found in Alabama, Texas, Louisiana, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Mississippi, North and South Carolina and Tennessee. The larger colony size – several million termites vs. several hundred thousand termites for native subterranean termite species – makes Formosans a greater threat. They are vigorous, aggressive and a greater threat than native termites, causing more structure damage at a faster rate. Formosans chew through asphalt, plaster, plastics and even through copper and lead sheeting. When they attack a home, they use saliva, dirt and wood to create nests called cartons. Mud tubes leading from the ground are a telltale sign of a termite infestation, but once established, Formosans can live without soil contact indefinitely. Queens can produce more than 1,000 eggs a day; soldiers constitute 10 percent or so of a colony.

What’s bugging you may cost you thousands of dollars. Common name: Formosan subterranean termite. Scientific name: Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki. Either way you say it, these pests are expensive trouble – and found in this area. Reproducing Formosan termites called alates or “swarmers” fly from the nest on calm evenings to create a new colony. During their dispersal flights, they are drawn to lights – such as porch or security lights – and the winged insects in the thousands can cover a structure, shed their wings and begin looking for a food source – the wood in your home. Thanks to recent rains, termites are swarming right now.

Termites, or just ants? Both termites and ants have two sets of wings, but ant wings are different sizes; all four termite wings are the same size. Ants have elbowed antennae and narrowed waists, termites have short, straight antennae and thick waists. What you can do Pressure-treated wood, which contains preservatives such as creosote, pentachlorophenol or copper arsenate, needs to be used where a structure comes in contact with soil. Formosans don’t like to eat pressure-treated wood but they frequently travel the treated wood to find and destroy untreated wood. Any moisture problem areas – whether caused by roof or air conditioning issues must be corrected. Roof gutters should carry water as far away from your home’s foundation as possible, in order to deny the insects easy access to moisture.

Gosling Games

Word Search ‘Insects’ R W U S M U J Y O R Z T N T O Q W A Q B I S R M B V M O X G

T P U O H I E T O Y B Y W T Z

L E A T U G H L Z C S X K H P

M C K Q E D F A N T H G P U S

H G P O S I C Y T I L T J X P T V L U D Y E Y J S W U E B U

M O L T M R Q D W T L M S E N

C F R V R M C F R A G H F L C

E B J F E B W O F F X P V U X

F T E L T E E B A H W G B O R

G W B A M Y M M C A Q O Q E D

ANT

GRUB

G R A S S H O P P E R B B D Y

BEETLE

MOSQUITO

CRICKET

MOTH

FLY

ROACH

GRASSHOPPER

TERMITE

P T U V D P T K H G C O O V O

R S V B E E U H J P F T D L J

Color Me ‘Bugs’

Treatment Termite fortifications include injecting chemical barriers, called “trenching,” into the soil around your home. A number of effective termiticides are used by professionals which kill the insects through contact. Holes are drilled into areas which otherwise cannot be reached – under concrete slabs, for example – and the chemicals injected. Pre-construction treatment of the foundation is the best prevention. Baits are also used to check for the presence of termites and to identify the species. Plastic spikes containing a bait are placed at intervals around the home’s foundation and inspected regularly. When termites are discovered, the bait station is replaced with one containing a sophisticated poison, which is carried by workers back to the nest. Do not hesitate to contact a licensed pest control professional if you suspect termite damage. If termites are at work in your home, the clock is already ticking.

Jokes & Groaners Awfully buggy jokes What do insects learn at school? Moth-matics What games do ants play with elephants? Squash. Who is the favorite singer for bees? Sting. Why do bees hum? They forgot the words. What do you call a nervous insect? A jitterbug. What goes “zzub, zzub, zzub”? A bee flying backwards. What are the smartest insects? Spelling bees. What did one firefly say to the other? “Got to glow now.” Which bug has mastered the metric system? The centi-pede. Why did the insect get kicked out of the park? He was a litterbug.


PA G E

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SPOTLIGHT

May 30, 2014

NETC IG team conducts area visit Story, photo by Scott A. Thornbloom Naval Service Training Command Public Affairs

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he Navy Education and Training Command (NETC) Inspector General (IG) area visit (AV) team visited several training commands on Naval Station Great Lakes April 29-May 9. “Bottom line, training commands here at Naval Station Great Lakes are accomplishing their missions,” said Alan Johnson, NETC’s IG. “There are some outstanding programs here at Great Lakes and those individuals running these programs are doing an awesome job.” During their time on board the base, Johnson said his team conducted visits to Naval Service Training Command (NSTC), Recruit Training Command (RTC), and Training Support Center (TSC). The principal objectives of an AV are to assess the ability of commands to perform their primary missions and assist in focusing on identification and improvement of mission critical and associated support processes. “The purpose of the area visit is to assist commanders and commanding offi-

cers every four years in achieving their primary mission which is training Sailors,” said Johnson, whose NETC AV Team conducted more than 82 process reviews and talked to more than 90 military and civilian training personnel in several focus groups. Johnson said his team also conducted interviews with students and recruits and handed out more than 45 recommendations to the commands they visited. “We reviewed their processes and made sure they were in accordance with instructions and regulations and they are as efficient as they can be,” said Johnson. “The training commands here at Great Lakes are doing exceedingly well, they’re accomplishing their mission of training Sailors and they have many programs that are outstanding.”

Johnson said his team looks at two types of processes during an area visit. The first is mission critical processes that are related to training. He clicked off a number of training processes including: curriculum development, curriculum management, instructor certification, master training specialist, student management, quota control and others related to training. According to Johnson, the second type of processes the IG team reviews are administrative support programs. These are programs that support training, such as finance programs that include government commercial purchase cards and government charge cards. Johnson added the NETC IG AV team also is tasked to review other programs that the team is required to look at by

Alan Johnson, the Inspector General (IG) for Naval Education and Training Command (NETC), speaks to staff members of area training commands on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., May 9. Johnson led his IG team on a week long area visit that occurs every four years.

direction from CNO (Chief of Naval Operations) or the Naval Inspector General. The programs reviewed included each command’s Privacy Act Program, urinalysis, SAPR (Sexual Awareness Prevention and Response) and suicide prevention. “As I said before, many of the programs we reviewed that are being run here (at the Great Lakes training commands) are outstanding,” said Johnson. “There are some individuals that are very dedicated to their programs or processes and who have made some innovated process changes which we take back and

share with other commands.” NSTC’s IG, Judith Goldsmith, called the area visit hectic but appreciated the assistance from the NETC IG team and their praise of NSTC’s processes and programs. “Overall I think our preparation before the area visit was pretty good,” said Goldsmith. “We appreciate the praise and commendations but I think as long as we keep internal controls on the processes and programs and if you do that annually, they should always look good.” During the final day brief and wrap up on May 9 before several area com-

manding officers, executive officers and staff members of the visited training commands, Capt. Bob Fink, acting commander of NSTC, called the area visit an assist visit and not a “gotcha” visit. “No one likes to be told that their programs aren’t, in fact, perfect, but that’s the purpose of these visits to identify issues,” Fink said. “We appreciate the advice and feedback we receive from these visits. We also appreciate these visits feel more like being an assist and not an inspection.” For more news on NETC, visit www.netc. navy.mil.


GOSPORT

May 23, 2014

Northwest Florida’s Business Climate Magazine

For Today’s Business www.businessclimate.com

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May 30, 2014

Morale, Welfare and Recreation

Story, photo from Fiesta of Five Flags Association

The 65th Fiesta of Five Flags, an annual celebration of the history of Pensacola, began May 29 when officials surrendered the city to the Fiesta forces. The Fiesta of Five Flags organization was formed to celebrate the founding of Pensacola. In 1559, Spanish conquistador Don Tristan de Luna established Pensacola as the first European settlement in the United States. Since that time, five different flags have flown over the city: Spanish, French, British, Confederate and American. With the help of many volunteers, the Fiesta organization plans and produces more than 20 events throughout the year. Here is a scheduled of upcoming Fiesta events: • Fiesta Prayer Service, 10:30 a.m. tomorrow, May 31, at Old Christ Church at 405 S. Adams Street. A traditional ecumenical service. The public is invited to attend. • Centennial Imports Fiesta Boat Parade, tomorrow, May 31. Boats are scheduled to set sail from the Pensacola Yacht Club at 1 p.m. The parade of more than 25 marine vessels will start at the mouth of the Bayou Chico Bridge and will make its way to the Quietwater Boardwalk on Pensacola Beach. The community is encouraged to join the procession of boats escorting Don Tristan DeLuna’s yacht to the shores of Pensacola Beach, where he will

be welcomed by Chief Mayoki, his queen, White Dove, and tribe at the DeLuna Landing Ceremony. Judging will take place as boats pass under the Bob Sikes Bridge. • DeLuna Landing Ceremony, 3 p.m. tomorrow, May 31, at the Quietwater Beach Amphitheater, 400 Quietwater Beach Road (Portofino Boardwalk) on Pensacola Beach. The DeLuna Landing Ceremony is a lighthearted reenactment of what might have happened when DeLuna landed in 1559. • Fiesta All Krewe Ball, 7 p.m. June 4, at the Hadji Shrine Temple. This event is by invitation only. All krewes are invited and the festivities include live music, krewe skits/dances and a presentation of krewe royalty. • Pen Air Federal Credit Union Fiesta Day Parade, 6:30 p.m. June 5 in downtown Pensacola. Officials with the Fiesta of Five Flags and Pen Air Federal Credit Union have once

again joined forces to present the 65th annual Fiesta Day Parade. More than 25 krewes will be parading through downtown Pensacola with special appearances by DeLuna XLV, his queen, and members of the court. The parade will begin at Garden and Spring Streets and will travel east on Garden to Palafox Street. The route will continue until Wright Street, where it will turn south onto Palafox Street, ending at Bayfront Parkway. • DeLuna Coronation Ball, 7 p.m. June 6 at the Pensacola Bay Center. The sponsors’ ball is by invitation. DeLuna LXIV will be crowned in a colorful ceremony accompanied by his queen and court. Many former DeLunas and dignitaries will be in attendance. Guests will be treated to a coronation breakfast beginning at 10 p.m. For more information, call the Fiesta of Five Flags office at 433-6512 or go to www.fiesta offiveflags.org.

At the movies FRIDAY

“The Amazing Spiderman 2” (3D), PG-13, 5 p.m., 8 p.m.; “The Quiet Ones,” PG-13, 5:30 p.m.; “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (2D), PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY

“Heaven is for Real,” PG, 11:30 a.m.; “Brick Mansions,” PG-13, 2 p.m.; “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (3D), PG-13, 4 p.m.; “The Edge of Tomorrow” (3D), 7 p.m. (free admission); “Rio 2” (2D), G, noon; “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (2D), PG-13, 2:30 p.m.; “The Other Woman,” PG-13, 5:30 p.m.; “The Quiet Ones,” PG-13, 8 p.m.

SUNDAY

“Heaven is for Real,” PG, 1 p.m.; “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (3D), PG-13, 3:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m.; “Rio 2” (2D), G, noon; “The Other Woman,” PG-13, 2:30 p.m.; “The Quiet Ones,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Transcendence,” PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY

“A Haunted House 2,” R, 5 p.m.; “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (3D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “Brick Mansions,” PG-13, 5:30 p.m.; “Oculus,” R, 7:30 p.m.

TUESDAY

“The Quiet Ones,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (2D), PG-13, 7:10 p.m.; “The Other Woman,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “Transcendence,” PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

“Rio 2” (2D), G, noon, 4 p.m. (free admission); “Heaven is for Real,” PG, 1 p.m., 3 p.m. (free admission); “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (3D), PG-13, 6 p.m.; “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (2D), PG-13, 7 p.m.

THURSDAY

“Brick Mansions,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “The Amazing Spiderman 2” (3D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “A Haunted House 2,” R, 5:30 p.m.; “The Quiet Ones,” PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

COST Regular: $3 adults, $1.50 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger 3D shows: $5 adults, $3 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

Details: 452-3522 or www.naspensacola-mwr.com

The NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department has a number of upcoming events and activities. For more information, call 452-3806, ext. 3100, or go to the MWR website at www.naspensacola-mwr.com. • Summer aquatics: Mustin Beach Pool, Bldg. 3201 and Mustin Beach are open for the season. The Corry Station pool is closed for repairs. Swimming lessons and aquatic summer camps are scheduled. Check out aquatics programs at www.naspensacola-mwr.com/water/ aquatics.html. For information, call 452-9429. • Voluntary pre-kindergarten: Corry Station Child Development Center has space for free voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) beginning Sept 2. The program offers high-quality education with qualified teachers for all children 4 or older on or before Sept 1. For additional information, call 458-6588. • Bowling family tournament: The Corry Bowling Center will present a qualifying tournament for the International Family Tournament at 10 a.m. May 31 at the Corry Bowling Center. Teams consist of parent and child with two age categories. More than $70,000 in scholarships will be awarded at the national tournament. For more information, call 452-6380. • Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling: Register for NOFFS performance training. One-day course will teach you how to execute NOFFS exercises. Classes 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 10, Aug. 7 and Oct. 2 at Radford Fitness Center. To register, e-mail Brian Hannah at brian.hannah@navy.mil. For more information, call 452-6198. • Free tennis clinic: The Pensacola Sports Association is offering a free tennis clinic at NAS Pensacola June 23. Register at www.pensacolasports.com or get a registration form at any MWR fitness facility at NASP or NASP Corry Station. For more information, call 434-2800. • NASP Youth Center Summer Day Camps: June 2 through Aug. 15. Registration required. For information, call 452-2417. • Summer Reading Program: The “Paws to Read” summer reading program is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday from June 10 through Aug. 7 at the NASP Library, Bldg. 634. For more information or to register, call 452-4362. • Ridiculous Skills Basketball Competition: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 11 at Radford Fitness Center. Teams of two compete in three-point shooting, cone drills, free throw shooting, layups, jump shots and a fastpaced lightning challenge with a twist. There is no cost to compete. Sign up at Radford front desk or call 452-9845. • Specialty Camps: Navy Child and Youth Programs (CYP) is accepting applications for the 2014 Navy 4-H Specialty Camps STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) Program. CNIC will fund all-expenses paid summer camp opportunities. Video applications are due June 6. For more information, visit the NASP Fred G. Smalley Youth Center, 690 Moffet Road, Bldg. 3690. Details can be found at https://www.cnic-n9portal.com/ elibrary/index.cfm/document-library/ ?documentlibraryaction=view&id=674.

Liberty activities Liberty program events target young, unaccompanied active-duty military. New hours are 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday. Regular events are scheduled at the main Liberty Center in the Portside Entertainment Complex. You must sign up in advance for off-base trips. For more information, call 452-2372 or go to http://naspensacolamwr.com/singsail/liberty.htm.

To advertise in this paper please call Simone Sands at 433-1166 ext. 21


May 30, 2014

COMMAND LINES

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GOSPORT SAPR

Help for victims of sexual assault in the DoD community is a call, click or text away. The SafeHelpline provides live crisis support and information by trained staff. Call (877) 9955247; go to www.SafeHelpline. org; or text: 55-247 CONUS; (202) 470-5546 OCONUS (may be additional charges for OCONUS). The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program provides prevention, intervention and a 24/7/365 response. Activeduty and adult family member sexual assault victims have a choice of reporting options, unrestricted and restricted. To access an unrestricted report, the victim can report to his/her chain-of-command, security/law enforcement, NCIS, SAPR Victim Advocate (VA), SARC, and his/her CO shall commence an investigation. To access restricted reporting, the victim can disclose his/her sexual assault only to the SARC, a current SAPR VA, a health care provider and/or a chaplain. To contact the NASP 24/7 VA, call 449-9231/2. To contact the SARC during working hours, call 452-5990, ext. 0; during and after working hours, call the SARC cell phone number at 554-5606.

Fleet and Family Support Center The NASP Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), 151 Ellyson Ave., Bldg. 625, is offering the following: • Smooth Move: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. June 4. Are you about to PCS? Learn how to apply for travel allowance, plan a relocation budget, and get helpful tips on personal property shipping and storage. To learn more about this workshop or to register, call 452-5609. • Stress management: 10 a.m. to noon June 5. Stress can damage your physical and mental health. Learn how to recognize stress and become more productive, happier and healthier. Class explores different stress management tips and techniques. Classes scheduled for the first and third Thursday of each

month. For details, call 452-5990. • Infant Massage Class: 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. June 13. For infants ages 2 to 6 months. Class is sponsored by the New Parent Support Home Visitors Program. Bring a baby blanket and an item that will soothe baby. Cass limited to 10 families, so call 452-5609 to reserve space. • Positive Parenting (ages 6 to 12): A five-week class (2 p.m. to 4 p.m. June 2, June 9, June 16, June 23, June 30 and July 7). Classes provide a practical approach to raising happy, respectful, self-reliant, healthy, confident, cooperative and responsible children. For more information or to register, call 452-5990 or 452-5609.

Community Outreach NASP Community Outreach has volunteer opportunities including: • YMCA: Whether you have just a few hours to give or can work a regular schedule, the YMCA can find a place to use your talents. Volunteer opportunities include: Working with youth sports teams; helping with housekeeping, landscaping and maintenance; enhancing child care programs with enrichment activities; providing clerical and administrative assistance; supporting special events; assisting with wellness programs; and helping raise money. • Pensacola Habitat For Humanity: Building, painting, framing and some clerical needs. Group assists lower income and/or disabled people

by building and restoring homes. • Pensacola Lighthouse and Museum: There are numerous opportunities such as helping with events and maintenance and grounds upkeep of the quarters. • Pensacola Humane Society: 5 North Q Street. Groom and exercise cats and dogs, clean cages and dog runs, process adoptions, feed the animals, launder towels and bedding and with office tasks. Single volunteers can volunteer at any time, groups will need to set up a time. The NASP Community Outreach office tracks volunteer hours. Report any volunteer hours to receive due recognition. For more information on volunteer activities, call 452-2532.

Worship schedule NAS Pensacola Protestant • Communion service, 8 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Sunday School, all ages, 9 a.m. Sunday, Bldg. 634, back classrooms. • Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Chapel choir, 12:30 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Contemporary service, 6 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Womenʼs Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Bldg. 634, back classrooms. • Training Air Wing Six Bible Study, 11:15 a.m. Tuesday, Griffith Hall student lounge, second deck. • Bible study (for all), 7 p.m. Tuesday, Bldg. 634, back classrooms. • Bible study, 5 p.m. Wednesday, J.B. McKamey Center.

Roman Catholic • Sunday Mass, 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Daily Mass, 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the All Faiths Chapel. • Confessions: Scheduled 30 minutes before services.

Jewish • Bʼnai Israel Synagogue, 1829 North Ninth Ave., conducts services at 7 p.m. Friday and

9:30 a.m. Saturday and military personnel are welcome. For more information, call 433-7311.

Latter Day Saints • Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. For NAS Pensacola worship information, call 452-2341.

NASP Corry Station Protestant • Adult Bible study, 9 a.m. Sunday, chapel conference room. • Chapel choir, 9 a.m. Sunday, sanctuary. • Worship service, 10 a.m. Sunday. • Fellowship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday. • Praise and worship, 7:30 p.m. Sunday. • Bible study and dinner, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, fellowship hall.

Roman Catholic • Mass, noon Sunday and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For NASP Corry Station worship information, call 452-6376.

NAS Whiting Field Chapel Roman Catholic • Mass, 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Friday.

Protestant • Bible study, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. • Weekly chapel service, 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For NASP Whiting Field worship information, call 623-7212.


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GOSPORT Too much stuff? Here’s the best and cheapest way to clear out the garage. List your stuff in a Gosport Classified. Rates are $9 for the first ten words and fifty cents for each additional word. Over 25,000 people see the Gosport every week. Go online to www.gosportpensacola.com

or call 433-1166 ext. 24 to place your ad today.

Pensacola Magazine Your City Your Magazine

www.pensacolamagazine.com


GOSPORT

May 30, 2014

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Ads placed by the Military are FREE

To place an ad go online at www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext.24.

Marketplace

★ Motor ★ Merchandise ★ Employment ★ Real Estate ★ and more

★ Publication date every Friday except Christmas and New Years.

★ Deadline to place an ad is 4:00 pm Friday, one week prior to publication date.

★ Place your ad online at www.gosportpensacola.com

★ Place your ad by phone at 850-433-1166 Ext. 24 Monday-Friday 8:30 am5:00 pm

Motor

Merchandise Employment

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Motors

Real Estate

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Hot tub seats 5, golf clubs, bags, shoes, fishing boat pelican. 4552966 or 2910891

Anacharis/Elo da fresh water plants. Good for ponds /aquariums. I have plenty. Two for $1. 255-5591

Trucks/Vans /SUV’s

Misc. Motor

Homes for sale

2001 Chevy Tahoe. White exterior, beautiful gray fabric interior. Well maintained every 3,000 miles. One time owner. 150,000 mi., 23,000 miles on newly rebuilt transmission. 516-9197. $7,500

2009 Gulf Stream-Innsbruck Lite series M-24RKDL. Asking $11,000 obo. 944-7707

Room for rent, close to front gate, for male or female. Nice neighborhood, protected p a r k i n g , kitchen inc l u d e d . $550/month. 572-6166

Escambia County Board of County Commissioners Maintenance Te c h n i c i a n (HVAC) Needed with a minimum of one year of work experience in heating, ventilation and air condition equipment. To apply, please v i s i t wwww.myesca mbia.com. EOE Wanted Trinitas Christian School: is seeking a fulltime Sexton-inc l u d e s janitorial, lawn care and light maintenance. w w w. t r i n i taschristian.org /employ

Dresser, very nice, must sell. $100. Computer keyboard and monitor, $10. Exercise bike, diamondback with all new features like heartbeat check, $250. 492-0025 Vintage guitar, 1974, black Gibson, $3,000. Amplifier, Marshall, 50 watts, $250. 492-0025

Garage sales

Maytag appliance, excellent condition, clean - Fridge $250 dishwasher $150 range $200. All 3 $500. Hood $40. 944-5305

4821 Huron Dr. in Perdido Key Country Club, sale between 9-3 pm Saturday. Furniture, clothes, odds and ends, lots of nice items. 4920025

Entertainment cabinet (32x38x16), glass doors, holds TV, DVDs/Player/ CDs, dark wood, new condition, $135, 4928907

Articles for sale Rolltop desk

Alto Sax for sale, $1,300. 501-9025 Gold power 2500, obo.

Gym tower $100

Hot tub/spa: excellent condition, Calvera seats 6, cover, chemicals, $2,500. 4920370

(32x45x45), w/swivel chair on casters, med-dark wood, good condition, $140, 4928907 Craftsman workbench, steel, 5 drawer, 54x20x34, $100. 4928907

Ammo, 38 s p e c i a l , 22Spear gun, professional model, teak wood by JBL, three band like new, $175. Retails over $500. 417-1694 2004 Lexus RX 330 SUV, Offshore fish- pearl white exing, two-speed terior, tan Penn interna- leather seats, tionals with IG all wheel drive, FA rods, flying all electric, gaff, double good tires— stainless hook- Excellent conrigged lures, dition-Serviced $1,000 for all. every 3,500 497-1167 miles/ just serviced May Black powder 8. Garage kept. rifle, CVA Op- Beautiful car, tima, stainless must see! with world fa- 122,300 miles. mous Bergara $13,990. 516barrel, 50 cal- 9197 iber, inline ignition, finger Motorcycles screw, new in the box, never 2006 Honda fired, $175. CVR 600 RR, garage kept, 454-9486 4,281 original very Rug, 10X14 miles, Wool, India, good condiasking OveeTee clas- tion, obo. sic collection, $5,500 $1,500 477- 607-5367. Will send pictures 7182 upon request. Black and orMotors ange tiger Autos for sale stripe paint scheme. 2012 Toyota Prius 2 Hatchback, 24,700 miles, includes transferable 7 year/70,000 mile warranty. 50 MPG. Black w/beige interior. Oneowner, garage kept. 346-5707

2 0 0 4 Kawasaki Vulcan 750 motorcycle. Runs great. Garage kept. Windshield, foot pegs, running bds, leather saddlebags, Only 14,000 miles. 2550144.

Real Estate Homes for rent

MLS# 457678 3/2 2-car garage. The cleanest house on the market in this price range. Quiet neighborhood close to schools and Interstate. Home warranty included; price recently reduced. See it on the Pensacola MLS

Pilot/students. 3/2 MH 14 mi Whiting. L i s t e d @ A H R N . $700/month. Nice quiet. 5499 London Ave, 2/2, house F u r n i s h e d 983-2904 trailer, 2 metal condo located 4 miles from 3/2 furnished buildings, lot NAS. Condo house. bay fenced backhas 1 meadows sub- yard, $30,000. bedroom/living d i v i s i o n , Ground floor room/kitchen & $1,000/month. condo, 2/2, Vilbath. Two bal- 455-2966 or las on the S q u a r e , conies that face 291-0891 $100,000. 1 Bayou Chico acre Wyndotte W/fishing dock. Rd, surveyed. $750 + deposit. Also content for 492-7078. sale. 206-6436 $750 a month, 750 deposit 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, screened porch 850-3417369

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3314 Meghans Way, Pace, 3/2 house, large Put your corner lot, large storage building, close to Whiting, by classified o w n e r , $140,000, 850637-4717 ad here High and dry: 3/2 full bath. Open concept, large corner lot: Perdido bay Oaks II. $155,000. 251961-1266

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59 Arapaho Dr Pensacola 32507 4/2.5. 25,000 New carpet. Great location, screened porch, lawn mainte- potential nance included. 817-657-0784 more info on customers Militarybyowner.com


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GOSPORT

never be bored www.downtowncrowd.com

Gosport - May 30, 2014  

Weekly newspaper for Naval Air Station Pensacola