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NASP Corry Station gate No. 7 to close for construction ...

Corry Station gate No. 7 will close at 6 p.m. today, Feb. 20. NASP Security will open Corry Station gate No. 6 starting Feb. 23 from 6-8 a.m. for inbound traffic only; this will occur Monday-Friday (i.e. normal work week). All outbound traffic will depart through Corry Station main gate. The construction to Corry Station gate No. 7 is to install an automated vehicle gate (AVG) and will last approximately 13 weeks.

Vol. 79, No. 7

VITA tax office open at NASP By Janet Thomas Gosport Staff Writer

If you haven’t already done so, it’s time to start thinking about filing your taxes. Free help is available at the NAS Pensacola Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) office and online. The NASP VITA office will be offering free tax help through the April 15 deadline. The self-serve office is located in Bldg. 680, Room 225E (on Cuddihy Street across from the NEX mini mart). Hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday. The service is available to active-duty and dependents, retirees and dependents with an adjusted gross income of less than $57,000, reservists (activated 30 days plus and pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses. Here is what you need to bring: • All forms, W-2s and 1099s. • Any information regarding other income. • Information about deductions and credits. • Social Security cards. • Proof of identification. • Bank information. • Last year’s return, if possible. Volunteers are also welcome. For more information, call 452-2209 or 4528753. Military OneSource also offers no-cost tax consultation, preparation and filing to service and family members, as well as to reservists regardless of activation status, survivors, and separated service members until 180 days after their retirement, discharge or endof-tour date. If you have questions about the tax services available or about preparing your own tax returns, call 1 (800) 3429647 and ask to speak with a Military OneSource tax consultant. Trained tax consultants are available seven days a week from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. (CST). For more, visit www. militaryonesource.mil. taxes.

VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: www.gosportpensacola.com

February 20, 2015

Carter takes oath of office in White House ceremony By Cheryl Pellerin DoD News, Defense Media Activity

WASHINGTON – With his wife, Stephanie, holding the Bible upon which he swore to support and defend the U.S. Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic, Ash Carter took the oath of office as the 25th secretary of defense in a ceremony at the White House Feb. 17. Vice President Joe Biden administered the oath in the Roosevelt Room, characterizing Carter as a genuine scholar of strategic military affairs and nuclear weapons policy and as a profoundly capable manager “with universal respect and af-

fection from the people you work with, reflected in a near-unanimous vote in the U.S. Senate.” “For me,” Carter said after taking the oath, “this is the highest honor, to be the 25th secretary of defense. I’m grateful to (President Barack Obama) and the vice president for your trust and confidence, and to the U.S. Senate as well for their trust and confidence.” Attending the ceremony were Carter’s son, Will, Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, Joint Chiefs Vice Chairman Navy Adm. James A.

USS Independence (LCS 2) makes port at NAS Pensacola ... The high-speed Littoral Combat Ship USS Independence (LCS 2) arrives at Naval Air Station Pensacola Feb. 17. The ship, which is homeported in San Diego, Calif., will conduct operations in the Gulf of Mexico for several months. Photo by Mike O’Connor (Below, left) Tugs position LCS 2. Photo by Janet Thomas. (Below, right) Ship’s crew make lines fast. Photo by Bethany Chestnut

See SecDef on page 2

International students gain training and leadership knowledge By Lt. Cmdr. Shelline Floyd NETSAFA Public Affairs

The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity’s (NETSAFA) International Training Center (NITC) held a graduation ceremony for International students Feb. 6 at the Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC) auditorium on board NAS Pensacola. The ceremony marked the completion of the International

Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) and International Professional Advanced Leadership (IPAL) courses for a combined total of 29 students from 16 countries, ranging from Saudi Arabia to Estonia. Cmdr. Russell Van Diepen, NITC officer in charge, served as guest speaker and presented graduation certificates to

the students from U.S. partner nations. “These international students should leverage their experience from NITC to manage innovative MPT&E solutions and to look from a different viewpoint at how to operate with other like-minded nations,” said Van Diepen. “This will improve participating countries’ interoperability with U.S. and other inter-

national forces, and our international partners will now realize a ‘global network’ of partner nations building trust and understanding that was expanded right here. Relationships that develop among classmates at NITC MPT&E and IPAL provide the foundation for life-long bonds and common understanding.” Brian Casey, MPT&E course instructor, said that the varying

See NETSAFA on page 2

NAMI graduates aeromedical officers By MC2 Kaitlyn C. Boland NMOTC Public Affairs

F&ESGC is CNRSE fire department of the year ... Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) Commanding Officer Capt. Keith Hoskins shakes hands with Fire Chief Frank Barrow Feb. 17 during a visit to the NASP Fire Station, Bldg. 4125. Fire and Emergency Services Gulf Coast was recently announced as the Commander Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) fire department of the year (large category) for 2014, an award the department also won in 2012. The consolidated department (NAS Pensacola/NAS Whiting Field) will now compete for the Navywide fire department of the year (large category) award for 2014. Photo by Janet Thomas

Twenty-nine U.S. Navy commissioned officers in three aeromedical disciplines received their respective wings during a Feb. 6 ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. (NASP). The Aeromedical Officer Class 2015-1 graduation ceremony recognized student’s completion of a six-month training program for the U.S. Navy’s newest flight surgeons, aerospace experimental psychologists and aerospace physiologists, an accomplishment Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) Academics Department Head Cmdr. Henry Casey (SEAL) said represents the culmination of an intense course designed to get these service members to the fleet.

See Graduates on page 2

Published by Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements constitute Department of the Navy, NAS Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing’s endorsement of products or services advertised.


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February 20, 2015

SecDef from page 1

Winnefeld Jr., members of Carter’s transition team, and several men and women in uniform. In his introduction, Biden called Carter a “physicist and a genuine expert on the acquisition and technical capabilities that are going to help guarantee the U.S. military is second to none in the world.” Carter has a driving intellectual force behind all he does and all the administration has been doing, the vice president added, including strengthening the nation’s cyber capabilities, improving the way the Pentagon does business, and implementing the Asia-Pacific rebalance, including deepening defense cooperation with India. “Most important of all, you’ve been a fighter,” Biden told Carter, “like the men and women in uniform here today, for the women and men who serve in uniform.” The defense secretary, like his predecessor, Biden added, “understands that while this country has many obligations, it only has one truly sacred obligation, and that’s to equip and protect those we send to war, care for their families while they’re there, and care for them and their families when they come home.” Many tough missions lie ahead, the vice president said, from fighting against the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant, strengthening NATO, and rebalancing to the Asia-Pacific region, to maintaining the nation’s technological edge and continuous efforts to make the most out of every dollar invested in defense. “Dr. Carter,” Biden said, “as you take leadership of the greatest military in the history of mankind, ... you do so with the confidence of everyone in your building, confidence of the United States Senate, confidence of President Obama and me, and so many other people who admire your work.” Carter thanked his wife and children, his transition team and the team he joins at the Pentagon, including Work, Dempsey, Winnefeld and others. The defense secretary characterized the defense of the nation as “the highest calling,” and he made three commitments to the men and women of the Defense Department, to the president and vice president, and to his fellow citizens. “The first is to help our president make the best possible decisions about our security and the (world’s) security, and then to ensure that our department executes those decisions with its long accustomed competence and effectiveness,” he said. While dealing with challenges to national security, Carter said, he wants to help the nation’s leadership grab hold of opportunities that lie before the country, and to help make the world safer and a better place for the next generation. “My second commitment is to the men and women of the Department of Defense, whom I will lead, to reflect in everything I do and to honor the commitment and dedication that brought them into service,” Carter said, “and to protect their dignity, their safety, their wellbeing, (and) to make decisions about sending them into harm’s way with the greatest reflection and care.” Carter’s third commitment was to the future, he said, “to building a force for our future that involves not only securing the resources we need but making ... the best use of the taxpayers’ dollar, making sure we embrace change so that years from now, ... we continue to be a place where America's finest want to serve, and a place that is a beacon to the rest of the world.” As Obama enters the fourth quarter of his presidency, the defense secretary added, “these commitments, ... I think, will help me help him and help the vice president to ensure that those years are productive, and that they leave our country’s future in the best possible place – in the best possible hands.”

Vol. 79, No. 7

Military Saves: Rainy days forecast – bring umbrella By FINRA Investor Education Foundation Staff

Most of us appreciate a sturdy umbrella on a stormy day. We don’t always know when we’ll encounter rain, but unless we live in the desert, we know that eventually rain will fall. Rainy day funds, or emergency savings, protect us too. We can’t always predict when we’ll have a money emergency, but we know that eventually a financial crisis will arrive. Chances are, you’ve already experienced a financial squall or two; it’s tough to go through life without them. An unexpected automobile or home repair, a surprise tax bill, or an unplanned trip home for a funeral or wedding all qualify. It’s a good idea to make a rainy day fund one of your highest savings priorities. Put $20 a week in an emergency fund and your account will grow to more than $1,000 in just one year. That’s often enough to cover a repair bill or emergency travel. A rainy day fund can also shield you from the high cost of borrowing. NETSAFA from page 1

backgrounds of the course participants significantly contributed to the class dialogue. “This International MPT&E class has been a joy for me to coordinate and teach,” said Casey. “It included officer, enlisted and civilian personnel representing their various countries’ navies, air forces, armies, and ministries of defense. Most of them are or will be involved in some aspect of MPT&E in their respective services, and the interaction among the students and the instructors was very dynamic and often very thought-provoking.” Paul Roarke, the NITC IPAL course instructor, noted that his curriculum was designed in 2009 with a singular focus on enhancing the leadership capabilities and professional development of international military members, specifically senior enlisted to junior officer (E-5 to O-3). Graduates from page 1

“They’ve spent six months here going through a training program,” he said. “The object of this program is to get them ready to be attached to aviation units in the Navy and U.S. Marine Corps, and they bring their particular specialties to the deckplate, whether it’s medical officership, physiology, aviation medical safety officers as well as scientists and optometrists.” Each graduate of their respective program was awarded certificates from the U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, as well as certifications from their discipline’s governing organization. United States naval flight surgeons practice preventive medicine first, and serve as the interface between this, the science of safety and the profession of aviation. The 24week course, offered three times annually, is designed to prepare Navy physicians for duty with U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps aviation operational forces. Casey said these newly winged flight surgeons will ultimately serve in a variety of capacities, whether at shore installations, aviation wings or large-deck Navy ships, and the importance of the training

February 20, 2015

The image on the right side is the Navy’s most modern fighter aircraft, the F-18 Super Hornet. Established in 1921 as the Air Station News, the name Gosport was adopted in 1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by flight instructors in the early days of naval aviation to give instructions and directions to their students. The name “Gosport” was derived from Gosport, England (originally God’s Port), where the voice tube was invented. Gosport is an authorized newspaper published every Friday by Ballinger Publishing,

A good way to set up a rainy day fund is to save automatically. Arrange to put money into an emergency fund account through an allotment from your military pay. You can accomplish the same thing through a systematic transfer from your regular checking or savings account at your bank.Keep your rainy day funds separate from your checking account, and label it “for emergency use only.” Visit “Start an Emergency Fund” on http://www.saveandinvest.org/ for more tips. Even if you start out small, keep saving. You should put aside enough in your rainy day fund eventually to cover living expenses for three to six months. If you anticipate a job loss or separation from the service, try to save even more. An easy way to save for your rainy day fund is by taking the Military Saves Savers’ Pledge. Choose “Emergency Fund” from the drop-down menu. It’s a commitment you make to yourself to take shelter from financial storms. Contact the NASP Fleet and Family Support Center for more financial education and counseling at 452-2155/2633.

“IPAL combines the best aspects of time-tested and proven leadership training with the latest state-of-the-art educational methods,” said Roarke. “Students completing this five and onehalf week course will not only have greatly improved their own leadership skills and professional development, but will return to their commands with a wealth of knowledge and that will provide a long-lasting positive influence to their countries’ military services.” According to Gavina S. Paramita, Indonesian Ministry of Defense, one of the things he enjoyed most about the NITC courses was their diversity. “The MPT&E course was a great opportunity for me to learn about U.S. military manpower and personnel systems, and especially those of the U.S. Navy,” said Paramita. “Much of what I learned will be applicable to my own country’s personnel systems. The classes were well-managed and the trips were amaz-

– including the four months of flight school – cannot be understated. “The importance of this training is that it gives them the credentials with the fleet, gives them the real experience of flight school to better understand the patients that they will serve, and to understand the environment those patients deal with every day,” he said. “One of Navy Medicine’s mottos is ‘good medicine in bad places,’ and that’s exactly what the Navy and Marine Corps does – we take our medical assets and go as far forward as we can. In any area of the world, there is some type of aeromedical asset there or is responsible to be there. What they do ranges from preventative medicine to patient treatment to administering aviation medicine programs to selection and testing of future aircrew, pilots and navigators.” With the Navy flight surgeon’s scope of responsibility stemming through all aspects of the aviation community – from the selection of individuals qualified to fly, maintenance personnel readying aircraft for flight and other aircrew personnel – training includes subjects ranging from the physiology of flight to industrial medicine, environmental hazards and the in-

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community Commanding Officer — Capt. Keith Hoskins Public Affairs Officer — Patrick J. Nichols The Gosport nameplate pays homage to the 100th anniversary of naval aviation in 2011: the Centennial of Naval Aviation, or CONA. The image on the left side of the nameplate depicts Eugene Ely taking off in a Curtiss pusher bi-plane from the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 18, 1911. While Ely had taken off from the USS Birmingham two months earlier after his plane had been loaded on the ship, the USS Pennsylvania event was the first time a plane landed on and then took off from a U.S. warship.

GOSPORT

ing. Field visits helped me to understand the processes better by hearing briefs from those people actually involved in the processes that we had discussed in class. I was very pleased to develop new colleagues from several other countries and learn about their cultures.” NETSAFA is the U.S. Navy’s agent for international education and training and coordinates training support to international governments and international organizations. As a field activity of the Naval Education and Training Command (NETC), the command serves as a focal point for all security assistance training program issues, coordination and advice within the U.S. Navy. In 2014, NITC trained 315 students, from 55 countries in 15 different courses at their international schoolhouse onboard NAS Pensacola. For more information about NITC, visit https://www.netsafa.navy.mil.

vestigation of aircraft accidents. Two naval aerospace and operational physiologists also received their wings during the ceremony. A smaller community, the naval aerospace and operational physiologists are Medical Service Corps (MSC) officers and the sixmonth training program includes training in hypobaric chamber operations, aeromedical aspects of flight, sensory physiology, aviation life support systems, acceleration physiology, emergency egress, water survival and aircraft mishap procedures. One aerospace experimental psychologist (AEP), now a member of this even smaller, highly specialized group in the naval aeromedical community, was also ‘winged’ during the ceremony. Also MSCs, AEPs are naval officers who apply state-of-the-science, psychology, and human factors principles in the design and testing of systems and technology to ensure Navy and Marine Corps maintain the most highly trained and best equipped aviators. Training of naval medical officers to be flight surgeons dates back to 1921, when instruction was given at the Army School of Aviation Medicine at Mitchell Field in

The Rhodes Building, 41 North Jefferson Street, Suite 402, Pensacola, FL 32504, in the interest of military and civilian personnel and their families aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Saufley Field and Corry Station. Editorial and news material is compiled by the Public Affairs Office, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-1051. All news releases and related materials should be mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hallford@navy.mil. National news sources are American Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News Service (NNS), Air Force News Service (AFNS), News USA and North American Precis Syndicate (NAPS). Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Defense, United States Navy, officials of the Naval Air Station Pensacola, or Ballinger Publishing. All advertising, including classified ads, is arranged through Ballinger Publishing. Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to rank, rate, race, creed, color, national origin or sex of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection of this policy of equal opportunities by an advertiser will result in the refusal of future advertising from that source.

Long Island, N.Y. From 1926 to 1934, the Navy trained its own flight surgeon students at the Naval Medical School in Washington, D.C., until the U.S. Army resumed training for U.S. Navy officers in 1934 at its School of Aviation Medicine, Randolph Field, Texas. In 1939, however, the mission of the medical department at Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) was amended to include the training of naval flight surgeons under the direction of the station’s senior medical officer. Today, NAMI, the U.S. Navy’s premier facility for aeromedical training, hosts the majority of U.S. Navy aeromedical training. NAMI is a component of the Navy Medicine Operational Training Center (NMOTC), the recognized global leader in operational medical and aviation survival training, which reports to Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC). NMETC manages Navy Medicine’s formal enlisted and officer education and training programs, medical operational training for medical and medical support personnel deploying worldwide, and training that prepares aviators and flight crews to survive in land and water mishaps.

For classified ads, call: (850) 433-1166, ext. 24 For commercial advertising: Simone Sands (850) 433-1166, ext. 21 Simone@ballingerpublishing.Com Visit Us On The Web At: Ballinger Publishing.Com Mail To: Gosport, NAS Pensacola, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, Pensacola, FL 32508-1051

Gosport Editor

Scott Hallford 452-4466 scott.hallford@navy.mil Gosport Associate Editor

Mike O’Connor 452-2165 michael.f.oʼconnor.ctr@navy.mil Gosport Staff Writer

Janet Thomas 452-4419 janet.thomas.ctr@navy.mil


February 20, 2015

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COMMENTARY

GOSPORT

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My hero is ready to save the day if power goes out

“D

o you think you bought enough?� I asked sarcastically, as my husband dropped multiple store bags on the kitchen floor. garage door opener is disabled.� Then, he drove each car to the gas station to fill up for “when the power goes out and the stations are closed.� Then he drove to the ATM machine on base and withdrew half our life savings in cash, for “when the power goes out and ATMs shut down.� And even though we don’t have a usable fireplace, he brought home seven starter logs for “when the power goes out and we don’t have heat.� “Don’t you think you’re going a bit overboard, Hon? I mean, we don't even know if we’re going to lose power at all.� His head, topped by a Navy watch cap sprinkled with fresh flurries, snapped toward me. “It’s not a matter of if we lose power, it’s a matter of when we lose power, and I, for one, will be prepared� Then he stomped off to crank the thermostat up to an

Winter Storm Juno was on its way, and Francis was determined to be prepared. I had casually mentioned that we might need a gallon of milk and maybe a loaf of bread. Two hours later, he returned to the house with enough supplies for our entire base neighborhood: bags of food, packages of batteries, five cases of water, two lighters and 27 candles. But of course, like a true Navy man, my husband’s first stop was the base package store, where he bought beer, wine, red Solo cups, and enough rum, limes, and ginger beer to make “dark and stormy� drinks from now until summer vacation. I wasn’t sure whether he was preparing for the storm or opening a tavern. After unloading the bags, Francis marched out to our garage to retrieve our shovels, road salt, and sleds for “when the power goes out and the

cocktails in the afternoon, put together a 500-piece jigsaw puzzle and slept with our mouths open. On the third morning, the skies cleared. Francis moped around the house before heading to work. “I guess we wont be needing these,â€? he said, lighting one of the seven cinnamonscented jar candles he had purchased for “when the power goes out.â€? Sensing his disappointment, I mustered my best damsel in distress. “You know, Hon, thank goodness you were so prepared, because the power definitely ‌ um, really did ‌ uh, almost go out. I shudder to think of what almost happened to our family. I mean, you pretty much saved our lives.â€? Francis threw me a suspicious glance, then made the split decision to accept the compliment shamelessly. With his watch cap to protect him from the bitter winds, he paused on his way out the door to announce, “Another storm’s coming in a couple days, but don’t worry, I’ll stop by the store on the way home.â€? My hero.

lounging around in pajama pants, Francis was looking forward to playing hero, and he was not going to let common sense get in the way. Still ensconced in his watch cap and an ill-fitting sweater, he removed his wet boots, poured himself a cold beer, and nestled in to await the impending doom from the comfort of his Barcalounger while binge-watching DVR episodes of “House Hunters.� Secretly, I rolled my eyes at Francis’ predictions of “Snowpocolypse,� but the wind howled so loud that night, I wondered if my husband had been right all along. Surely, the unrelenting gusts will snap a power line, I thought. By the time the chill wakes us, it will be too late – in the darkness, we will fumble for candles, wrap ourselves in blankets, and huddle together until the house succumbs to the bitter cold. Then, shivering, we will hunch over a smoldering starter log in our patio fire pit, our shallow breaths of survival barely visible in the dim light ... But instead, our radiators pumped out heat nonstop while we ate like kings, took long hot showers, watched way too much TV, drank

By Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist

About the columnist Lisa Smith Molinari, mother of three, has been a military spouse for 20 years (and running). She also writes columns for Military Spouse magazine and a blog at www.themeat andpotatoesoflife.com. She and her family are stationed at Naval Station Newport in Rhode Island. uncomfortable 74 degrees for “when the power goes out.� There was no reasoning with him. Much like our teenage girls who were excited about two snow days of sledding and

Commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as official government, Navy or command policy statements. Reader submissions are welcome but should not exceed 800 words. Submissions must be bylined and include a daytime phone number or e-mail contact for the writer. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with policy and standards. Send commentary submissions to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil.

How to submit a commentary

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February 20, 2015

GOSPORT

USNA: apply now for 2015 summer STEM program By Lt. Teng K. Ooi USNA/NAVAIR Reserve Program and retired Navy Capt. Linda J. Beltra

A

pplications for the 2015 U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) summer program are open at www.usna.edu/admissions/STEM. Session dates include June 1-6 for rising ninth-graders; June 8-13 for rising 10thgraders; and June 15-19 for rising 11th graders. This annual summer program is designed to expose young people to STEM concepts and technologies and to encourage ninth- to 11thgraders to pursue a course of study in engineering and technology throughout high school, college and beyond. The aim is to integrate STEM-focused concepts across the curriculum and pave the way for students to succeed academically in

mathematics and science and help put them on a path towards successful STEM careers. An effective and practical way to stimulate student interest in STEM is to show how mathematics and science are applied to create exciting technologies. The 2015 STEM program will showcase the latest in technological advances in a wide variety of science and engineering topics to include energy and light, infrastructure, transportation, cybersecurity, environmental challenges, flight and fluids, automation, simulation and

STEM students participate in a variety of hands-on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics activities, and have the opportunity to interact with Naval Academy faculty and midshipmen, who serve as role models and mentors for the students. Photo courtesy of USNA

modeling, biometrics and robotics. Students will participate in project-based modules using a hands-on, real-world approach to solving design and analysis problems at the Naval Acad-

emy’s world-class laboratory facilities. This unique learning environment promotes engineering “habits of mind” such as critical thinking, optimization, innovation, creativity and teamwork. It exposes students

to a problem-based environment outside the traditional classroom. The 2015 Summer STEM Program is a great start to a student’s career in science and engineering.

U.S. Naval Academy Summer 2015 Seminar seeks students By Lt. Teng K. Ooi USNA/NAVAIR Reserve Program

Applications for the Naval Academy Summer 2015 Seminar (NASS) are being accepted at www.usna.edu/admissions/NASS. Session dates include May 30-June 4, June 6-11 and June 13-18. The United States Naval Academy (USNA) Summer 2015 Seminar invites a select group of young men and women to attend this fast-paced, six-day experience designed to introduce the Naval Academy to rising high school seniors. At the core of the seminar is the academic program involving 90-minute workshops designed to promote

problem-solving skills using critical thinking, optimization, innovation, creativity and teamwork. Students choose eight workshops from a wide range of subjects to include: information technology; topics in math; meteorology and oceanography; robotics; computers and naval weapons systems; electrical and biometrics engineering; ship behavior in waves; ocean engineering; cyber operations; mechanical engineering; aeronautical engineering; astronautical engineering; chemistry of photography; chemistry; foreign languages; history; political science; introduction to literature; economics; physics; character development seminars; martial arts; seamanship and navigation; and nuclear engineering.

Students participate in project-based modules applying hands-on, real-world approaches to solving design and analysis problems utilizing the Naval Academy’s world-class laboratory facilities. These facilities provide a unique learning environment outside the traditional classroom. The NASS teaches prospective applicants about the life of midshipmen at the Naval Academy, where academics, athletics and professional training are key elements in developing our nation’s leaders. Students live in the dormitory, eat in the dining hall and participate in academic and leadership workshops. They also participate in daily physical training including group runs and conditioning exercises. Seamanship and navigation classes culminate in a cruise aboard a Navy Yard patrol craft. The seminar helps educate, motivate and prepare selected students who are considering application for appointment to the Naval Academy. If you think that you may be interested in pursuing an appointment to the Naval Academy and serving your country as an officer, you should seriously conSummer seminar students participate in piloting a Chinook helicopter model. During the seminar, students sider attending the Naval Academy Summer 2015 have the opportunity to interact with U.S. Naval Academy faculty and midshipmen who serve as role modSeminar. els and mentors.

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To advertise in the GOSPORT, please call Simone Sands at 433-1166, ext. 21


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Making Sailors â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SAFFiRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Navy unveils firefighting robot prototype at Naval Tech EXPO By Tammy White Office of Naval Research Public Affairs

W

ASHINGTON (NNS) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Scientists unveiled a

firefighting robot prototype Feb. 4 at the Naval Future Force Science & Technology EXPO, revealing details about its successful demonstrations last fall. The Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot (SAFFiR), sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), walked across uneven floors, used thermal imaging to identify overheated equipment and used a hose to extinguish a small fire in a series of experiments Nov. 35, 2014, aboard the USS Shadwell, a decommissioned Navy vessel. Developed by researchers at Virginia Tech, the two-legged, or bipedal, humanoid robot is helping ONR evaluate the applications of unmanned systems in damage control and inspections aboard naval vessels, supporting the autonomy and unmanned systems focus area in the Navyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Science and Technology Strategy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We set out to build and demonstrate a humanoid capable of mobility aboard a ship, manipulating doors and fire hoses, and equipped with sensors to see and navigate through smoke,â&#x20AC;? said Dr. Thomas McKenna, ONR program manager for human-robot interaction and cognitive neuroscience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The long-term goal is to keep Sailors from the danger of direct

exposure to fire.â&#x20AC;? SAFFiR stands 5 feet, 10 inches and weighs 143 pounds. The unique mechanism design on the robot equips it with super-human range of motion to maneuver in complex spaces. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Balancing on any type of terrain thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unstable â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially for bipedal robots â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is very difficult,â&#x20AC;? said Brian Lattimer, associate professor for mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whole-body momentum control allows for the robot to optimize the locations of all of its joints so that it maintains its center of mass on uncertain and unstable surfaces.â&#x20AC;? Sensors, including infrared stereovision and a rotating laser for light detection and ranging (LIDAR), enable the humanoid to see through dense smoke. It is programmed to take measured steps and handle hoses on his own, but for now, takes his instruction from researchers at computer console. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The robot has the ability to do autonomous tasks, but we have a human in the loop to allow an operator to intervene in any type of task that the robotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing,â&#x20AC;? Lattimer said.

McKenna plans to sponsor a more advanced design as part of the long-term investigational research program. Blueprints include equipping the robot with enhanced intelligence, communications capabilities, speed, computing power and battery life for extended applications. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have taken a look at other kinds of sensors that you can put on these robots,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For instance, a bipedal robot could be configured to take shipboard measurements, scan for corrosion and leaks, and identify changes to the shape of the room from its original configuration. By taking on these time-consuming tasks, SAFFiR could free up Sailors for jobs that more fully take advantage of their training and technical skillsets.â&#x20AC;? Even with added intelligence, however, SAFFiR will take its instruction from Sailors and â&#x20AC;&#x153;fire bossesâ&#x20AC;? working remotely in the event of a fire or other dangerous event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working toward human-robot teamsâ&#x20AC;? McKenna said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we call the hybrid force: humans and robots working together.â&#x20AC;?

The Office of Naval Research-sponsored Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot (SAFFiR) undergoes testing aboard the Naval Research Laboratoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aboard the USS Shadwell, a decommissioned Navy vessel in Mobile, Ala. Photo by John F. Williams

ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corpsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; technological advantage. Through its affiliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 in-

dustry partners. ONR employs more than 1,000 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C. For more news from Office of Naval Research, visit www. navy. mil/ local/ onr/.

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February 20, 2015

GOSPORT

NASWF announces Civilians of the Quarter By Ens. Jon Spoehr NAS Whiting Field Public Affairs

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he civilian employees of Naval Air Station Whiting Field play a vital role in developing and training Navy, Coast Guard and Marine Corps officers. The hard work, dedication and professionalism of two members of the civilian workforce were recognized recently with their selection as Civilians of the Quarter (CoQ). The awardees for the fourth quarter of 2014 are Senior CoQ Patricia Dillenback and Junior CoQ Mike Flournoy. Both awardees displayed exemplary technical skills, diligent work ethic and a desire to improve their corporate knowledge and were nominated by their supervisors to recognize their superior achievements. Dillenback works as the Counseling and Advocacy (CAP) Lead at the Fleet and Family Support Center. She volunteered to coordinate and organize the 2014 Hurricane/Disaster preparedness training and vendor fair. She brought a large number of various organizations to the base to educate NAS Whiting Field team members and family on how to be ready if a disaster were to strike the local

area. Dillenback also initiated the steps to bring background investigations process into compliance for FFSC. She serves as the family advocacy representative and helps to facilitate the monthly incident determination committee to ensure that the incident reports are in the proper format and that they meet deadlines. Her active and effective role as FAP representative is even more amazing considering her minimal time in the position and lack of experience in the role and responsibilities pertaining to the program. Dillenback was recognized for this award due to her “trememdous career growth” said Bill Lawson, Dillenback’s supervisor. Flournoy works as the executive ad-

Patricia Dillenback

Mike Flournoy

ministrative assistant for the Command Triad in the command building. Flournoy manages the command schedule, which he has sole control over, and handles all the official travel requests and claims for the commanding officer, executive officer and command master chief. Flournoy also has intimate knowledge of the base and surrounding area and due to this is the first person the command goes to for subject matter expertise. His work as the administrative assistant has reduced the administrative burden on the command team. Flournoy was recognized for this award due to his “continuation to exceed all expectations in his performance,”

said Cmdr. Greggory Gray, NAS Whiting Field Executive Officer. “Mike is the first person the CO, XO and CMC seek for guidance or assistance in any issue.” “The civilian employees of NAS Whiting Field are instrumental to us here because of the continuity and longevity that they have in their jobs. They are vital toward completing the mission. I am happy to be congratulating Pat and Mike for their exceptional performance, but there are a large number of deserving civilian employees here, and choosing among them is always a daunting task,” NAS Whiting Field Commanding Officer Capt. Todd Bahlau stated.

‘Military Saves’ week starts Feb. 23 By Ens. Steven Krepps NAS Whiting Field Public Affairs

Naval Air Station Whiting Field’s Fleet and Family Support Center is gearing up this week for the DoD-wide Military Saves Campaign, an annual event that serves to encourage military families to save, reduce debt and build wealth. While the campaign doesn’t officially kick off until the week of Feb. 23 they are spearheading efforts to raise awareness. Throughout the month of February NASWF members will find financial education booths and Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) personnel distributing literature, stressing the importance of financial responsibility and promoting

the courses that will be offered during Military Saves Week. “Our goal in this campaign is to be pro-active,” said Fleet and Family Financial Educator Eugene Jackson. “People come in all the time and ask us to help

them after they are already in trouble. That’s reactive. We want to help them make the right decisions and avoid ever getting to that point.” In attempt to achieve this goal, from Feb. 23 to Feb. 28 Fleet and Family will be offering a Thrift Savings Plan course

on Monday, Saving and Investing on Tuesday, Home Buying on Wednesday, Credit Management on Thursday and Developing a Budget on Friday. MWR, Fleet and Family Financial Education, the Navy Exchange, the commissary and Pen Air and will cap off Military Saves week with a poker run that will take place at the Whiting Field atrium. There will be booths set up to educate participating members on various financial matters, after which the participant will draw a card from each table to result in a five card poker hand. As an incentive for service members to partake in the poker run, the highest hand will receive a $100 gift card. In addition to providing play-

ing cards and educational literature, the booths will also give participants the opportunity to take the “Saver Pledge.” Taking the pledge enables the individual to receive further information and assistance regarding the financial topic(s) of their choice via e-mail. Taking the pledge will also enter the individual into a drawing for another gift card at the end of the poker run. The weeklong push also aims to shed light on the other issues that can arise from being financially irresponsible. While no one enjoys stressing over money, the broader impacts are not often considered. “The aviation community puts a lot of emphasis on the mental state of pilots. Money problems can cause a lot of

stress, especially when you consider that the majority of marital issues we see have some roots in finances. Furthermore, an even more direct impact is the fact that financial trouble is one of the top causes for loss of security clearance,” Jackson elaborated. Lack of financial responsibility is not just a personal issue. It can also impact command wellness. That’s why the event coordinators are urging all personnel to participate. “We are really relying on department heads to make this campaign a success. If they pass the word down and stress the importance to their Sailors, I know we can knock this campaign out of the park,” Jackson said.

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February 20, 2015

PARTYLINE

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GOSPORT

Production to feature six short plays

Pensacola Little Theatre’s Studio 400 Production of Short Attention Span Theatre will feature six short plays about love, life and relationships. Performances are scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Feb. 20-21 at the M.C. Blanchard Courtroom Theatre. Tickets are $10 for general admission and $17 for café seating. Pensacola Little Theatre is located inside the Pensacola Cultural Center, 400 South Jefferson St. For more information, call 432-2042 or go to www.PensacolaLittleTheatre.com.

Classes scheduled for military spouses

A Lifestyle, Insights, Networking, Knowledge, Skills (L.I.N.K.S.) for Spouses training classes is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Feb. 28 and March 28 in the Commanding Officer’s Conference Room at MATSG-21 Headquarters, Bldg. 3450. Classes are free and all military spouses are welcome. L.I.N.K.S. for Spouses training provides an overview of the Marine Corps structure, services and benefits. Participants also get an opportunity to meet other spouses, participate in fun and informative activities, and learn about resources that are available. The training also includes an introduction to what the local area has to offer. Preregistration is required, and child care reimbursement is available. To register, contact Lisa Duvall, MCFTB trainer, by phone at 452-9460, ext. 3012, or by e-mail at lisa.duvall@usmc.mil.

Navy League plans awards luncheon Members of the Pensacola Council of the Navy League of the United States have scheduled the annual Military Recognition Day luncheon and Margaret Flowers Civic Award ceremony for 11:30 a.m. Feb. 26 at New World Landing. Since 1983, the Margaret Flowers Civic Award has been given to military members from Navy commands in the Pensacola region in recognition of superior community service. It is named in honor of Margaret Flowers, a former NASP public affairs officer with a long record of service to the Navy and the community. Cost is $15 per person. Table sponsorship is $150. For more information, call 436-8552. Tickets are $12. Seating is limited for each show. For reservations, call 221-7599 or e-mail panhandle _community_theatre@yahoo.com. The non-profit Panhandle Community Theatre is located one mile off Highway 90 in Pace, in the Storage Masters Center, 4646 Woodbine Road. For more information, go to www.panhandlecommunity theatre.com.

Color guard, percussion contest Feb. 21 Fight diabetes by taking a bike ride A percussion and color guard contest is scheduled from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. tomorrow, Feb. 21, at the Escambia High School gymnasium. About 1,000 high school students from Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Florida will compete for best in class titles. Doors open at noon. Admission is $10, and ages 65 and older and 5 and younger get in free. Parking is free. The event is sponsored by the Escambia High School Band boosters and the Gulf Coast Color Guard and Percussion Circuit. For more information, call Terry Sanders at 293-5369 or go to http://gcgpc.org.

Multilingual performance planned Francisco J. Núñez will be the special guest conductor for the Pensacola Children’s Chorus concert, “One World Many Voices,” at 2:30 p.m. Feb. 22 at the Pensacola Saenger Theatre. Núñez is the artistic director and founder of the award-winning Young People’s Chorus of New York City (YPC). In a program that will feature multilingual performances in Arabic, English, French, Hebrew, Maori, Spanish and Swahili, Núñez will lead the chorus in works by Jim Papoulis and Douglas J. Cuomo, as well as four of his own compositions. Tickets are $15, $20, and $25. For more information, call 434-7760 or go to www.pensacolachildrenschorus.com.

PSC celebrating Black History Month Pensacola State College (PSC) is rounding out Black History Month with three celebrations during the last week of February. All events are open to the public and are on the PSC main campus. • Entertainment including music, dance, poetry, history and fashions are being presented by the African American Student Association 6-8 p.m. Feb. 24 in the Student Center, Bldg. 5. Community leader Honor Bell and historian Marilyn Love-Hartman will be featured speakers. • A “Readers Ensemble” will be presented by the African American Heritage Society from 6-8 p.m. Feb. 26 at the Anna Lamar Switzer Center for Visual Arts, Bldg. 15. The event is in collaboration with acclaimed photojournalist Art Shay’s historic photo exhibit, “Integration and Civil Rights,” on display at the Switzer Gallery through March 13. For more information, call the gallery at 484-2550. • The African American Memorial Endowment Scholarship and the Dr. Garrett T. Wiggins “Live Your Dream” Scholarship Banquet begins at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 27 at the Jean and Paul Amos Performance Studio, Bldg. 23. Tickets are $10 and reservations can be made by calling 484-1759. For more information, call PSC Marketing Director Sheila Nichols at 484-1428.

Color Vibe 5K scheduled for Feb. 28 Pensacola Color Vibe 5K Run is scheduled for 9 a.m. Feb 28 at the Maritime Park, 301 West Main St. The run will include a color throw and dance party. For more information, go to www.thecolor vibe.com/pensacola.php.

Theater group presents ‘Night Watch’

Panhandle Community Theatre will present the suspense thriller “Night Watch” Feb. 26-28 and March 5-8. Evening shows are at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday matinee are at 2:30 p.m.

Partyline submissions

The 2015 Gulf Coast Tour de Cure to support the American Diabetes Association is scheduled for March 21. Cyclists will gather at the Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road, on Pensacola Beach. Routes range from a four-mile bike trail ride to a 60-mile route along the beaches of Northwest Florida. The bus will leave for starting locations at 8 a.m. All routes offer rest stops, support and gear vehicles. Riders return to a party, lunch and entertainment at Margaritaville Beach Hotel. The registration fee is $15, with a fundraising minimum of $200. For more information, contact Lynne Cranford at 492-6100, ext. 3131 or by e-mail at lcranford@diabetes.org.

Band, drill platoon coming to Pensacola

Pensacola residents will be treated to upcoming performances by the United States Navy Band and the Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon. The United States Navy Concert Band’s performance is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Feb. 23 at Pensacola’s Saenger Theatre. No more tickets are available for the performance. All Navy Band performances are free, but tickets are required due to limited seating. For more information about the concert, go to http://www.navyband. navy.mil/national_tour.shtml. The Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon is scheduled to perform onboard NAS Pensacola at noon March 19 on the Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC) parade field.

Rock N Fly run to take place March 21

The second annual Blue Angels Rock N Fly Half Marathon and 5K (3.1 miles) is scheduled for March 21 aboard NAS Pensacola. Both races will start at 8 a.m. at the corner of Radford and Fred Bauer roads (in front of Starbucks). There is a registration limit of 3,000 people and the race sold out in 2014. Proceeds from the race will benefit the Navy Ball and Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. To register or volunteer, go to www.runrocknfly.com. For more information, e-mail runrocknfly@gmail.com or call 505-7086 or 505-6020.

Dates announced for Senior Follies The theme for the 18th annual Pensacola Seniors Follies will be “Those Were the Days.” The two-hour song-and-dance comedy review is scheduled for March 13-15 at WSRE-TV Jean & Paul Amos Performance Studio. Performances are scheduled for 7 p.m. March 13 and 2 p.m. March 14 and March 15. Proceeds will go to support various senior programs in the community. Tickets can be purchased at Bayview Senior Center and West Escambia Senior Center. Ticket information is available by calling 453-3016 or 417-7736.

VA announces creative arts competition Veterans in the Gulf Coast region can register for the local competition of the 2015 National Veterans Creative Arts Competition at the Department of Veterans Affairs Gulf Coast Veterans Health Care System March 4-5 in the VA Recreation Hall, 400 Veterans Ave., in Biloxi, Miss. The deadline for submitting entry forms to Gulf Coast VA is at noon Feb. 23. The VA is looking for talent in the art, creative writing, dance, drama and music categories. Firstplace winners in the various categories will be sub-

mitted for national judging. For more information, veterans who live outside the Biloxi are can contact Bobby Hakanson at (228) 233-7348 or go to www.creativeartsfestival.va.gov.

School to present auction March 7

Escambia Christian School will presents its 11th annual “A Bid for Excellence” auction March 7 at Gateway Church of Christ Family Life Center, 245 Brent Lane. Doors open at 4 p.m. for preview of items. Dinner will be served at 5 p.m. The live auction will begin at 6 p.m. Cost is $35 per person. Seating is limited. For more information, call 433-8476.

PSC plans Warrington Campus event Pensacola State College (PSC) will present Discover PSC Warrington Campus from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. March 3 at Student Services, Bldg. 3600. You can talk to counselors and get details on: • Admissions, financial aid, scholarships. • Health care programs and requirements. • Full degrees and courses completed on Warrington campus. For more information, call 484-2200.

Tea party for Women’s History Month A Will & Way Inc. will present an afternoon tea party to celebrate Women’s History Month at 2 p.m. March 14 at 1824 North Ninth Ave. Several local women who have made history will be recognized and some in honor of national legends. Music and entertainment will also be presented. A donation of $20 per person is requested and is due by March 3. Checks made payable to A Will & Way Inc. may be mailed to P.O. Box 3133, Pensacola, FL 32516 or via PayPal. The proceeds will benefit the group’s youth leadership project. For more information, contact Williemae Stanberry by e-mail at williemaez@aol.com.

Money management class announced Redeemer Lutheran Church and School, 333 Commerce St., is offering a nine-week class on getting control of your money. The first class is 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. March 14. The fee is $93. For more information contact Sharon Barger at sharon@barger.com or (618) 638-4333. Register at www.daveramsey.com/fpu/locations/org/54340/ class/273826.

Exhibit about Underground Railroad “Color in Freedom: Journey Along the Underground Railroad” will be on display at the The Pensacola Museum of Art (PMA) through April 4. The exhibit of works by artist Joseph Holston consists of four movements that track the flow of events in the lives of those who traveled along the Underground Railroad. Holston’s career has spanned more than 35 years. He has exhibited across the United States. Our Voices Are Many will be performing freedom songs, dances and poetry inspired by musical and literary works from the period at 2 p.m. tomorrow, Feb. 21, and 2 p.m. March 21. Admission will be free on Feb. 21 and March 21. For more information, call 432-6247 or go to pensacolamuseum.org.

Sign up for accident investigation class Faculty from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Worldwide will share their accident investigation expertise this spring during a free massive open online course. Registration for Aircraft Accident Investigation is limited and will open until Feb. 23. The course runs from March 23 to April 19. To learn more about the course, go to http://worldwide.erau.edu/degrees-programs/freeonline-courses/index.html.

SBDC offers workshop on exporting The Florida Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at UWF is presenting “Growing Your Business Through International Trade: Exporting 101” on from 10 a.m. to noon Feb. 24 at the Greater Pensacola Chamber. In this workshop, you will learn about the benefits and basic steps involved in exporting, how to develop an export strategy, and about key resources that can help you along the way. Attendance fee is $20. Pre-registration is strongly recommended. For more information or to register, call 474-2528 or go to www.sbdc.uwf.edu and click on “training opportunities.”

AeroFest to be March 20-21 in Mobile

AeroFest is coming to Mobile March 20-21 at the Mobile Aeroplex at Brookley Field. The festival’s mission is to actively improve the lives of America’s injured warriors through a confluence of talent, vision and technology. The festival will feature music, arts, sports, educational information, festivities and fun. For more information, go to www.mobileaerofest.com.

You can submit information for possible publication in Partyline by sending an e-mail to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil. Submissions must include the organization’s name and details about events including times, dates, locations and any costs involved. Contact information also is required. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with established standards. Items should be submitted at least one week in advance. The deadline is noon Friday for the next week’s publication.


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February 20, 2015

GOSPORT


SECTION

LIFE

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February 20, 2015

NETPDTC’s 2014 Civilian, Civilian of the Quarter; See page B2 Spotlight

GOSPORT DoD recognizes African American military, national contributions By Amaani Lyle DoD News, Defense Media Activity

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ASHINGTON – An annual presidential proclamation and Department of Defense (DoD) memorandum urges the services to highlight the contributions and sacrifices of black Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen in recognition of African American History Month. Clarence Johnson, director of the Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity, reflected on current and past positive impacts of integration and its necessity in maintaining an edge as an organization nationally and abroad. DoD leads in diversity “The Department of Defense has led the nation in assimilating diversity into our workforce,” Johnson said in a DoD News interview. “African Americans have played heavily in the diversity and the mission landscape for the DoD.” In line with this year’s theme, “A Century of Black Life, History and Culture,” Johnson recounted DoD’s diversity milestones throughout the decades. From President Harry S. Truman’s executive order integrating the services, to

removing barriers for civilians and later opening doors to disabled employees, women in service and repealing “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” to grant rights to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender community, Johnson described the evolution of the department’s diversity as a force multiplier. Johnson noted that African Americans over the last 100 years have not only contributed to military history, but to national history. “I see America as a big piece of tapestry, where we all … contribute to that tapestry and certainly black life, history and culture is important,” Johnson said. Military icons such as Crispus Attucks, the first black to die in the Revolutionary War, to the Buffalo Soldiers in World War I and World War II, the Tuskegee Airmen in World

War II, and Navy Adm. Michelle Howard, the first black woman to achieve the rank of four stars, reflect beacons of hope and resilience in the face of adversity. “Diversity … gives us a strategic advantage and the opportunity to have everybody participate in decision making and readiness,” Johnson said. But diversity, Johnson emphasized, extends beyond race and gender. “We can use the talents and skills sets of all our folks because … diversity not only improves the productivity of the individual,” he said, but also of the team and overall organization. “There’s a war for talent out there and (it) doesn’t know any race or gender, it’s inherent in all populations.” Military offers opportunities to learn and lead Johnson shared his per-

NEX to host Black History Month event Feb. 21 From Andrea Beck NEX Special Events Coordinator

Join the Navy Exchange (NEX) Mall for a Black History Month celebration, “Black History Awareness 2015,” tomorrow (Feb. 21), from noon to 1:30 p.m., inside the main mall entrance. Highlights include a third appearance by members of the African American Heritage Society of Pensacola, which will bring several local stories to life with readings from the book, “When Black Folks was Colored.” For more information, call Andrea Beck at 458-8250.

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AURORA ESKIMO FLOE ICEBERG KAYAK

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sonal experience as a schoolteacher in Mississippi before joining the Air Force as a second lieutenant. Despite myriad opportunities extended to him from outside the Air Force, he said, he opted to remain a blue-suiter due to the service’s team concept and many opportunities to learn, improve and lead. With 40 years of mili-

tary and civil service, ascension to colonel and now leading in a critical senior executive service role, Johnson credits his physics teacher and late father for presenting moral and character attributes into his life and propelling him to achieve. “The military provides you the opportunity to get leadership responsibility

fast,” Johnson said. “Nowhere in America will you be able to lead and manage resources as fast as in the military.” Follow the Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity Office on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @ODMEO to learn more about observance events and diversity across the total force.

NASP Black History Month Observance to be held Feb. 27 at NASC Auditorium From staff reports

Ora Wills takes the podium at a previous NEX Black History Month event.

Word Search ‘North and South Pole’ W H B V R N C Q I C E V D H Q

In observance of African American/Black History Month, celebrated each year during the month of February, the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) has announced the availability of original artwork available for download from DEOMI’s public website, www.deomi.org. “The theme is represented by the use of 100 names gathered from various professions and events to signify 100 years of history,” said Peter Hemmer, DEOMI illustrator.

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PENGUIN POLE SEAL SNOW WHALE

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Naval Education and Training Professional Development and Technology Center (NETPDTC) Commanding Officer Capt. Janet Lomax will be guest speaker at NAS Pensacola’s Black History Month Observance. The event will be held Feb. 27 at Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC) auditorium, Bldg. 633, at 11 a.m. Opening remarks will be presented by NAS Pensacola Commanding Officer Capt. Keith Hoskins.

Gosling Games Coloring: ‘Astronaut Dr. Mae C. Jemison’

Capt. Janet Lomax

Biography: Dr. Mae C. Jemison First African-American woman in space Born Oct. 17, 1956, in Decatur, Ala., but considers Chicago, Ill., to be her hometown. Recreational interests include traveling, graphic arts, photography, sewing, skiing, collecting African art, languages (Russian, Swahili, Japanese) and weight training. She has an extensive dance and exercise background and is an avid reader. Jemison has a background in both engineering and medical research. She has worked in the areas of computer programming, printed wiring board materials, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, computer magnetic disc production and reproductive biology. Jemison was selected for the astronaut program in June 1987. She was the science mission specialist on STS-47 Spacelab-J (Sept. 12-20, 1992). STS-47 was a cooperative mission between the United States and Japan. The eight-day mission was accomplished in 127 orbits of the Earth and included 44 Japanese and U.S. life science and materials processing experiments. In completing her first space flight, Jemison logged 190 hours, 30 minutes, 23 seconds in space. Jemison left NASA in March 1993.


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SPOTLIGHT

February 20, 2015

NETPDTC’s 2014 CoY and CoQ fourth quarter By Katrina Gergely NETPDTC PAO

The selection of James Larkin as the 2014 Civilian of the Year (CoY) and Sue Dickerson as the final 2014 Civilian of the Quarter (CoQ) for the Naval Education and Training Professional Development and Technology Center (NETPDTC) was announced recently. Larkin works for the Navy Advancement Center (NAC), a department of NETPDTC, as a program assistant in the exam ordering and discrepancy branch. He develops and implements process redesigns and interventions, continuously updating and improving exam administration procedures for the Navy Enlisted Advancement System (NEAS), which directly impacts more than 300,000 Sailors annually. “I am honored to be recognized as Civilian of the Year. It’s a good feeling to know that performing my job and exceeding expectations daily is acknowledged and recognized by the leadership and my peers,” said Larkin. Larkin began his career at NAC in 2010 after retiring as a senior chief petty officer with the Navy. Recently, while managing Navywide advancement examination orders for fleet Sailors, Larkin identified and tracked advancement exam shipping errors resulting from a postal policy change. He implemented corrective measures which reduced exam returns by 90 percent and

cut package error rates by 50 percent, significantly increasing exam processing time. “Having the opportunity to help out enlisted Sailors on advancement issues and concerns while cutting costs for the command and our country has been truly rewarding,” said Larkin. “Mr. Larkin’s efforts to improve exam shipping have been amazing. The results are clear,” said Thomas Updike, Navy Enlisted Advancement Executive Division head. “The Navy is now saving significant money, and delivery of exams to commands has been accelerated – that’s a win, win. Mr. Larkin’s Civilian of the Year recognition is well deserved.” Dickerson also works for NAC in the exam execution division as a mathematical statistician. She develops and performs statistical functions and controls that ensure the accuracy and integrity of NEAS processes and exam development. “I attribute much of my success to God, my coworkers and the teams that I’ve worked with,” said Dickerson. “I also give much credit to Darlene Barrow. She is the best supervisor I’ve ever had and always finds time to help. Her dedication pushes us to perform better.” Starting with NETPDTC in 2004 as a cooperative education student while simultaneously attending the University of West Florida, Dickerson has been instrumental in current NAC initiatives associated with

Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center’s (NETPDTC) commanding officer, Capt. Janet Lomax, presents the 2014 Civilian of the Year (CoY) award to James Larkin (left), program assistant for the Navy Advancement Center (NAC). The final Civilian of the Quarter (CoQ), 2014, was presented to Sue Dickerson (center), a mathematical statistician at NAC. CoQs within the same fiscal year are eligible for selection as CoY, which included civilian of the first quarter, 2014, Michelle Martinez (right), a personnel psychologist for NAC during a recent all hands event at NASP Corry Station. Photo by Anthony Ruiz

examination development processes and production modifications. One key product Dickerson developed was a sophisticated item plan tool, which tracks the number of questions required for each area of rating knowledge put on an advancement exam and how much each question contributes to the overall score on the exam. This projects the number of questions fleet subject matter experts (FSMEs) need to write for each exam cycle. The item plan is used to develop 560 individual activeduty and reserve advancement exams annually, which are ad-

ministered to 300,000 advancement-eligible Sailors. During a two-week period, FSMEs typically write enough questions for two years’ worth of exams for each paygrade (E-4 through E7) within their rating. “Sue Dickerson’s technical expertise and forward thinking have been essential in the success of revamping the Navy’s enlisted advancement exam development processes. Sue is a hard-charger with unlimited determination and is known throughout the command as a kind, easy-going person who can be counted on to get the job done,” said Darlene Barrow,

NAC’s Statistical Analysis Branch head. During a recent all hands awards event, Capt. Janet Lomax, NETPDTC’s commanding officer, said, “Employees like Mr. Larkin and Ms. Dickerson work diligently behind the scenes but their efforts produce amazing results. They are an inspiration to all of us here at NETPDTC.” Additional information on the Naval Education and Training Professional Development and Technology Center can be found on the NETPDTC website: https://www.netc.navy.mil/netc/n etpdtc/.


GOSPORT

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Troops to get compensation for illegal foreclosures From DoD News, Defense Media Activity

WASHINGTON (NNS) – The Justice Department announced Feb. 9 that under its settlements with five of the nation’s largest mortgage servicers, 952 service members and their co-borrowers are eligible to receive more than $123 million for non-judicial foreclosures that violated the Service Members Civil Relief Act. The five mortgage servicers are JP Morgan Chase Bank N.A.; Wells Fargo Bank N.A. and Wells Fargo & Co.; Citi Residential Lending Inc., Citibank, NA and CitiMortgage Inc.; GMAC Mortgage, LLC, Ally Financial Inc. and Residential Capital LLC; and BAC Home Loans Servicing LP formerly known as Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP (Bank of America).

In the first round of payments under the SCRA portion of the 2012 settlement known as the National Mortgage Settlement, 666 service members and their coborrowers will receive more than $88 million from JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Citi and GMAC Mortgage. The other 286 service members and their coborrowers already have received more than $35 million from Bank of America through an earlier settlement. The nonjudicial foreclosures at issue took place between Jan. 1, 2006, and April 4, 2012. The settlement was announced in connection with the President’s Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force, which was established to wage an aggressive, coordinated and proactive effort to investigate and prosecute financial crimes. For more information on the task force, visit www.StopFraud.gov.

For more information Borrowers should use the following contact information for questions about SCRA payments under the National Mortgage Settlement: • Bank of America borrowers should call Rust Consulting Inc., settlement administrator, at (855) 793-1370 (toll-free) or write to BAC Home Loans Servicing Settlement Administrator, c/o Rust Consulting, P.O. Box 1948, Faribault, MN 55021-6091. • Citi borrowers should call (888) 326-1166 (toll-free). • GMAC Mortgage borrowers should call Rust Consulting, settlement administrator, at (866) 708-0915 (toll-free) or write to P.O. Box 3061, Faribault, Minnesota 55021-2661. • JPMorgan Chase borrowers should call (877) 469-0110 (toll-free) or write to P.O. Box 183224, OH-7160/DOJ, Columbus, Ohio 43219-6009. • Wells Fargo borrowers should call the Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Military Customer Service Center at (877) 839-2359 (toll-free). Service members and dependents who believe their SCRA rights have been violated should contact an Armed Forces Legal Assistance office. To find the closest office, consult the military legal assistance office locator at http://legal assistance.law.af.mil and click on the Legal Services Locator. Additional information about the Justice Department's enforcement of the SCRA and the other laws protecting service members is available at www.servicemembers.gov.

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS


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GOSPORT

February 20, 2015

Morale, Welfare and Recreation

Snowmen decorate the lawn during a past Winter Wonderland at Naval Air Station Pensacola. This year’s event is scheduled for tomorrow, Feb. 21.

Snow, travel expo on schedule Story, photos from NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation

A snow day and a travel day are at the top of the list of upcoming events being presented by Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Here are the details: • Winter Wonderland: Track down your mittens and scarves because snow is in the forecast from noon to 4 p.m. tomorrow, Feb. 21. The event will take place at the old hospital grounds across the street from Mustin Beach Club on Radford Boulevard. The cost is $2 per person. Food and drinks will be available to purchase. Round up the family and

Activities scheduled for the Winter Wonderland include sledding down the hill on real snow.

come enjoy sledding on real snow, penguin bowling, golf chipping, ice fishing, an obstacle course, inflatable games and more. For more information, call

452-3806 ext. 3140. • Travel Expo: Are you searching for ideas vacation ideas? Come to the Travel Expo from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 25 at the Mustin Beach Club. You can browse through information about a large variety of travel and recreation destinations from across the Southeast. Visit the booths and register for on opportunity to win door prizes. Admission is free. For more information, call 452-6362. Both events are open to all MWR authorized patrons: active duty, retirees, DoD civilians and their families. For more information about other upcoming MRW events, go to http://naspensacola-mwr. com/current/current.htm.

At the movies FRIDAY

“Paddington,” PG, 5 p.m.; “American Sniper,” R, 7:30 p.m.; “Selma,” PG-13, 5:30 p.m.; “The Boy Next Door,” R, 8:10 p.m.

SATURDAY

“Paddington,” PG, noon; “Taken 3,” PG-13, 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m.; “The Boy Next Door,” R, 7 p.m.; “The Wedding Ringer,” R, 9 p.m.; “Big Eyes,” PG-13, 12:30 p.m.; “The Imitation Game,” PG-13, 3 p.m.; “Selma,” PG-13, 5:30 p.m.; “American Sniper,” R, 8:30 p.m.

SUNDAY

“Paddington,” PG, noon, 2 p.m.; “American Sniper,” R, 4 p.m., 7 p.m.; “Selma,” PG-13, 12:30 p.m.; “Taken 3,” PG-13, 3 p.m.; “The Boy Next Door,” R, 5:30 p.m.; “The Gambler,” R, 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY

“Taken 3,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “The Wedding Ringer,” R, 7:30 p.m.; “Paddington,” PG, 5:10 p.m.; “American Sniper,” R, 7:10 p.m.

TUESDAY

“Woman in Black 2: Angel of Death,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “The Gambler,” R, 7 p.m; “Big Eyes,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “American Sniper,” R, 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

Selma,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “The Boy Next Door,” R, 7:30 p.m.; “Woman in Black 2: Angel of Death,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “The Wedding Ringer,” R, 7:10 p.m.

THURSDAY

“Paddington,” PG, 5 p.m.; “American Sniper,” R, 7 p.m.; “Taken 3,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “The Boy Next Door,” R, 7:30 p.m.

COST Regular: $3 adults, $1.50 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger 3D shows: $5 adults, $3 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

Details: 452-3522 or www.naspensacola-mwr.com

The NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department has a number of upcoming events and activities. For more information, call 452-3806, ext. 3100, or go to the MWR website at www.naspensacola-mwr.com. • February Freeze Polar Bear Plunge – Villains, Gypsies and Thieves: Feb. 21. Are you brave enough to conquer a cold plunge in icy water? Come to the MWR Villains, Vixens and Thieves Freeze Polar Bear Plunge. Dress up in your best costume and see if you have what it takes. Participants will take a quick dip in the icy ocean. There will be a costume contest, hot cocoa and music. For more information, call 452-9429. • Youth Sports soccer and baseball/ T ball: Register your child for soccer or baseball at the NASP Youth Center through Feb. 27 (8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday). The season runs March through May. There is a $50 registration fee per child, which includes a uniform and trophy. Registration open to all dependents of active-duty, retired military, DoD employees, contractors and reservists ages 414. For more information, call 452-3810. • Danger Zone Paintball: Sign up for the Paintball Challenge at Blue Angel Naval Recreation Area. Danger Zone Paintball is now open until 5 p.m. Monday and Friday for challenge events. The cost is $20 for activeduty and $30 for civilians and includes three acres of woodsball play, full equipment rental, 500 rounds of paint and free air refills. Reservations are required two weeks in advance. For details, call 281-5489. • The First Tee: Register for the program and take advantage of free golf lessons. Available free for children ages 7-18 of military personnel and civilian employees. Register at Youth Center, Bldg. 3690, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, contact Josh Meador at A.C. Reed Golf Course, 452-2454, or the Youth Center, 4522417. • Seabreeze Jazz Festival: The Information, Tickets and Travel (ITT) office at the NEX Mall on Highway 98 has discount tickets available for purchase for the Seabreeze Jazz Festival April 22-26. There are single-day, three-day and four-day tickets available. For more information, call 452-6354. • Indoor pool open: Bldg. 3828. Hours are 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Pool is closed holidays, Wednesdays and the first weekend of the month. Call for fees, specials and restrictions. Masters training available for $30 per month from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. Free Aqua Zumba classes 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For more information, call 452-9429. • MWR App: Navylife Pensacola app now Available for Android and Apple devices. It will allow you to view information on all services, programs and activities for NAS Pensacola including hours of operations, locations and GPS, description of services, and even call the facilities directly from your phone.

Liberty activities Liberty program events target young, unaccompanied active-duty military. New hours are 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday. Regular events are scheduled at the main Liberty Center in the Portside Entertainment Complex. You must sign up in advance for off-base trips. For more information, call 452-2372 or go to http://naspensacolamwr.com/singsail/liberty.htm.


February 20, 2015

GOSPORT

COMMAND LINES

SAPR If you are a victim of sexual assault, it is not your fault. Help for victims of sexual assault in the DoD community is a call, click or text away: The SafeHelpline provides live, one-on-one crisis support and information by trained staff. Call: (877) 995-5247; click: www.SafeHelpline.org; or text: 55-247, CONUS; (202) 470-5546, OCONUS (may be extra charges for OCONUS). The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program provides prevention, intervention and a 24/7/365 response to non-intimate partner adult victims of sexual assault. Active-duty and adult family member sexual assault victims have a choice of reporting options, unrestricted and restricted. Unrestricted reporting allows victim to have an advocate, seek medical care, counseling, legal services, safety interventions and/or transfer, etc. To access an unrestricted report, the victim may report to his/her chain-ofcommand, security/law enforcement, NCIS, SAPR VA, SARC, or others. NCIS shall be notified by the CO and/or the VA/SARC in unrestricted cases to begin investigation. Investigation results are provided to the offender’s CO for appropriate action/disposition. Restricted reporting allows a victim to have a confidential report, which does not trigger command or law enforcement notification and the victim may have a SAPR VA and seek medical care and/or counseling. To access restricted reporting, the victim may disclose his/her sexual assault only to the SARC, a current SAPR VA, a health care professional and/or a chaplain. To contact the NASP 24/7 Victim Advocate, call 449-9231/2. For the Civilian Victim Advocate, call 293-4561. To contact the duty SARC, call the SARC cell at 554-5606.

Worship schedule NAS Pensacola Protestant • Communion service, 8 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Sunday School, all ages, 9 a.m. Sunday, Bldg. 634. • Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Chapel choir, 12:30 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Contemporary service, 6 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Womenʼs Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Bldg. 634. • Training Air Wing Six Bible Study, 11:15 a.m. Tuesday, Griffith Hall student lounge. • Bible study (for all), 7 p.m. Tuesday, Bldg. 634, back classrooms; 5 p.m. Wednesday, J.B. McKamey Center. Roman Catholic • Sunday Mass, 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Daily Mass, 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the All Faiths Chapel. • Confessions: 30 minutes before services. Latter Day Saints • Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. For information, call 452-2341. NASP Corry Station Protestant • Adult Bible study, 9 a.m. Sunday, fellowship hall vice conference room. • Chapel choir, 9 a.m. Sunday, choir

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Fleet and Family Support Center room vice sanctuary. • Worship service, 10 a.m. Sunday. • Fellowship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday. • Contemporary worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, followed by fellowship at 7:30 p.m. • Bible study and dinner, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, fellowship hall. Latter Day Saints • Service, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Roman Catholic • Mass, noon Sunday and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For information, call 452-6376. NAS Whiting Field Chapel Roman Catholic • Mass, 11 a.m. Friday. Protestant • Bible study, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. • Weekly chapel service, 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For information, call 623-7212. More services Jewish • Bʼnai Israel Synagogue, 1829 North Ninth Ave., services 7 p.m. Friday and 9:30 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 433-7311. • Temple Beth El, 800 North Palafox St., services 7 p.m. Friday (6 p.m. first Friday of month). For information, call 438-3321 or go to http://templebethelofpensacola.org. Seventh-day Adventist • Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1080 North Blue Angel Parkway, Bible studies at 9:30 a.m. and services at 11 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 453-3442.

The NASP Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), 151 Ellyson Ave., Bldg. 625, is offering the following: • Time Management: 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 26. Learn how to use your time more effectively. Time management skills reduce stress. For information or to register, call 452-5609. • Emergency Preparedness: 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 27. Each type of disaster requires different measures to keep you, your family and your pets safe. The best thing you can do is to be prepared.

For information or to register for the workshop, call 4525609. • Conflict Management and Resolution: 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Feb. 27. Workshop helps people manage conflict by examining attitudes and behaviors when faced with conflicting situations. Practice skills that prevent conflicts from escalating and learn how to work with others to solve problems, allowing people to grow, missions to succeed and families to strengthen. For more information or to register, call 4525609.

Community Outreach NASP Community Outreach volunteer opportunities: • Perdido Spring Fest: A small town fair at 2221 South Blue Angel Parkway. Volunteers needed from March 914. March 9-10 volunteers will be needed midday to assist with event setup; March 1114 volunteers will be needed in the evening to assist with parking. Meals and transportation will be provided. • Boys and Girls Club of Emerald Coast: NAS Pensacola’s First Class Petty Officer Association invites you to make a positive impact in

the community. Motivated, positive individuals needed to volunteer as basketball coaches, homework tutors, mentors, choir directors and computer tutors, among other things. Volunteers can also assist with landscaping, painting and simple clean-up. The NASP Community Outreach office tracks volunteer hours. Report any hours you work to receive due recognition. For information on volunteer activities, call 452-2532 or e-mail SH2 Patricia Cooper at patricia.cooper@Navy.mil.


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February 20, 2015

GOSPORT

Your City, Your Magazine Gosport has over 25,000 readers every week. That’s a lot of potential for your ad to be seen every week. How can you not afford to place your ad with Simone Sands? Contact her today at 433-1166 ext. 21


GOSPORT

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February 20, 2015

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Ads placed by the Military are FREE

To place an ad go online at www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext.24.

Marketplace

★ Motor ★ Merchandise ★ Employment ★ Real Estate ★ and more

★ Publication date every Friday except Christmas and New Years.

★ Deadline to place an ad is 4:00 pm Friday, one week prior to publication date.

★ Place your ad online at www.gosportpensacola.com

★ Place your ad by phone at 850-433-1166 Ext. 24 Monday-Friday 8:30 am5:00 pm

Motor Bulletin Board

Merchandise Employment Merchandise

Sofa sleeper with queen sized matDisk jockeys tress, like new. wanted, week- $400. 455-4639 ends, training, fun, great pay! Sofa with pullout sales@adjcon- mattress, never n e c t i o n . c o m . slept on, like new. 850-968-1968 $475. 418-4614 or 944-8886 Garage sales Two wingback Yard sale, Feb. chairs, mauve, 28 8 until 1, 706 excellent condiJester Ct., tion. $125 each. Crowne Pointe. 418-4614 or 9448886 Merchandise Wedding band, Pets 14K white gold, AKC toy poo- two rows of diadles, males, monds, beautiful, health certifi- $450. 418-4614 cates, second or 944-8886 shots. $500. Brown in color. M o t o r c y c l e 850-476-1196 jacket, yellow neon with liner, Articles for sale like new, XL, $50. Black Joe Conair 1.5 Rocket motorcyinches, hot air cle jacket, XL, curling combo, $25. Leather vest, retail value $35, new, XL, $40. new $20. 476- Electric heated 3592 jacket, L44, $50. 251-747-7056 Dog house, wood, custom, Full faced helvery nice, up to met, new, 2X, 70 lbs, $60, 478- $40. Regular hel9321 met, 2X, $15. Orange neon visible Like new Merit vest, XL, $15. treadmill, model Winter riding 720T. $100. gloves, large, Please call 850- $10. 251-747450-6674 7056 Employment

Merchandise Bogle Porcelain Collectible Plates featuring Native Americans for $15 each. Have several. 2555591. 2 posthole diggers $5 each. Anacharis water plant 2 for $1. Fishing flies, 2 for $1. 255-5591

Motors

Autos for sale 2003 Suburban, Looks good, BMW 325i, runs good. No 2003, excellent major issues. condition, silver Text for pictures blue, 6 cylinder, or call and leave must sell. $8,000 message. 748firm. 492-0025 7361. $1,500

1995 Nissan 300Z. Runs as good as it looks. All scheduled maintenance & records. 9944KW (6.6Kw surge) Genrac 1030 emergency Trucks/Vans &SUVs standby generator. 33.3 Amps Dodge @120v. Like 2010 Grand Caravan new. $300. 477$13,000 obo; 6272 must sell! MotiBest rifle ever vated! Contact made, Steyr, bolt Virginia @ 477action, 270 cal- 3056 iber. Perfect. $650. 497-1167 2005 Dodge Dakota Laramie Penn Senator Quad Cab 114, high speed $8,500 obo; red side, 6/0 with must see/sell! factory matching Motivated! Senator rod, $75. Contact Virginia 417-1694 @ 477-3056 Crossbow, PSE, fast and quiet, like new with arrows, quiver and cocker. Silent and fast. $500 value for $250. 454-9486

Motors

2002 Chevy Tahoe, LT edition. white; 135,000 miles, leather, loaded, sunroof, towing package, 3rd row seat. $5,900 Panasonic TV, obo. 850-452excellent condi- 9818 or 450tion, 23”, please 0889. call 492-0025. $50

Motorcycles 2003 Kawasaki 1600 Vulcan Motorcycle. 17,488 miles. Bags, locking trunk, w/s & lots more. Very good condition. $4500. 2555591. 2006 Harley Night Train. blacked out hardly any chrome. fast and clean with low miles so get it now for riding season at $9,500. (850) 503-6299

Misc Motors 2000 Coleman Pop-Up Camper. Excellent condition with many extras. $3,500 obo. Larry 3566846 Call 433-1166 ext. 24 and this spot could be yours.

Real Estate

★ Ads placed by the Military are FREE

Motors

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

2012 Freedom Elite 21C RV, 24ft, Ford engine, clean, sleeps 6, extra s t o r a g e , TV/DVD, Corry Station. $36,000. 850-293-0701.

3/2 brick convenient to bases. Fenced yard, great schools, $800/month. $550 deposit, no pets. 968-6076

Lots

Real Estate

Looking for roommate to share a 3/2 home near NAS in quiet neighborhood. $500 inc l u d e s utilities/$500 deposit. Call 3843665

Beautiful 3,311 SF pool home in NE Pensacola ~ 4/3 ~ large kitchen ~ family room ~ formal dining ~ bonus room ~ screened patio ~ desirable location! Call Nancy @ 850206-5526 for more info.

Homes for rent

Cute cottage close to downtown section, 2 B R 1 B , CH&A, $750 a month. 209 S. J St. 390-5607 2/3 1,821 sq ft $1,150, 601 Dye St Pensacola FL 32534. 1/1 1,083 sq ft $775, 603 Dye St Pensacola FL 32534. call Tommy 850602-2033 (Application fees apply) Near NAS and Corry 2/1 duplex CH&A, W/D h o o k u p , e q u i p p e d kitchen, hardwood floors, ceiling fans, mini blinds, outside storage, privacy fence, $600 a month. 9442235 or 4173370

Roommates

Homes for sale

Gulf Breeze 2984 Ranchette Square, 3 beds, 2 baths, .48 acres, 1,467 square feet, $160,000. Call 850-733-0397 Wa t e r f ro n t Dome Home. Hurricane Proof Dome Home on Bayou Grande. 3Bed/2.5Bath. Over 100 Ft of Waterfront 850-572-1913 Call 433-1166 ext. 24 and this spot could be yours.

Mobile home lot in George state for sale or lease. All hookups in place. 45560233

Bayview Memorial Park. 2 cemetery plots & 1 vault. Call 850-994-1931 To w n h o u s e , for details. 1,480 sqft. Over3looking Perdido Beautiful Bay golf course, acre lot off Hwy 2/1.5, excellent 89. Can be subcondition, must divided. Peacesell. $83,500. ful area. Call 492-0025 850-994-0324 or szimm4@mchsi. Move in ready, com for more 7856 Hestia details Place, Pensacola, 4/2, 2 car Leeward S/D garage, hard- building lot. wood floors, Great neighborgranite counters, hood with many double paned amenities. Easy windows, large owner financing. back porch, de- $1,000 down, tached 14x20 $ 2 6 0 / m o n t h . workshop with 850-712-2199 two doors and more windows. Call Could be converted to studio. 433-1166 $129,900. Conext. 24 tact Leighton Realty Linda and Pinson, 850712-8656 this spot

could be yours.


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February 20, 2015

GOSPORT

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Gosport - February 20, 2015  
Gosport - February 20, 2015  

Weekly newspaper for Naval Air Station Pensacola