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contents SPRING 2018

An illustration by Ruben Toledo

MATTER OF STYLE What to see, where to go and what to buy this Spring.

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TROPICAL EXPORT Laure Hériard Dubreuil expands The Webster empire to New York City and launches her own fashion label.

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A RARE GEM Graff’s Bal Harbour boutique gets the Peter Marino treatment.

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THE NEW POWER SHADE Designers have whitewashed Spring’s best clothes—for the betterment of women everywhere.

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FIT TO PRINT This season, bright colors and bold patterns are the true conversation starters.

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A MOMENT OF CLARITY Plastic, fantastic and utterly see-through, this season’s most exciting looks leave little to hide behind.

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DESTINATION ELATION The Museum of Ice Cream is an Instagram phenom. We visit its latest incarnation in Miami Beach.

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PHOTO BY DIEGO UCHITEL

contents

Model Dasha Maletina wearing Chanel

SKIN DEEP Author Bee Shapiro reflects on nearly a decade of covering beauty for The New York Times.

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RESORT LIFE Building on the runaway success of her Les Bonbons earrings, designer Rebecca de Ravenel breaks into ready to wear.

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IT’S A MUST We've assembled the perfect Spring accessories to dust off that hazy shade of Winter.

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IN STELLA WE TRUST The Cut’s editor in chief, Stella Bugbee, speaks candidly about tone, teamwork and taking it too far.

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DOLCE VITA We caught up with Leticia Herrera to see what's on her must-have list and get the scoop on the new Casa Tua Cucina.

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WINDOW SHOPPER We peek into illustrator Kelly Beeman’s exquisitely dressed fantasy world and get a preview of her debut book.

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RUTH REICHL ENVY Author Andrew Friedman sits down with the inimitable culinary author and critic Ruth Reichl.

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SLIM FIT Timepiece expert Michael Clerizo explores how Panerai’s Luminor Due is one of the greatest examples of Italian design.

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eyewear K ATE B OS WOR TH FOR R AG & B ONE B A L H A R B OUR S HOP S 970 0 COL L IN S AV E 3 0 5 728 4 4 0 0


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Illustrator Kelly Beeman

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SPRING 2018

THE SWEETEST THING Try on a softer palette of nudes, pinks and blues to make a gentle statement that won't go unnoticed. SPRING SEDUCTION The season’s best blooms are of the sequin variety. AGE OF ELEGANCE The Surf Club ushers in a new golden age of sophisticated travel in Miami. THE PERFUMES PROVENCE BUILT During harvest time in the South of France, exclusive fragrance farms create an ephemeral experience of sight and smell. AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHIVE Artist Ruben Toledo speaks to the power of the sartorial sketch. BOHEMIAN DREAM We traveled to Islamorada's most storied property, The Moorings, to live out our beach fantasy in the season's most romantic looks. THE CULT OF AMAN What is it exactly that makes this luxury resort brand so addictive? Kathryn Romeyn checks in to find out. BETWEEN THE LINES From fashion’s lensmen to its most daring designers, these titles are a must-read.

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Model Lindsay Ellingson, photographed by Greg Kadel exclusively for Bal Harbour Magazine. Styled by Kira Alvarez, Ellingson wears a Chanel dress and fanny pack and a Victoria Beckham trench coat, available at Neiman Marcus.


Welcome Note

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s we put together our Spring issue, we were fueled by all of the excitement at Bal Harbour Shops. In a nod to its position as the premier shopping destination, Barneys New York announced that it will be opening a flagship store (and its signature restaurant, Freds) at the Shops; Saint Laurent is set to unveil a new two-level flagship in a few months; beloved eyewear brand Linda Farrow just opened a stunning outpost and Balmain, under the direction of wunderkind Olivier Rousteing, will open later this year. The energy is palpable. While fashion is always guiding us—and we have packed the issue with more than 30 pages of fashion editorials from the beaches of Islamorada to the studio in New York with photography legends Greg Kadel and Diego Uchitel—we like to shine a light on some of the personalities who are shaping, inspiring and informing fashion. In this issue, we turn our attention to some of the powerhouse women who have no reservations about their message. At the helm of The Cut is Stella Bugbee, who has created the online platform for a new era of feminists to be heard. She is candid with executive editor Tali Minor in “In Stella We Trust” about how her team navigates the new media landscape and reflects the most pressing conversations of the moment. And from another corner of New York, the legendary Ruth Reichl, who basically rewrote the rules of culinary journalism, shares some of her fondest memories, (and photos), from her early days in the kitchen with Alice Waters, Wolfgang Puck and Thomas Keller. And speaking of legends, the inimitable artist Ruben Toledo shares how he developed his signature style in an essay that introduces our portfolio of fashion illustration. For this special feature, we dug into our own magazine archive to revisit some of the great illustrators whose work we have celebrated for more than a decade. As we spring ahead, it’s always important to take a moment to look back, too.

Here with Linda Farrow’s creative director, Simon Jablon; from the issue: India Hicks, model Dasha Maletina wearing Chanel, the newly redesigned Graff boutique by Peter Marino and my daughters, Audrey and India, with Ella Rubell at Bal Harbour’s Ice Cream We Love event.

Publisher/Editor-in-Chief Sarah G. Harrelson

Bal Harbour Magazine Publisher/Creative Director Carlos A. Suarez Publisher/Editor-in-Chief Sarah G. Harrelson Executive Editor Tali Minor Associate Art Director Katie Brown Contributing Fashion Director Sarah Gore Reeves Contributing Writers Kate Betts, Leslie Camhi, Jackie Cooperman, Amanda Eberstein, Mark Ellwood, Emily Holt, Ted Loos, Jessica Michault, Degen Pener, Bee Shapiro, Alyssa Shelasky, Lynn Yaeger Contributing Photographers Nico Bustos, Anthony Cotsifas, Chris Craymer, Fumie Hoppe, Dean Isidro, Russell James, Greg Kadel, James Macari, Kristian Schuller, Diego Uchitel Director of Marketing Marissa Cornejo Broennle Editorial Assistant Jessica Idarraga Editorial and Marketing Assistant Simone Sutnick Copy Editor Robin Shear Pre-Press/Print Production Pete Jacaty Digital Imaging Specialist Matt Stevens Marketing Coordinator Maria Rion Accountant Judith Cabrera Chief Executive Officer Mike Batt 34 BAL HARBOUR

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Contributors GREG KADEL is a fashion photographer and

PHOTO BY WHITNEY PAVLAS (SHAPIRO)

filmmaker based in New York. For our cover story, Kadel captures model Lindsay Ellingson in some of Spring’s most romantic looks. His images have appeared in AnOther Magazine, GQ, Harper’s Bazaar, iD, Industrie and Vogue Paris, and he has shot campaigns for Christian Dior, Hermès, Jil Sander, Salvatore Ferragamo and Valentino.

BEE SHAPIRO is the longtime beauty columnist at The SARAH GORE REEVES is the fashion director of Harper’s Bazaar Turkey and a contributing editor for Vanity Fair Italia. She has collaborated with photographers Miguel Reveriego, Will Davidson, Patrick Demarchelier, Alexi Lubomirski, Ben Hassett and Paola Kudacki, among others. In this issue, Gore Reeves styled “Spring Seduction” with photographer Diego Uchitel. 36 BAL HARBOUR

New York Times and the founder of the fragrance line Ellis Brooklyn. She is also the author of The New York Times’ book “Skin Deep: Women on Skin Care, Makeup, and Looking Their Best,” a collection of her best-read columns, published by Abrams. A Seattle native, she’s now based in Brooklyn, where she tries to keep up with her two toddlers.


Contributors KATHRYN ROMEYN is a Los Angeles-based freelance journalist who writes about travel, wellness, beauty and design. This issue, she explores the cult of the “Aman Junkie,” as the beloved hotel brand celebrates its 30th anniversary. She also visited Provence’s perfume gardens, which yield some of the most coveted blooms each spring. Her writing regularly appears in Vogue, Architectural Digest, The Hollywood Reporter and Robb Report.

For her first contribution to Bal Harbour, SIOBHAN MORRISSEY visited The Surf Club to interview landscape architect Fernando Wong, retail visionary Melanie Courbet and culinary virtuoso Antonio Mermolia—all of whom have helped to shape the property. Morrissey’s articles appear in numerous publications, including Time, People, ESPN the Magazine, Cultured and Latina. She has also been appraising fine art for nearly a decade for private and public collectors. 

MACKENZIE WAGONER is a writer for Vogue, W and Bon Appétit. In this issue, she writes about why transparent go-go boots, blanched micro dresses and news-printed twin-sets round out this season’s collections.

ANDREW FRIEDMAN writes about chefs on his Toqueland blog and interviews them on his Heritage Radio Network podcast, “Andrew Talks to Chefs.” For Bal Harbour, Friedman met with writer and critic Ruth Reichl to discuss some of her most memorable culinary tales. The New York-based writer’s new book, “Chefs, Drugs and Rock & Roll: How Food Lovers, Free Spirits, Misfits and Wanderers Created a New American Profession” is being published this month by Ecco/HarperCollins.

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EVAN SUNG is a food, lifestyle and travel photographer based in Brooklyn. In addition to his work for The New York Times, Sung’s photographs have appeared in Vogue, GQ, Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, Gourmet and many others. Sung has photographed more than 40 cookbooks, including “Senegal” and “Tacos,” both nominated for IACP and James Beard awards.

RUBEN TOLEDO is a celebrated artist and illustrator, who, along with his wife, Isabel, was the subject of a career retrospective at the Columbus Museum of Art last year. His work has also been shown at the V&A Museum, MOMU in Antwerp and is held in the permanent collection of The Met’s Costume Institute. Toledo lent his sharp wit and signature style to our portfolio of fashion illustration, for which he penned an introductory essay.

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MIEKE TEN HAVE is a New York-based design and interiors journalist, stylist and consultant. Formerly the home editor of Vogue magazine, she is design editor at large for Elle Decor and Cultured’s New York design editor. Ten Have interviewed designer Rebecca de Ravenel about her debut ready-to-wear collection. “It's a rare treat to interview a designer who is as interested in interiors as she is in fashion. I'm looking forward to seeing what comes next for Rebecca.”

PHOTO BY KARL LAGERFELD, COURTESY TOLEDO ARCHIVES (TOLEDO)

Contributors


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COURTESY OF GUCCI

MATTER of STYLE

     This season, Gucci presents its floral dresses, tracksuits and coveted bags in an illustrated campaign by artist Ignasi Monreal. Creative Director Alessandro Michele tapped the London-based Spaniard to create wildly whimsical images that feature the equally imaginative pieces from the Spring/Summer 2018 collection, drawing on both art history and fashion history to create a fantastical vision. These striking visuals are also on display in store windows around the world, including Gucci’s flagship at Bal Harbour.

One of Ignasi Monreal’s illustrations for Gucci’s Spring/Summer 2018 campaign.

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Jean-Michel Othoniel’s Black Tornado, 2016

   

BEJEWELED Bowie’s iconic striped bodysuit for the Aladdin Sane tour in 1973, designed by Kansai Yamamoto.

     Goyard’s trademark geometric canvas—inspired by the loggers from which the namesake family descended—is often seen monogrammed or emblazoned with bold stripes. The oldest trunk-maker still in production, Goyard has a history of creating bespoke pieces with only the customer’s imagination as the limit. To wit, Pablo Picasso, Coco Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld, Cristobal Balenciaga, Jeanne Lanvin and the Agnellis are among those who turned to Goyard for their most precious cargo. Today, the house’s legacy of the art of marquage continues with a dedicated following of artists, celebrities and style setters worldwide. Visit Goyard’s first-level boutique at Bal Harbour Shops to personalize your own accessory—or two.

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This March, Galerie Perrotin inaugurates its new Lower East Side space in New York with the exhibition “Dark Matters,� by Jean-Michel Othoniel. The French artist’s ties to the fashion world—including commissions by architect Peter Marino for Chanel and a redesign of the iconic J’adore Dior perfume bottle—are evident in the monumental sculptures on display, that bear a resemblance to oversize strands of jewels.

Š SUKITA/THE DAVID BOWIE ARCHIVE; PHOTO CLAIRE DORN Š OTHONIEL; COURTSEY GOYARD.

After five years of touring, the groundbreaking exhibition “David Bowie is� will take its final bow at the Brooklyn Museum this spring. On view from March 2 to July 15, the exhibition provides a backstage pass to Bowie’s personal archive of original costumes, handwritten lyrics, photographs, original album art and hundreds of artifacts that illustrate his brilliantly creative life.


When completed later this spring, Saint Laurent’s new Bal Harbour Shops boutique will be an opulent two-story flagship showcasing all of the brand’s collections. For now, fans of Anthony Vaccarello’s feathered dresses and structured leather pieces can head to the second level where the first phase of this new design has just debuted.

A rendering of Freds at Barneys New York's at Bal Harbour Shops

PACK IT UP

This year saw a most unexpected revival in fashion: the fanny pack. Designers have been reinventing the accessory and giving it new life as an ultrachic, ultra-utilitarian item. Some brands like Gucci, Chanel and Valentino have opted for luxe statement bags in their signature prints and materials; Zimmermann’s version is a beachy woven waist-bag, perfect for the spring.

FROM NEW YORK WITH LOVE Barneys New York has announced plans to open a new outpost at Bal Harbour Shops. The 53,000-square-foot department store will also bring with it the beloved restaurant, Freds—which will have a decidedly tropical vibe with an expansive dining terrace. A plan several years in the making, the retailer is set to open its chic doors in 2023. 48 BAL HARBOUR

A look from Zimmermann’s Spring 2018 collection

COURTESY SAINT LAURENT; COURTESY BARNEYS NEW YORK; COURTESY ZIMMERMANN

SO SAINT LAURENT


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TROPICAL EXPORT Laure Hériard Dubreuil expands The Webster empire to New York City and launches her own fashion label.

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eople say retail is dead, but I think it’s the opposite,” says Laure Hériard Dubreuil, standing on the penthouse balcony of the new Manhattan outpost of The Webster, the fifth iteration of her retail mecca. Opened first in 2009 in South Beach against all odds, Dubreuil managed to create a powerhouse name in fashion, building a robust business and devoted following that soon demanded a second location. She selected Bal Harbour Shops for her expansion and continued to build upon that store’s success with outposts in Houston, Costa Mesa and, now, SoHo. “If you are going to take the time to go somewhere, you want it to be something really special,” the heiress of Rémy Martin cognac explains of her inclination for the art of experience. For The Webster, the magic lay in the setting of terrazzo floors, Milo Baughman chairs, vintage wallpaper, Pierre Frey fabrics and contemporary art (including pieces by Nate Lowman, Gaetano Pesce and Dubreuil’s husband, Aaron Young), which act as insanely stylish backdrops for the best of Alaïa, Chanel, Céline, Gucci and Givenchy. The high glamour classics are mixed with dashes of fashionable mischief courtesy of Attico’s metallic rainbow slingback sandals, Loewe’s pink leather bags resembling elephants and Sies Marjan’s plush faux fur coats in an exclusive shade of lilac. The overall effect is being invited into Dubreuil’s own walk-in closet.

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Dubreuil spent nearly a decade honing her eye with Nicolas Ghesquière and Stefano Pilati before opening The Webster in 2009. Last year she launched her LHD collection, a look from which is seen here. Above, The Webster’s new SoHo store.

“Editing and curating is number one. I scan all of the collections,” she says. “It’s a very personal eye.” One that could elevate the crew-neck sweatshirt (in this case, in high-octane magenta) and skinny jeans with bold geometric statement earrings and crisp white brogues, which, on this grey November afternoon in the Northeast, Dubreuil is defiantly wearing. Save for the jeans, each technicolor piece is part of her debut namesake clothing and accessories line, LHD, which launched late last year. It’s about time. After years of collaborating on exclusive colors and finishes for her shops, creating a more than 200-piece collection for Target (which earned a fan in Valentino Garavani no less) and an allwhite series of designer collaborations for Paris’s Le Bon Marché, Dubreuil seemed to be the last person to recognize her talent for creating. The new range of dresses, skirts, shorts, rompers, sweaters and bodysuits, as well as accessories, jewelry and swim, is designed to heed the requests from her clients for help layering patterns at price points that encourage risk taking. The resulting mix of classic silhouettes with bright, Miami-inspired prints (think alligators and tropical flora), is above all else “playful,” says Dubreuil. “And it’s versatile because you can buy a top separately or pair the pieces together and make your own look.” To boot, she’s also launched “x LHD,” which includes collaborations with Aurélie Bidermann, Maison Michel, Eres, Linda Farrow and Pierre Hardy. In other words, for Dubreuil’s little shop that could, retail is only getting better.

PORTRAIT & LHD SHOT BY CAMILO RIOS WHITE; INTERIOR PHOTO BY ANDREW ROWAT

BY MACKENZIE WAGONER


A RARE GEM Graff’s Bal Harbour boutique gets the Peter Marino treatment, giving the brand’s coveted diamond jewelry a dramatic new backdrop. BY TANYA DUKES

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From above: the newly redesigned Graff boutique; the Love Birds brooch, made with 46 carats of pink and white diamonds; the oceaninspired tones of the boutique’s elegant interior.

dedicated space that allows our clients to take their time getting to know our jewels in a suitably luxurious setting.” The arrival of an exhibition featuring some of Graff’s unique jewels and timepieces coincided with the reopening of the boutique. The array included examples that highlighted the brand’s talent for cutting and polishing exceptionally rare diamonds, especially jewels topping 100 carats. One example, the Graff Sunflower, a 107.46carat cushion-cut stone is one of the finest yellow diamonds in existence; another, the Graff Venus, is a 118.78-carat diamond in the shape of a heart; and not be overlooked is the Graff Fascination, an extraordinary watch comprising over 152 carats of white diamonds framing a pear-shape dial. But, according to the brand’s founder, even after the departure of the roving exhibition, the Bal Harbour boutique has no shortage of spectacular offerings on display. “All of our jewels are special,” says Graff. “They each have their own personalities and charisma.”

COURTESY OF GRAFF

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t’s tough to resist remarkable diamonds. Put them in a setting that shines a spotlight on their beauty and it becomes virtually impossible. With its recently redesigned Bal Harbour boutique, Graff has created an environment that will tempt anyone who passes through its doors to take home, say, a cocktail ring with a flawless diamond or butterfly earrings dotted with violet sapphires. Peter Marino, whose name is as revered in the realm of architecture as Graff’s is in jewelry, designed the sumptuous space. His decades-long habit of creating imaginative environments— including salons for Graff in the U.S., Europe and Asia—that mingle art, sumptuous materials and a sophisticated sense of drama made him a natural choice to reimagine the boutique’s look. An inside-out overhaul of the structure made way for an atmosphere that subtly mirrors the coastal setting. “We were inspired by the nearby areas of Biscayne Bay and the Atlantic Ocean,” says Laurence Graff, the brand’s founder and chairman. “We wanted to create a store that reflects the serene and luxurious ambience of the local area.” Geometric stonework, cushy silk upholstery and hand-painted wall coverings have a sheen of elegant opulence—all in a warm spectrum of cream and pale green tones that reveal the influence of the ocean-adjacent location. Bespoke elements, like chiseled mirrored glass surfaces and custom-made display cases with faceted angles inspired by a diamond, are a nod the glittering jewelry that is the boutique’s main attraction. Beyond an opportunity to rebuild with a fresh point of view, the renovation provided a chance for expansion, and now offers 1,600 square feet of elegance. The extra elbow room allows space for additional features, including a zone dedicated to bridal jewelry and a private VIP salon. Graff describes the latter as “an intimate and


J AV I E R B A R D E M a n d D E V P AT E L , M A L I B U H I L L S , 8 p m W AT C H T H E S E R I E S O N Z E G N A . C O M


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THE NEW POWER SHADE Designers have whitewashed Spring’s best clothes—for the betterment of women everywhere. movement and, later, wearing the alabaster shade to show solidarity with Muslim women during the controversial travel bans. It’s an old trick born anew; when turn-of-thecentury suffragettes chose the color white to represent the purity of their mission, they wore it so that when they marched together, their collective power could be seen. It’s uncertain whether designers had this in mind—after all, what could be more definitively Chloé than a breezy, bohemian white dress? But should one Parisian bombshell shimmy into Saint Laurent’s micro ostrich feather confection, another Hollywood powerhouse don Tom Ford’s impeccably tailored slinking jumpsuit and a polished Italian donna slip on Dolce & Gabbana’s clean-cut lace separates, their concerted strength will symbolize something much greater than style. Really, what could be chicer?

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BY MACKENZIE WAGONER

Left, Saint Laurent’s Yeti boot; above, a feathered look from the Spring collection.

COURTESY SAINT LAURENT

n terms of light, white is every color at once— and this season on the runway, white was every woman, too. The clean-slate shade proved to be seasonless, ageless and, thanks to a certain presidential candidate with an aptitude for the hue (think pantsuits), stripped from its associations with naïveté. There were ethereal, lingerie-inspired gowns from Alexander McQueen ideal for a country wedding and smart, eco-friendly safari suits for the urban jungle from Stella McCartney. Demna Gvasalia’s Balenciaga collection featured one particularly useful two-for-one button down with both long and short sleeves, and within Phoebe Philo’s penultimate show for Céline was an unforgettable double-layered trench coat featuring a pleasingly crisp, pale outer layer tacked up like paper at the ends. Multi-hyphenate workhorses for the multi-hyphenate working woman. This is no white flag. In the past year, the color has been invoked by women working toward a united cause, such as the #WearWhiteToVote


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COURTESY GIORGIO ARMANI, DOLVE & GABBANA, VERSACE

ashion is at its best when clothes speak for themselves. For Spring 2018, there was much to say—all the news that was fit to print, to be exact. Demna Gvasalia, the rule-breaking designer with his finger on the pulse of precisely how cool kids will want to dress, imbued his Balenciaga collection with a touch of reality and a sense of impending danger—invoking, appropriately, the front page news. Newspapers were transferred onto twinsets and multi-sleeve button downs layered with prints of the Euro and the U.S. dollar. Shane Oliver’s collection for Helmut Lang featured one malleable tote rolled up to reveal a faux headline of the design house’s own name. Miuccia Prada has designed, as always, for a woke generation of women who are not just aware, but active in making positive change. Here there are female manga and comic book characters (drawn by women) emblazoned on militant overcoats and sweetheart topped nipped-waist dresses. The very idea of women having the freedom to tell their own stories and have them read, heard and believed was what drew her to the prints in the first place—a sentiment echoed just weeks after by the ground-shifting #metoo movement. Armani’s remarkable number of dresses were delivered in optimistic abstracted patterns reminiscent of blue chip artists—think Pollock, Miró and Klimt. Though not cited directly, the latter was called to mind in an all-over print of red and violet circles—a favorite motif of the Austrian painter who overlaid his fashionable subjects—champions of women’s suffrage—with repeating circles meant to symbolize their fertility and freedom.

FIT TO PRINT This season, bright colors and bold patterns are the true conversation starters. BY MACKENZIE WAGONER Versace had a self-reflective moment, acknowledging the 20th anniversary of Gianni Versace’s untimely death with a look back at his greatest hits—dresses splayed with neon covers of Vogue magazine, high-waisted jeans smattered with Baroque gold wreaths and silk-pleated skirts enveloped in Tresor de la Mer’s coral starfish among them. And for whispers of the heart, Dolce & Gabbana’s romantic show was replete with Queen of Hearts separates, exquisitely beaded flower-bombed maillots and a Warholian print of cans—the Campbell’s insignia swapped out for “amore”—on a pencil skirt. From Chloé’s cotton dresses painted with auspicious eyes to Off-White’s saffiano leather pochette replicas of Time and Life—no matter what statement you wear this season, fashion stands united in making one.

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Versace

Giorgio Armani

Dolce & Gabbana


A MOMENT OFCLARITY Plastic, fantastic and utterly see-through, Spring’s most exciting clothes and accessories leave little to hide behind. BY MACKENZIE WAGONER

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COURTESY VALENTINO

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ransparency just might be the most luxurious word of 2018. In this hour of alternative facts, convenient truths, and false headlines, what could be more covetable than straightforward clarity? The Spring runways certainly made more than one thing clear—see-through accessories and garments gleamed on models’ heads, toes, torsos and limbs in New York, Milan and Paris. Nowhere more so than under the guidance of Karl Lagerfeld at both Chanel and Fendi (executed by Silvia Venturini Fendi), recalling the optimism of Paco Rabanne and Andre Courreges’s late ‘60s foray into mod plastics, new materials for the romantic youth uprisings happening from San Francisco to Paris. Lagerfeld bristled at any reference to past political movements, but the rainbow created by the facsimile waterfall in the Grand Palais set a literal arch of hope above the supermodel cast of Kaia Gerber, Binx Walton and Kendall Jenner gliding by in their crystalline bucket hats, demurely capped thigh-high boots, glassy tote bags and gloves, and abbreviated capes. For Fendi’s nod to the machine-age mania of Italian Futurism, transparent layers of day dresses, pencil skirts and button downs were given a pale candy stripe finish. The plastic patina took a romantic turn with Oscar de La Renta’s pointed toe Cinderella slippers—no fairy godmother or prince required. And then there were the bags. Who wouldn’t be thrilled to see people in power carrying a what-you-see-is-whatyou-get plastic briefcase from Sean Oliver’s debut collection for Helmut Lang? Or want to sweep through the airport hassle-free thanks to Maison Martin Margiela’s TSAfriendly PVC handbag adorned with flight stickers? And Valentino’s quilted shoulder bag served as a simple reminder that whether studded, piped, sequined or pleated, this rainresistant gear is for women who can weather the storm— and have nothing to hide.

Valentino’s Rockstud shoulder bag and PVC biker jacket with sequin detailing.


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SKIN DEEP

Author Bee Shapiro reflects on nearly a decade of covering beauty for The New York Times.

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PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH LIPPMAN AND ERIN BAIANO

s celebrity interviews go, beauty can be a touchy topic. You wouldn’t think it—in today’s image-conscious world creams and shampoos seem like pretty safe territory, but they can reveal a lot about a person’s character. Does she layer on serums like she’s dressing for a blizzard? Or is she the closet groomer who feigns that she effortlessly “doesn’t do much at all”? And there are the actresses who, through their publicists, say right off the bat that they don’t do that kind of story, as if beauty was a kind of feminine allergy. After more than eight years of covering beauty for The New York Times—a —a good part of that interviewing celebrities on their regimens, work which I’ve since compiled into a new book, Skin Deep: Women on Skin Care, Makeup and Looking Their Best (Abrams)—I’m happy to say that the latter attitude has been shifting. A recent interview with Australian actress Ruby Rose perhaps best captured the new thinking about beauty: “There are people who balk when asked about their beauty regimen because they think ‘beauty’ is a vain sort of thing. I don’t really think about it like that. I consider it all as selfcare. I really enjoy the process.”

“There are people who balk when asked about their beauty regimen because they think ‘beauty’ is a vain sort of thing. I consider it all as self-care." —Ruby Rose It’s powerful what a new vocabulary can do. The word “beauty” may be linked to vanity, but “self-care” suggests a dedication to health and well-being. In certain cultures, this has long been the case. In fact, Clémence von Mueffling, a New York-based Parisian who comes from a long line of beauty editors, has a wonderful site called Beauty and Well-Being. Over lunch recently, von Mueffling noted how beauty for French women is the entire experience. “We are all so busy now,” she says. “This is just a bit of time for yourself.” These practices, or time-outs, can have profound impacts beyond the skin’s surface. According to Dr. Amy Wechsler, who is boardcertified in both dermatology and psychiatry, self-care rituals can de-stress and boost confidence; beauty regimens can prepare us for a tough day at work or signal our minds to go into relaxation mode. And taken in the sober context of today’s news headlines, how lovely is the concept of beauty as a respite?

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As featured in the book “Skin Deep,” clockwise from above: makeup artist Bobbi Brown, model Alek Wek and actress Nicole Richie.


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COLOR CODE Designers are bringing out every shade under the sun for a truly bright season.

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IN STELLA WE TRUST Stella Bugbee is one of the great feminist voices of today. Here, The Cut’s editor in chief speaks candidly about tone, teamwork and taking it too far.

Tali Minor: I wanted to begin with how your role has changed since being promoted from editorial director to president and editor in chief. Does that mean you’re now engaged with both editorial and publishing concerns? Stella Bugbee: It does. As you are probably aware we are in a complicated publishing environment in the sense that the old rules and methods are still somewhat in place, but everything is changing in a very rapid way. The ground is sort of moving underneath our feet. My title change is sort of like an acknowledgement that a person in my position needs to play a role that is forward-thinking and business-oriented, but also editorial. TM: It’s all about the brand. SB: Well, I think to be a successful media company, everyone is thinking about all aspects of the business, like growing editorially or growing in a business capacity. And I think it’s also a sort of acknowledgement that a lot of people in our space already operate this way—whether they have the title or not. I wouldn’t say that my job drastically changed, it certainly meant that externally it did, but internally I’m not doing things super differently than I was. TM: I noticed there was a flurry of Bugbee interviews around the relaunch of The Cut, which also coincided with your promotion. Was that part of your overall strategy? SB: We did a pretty big push with press around relaunch. That was necessary because it was a redesign. We didn’t fundamentally alter our DNA, but we reorganized ourselves pretty drastically, so there was a bit of explaining that needed to happen. I worked pretty closely to re-architect the site in the sense of coming up with the four new categories: Style, Self, Culture and Power. And those words needed a little explanation. I think we really saw this as an opportunity to

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introduce the brand to some more people—or reintroduce the brand to people who thought they knew it. I did a huge push around that, which I think I would have done regardless of my new title. TM: How much of what we see is your vision? For instance, are the column ideas your own, or is it all collaborative? SB: It’s really hard to say. I mean, any person running a project is just in charge of a big giant collaboration. I have really great team members, so I wouldn’t say that like 50 percent of The Cut is me, me, me. It’s really just a sensibility thing, a hiring thing. I’m a big part of it in terms of my sensibility. I make a lot of choices editorially and visually. TM: And you set the overall tone. SB: Yeah. My background as a visual person plays into things a lot. I think about things visually, as well as packaging ideas into stories and coming up with rubrics. It’s a giant collaboration; my coworkers are really amazing creative people who are all the time coming up with their own creative contributions. TM: Some of the columns are just so spot on. There’s an intimacy that you create with the content that feels as if it has evolved from the best conversations I ever had with my girlfriends. SB: Well, that’s really good to hear because that’s what we are going for. We do talk a lot about conversation and about what kind of conversations people are having. In a very modern way, we just try to mimic the sound of the time. TM: As a women’s magazine, have you reflected on how the idea of feminism has changed over the last five years? SB: It’s been a really amazing time to get to cover feminism and women’s politics. I can’t imagine a more interesting moment, honestly. We’ve had the first female presidential candidate run, so much sexual

PHOTO COURTESY OF NEW YORK MAGAZINE

BY TALI MINOR PORTRAIT BY VICTORIA STEVENS


“We do talk a lot about conversation and about what kind of conversations people are having. In a very modern way, we just try to mimic the sound of the time.” —Stella Bugbee

harassment, we’ve had crazy setbacks in abortion rights, it’s like a moment where... TM: ... everything is up in the air. SB: Ten years ago I was working at Condé Nast at an interior design magazine. That felt really timely and great at the moment; it was the housing boom. It was the place to be at that moment. Well, lucky for me, I feel like I’m in the feminism boom—well, at least it certainly is where the national conversation seems to be focused. And I get to be within the conversation. It’s really nice. TM: How much of your staff is female? SB: About 99 percent of it; we have one guy on staff. TM: So do you ever have a moment where you think you might be going too far? With your headlines, for instance; they can be pretty edgy! SB: We work on our headlines a lot. We work on them as a group. We’re trying to sound like nobody else. I don’t think we worry too much about offending people. In the sense of, has it gone too far? We know what would offend us, and we don’t do that. It’s very intuitive, I hate to say it but it just really is. And in terms of the whole site, it’s very much run by analyzing data and then making intuitive decisions based on that. We’re definitely not writing for computers. We’re writing for people, based on what we think they want and they need. TM: It’s so nice to hear someone say that. So, SEO is not your driving force? SB: It’s obviously an important consideration when you’re publishing online. But it is not the only consideration that we make when we are considering what to assign. TM: What’s your communication style? Do you have a lot of face-toface interaction or is almost everything via Slack? SB: I’m in meetings all day. I’m also on Slack all day. Constantly using both. TM: So how do you turn off or disconnect? SB: I do not. I’m always on. TM: Does that make you happy?

SB: I don’t look at it as whether I’m happy or not. I’m engaged in what I do. It’s a privilege to get to work here; it’s a privilege to get to do what I do, to be this engaged and want to work the way I want to work here. I think this is slightly generational but it also might be unique to me. I really enjoy what I do, so I’m thinking about it 24 hours a day. And in no way is that a complaint. I feel like [New York Magazine editor] Adam Moss is the same way. He’ll go on vacation and come back with all these great notes because he’s been thinking. The reason I chose this job and not any number of other things is that I wanted to be creative all the time and get to work in that way. And I guess I’m just very lucky that I feel that way. TM: Where do you get your news? What do you like to read on a daily basis? SB: I look at twitter a lot, I read all of New York Mag for news, I read The New Yorker. I basically get my links from Twitter and from our Slack channel. I get newsletters; I read The New York Times newsletter. I see the news alerts form Apple News. I would say I’m not a newshound in the sense that I’m waiting for the news to break like all the time. There are people on my staff who are more like that. I’m in meetings all day, and then I’ll catch up to the news when I get out of them. TM: Were you responsible for building most of the team as it is now? SB: Yes. There’s nobody here who I have not hired. TM: What’s your hiring process like? SB: I would say that creativity, ambition and a sense of humor are the things everybody has to have if they work here. TM: Looking at some of the greatest macro-changes online, are there things that really stand out, that really rocked your world? SB: We’ve watched the whole process improve, in terms of the content getting better, the writing getting better, people being more ambitious. And at the same time, we’ve watched an over-reliance on social media-driven traffic. I think we’ve yet to see if this is a sustainable business model, honestly. I don’t think anybody knows yet. This is a very interesting time to be alive and doing what we are doing.

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“Cucina stems from our own home and experiences. The simplicity of going back to our roots was important to us. The kitchen is the soul of a house—where our family laughs, loves and creates our treasured memories.”

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Tata Harper available at Saks Fifth Avenue; 305.865.1100. “All of the ingredients we use are of the highest quality; sourced both locally and internationally from producers who put forth as much soul into their craft as we do in ours.”

DOLCE VITA Leticia Herrera has opened a gateway to the lantern-lit, cobblestone alley marketplaces of Northern Italy through Miami Beach- and Aspen-based Casa Tua—and her latest extension of the brand, Casa Tua Cucina, an Italian food hall at Brickell City Centre. Curated by the ever-refined Herrera, and in partnership with her husband, Michele Grendene, the Miami-based model has transformed Casa Tua into a lifestyle brand—including a membership club founded in 2004. The extended family approach to hospitality is infused in every aspect of Casa Tua’s restaurants—and not surprisingly, Herrera’s own style is equally as relaxed yet refined. Here, we catch up with the restaurateur to see what's on her Spring must-have list, and get an insider’s take on what to order on (and off) the menu.

“My weekend uniform consists of 100% Capri linen and Eres bathing suits.” “The Cabat from Bottega Veneta is on my must-have list.” Eres Paseo one-piece swimsuit, available at The Webster; 305.868.6544. Bottega Veneta Cabat bag; 305.864.6247.

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PHOTO BY MARCELLO CASSANO; COURTESY OF CASA TUA; BOTTEGA VENETA; THE WEBSTER; TATA HARPER; INDIA HICKS

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Kelly Beeman’s affinity for sensual and expressive fashion illustrations has brought about commissions from brands like J.W. Anderson, Tory Burch and Elie Saab.

WINDOW SHOPPER We peek into illustrator Kelly Beeman’s exquisitely dressed fantasy world—think Saint Laurent, Dior, Valentino—and get a preview of her debut book. BY JANELLE ZARA

“My art influences are varied and change a lot,” says fashion illustrator Kelly Beeman, citing the 1930s Neue Sachlichkeit portraits of German painters Christian Schad and Otto Dix as favorite influences. And in her new book “Window Shopping,” which is being released by Edition Patrick Frey during New York Fashion Week in February, the protagonists of her watercolors, mostly women, bear the beguiling almond-shaped features of a Modigliani and inhabit the

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pattern-saturated world of a Matisse. “The narratives are usually about everyday life and mundane things happening in vaguely familiar places,” says New York-based Beeman—although, as in the pages of a magazine, they’ve been exquisitely styled in the clothing often featured in her titles: At the Piano in Dior, for instance, or Katie and Her Japanese Fighting Fish, In Saint Laurent Party Dress. A self-taught painter, Beeman had


Kelly Beeman’s Dancer Reading the News with a Guard Dog, 2017.

initially painted nudes before more recently using her work to explore what we wear as a cultural touchstone. It was 2015 when she came across London-based designer J.W. Anderson online, and he proved to be one of her early fashion muses. After dressing a nude in a striped piece from the J.W. Anderson Resort collection, she caught the label’s eye on Instagram. The result: commissioned illustrations for Anderson at both his own label and at

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Loewe, where he serves as creative director, followed by a handful of fashion brands as well as The New York Times and Vogue Korea. “I am more inspired by the way that people use fashion than fashion itself,” says Beeman, who studied sociology before becoming an artist. “Clothing can be very expressive and has the potential to emphasize certain qualities in my subjects: It can also be celebratory or ceremonious, it can mark an occasion, it can give a sense of


Clockwise from top: Woman in Jason Wu Dress, with Vase of Purple Flowers, 2017; the cover of Beeman’s new book “Window Shopping;” Boy in a Pool, 2017.

empowerment.” Unfettered by the male gaze, they exude an unmistakable air of sophistication and knowing worldliness, an autonomous point of view. Having said in the past that she’s not one to wait for inspiration, Beeman actively mines the public library for books on art and art history, and the results frequently appear in her work: the floral motifs of Georgia O’Keeffe or the abstract shapes of Alexander Calder, the cold hue of Picasso’s Blue Period or the stateliness iconicity of Byzantine religious figures. (The piano, too, is a recurring figure.

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Beeman keeps an upright piano in her studio, “and I play (and sing) for at least a couple hours every day when I need a break from painting,” she says.) As for the protagonists themselves, adds Beeman, “Most of the time they are not anyone in particular, but they’re often inspired by people I know or have known in the past. I try to create multilayered subjects determined by context—the surface details, objects, places, backgrounds and clothes—and then there’s a layer beneath all of that, which is much harder to describe.”


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RUTH REICHL ENVY

She blazed a trail creating a genre of restaurant and chef chronicling that, in today’s culinary era, is impossible to replicate. Author Andrew Friedman sits down with the inimitable Ruth Reichl. PORTRAIT BY EVAN SUNG

W

hen it comes to my relationship with chefs, I’ve got it pretty good. In 2000, my wife and I celebrated our wedding—an announced elopement—with an intimate lunch personally prepared by Alfred Portale at New York’s Gotham Bar and Grill, and a month later with a party at Union Pacific, where Rocco DiSpirito was a phenomenon. For my book “Knives at Dawn,” I was welcomed behind the scenes at the French Laundry, Thomas Keller’s landmark Napa Valley restaurant. And so on… It's been 20 years now that I've been writing about the professional kitchen. But I’ll tell you something: As a chronicler of chefs, I’ve got nothing on Ruth Reichl. Reichl’s place in the food world isn’t news. It’s the stuff of legend and lore: Her life and career trace the evolution of new American cuisine, from her formative days in Berkeley, California, to her coverage of the Los Angeles restaurant scene of the late 1970s and 1980s, to her stints as The New York Times restaurant critic in the 1990s and then as editor of Gourmet magazine. Oh, and she has immortalized the double helix of her life and its culinary

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backdrop in a series of beloved, best-selling memoirs. The riches of Reichl’s life render the privileges of mine positively paltry by comparison: How quaint that Rocco cooked for my wedding, when Ruth put him on the cover of Gourmet, the first chef ever featured there. Alfred treated us to lunch? Well, Ruth once helped Alfred cook at a benefit event she was covering. Those weeks observing at the French Laundry felt like a coup, but really what were they next to the fact that Reichl helped make the restaurant when she wrote in The New York Times, in 1997, that it was “the most exciting place to eat in the United States”? And yet, it wasn’t until I researched my book about the American chef movement of the 1970s and 1980s, “Chefs, Drugs, and Rock & Roll: How Food Lovers, Free Spirits, Misfits and Wanderers Created a New American Profession” (Ecco/HarperCollins), that I truly understood the chasm between Ruth’s life and mine, not merely the superiority of her titles and output, but of something greater and more uniquely hers. My book interviews conjured a moment of breathtaking innocence and access. Where today publicists, managers, agents and other


“Chefs have become very self-conscious; in those days they weren’t. They were excited that you were interested in them... I just loved them.” —Ruth Reichl

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gatekeepers control a chef’s time and often serve as consigliere during interviews, then there were no such go-betweens, and the result was reporting the rest of us can only dream of. To learn more, I invited Reichl to lunch. She graciously accepted, and in December, we met on a sun-drenched weekday in the dining room of Porter House Bar and Grill, overlooking Central Park. Reichl wears her prestige well. She arrived attired in emerald green that regally offset her trademark black bangs, and made my day by inclusively asking what I was working on. I kicked off our interview with a reality check: Was my impression, and envy, of her charmed professional life accurate, or the product of misplaced nostalgia? A smile spread across her face: “Oh, you are definitely right to be jealous.” Over the next hour, she transported me with stories that left me as green as her ensemble, like the year she spent covering the genesis of Michael McCarty’s seminal restaurant Michael’s Santa Monica, becoming such a constant presence that at one point, McCarty, who’d run out of seed money, asked if she could loan him some. “That’s how blurred the lines were,” said Reichl. “I spent so much time there that they forgot I was writing a story.” The moment exemplifies a defining dynamic of the era: Chefs and writers had more in common than not in those days, when the American food landscape was remade. “There was this sense that nobody cared about food, but we cared and we were promoting it together,” she said. A focal point was a new breed of professional cook—American, and often college-educated—who took cooking in more expressive directions. And so, Reichl, who had a masters in art history, covered chefs the way journalists covered other creative figures, introducing the public to the eclectic characters who were remaking American restaurants: Chez Panisse’s Alice Waters, McCarty,

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Michael’s chef Jonathan Waxman, Boston’s Lydia Shire, and on and on. “They were all fascinating to me,” she said. “It’s changed now: Chefs have become very self-conscious; in those days they weren’t. They were excited that you were interested in them… I just loved them.” The food world of the time was minuscule. “There were a handful of us who really cared where American food went, and it was up to us to advance it any way we could,” she said. The intimacy and shared mission made it perfectly natural for Reichl to ring up Waters and ask her to take her to Chino Farm, or to travel with chef friends to the opening of Mark Miller’s Southwestern restaurant Coyote Café in Santa Fe in 1987, or to spend a week on the road with Wolfgang Puck to write a Los Angeles Times profile. At one crucial moment, journalist and subject, seated alongside each other, nodded off on a flight. Puck snapped awake, sharing with her a nightmare that he forgot a catering gig for a Hollywood mogul. The moment gave Reichl the insightful ending to the story. “You can’t get those pieces if you have a PR person trailing along behind you,” she said. Ironically, stories like that helped catapult chefs to a level of celebrity that threw down a roadblock for those of us who came later. “Restaurants occupy a completely different place in the culture now,” she said. “It has to be the way it is now. It’s not a fledgling industry anymore. You need to recognize that reporters do one thing, critics do one thing, and chefs do another.” That observation really brings home the most defining difference between Reichl and pretty much any writer of my generation: We may be lucky enough to write about a world we love as much as she, and even to probe its history. But Reichl is a part of that history—she helped forge the very world we inhabit—and it occurred to me as I put these thoughts down that for all of the heartfelt flattery I threw her way at lunch, I left out two crucial words: Thank you.

COURTESY OF RUTH REICHL

Reichl with chef Jonathan Waxman; at right, chefs Alice Waters, Cecilia Chiang and Wolfgang Puck at Reichl’s wedding.


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SLIM FIT

Timepiece expert Michael Clerizo explores how Panerai’s Luminor Due is one of the greatest examples of Italian design.

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COURTESY OF PANERAI

T

here is plenty of profundity in Italian culture especially in 42mm (automatic, small seconds, date, 3-day power reserve); the physical objects whether buildings, paintings, cars or P.4001, P.4002, and P.4000 automatic in the new 45mm. Panerai’s movement components have a far simpler finish than watches. And, the meaning behind these creations originates in the desire to reconcile two seemingly on a traditional Swiss movement, resulting in a subtle visual harmony. Interestingly, the skeletonized version is only seen through opposed ideas: beauty and pragmatism. Think about Ferraris. We all ogle a Ferrari when one zooms into a crystal at the back of the watch so that the view of the functioning view. They are stunning—and they are also a means of movement is unimpaired by the hour and minute hands. The shape of the case also links to something deeper. transportation. Cars do not need to be drop dead gorgeous but Called a cushion case and characterized by a perfect circle Ferraris are. That’s what happens when beauty and pragmatism are contained in an almost perfect square—one with slightly curved combined. edges—the case is found on many of Panerai’s watches. The shape The same is true for watches from Panerai. Founded in 1860 by Giovanni Panerai in Florence as a shop also frequently appears in the architecture of Florence, Panerai’s selling and servicing clocks and pocket watches, by the early 20th hometown. One example is the Pazzi Chapel completed in 1443. A dome resting on four century the enterprise curved triangles, called evolved into a pendentives, caps the specialized supplier of chapel. Stare at the watches and other dome and imagine the instruments to the Italian pendentives slightly Navy. It wasn’t until 1993 flattened and you’ll see a that Panerai watches perfect circle inside an became available to almost perfect square— consumers. in other words, the Today’s Panerai are Panerai case. direct descendants of Monks used the those pragmatic ‘tool’ Pazzi Chapel and when watches. Where does the they gazed at the dome beauty come in? they saw a visual Consider the metaphor for the Luminor Due Collection. perfection of the Beauty is present in the universe. The same polished case metals; applies to the Luminor stainless steel, rose gold Due, look at the time and and titanium, in the The Luminor Due 3 Days Automatic watch in Panerai’s trademarked red gold with an ivory face and blue alligator wristband. contemplate the symmetry of the dials on meaning of perfection. both the 42mm and When the Luminor 45mm version—and just revealed at SIHH in January, a 38mm dial—and in the dial Due collection debuted, much comment focused on the fact that color/case metal combos that include anthracite and stainless steel the watches—at 10.7 for the automatic and 10.5 for the handor rose gold, blue and titanium, black and rose gold and ivory and wound—are the thinnest ever from the brand. The thinness proves one point perfectly summed up by the rose gold. The darker dials feature a subtle sun burst finish. For a great Italian writer Baldassare Castiglione in his “The Book of the pragmatic touch, the hands and hour markers glow in the dark. Beauty and pragmatism also co-exist inside the watch as the Courtier,” published in 1528. “Everyone knows the difficulty of Luminor Due collection features several different movements: The things that are exquisite and well done—so to have the facility in P.1000 hand wound calibre in the 42mm case, (some models such things gives rise to the greatest wonder.” Ah, the Italians. feature a skeletonized P.1000/10); OP34 calibre in the 38mm and


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A KAR Properties development. Exclusive Sales & Marketing by Douglas Elliman Development Marketing. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. This is not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation to buy, condominium units to residents of any jurisdiction where such offer or solicitation cannot be made or are otherwise prohibited by law, and your eligibility for purchase will depend upon your state of residency. This offering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. The information provided, including pricing, is solely for informational purposes, and is subject to change without notice. APPLICABLE TO NEW :03,3&4*%&/545IJTBEWFSUJTFNFOUJTOPUBOPGGFSJOH*UJTBTPMJDJUBUJPOPGJOUFSFTUJOUIFBEWFSUJTFEQSPQFSUZ/PPGGFSJOHPGUIFBEWFSUJTFEVOJUTDBOCFNBEFBOEOPEFQPTJUTDBOCFBDDFQUFE PSSFTFSWBUJPOT CJOEJOHPSOPOCJOEJOH DBOCFNBEFVOUJMBOPGGFSJOHQMBOJTĂŹMFE with the New York State Department of Law. This advertisement is made pursuant to Cooperative Policy Statement No. 1, issued by the New York State Department of Law. CP16-0047, Sponsor: 2000 S. Ocean Drive, Hallandale Beach, Florida 33009. Equal Housing Opportunity.


IWC PILOT. ENGINEERED FOR ORIGINALS.

Join the conversation on #B_Original.

Big Pilot’s Watch Edition “Le Petit Prince”. Ref. 5009: The little prince tells the pilot he will give him a friendly laugh from the countless stars in the night sky. The sight of this watch inspires similar sentiments, for every single detail is a joy to behold. The timepiece is not only an imposing 46 millimetres in diameter but also impresses with classic elegance that sets off the midnight blue dial to perfect advantage. Technical perfection, on

the other hand, is guaranteed by the IWCmanufactured 51111-calibre movement with its seven-day power reserve. Time enough to forget time and follow the dream-like journey of IWC . E N G I N E E R E D FO R M E N . the little prince. Mechanical movement, Pellaton automatic winding, IWC-manufactured 51111 calibre, 7-day power reserve when fully wound, Power reserve display, Date display, Central hacking seconds, Screw-in crown, Sapphire glass, convex, antireflective coating on both sides,

Special back engraving (figure), Water-resistant 6 bar, Diameter 46 mm, Calfskin strap by Santoni


A TRUE LUXURY HOME COMES WITH ITS OWN ISLAND

FISHER ISLAND WELCOMES PALAZZO DELLA LUNA

50 NEW WATERFRONT CONDOMINIUM RESIDENCES ON CELEBRATED FISHER ISLAND. A HAVEN OF PRIVACY AND EXCLUSIVITY, MINUTES FROM SOUTH BEACH AND THE CULTURAL ATTRACTIONS OF MIAMI, WITH SUPERBLY CURATED BUILDING AMENITIES AND 6-STAR WHITE-GLOVE SERVICES.

ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. All artist’s or architectural renderings, sketches, graphic materials and photos depicted or otherwise described herein are proposed and conceptual only, and are based upon preliminary development plans, which are subject to change. This is not an offering in any state in which registration is required but in which registration requirements have not yet been met. This advertisement is not an offering. It is a solicitation of interest in the advertised property. No offering of the advertised units can be made and no deposits can be accepted, or reservations, binding or non-binding, can be made in New York until an offering plan is filed with the New York State Department of Law.


PRICED FROM $6.5 MILLION TO $40 MILLION. NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION. SCHEDULE A PRIVATE APPOINTMENT: +1.305.535.6071 | INFO@PALAZZODELLALUNA.COM | PALAZZODELLALUNA.COM BEACH | MARINA | TENNIS | GOLF | RESTAURANTS & BEACH CLUB | SPA & FITNESS CENTER | BOUTIQUE HOTEL DAY SCHOOL | COUNTRY MARKET | FERRY SERVICE TO & FROM THE MAINLAND


Memories create a journey you can always return to.

Perched between the Atlantic Ocean and Intracoastal, The Ritz-Carlton, Bal Harbour is a coastal sanctuary, effortlessly blending urban sophistication with relaxed casual elegance. ritzcarlton.com/balharbour

. Š

2018 The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.


9700 COLLINS AVENUE, SHOP 250, BAL HARBOUR SHOPS P. 305-397-8231


TH E G R I L L AT B AL HARB O UR I S NOW HI LLSTO NE

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HA RBOUR

786 . 2 6 0. 6 6 5 0  HI LLSTO NE.CO M


South Beach • Bal Harbour • SoHo • Houston • South Coast Plaza WWW.THEWEBSTER.US


A HISTORY OF Find out more about this story on

ELEGANCE.

Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave, Store 150, Miami, FL. 33154


Dine Exquisite A five-star resort directly across from the Bal Harbour Shops. The St. Regis Bal Harbour’s four distinct restaurants—Atlantikós, BH Burger Bar, The St. Regis Bar & Sushi Lounge, and La Gourmandise—each present an exquisite culinary experience.

©2018 Marriott International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Preferred Guest, SPG, St. Regis and their logos are the trademarks of Marriott International, Inc., or its affiliates.

9703 Collins Avenue Bal Harbour-Miami Beach, Florida 33154 855 993 0700 stregisbalharbour.com

Stay exquisite at more than 40 St. Regis hotels and resorts worldwide. @stregishotels


Bal Harbour Shops

9700 Collins Ave

Bal Harbour, FL

305.867.7777


Founded in St Tropez in 1971 www.vilebrequin.com BAL HARBOUR SHOPS - 9700 COLLINS AVENUE - BAL HARBOUR - TEL: (305) 861-4022


BAL HARBOUR SHOPS APPOINTMENTS (305) 864 3978 WWW.REDMARKETMIAMI.COM 9700 COLLINS AVENUE BAL HARBOUR, FLORIDA 33154 3RD LEVEL OF BAL HARBOUR SHOPS


Bal Harbour Shops - 9700 Collins Ave #219 (305) 864-1099 // www.addictmiami.com


Bal Harbour Shops, Bal Harbour — shop at santonishoes.com


BARBARA PALVIN

NOVEMBER 2017 LONDON, SPRING STUDIOS

pinko.com BAL HARBOUR 9700 Collins Avenue Suite 269 Ph. 786 577 7330


INTRODUCING THE SPECTACULAR ESTATES AND VILLAS Nine Residences Half Floor Villas and Full Floor Estates Rooftop Pool and Garden Rooftop Sunset Barbecue & Kitchen Private Boat Slips Priced from $995,000

WAT E R IS THE DRIVING FORCE OF ALL N AT U R E LEONARDO DA VINCI

T H E W AT E R S G A L L E RY

305-763-8161

1133 KANE CONCOURSE

I N F O @ T H E W AT E R S B AY H A R B O R . C O M

B AY H A R B O R I S L A N D S , F L 3 3 1 5 4

T H E W AT E R S B AY H A R B O R . C O M

Exclusive sales and marketing by

ŠCompass Florida, LLC. Equal Housing Opportunity. All information furnished regarding property for sale or rent or regarding ďŹ nancing is from sources deemed reliable, but Compass makes no warranty or representation as to the accuracy thereof. All property information is presented subject to errors, omissions, price changes, changed property conditions, and withdrawal of the property from the market, without notice. DISCLAIMER Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating representations of the developer. For correct representations, make reference to the condominium documents required by section 718.503, Florida statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee. Obtain the property report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This offering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. This is not an offer to sell, or solicitation of offers to buy, the condominium units in states where such offer or solicitation cannot be made.


THE

SWEETEST

Sometimes you need to sugarcoat it. With that in mind, try on Spring's softer palette of nudes, pinks and blues to make a gentle statement that won't go unnoticed.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG KADEL

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THING

S T Y L I N G B Y K I R A A LVA R E Z


Bottega Veneta knitted slip dress with sequin detailing, silk trench coat and braided leather belt, 305.864.6247.

Opposite page: CĂŠline oversized blazer, cropped knit halter top, pleated skirt, lace-up boots and silvered round pin, available at The Webster, 305.868.6544.


Loewe patchwork dress, available at Saks Fifth Avenue, 305.865.1100.

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Salvatore Ferragamo strapless satin corset, canvas skirt and leather belt, 305.866.8166.


Prada oversized shirt, canvas pants and red patent slingback pumps with bow detail, 305.864.9111.

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Louis Vuitton striped turtleneck mini dress, available at Saks Fifth Avenue, 305.861.9933.


Escada metallic jacquard two-piece suit, 305.867.9283.

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Michael Kors long sleeve cotton button-down shirt and ombrĂŠ wide-leg sequined pants, available at Neiman Marcus, 305.865.6161.


Carolina Herrera ruffled blouse, pleated colorblocked skirt and square heels, available at Neiman Marcus, 305.865.6161.

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Valentino velvet halter top, sequin top and pants with embroidered detail, 305.867.1215. Photographer: Greg Kadel Producer: Simon Schwarz/ No-Name Productions Stylist: Kira Alvarez/ No-Name Management Stylist Assistant: Pedro Rodrigo Gonzรกlez Model: Lindsay Ellingson Hair: Gavin Harwin/ The Wall Group Makeup: Christine Cherbonnier/ The Wall Group Manicurist: Sarah Nguyen/ Kate Ryan Inc.


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Chanel blouse with lace detailing, mini skirt, earrings, leather gloves, boots and hat, 305.868.0550.

springseduction Forget the florals for a moment. The season’s best blooms are the sequin variety, adorning everything from track suits to micro mini skirts. So add a little gloss to your wardrobe and glide into Spring. photography by DIEGO UCHITEL styling by SARAH GORE REEVES


Balenciaga gold statement ring, 305.864.4932.

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balenciaga


tom ford

Tom Ford ruched dress with metallic beaded sleeves, available at Neiman Marcus, 305.865.6161.


jeremy scott tights:

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wolf ord

Wolford tights, 305.868.4404. Tom Ford heels, available at Neiman Marcus, 305.865.6161. Jeremy Scott metal tube.


bottega veneta

Bottega Veneta dress, 305.864.6247. Christian Louboutin boots, available at Saks Fifth Avenue, 305.865.1100.

boots:

christian louboutin


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dolce & gabbana


Dolce & Gabbana blouse, leopard-print mini skirt and crystal-embellished shoulder bag, 305.866.0503. Giuseppe Zanotti star-embellished heels, 305.868.0133.

giuseppe zanotti


t-shirt:

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brunello cucinelli


dress:

fendi

Brunello Cucinelli t-shirt, 305.864.4833. Fendi sequin dress, 305.861.7114. Mounser earrings.


Brunello Cucinelli sweater, 305.864.4833. Alberta Ferretti sequin suit, available at Saks Fifth Avenue, 305.865.1100. Roger Vivier sneakers, 305.868.4344. Lynn Ban rings.

sweater:

sneakers:

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roger vivier

brunello cucinelli

sequin suit:

albertaferretti


dior

Photographer: Diego Uchitel/ Jones MGMT Photo Assistant: Olivier Simille Producer: Fill in the Blank Production Stylist: Sarah Gore Reeves Stylist Assistants: David Taveras, Elizabeth Pascarella Model: Dasha Maletina/ The Lions Hair: Felix Fischer/ Factory Downtown Makeup: Kajsa Svanberg/ Art Department Manicurist: Rica Romain Digital Tech: Kristoffer Ohlsson

Dior embellished bodysuit and sheer skirt, available at Saks Fifth Avenue, 305.867.1900. Tane by Enrique Norten necklace.


AGE OF ELEGANCE The Surf Club ushers in a new golden age of sophisticated travel in Miami.

COURTESY RICHARD MILLE

BY SIOBHAN MORRISSEY

The pool at the Four Seasons at The Surf Club calls for a moment of reflection—and relaxation.

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A

portal to the past and at the same time a completely modern escape, the new Surf Club is a stunning expression of subtle luxury. A cocoon of comfort, the property is a melding of intimate hotel—the Four Seasons, designed by Joseph Dirand—and private residences featuring the clean lines of architect Richard Meier. The old and the eternal unite in this project with its preserved Art Deco architecture, modern additions and emphasis on nature. The iconic Peacock Alley looks more like the nave of a church, with the entrance more uplifting than grand as the eye travels from the vaulted ceiling with its dark exposed beams to the big reveal of the ocean in the distance. It’s a place where husband and wife can be couples again while staff entertain their children. Guests can unwind at the spa, which boasts treatments so rejuvenating that one client claimed the facial recognition program on her cell phone couldn’t identify her for two days after a visit. Back in its heyday, people paddled around the pool in kayaks and attended fashion shows or black-tie boxing matches. Unusual sightings were commonplace, from elephants in the lobby to race cars by the beach. On any given night, one might bump into Gary Cooper, Frank Sinatra or Elizabeth Taylor and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor frequented the club. Even former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill relaxed there, chomping on a cigar while painting seascapes. Tire magnate Harvey Firestone opened The Surf Club in 1930. Roughly eight decades

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later, real estate investor Nadim Ashi decided to expand on that concept and lured a stable of talented individuals to make The Surf Club once again a destination of distinction. Here, we check in with a few of these tastemakers. Fernando Wong, landscape architect “The history of The Surf Club was really important to me,” Wong says regarding his decision to take on a project that ultimately involved 40 plant varieties, 240 palms and 250 other trees, including a banyan tree that’s three stories tall and 45 feet wide. Trucked in from Hobe Sound, the tree had to be cut vertically into five separate sections, transported by flatbed, and then reassembled like a living puzzle upon its arrival. Wong transformed the original property from a sandy expanse to a seaside oasis. He credits Winston Churchill for inspiration. “There was a photograph of Churchill at one of the pool cabanas,” he says. “I was captivated by the whole notion of him in this cabana, painting, and what he would be painting now. I wanted the possibility of adding greenery to the painting.” Melanie Courbet, curator and retailer Les Ateliers Courbet is a seductress of beauty, with household objects so enticing you may be tempted to pet them. “We don’t place anything behind glass. I hate vitrines,” she says. “I try to make things very comfortable and accessible.” Aside from the myriad varieties of chairs, sofas, tables, rugs and even an assortment of marquetry flooring, there’s also a full complement of objets d’art, such as Tadao Ando’s limited-edition Venini Cosmos

vase, with its combination of cubes that carve a sphere out of negative space. Courbet, who is a descendent of the famed French painter Gustave Courbet, represents a stable of artists and artisans who also exhibit at her flagship store in New York. The Surf Club boutique features work by the same craftsmen and emphasizes the more colorful objects in their collections. Antonio Mermolia, Le Sirenuse head chef Mermolia creates miniature gardens on a plate. Some dishes resemble a bouquet of colorful spring flowers. Others, like his signature tiramisu, are more monochromatic. The tiramisu, with its twin stalks of chocolate spiraling out of the glass, has tiny leaves of mint that conjure the image of a newly budding plant. Taking his cue from the restaurant’s namesake, a resort on the Amalfi Coast of Italy, Mermolia infuses Le Sirenuse with the flavors of his native Southern Italy. At 34, Mermolia may seem young to helm such an iconic establishment, but he’s put in his time at several landmark Italian restaurants in New York, including Il Punto. He also has something all great chefs must possess, the ability to take command in the kitchen. He once played professional basketball as a point guard in Italy’s national league. “A point guard is basically the coach on the court,” he says. “In the kitchen it is very similar.” In addition to Mermolia, The Surf Club wooed America’s top chef and the Michelin man behind the French Laundry, Chef Thomas Keller. His restaurant will open later this year.

PHOTOS BY: ADRIEN DIRAND; KRIS TAMBURELLO

Guests can sip from handmade Venetian glassware at Le Sirenuse Champagne Bar (left) and peruse elegant design at Les Ateliers Courbet.


Follow in the footsteps of Winston Churchill, Elizabeth Taylor and Frank Sinatra through The Surf Club’s iconic Peacock Alley.

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Taking his cue from the restaurant’s namesake, a resort on the Amalfi Coast of Italy, Chef Antonio Mermolia infuses Le Sirenuse with the flavors of his native Southern Italy.

Le Sirenuse’s Champagne Bar offers a menu of unique and classic cocktails, as well as the largest selection of Champagne in Miami.

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COURTESY DIOR

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THE PERFUMES PROVENCE BUILT During harvest time in the South of France, exclusive fragrance farms create an ephemeral experience of sight and smell. BY KATHRYN ROMEYN

T

he morning air is sweet with the scent of justemerged Rosa centifolia blossoms cascading over fields thriving in southern Provence. Late April or early May—dependent on the weather, as in a vineyard—is when the fields begin to hum with activity as harvesters filter in to pluck the precious flowers the same day it’s bloomed (otherwise it’s unusable). The ritualistic picking is done by hand in the mornings over several weeks and is meticulous—the fragile flowers are broken off and the bounteous petals are gently dropped into burlap bags that are taken to the factory within hours for immediate distillation. It’s a romantic vision, but not without plenty of work— pickers collect up to six kilos of roses per hour. Still, spring is a heavenly time to be in and around the perfume mecca of Grasse. It’s been nearly 500 years since the inland town, close to Nice and Cannes, began perfume production—an endeavor that was initially taken on in order mask the stink wafting up from the town’s tanneries. By 1798, perfume won out over leather as Grasse’s bountiful blooms became famous throughout Europe. The pristine medieval village is

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The ritualistic flower picking is done by hand in the mornings over several weeks and is meticulous.

now awaiting a decision by UNESCO on a proposal to classify the cradle of fragrance flowers as a World Heritage Site for Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. A favorable microclimate is to thank for the region’s continued success that crystalized in the early 20th century when it became recognized as the international capital of exceptional flowers and perfumery. Rosa centifolia, dubbed May rose for the month in which the flowers bloom, and fine jasmine have made perhaps the most profound impact on the luxury fragrance industry—so much so that Chanel and Dior rely on the annual harvest for some of their most legendary scents. “Rose harvesting is a deep-seated tradition in the South of France,” says Fabrice Pellegrin, perfumer at Firmenich (which has made iconic fragrances for the likes of Issey Miyake, Kenzo, Ralph Lauren and Giorgio Armani), one of the most important players in the exceptional rose de Mai extraction in Grasse. Its legacy is so important that for the past few years, says Pellegrin, Grasse Town Hall has made efforts to help extend perfume fields, allowing growers to plant new flower plots around the city. (Rare and precious flowers there also include tuberose, orris, violet leaves, lavender and orange flowers.) Firmenich also leads an initiative called #NaturalsTogether, partnering with local farmers to support them in ensuring the best quality ingredients and preserving the resources for the future. Indeed, not all farms are created equally. Christian Dior, who adored flowers, acquired the Château de La Colle Noire in Montauroux near Grasse in 1951 and set about planting ambitious and sublime gardens, leaving behind fields of now-rare Jasmine grandiflorum and May rose flowers—cultivated with water brought from Montauroux village—when he passed away in 1957. (In 2016 Christian Dior Parfums reinvested in the chateau and re-created his garden, replanting the signature blooms in a tribute.) From Dior’s very first fragrance, Provence was his muse. Dior described the native scent

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as the “perfume of contented nature.” And “Miss Dior,” he said, “was born of those Provençal evenings, alive with fireflies, where young jasmine plays a descant to the melody of the night and the land.” More recently, Dior perfume-creator François Demachy, raised in Grasse, created exclusive partnerships with Domaine de Manon and the Clos de Callian (which has 20,000 May rose plants imbued with scents of different facets thanks to an ambient ecosystem), where the entire three-hectare harvest is reserved for the fashion house. The May rose at Domaine de Manon, grown in a highly productive passeddown technique, is called “both subtle and honeyed” by fourth-generation heiress Carole Biancalana. For its part, Chanel looks to the local Mul family for its buds, grown on a generations-old farm. Their long-term presence in the area is of no surprise, considering it takes 1,000 jasmine flowers and a dozen May roses to make one single ounce of Chanel No. 5. (The jasmine harvest, from July to October, sees workers at dawn picking thousands of minuscule white bells that blossomed overnight.) Lavender, to the joy of springtime travelers, is another major ingredient, and is at the heart of Frédéric Malle’s new Music for a While. “When you’re European and you smell lavender, you think of lavender sachets and this cliche of the South of France—it’s delicious,” he says of the interesting, bold accord perfumer Carlos Benaïm found in the botanical. Interested parties staying nearby, on the French Riviera or even in Monaco (a one-hour drive) can get involved in the magical harvest beyond visiting the International Perfume Museum in Grasse, which has botanical gardens outside the city open to visitors. Guests of Parfumerie Galimard can peruse their flower fields in Gourdon, escorted by a master gardener; lavender fields ready to run through, arms spread, aren’t hard to find; and with prior arrangements it’s possible to tour the exclusive Domaine de Manon and maybe even pick roses of your own. Never has the expression “stop and smell the roses” been more apropos.


Chanel sources flower buds from a generations-old farm for its fragrances; rose harvesting is a deep-seated tradition in the South of France; lavender fields abound in Grasse—to the delight of all who visit. IF YOU MAKE THE PROVENCIAL PILGRIMAGE, HERE ARE A FEW PLACES TO STAY LA BASTIDE SAINT-ANTOINE This circa 18th-century Relais & Châteaux property is tucked in the heart of an expansive olive grove in Grasse proper, and boasts all the sensorial stimulations that you’d expect of a Provençal bolthole with a Mediterranean restaurant, botanical garden and pétanque court. And, for real enthusiasts, try out classes at the aromatic tasting school. BASTIDE ST. MATHIEU Just 20 minutes from the Cote d’Azur glow of Cannes and 40 minutes from Nice is an 18th-century manor house turned charmingly decorated boutique hotel and event space surrounded by bucolic gardens and olive groves.

LE MAS CANDILLE With its Michelin-starred restaurant, trio of swimming pools, spa and acres of terraced grounds, this relaxed five-star in Mougins—formerly an 18th-century farmhouse—is all about atmosphere. LE COUVENT DES MINIMES HOTEL & SPA Nestled in the Luberon, two and a half hours northwest of Grasse, the L’Occitane-owned Eden provides an enchanting setting with plenty of verdant growth and mountains in the distance. Though it’s not in Grasse, the experiences available in the spa ensure an equally olfactory and blissful journey.

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Artist Ruben Toledo speaks to the power of the sartorial sketch as we take a look back at a decade of celebrating fashion illustration in Bal Harbour Magazine. We can sense when a new fashion creature is emerging out of the deep jungle; we can feel when the fashion natives are getting restless and the hunger for the “new” is reaching a fever pitch. Fashion has its own particular heartbeat, and fashion illustrators are among the best at anticipating this unique pulse. Fashion is a living breathing thing with a mind of its own and, together with time, creates its own unique shapes and forms. “Fashion is what time looks like,” my wife, Isabel, has been quoted as saying. And fashion illustrators have an uncanny ability for capturing this Zeitgeist. I consider myself a visual journalist when it comes to how I approach my fashion illustrations, I learned this from my friend the late Bill 172 BAL HARBOUR

Cunningham, who was quick to tell me he liked looking at my scribbles and then trying to find people who really looked like them in the streets. We debated what comes first, imagination or reality—the fashion chicken or the artist egg? We proved each other wrong constantly and that’s just it—reality needs fantasy and fantasy conjures up reality. That is exactly what fashion illustration does. Each of the fashion illustrators in this special portfolio—David Downton, Donald Robertson, Tanya Ling and Jean-Philippe Delhomme—are as individually gifted and eccentrically focused on their own inner vision as fashion design itself. This is what keeps the fashion industry’s creative wheels delightfully and furiously spinning every season.


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“Fashion has its own particular heartbeat, and fashion illustrators are among the best at anticipating this unique pulse.” —Ruben Toledo

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“Home for me is a piece of paper or a canvas. I see those as a territory, a principality, an empire. That’s the world I make.” —Tanya Ling

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“I have to make sure that it doesn’t get too slick—I have to keep the hand in there. They have to be able to see me making it.” —Donald Robertson

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“When I was a student, I was much more interested by the work of photographers; photography was really what inspired me to paint.” —Jean-Philippe Delhomme 178 BAL HARBOUR


“Controlled spontaneity is my goal.” —David Downton BAL HARBOUR 179


BOHEMIAN

Who hasn't dreamed about island living? We traveled to Islamorada's most storied property, The Moorings, to live out our beach fantasy in the season's most romantic looks.

DREAM

PHOTOGRAPHY BY F & G STYLING BY KIRA ALVAREZ

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Etro lace mini dress, 305.868.5971.


CĂŠline cotton dress with lace detailing, available at The Webster, 305.868.6544.

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Dolce & Gabbana earrings and cotton shirt with bow tie and lace sleeves, 305.866.0503. CĂŠline lace culottes, available at The Webster, 305.868.6544.


Oscar de la Renta tulle and lace gown and enameled earrings, 305.868.7986.

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Etro earrings and gauze dress with lace detailing, 305.868.5971.


Gucci lace dress, 305.868.6504. Céline gold hoop earrings, available at The Webster, 305.868.6544.

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Bottega Veneta fringed leather mini dress, 305.864.6247.

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Chanel necklaces and dress with crystal embroidery, 305.868.0550. Photographers: F & G Producer: Simon Schwarz/ No-Name Productions Stylist: Kira Alvarez/ No-Name Management Stylist Assistant: Maria Rion Model: Marie Ihm/ Next Model Management Hair: Tina Echeverri/ Artist Management Makeup: Miriam Azoulay "Bohemian Dream" was shot on location at The Moorings in Islamorada. To book, please visit themooringsvillage.com or call 305.664.4708.


You may have heard the term Aman Junkie, but what is it exactly that makes this resort brand so addictive? Kathryn Romeyn checks in on the eve of the brand’s 30th anniversary.

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COURTESY AMAN RESORTS

THE CULT OF AMAN


Aman Resort’s flagship location, Amanpuri, in Phuket, Thailand. BAL HARBOUR 191


COURTESY AMAN RESORTS

“Once addicted to the values of Aman we remain true to it.” —Jean-Michel Gathy

The Beach Club Restaurant at Amanoi serves authentic Vietnamese cuisine in an idyllic setting overlooking Vinh Hy Bay.

W

hen Amanpuri, meaning “place of peace,” opened on Phuket Island in 1988, it redefined the luxury hospitality experience. Indeed, with its 84 ultra-discreet pavilions and villas sprinkled across almost 50 acres of coconut palms and eggshell-hued beach, the minimalist yet thoughtfully indigenous aesthetic was completely fresh. With its 24/7 butlers, in-room check-in and intuitive service, Aman, founded by Adrian Zecha, gave new meaning to the classification five-star. In a sea of overwrought lobbies and stuffy white-glove service, it stood out. “It’s a true luxury experience because they let you relax while making sure you’re looked after,” says landscape architect Nathan Browning, who began working with

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the brand around 2002. “It’s a magical experience.” Amanpuri, the flagship, turns 30 this year; coincidentally, the brand that’s become a benchmark in luxury travel now has 30 properties (in 20 countries), too. And they’ve collectively spawned a cult-like following called “Aman Junkies,” who swear by resorts including Amanpulo (Philippines), Amangiri (Utah) and Amankila (Bali). “Once addicted to the values of Aman we remain true to it,” says Malaysia-based architect Jean-Michel Gathy of the phenomenon. A star Aman architect, he’s designed nine resorts and is at work on a new one set to open in New York City. “Aman has a subtle nature I think a lot of people are turning toward and have responded to for the past 30 years,” says Browning. “They appreciate the fact it’s not all

just marble and gold…There’s a sophisticated casualness in the design in a way that’s bespoke.” What started off with a heavy concentration in Asia has spread around the globe, and now highly personalized, private stays can be found on most continents in places as varied as Laos and Morocco, China (Amanyangyun in Shanghai, their fourth in the country, opened in January) and Venice, Italy. But it’s safe to expect an even more outsized presence in the years to come, as the brand’s portfolio grows more robust. Not without some drama, of course. The Indonesian-born octogenarian founder’s affiliation with Aman ended in 2016, which upset some Junkies (he opened his first Azerai boutique hotel in Laos in 2017). Still, says Browning, a longtime Zecha collaborator


“They appreciate the fact it’s not all just marble and gold… There’s a sophisticated casualness in the design in a way that’s bespoke.” —Nathan Browning

Clockwise from top left: The Japanese spa at Amanemu; a view from the beach at Amanpuri; a Mediterranean-inspired appetizer at Amanpuri’s Beach Club Restaurant; the Aegean Sea as seen from Amanzoe; a detail of Amankora in Bhutan; Aman Tokyo’s contemporary lobby overlooks the bustling city; a slice of desert seen from Amangiri’s spa.

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Contemporary luxury evokes forms of classical architecture at Amanzoe, located on the eastern coast of Greece.

At Amanyangyun, the spa offers treatments inspired by Chinese medicine.

who’s working with him on other projects, “Adrian is still very passionate about what he created and how it moves on.” And it is continuing to make waves in his absence. The current CEO and owner, Vladislav Doronin, seems committed to spreading the beloved Aman ethos far and wide. There isn’t a major shift in brand direction beyond, perhaps, more of an emphasis on wellness and cuisine programs, which are constantly evolving and advancing. Rumors over the last few years have teased obsessives with dreamy destinations from Perth to Gabon, Portugal to Paris and Mexico to Napa Valley. A New York location opposite Trump Tower is slated to open in 2020. It’s the first East Coast location and second city property—something Zecha always wanted to offer the Junkies. “Whether it’s in the jungle, on a beach or in a metropolis, it’s supposed to be beautiful and serene, with local materials that blend in,” says Browning, who recently completed work on a post–Hurricane Irma refurbishment at Amanyara in Turks and Caicos and is on the team for a forthcoming Costa Rican resort, which hasn’t been officially announced. “Ultimately it’s exactly that—it’s supposed to blend in.”

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COURTESY AMAN RESORTS

Amanyangyun—located just outside Shanghai in a forest of camphor trees—is the resort’s fourth location in China.

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EGON SCHIELE

OLIVIER THEYSKENS: SHE WALKS IN BEAUTY Belgian fashion designer Olivier Theyskens is the subject of Antwerp’s ModeMuseum current exhibition, on view through March. The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue examine the evolution of Theyskens’s career of 20 years in the fashion industry, from the time he emerged onto the scene in 1998 to his celebrated partnership with Theory in 2011 and later the re-launch of his eponymous brand. (Rizzoli)

Between the Lines From fashion’s greatest lensmen to its most daring designers, these Spring titles are a must-read. BY SIMONE SUTNICK

MERT ALAS AND MARCUS PIGGOTT Taschen’s newly released Collector’s Edition—1,250 copies plus 240 artist’s proofs—contains about 300 vibrant images from the duo’s oeuvre, such as photographs of Kate Moss, Gisele Bündchen and Naomi Campbell for brands like Miu Miu, Gucci and Saint Laurent, among many others. Copies 1-250 include an original print signed by Mert and Marcus. (Taschen)

Olivier Theyskens S/S 2001 from Dutch Magazine.

#LOVEVIVIER Fashion mavens Ines de la Fressange, Christene Barberich, Leandra Medine and Arianna Piazza provide a fresh look at one of the most revered designers in the history of fashion, Roger Vivier. The celebrated designer’s illustrious career is marked by iconic creations such as the stiletto heel and the pilgrim pumps as worn by Catherine Deneuve. The book, to be released by Rizzoli in May, will provide a uniquely contemporary understanding of Vivier’s lasting legacy. (Rizzoli) 196 BAL HARBOUR

PHOTO BY DIEGO UCHITEL (THEYSKENS); PHOTO BY THOMAS SCHENK (THEYSKENS)

Egon Schiele, a disciple of Gustav Klimt, is considered one of the defining artists of early 20th-century Modernist painting. This complete catalogue of works by the celebrated Austrian painter is comprised of 221 paintings and 146 drawings in large format. Newly photographed works accompanied by insightful essays as well as some of Schiele’s own personal writings and poems provide a reinvigorated look at the brutally honest and often grotesquely beautiful works of the artist’s short-lived yet influential career. (Taschen)


©THE WHITE HORSE BY MARY MCCARTNEY, RIZZOLI, NY, 2018; ©INDIA HICKS: A SLICE OF ENGLAND BY INDIA HICKS, RIZZOLI, NY, 2018; ©THE PARISIAN FIELD GUIDE TO MEN’S STYLE BY INES DE LA FRESSANGE & SOPHIE GACHET, FLAMMARION, 2018

THE WHITE HORSE This May, acclaimed British photographer Mary McCartney will share an intimate look at her relationship with an unexpected subject: her white stallion, Alejandro. Composed portraits and candid shots reveal the bond between the photographer and her beloved horse, set in the countryside of Sussex, where McCartney grew up. Taken over the course of a year, the photographs carry the dynamic energy of the stunning creature, tenderly captured by its owner. (Rizzoli)

INDIA HICKS: A SLICE OF ENGLAND

ALBERT WATSON: KAOS A compilation of his most celebrated photographs, unpublished Polaroids and quotes from Albert Watson himself, this Collector’s Edition includes iconic portraits of Alfred Hitchcock, Kanye West, David Bowie, Steve Jobs and Andy Warhol as well as brilliant landscapes and fashion shoots. An edition of 1,200, the first 200 copies include a print signed by the famed photographer, while the rest are numbered and signed by Watson. (Taschen)

THE PARISIAN FIELD GUIDE TO MEN’S STYLE

Authors of The New York Times best-selling “Parisian Chic,” Ines de la Fressange and Sophie Gachet, have developed an insightful and clever guide for men’s style from everyday chic to blacktie. Together as a dynamic duo of Parisian style, they break down the dos and don’ts of men’s fashion in a pragmatic, easy-to-follow field guide to be released in May. (Rizzoli)

All titles available at Books & Books Bal Harbour.

Designer and entrepreneur India Hicks shares both her family history and her contemporary approach to English tradition in this follow-up to her New York Times bestseller, “India Hicks: Island Style.” To be released by Rizzoli in April, this book is a refreshingly personal synthesis of past and future with a foreword by designer Carolina Herrera. (Rizzoli)

PORSCHE: MILESTONES Celebrating 70 years as a forerunner in sports car manufacturing, this beautifully illustrated compilation provides a comprehensive look at Porsche’s history. The newly released book from teNeues traces the influence Porsche has had on the evolution of the automobile, setting industry standards from racing to luxury vehicles. Thoughtful texts by international writers and journalists, along with elegant photos, capture the sleek power of iconic models like the Boxster, the Cayenne and the Macan. (teNeues)

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Bal Harbour Magazine - Spring 2018  

Stay connected to the world of fashion, style and beauty with the Bal Harbour Magazine Spring 2018 issue! Please visit https://www.balharbou...

Bal Harbour Magazine - Spring 2018  

Stay connected to the world of fashion, style and beauty with the Bal Harbour Magazine Spring 2018 issue! Please visit https://www.balharbou...