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Publisher cum Editor

Rajneesh Sharma

E d i t o r i a l

rajneeshhammer@gmail.com

Associate Editor

Swarnendu Biswas Resident Editor

Sharmila Chand (Delhi) Ashok Malkani (Mumbai) Layout & Design

Hari Kumar. V Abhishek Singh Rathore Production Assistant

Mamta Sharma

Advertising Sales

Delhi: Debabrata Nath, Sumesh Sharma Director Sales

Sanjay Anand Mobile: +91 9811136837 Director Operations

Rajat Taneja Mobile: +91 9810315463 Editorial & Advertising Offices: Delhi:

Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 206, Samrat Bhawan, Ranjeet Nagar Commercial Complex, New Delhi-110008 Phone: 91-11-25704103, 45084903, 45093486 Mumbai:

Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 105, 1st Floor, Aarpee Centre, Gufic Compound, 11th Road, MIDC, Near Tunga Paradise Hotel, Andheri (E), Mumbai-400 093 Phone: 022-28395833

E-mail: info@hammer.co.in © 2018 Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. No part of the publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher. Bakery Review is a bi-monthly magazine, printed, edited, owned and published by Rajneesh Sharma from 206, Samrat Bhawan, Ranjeet Nagar Commercial Complex, New Delhi. Printed at Swan Press, B-71, Naraina Industrial Area, Phase-II, New Delhi-110 028. Editorial Policy: Editorial emphasis in Bakery Review magazine is on educational & informational material specifically designed to assist those responsible for managing Bakery & Confectionery business. Articles are welcome and will be published on the sole discretion of the editor. Disclaimer: The editor and publisher believes that all information contained in this publication are correct at the time of publishing. Content published not necessarily are the opinion or view of the editor and publisher. Editor and publisher declines any responsibility for any action taken based on the information contained in this publication, including liability for error or omission.

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esserts are one of the very few food categories which have universal acceptance across the globe. As many Indians have a sweet tooth, the role of desserts in India as a culmination of meal does make relevant business sense in India’s food service industry. Their role in the bakery and confectionery business is extremely crucial. With the wave of health consciousness sweeping through urban India during the recent years, the gluten-free desserts and vegan desserts are gaining popularity. Savoury dessert is also evolving as a trend across India’s food service industry. In our Cover Story, we have discussed various dessert trends across India’s food service industry, through interactions with some industry experts. With the maturation of globalisation in urban India and with shifts in our socio-economic facets during the recent years, there has been an evolution in breakfast tables of middle class urban India. The heavy aloo paranthas or bread omelette are getting fast replaced by healthy RTE and RTC breakfast options, which include healthy breakfast cereals also. Idli, dosa, upma, oats, cornflakes and varied juice options are frequently adorning our breakfast tables. The Business Story endeavours to explore the evolution in India’s breakfast market, where the bakery and confectionery industry can play an important role. It also presents some factors to consider for players entering the RTE and/or RTC breakfast segment in India. The case of impressive market potential of QSRs, bakery cafes and standalone bakery outlets specialising in our indigenous bakery products is presented through our Feature section. With diabetes becoming a huge health menace in India, the role of natural sweeteners is expected to assume more importance in India’s food & beverage industry, particularly in India’s bakery and confectionery industry. In this regard, a feature on the much talked about natural sweetener stevia also makes for interesting reading. The crucial role of maintaining hygiene in bakeries is being probed through our Operations section. Besides these, other interesting industry relevant issues and important information pertaining to India’s bakery and confectionery industry are being presented in this issue. We hope our readers would find the exercise of going through this issue as much fulfilling as we had while developing it. I hereby sign off by wishing all our readers a very fruitful financial year.

Annual subscription rate within India is Rs. 450 and for overseas it is US $110, for surface mail. Single issue is available for Rs. 90 in India and US $25 for overseas. Cheques are payable to Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

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18 COVER STORY

departments

Delicious Dessert Trends

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Event

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News Scan

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Report

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Ingredient

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Product Preview

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Interview

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Evolution in Breakfast Tables

30 FEATURE

Time for Indianised Bakery Cafes

32 PRODUCT

Ideal Beverages for Cafes

34 OPERATIONS

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Bakery Needs Hygiene

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Europain 2018: Boosting Business for Bakery-Pastry Entrepreneurs Attended by more than 52,000 professionals, the event facilitated entrepreneurs in the bakery-pastry sector to find optimal solutions to enhance productivity and transparency, boost sales using innovative tools, and manage efficiently to invest more effectively

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he Europain trade fair, held in Pa r i s f ro m 3 rd - 6 t h Fe b r u a ry, brought together players in the bakery industry from different parts of the world. M o re t h a n 5 2 , 0 0 0 p rofe s s i o n a l s attended the four-day event where latest products and services were presented by t h e ex h i b i to rs . O n e t h i rd of t h e professionals came from outside France, highlighting the international character of the event. On 5th February, the French Minister for Labour, Muriel Penicaud honoured Europain with her presence as part of a visit during which she met several exhibitors and visitors. More than 100 new products were presented at the show. For the first time, the show was structured into three sections –manufacturing, selling and managing. Reflecting the dynamism of a booming sector, the new Europain Forum attracted many visitors keen to find information on the latest trends and best practices in the trade. The fair facilitated entrepreneurs in the bakery-pastry sector to find optimal solutions to enhance productivity and transparency, boost sales using innovative tools, and manage efficiently to invest more effectively.

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Exhibitors at the show reported that visitors often came to them with concrete investment projects concerning production equipment or sales point design and arrangement. “We made a considerable number of contacts with motivated visitors who were clearly attending the event with business in mind. We concluded several sales and prepared some estimates, including some export sales that would not have been possible without Europain,” said Antoine Lemerle, CEO, ARIA, one of the exhibitors. As for appliances and equipments covered, the emphasis was clearly on flexibility, user-friendliness and energy eff i c i e n cy. A m o n g t h e n ew p ro d u cts proposed for the first time to the visitors’ vote, the ‘Carrés’ by Moulins Bourgeois

won the Europain 2018 Visitors’ Award.

Stage for Worldwide Bakery Europain 2018 welcomed more than 32 per cent international visitors from all over the world who are increasingly drawn by French excellence in this sector. This was up from 12 percent as compared to the previous edition of the show.

Outstanding Programme For the first time, Europain introduced the Europain Forum, a think-tank for t h e b a ke ry - p as t ry i n d u s t ry, r u n n i n g up to 2020: At the forum, 41 themes we re a d d ress e d w i t h m o re t h a n 8 0 c o n t r i b u t o rs , i n c l u d i n g Fre n c h a n d international entrepreneurs and several world’s leading experts. n

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Bakery and Pastry Sector

Showcases at Food&HotelAsia

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he most comprehensive international food and hospitality biennial mega trade event in t h e re g i o n , t h e 2 1 s t e d i t i o n Food&HotelAsia  (FHA), will be held from 24th to 27th April 2018 at two venues – Singapore Expo and Suntec Singapore. Ce l e b rat i n g 4 0 ye a rs of b u s i n ess excellence, Food&HotelAsia (FHA) is the preferred choice for industry professionals to access an international showcase of food and hospitality products, equipment and solutions, which are needed to drive business inspiration today and tomorrow. The slated event will house its biggestever industry congregation with 4,000 international exhibitors from more than 70 countries and regions; an increase of 25 percent compared to its last edition. The event’s total floor area spans 119,500 sqm, 23 percent increase from 97,000 sqm. 68 international groups are confirmed and spread across the two venues, with Armenia and Qatar being the newest countries to participate. 78,000 trade attendees from over 100 countries and regions are expected at the 2018 edition of the show. A mega tradeshow synonymous with the food and hospitality industry in Asia and beyond, Food&HotelAsia (FHA) has

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grown tremendously in tandem with Asia’s food and hospitality industry, and has earned itself a reputation as the most comprehensive premier international food and hospitality trade show in the region. This biennial event has proved to stay relevant to the Asian markets’ needs. To cater to the diverse needs of its food and hospitality industry, FHA offers an extensive assortment of products and services through its 6 specialised sector’s.

Serving the Bakery & Pastry Sector The bakery& pastry sector at FHA2018 is a dedicated all-in-one sourcing platform that features a complete selection ranging from ingredients and supplies, to preparation, refrigeration and storage equipment. Confirmed participants include Aladdin, Allied Foodservice Equipment, AMF Bakery Systems, Angel Yeast, BarryCallebaut Chocolate Asia Pacific, Bundy Baking Solutions, CSM Deutschland, DLA Naturals, Femac Singapore, ForniCeky, Fuji Shokai, G e l M at i c I t a l i a , G e l at o S p e c i a l i s t s , GroupeProva, Harvest Bakery Ingredients, Kobird, Lactalis Singapore, Lesaffre, Mackies Asia Pacific, Martellato, Momolato, Pavoni Italia, PhoonHuat, Rondo Asia, Scandibake, Valrhona, Wellcook Kitchenware and many

more. With the increasing popularity of gelato in Asia region, the event will feature a dedicated Gelato Zone and host the inaugural Asian Gelato Cup. The Gelato Zone will include a wide variety of product selections, and participation from leading suppliers around the world. Jointly organised with the Singapore Pastry Alliance, at the first-ever Asian G e l a t o C u p t a l e n t e d Pa s t r y C h efs around Asia will put their creativity and technical skills to the test for the Gelato Championship title. Judged by a panel of experts, 12 teams of Gelato/Pastry Chefs from around Asia will vie for the inaugural title. This prestigious competition also acts as a preselection platform for World Gelato Cup 2020, to be held in Rimini, Italy. The largest ‘live’ pastry competition in Asia, the Asian Pastry Cup will also return. New segments include a Chocolate Chef Competition and Global Star Chefs Pastry Show. In addition, the FHA2018 International Conference will include a Bakery Masterclass. For updates, please visit www. foodnhotelasia.com.

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The Right Platform for F&B Ingredients’ Players

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nce again, Food ingredients (Fi) Asia 2018, which is regarded as one of the most important meeting places for the food & beverage ingredients’ industry in South-east Asia, would make history. Organised by UBM PTPNI Indonesia, the 23rd edition of the show is set to be held from 3rd to 5th October 2018 at Jakarta International Expo at Jakarta, Indonesia. The floor space for

the forthcoming edition of the show has been expanded by 40 percent, covering nine halls, as compared to the last edition of the show. Fi Asia 2018 will bring together more than 750 leading local, regional and international F&B ingredient suppliers and distributors. The three-day event would present lucrative business opportunities. More than 20,000 F&B professionals will come to Fi Asia 2018 for various purposes. They would be looking to do business or to think, talk and discover F&B ingredients or to experience the latest technologies, or endeavour to find solutions to formulate products that meet their consumer demands, or they would be looking to be competitive in the marketplace and aiming for more valueadded products, and so much more. Yes, they may endeavour to do all of these above activities together too! Here a visitor or exhibitor can expect to see, smell, hear, taste and feel the latest innovative F&B products and technologies from more than 750 leading local, regional and international exhibitors, covering all sectors of the F&B ingredients’ industry. Fi Asia 2018 will feature extensive educational international conferences and more than 60 technical seminars from expert speakers from the industry. Innovation Zone, Innovation Tour, Discovery Tour and

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Food Product Development Competition are effective platforms where you can explore the latest products and applications that can transform your product and process development, and also give you opportunity to hear about the latest industry trends that will help you to grow your business. In the recent past, Fi Asia welcomed an array of media personnel throughout Asia for an exclusive opportunity to visit Indonesian food and food ingredient manufacturers and laboratories, and ex p e r i e n ce t h e dynamic growth of I n d o n es i a ’ s F&B markets, learn about food ingredients processing and explore business opportunities in the region during the ‘Fi Asia 2018 Media Visit.’ The media professionals visited PT Foodex Inti Ingredients, and Kerry Ingredients Indonesia. They also went to PT SINAR SOSRO, PT Sucofindo(Persero) SBU Laboratory, PT Indesso Aroma, and BT Cocoa. Here it deserves a mention that the F&B industry is one of the industrial development priorities set by the Indonesian government, and the industry is promising for both domestic manufacturers and importers operating in the Indonesian market. The Chairman of the Association of Food and Beverage Entrepreneurs of Indonesia (GAPMMI), Adhi S Lukman projects that the Indonesian F&B industry will grow year-onyear by more than 10 percent during 2018. Indonesia is one of the top three spice, seasoning and condiment producers worldwide. Indonesia’s bakery sector is flourishing — between 2010 and 2015, baked goods in the world’s largest archipelago grew at 11.7 percent compound annual growth rate in value and 5.5 percent in volume, as more companies expanded their capacity and opened new markets in smaller cities. In this context, an event of the magnitude of Food ingredients (Fi) Asia has the potential to make a huge impact on Indonesia’s food ingredients market.

EVENTS’ CALENDER FHA 2018 24-27 April 2018 Singapore Expo, Singapore www.foodnhotelasia.com Hotel Asia 2018 24-27 April 2018 Suntec, Singapore www.foodnhotelasia.com SIAL China 2018 16-18 May 2018 Shanghai New International Exhibition Center Shanghai, China www.sialchina.com NRA Show 2018 19-22 May 2018 McCormick Place Chicago, US www.show.restaurant.org Thaifex- World of Food Asia 2018 29 May-02 June 2018 Impact Challenger & Exhibition Center Bangkok, Thailand www.worldoffoodasia.com Food Taipei 2018 27-30 June 2018 Taipei Nangang Exhibition Center, Taiwan www.foodtaipei.com.tw Heimtextil India & Ambiente India 2018 27-29 June 2018 Pragati Maidan Exhibition Centre New Delhi, India www.heimtextil-india.in.messefrankfurt.com www.ambiente-india.in TRAFS - Thailand Retail, Food & Hospitality Services 2018 12-15 July 2018 Bangkok International Trade & Exhibition Centre (BITEC) Bangkok, Thailand www.thailandhoreca.com Bakers Technology Fair – 2018 06-08 July 2015 Codissia Trade Fair Complex Coimbatore. TN, India www.bakerstechnologyfair.com MIFB 2018 27-29 July 2018 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia www.mifb.com.my Hotelex Chengdu 2018 10-12 August 2018 Chengdu Century City Intl. Convention & Exhibition Center Chengdu,China www.hotelex.cn Aahar 2018 23-25 August 2018 Chennai Trade Centre Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India www.aaharinternationalfair.com

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Ananda Dairy Opens 105 New Outlets in Delhi-NCR

Developing a Change in Indian Commercial Kitchens

In line with its aim of achieving 30 percent growth and a turnover of Rs. 1,500 crore by the end of this fiscal, Ananda Dairy in February announced the opening of 105 stores in New Delhi and the NCR. “We are delighted to unveil our 105 COCO (company owned, company operated) stores, bringing the world of Ananda, including our diverse product range, as well as our expertise, closer to our consumers,” Ananda Group’s Chairman, R S Dixit said in a statement. “By the end of 2018, we aim to expand to 500 Ananda stores across Northern India,” Dixit added. Set up in 1989 in Bulandshahr, in Uttar Pradesh, the company offers a wide range of dairy products, including confectionery and bakery items. The company said it reached a new milestone in 2017 by manufacturing and supplying over 50 products, and its milkprocessing centres have increased their capacity to handle 16 lakh litres of milk per day. With its focus on expanding its network in the northern part of India, Ananda Dairy recently announced its commitment to invest Rs. 500 crore in Uttar Pradesh.

Ke e p i n g t r u e t o t h e mission of offering maximum customer benefit, RATIONAL is growing rapidly in the casual dining and staff canteen segments of the Indian hospitality industry. Showcasing the live demonstration of the SelfCookingCenter® India Edition in varied sizes at AAHAR 2018 (Pragati Maidan, New Delhi), the RATIONAL team vouches to offe r p re c i s e c u s to m i s e d solutions for the challenges a typical commercial kitchen would face in its day-to-day business. The product is already winning over an important place in the professional kitchens across India. Efficient food production, unique quality and minimal costs are the outstanding features of RATIONAL combi-steamers. It also offers a significant saving in space and investment costs, without losing any of the quality. Offering customised solutions to the casual dining restaurants and staff canteens in India is one of the main focus areas for RATIONAL India right now. RATIONAL has also launched cookbooks for these two segments, offering quick and easy preparation hacks for a variety of Indian recipes like tandoori aloo, broccoli kebab, sambhar, andhra biryani, dal makhni and so on.

Announcement of Management Change

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here has been a recent change of guard at RATIONAL. Wolfgang Syhr takes charge of Asia South region (India, South East Asia, New Zealand and Australia) and shares the responsibility for the Asian market along with Thomas Stuetz, who will be now focusing on Asia North region (Japan, China and Korea). Wolfgang is a highly qualified specialist for the Asian region, especially India. He has a deep knowledge of the Asian culture. He has taken over the responsibility for India, South-East-Asia and Australia/ New Zealand from January 1st, 2018. His place of work is in Singapore. “It is a privilege to drive the development of our presence in this region and to deliver and sustain maximum benefit to our local customers“, said Syhr.

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NATURALLY GLUTEN FREE CHOLESTEROL FREE

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Painting with Chocolates Gurugram-based Windsor Chocolatier has made another record in chocolate creations! Recently, the team at Windsor Chocolatier created the largest chocolate painting in India, which is 8ft. in height and 20 ft. in length. The sweet exercise involved the sweat and creativity of six personnel from Windsor Chocolatier, and 23 days. The painting involves 160 colours and shades created from four base colours — red, blue, yellow, and white. Here it deserves a mention that Windsor Chocolatier is a manufacturer of fine handmade Belgian chocolate products. Records are however, nothing new to Windsor Chocolatier. In the recent past, it came up with the largest chocolate bar in India, for which it was listed in the Limca Book of Records-2017. The company was also credited with creating The Tallest Macaron Tower in India. “Our chocolates are tempered and processed over European machines with perfect blend of modern equipments and traditional methods. Thereafter these chocolates are hand moulded, filled

AAK Kamani Enters Bakery Laminated Pastry Fat Sector In line with the strategy to strengthen its product portfolio in India, AAK Kamani Pvt. Ltd, one of the country’s leading producers of specialty oils and fats, announced in February its entry into the premium bakery laminated pastry fat range with the launch of its latest offering ‘Jade.’ The product is used in laminating pastry applications such as kharis, puffs, and cream rolls, among others. “Innovation and technology are the foundation of all our product offerings at AAK Kamani. With the launch of Jade we are looking at targeting the premium segment of the market, which offers a premium finished product to the end consumers,” said Prakash Chawla, CEO, AAK Kamani. “We have crafted this product keeping the changing preferences of cutomers in mind and this is the first of its kind fat. It will enhance the taste of bakery products,” Chawla added. The product was launched in Mumbai by Mikael Ekdahl, Chairman of AAK Board, in the presence of other Board Members of the company. The other significant features of the product includes distinctly light layers that provide excellent rise and great volume, soft melt treatment resulting in no waxy note or palate cling, which can provide better taste and texture. This is the first of a series of launches planned by AAK Kamani, as part of its strategy to strengthen its product portfolio in India.

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with freshly made fillings and finally decorated using premium colours and decorations,” conveyed Munish Gupta from Windsor Chocolatier. “Our finished products are ideal for corporate and personal gifting, festivals, weddings, other important events, and also for birthdays, baby shower as well as for self consumption. We also c u s to m i s e c h o co l ates to s u i t consumers’ taste and requirements. We have installed extra production capacity to cater to our customised ‘made to order’ chocolates so that they are prepared fresh, just before the time of delivery,” he elaborated. According to him, Windsor Chocolatier has in-house facility of melting, tempering, moulding, enrobing, dosing, nut roasting, grinding, mixing, cooking, nuts coating, vacuum & steam jacketed cooking and has ISO/ HACCP certified facility. “We have more than 150 European moulds and shapes, and a wide variety of flavours and fillings, freshly made in-house,” pointed out Gupta.

PizzaExpress Starts its 'Runway Project' in New Delhi As part of its Project Series, which got underway with the aim of offering its patrons across the country a dynamic sensory and hyper local experience, global casual dining major PizzaExpress has started its 'Runway Project' in New Delhi’s​ favourite fashion retail and lifestyle hotspot Select City walk in Saket. “True to its name, this outlet will take forward its signature hyperlocal experience, highlighted with a couture-inspired flavour. The idea is to curate an immersive design and fashion-centric experience that mirrors the ethos of not just its location but also the community it is created for,” PizzaExpress said in a statement. The first in this series of new destinations was The Bandra Project by PizzaExpress that opened in July 2017 in Mumbai. Established in 1965 in London, PizzaExpress now operates over 550 restaurants in 14 countries. The brand was launched in India in 2012, in partnership with Gourmet Investments Ltd., a company promoted by the Bharti Family Office. "We are committed to creating spaces that are more than just restaurants and bars, but are addresses that are hyper local, while always being about curated experiences and settings that stimulate conversations,” said Ramit Mittal, CEO, Gourmet Investments Ltd. “Each of our openings in India will be a hub of sorts; known for great hospitality, distinctive design, whimsical decor​ and memorable times,” Deepinder Batth, Chief Operating Officer, Gourmet Invesments Ltd., said.

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Enquiry on Visiting: Ms. Komal Sanghvi, Promosalons India, T: +91 22 6610 0401 E: ksanghvi@promosalons.com 13

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Prasenjit Jana Prasenjit Jana has been appointed as the Pastry Chef of The Westin Kolkata Rajarhat. With over nine years of experience in the hospitality industry, Chef Jana has grown to be an accomplished chef par excellence in the bakery and confectionary segment. A graduate in hotel management from the NIMS School of Hotel Management, Chef Jana has worked in several premiere properties across the country, namely the Park Hyatt Hyderabad; Hyatt Hyderabad Gachibowli; IHHR Hospitality; Taj Group of Hotels; Orchid Hotels, and Sarovar Group of Hotels. He began his culinary career from The Beach Orchid Hotel, Kerala in 2007, where he was applauded for his creativity and technique in terms of production. Later he moved on to Hyatt Hyderabad Gachibowli and later to Park Hyatt Hyderabad, and subsequently to other prestigious properties. In his current role, Chef Jana’s primary responsibility includes overseeing operations of the pastry kitchen; ensuring top notch quality of international and Indian sweets, day-today menu planning and bringing innovation in the dessert and bread making craft.

Himalaya Food International Introduces its Burgers ‘N’ Fries Frozen food processing, manufacturing, and exporting company Himalaya Food International Ltd. said it was venturing into the Indian market with a healthy fast food brand, Burgers ‘N’ Fries. The company said it plans to open 500 outlets under Burgers ‘N’ Fries franchise model by next year. The products have been launched at a company owned retail outlet in the Delhi-NCR region, Himalaya Food International Ltd. said in a statement. “Himalaya is already catering to globally renowned B2B (business-to-business) clients with its range of products with healthier innovations. With Indian food preferences changing in favour of greater health consciousness, we think that the time is right to manufacture and market these products in the country under the banner ‘Burgers’N’Fries’,” Man Mohan Malik, FounderCMD of Himalaya Food International Ltd., said on the launch of the brand in India. “We want to establish the brand as a healthier alternative to popular fast food, and are building a pan-India franchise chain that can reach out to consumers directly via B2C (business-toconsumer) verticals,” Malik said.

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Jubilant FoodWorks to Launch Domino’s Pizza in Bangladesh Jubilant FoodWorks Limited, which operates Domino’s Pizza and Dunkin’ Donuts outlets in India, recently announced its joint venture with Golden Harvest QSR Limited to launch Domino’s Pizza in Bangladesh. Golden Harvest QSR Limited is a part of Golden Harvest Group of Bangladesh which is a diversified conglomerate and has interests in various sectors such as food, IT, logistics, real estate, dairy and insurance. As per the agreement, Jubilant FoodWorks will be the major shareholder in the joint venture entity, 'Jubilant Golden Harvest

Limited', with 51 percent of the total shareholding, while 49 percent will be with Golden Harvest QSR Limited, the company said in a statement. The announcement marks a significant step in Jubilant FoodWorks’ journey of international expansion, according to the company’s Chairman Shyam S. Bhartia. “As one of the fastest growing economies, we believe that Bangladesh offers huge potential for Domino’s. We are delighted to partner with the Golden Harvest group to introduce Domino’s Pizza in Bangladesh,” said Hari S. Bhartia, Co-Chairman, Jubilant FoodWorks Limited. Jubilant FoodWorks Limited (JFL/Company) is part of Jubilant Bhartia group and is one of India’s largest food service companies, with a network of 1,128 Domino’s Pizza restaurants across 265 cities (as of 19th January 2018). It has the exclusive rights to develop and operate Domino’s Pizza brand in India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Nepal. At present it operates in India and through its subsidiary in Sri Lanka. Commenting on the new joint venture, Jubilant FoodWorks Limited's CEO Pratik Pota said, “We are excited to be entering the Bangladesh market. As the eighth most populous country in the world with the highest population density and a young demographic, the Bangladesh market presents a great growth opportunity for Domino’s.” According to Rajeeb Samdani, Managing Director of Golden Harvest Group, pizza is a growing food segment in Bangladesh as the consumers are opening up to more experimentation in food, especially global cuisines. “We are excited to collaborate with Jubilant FoodWorks to bring the world renowned and iconic Domino’s Pizza brand to Bangladesh,” Samdani said.

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India’s Love for Packaged Tea Confirmed by Research W

hile the journey of tea is widely believed to have begun in China, the latest research from Mintel  reveals that India currently vies with China as the world’s biggest packaged tea market. Here it deserves a mention that Mintel’s definition of packaged tea market talks about household consumption of packaged tea and this excludes out of home and unpackaged, loose tea formats. During 2017, according to Mintel’s estimates, India consumed a total retail volume of 678,200 tonnes worth of packaged tea, followed by China in second place at 576,800 tonnes. Meanwhile, Turkey with 173,400 tonnes, Russia with 134,200 tonnes and Japan with 92,900 tonnes complete the top five global ranking in terms of retail volume of packaged tea consumption. “Traditionally, Chinese consumers prefer fresh tea in loose formats, so it makes sense that our research shows that India is ahead of China as the world’s leading retail packaged tea market,” said Loris Li, Associate Director, Food and Drink, at Mintel. Indeed, Mintel’s research reveals that in 2017, most Chinese consumers (78 percent) were frequent users of freshly brewed loose tea. Ready-to-drink (RTD) tea drinks also enjoy high penetration in China, with nearly half (49 percent) of Chinese consumers identified as frequent RTD tea drinkers. Tea bags, on the other hand, are frequently enjoyed by 45 percent of these Chinese respondents. While India is leading the packaged tea market for retail volume sales globally, Turkey takes the lead when it comes to per capita consumption. According to Mintel’s findings, the average Turkish consumer guzzled 2.15kg of packaged tea last year. “Looking beyond top level market sizes and consumption figures, there is an interesting new tea culture brewing in both hot and ready-to-drink tea, fuelling

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global and regional innovation activity,” commented Julia Buech, Global Food & Drink Analyst at Mintel. According to Mintel Global New Products Database (GNPD), hot tea launches in Asia-Pacific accounted for 27percent of all global new tea product launches during 2017, while RTD tea launches in Asia-Pacific accounted for 13 percent of these global tea launches. Hot tea introductions in Europe accounted for 30 percent of the world’s new tea launches in 2017, while European RTD tea launches represent 7 percent of these launches. Here it deserves a mention that Mintel’s definition of tea launches includes packaged hot tea and ready-to-drink (iced) tea. “Although hot tea continues to be the biggest tea subcategory globally, RTD tea has started to build its base in the global tea market — following the same developments seen in the global coffee market. The RTD tea landscape is changing dramatically; having suffered for years from a ‘cheap’ and unhealthy image, the category is now undergoing a lifestyle makeover. Artisanal production attributes, such as cold brew, are helping create a new premium tier in the segment. Our research shows that cold brew is just emerging as an upscale taste and quality descriptor in RTD tea. Better-for-you innovations from major beverage companies are further boosting the development of the RTD tea category,” commented Julia. Data from Mintel GNPD shows that tea bags were the leading format type of global new hot tea launch activity during 2017. Indeed, 84 percent of all new tea launches in North America during this period were tea bags. In Europe, tea bags accounted for 75 percent of all new regional tea launches in 2017, which was 45 percent in Asia-Pacific. What is more, according to Mintel of all new tea launches in Asia-Pacific during 2017, loose tea formats accounted for 36

percent, compared to 19 percent in Europe and 12 percent in North America. “Most Asian consumers are, at the end of day, traditionally inclined to enjoy tea in loose formats—which is also likely the reason behind Asia-Pacific’s lead in driving loose formats in packaged tea innovation. However, the tea bag category in China, and in the wider Asia-Pacific region, has definite growth potential as we see more and more tea bag innovations coming from Asian tea manufacturers,” added Li. Mintel GNPD also shows that during 2017, teas described as ‘energy-boosting’ accounted for 11 percent of all functional tea introductions globally, up from 9 percent during 2015. It seems boosting the emphasis on energy can help tea compete with coffee, especially for morning occasions. “In a world that is becoming more health conscious, naturally functional drinks are ever more relevant. Tea consumers continue to show interest in products that can target specific ailments and provide diverse functions, from energy-boosting and anti-inflammatory to slimming and relaxing benefits.  In this saturated field, ‘energy’ has grown in significance as a focus of innovation activity among tea companies and will continue to be a market with potential in the near future,” Julia concluded.

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School for European Pastry

SEP

SCHOOL FOR EUROPEAN PASTRY

SEP brings India’s accomplished Chefs and fine, authentic European ingredients for creating pastries and chocolates for Mumbai. Chef Anil Rohira, Corporate Pastry Chef Felchlin, Switzerland and Chef Vikas Bagul, give you another chance to get back to school. With over 50 years of pastry experience amongst them they will be sharing their expertise and knowledge with you all @ SEP. SEP is equipped with state ­-of-the-art equipment, ideal tools, creative ambience and precise techniques to help you to create a unique chemistry between you and your pastry making experimentations. SEP works with the philosophy - HEART, HEAD AND HANDS. At SEP, they believe that a good pastry tells you a story of a perfect blend of sheer craftsmanship, thoughtfully selected quality ingredients

and the fine aesthetics’ of art. Making a pastry is an experience in itself and they love to cherish this experience every single day. SEP will offer a variety of SEP courses for the pastry enthusiasts. Beginners who wish to make a career in pastry making and professional Pastry Chefs who are looking to sharpen their skills can enrol here. Some of the pastry courses SEP offers include 6 months of Diploma in Baking and Pastry and weekend courses for 2-3 days. SEP is affiliated to ‘City and Guilds London’ and their preferred partner is Felchlin, Switzerland The school is located at Chakala Andheri (E) in Mumbai. One can contact them at: info@sep.in.net

NatureFresh Professional Displays Interesting Recipes NatureFresh Professional, the nationally renowned brand of bakery shortenings and margarine from Cargill’s food business in India, brought an eclectic range of recipes at the recently held AAHAR Expo 2018, held at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi, during 13th-17th March. Curated by the brand, these recipes were created using NatureFresh Professional Lite and were displayed at the brand’s stall at the exhibition. The stall hosted four different and interesting baking sessions for home bakers and on Danish pastry, desserts and doughnuts, from 13th-17th March 2018. In addition, Karachi Bakery, one of NatureFresh Professional’s most important partners, showcased its range of products at the brand’s stall. NatureFresh Professional also launched its recipe booklet for the quarter, showcasing recipes which can be made using NatureFresh Professional Lite such as Chinese taosu, crispy sesame strips, Italian plum cake, crisp black sesame strips and cheese cracker. Aiming to add value for its customers, NatureFresh Professional showcases its products in the recipe booklet on a quarterly basis, thereby facilitating customers. Speaking on the occasion, Deoki Muchhal, MD, Cargill’s food business in India stated, “NatureFresh Professional is an important brand in the Cargill’s portfolio, catering to both B2C and B2B customers. Adhering to the ethos of the brand, we are committed towards providing good quality bakery shortenings that help in making best-in-class bakery products. Aahar is an ideal platform to reach out to our customers and as in the past, we continue to collaborate with Aahar to increasingly engage with bakers and our other potential clientele, while for the first time ever, we have extended our engagement to home bakers as well.” “We have a comprehensive range of NatureFresh Professional bakery shortenings under five brands — Classic, Select, Supreme, Elite and Delight; three variants of margarines — Champion, Genius and Master— and a specialty fat known as Lite,” he informed. Here it deserves a mention that over 2500 visitors visited NatureFresh Professional’s stall at this year’s edition of Aahar, a number higher than the previous two editions of the exhibition. Home bakers engaged avidly in the baking sessions at the stall. The recipe cards launch received enthusiastic response and the new recipes were a hit amongst the bakers.

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SCHOOL FOR EUROPEAN PASTRY

The Growth of London Bubble One of the impacts of maturation of globalisation, the spread of television and Internet, and the significant increase in disposable incomes in select but sizeable pockets of urban Indian society during the last decade has been the growing popularity of many foreign food products in the country, which our society by and large was not much acquainted with even a decade earlier. One of them is waffle. I n fa ct , few t h i n g s compare to starting your day with a warm crispy waffle, doused in maple syrup and butter. There are many variations of waffles based on the type of waffle iron and recipe used. London Bubble Co. is a waffle brand that specialises in Bubble Wrap waffles, pocket waffles and bubble milkshakes. LBC endeavours to redefine your idea of waffles with its variations such as bubble waffle wraps, pocket waffles and bubble milkshakes. London Bubble Co.  already has four outlets in Mumbai  since its launch in November 2017, namely in Juhu, Andheri West, Chembur and Vashi. They are shortly opening an outlet in Ghatkopar in Mumbai too. The company’s growth probably reflects the growing popularity of waffles in India’s bakery and confectionery business. Distinct from the regular bubble waffles, the bubble waffles from London Bubble Company are 100 percent vegetarian. It is an ode to the huge vegetarian populace of the city.

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Delicious Dessert Trends Virginia Woolf, an English writer, who is considered among the most important modernist twentieth century authors, had said, ‘One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.’ To that one may add, delectable dessert/s is/are the ultimate, ethereal culmination of dining well. Yet, often one is made to feel guilty about indulging one’s sweet tooth by health freaks. For connoisseurs of desserts, it doesn’t matter what the occasion or the time of the year is; consumption of dessert delicacy is a must. And to keep the health conscious satisfied, Chefs have now introduced desserts that can be labeled as healthy desserts – no sugar, gluten-free, with fresh fruits. Ashok Malkani examines the dessert trends for 2018 and discovers that there are now even savoury desserts available! 18

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alk about desserts and many among us are apt to go weak in the knees. Dessert in a dinner can be compared to icing on the cake or the climax to a spectacular movie! There can be no denying the fact that a sumptuous dessert gives a befitting culmination to any meal. The word dessert comes from the French word desservir, meaning to clear the table. This refers to the fact that dessert was served after the table had been cleared of other dishes. Desserts around the world have come a long way since they were made. There have been multiple flavour variations by Chefs who have added to the craving of the people for these sweet delicacies. Mirror glazed cakes, where one can see her/his reflection as she/he about to take a bite, have become the latest Internet sensation. Patisserie Chefs have constantly been coming up with new flavours that not only look appealing but also taste fabulous.

New Trends So what are the new dessert flavours and what will be the new trends in desserts, especially in the context of Indian food service industry? Chef Prabhu from Holiday Inn Chennai OMR IT Expressway, declared, “In my personal opinion, 2018 is expected to be a year where many interesting desserts’ innovations are about to happen. However, the top dessert trends around the world would be desserts for special dietary preferences such as gluten-free, vegan & savoury desserts.” “During the summer months, main consideration of the Bakery Chefs is to keep the guests hydrated, which draws our attention to seasonal fruits. All we have to do is infuse these fruits in our desserts to make it more tempting in summer. Some of the desserts which we will have in this summer are White Chocolate Mousse with Lychee Granita, Vegan Mango Mousse, Texture of Mango, Guava Lemon Parfait, Fig & Honey Frozen Yoghurt,” he pointed out further. “Patisserie, as a profession, provides lots of scope for experimentation and usage of new techniques. It combines flavours to create innovative desserts that taste good. Activated charcoal has already made its way into the bakery and it will continue to rule the industry. With so much awareness towards healthy lifestyle, usage of natural flavours, which are derived from natural sources, will also be making its way through

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Suresh Thampy

Manohar Singh Devandi

2018. With the trend moving towards veganism, vegan desserts (no eggs, no milk and no cream) are also going to be the next big thing in 2018,” disclosed Neeraj Tyagi - EAM Food and Beverage at Shangri-La’s Eros Hotel, New Delhi. “All fruit-based desserts are highly likeable as summer desserts. Mango and all tropical fruits like papaya, pineapple, lychee work very well as ingredients in summer desserts. At Tamra, our awardwinning multi-cuisine restaurant, we offer 21 gelatoes as part of our dessert buffet. Our flavour combination is very unique with flavours like jamun, popcorn ice-cream and more,” elaborated Tyagi. Manjul Myne, Pastry Chef, Chandigarh B a k i n g Co m p a n y, J W M a r r i ott H ote l Chandigarh opined, “Moving beyond ‘pastry’ to ‘not very sweet’ desserts is the latest trend, particularly in the bakery segment. Desserts based on seasonal fruits, and the use of locally sourced ingredients will surely be in vogue in 2018. I may add that guests these days are very health conscious and prefer healthier options like fresh-baked wholegrain cookies, savoury cupcakes, multigrain breads, etc.” “In my kitchen at Chandigarh Baking Company in JW Marriott Hotel Chandigarh, I am working with my team on innovative ‘fusion’ desserts for this summer. We are planning to serve unique desserts like the special Nolen Gur Ice Cream, Honey Semifreddo and many more. We are looking to use jaggery and honey in mousses and ganache and are experimenting by pairing them with other ingredients like fennel, rose, etc. to see how they complement each other,” explained Myne.

“I have also tried and used different textures like gels, dehydrated fruits, root vegetable creams, etc.,” Myne added. “Chocolate is something which will never be out of trend. What will be added to this will be the fruits, organic ingredients, and there would be more focus on natural sweeteners. There will be special emphasis on appearance and presentation. Artistic approach to desserts would be ‘in’ during this year,” averred Chef Manohar Singh Devandi, the Executive Chef at Hotel Royal Orchid, Jaipur. “The special desserts offered by our hotel this summer would be among others, Sweet Potato Gulab Jamun, Watermelon Rasmalia and Mint Chutney White Chocolate Blondie,” informed Manohar Singh Devandi. Suresh Thampy, Executive Chef, Hilton Mumbai International Airport stated that there would be changes in the dessert menu this year. “There is a shift in trend from heavy desserts with chocolates, and also from rich creamy and spongy cakes to desserts which are lighter with ingredients

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Dessert Recipes Here are a few recipes to satiate your sweet tooth

Three Layered Ice-Cream Preparation Time - 1 hr. Portion Size - 01

Ingredients

Chef Prabhu like fruits, berries, dry fruits and nuts. Use of pro-biotic yoghurts is also going to receive a boost this year. Besides these, there will be a growing demand for vegan desserts and for those desserts which are sugar free and natural honey based,” pointed out Thampy. “During this summer, we would be introducing desserts like Yoghurt and Berry Trifles, Minty Melon Sorbets and Avocado & Pistachio Parfait,” Thampy conveyed. “During the summer, desserts based on vegetables like zuccinni, jackfruit, sweet potato will make their way into the menus. Among the fruits, mango, grape, litchi, watermelon, and apricot with some twists will be the summer delights in desserts. Zucchini Cobbler, Summer mix Fruit Parfait, Margarita Cake, Baked Gajar Halwa Cheese Cake, Baked Gulab Jamun Cheese Cake, Mango Jalebi, Mango Layered Baked Cheese Cake are a few of the fusion dessert varieties we plan to introduce on the menu,” averred Sanjay Mamgain, Corp. Exec. Sous Chef, Lords Hotels & Resorts, Mumbai.

Vegan and Other Healthy Desserts According to patisseries across India, people are becoming more health conscious and the trend would be for vegan and other forms of healthy desserts. One may raise one’s eyebrows, snigger and ask incredulously, ‘healthy and vegan desserts? Are you kidding?’ But it is true and happening, “People today are more aware than ever before about what they are consuming and what is good or bad for their health. This has made the culinary world to experiment and evolve. The experiments are more towards offering healthy options followed closely by their consumers’ tastes, and appearance of the products. We are already witnessing trials carried out in vegan, gluten-free and organic or even fusion desserts. Lentils, mushrooms, and other vegetables that would offer both variety and distinct flavours to the palate are being tried in desserts,” asserted Mamgain. “More gluten-free products are now being used along with vegan products. Natural sweeteners like inulin – which is a fibrous carbohydrate, is being used more as a sugar and flour replacement and which can be added to baked products such as cakes,” he stated.

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Cookies Pastry flour Vegan ice-cream Corn starch Strawberry Pear Dry fruits Blue berry organic syrup Micro greens Natural sweeteners Butter vegan Coconut milk cream

6 nos. 50 gm 2 scoops 1 tsp 50gm ½ no 30gm 20 ml 5 gm 120 gm 50 gm 30 ml

Procedure

1. Make the cookies using natural sweeteners , butter and pastry flour. 2. Set the ice-cream in three layers by using cookies as the base and refrigerate it for 30 minutes. 3. Make the strawberry emulsion by making puree and cook it till the coating is consistent, while adding little amounts of natural sweeteners. 4. Make the pear puree by adding coconut milk cream and sweeteners. 5. Make the jelly of blue berry organic syrup. 6. Crush the dry fruits. 7. Assemble in the plate by using strawberry emulsion , cookies , vegan ice-cream, pear puree, and garnish with the micro greens.

Recipe by Sanjay Mamgain, Corporate Exec Sous Chef, Lords Hotels & Resorts, Mumbai

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“I would like to add that vegan products cannot include animal milk, dairy products or even honey. At Lords Hotels & Resorts, we are working on offering vegan desserts with alternatives like soya based milk, coconut milk and cream, and tofu cheese. Presently, in the vegan dessert options we offer tofu cheese cake, dairy free chocolate pudding, chia coconut pudding, strawberry tapioca mousse, and quinoa pudding, among others,” pointed out Mamgain. Chef Prabhu however, has a different take to the issue. “Many of us blindly believe that sugar free desserts and fat free desserts are healthy, but this is not necessarily true. If you compare any regular dessert and sugar free dessert there will not be much difference in calories. I would suggest if you want to be healthy, try to consume desserts made of palm, and/or jaggery instead of sugar. Also consumption of ghee and butter rather than trans-fat is considered good for health,” he opined. “It may also be mentioned that though in European countries people are preferring vegan desserts, but this has not yet become popular in India. We have been serving vegan desserts frequently in our restaurant on special occasions and are proposing to introduce desserts like Zesty Lemon Coconut Cake, Water Chestnut Delight, Vegan Cheese Cake and Peanut Butter Pie, in the near future,” he added further. “People are getting health conscious and their health demands have to be catered to by the desserts. However, the focus is both on health aspect as well as on the taste and appearance of the dessert. Because if a dish fulfils a guest’s health demands but is not appealing to taste and appearance, the guest may not eat it. One of the steps considered for healthy desserts involve use of natural sweeteners like raw honey, maple syrup and stevia in its making,” affirmed Tyagi “As far as vegan desserts are concerned, we already have few vegan desserts available at our Tamra outlet,” he informed. Myne stated that nowadays there are a lot of queries about healthy desserts from the diners. “To dish out healthy desserts, experimenting with ingredients like jaggery and honey and spices like mace, green cardamom and star anise are in trend – and on our menu. To begin with, my team and I are working on a recipe of jaggery and whole wheat crumble, mace and dark chocolate cremaux, etc. With patrons today extremely conscious about what they eat and inclined towards sweets with ‘no sugar’, we have replaced sugar with honey and jaggery in many of our desserts. At JW Marriott Hotel Chandigarh, desserts which I am already

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working on at present are succulent, delightful to look at and at the same time healthy,” Myne informed. “In recent times, probiotic yogurt has emerged as a replacement for fats like butter and margarine. Yogurt has been consumed by humans since ages and now it is being used in many dessert recipes in place of butter and trans fats,” Myne disclosed. “Vegan menus have popped up all across the globe during the recent years as demand for plant-based options is on the rise. There is no doubt that vegan desserts would be in vogue in 2018. We are planning to introduce many vegan desserts in our menu at Chandigarh Baking Company, including Watermelon Granita, Pumpkin Pie and Peanut Butter Banana Ice-cream, to name a few,” Myne affirmed. “We focus on gluten-free dessert recipes, fresh ingredients with no added sugar, natural sweeteners like honey/maple syrup, low fat yogurts/milk/soya milk for ensuring the production of healthy desserts,” asserted Chef Thampy. “We carry out experiments to ensure that our desserts meet all the three parameters of taste, texture, appearance and health components,” he added further. However, he doesn’t think vegan desserts are a big trend in India. “As far as vegan desserts are concerned, at the moment they are not a very big hit in the country….but we definitely see a big trend for vegan desserts in India in the coming months/ years,” Thampy said. “People are enthusiastic for healthy food but still what I have seen is that when it comes to desserts people give a miss to health because desserts never fail to tempt or lure people. An amazing dessert is good enough to corrupt your taste buds and make you forget health consciousness. But nevertheless, we aim to make desserts without sugar. Honey is the best option when it comes to natural sweeteners. Optimum utilisation of natural sweeteners and minimising the fat content of the desserts is what we work for,” claimed Chef Manohar Singh. “Veganism attracts people due to environmental advantages it offers, and more and more people are getting attracted to it. If we have more guests preferring vegan desserts we have to look at their demands and accordingly offer them the same. At Hotel Royal Orchid Jaipur, we have some amazing desserts on the platter like Motichoor Coconut Kheer, Plum Tomato Blueberry Halwa, and Aampanna Jalebi,” informed an enthusiastic Singh.

Savoury Desserts A new trend in the dessert business is that of savoury desserts. Globally they have been taking hold for a while and it is predicted that they will continue to dominate the menus through 2018. Chef Manohar Singh believes that savoury desserts are like a pinch

Charcoal Gelato Ingredients Cream Milk Food grade activated charcoal Milk powder Dextrose sugar Sugar Egg yolk Ice-cream stabiliser Lemon zest Lemon juice Vanilla extract Gold leaf

300 gm 2 litres 35 gm 50 gm 80 gm 400 gm 16 nos. 100 gm 1 teaspoon 1 tablespoon 1 tablespoon

Method: 1. In a saucepan combine milk, cream, and sugar over medium heat. Cook until the sugar dissolves; for about 5 minutes. 2. In a medium bowl, whip the egg yolks with the remaining ingredients using an electric mixer, for about four minutes, until the eggs have become thick and pale yellow. Pour 1/2 cup of the warm milk and cream mixture into the egg mixture and stir. Add this mixture back into the saucepan. Cook over very low heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture becomes thick enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon. 3. Place a strainer over a medium bowl and pour the warm custard mixture through the strainer. Chill mixture completely before pouring into an ice-cream maker and follow manufacturer’s instructions to freeze. To serve, scoop gelato into serving bowls and top with Gold leaf.

Recipe by Neeraj Tyagi - EAM Food and Beverage at Shangri-La’s Eros Hotel, New Delhi 22

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Nolen Gur Ice Cream Ingredients Nolen Gur or Date Palm Jaggery Soya milk Coconut milk powder Liquid glucose

of salt in the mundane life. “They will continue to dominate menus in 2018. Always being sweet gets monotonous so you put a dash of salt to make the dessert more complete and interesting. Savoury dessert does not mean the dessert dish is devoid of sweetness, but has a salty element to the overall sweetness in the dessert, which can give it a more wholesome taste and flavour,” explained Manohar Singh. Chef Thampy concurred with this by stating, “Savoury desserts like chili stuffed chocolate, pumpkin pies (sweet), desserts made from carrots, beetroot etc. are slowly gaining popularity.” “Savoury desserts are a big hit and the demand for this specialty food seems to be only growing. While the conventional desserts still rule the roost, savouries have offered an alternative. Savoury desserts are light food items which have a salty taste or plain taste or are a mix of sweet and salty taste,” averred Mamgain. “Savoury desserts are getting more and more popular because people are experimenting with their taste buds and times are changing. Savoury desserts are expected to become more popular with time as new flavours and tastes will be added. The use of edible flowers, mushrooms, tomato jam in different forms such as fresh, dry, powder or syrup will soon be included in making savoury desserts. Simultaneously, we may also see the evolution of processed savouries that will taste like meat without the use of real meat,” Mamgain explained. “Vegetarian chicken tenders, chocolate peanut tarts, beetroot hummus with baked harissa, tortilla triangles, mushroom volau-vent, vegetable puffs, and bruschetta are some such savoury desserts,” he informed. Chef Prabhu elaborates on the subject of experimenting with new dessert options. “In present times, none of us would like to go out for a dinner and have the same food over and over again. Everyone likes to try different trending things in all aspects let it be fashion, food or shelter. When it comes to food, people nowadays are eager to try new ideas. One such new idea which has snowballed into a trend is the savoury dessert. Some of such savoury desserts are cinnamon apple taco, sweet potato dry cake, pumpkin pie, zucchini ricotta muffins, gluten-free carrot cake mascarpone frosting among others.” Tyagi however, is of the opinion that “there are very few takers for savoury desserts, as people still want to enjoy something completely sweet, healthy and natural in its flavour to end their meal. Savoury desserts include oriental crepes, waffles (relished best with fruits and gelatoes/ice cream),” he stated.

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50 gm 350 gm 50 gm 20 gm

Method: 1. In a thick bottomed pan pour soya milk, nolen gur, coconut milk powder and liquid glucose and put over medium heat and get it to boil. 2. Once cooled, pour the mixture into an icecream churner and make it into a light and fluffy ice-cream. 3. Pour it into a container and cover it with a tight fitting lid. 4. Scoop out the ice-cream and garnish with liquid nolen gur before serving.

Recipe by Manjul Myne, Pastry Chef, Chandigarh Baking Company, JW Marriott Hotel Chandigarh. “It won’t be out of place to say that savoury desserts have come up in a big way in recent times. With public demand for them on the rise, more and more restaurants and bakeries around the world are experimenting by adding savoury ingredients to traditional desserts to create new and unexpected flavour pairings,” declared Myne. “We have observed that patrons love to try savoury treats like savoury cupcakes, cumin cookies, beetroot cremaux, etc. However, making a savoury dessert requires a deep understanding of the ingredients. For instance, as a thumb rule, the key ingredient in a savoury item must have a hint of natural sweetness. Sea salt and herbs, if used in the right balance, can lend immense depth and enhance sweet flavours, especially when put in cakes, pastries and chocolates. Basil works wonderfully well in ice-creams because when chilled, it lends a tanginess to it. Bacon in pies, breads and cookies lend depth and enhances the flavour of the dough,” Myne elaborated. But all said and done, desserts, whether they be vegan, savoury or plain sinful, are all time favourites among diners. They are among few of the things, whose popularity is not influenced by geography or culture. Their universal popularity transcends all age groups. And their sweet taste is complemented by their sweet future in the Indian food service industry. n

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Evolution in Breakfast Tables The changing lifestyle of the Indian consumers has changed the entire scenario at the breakfast tables in many urban Indian homes. These days, with profusion of nuclear families with both husband and wife rushing off to their work there is little time for setting an elaborate breakfast table. The days when the Indian breakfast varied from region to region – with a variety of recipes which differed from kutch in the west to Kolkata in the east; Srinagar in the north to Suchindram in the south seems to be over, especially in the context of busy post-modern urban India. These days, healthy RTE and RTC options are adorning many a breakfast tables in urban India. This has opened up a wide scope for the cereal breakfast food manufacturers to expand their horizons and provided new entrepreneurs an opportunity to enter the fast expanding Indian cereal breakfast market. Ashok Malkani examines the scope for the entrepreneurs in India’s breakfast cereals market and looks at all the pros and cons of entering this promising market.

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o tackle the day ahead successfully, a healthy and hearty breakfast is essential. And the youngsters in middle class urban India today do not prefer ‘dahi-parantha’ for breakfast anymore. We are witnessing a drastic turn in the breakfast culture in urban India. This could be attributed to the fact that 65 percent of India’s population comprises of youth, who are responsible for changes in the India’s breakfast segment. Some of them are health freaks, some are tech savvy and some others just want to save their time. Many among this young population in urban India are from nuclear families where both husband and wife go to work. Thus they often do not have the luxury to have elaborate breakfasts made at home. Besides that nowadays more Indians than ever before are well travelled and are exposed to global lifestyle, which includes global eating habits. Moreover, today Indian consumers are more hygiene conscious, taste conscious, brand conscious and experimental than ever before. All these factors have contributed to the growth in the RTE(ready to eat) and

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spurred innovation, and comes in different formats—right from smart packaging to multi-grain formulations. Such an evolution of a category has the advantages of ensuring choice, immediate consumption and easy availability of a product not native to a particular region.

RTE, RTC and Healthy

Deepika Warrier RTC(ready to cook) breakfast options in the country. Mintel Trend ‘FSTR HYPR’ discloses that several brands in India have launched readymade idli or dosa batter for households looking for easier breakfast or meal solutions that are not too different from everyday fare. Formats range from shelf-stable dry mixes to fresh, ready-to-use batter. The popularity of the ready-made batter has

Breakfast menu in post-modern India has changed since the day grandma made parathas with various fillings or malpuas that were lapped up by the family. Today, few have the time to lovingly develop these time consuming dishes. Moreover, these dishes are considered unhealthy by many upwardly mobile new generation of Indians who influence the market forces. Breakfast options comprising dishes made from ready-to-cook or ready-to-eat packages or cereals like cornflakes, muesli, oats, etc. are now common among middle and upper class urban Indian homes. Health consciousness has become the watchword for the new generation India. Yes, one can truly say that the breakfast menu in India has undergone a conspicuous change. One of the major transformations

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t h a t h a v e o c c u r re d , a c c o rd i n g t o Hitesh Keswani - Director Silver Beach Entertainment & Hospitality Private Ltd, is that organic and other natural ingredients have come to the forefront. “Burritos have now become wraps, cupcakes have changed to chia puddings and traditional recipes like poha and upma are being spruced with rich quinoa, lentils and mixed beans while pancakes are pepped up with buckwheat. Florentines are being served gluten-free while omelettes are now made with ‘smart eggs’ option instead of one with all yolks. Avocado is being served in several forms. It is being served on toast, then you have an avocado smoothie, and avocado in eggs/sandwiches & avocado bowls are also there. Guests are also readily accepting ingredients and dishes from across the border,” Keswani affirmed. Several players have jumped into the fray to provide the Indian consumers with a variety of breakfast food options. Many multinationals and large domestic food companies are now fighting for a pie of the fast-growing breakfast category in India, which includes oats, cornflakes, muesli, dalia and mixes of traditional breakfast like idli and upma. The market provides a lucrative opportunity for new entrepreneurs. MTR Foods has now introduced instant breakfast dishes like upma, poha, oats and kesari halwa. In fact, now they have come up with 3 minutes versions of these dishes, which used to take eight minutes to cook. All you do is take the packet (or cup) pour in hot water, keep for exactly three minutes and eat. MTR has also realised that it needs to change its geographical perspective. It has thus moved from being a predominantly southern India focused company to a pan-India one. That is one of the reasons why, recently, it launched two large scale products – spicy sambar in the south and

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Some Idli & Dosa Breakfast Options

a ‘3 Minut Breakfast’ with a national focus. PepsiCo’s Quaker India has launched Quaker Nutri Food — the oatmeal versions of traditional breakfast options such as idli, dosa, upma and khichdi to suit Indian taste buds. These are conventional Indian breakfast options, but with 40-50 percent oats and vegetable content. Deepika Warrier, Vice-president (Nutrition Category), PepsiCo India, declared, “Consumers want healthy options in easy-to-adopt formats, without compromising on the taste, so we took popular breakfast recipes like idli, dosa and upma and made them healthier.”

“Our primary focus is millennials between the age group of 18-34, who lead rushed lifestyles,” she added. Just like one presumes olive oil to be an urban phenomenon, oats too seem to have a similar fate, in the Indian context. However, she is hopeful that her product’s future customer base will be from tier-II and tier-III cities of the country. “Tier-II and III towns of India are seeing the same fitness, health and wellness consciousness as the Indian metros. Our key task is to create the category and grow the habit of a nutritious packaged breakfast, which is as much an opportunity in the metros and in mini-metros of the country,” she proffered. Bengaluru-based Britannia is also planning to enter the breakfast segment as part of its efforts to evolve into a total food company. There can be no doubt that the Indian convenient food market is set to grow. This can be gauged from the fact that in 2012, Sequoia Capital invested Rs.3 crore in iD Fresh Food, a Bengaluru-based ready-tocook idli and dosa batter-making firm. This came as a surprise to many fund watchers, as it was an investment outside the tech

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arena by the US-based technology venture capital firm, which once backed tech giants such as Oracle, Google, PayPal, Cisco and LinkedIn. But the increasing demand for convenient food in India has also encouraged Helion Ventures, another India-focused tech fund, to invest Rs.35 crore in another convenient food firm. And one can expect more investments from others as data from global marketing research firm Nielsen for the last four quarters (from Q3 of FY16 to Q2 of FY17) shows that the mixes market in India, which includes breakfast, is approximately about Rs.725 crore, of which the Indian breakfast mix market is Rs.255 crore. According to ValueNotes, the heat and eat food industry in India was valued at Rs.2370 million in FY 2014. According to the same market and competitive intelligence firm, the industry was expected to grow at a CAGR of 22 percent in the next five years till FY 2019 due to rapid urbanisation, increasing disposable income, and an expected improvement in retail infrastructure. ValueNotes estimated that

Aditya Bagri the industry would be worth approximately Rs.6405 million by FY 2019.

Breakfast Cereals’ Market

The Indian breakfast is not limited to idli, dosa and upma. There has been an incessant and increasing demand for cereals, particularly by the Indian youth and others in the country seeking healthy breakfast. Lifestyles are changing in tandem with increasing spending power, greater time-poverty, higher need for convenience, and health consciousness. These factors

have encouraged Indians, especially in urban areas, to opt for breakfast cereals. The influence of ‘western’ lifestyles and eating trends has played an effective role in opening the gateway for experimenting with different tastes and varying eating preferences. Cereals constitute a part of the RTE and RTC breakfast market. However, here it deserves a mention that cereals have always held their share of the Indian breakfast platter e.g. flattened rice flakes (chivda/poha) with milk is popular in western and central India, whole wheat grits (dalia) in northern India, etc. But now breakfast cereals in India have emerged in new avtaars. In fact, the spread of popularity of breakfast cereals is much beyond India. Increasing trend to adopt western dietary patterns in emerging economies such as Indonesia, India and Malaysia is driving the growth in breakfast cereals market. Several urban consumers are getting accustomed to eating cereals with milk for breakfast which is easy to prepare and also offer many health benefits. According to Transparency Market

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Feb-Mar ’18

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B U S I NE S S

Research (TMR), between 2013 and 2019, regionally, Asia- Pacific as an attractive market for breakfast cereals is expected to rise at a prominent pace. The growth, during this period, is mainly due to the burgeoning middle class population in key economies, supported by the swift pace of industrialisation in various parts of the region. The constantly changing breakfast consumption patterns towards the consumption of packaged cereals are responsible for fueling the demand. The success story of Kellogg’s, Bagrry’s, etc. has reinforced the belief of enterprising entrepreneurs in the potential of India’s breakfast cereal market, which is at a growing stage with few national and international players. The segment has witnessed healthy year-on-year growth in the past couple of years. Aditya Bagri, Director, Bagrry’s India L i m i te d , fe e l s t h at u r b a n i s at i o n a n d increased preference for healthy eating are responsible for the growth trajectory in the country’s breakfast cereals market.” The other big reason for the growth of breakfast cereals market in India is the widespread communication on health, especially on the rising incidence of ca rd i ovas c u l a r d i s e as es , diabetes and obesity among Indians,” he asserted. “Health and wellness is one of the fastest growing segments in India and at the same time there are enough developments taking place in the sub-urban sector of the country. With all of these, the breakfast cereal segment is growing both in urban and semi-urban markets of the country,” he expressed further. The two major types of b re a k fa s t c e re a l s i n t h e market comprise ready-to-eat and hot cereals. Breakfast cereals market in India can be divided into ready-to-eat breakfast cereals, which include cornflakes, wheat flakes, muesli, biscuits, etc. which are often h a d w i t h m i l k a n d yo g u rt . Cakes and muffins also fall in this category. They are not heated. Then there are hot breakfast cereals like oat and porridges. A large portion of the breakfast cereals market in

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Hitesh Keswani India is accounted by cornflakes. Bagri disclosed that his company had been innovating in the oats category in order to make oats a staple food for Indian consumers. With this in mind, they have introduced veggie masala oats, which serves the savoury category of cereals. In period of just two years, the oats category has gained 26 percent of the Rs.720 crore breakfast cereals market in urban India.

With innovations, India’s breakfast cereal market has been growing with a CAGR of 13 percent, from Rs.1168 million to Rs. 1450 million, over the last five years. Breakfast cereals market in India is expected to exceed 43 billion USD by 2022. The market is expected to exhibit a growth rate exceeding 4 percent CAGR from 2015 to 2022. Kellogg’s, Nestle, PepsiCo, Heinz, MTR, Bagrry’s, Future Group are some of the important players in India’s cereal market. Kellogg’s India retained the lead in India’s breakfast cereals market during 2017, holding a 56 percent value share. The company has products available in all categories of breakfast cereals and it frequently launches new products every year. Having had a presence in India for many years, the company has a good brand-recall level and has established a good distribution network, with its products being available across the nation. All these have put it far ahead of other players in its category, in the Indian market.

Entering the Market Though the market for cereal breakfasts in India is enticing, a new entrepreneur must weigh all the pros and cons. One must realise that in India’s cereal market of present day, one will be competing with leading food giants like Kellogg’s, PepsiCo, Marico, etc. Apart from these brands, local players are also cause of concern as they have strong reach and distribution. Branded breakfast cereal players have already gained trust among the consumers, so new entrants will have to compete with them. Another factor is that of inflation. Rise of cost of raw materials leads to an increase in cost of production which in turn leads to increased p ro d u ct p r i ce. I n o rd e r to avoid the impact of inflation on consumers’ pocket, many a time the company is forced to bear limited profit margins. If price of a product is increased significantly, consumers may s w i tc h to ot h e r b ra n d o r product options. This principle can be very much applied for players in breakfast cereals market of India, as many in

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the country may still perceive breakfast cereals as non essential products, having price elasticity. Another difficulty that all breakfast cereal manufacturers face in India is that since they have vegetables or fruits in dried form their freshness cannot be sensed. And freshness plays an important role in Indian kitchens. But on the positive side, you have the fact that the country’s impressive economic growth has given rise to an emerging middle class – with new consumption patterns. They will be primarily responsible for rise in  consumer  spending and will account for 59 percent of the country’s total consumption by 2025. Also people are now becoming aware of the flaws of traditional breakfasts. They are turning towards balanced and healthy diet to keep control on lifestyle diseases. In this market, breakfast cereals of high nutrition content can have high potential to garner impressive consumer share.

Factors to Consider Overall, whether manufacturers of cereal breakfast or not, the players in the

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RTC and RTE breakfast segment in India should also have in product packaging. Smaller packs which will encourage customers to try a new product should be the priority for new entrants in the market. The pack should also clearly indicate the main ingredients in the product. P r i ce of t h e RT E and RTC breakfast product is another factor in a price-sensitive market like India. Customers are looking for healthy products at economic prices. Besides these, right type of promotion in right channels through intelligent advertising is always helpful to carve a niche in this competitive market, especially for new entrepreneurs. Advertising needs to deliver right messages to right audiences at the right time. Of course, all the above strategies remain ineffective if product lacks appropriate distribution. Optimum utilisation of various channels of distribution can greatly

facilitate sales, and this rule is valid for RTE and RTC breakfast segment in India too. Succinctly, there is no doubt that market for healthy breakfast in India has great potential for growth. Factors like increase in urban population, rise in health consciousness and prevalence of lifestyle diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and heart attacks are encouraging consumers in the country to switch to healthy breakfast choices. However, players must be ready to constantly innovate and improve their products to meet the changing tastes of the customers. n

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Time for Indianised Bakery Cafes By Swarnendu Biswas

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t is a matter of common knowledge that the QSR market in India is growing at a rapid pace. According to ASSOCHAM’s findings, the QSR sector in India was Rs.8500 crore in 2015, and it was expected to grow to Rs.25,000 crore by 2020. The finding was reported in October 2015. This is natural considering the maturation of globalisation in India, which has made a plethora of Indians develop a craze or even love for foreign origin products like burger and pizza.

QSR Growth The significant growth in disposable incomes in select but sizeable pockets of urban India during the last decade-and-a-half and the huge number of nuclear families in urban India having less and less time to cook at home have also fuelled the demand fo r QS Rs i n I n d i a ’ s fo o d service industry, during the recent years. This is reflected by the huge popularity of multinational QSR chains like McDonald’s and Domino’s Pizza in India. McDonald’s entered our country in 1996, and today there are about 300 outlets across India within McDonald’s brand ambit. In 2015, India became the second biggest market for Domino’s Pizza, with only the US market for Domino’s Pizza being ahead of us. Domino’s Pizza also was introduced to India in 1996 and till 19th January 2018, there was a network of 1128 Domino’s Pizza restaurants across 265 cities of India. Jubilant FoodWorks & its subsidiary operates Domino’s Pizza brand with the exclusive rights for India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Jubilant FoodWorks Ltd. launched Dunkin’ Donuts in India, in April 2012, in Delhi. Till 19th January 2018, Jubilant FoodWorks had 43 Dunkin’ Donuts restaurants across 12 cities in India.

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In a report of PTI in 2017 it was stated that Pizza Hut envisaged to almost double its store count in India from 360 to over 700, within the next five years. During the recent years, many brands have entered India’s QSR market, which is another indication of the popularity of QSRs in the country. Carl’s Jr., Burger King and PizzaExpress are only some of them. The huge market potential of QSR outlets selling burger, pizza or patties or croissants can give a fillip to India’s bakery business. There is no denying the fact that QSR market in India is brimming with huge potential. The market presents a lucrative o p p o rt u n i ty fo r t h e new entrepreneurs to enter. However, many of the local players with limited resources at their disposal may find it difficult to counter the onslaught of multinational giants in this area. One of the pragmatic a p p ro a c h es fo r t h e new entrepreneurs to enter India’s QSR market is to Indianise their burgers, pizzas and patties. But that is already being initiated by multinational players like McDonald’s, Domino’s Pizza, etc. with considerable success. However, the QSRs and bakery outlets or bakery cafes in India can easily fight off t h e c h a l l e n g e of the multinational players by specialising in our age-old baked c re at i o n s . Th i s would give them a different market niche, a different identity. Yes, our own bread pakora, kulcha, and naan and kathi rolls, if packaged well, can be the answer to the burgers and pizzas.

A Different Market Niche Yes, this writer has many times seen huge crowd during office hours at a tiny outlet in Connaught Place, selling yummy bread pakoras and other goodies. Its bread pakoras are a craze. There are many such outlets across India. The point is, we may become globalised, but still by and large, the palate of common men and women in the country is rooted in our culinary traditions. In the unorganised segment of India’s food service industry there are numerous outlets and roadside kiosks across the country selling bread pakoras, kathi rolls and kulchas, but there are not many players in India’s organised food service industry which are specialising on awesome variety of bread pakoras, naans, idlis and kulchas. There are some players in India’s organised food service industry which are into kathi rolls, but their numbers are also quite less. Their market range in India is also quite less as compared to many multinational QSR players operating in the country. This needs to change. So I am quite confident that a bakery café chain specialising in bread pakoras and different types of aromatic tea options at affordable prices can soon garner huge popularity in India. Yes, to cater to the nonvegetarians, our imaginary café chain (let us name it as café C) can present bread pakoras in both vegetarian and nonvegetarian formats. One form of bread pakora can have the filling of potatoes and p a n e e r , t h e ot h e r fo r m ca n h ave t h e filling of meat and chicken. Of course, these outlets would have other bakery products too, but their specialisations should ideally be on one of the very popular Indian bakery products like bread pakora, kulche, naan, etc.

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Similarly, there can be sleek cafes or QSR outlets specialising in naans and kulchas, accompanied with chickpeas or minced meet or minced chicken, complemented by lassi, filter coffee and an array of piping hot aromatic tea options. Naans stuffed with minced meat or potatoes can also be delectable options for bakery cafes. Naan and kulcha are Indian flatbreads whose popularity is time tested.

An Untapped Market I a m s u re a QS R c h a i n o r a bakery outlet specialising in delicious keema naan or keema kulche can compete with multinational burger and pizza chains and carve out its own niche, in the Indian bakery industry. Similarly, there is a strong market need for cafes serving oven baked idlis with coffee in south India and also in other parts of India. Players can come up with QSRs of baked idli chain to make a fresh inroad in India’s bakery and confectionery business. The bakery cafes or QSR entrepreneurs in India can also tap the market by merging

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F e a t ur e

the indigenous with the exotic. Examples of such creativity are idli manchurian and pizza dosa among others. This writer still remembers having wonderful pizza dosa at Hariji’s stand-alone bakery cafe in Kerala. Succinctly, we need to Indianise our stand-alone bakery outlets and bakery c a f e s , ra t h e r t h a n Indianising the foreign b a ke r y p ro d u ct s ; a trend which is already getting common. The concept of Indianised QSRs also needs to be fostered in India’s food service industry, which would help many new entrepreneurs in the industry to find their respective niches without stiff competition, constant threat of extinction, and without long gestation periods. Th es e ty p e of o u t l ets s e l l i n g o u r indigenous bakery and confectionery products can easily widen their base in tier-II and tier-III cities, and rural India too, provided they can keep their prices in check.

Décor and Desserts Of course, the ambience and décor of these QSRs or bakery cafes or stand-alone bakery outlets would also need to be quite different from the typical QSR outlets, bakery cafes, and stand-alone bakery outlets, so as to strengthen their market positioning. They should be inherently sleek but with an outward rustic charm. Ideally, they could have reflections of local culture as part of their interior artworks, as part of their décor. For example, artwork representing bhangra dance can be apt for a Punjabbased bakery café chain specialising in keema naan, bread pakora and lassi, and artwork representing Bhartanatyam, Mohiniattam, Kuchipudi, boat racing in Kerala, etc. can be apt for an idli café chain based in south India. It would be wise if the dessert offerings at these very desi bakery cafes or QSR outlets or stand-alone bakery outlets specialising in indigenous bakery products are Indian sweets like rasogulla, rasmalai, and gulab jamun , and not exotic muffins, macaroons, and tiramisu. This would facilitate them to get a defined market identity.

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Ideal Beverages for Cafes By KS Narayanan

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ithout food & beverages our life couldn’t be conceived. Beverage is any liquid which is intended for human consumption. Some common types of beverages include water, tea, coffee, butter milk, juices, and beer among others. Water, tea and beer are the three most popular beverages of the world. In human civilisation the usage of beverage has not only been to quench thirst but also for refreshment, health, satiety, energy boosting, immunity boosting, s o c i a l i s at i o n a n d eve n i ntox i cat i o n . Drinking has always been a part of the socialising throughout the centuries. As mankind evolved, newer techniques were discovered to create new beverages that were native to the local areas. Today mega multinational corporations have been built around beverages, whether it is in the form of plain potable drinking water (which is the world’s most consumed beverage), carbonated beverages, fruitbased beverages, tea and coffee and its various avatars, dairy-based beverages and alcohol-based beverages. Here we would focus on some of the non-alcoholic beverages which are being used or can be used in bakery cafes to facilitate lucrative revenues. Th e g l o b a l b eve ra g es i n d u s t ry i s estimated to be to the tune of 1.6 trillion USD with a steady growth rate of 2-3 percent per annum, with almost 60 percent coming from the non-alcoholic category. Major drivers for growth are the growing

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their diets and health routines.

Enriched Water

urbanisation, growth in disposable incomes and the growth in population, particularly in the Asian and African continents. As health consciousness has gained momentum in the urban Indian society, bakery cafes can earn good profits by p res e nt i n g h e a l t h y b a ke ry p ro d u cts complemented by healthy beverages, Health and wellness awareness is a trend which has significantly impacted the food and beverage industry during the recent years. Not only does the increased focus on health and wellness induces consumers to make replacement choices (replacing ‘badfor-you’ beverages with ‘good-for-you/ healthy’ choices), but it also creates new purchasing occasions through functional beverages. Consumers are increasingly looking at beverages to play new roles in

The cool and hot beverage market of India is reflected by the evolution in our water market. Flavoured and fortified water are now the in thing in the India’s beverages market. Starting from plain drinking water presented in convenient disposable PET bottles to sachets, India is now witnessing vitamin fortified water. During the recent past, PepsiCo entered vitamin fortified water segment in India with Aquafina Vitamin Splash. Then there is O’cean fruit water, which is a wonderful blend of water, fruit juice, glucose, electrolytes and vitamins. Some years back, Beltek Canadian Water Limited, a bulk water company, did introduce the brand WILD vitamin water in India, which is vitamin-enriched water.  These are only some of the examples of healthy water players floating in the happening beverages market of the country. In addition, we also have the ‘Natural’ water sourced from the springs with added minerals. A classic example in this category is the brand named Himalayan.

Tea-Coffee Culture Both tea and coffee do have significant role in facilitating the bakery business. Tea is a ubiquitous drink in India. There is no denying the fact that despite the onslaught of coffee café culture across

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urban India during the recent years, tea is still the most popular beverage of India, after water. Almost 85 percent of Indian households consume this healthy, aromatic and perennially popular beverage. In India, often the day begins with tea; the drink is also an integral part of our business discussions and social parleys. One of the reasons for the enduring popularity of teas in India could be that most of the teas are highly affordable, which is a major marketing factor for a by and large price-sensitive economy like that of India. Tea is not only the most popular beverage in India after water but its production in India has been showing steady increase over the years. India recorded total tea production of 1233.14 million kg during the financial year 201516. As compared to 2014-15 figures, the total tea production in the country registered an increase of 35.96 million kg during 2015-16. According to the statistics of Tea Board India, we can find that the tea production in India increased from 1095 million kg in 2011-12 to 1233.14 million kg in 2015-16. Today India is the world’s second largest producer and second largest consumer of tea. According to Tea Board India, during 2016-17, the production of tea in India was 1250.49 million kg, which is the highest production of tea during a fiscal, in the Indian tea industry. From black tea leaves in pouches / cartons, to branded teas to masala tea to instant tea to green tea, India’s tea tastes are rich and diversified. The tea retail business in India can get a further fillip through the mushrooming of tea lounges or tea cafes across the country. The sleek tea lounges or tea cafes are also contributing towards the trend of making tea a lifestyle drink in India. As far as tea lounges and

cha bars go, Chaayos, Cha Bar and Tea Trails are some of the important players in this direction. Cha Bar can be credited with ushering the concept of tea lounge or tea bar in India. Coffee cafe market in India also shows great promise and potential. According to TechSci Research report titled India Coffee Shops / Cafés Market Forecast, Consumer Survey and Opportunities, 2021, coffee shops / cafés market in India was projected to grow at a CAGR of over 11 percent during 2016-2021, on account of the growing coffee culture among young population, increasing urbanisation, r i s i n g d i s p o s a b l e i n co m e l eve l s a n d changing eating and drinking preferences of consumers. Changing work patterns of business executives is also driving demand for such coffee shops / cafés, as these outlets offer services such as free Wi-Fi, entertainment zones, etc., the report noted. The report was published in January 2016. Both tea and coffee drinking in urban India is getting or rather already got a trendy character. We have graduated from teas at familiar roadside kiosks in kulhads to sleek tea lounges and cha bars, and from filter coffees at homes to coffee houses infused with intellectual atmosphere to cosy coffee cafes infused with the ambience of casual chatter of the young and the young at heart. At the same time, we are now witnessing filter coffee being made available at a growing number of places along with smart mixes which deliver the taste of heaven (oops, I mean filter coffee).

Fruity and Dairy Dairy-based beverages segment in India is expected to see positive traction with a huge thrust on the investments happening from both the cooperatives as well as the private players in the industry. India should actually take the lead and establish itself as the numero uno in this category. Health

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& nutrition is expected to drive the growth in this category, in India. Fruit juices business in India is also a very much happening market. Gone are the days of plain orange and apple juices. Many among today’s generation demand a heady cocktail of tastes and flavours. They are also looking for experimentation and innovation in their beverage choices. In this market, uncommon juice options like wood apple juice, plum juice, black currant juice, etc. if packaged and marketed intelligently, can bring impressive business. There is a lot of potential to introduce refreshing dimensions in the fruit juices business in India. Also keeping the Instagram generation in mind, beverage blends / innovative mocktails should see rapid explosive growth among the breed of new experience demanding consumers. Overall, the world of beverages is much more diversified in post-modern India, than it was ever before. There are a plethora of consumer choices on offer. Beverages catering to a host of functional benefits are now a reality in India. The coffee cafe and bakery cafe chains and even standalone coffee cafe and bakery cafe outlets in India can present these diversified beverage choices along with low calorie but tasty bakery products to induce the new and growing breed of health conscious consumers. Many players are already undertaking such endeavours. The writer is the former MD of McCain India and has worked 25 years in the food & b e v e r a g e industry in various roles. Contact him at: ksnaraya@ gmail.com

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Bakery Needs Hygiene These days, to establish a successful bakery business, it is crucial to ensure hygiene in all layers of production, distribution and retailing. And this is possible only when food handlers involved in the bakery supply chain are adequately trained By Jyotismita Sharma

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akery products are items of mass consumption. Their acceptance in India has increased over the years because of various factors. The significant increases in disposable incomes in select but sizeable pockets of urban Indian society during the last decade-and-a-half; changing eating habits of people; growth in the number of nuclear families in urban India with less time to cook at home being only some of them. In India, there are more than 2,000 organised and semi-organised bakeries, and 1,000,000 unorganised small-scale bakeries. Bread and biscuits are the most popular bakery items in the country and account for more than 80 percent of the total bakery products in India. In fact, India is the world’s second-largest producer of biscuits after the US. According to the report by IMARC Group, titled ‘Indian Bakery Market: Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2018-2023’, the Indian bakery market reached a value of more than 6 billion USD during 2017. The bakery sector comprises the largest segment of the food processing sector in India and offers huge potential for growth, according to the guidance document produced by FSSAI, which was published in October 2017.

Healthy Bakery Trends in India’s bakery business continue towards lighter, healthier products, and those containing allergen-free, organic, and whole-grain ingredients, states the abovementioned guidance document. Interest in inclusions and fortification continues to increase among consumers of baked goods in India. The use of whole and

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alternative grains and grain products also continues to drive new product development in the Indian bakery industry. In response to the demand for products that are free from gluten and other allergens, baked goods using flours made from buckwheat, quinoa, millet, amaranth, flax, corn, rice, sorghum, wild rice, and other non-wheat grains remain a popular trend in India’s bakery industry . These flours offer tastes and textures that are uniquely different from wheat flours, which also serve the trend towards more types of artisan and handcrafted breads.

Hygiene Matters Besides emphasis on healthy bakery products, India’s bakery industry is also becoming more serious about safety and hygiene. Thankfully, the importance of hygiene in food service has increased over the years along with greater focus on healthy food items. In fact, in some cases, emphasis on sanitation and hygiene and focus on preparing healthy food are co-related. Sanitation, for example, is an absolute necessity while producing gluten-free products because even slight gluten contamination can make such ‘gluten-free products’ unsuitable for

consumption for people suffering from certain diseases. Commercial bakeries that produce gluten-free products must maintain strict sanitation standards to avoid contamination, especially if products containing gluten are also produced in the same bakeries. Overall, the issues of safety and hygiene are extremely important for the bakery industry for several reasons. First of all, without maintaining hygiene in the production process, distribution and in the retail space pertaining to bakery business, it is next to impossible to provide safe bakery items for consumption on a long-term basis. Following the hygiene rules is critical to avoid contamination of the products with harmful microbial organisms. Putting adequate hygiene norms in place is also important for extending shelf-life of products, which again is very critical from the bakery business point of view. This is because bakers generally work with highly perishable raw materials including milk and other dairy products. In the absence of strict hygiene standards, products made with such perishable materials are likely to have very short shelf life, increasing the chances of spoilage of bakery products. Therefore,

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to establish an enduringly successful bakery business, it is extremely crucial to ensure hygiene in all layers of production, distribution and retailing. Underlining the importance of hygiene in the Indian bakery industry, Pawan Agarwal, CEO, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), in a guidance document on food safety management system, said, “It is important that food handlers involved in the bakery supply chain are trained appropriately to implement the good manufacturing practices and good hygiene practices to ensure food safety.” The key issues that the Indian bakery industry is facing include the need for improvements in hygienic practices as well as technology apart from availability of skilled manpower at all levels of bakery operations, says the document. Improving hygiene practices can be said to be a key driver for the growth of the Indian bakery industry.

Maintaining Hygiene in Bakeries To maintain hygiene in bakery establishments and ensure safety of the products, one needs to have a holistic approach. This is because hygiene issues encompass almost every aspect of the production process. For example, it may not be possible to follow the right hygiene standards if a bakery production facility is found to be wanting in having adequate provisions for ventilation and windows in areas where the workers carry out their duties, or, for that matter, found wanting in having well-maintained toilets. Bakery establishments should also have impeccable provisions for storing food and packaging materials in appropriate areas for effective protection from dust, condensation, drains, waste and other sources of contamination during storage. It is also crucial for storage areas to be kept dry and well ventilated. Attention should also be paid to have the products stored as per their temperature and humidity requirements and in specific sections. It is also important to make the employees aware about all the allergic foods or ingredients and they should be stored at a designated area. It also helps to label the raw materials that are allergens with a tag that states ‘Allergens.’ “Thorough cleaning should be there b etwe e n a l l e rg i c co nta i n i n g p ro d u ct manufacture and non-allergic containing product manufacture,” states the FSSAI guidance document.

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It also states that the baking room should be cleaned periodically, followed by mopping with 500 ppm (parts per million) sodium hypochlorite solution or other appropriate odourless floor cleaners. It is necessary to keep the baking room dry. Similarly, the cake cooling trolleys also need to be mopped daily with 500 ppm sodium hypochlorite solution. The equipments, utensils and other tools used in handling food products should also be cleaned and sanitised whenever necessary. Bakeries also should not ignore hygiene at the packaging stage as using damaged, defective or contaminated packaging materials may lead to contamination of the product/s. In order to prevent packagingrelated contamination, it is important to inspect food packaging material before use. Moreover, the packaging surfaces should be kept clean and sanitised for high-risk products, at all times. The FSSAI recommends that to avoid contamination of the products, wrapping and packaging operations need to be carried out in a hygienic manner. When it comes to cakes or pies, the packaging room should be air-conditioned.

And when it becomes necessary to handle naked cakes manually, food handlers should use sterilised gloves or disinfect their hands with disinfectant solution. Parts of the packaging machines that come in contact with the food handlers should be cleaned daily with 500 ppm hypochlorite solution, according to the FSSAI guidance document. To protect food stuff from contamination, it is also important to keep conveyances or containers used for transporting food stuffs clean, and maintain them in good repair condition. But it is also important to keep in mind that the cleaning chemicals should be food grade, handled and used carefully, i n a cco rd a n ce w i t h m a n u fa ct u re rs ’ instructions. Moreover, food handlers should be trained adequately to ensure that cleaning and sanitising chemicals do not contaminate

food or packaging materials during or after cleaning and sanitising.

Pest Control Having comprehensive pest control measures is another important aspect of maintaining hygiene in bakery establishments as contact of disease-bearing pests such as rodents, cockroaches, or even flies, with food ingredients may lead to contamination and may endanger food safety. Food can act as a carrier of diseases caused by pests who have the ability to fit in compact spaces and survive in adverse conditions. When it comes to pest control, it is important to have a preventive approach, along with a system to detect and eliminate pests, in case they gain entry. But an effective application of multiple pest management strategies requires an understanding of different types of pests on the part of those in charge of the production process. They should also evaluate the economical and safe ways to controlling pests. In fact, controlling the pest requires the cooperation of all the employees involved. Therefore, the new employees in a given bakery unit should also be adequately educated about the pest management programme in place at the bakery unit and on how he or she could contribute to that programme. But pesticides used in pest control measures should be “registered under the Environment Protection Act, 1986”, the FSSAI guidance document states. It is also important for the food operator to maintain all records regarding pest control including pesticides / insecticides used along with dates and their frequency of use.

Waste Disposal is Must The waste disposal system also contributes g re at l y to t h e h yg i e n e m a i nte n a n ce of a bakery. It is important for these establishments to not allow food waste, non-edible by products and other refuse to be accumulated in food handling or storage areas. Food waste should ideally be cleared daily in order to avoid accumulation and overflow in food handling and food storage areas. It is extremely important to carry out disposal of sewage and effluents — solid, liquid and gas — in conformity with specified requirements of factory act/ state pollution control board.

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I N G R ED I ENT

Sweet Leaves for Health By Swarnendu Biswas

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i t h h e a l t h co n s c i o u s n e s s i n the post-modern Indian society gaining ground, there has been lots of talk regarding usage of natural sweeteners as sugar substitutes in the country’s food & beverage industry, which of course includes India’s bakery and confectionery industry. Raw honey, maple syrup, dates, stevia and coconut sugar are some examples of natural sweeteners, which can reduce the usage of sugar a n d a rt i f i c i a l swe ete n e rs i n d ess e rt preparations. Stevia, also called meethi tulsi in Hindi, is a natural, plant-based sweetener with very less calories. Stevia, a wonderful natural sugar substitute, is extracted from the leaves of the plant species named Stevia rebaudiana. This plant is native to Paraguay in South America. According to Wikipedia, the active co m p o u n d s of s tev i a a re s tev i o l glycosides  (mainly  stevioside  and rebaudioside), which have up to 150 times the  sweetness  of sugar,   are heatstable,  pH-stable, and not  fermentable. Despite being so sweet, stevia doesn’t adversely affect the blood sugar levels of humans. The beginning of the usage of stevia rebaudiana can be traced to the Guarani peoples of South America, and to 1500 years back. The stevia rebaudiana

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leaves have been in usage in Brazil and Paraguay for many centuries, for the purpose of sweetening local teas and medicines.

Forms of Stevia Stevia can be found in three forms, which are Whole Leaf Stevia, Stevia Leaf Extracts, and Altered Stevia. These different types of stevia are based on levels of stevia’s processing. The whole leaf stevia is the least processed form of stevia, which is 30-40 times sweeter than sugar; but it is also slightly bitter. It is not approved for food and beverage use because of lack of enough safety studies. Stevia leaf extracts are 200-400 times sweeter than sugar and are less bitter than whole leaf stevia.

Altered stevia is highly processed and has GMO ingredients. Its sweetness can vary between 200-400 times of sugar.

Enriched with Health Stevia is endowed with several health benefits. It can regulate blood sugar levels in human body. Thus stevia can be a convenient replacement for sugar, e s p e c i a l l y fo r d i a b et i c a n d ca l o r i e conscious population. Stevia also has an impressive content of antioxidant compounds, and thus its intake can be helpful for prevention of various types of cancers. Glycoside compounds in stevia can facilitate to do away with free radicals in the body, a process which can help prevent germination of cancer cells.

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Stevia can also play its role in regulating blood pressure and thus it can facilitate prevention of heart attacks and strokes. As stevia is extremely low in calories, its intake would not lead to weight gain.

Widespread Acceptance Over the years, stevia has assumed wide acceptance across the globe. Multiple, major global regulatory organisations, including the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) have determined high-purity stevia leaf extract to be safe for consumption by children, adults and special populations. Today stevia is used as a sweetener in more than 16,000 food and beverages around the globe, including soft drinks, juices, waters, flavoured milks, yogurts, baked goods, cereals, salad dressings, sauces, confectionary, tabletop sweeteners and more. The approval of Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) in December 2015 has opened a plethora of categories in the Indian food & beverage industry, which can now incorporate stevia as a sweet source. It is apt time for India’s food & beverage industry, especially for the India’s bakery and confectionery industry, to use stevia more abundantly to cater to the growing wave of health consciousness among sizeable numbers of consumers. The replacement of sugar with stevia can also counter the huge incidences of lifestyle diseases in urban India. As Indians are generally very fond of sweets, India can be a sizeable market for stevia infused beverages and desserts, which would enable the consumers to enjoy sweets without the risk of diabetes looming over them.

PureCircle’s Role Here it deserves a mention t h at Ku a l a Lu m p u r - b as e d PureCircle (PURE.LSE), the globally renowned producer of s tev i a s we ete n e rs fo r the global food & beverage industry, announced in late November 2017 the opening of its first South Asia laboratory facility in India.

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Ajay Chandran “ To a d d re s s t h e ra p i d l y g row i n g consumer demand for naturally-sourced, zero calorie sweeteners, India’s food and beverage manufacturers are turning to stevia as a viable, plant-based solution. We are receiving increasing requests from food and beverage companies in India to help them formulate stevia ingredients for their specific needs. PureCircle’s flagship S o u t h As i a laboratory is re a d y to s u p p o rt formulation for customers looking to reduce sugar with a new generation of ingredients stemming from the stevia leaf,” affirmed Ajay Chandran, Senior Director and Head of South Asia at PureCircle. According to a press release, PureCircle’s South Asia laboratory facility aims to support food and beverage companies operating in India in their drive to develop low calorie, naturally sweetened products for Indian consumers. PureCircle has also introduced its Sigma Matrix Solutions range for F&B manufacturers to moderate sugar content in their products. These solutions all have influence of stevia. Within the ambit of Sigma Matrix S o l u t i o n s , t h e re a re d i ffe re nt p ro d u cts , “ Fo r exa m p l e, S i g m a D is for dairy, Sigma B is for beverage, and Sigma S is for table-top sweeteners,” averred Chandran. In 2016, 7UP Revive from PepsiCo achieved the distinction of the

first stevia-based drink in India. 7UP Revive has been presently launched in Gujarat only. Fanta, and Sugar Free Green are some of the other products in India where stevia support is given by PureCircle. PureCircle has customised its range of products to complement the Indian palate, including tailored blends for carbonated drinks, juices, ketchups, powdered drinks, yogurts, flavoured milks and traditional sweets. H e re i t d es e rves a m e nt i o n t h at PureCircle supplies to nearly 300 food and beverage manufacturers, which are spread across 100 countries. Its global clientele includes names like Nestle and Pepsi. PureCircle currently has 72 stevia-related approved patents with 200 pending. According to Chandran, PureCircle has a portfolio of more than 20 sweeteners and flavours. In the recent past, PureCircle announced that it was committing to help Indian companies reduce 250 billion calories in the Indian diet by 2020. “PureCircle has invested significant funds and resources into the research and development of stevia as the next global, natural sweetener,” Chandran added. Presently, PureCircle, which doesn’t have a manufacturing facility in India as yet, is eyeing for a right partner to cultivate stevia in India.

Awareness Needed Overall, given the new socio-cultural d y n a m i cs i n p o s t - m o d e r n I n d i a , t h e market for stevia in the country seems bright. However, awareness about the market benefits of stevia is necessary among India’s farming community at large for getting them engaged in stevia production in a big way. Otherwise, the players operating in stevia market of India may face supply chain bottlenecks or have to contend with high prices for their essential raw material. "In addition, Government also has a role to play in incentivising demand for low calorie naturally sweetened beverages like those made with stevia to generate local demand for this kind of sustainable crop," conveyed Chandran. Therefore players which are thinking of entering the buoyant Indian food & beverage market with their stevia formulations, need to work with the country’s farmers and attempt to educate them about the nuances, challenges and benefits of stevia cultivation. n

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P R OD U C T

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Making Quality Biscuits Julie’s Manufacturing Sdn Bhd, better known for its products Julie’s Biscuits, was established in 1981. The company’s founder Su Chin Hock is a Malaccan entrepreneur who decided to enter the biscuit manufacturing industry when he realised that 95 percent of biscuits in the Malaysian market then were imported. He was confident that Malaysians were able to produce biscuits that were fit for exporting abroad. The company which started with a single plant in 1981 is now having three plants and a staff of 1000. Initially, the entrepreneur started with crackers, but over the years, the product range has increased to include other types of biscuits such as cream sandwich, wafer rolls, waffles, cookies and others. Over the past three decades, the company has grown steadily to become the largest biscuit exporter in Malaysia. The overseas market of the company has also been growing. Currently, the company exports to 79 countries. The company is optimistic that it will be able to expand its wing to cover 100 countries by 2020. Some of the countries that Julie’s Manufacturing is currently exporting to are China, the US, Mongolia, Australia, Taiwan and the

Middle Eastern countries. Julie’s biscuits are baked with quality raw materials and ingredients, and the production is being done in a clean and hygienic environment. Every stage of the manufacturing process is closely monitored to meet the requirements and conditions of HACCP, an international food safety standard certification. To safeguard the safety and health of consumers, a water filtration system is installed at water points to remove impurities and chlorine from the water before use. Artificial colouring and preservatives are forbidden in the production of Julie’s biscuits as they can be harmful to health. Not only are Julie’s biscuits tasty, they are baked with the consumers’ health in mind. Julie’s is more than just a brand, logo or product; it is about the people it works with. In April 2014, Julie’s Manufacturing launched ‘The Best of You’ movement, a movement that honours the dedication and hard work of its employees and expresses the company’s appreciation for them for making Julie’s into what it is today. Julie’s Manufacturing Sdn Bhd internationalsimplex@gmail.com

The Italian Job Chef’s Forno Authentic Italian pizza can only be made in traditional oven offering the right process and temperature to create a perfect pizza. Chef’s Forno a innovation by Chef Gurmit Singh Grover, created ripples in pizza making technology by introducing a pizza oven offering the near perfection of pizza making, to the Chef’s satisfaction. After completing IHM from Bhubaneswar and having specialisation from IHM Pusa Delhi, he joined his father’s kitchen equipment business but wanted to create innovative products for the ever changing food service industry in India. Chef’s Forno can create an authentic Napoleon / Florence pizza in just 90 seconds and retain the real flavour of pizza. It provides perfect burn marks on pizza dough as well as cheese in smaller time of baking. The refractory stone used in oven base and tomb, absorbs large amount of heat in a small period of time, whereby consuming less gas, thus reducing operational cost. The company also provides special wood chips to provide perfect flavour

to the pizza. The specially designed burner provides equal heat inside the oven, thus ensuring proper baking in minimal time. Traditional pizza ovens weigh 800-900 kg whereas Chef Forno weighs only 450 kg. Thus it can be easily installed and moved around. This feature gives good reason for caterers to use it more often too. Chef’s Forno is a perfect alternative to any Italian or imported pizza oven. It is more economical and easy to handle and service. With pan India service, company offers easy spares and service to its customers. The oven is available in different colour options to match the interiors of the property. The oven has already been installed at Radisson, ITC, Leela, Amici, Monkey Bar, Toast & Tonic, Olive Bar & Kitchen, The Coffee Shop, Fatty Bao, Wine Company, The Grid among others. Allied Metal Works allied@alliedmetalworks.com

CONVEYOR PIZZA OVEN For the first time made in India, Conveyor Pizza Oven can be seen at AKASA. The company has been feeding the food industry with supreme quality Indian products. Akasa Conveyor Pizza Oven is a compact, sleek and elegant product delivering excellent quality pizzas in minimal time. From this equipment one can get pizzas which are crisp as well as retain necessary moisture with its variable top and bottom loads. Its forward and reverse operation enables ease in usage of the oven. Its air-cooled sides keep the exterior cool to the touch. The equipment also has adjustable belt speed to control the baking of pizzas.

It has top and bottom heating control for best desired results. It precisely regulates the heating elements for perfect baking every time. The equipment saves up to 20 percent on energy consumption. Moreover, the equipment is very user-friendly with indicator lights and high insulation fiber wiring and is easy to clean. It comes with detachable drip tray.

AKASA International info@akasainternational.in

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

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Spurred by Creativity By Sharmila Chand

Chef Raj Ganesh, Sous Chef-Bakery, Novotel ibis Chennai OMR, has been a part of the culinary industry for over a decade. He began his career in Chennai. He then worked on a cruise ship for six years. He is now back on land and working with Novotel ibis Chennai OMR. His strength and expertise is making and serving new and delicious desserts. The excerpts of the interview follow:

What is/are the current trend/s in the Indian bakery industry? These days, in the Indian bakery industry there is much emphasis on presentation. Chefs are seen focusing on unique plating styles and experimenting with fusion products. The industry has also seen a gradual growth in terms of using science in the kitchen and hence molecular gastronomy is becoming popular. Moreover, creativity is the keyword these days. Customers are looking for products which standout on the shelf.

How did you become a Pastry Chef? When I was a kid, I used to love when my cousins brought cakes for my birthdays. Since then I had decided to become a Pastry Chef and my interest in this industry grew during my college days.

Who are your idols, that is who all have inspired you? There are a lot of Chefs who have inspired me, but I most admire Chef Selva for his amazing knowledge and expertise.

What are your hot selling bakery items? Chocolate cakes and molten chocolates are the hot selling bakery & confectionery items during my present tenure.

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What about the health quotient? How do you take care of that aspect? Of course, health is a major consideration while working in bakery. We follow HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) which takes care of the hygiene, food temperature, usage, service temperature, storage conditions and requirements, etc.

What is your favourite tool? I have two favourite tools. First is the ‘Balloon Whisk’, as it is the most required and most usable tool while preparing desserts. The second one is ‘Palette Knife’ as it helps give a perfect finishing touch to cakes, desserts and also facilitates to increase the smoothness of the product.

How do you perceive the challenges a Bakery Chef has to face in his/her job? I don’t see any of my work related challenges as hindrance but consider them as tests where my team and I are induced to give our best.

What do you like about your job? The best thing about my job is the word ‘Chef.’ I simply love it when someone calls me ‘Chef.’ The other great thing about my job is the creativity involved in it. There is no boundary for my work and lots of

creative space.

What is/are your professional strength/s? I think managing a talented team and working for long hours with the support of my team keeps me going.

What is your working philosophy? My working philosophy is to ‘Work as a Team.’ Team spirit is the key to success.

What are you passionate about besides baking? Besides baking, I love to watch bakery related videos which help me learn different techniques. I also love travelling with family and friends.

How do you like to de-stress? To de-stress myself, I love to spend time in a serene place. A walk by the sea often does the trick.

What is/are your dream/s? My dream is to make people smile with the food I prepare and to keep learning the art of baking.

Lastly, what is your mantra for success? My mantra for success is to ‘Be Calm and Be Positive’ and to never say ‘No’. I believe in facing challenges and overcoming them.

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Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Feb-Mar ’18

Bakery Review (Feb-March 2018)  

With the wave of health consciousness sweeping through urban India during the recent years, the gluten-free desserts and vegan desserts are...

Bakery Review (Feb-March 2018)  

With the wave of health consciousness sweeping through urban India during the recent years, the gluten-free desserts and vegan desserts are...

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