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DEC-JAN ’18 VOL. X NO. 2 ` 90

BAK ERY Business Magazine for Bakery & Confectionery Professionals

REVIEW

Business Sweet Prospects for Creative Bakers

Feature Fostering Success of Bakery Outlets

Trend India is Loving Mayonnaise

Product The Roll with a Hole

Health, Hygiene and Safety Needs for Bakery a

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E d i t o r i a l

Publisher cum Editor

Rajneesh Sharma

rajneeshhammer@gmail.com

Associate Editor

Swarnendu Biswas Resident Editor

Sharmila Chand (Delhi) Ashok Malkani (Mumbai) Layout & Design

Hari Kumar. V Abhishek Singh Rathore Production Assistant

Mamta Sharma

Advertising Sales

Delhi: Debabrata Nath, Sumesh Sharma Director Sales

Sanjay Anand Mobile: +91 9811136837 Director Operations

Rajat Taneja Mobile: +91 9810315463 Editorial & Advertising Offices: Delhi:

Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 206, Samrat Bhawan, Ranjeet Nagar Commercial Complex, New Delhi-110008 Phone: 91-11-25704103, 45084903, 45093486 Mumbai:

Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 105, 1st Floor, Aarpee Centre, Gufic Compound, 11th Road, MIDC, Near Tunga Paradise Hotel, Andheri (E), Mumbai-400 093 Phone: 022-28395833 Telefax: 022-28388947

E-mail: info@hammer.co.in © 2018 Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. No part of the publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher. Bakery Review is a bi-monthly magazine, printed, edited, owned and published by Rajneesh Sharma from 206, Samrat Bhawan, Ranjeet Nagar Commercial Complex, New Delhi. Printed at Swan Press, B-71, Naraina Industrial Area, Phase-II, New Delhi-110 028. Editorial Policy: Editorial emphasis in Bakery Review magazine is on educational & informational material specifically designed to assist those responsible for managing Bakery & Confectionery business. Articles are welcome and will be published on the sole discretion of the editor.

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ith the rise in health conscious in the urban Indian society during the recent years, the demand for healthy bakery products has also risen in India. At the same time, hygiene in bakery operations has also assumed crucial importance in digital India, not only because of the recently introduced strict rules of FSSAI, but also because of the growing power of the social media, and also due to the marked increase in general awareness in our society at large during the last decade or two. And the role of stringent adherence to safety in bakery operations simply cannot be overstated. In this regard, the focus of our Cover Story on health, hygiene and safety concerns for the bakery and confectionery industry can make for interesting reading. Here we have discussed on healthy ingredients in bakery production, along with food safety and other hygiene measures, which can be very much crucial for commercial bakeries operating in today’s times. Home baking has emerged as a heartening trend in the Indian bakery industry, a trend which is being led by some enterprising ladies. The feature briefly covers the operations of some of them. The challenges faced by bakers and the necessary requirements for their business, along with the legalities of opening a bakery in India are also being discussed. The Feature section explores the factors which are needed to make your bakery outlet a successful enterprise, whereas the Trend section showcases the impressive market for mayonnaise in India. The various facets of the promising chocolate products business in India are being explored upon in the issue, and the Product section deals with the wonderful world of bagels. These are some of the highlights of the issue. We hope our esteemed readers would enjoy reading it as much as we had while developing it. I hereby sign off while wishing the bakery and confectionery industry a fruitful time at Aahar 2018. See you all there…

Disclaimer: The editor and publisher believes that all information contained in this publication are correct at the time of publishing. Content published not necessarily are the opinion or view of the editor and publisher. Editor and publisher declines any responsibility for any action taken based on the information contained in this publication, including liability for error or omission. Annual subscription rate within India is Rs. 450 and for overseas it is US $110, for surface mail. Single issue is available for Rs. 90 in India and US $25 for overseas. Cheques are payable to Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

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16 COVER STORY

Health, Hygiene and Safety Needs for Bakery

22 BUSINESS

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Event

28 FEATURE

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News Scan

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Ingredient

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Product Preview

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Interview

Sweet Prospects for Creative Bakers

Fostering Success of Bakery Outlets

30 TREND

India is Loving Mayonnaise

34 CONFECTIONERY

The Flow of Dark Delights

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The Roll with a Hole

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SIGEP 2018 Gets Bigger than Ever With a record of 209,135 overall attendees, the event confirms its international leadership as trade fair for professional operators all over the world in the artisan gelato, pastry and baking sectors, together with that of coffee

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he 39th edition of International Trade Show of artisan gelato, pastry, bakery and the coffee world, SIGEP ended on 24th January, at the Rimini Expo Centre, in Italy. This international trade show gave a great stimulus to the Italian-made confectionery sector, a consistent part of Italy’s agri-food export, which rose to 40 billion euros at the end of 2017. The five-day event ended with a record of 209,135 overall attendees, of whom 135,746 were Italian buyers and 32,202 were foreign buyers from 180 countries, alongside which there was the universe of exhibitors; participants in the international contests, teams for the competitions, guests at the conferences and participants in the academy areas. Of the international buyers, 77 per cent came from Europe (mostly from Spain, Germany, France, Greece and Poland), 12 percent from Asia (Japan, Korea, China and India), seven percent from the Americas (United States, Canada and Brazil), three percent from Africa (Morocco, Algeria and Egypt) and one percent from Oceania (Australia).

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All the figures set records at SIGEP 2018:1,250 exhibitors occupying an area of 129,000 sq.m. and over 1,000 events, among others. The App dedicated to SIGEP was a success: 10,000 downloads were exceeded. The highlight events at SIGEP 2018 were the Gelato World Cup and The Pastry Queen (Ladies World Pastry Championship), along with a series of events in all the

product chains. The links with live streaming coverage (Italian and English) of the events covering the various arenas had a world audience of approximately 244,000 users. France won the Gelato World Cup. Spain came second and Australia third. The World Gelato Cup is a biennial competition organised by SIGEP and Gelato e Cultura, and will therefore once again be in the spotlight in 2020 with some new features. A m o n g t h e key w o r l d ex p o s fo r foodservice, SIGEP is one of the leading players in the solid confectionery sector, with a particular slant on artisan and high quality production. Consequently, the product chains of artisan gelato, pastry and bakery, along with coffee, spread out from the SIGEP platform with a new impulse, relations and business in Italy and worldwide. The widespread satisfaction among all the exhibitors confirms SIGEP’s leadership and the strategic quality of its development plan, said the Italian Exhibition Group, which organised the event. The 40th edition of SIGEP will be held in Italy, from 19th-23rd January 2019.

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Bakery and Pastry Sector

Showcases at Food&HotelAsia

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he most comprehensive international food and hospitality biennial mega trade event in t h e re g i o n , t h e 2 1 s t e d i t i o n Food&HotelAsia  (FHA), will be held from 24th to 27th April 2018 at two venues – Singapore Expo and Suntec Singapore. Ce l e b rat i n g 4 0 ye a rs of b u s i n ess excellence, Food&HotelAsia (FHA) is the preferred choice for industry professionals to access an international showcase of food and hospitality products, equipment and solutions, which are needed to drive business inspiration today and tomorrow. The slated event will house its biggestever industry congregation with 4,000 international exhibitors from more than 70 countries and regions; an increase of 25 percent compared to its last edition. The event’s total floor area spans 119,500 sqm, 23 percent increase from 97,000 sqm. 68 international groups are confirmed and spread across the two venues, with Armenia and Qatar being the newest countries to participate. 78,000 trade attendees from over 100 countries and regions are expected at the 2018 edition of the show. A mega tradeshow synonymous with the food and hospitality industry in Asia and beyond, Food&HotelAsia (FHA) has

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grown tremendously in tandem with Asia’s food and hospitality industry, and has earned itself a reputation as the most comprehensive premier international food and hospitality trade show in the region. This biennial event has proved to stay relevant to the Asian markets’ needs. To cater to the diverse needs of its food and hospitality industry, FHA offers an extensive assortment of products and services through its 6 specialised sector’s.

Serving the Bakery & Pastry Sector The bakery& pastry sector at FHA2018 is a dedicated all-in-one sourcing platform that features a complete selection ranging from ingredients and supplies, to preparation, refrigeration and storage equipment. Confirmed participants include Aladdin, Allied Foodservice Equipment, AMF Bakery Systems, Angel Yeast, BarryCallebaut Chocolate Asia Pacific, Bundy Baking Solutions, CSM Deutschland, DLA Naturals, Femac Singapore, ForniCeky, Fuji Shokai, G e l M at i c I t a l i a , G e l at o S p e c i a l i s t s , GroupeProva, Harvest Bakery Ingredients, Kobird, Lactalis Singapore, Lesaffre, Mackies Asia Pacific, Martellato, Momolato, Pavoni Italia, PhoonHuat, Rondo Asia, Scandibake, Valrhona, Wellcook Kitchenware and many

more. With the increasing popularity of gelato in Asia region, the event will feature a dedicated Gelato Zone and host the inaugural Asian Gelato Cup. The Gelato Zone will include a wide variety of product selections, and participation from leading suppliers around the world. Jointly organised with the Singapore Pastry Alliance, at the first-ever Asian G e l a t o C u p t a l e n t e d Pa s t r y C h efs around Asia will put their creativity and technical skills to the test for the Gelato Championship title. Judged by a panel of experts, 12 teams of Gelato/Pastry Chefs from around Asia will vie for the inaugural title. This prestigious competition also acts as a preselection platform for World Gelato Cup 2020, to be held in Rimini, Italy. The largest ‘live’ pastry competition in Asia, the Asian Pastry Cup will also return. New segments include a Chocolate Chef Competition and Global Star Chefs Pastry Show. In addition, the FHA2018 International Conference will include a Bakery Masterclass. For updates, please visit www. foodnhotelasia.com.

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Aahar 2018:

Expected to Garner Impressive Participation

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ahar, the international food & hospitality fair, will be taking place at its regular venue of Pragati Maidan, New Delhi. This would be the 33rd edition of Aahar. Aahar is regarded as the largest trade fair in the food & hospitality sector in India. The 33rd edition of the mega annual show for the food & beverage and hospitality industry would be taking place during 13th -17th March 2018. The forthcoming event is being organised by India Trade Promotion Organisation (ITPO). Aahar 2018 will be demarcated into two separate but concurrent exhibitions. They are ‘Hospitality India’ covering hotel& restaurant equipment and supplies, and ‘Food India’ covering food, processed food & beverage products. The impressive product ranges displayed at the fair would include fresh produce & dairy products, confectionery/desserts, bakery products & ingredients and bakery equipments, organic & health products, frozen, canned & processed food products, meat, poultry & sea food, cheese and fine specialty food, snacks and convenience food, food ingredients, additives and preservatives, coffee and tea, syrups, juices & energy drinks. etc. The exhibition is also expected to showcase bar accessories, bed, bath and table linen, chafing dishes, tableware, cutlery, chopping boards, crockery, glassware, garden furniture, kitchen ware, spa amenities, stainless steel products, brass platters, toiletries, sanitary fittings, laundry equipment, dish washing machines and packaging machinery related to food products, among others. The event is expected to be visited by a galore of professionals and entrepreneurs from the food & beverage and hospitality industry across the globe, which include Executive Chefs and Executive Housekeepers, Hospitality Procurement Heads, Purchase Consultants among others. Like the previous editions of the show, Aahar 2018 is also expected to give an impetus to the business potential of Indian food service and hospitality industry. Besides facilitating business, Aahar also serves as a platform for the food & beverage and hospitality industry players to disseminate/gather relevant information and gauge evolving and futuristic trends

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which can greatly benefit many participants at the fair. Here it deserves a mention that about 900 exhibitors from India and abroad showcased their products at Aahar 2017. The foreign exhibitors at the fair were from the US, China, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Russia, Poland, Turkey, Italy, Bulgaria, Spain, Oman, Korea, Sweden, Thailand, UAE, Peru and Lebanon. Around 70,000 trade visitors visited Aahar 2016, over the five days of the fair. Going by the emerging and ongoing trends in the Indian food & beverage and hospitality industry, we can safely assume that the forthcoming edition of Aahar is expected to supersede even these impressive figures of Aahar 2017, and is poised to become a great success story.

EVENTS’ CALENDER Sigep 2018 20-24 January 2018 Rimini Expo Centre, Italy www.en.sigep.it

Europain 2018 3-6 February 2018 Paris Nord Villepinte, Paris www.europain.com

PlastIndia 2018 5-6 February 2018, Gandhi Nagar, Ahmedabad Gandhi Nagar Exhibition Centre, Helipad Ground www.plastindia2018.plastindia.org

Hotel Investment Forum India 2018 7-12 February 2018, Mumbai, JW Marriott Hotel Mumbai Sahar www.hifi-india.com

Gulfood 2018 18-22 Feb 2018, Dubai Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre www.gulfood.com

Aahar 2018 13-17 March 2018, New Delhi Pragati Maidan www.aaharinternationalfair.com

ProWein 2018 18-20 March 2018, Dusseldorf Fair ground Düsseldorf www.prowein.com

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Three Months Shelf Life Necessary for Imported Food Items Imported food items in India now need to have minimum 60 percent of shelf life or at least three months to go for expiry, India’s food safety regulator has ruled. "Customs shall not clear any article of food unless it has a valid shelf life of not less than sixty percent or three months before expiry whichever is less at the time of import," said the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) in a draft notification issued in December. The food importer needs to register with the Directorate General of Foreign Trade and needs to have a valid import-export code, as per the FSSAI notification. FSSAI said that it would profile the importer, custom house agent, manufacturer of the imported product, imported product, country of origin, source country of the consignment, port of entry and history of compliance and any other parameters as it deems fit for assessing the risk associated with the commodity. “The importer shall submit certificate of sanitary export from authorised agencies in exporting countries for the categories of food as may be specified by the food authority from time to time,” the notification said.

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Prataap Snacks Limited Enters the Market of Sweet Snacks Indian snack foods company Prataap Snacks Limited (PSL) has ventured into the sweet snacks market through its wholly owned subsidiary with the launch of its new brand ‘Rich Feast’. The first product under the new brand is ‘Yum Pie’, a three layered treat with sponge cake, flavoured jam and chocolate. The company has set up a fully automated manufacturing plant by its wholly owned subsidiary Pure n Sure Food Bites Pvt. Ltd. in Indore, Madhya Pradesh to manage the production of Yum Pie. The product has been designed for kids in the age group of 4-14. Yum Pie is available in orange, strawberry and mixed fruit flavours. “Our new brand ‘Rich Feast’ marks our entry into sweet snacks category where we see a lot of untapped growth opportunity,” said Amit Kumat, MD & CEO, Prataap Snacks Limited. “With this, we will now get into a bigger macro-snack category from only being a salty snacks player. We intend to grow the Rich Feast brand further with new launches in the coming time,” Kumat added. Prataap Snacks Limited also offers multiple variants of products across categories of potato chips, extruded snacks and namkeen (traditional Indian snacks) under the Yellow Diamond brand.

Packaged Food Category Gets Sweet Magic With the launch of 'wheat rusk' early in December, Sweet Magic Foods, a leading sweets and bakery products brand in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, marked its foray into the packaged food category. Unveiling the product, Sweet Magic Foods's Managing Director AVS Vara Prasad said that 'rusk' is a high growth segment which is expected to grow at 25 percent and become Rs. 5,000-crore market in India by 2020. Sweet Magic is eying 10 percent of India's rusk market share by 2019. The company has a turnover of Rs. 30 crore and the rusk unit of the group may require investment of about Rs. 10 crore.

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‘Gurgaon Moms’ Showcases Baking Talent

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arely 10 days before Christmas, the Academy of Pastry Arts, in association with ‘Gurgaon Moms’ – a community of mothers, organised a baking contest on 15th December. The competition, held at the Gurugram premises of the Academy of Pastry Arts, was open to all the members of ‘Gurgaon Moms.’ The participants were asked to get already baked items along with the printed copy of the recipe. Only garnishing, finishing and presentation were allowed at the venue. Participants were seen carrying their own crockery, cutlery and every other thing which were required for the presentation. “It is an initiative to bring all the passionate home bakers of ‘Gurgaon Moms’ on one platform for a friendly contest between the home bakers,” said Major Dinesh Sharma, Director of Academy of Pastry Arts. “Christmas means time off from work, holidays, warm weather, lots of parties and gatherings with friends, and plenty of time to round up the family around the kitchen, who can be seen baking up some delicious treats. We are sure that this contest would give the ‘Gurgaon Moms’s members something to add on the Christmas party or get-together that they are planning to host,” Sharma said. Chef faculty members of the Academy of Pastry Arts were the

judges of the competition. They were ­— Chef Guilaume Lejeune, Director of Pastry Studies; Chef Eureka Araujo, Indian Pastry Queen 2017 ; and Chef Alisha Faleiro, India Pastry Cup 2017 winner. The contestants were judged as per the presentation, cleanliness and creativity. Gayatri Datla came first at the competition. She was honoured with a gift hamper and free weekend classes worth Rs. 30,000. Arpita Prakash, who came second, was honoured with a gift hamper and free weekend classes worth Rs. 15,000. The third position holder, Seema Krishnan, was presented a gift hamper by the Academy of Pastry Arts. Academy of Pastry Arts is an international group of professional culinary and pastry schools, located in Malaysia, the Philippines and India. In India, it has two centres – while one is located in Gurugram, Haryana; the other is in Bengaluru, Karnataka.

Rich Varieties of Cheese from Europe Showcased The European Union and CNIEL (National Interprofessional Center of the Dairy Economy, France) organised events in New Delhi and Mumbai in December to showcase the rich variety of cheeses from France and other parts of Europe. CNIEL is a privately-run organisation whose main objective is to promote dairy products and to facilitate relationships between dairy producers and processors. The events introduced members of the media (food journalists, critics, bloggers and culinary specialists), food importers, Chefs and restaurateurs to tastes of fine vegetarian cheese from Europe. The event in Mumbai was held at Sofitel Mumbai hotel on 11th December and in New Delhi, the event took place at the Lodhi — The Garden Restaurant on 13th December. François Robin, recognised as one of the best cheesemongers in France, prepared various delicacies with European cheese and Indian spices for the guests. Mansi Jasani, the Founder of the Cheese Collective in Mumbai, spoke about consumption of European cheese by Indians and offered several suggestions on how and when to consume cheese, and how to present them. Even though the consumption of cheese has increased by 15-20 percent in India in the recent years, India's consumption of cheese is quite low as compared to the global average consumption of cheese. Per capita consumption of cheese in India is a mere 200 gms per year in contrast to the global average of 7 kg per annum, according to an estimate. But with a large section of the people opening up to acquiring new tastes, food habits in the country are changing. With a market share of around 13 percent, France ranks as the third largest supplier of cheese to India, after Italy and Denmark.

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The End of a Partnership Olives from Spain Targets the Indian Market Savencia Formage & Dairy India Pvt. Ltd. (formerly known as Dabon International Pvt. Ltd.) and Epicure Frozen Foods & Beverages Pvt. Ltd. have recently split their association, as Savencia decided to go back and focus on its core business of manufacturing and thus made its exit from the fine food business in India. Here it deserves a mention that Epicure gained stature, when in 2009 Dabon International Pvt. Ltd., now Savencia Formage & Dairy India Pvt. Ltd., expressed interest in joining hands with it. The association helped Epicure to set bigger goals, diversify and expand. Now Epicure is back with greater strength and is repositioning its dairy and fine food business. With stronger base and infrastructure, Epicure is now continuing its journey ahead as one of the leading traders and importers in its core products. Epicure has the legacy of a successful journey behind it. Epicure Frozen Foods & Beverages Pvt. Ltd. was started by Sanjay Tandon in 2005. The primary focus of the company was to market imported dairy-based products from Europe in the Indian market, which included cheese, milk, dairy cream, etc. Later the company diversified into fine food business; introducing a wide range of gourmet food products imported from various countries. Despite limited resource, the company managed to create a niche for itself in the highly competitive Indian market. Though the journey was not easy but within a short span of time the company started coming to limelight and eventually become a major stakeholder in the imported fine food business in the country.

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At the 15th Uppercrust Food & Wine Show, which was held during 8th-10th December in Mumbai, visitors indulged themselves in a party of flavours, trying wide variety of products and food brands. Olives from Spain participated in the event. It showcased Spanish olives marinated with Indian spices and condiments. At the Olives from Spain stand, guests were captivated by the different flavours and textures and by the Spanish olives in marinades prepared by Chef Saransh Goila. Chef Saransh also shared his culinary skills and knowledge to an enthusiastic audience in his two Master Classes; presenting two Indian recipes with the taste and texture of Spanish olives in them. In his first Master Class, he delighted the non-vegetarian visitors by cooking mustard prawns with a green olive rice poha. In his second Masterclass, he cooked a delicious vegetarian jackfruit

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biryani with black and green Spanish olives, giving the dish a juicy appetising variation. For a fourth year in a row, Olives from Spain is targeting India as a key market for international promotional campaigns. One of the main activities of this promotional campaign has been the participation of Olives from Spain at the 15th Uppercrust Food & Wine Show. Here it deserves a mention that Spain is the world leader in table olive production. It exports olives to more than 120 countries, representing 40 percent of the global market. The main markets for Spanish olives are the US, Italy, Germany and France. Since 2007, Olives from Spain has targeted other potential markets, India being one of them, where consumption of olives is steadily increasing. To continue with this positive trend, the campaign is focused on presenting ideas for integrating olives into the Indian diet. It also focuses on sharing the nutritional benefits and the importance of olives in the Mediterranean diet. For information about Spanish olives and recipes, visit www. olivesfromspain.in or join Facebook@olivesfromspainindia or Instagram@olivesfromspainindia for updates.

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Health, Hygiene and Safety Needs for Bakery A country known for its sugary snacks and bakery products like khari, which are supposed to be high on fat content, is now keen to make healthy living a priority. Market intelligence firm, Mintel, which conducted a survey in June 2016, found that healthy living topped the list of consumers’ goals and aspirations for the next three years. Healthy food is thus the preferred option for F&B outlets and bakeries in India. The demand for bakery products is increasing in the country due to widespread urbanisation, and also due to increase in population of working women and rising awareness about health and wellness in the society. In this changing scenario where health consciousness and general awareness are rising in the Indian society, it has become imperative for the bakeries in the country to adhere to strict measures of introducing not only healthy ingredients in their products but also adopting safety as far as packing and storing of materials is concerned. Ashok Malkani examines the trend in detail, and explores the healthy and hygiene initiatives and safety concerns in the Indian bakery industry. 16

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akery industry in India has been growing at a steady pace. The branded packaged segment in this sector is estimated at Rs 17,000 crore, in the last financial year, and is expected to grow at phenomenal rate of 13-15 percent in the next 3-4 years. With 75 percent of the biscuit segment in the country in the organised sector, the breads and cakes market in the country is much fragmented with multiple regional and local players. According to a report by IMARC Group, ‘Bakery Products Market: Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2017-2022’, due to high demand, affordability and wide availability, the sales volume of bread reached more than 130 million tonnes in 2016, growing at a CAGR of around 1.3 percent. The global baked goods market has shown rapid recovery following the economic recession, recording strong growth over the recent years. Factors fuelling market expansion include convenience, affordability and health benefits of baked products. Demand for healthier fortified baked products has also driven sales. The demand for healthy bakery products has resulted in introducing newer varieties of breads – such as breads with rye, nuts, dried fruits and vegetables – to capture the emerging markets. As far as biscuits are concerned, nowadays biscuits such as wholewheat, multi-grain, high-fibre and diabeticfriendly biscuits are being introduced in the market, especially in the urban regions. Added to other factors like innovation in packaging, etc., the sales volume of the biscuit market is expected to reach almost 15 million tonnes by 2022.

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Fibre for Fitness Healthy diet is now becoming the trend, a trend which is also becoming very much visible in India. Everyone is becoming conscious of avoiding unhealthy food. According to Sheela Krishnaswamy, Diet, Nutrition & Wellness Consultant, dietary fa cto rs we re m a i n l y res p o n s i b l e fo r cardiovasulcar diseases and also diabetes. The World Health Organisation has estimated about 150 million cases of diabetes worldwide. By 2025, this number is predicted to double. As far as cardiovascular diseases are concerned, an estimated 17.7 million people died from cardiovascular diseases in 2015, representing 31 percent of all global deaths. Many of these deaths could be avoided by regular healthy diet, which of course include intake of healthy bakery products. One of the constituents for healthy bakery products could be fibre. It may be recalled that virtues of fibre have been extolled from the times of Hippocrates. Dr. Denis P Burkitt in 1973 wrote in BMJ that many diseases of the western civilisation were rare or unknown in communities that did not deviate from their traditional way of life. One of the dietary factors that helped in preventing non-communicable diseases in such communities was fibre. “Many dietary factors are involved in increasing or decreasing the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. One among them is dietary fibre. Reduced intake of dietary fibre increases the risk of disease and vice versa,” claimed Sheela. Sheela avers that dietary fibre improves cardiovascular health, improves blood glucose control, helps in weight management, slows down cholesterol absorption, and acts

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as substrate for gut bacteria. In the baking industry, whole-wheat or products containing oats are considered high in fibre. Keeping this in mind, the bakery industry has now introduced whole wheat bread, multigrain bread, rye bread, etc. The bakers have also now introduced healthy cookies. There are also biscuits on the stand which boast of being multigrain and also having low fat content.

Weight Management Weight gain is also responsible for several diseases. Extra weight makes you more likely to have high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Both these conditions make heart disease and stroke more likely. Overweight and obesity could increase the risk of several diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and certain cancer. Karuna Jayakrishna, Senior Application Specialist, DuPont Nutrition & Health, claimed, “Weight management is a key step for a healthy lifestyle. This can be achieved by developing healthy eating habits while monitoring the intake of essential nutrients.” The WHO World Health Statistics Report 2012 stated that globally one in six adults were obese and nearly 2.8 million individuals did die each year due to overweight or obesity. India, with 1.2 billion people, is the second most populous country in the world and is currently experiencing rapid epidemiological transition. Karuna disclosed that researchers have found that protein can play a unique role in weight control and weight loss. It is found that increasing the percent of calories derived from dietary protein can bring benefits beyond those of simple caloric

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restriction. “Researchers believe that energyrestricted diets which provide protein in the range of 25-35 percent of total energy are effective in a number of ways,” stated Karuna. “Researchers have concluded that replacing carbohydrates—especially refined carbohydrates—with protein sources low in saturated fat increases satiety, increases loss of body fat while reducing loss of lean tissue, and results in greater weight loss and possibly improved body composition,” she added. “Soy protein is a complete protein and eating a diet rich in soy protein may help with weight management by enhancing satiety and reducing hunger,” she emphasised. Soy bread is thus becoming popular. Soy flour contains more than 38 percent protein; the addition of soy in bread increases the amount of protein content in bread. Karuna added, “There is also clear evidence that higher-protein diets, especially those containing high quality protein, such as that provided by soy, help to preserve fat free mass (FFM) during weight loss. This, in turn, improves the metabolic profile of dieters.” Thus we can see that in this age of growing health consciousness, bakery products with less fat and impressive protein content are expected to gain popularity in the coming years.

Innovative Measures Polyunsaturated spreads based on sunflower, canola spreads with omega-3 fatty acids, monounsaturated olive oil spreads, etc. are endeavouring to address the fat problem in bakeries. . AAK Kamani has now come up with, what it claims to be, trans fat free oils for bakeries. Prakash Chawla, Kamani’s CEO said, “Consumers are gradually becoming health conscious and are demanding healthier food. In order to cater to the needs of the modern consumers and promote healthy eating habits especially amongst the kids, AAK Kamani has established itself as a pioneer in developing trans fat free products such as Cakelite, Pufflite and Klite for the bakery industry. These shortenings and margarines add value to the finished products.” “To take the health quotient several notches higher, AAK Kamani has set up a food innovation lab at its HO at Chandivali, Mumbai. The purpose is to learn, develop and share new insights into food applications using the right oils and fats in the right

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manner. Today’s consumer is aware of various interesting cuisines, is health and fitness conscious and demands more value for her/his money. At the lab, we offer value added services to our customers by assisting in innovating, improvising and improving their product quality, thereby enhancing the food experience for the public at large. To achieve this, we are well equipped with the proper perspective, persistence, people and, of course, products,” he disclosed. Speaking about these trans fat free products, Chawla revealed the feature of some of them. Pufflite is a transfree bakery shortening, that can withstand high ambient temperature and is characterised by excellent plasticity. An ideal option for healthy khari/puff products, it has zero transfat and zero cholesterol. K-Lite is a premium transfree aerated multipurpose shortening. It can be used for baking items right from cupcakes and cakes to biscuits, brownies and icing.   There are other ideas being introduced by other companies to get healthy bakery products that would appeal to the consumers. Döhler, the global ingredients provider, which sold the bakery side of its business almost 16 years ago to focus on the beverage sector, is now reintroducing many of the ideas behind trend-setting beverages into food applications. At ProSweets, held in Cologne, in January this year, the company showcased several concepts for multi-sensory experiences focused on ‘healthy nutrition’ for the bakery and snacks industries, including cola-flavoured biscuits; and intense red coloured biscuits that contain real pieces of raspberries. Döhler also released its savoury portfolio, including savoury clays or glazings for

Sheela Krishnaswamy bagels, such as a mango curry preparation and a tomato basil topping; and new filling combinations, like a pineapple, lentil and red pepper application.

Safety First But healthy bakery products reflect only one of the new trends taking place in the bakery industry. Safety is also of prime importance in the bakery industry. It is well-known that several large bakery manufacturers outsource to contract manufacturers who do not have the requisite financial strength to implement comprehensive safety measures. One may classify safety in the bakery industry into different sections like personal safety, fire safety and electrical safety. Personal safety in the bakery industry would involve avoiding or preventing slips and trips due to spillages, avoiding or preventing noise which could cause deafness, avoiding or preventing odour, dust, and sprains due to carriage of heavy loads, etc. Since bakery has many inflammable materials proper fire safety is also essential.

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S T O R Y

Karuna Jayakrishna Electrical safety in bakery involves proper instillation of transformers, cable trays and panels in the factory. Employers in the bakery industry have a responsibility to provide and maintain a safe working environment in which employees are not exposed to hazards. This responsibility  includes providing relevant information, instruction, training and supervision so  that their workers are not exposed to hazards. It also includes addressing  any health risks such as occupational asthma that could arise at the  workplace. Additionally, employers are required to consult with safety  and health representatives (if any) and employees on safety and health matters.

Food Safety Besides personal safety, an important issue that concerns the consumers in the bakery industry or rather in the entire food & beverage industry, is the issue of food safety. Here food defense, allergen control and sanitation programs, and criteria for shelf-stability, come in. Bakers need to be proactive and extra cautious when it comes to handling allergens in their plants. Impeccable sanitation practices to remove allergen residues from equipment and the food production environment should be always on their priority. But food safety in the Indian bakery industry still remains a major concern. Here it deserves a mention that a recent study by the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) had pointed to the presence of possible cancer-causing chemicals in pre-packaged bread. The specific chemical in question, potassium bromate, had been used as an oxidising agent for bread and a few other bakery items such as pao, bun and pizza base.

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However, according to the FSSAI’s 2011 regulations, the maximum permissible level of potassium bromate and potassium iodate in bread is 50 ppm, while for flour and maida it is up to 20 ppm. The CSE report has found additive levels in the various samples to be from 1.18 ppm to 22.54 ppm. The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) stated that the potassium bromate and potassium iodate levels found in random samples of domestic bread by the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) were not ‘carcinogenic’.” “A major concern of food businesses is around enforcement. Food testing is another area of concern. A major investment is being made for upgrading the labs and capacity building of the staff. We have also created a single platform for sampling and food testing, which will ensure testing is done in a consistent and reliable manner throughout the country. The platform we have created would ensure a coordinated approach by all regulatory agencies so that food businesses would get a hassle-free environment”, said Pawan Agarwal, Chief Executive Officer of FSSAI.

Hygiene is Crucial Another issue is that of hygiene – personal as well as environmental – which should be adopted stringently by the bakeries. Here it deserves a mention that the National Environment Agency (NEA) from Singapore has issued guidelines, which are important for food handlers at bakeries and cake shops to adopt for good hygiene practices, so as to ensure bread and confectionary products served to consumers are safe for consumption. Some of them are:

Purchase and Receipt of Ingredients • Purchase ingredients from reliable

Prakash Chawla suppliers approved by the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA). • Check that the ingredients are not expired. • Ensure that the packaging is intact and that the ingredients have been transported at appropriate temperatures (e.g. chilled products at 4 degree centigrade and below). • Keep invoices of purchase for traceability purpose.

Storage of Ingredients • Adopt a First-Expired First-Out (FEFO) approach. Do not use ingredients beyond their expiry date. • Store ingredients at appropriate temperatures. Monitor temperatures of the chiller and freezer daily. • As far as possible, store raw ingredients in a separate chiller from ready-to-eat ingredients. Always store ready-to-eat ingredients in covered containers above raw ingredients.

Preparation • Do not work when unwell. • Wash hands (including area under the fingernails) thoroughly with soap and water

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after visiting the toilet and before handling food. • Prepare raw and cooked/ready-to-eat food separately to avoid cross-contamination. • Use clean gloves and a separate set of utensils (including chopping boards and knives) when handling raw food and cooked/ ready-to-eat food. • Do not handle cooked/ready-to-eat food with bare hands. • Do not keep cooked/ready-to-eat food at room temperature for more than four hours.

Slicing/Packing of Bread and Confectionery Products • Cool baked products on clean racks and trays. As far as possible, the baked products should be covered during cooling. • Clear crumbles that are left after slicing the products. • Use clean packaging to pack the products.

Display • Ensure that products are stored in clean display cases which are covered at all times. • Ensure products are stored at appropriate temperatures (e.g. cakes with fresh cream should be stored in chiller display units at 4ºC and below). • Do not display products with perishable fillings beyond four hours, at room temperature. Adopt first-in-first-serve approach in the display of products for sale. • You are encouraged to time stamp the products to inform consumers on the “consume-by” date.

Cleaning • Clean all equipment (e.g. oven, dough mixer and proofer), utensils and food preparation surfaces thoroughly with soap and water. Clean-up after every step of the preparation process (i.e. mixing, proofing, baking, cooling, etc.) to prevent crosscontamination. • Clean the kitchen, storage and display areas and utensils on a daily basis. • Conduct regular inspections and maintenance of equipment. Promptly repair or replace damaged equipment to prevent contamination. • Practice good refuse management. • Plan and follow a cleaning schedule. • Have an effective pest control programme. Taking inspiration from and adhering to these comprehensive hygienic measures throughout our bakery and confectionery industry can be greatly beneficial for the industry and its consumers. Overall, we can say that health and hygiene have assumed even more crucial importance in today’s Indian bakery industry, as our society is becoming more health conscious and hygiene conscious. In the urban Indian society, the awareness levels have also increased manifolds, due to the spread of television, Internet and social media. In this changing scenario, the bakeries need to observe strict vigilance not only on health and hygiene, but also on safety of the employees. Compliance of stringent health, hygiene and safety norms would not only make the bakery industry more humane, but also help the individual bakery outlets to survive and thrive in the long-run. n

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Sweet Prospects for Creative Bakers Christmas is the time to hang up the stockings and deck up the tree and, of course, get your hands on the most creative gift hampers and cakes. Away from all the glitter and glitz of cake mixing sessions to bake large cakes which decorate the lobbies at star hotels, there are the traditional home bakers with their array of yummy and artistically designed cakes, capturing the hearts of many children as well as adults. Yes, home baking has emerged as an important trend in urban India‌ These home bakers, mostly women, are busy throughout the year to meet the demands of the children and fastidious gourmands, and they are making creative and imaginative pieces of marvels. Ashok Malkani presents a brief on some of them and also about the difficulties they face. Some of the home bakers have started their own bakeries. For those who are likely to do so in the future, he examines the legalities of opening a bakery, in the Indian context. 22

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omen have always aspired to start a home-based business where they can take care of their children as well as make some money in their free time. One of the businesses that they have a natural talent for is food. Many of them have taken to baking. An activity not usually associated with traditional Indian kitchens, baking has been on the rise over the past decade in the country. It may be mentioned that baking is a combination of both art and science. It demands a lot of creativity, commitment and passion for food. It is an exciting career for those with an intrinsic interest in cooking, have natural culinary talent, artistic skill and a social nature. Bakers need to be skilled, creative and innovative professionals. Though no formal educational qualification is required to become a home baker, one needs some basic training in baking, icing and decorating. This is because baking demands the right mix of ingredients and even small changes to baking recipes could ruin the dish. So, is home baking really a cakewalk? N o i s t h e s h o rt a n d s i m p l e a n swe r.

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But it is exciting with lots of scope for experimentation and innovation.

Baking Delights

Bayiravi Mani admits that being a home baker entails lots of hard work. Bayiravi, who was working for an event management company and had never even baked before 2011, developed an interest in baking after visiting a friend and looking through a recipe book. It was then that she realised that the ingredients used for baking were simple. This prompted her to go out and get an oven and she started by making a vanilla muffin. And there has been no looking back since then! Her major challenge as a home baker was delivery. Several customers stayed far off and would be put off by the distance they had to travel to pick up the cake. But once the business and her reputation as a home baker grew, she faced no problems. “Once people think that you are worth the effort, they make the effort,” she said with a smile. Insia Lacewala, Co-founder of Small Fry Co., Mumbai, a food consultancy company, moved into the food pop up business in

Anuradha Chopra Kukreti 2013 after over ten years of experience in events, film, television and Indian music. “In urban India, home bakers are growing at a rapid rate. I say this because I come across so many people who have started their own catering business or deliveries from their house on a day-to-day basis. The numbers are really crazy, there are some 200 people on my list of home bakers and that is just for Mumbai,” she pointed out. The growth in the number of home bakers during the recent years, in urban India has been mainly because baking

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Dhiren Kanwar business is conducive for many women, as they get the benefit of working from home; which enable them to manage family expectations while working on something they are passionate about. Also, who doesn’t like to walk into a home that smells of freshly-baked choco-chip cookies or to the sights of colourfully sprinkled cupcakes? The number of women entrepreneurs in urban India who have taken up home baking as a career is increasing and many of them have expanded, or are planning to do so. Many of them have opened their own bakeries. One of them is Janki Paingy, who is planning to start her own business in early 2018, from Ooty. “I am planning to switch from using just one oven from my kitchen to having a dedicated bakery within my home from where I would love to scale up and get into mass-manufacturing. We will buy the industrial ovens and other equipment locally made from Coimbatore and I would employ and train locals to assist me in the various aspects of baking,” she disclosed enthusiastically. When questioned about the reason for selecting Ooty as her choice of starting her new venture, she stated, “Ooty hosts many boarding school students and also attracts a lot of tourists from three neighboring states. I wish to cater to the locals and visitors alike who I am sure will be looking to feast on the most delicious, yet affordable desserts to make their holiday complete.” Janki, who is a graduate from JJ School of Arts, began her journey into the baking world because breads, cakes, desserts always caught her fancy and cooking and trying out new dishes is an obsession with her. “My strength lies in theme-based

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fondant cakes as my knowledge from JJ comes in handy to handcraft intricate elements made out of edible fondant that are part of the theme,” asserted Janki. Speaking about the challenges that one would face in this profession, she claimed, “Trial and error are a part of any new business and I have been a part of the drill but I have learnt a lot from every mistake. As I use my home kitchen, hygiene has always been top priority for me.” “Since I started home-baking, in 2015, I have seen a huge growth in the overall baking business in the country. Nowadays you can find each city in the country having a lot of cake artists, and many of them are doing amazing work,” she conveyed. Anuradha Chopra Kukreti, from Vizag, has made a name for herself as she does not believe in using chemical additives, preservatives and pre-mixes for her cakes. She is said to offer the fresh and most delicious bakes, on order. Anu, as she is called, stated, “The bakeries use pre-mixes because they produce in bulk. I use pure ingredients in my bakes. All my cakes and cookies are made from whole wheat and not maida.” A naval officer’s wife, who lives in the Naval Base at Dolphin’s Hill, Anu claims that baking has been a childhood passion with her and she started taking orders from home about a year ago. “I used to bake for my family and friends earlier. It was they who induced me to start this enterprise, which eventually grew into something bigger. My husband has been

my biggest support in pursuing my passion,” she declared. A filmmaker turned baker, Poonam Maria Prem, the owner of Zoey’s Bakehouse, Hyderabad, turned into a baker about nine years ago, but it was only in 2012, in an attempt to get a decent looking animal theme cake on her daughter’s third

Janki Paingy birthday that she realised she should try her hand at sugarcraft. “How difficult could it be, was my first thought. And even if it did not turn all right, it was my cake after all,” she reminisced. Baking caught on Poonam yet again when a colleague asked her how to make a rainbow-themed cake for her daughter’s birthday. “It was the most nerve-wrecking thing I thought I had done and always wondered how do they make those big fat cakes they show on television channels!” exclaimed Poonam. She gave up her job to start her own business. Having worked for an employer earlier and now turning entrepreneur, Poonam feels both have their pros and cons.  S h e i t e rat e d t h at m a n a g i n g t h e online bakery is difficult as one has to systematically keep records of people’s enquiries and requests, messages on Whatsapp, phone calls, e-mails, walk-ins and Facebook postings. “Most of them do feel we are a team, but it is like living on the edge each day trying to figure it all out single-handedly. My husband is my backbone, without whose support Zoeys Bakehouse would have been a distant dream,” she averred.   “ C re at i n g v i s u a l ef fe ct s i s a to u g h j o b a n d o u r off i ce h o u rs stretch sometimes beyond human ability. I remember working for 14-15 hours at a stretch and not being able to see my daughter. Even now, I work approximately for 12 hours in a day but have a better control over work-life balance,” Poonam confessed.

Bakery Ingredients One of the problems faced by home

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professional home bakers. An exclusively designed smaller packaging for home bakers provides bakery fillings, chocolates and cake mixes in smaller and appealing quantities.” Kanwar disclosed that there were close to about 8000 domestic artisan customers or home bakers in Mumbai. “India is making history for Puratos group because it is the first time that we developed an app that is going to enable us to supply to professional home bakers. Normally it is difficult to cater to home bakers because our company usually supplies in large quantities. But with the launch of the new app, we can deliver products, in the desired quantities, in a convenient way,” he added. T h e re a re s e v e ra l ot h e r b a k e r y ingredient manufacturers too, like Swiss Bake Ingredients Ltd., the manufacturing and marketing arm of Trade ‘n Bake Switzerland. They manufacture and market bakery ingredients across Asia, Middle-East, Africa and Europe.   A B M a u r i i s a n ot h e r i n g re d i e nt manufacturing company renowned for baking capability, expertise and knowledge.

bakers in India is the dearth of superior quality ingredients. And what could be better than getting a range of innovative bakery, patisserie and chocolate ingredients delivered to your doors? Puratos India, a 100 percent subsidiary of Puratos International, a global leader in innovative ingredients for bakery, patisserie, and chocolate business, has recently launched a mobile app and web shop named ‘Let’s Bake’ that aims to reinvent the home-baking industry and add convenience to the profession. Home bakers now have an opportunity to buy online from a repository of bakery, patisserie and chocolate ingredients. The launch of ‘Let’s Bake’ app and web store adds to the convenience of domestic artisans and facilitates the ease to order ingredients for making cakes, chocolates and breads. Dhiren Kanwar, MD - India, Area Director – South Asia, Puratos Food Ingredients India Pvt. Ltd., while addressing a press conference had stated, ‘Let’s Bake’ app and web store offers convenience and a host of unique privileges and benefits to its

AB Mauri India supports and enables bakers, both small and large, across craft/ artisan and industrial segments. A few of the other manufacturers operating in the country in this realm are Stern Ingredients India Private Limited,

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Visit us at : www.alliedmetworks.com

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Bayiravi Mani Delta Nutritives Pvt. Ltd., etc.

Equipment & Other Necessities Some jurisdictions allow you to operate a bakery from home. In such cases, using your home kitchen to launch your business can save you costly overheads. Once you have passed initial health department inspection, you can begin baking goods to sell wholesale or retail. The equipment you need depends on the type of baked items you intend to produce and on your expected sales volume. Some of the equipments that you would need for running bakery operations are: Commercial Electric Mixer: For preparing cake frosting and other pastry fillings. Mobile Cooling Racks: You can re m ove b a ke d g o o d s f ro m t h e ove n quickly by keeping a rolling cooling rack nearby when you are baking. Being able to set down hot baking pans and sheets immediately also reduces hand burns. Refrigerator: To avoid spoilage. Ovens: Convection ovens use fans to circulate hot air inside the oven, which results in even baking. For starting a bakery you would also need flour, leaveners, sugar, salt and butter (unsalted butter is the default choice for baking, unless your recipe specifies salted butter), oil and shortening, extracts and flavourings, spices, mixing bowls (you will need at least two mixing bowls for the cake — one for wet and one for dry ingredients), measuring cups and spoons, electric mixer, cake pans, parchment paper, kitchen scissors, pastry brush, toppings, baking pans, dough hook, food processor, plastic wrap/kitchen towel and rolling pin among equipments and ingredients. Besides these, for cake decoration the aspiring baker would need some more equipments. They are cake pans, sharp knife/X-Acto blade, cake boards/drums, off-set spatula and/or bench scraper, turntable, powdered sugar or cornstarch.

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Poonam Maria Prem

Professional Training For those who want to be professionally trained as a baker can join short-term certificate or diploma courses in bakery and confectionary. The duration of these courses in India generally varies from four to six months. Most baking and confectionery courses cover topics such as nutrition, food service safety and sanitation, baking principles,

Insia Lacewala operating and maintaining of machinery, production processes and establishment and management of bakery unit, etc. There are also individual teachers like Padma Renjith who, after returning from Dubai four years ago, has taught more than 500 baking enthusiasts in Thiruvananthapuram, the capital of Kerala. She claims that almost three-fourth of them are doing roaring business from their

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home. But for certification or diploma one has to join formal training institutes.

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Licensing Rules for Starting a Bakery For a home-based bakery business in our country, it is best to start a limited liability partnership (LLP) or a one person company (OPC). Both LLP and OPC offer limited liability protection for the promoters of the business, which is an important aspect for any food business in India. To o p e r a t e a bakery in the country, a fo o d b u s i n e s s operator license, VAT re g i s t rat i o n a n d t ra d e m a r k registration would have to be obtained. With a LLP or OPC, all these registrations would be obtained in the name of the business. Both LLP and OPC require lesser compliance related formalities when compared to a private limited company, making it the ideal choice of entity for a small business operated from home. Food Licensing: For those wanting to start bakery business in India, there is necessity to acquire FSSAI Food Business License. This will facilitate the bakery to sell its products to retail chains, which generally insist on its vendors having FSSAI licenses. Moreover, operating a food business without a valid FSSAI license attracts stringent penalty of imprisonment of up to six months and a fine of not more than Rs. 5,00,000. VAT Registration: Since baked goods are taxable under VAT, it is necessary to have VAT registration from local sales authorities for even home-based bakery business. Trade Mark Registration: If you want to create a unique identity for the business in India, then trade mark registration is a must. It is extremely cheap and easy to obtain. Those who want to establish a strong social media presence for marketing their products, it is important to have a trademark registration to ensure that the brand is not abused or used by unauthorised personnel. You can get this registration done for only about Rs. 6000.

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In Conclusion Overall, during the past couple of years there has been a big boom in the home-based bakery business in the country. The social media has been a major contributor towards this growth. The growth has also been due to people preferring customised baked products. This is a competitive industry but the future is bright. Customisation has created a huge demand for home-based bakers. However, besides sustained hard work, creativity, innovativeness and knowledge of bakery ingredients are necessary for the success of entrepreneurs engaged in the bakery business. So pick up your ladle and get started. n

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Fostering Success of Bakery Outlets By Swarnendu Biswas

T

h e b a ke ry a n d co nfe ct i o n e ry business of post-modern India has good potential to grow. This is natural considering the fact that today’s urban India has huge numbers of nuclear families, many of whom have very little time at their disposal to cook elaborate meals. This trend is expected to gain further momentum in the near future. In such a scenario, the demand for ready-to-eat bakery products is expected to increase, especially when people are looking for quick lunch options to save time. The popularity of global food & beverages in Indian palates (for example burger, pizza), along with significant increase in disposable incomes across pockets of middle class India during the last decade has also contributed to the growth of the Indian bakery and confectionery industry. The mushrooming of retail chains in urban India selling an impressive array of bakery and confectionery products is a reflection of these trends. We have seen that over the past few years, the Indian bakery industry has been growing at a CAGR ranging between 12-15 percent, and this growth trend is likely to continue in the near future. So we can see that the entrepreneurs thinking of entering the bakery and co n fe ct i o n e ry b u s i n e s s of I n d i a d o h ave i m p ress i ve p ote nt i a l to g a r n e r l u c rat i ve p rof i ts . H oweve r, p ote nt i a l doesn’t automatically entail reality. The entrepreneurs would be needing various factors to translate this potential in to the reality of lucrative revenues and profits. Th e e nt re p re n e u rs ca n e nte r t h e

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promising but equally challenging Indian bakery and confectionery business through a number of routes. One of them is by opening of a stand-alone bakery outlet. Here we would discuss some of the fundamental factors which are necessary to make your bakery outlet a successful enterprise, in the urban Indian context. However, here I would like to mention that here we are not only considering home bakers but any entrepreneur who is running a bakery outlet, preferably a stand-alone bakery outlet, and neither we are taking into account of the legal rigmaroles necessary to run a bakery business in India. Succinctly, we are not taking into account of the factors needed to merely operate a bakery outlet, but are considering the factors which are required

to make an enviable success story out of your bakery outlet.

Checking Costs One of the factors that an entrepreneur running a bakery outlet should take care of is the variable cost. This is particularly relevant if you have started your standalone bakery outlet with a limited budget to back you. Rather than cutting down on the quality of ingredients, which can adversely affect the quality of the entrepreneur’s products, she/he should see that there is no or minimal wastage of raw materials in the production process. Having energy-efficient appliances, and procuring the right supplies from the right supplier in right quantities at the right time can also be helpful in keeping the

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cost of operations of the bakery outlet in check. The wastage of manpower and other variable costs should also be strictly checked by the entrepreneur, especially if the concerned entrepreneur starts the bakery with paucity of funds.

The Right Location Location of the bakery outlet should be given careful consideration, as the product range and as well as business prospects of the outlet would depend highly upon its location. In the Indian context, it is always preferable to have your bakery in an upmarket locality, for there the demand for your bakery and confectionery products is likely to be high.

Outsmarting Competition The owners or managers responsible for running bakery outlet/s should be particularly concerned of the competition around. For a stand-alone bakery outlet, unless it has acquired a nationwide name, local business is generally the major driver of revenues. Thus the entrepreneur should always strive to make her/his bakery perform better than that of the bakeries in competition in the locality, so as to garner more local consumers. Now there are three broad ways of tackling competition. One is to produce more or less similar products like that of competition, within similar price ranges of the competition, but involving a distinctly better quality. Second is to produce more or less similar products like that of the competition, involving more or less similar quality, but with a distinctly reduced price range. If both are attained together, then it is a sure shot winning combination. But the competition needs to be defined clearly and precisely. Of course, a standalone bakery selling everyday bakery products shouldn’t try to compete with a bakery housed within a five-star hotel. So if our entrepreneur (let us name her as Sheena) runs a stand-alone bakery outlet with limited budget she should give careful attention to provide better products and/or lesser priced products than similar bakeries within the locality where her bakery is located. But she should not bother so much to compete with a bakery housed within a five-star hotel within the same locality (unless she wants to change her market positioning altogether), for the latter’s clientele is likely to be totally different from

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her clientele. Third way is to stand out differently from the competition with a different range of products. For example, there is no bakery in the locality of Sheena’s bakery serving organic products or artisan bakery products, then in that case Sheena can come up with organic bakery products or artisan bakery products to attract impressive revenues and profits, subject to the condition that the locality concerned where Sheena’s bakery is operational needs to be a posh one to generate demand for organic and artisan bakery products. Along these three broad routes to tackle competition, there should be the common factor of innovation. Time to time innovation in terms of products, ambience and décor, in keeping with the market of your products, can help your bakery to garner impressive business, as in this way the boredom is not likely to not set in among your target clientele, as far as your bakery outlet is concerned.

Promotion and Customisation The bakery outlets should also promote their more profitable products by displaying them in the counter more attractively as compared to the less profitable products. This will raise these outlets’ ratio of profit to revenues. Attractive promotional offers during festivities could also contribute towards the success of bakery outlets. If the bakery outlet is located in an upmarket locality in a metropolitan city of India, then it would be helpful for the outlet if it undertakes customisation of cakes and chocolate products embodying creative designs, as this trend has been gaining currency these days in select and affluent niches of the urban Indian society. However, that wouldn’t be needed if the bakery outlet is located in middle or lower middle class colony of India, for in those localities there is unlikely to be any demand for designer cakes or chocolates. Today there is need for the bakery outlet to have impressive online presence, which should of course include presence in social media. It is because nowadays, a lot many orders, even neighbourhood orders, can come from online. Not exploring these channels proactively and creatively could entail not only loss of revenues and potential revenues for the concerned outlet, but without impressive online presence, the bakery outlet’s market image can also take a beating.

Other Factors Maintaining impeccable hygiene and producing healthy bakery products can always help the Sheena’s bakery in our example to stand in good stead in today’s times, as our society is at last becoming health and hygiene conscious. Of course, besides all these factors, the bakery outlet owner should also need to have good knowledge of ingredients needed in the bakery and confectionery business. Otherwise, the quality of her/his products would suffer. Moreover, then her/ his staff or suppliers can take her/him for a ride and this in turn can result in escalation of the outlet’s operational costs, thereby compromising on the entrepreneur’s profits. Along with knowledge the zeal to innovate is also needed for long-term success of your bakery, especially in these days where consumers are frequently demanding new products or old products in a new avtaar at least. As discussed before, innovation is one of the ways to tackle competition. The entrepreneurs setting up bakery outlet/s should also hire the right personnel, for quality ingredients and equipments can only facilitate to make tasty food, but the people in the kitchen make it. Instead of going for personnel who charge less or least for a given job, the bakery outlet, if it could afford, should go for quality personnel. This would be helpful for the entrepreneur in terms of costs, in the long-run. One can say that the entrepreneurs running bakery outlet/s should strive to hire the best possible personnel within a given budget, which in turn would save their variable costs. However, as finding skilled workforce is a perpetual challenge in the Indian food service industry, this is much, much easier said than done. The safety of the guests and the staff also contributes to the success of a bakery outlet, as not doing so can lead to loss of man hours, which in turn can delay the delivery and eventual incurring of customer dissatisfaction. And a dissatisfied customer can be a customer lost in these times of fierce competition; in the realm of India’s bakery and confectionery business. Of course, having all these factors in place would not guarantee the success of your bakery outlet, either in the short or long-run, but these factors can definitely greatly enhance your chances of making a worth emulating success out of your bakery outlet. n

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India is Loving Mayonnaise By KS Narayanan

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ayonnaise or mayo is a thick white base sauce made generally from vegetable oil and egg yolks. Whitish-yellow in colour (like an egg shell), this stable emulsion is generally flavoured with mustard, lemon juice and/or vinegar, salt and pepper. In non-vegetarian mayonnaise, the emulsifier is egg yolk, which contains lecithin, a fat emulsifier.

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Interesting History Mayonnaise is said to be invented in the 1750s by Duc de Richelieu’s French Chef. After the French defeated the British at Port Mahon, his Chef created a victory feast that was to include a sauce made of cream and eggs. On realising that there was no cream in the kitchen, the Chef substituted olive oil for the cream, and

a new culinary creation was born. The Chef named the new sauce ‘Mahonnaise’ in honour of the Duc’s victory. What a journey it has had been since then for the mayonnaise...

Ascertaining Good Mayonnaise Worldwide, mayonnaise is commonly used

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as a sandwich spread or as a burger spread. Additionally, it is used extensively in salads where it performs the role of holding the vegetables / meat together. Further, mayonnaise is used as a base to prepare a wide range of sauces, dips and salad dressings, such as the popular Thousand Island and Tartar sauce. The preparation of mayonnaise is a skilled job, and is also labour- intensive. There exists the possibility of wastages and curdling. It is also extremely difficult to maintain the consistency of mayonnaise. Now what is a good mayonnaise? Based on the experts’ worldview on what is a good mayonnaise, we can say that following factors are necessary for a good mayonnaise. It should be mildly yellow coloured like that of an egg shell, and not plain white in colour; it should be thick enough in such a way that when one runs a spoon over it, it should have the ability to hold the shape; it should have good spread-ability in sandwiches; on application in salads the mayonnaise should be able to hold the vegetables together without releasing water. Moreover, a good mayonnaise

should be mildly flavoured, without any strong acidic aftertaste. 


Impressive Market With the entrance of the burger chains i n t h e co u nt ry i n t h e m i d n i n et i es , commercially made mayo for the QSR chains were introduced in India. Initially

it was popularised as a white sauce! Taking into account of huge population of vegetarians in India, it became incumbent on the manufacturers to come up with eggless versions of mayonnaise. Necessity is the mother of invention and thus, an eggless version of mayonnaise was eventually developed in India.

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Scratch Mayonnaise

This is one recipe that is probably taught across most of the catering colleges through the country but today rarely used by the Chefs in the kitchen, in India! Here mayonnaise is made by slowly adding oil to egg yolk, while whisking vigorously to disperse the oil. The oil and the water in yolk form a base of the emulsion, while the lecithin from the yolk acts as the emulsifier that stabilises it. Additionally, a bit of mustard is also added to further stabilise the emulsion. It is essential to constantly beat the mayonnaise using a whisk, while adding the oil; a drop at a time. Experienced cooks can judge that a mayonnaise is done when the emulsion cannot be beaten any further. Preparing mayonnaise is as much an art as well as a science and it requires an experienced Chef to get it right. It is prone to splitting which then renders the whole mix to be unfit for consumption. Scratch-based mayonnaise also has its disadvantages. Clearly, scratch-based mayonnaise is possible only with the use of eggs, thereby giving it a non-vegetarian base. In India, with most of the consumption being vegetarian, this does not provide a pragmatic base to develop vegetarian products. Moreover, since scratch-based mayonnaise uses raw eggs, there always exists the risk of Salmonella poisoning. This is a serious issue, which kitchens should take cognisance of. Acco rd i n g to A ks h ay B e cto r, t h e Chairman and Managing Director of Cremica Food Industries Ltd, “The mayonnaise boom in India can be attributed to eggless mayonnaise. Indians prefer vegetarian mayonnaise and are now using it for multiple applications, be it sandwiches, burgers and other fast food applications or even in some Indian cuisines. We are regularly developing new variants and recipes to meet the ever growing demand of mayonnaise for different applications.” In addition, the Indian companies have managed to d eve l o p a w i d e ra n g e of m a y o n n a i s e w i t h fa t percentages varying from 2080 percent, thereby opening up many new avenues. The major push for growth in the mayonnaise market in India is the fast urbanisation, rise in disposable incomes in the age group that likes ex p e r i m e nt i n g w i t h fo o d , and the increasing eating out culture in urban India. The busy lifestyle has induced our consumers to adapt to sauces, dressings and condiments in a big way as ‘on the go’ eating has become more popular. According to Viraj Bahl of Veeba Food Services Pvt. Ltd., “The huge popularity of sandwich in the country has further contributed to mayo moving from an out of home consumption to an in home consumption product in urban India. People are now accepting mayonnaise as one of the major elements in their daily food

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requirements. Being healthy, it is replacing unhealthy options, which are already slowly loosing market.”

Mayonnaise v/s Ketchup Ketchup still maintains the lead in the Indian condiments market primarily due to its commercial presence since the early 1970s, but mayonnaise isn’t far behind. The mayonnaise market in India is rapidly growing at a CAGR of more t h a n 2 0 p e rce nt w i t h eggless mayonnaise sales co nt r i b u t i n g a ro u n d 9 0 percent of the overall sales volume of mayonnaise in the country. The usage of mayonnaise in urban India has also become more widespread. From its initial usage in the QSR / restaurant business, mayonnaise is getting into the household kitchens of the country now. While ketchup is usually consumed only as dip, mayonnaise is far more versatile and is consumed in the form of a spread, dip, binding agent and as a base sauce for many other sauces. It is in addition an excellent carrier. This multi utility aspect of mayonnaise has the potential to make it preferable over ketchup in India. In the  US, the mayonnaise market accounts for 2 billion USD, while that of ketchup is just 800 million USD. This is the scenario across most of the world; however it will take some more years for

it to happen in the Indian market.

The Versatile Product The versatility of mayonnaise stems from the fact that it can be used in a grill / oven at high temperatures, applied on dosas and parathas, used to saute vegetables / meat and even be mixed with vegetables as a base. It is interesting that the Indian consumers seem to have taken a liking for a product called Tom-Mayo i.e. a 50-50 blend of ketchup and mayonnaise! What used to be popularised by Chefs as a cocktail sauce, is now gone mainstream. Additionally, m ayo n n a i s e ca n b e te m p e re d w i t h spices, masalas and seasonings to create interesting flavour combinations. M a r ket s t h at w e re fa m i l i a r w i t h mayonnaise had fixed ideas on how to use it; much as ketchup and chutneys are used here. Mayonnaise in India shows how sometimes starting on a blank slate can have its advantages.   This coupled with the various applications of mayonnaise as cited above, mayonnaise can open up a whole new world of flavours for the Chef. Only time and imagination will unfold the true potential of this great versatile product in India.   The writer is the former MD of McCain India and has worked 25 years in the food & beverage industry in various roles. Contact him at: ksnaraya@gmail. com

Dec-Jan ’18


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The Flow of Dark Delights By Swarnendu Biswas

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es p i te t h e n ot s o e n co u ra g i n g economic climate of India during the recent years, it would be an understatement to say that chocolate market in India is growing impressively. According to Mintel, one of the world’s leading market intelligence agencies, sales of chocolate confectionery in retail markets grew by 13 percent between 2015 and 2016 in India. According to Mintel, “India’s chocolate confectionery market has had a strong CAGR (compound annual growth rate) of 19.9 percent, in retail market value, between 2011 and 2015, and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 20.6 percent from 2016 to 2020.”

Thriving with Potential According to the estimates of Mintel’s research, India consumed 228 thousand tonnes worth of chocolate in 2016, which was 50 percent higher than 152 thousand tonnes of chocolate consumption in India during 2011. According to TechSci Research’s report titled ‘India Chocolate Market Forecast & Opportunities, 2020’, chocolate market in India was projected to surpass 17 billion USD by 2020. The report was published in September 2015. “Product innovations, strong marketing strategies and increase in variety of products are driving consumer chocolate sales in India,” observed the report. The findings of ValueNotes also indicate a promising future market for chocolates in India. According to the research report of ValueNotes titled Chocolate Industry in India 2014-2019, the chocolate industry in India was valued at Rs.58 billion in FY 2014. It was estimated by ValueNotes that the industry would be worth nearly Rs. 122 billion by FY 2019, growing at a CAGR of 16 percent. “Increasing disposable income, changing lifestyle, rising trend of gifting chocolates instead of traditional Indian sweets, and a surge in the sale of dark chocolates are expected to drive the

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industry growth,” noted the report. Here it deserves a mention that ValueNotes is a market and competitive intelligence firm, based in Pune, Maharashtra. No wonder the per capita chocolate consumption in India has increased from 50 gm in 2005 to 120 gm in 2013. But still it much less. For example, an average Indian shopper presently buys less than 150 gm of chocolate a year, while a typical UK shopper buys more than 6 kg of chocolate every year. The fact that still the per capita consumption of chocolate products is much less in India as compared to that of many developed western countries also indicates a huge potential for the growth of chocolate market in India, in the backdrop of the present day socio-economic scenario of the country.

The Influencing Factors The above-mentioned report by TechSci Research maintained that over the last decade, chocolate market in India had been growing at a significant rate, on account of expanding middle class population and increasing use of chocolates in various confectionery products. It opined that expansion of organised retail industry

in India and rising disposable income levels of consumers had been further propelling growth in the country’s chocolate market. The report by TechSci Research pointed out that manufacturers were luring consumers by expanding their product portfolios and increasing availability of chocolates in various price ranges.  One can say that some of the reasons behind the impressive growth in chocolate consumption in India during the recent years can be due to the significant increase in disposable incomes in select but sizeable pockets of urban Indian society during the last decade, massive expansion of the retail industry in urban India and also due to the rising chocolate consciousness in some select pockets of urban Indian society. However, the industry and the people at large hardly need the scholars of market intelligence agencies to arrive at the perception that the chocolate market in India is thriving with impressive growth potential. Chocolates are now not only loved by the kids, but are liked by people of all age groups in urban India. In Indian festivities, the role of chocolate products has become prominent during the recent years. T h i s h u g e g ro w t h i n c h o c o l a t e

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consumption in the country during the recent years has paved the way for an impressive variety of chocolate products in the urban Indian market, and this trend is expected to continue in the near future. Though Mondelez India and Nestle India together account for about 80 percent of the estimated Rs. 8500 crore chocolate market of India, but there is no denying the fact that the market is now crowded with many players and premium chocolate brands. Mondelez, Nestle, Ferrero, Mars, Hershey, and Amul are among the important players in the Indian chocolate market, a market which is thriving with sweet potential.

Market Evolution If we study the continued evolution of market positioning of chocolates in India during the last two decades, we can see that over the two decades the market positioning of chocolate products in India has moved from occasional luxurious indulgences for children to indulgences for all age groups. Chocolate products are also playing the role of emotional bond during

Dec-Jan ’18

festivities. Moreover, chocolate brands like Snickers and Cadbury Fuse are now also positioned as means of satiating hunger and Perk is positioned as an energy booster, through creative advertisements. . There are other trends evolving in the Indian chocolate business too. For example, dark and less sweet chocolates are gaining currency. According to India Chocolate Market Outlook, 2022 from Research and Markets, dark chocolate has gained popularity in recent years because of its health benefits and rising awareness among customers. Furthermore, according to the report, preferences of Indian consumers are slowly evolving and getting accustomed to the taste of dark chocolates. Companies like Mondelez and Nestlé have successfully introduced their dark chocolate brands such as Bournville and Nestlé Dark Chocolate in the country. The report was published in January 2017. Premiumisation in the chocolate market is also gaining ground in urban India, whose height is manifested in the trend of designer chocolates and customised chocolate products. The report titled India

Zeba Kohli Chocolate Market Outlook, 2022 observed that parallel to premium chocolate brands and the market dominance of mass appeal, the market for handmade and designer chocolates was also emerging which was catering to the selected pockets of urban India. “As a result, the concept of exclusive chocolate stores in India has gained ground,” noted the report. “Today the Indian palate is changing and more people are discovering the joys of dark & less sweet chocolate,” opined Zeba Kohli, the Managing Director of Mumbai-

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Nidhi Bhageria based Good Housekeeping Company Pvt. Ltd., which has the brand Fantasie Fine Chocolates in its ambit. Fantasie Fine Chocolates is a 72-year-old brand name for exclusive handmade chocolates, having six outlets — five of them in Mumbai and one in Pune. “Dark chocolates and as well as white chocolates are gaining market momentum in India,” opined Nidhi Bhageria, the MD of Celeste Chocolates, a Delhi-based company engaged in making artisan chocolate products with high quality ingredients. Her products presented in exquisite packaging are targeted towards corporate gifting, hotels, and for retail clients of the upper echelons of the Indian society. “Our chocolate products can bring an added sweetness to the festivities or on occasions like birthdays, weddings, wedding anniversaries, etc.,” stated Nidhi. The dynamic businesswoman also maintained nuts coated with chocolate, and chocolate products with infusion of coconut, pistachio, fruits are gaining popularity in the fast evolving Indian chocolate market. As far as customisation of chocolate products goes, Zeba feels that “The trend has really not taken over India by storm as yet and its presence is limited to niche segments and that too in the big cities of the country.” She is right, but though the market for customised chocolate products in India is miniscule, but it is growing nevertheless. Zeba conceded that the consumption of customised, designer chocolate products has grown in India. Chocolate products embodying fancy d es i g n s ; ref l e ct i n g t h e t ra i l of ve ry creative thought process, are gaining

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currency. According to Zeba, “Fantasie Fine Chocolates has created incredible chocolate novelties, which include chocolate chess games, chocolate puzzles, chocolate alphabets, chocolate butterflies and edible chocolate paints among others.” Fantasie Fine Chocolates has a plethora of wonderful chocolate designs on offer, which include Chocolate Motorbike, Chocolate Stiletto, Chocolate Aeroplane, Chocolate Eiffel Tower among many others. Of course, their chocolate designs can be customised according to the client’s preferences. “If you can conceive something in chocolate, chances are we can make it a reality for you,” asserted Zeba, the chocolatier cum entrepreneur, who is the creative force behind Fantasie Fine Chocolates. She has also been involved in the creation of sweet and sensuous fashion statements in the form of chocolate jewelry, chocolate couture, skirts and stoles. The impressive growth in chocolate market in India, along with these other happening chocolate trends indicate more extensive and creative usage of chocolates in bakery products across the Indian bakery and confectionery industry, in the near future. We can say that going by the present scenario, classy retail bakeries in metros and other big cities of the country would require the services of a dedicated chocolatier in the near future. These bakeries would also have to come with more and more customised chocolate creations to suit the tastes of their discerning clientele. Chocolate-based beverages across bakery cafes in the country are also expected to gain popularity.

Infrastructure, Pricing and Awareness Now how can chocolate products’ market share in the total sweet market of India be enhanced in the near future? “Increase in market share of chocolate products in the country needs impressive cold chain infrastructure and sound logistics throughout India, along with more reasonable pricing,” said Zeba. Besides bolstering of infrastructure and moderation in pricing, enhancement of consumer consciousness in relation to chocolate products is also needed to increase the market of chocolates in the country even faster, as well as further and deeper. It is not a sign of maturity of the Indian chocolate market that the milk chocolates still remain the most popular

chocolate category in the country. However, ValueNotes in its above-mentioned report observed that dark chocolate “is expected to be the fastest growing segment among Indian consumers due to its health benefits and increasing awareness among Indian consumers.” “Only if more and more people realise the difference between a great chocolate, a good chocolate, and an ordinary chocolate, they would be willing to pay a substantially higher price for a great chocolate product, as compared to a mere good chocolate product. In this regard, we can say that more chocolate workshops for both grown-ups and children, across hotels and exhibitions, are the need of the hour,” pointed out Nidhi. “One of the ways to make the tastes of average Indian chocolate consumers mature is by organising free tasting sessions of chocolates by chocolate products’ manufacturers or chocolatiers in retail outlets, exhibitions and events.,” she added further. Here it deserves a mention that Fantasie Fi n e C h o co l ates co n d u cts c h o co l ate workshops for adults and children and organises chocolate theme parties on prior notice. Celeste Chocolates has also been active in undertaking free tasting sessions. Succinctly, unless the industry makes a sincere endeavour to educate the palates of its chocolate products’ consumers and potential consumers, and unless our cold chain infrastructure gets bolstered, we cannot hope to develop the Indian chocolate industry in real sense, despite its current impressive growth rate. However, according to ValueNotes, the chocolate manufacturers are increasing their investment in the cold chain facilities across the country, which is an encouraging development.

Rural Reach Moreover, urban areas of India still account for more than 75 percent of the consumption of chocolates in India, though majority of India is rural. To more vigorously tap the vast yet largely untapped rural Indian market, the chocolate manufacturers need to come with more affordable packaging options, and better warehousing facilities. To explore the rural Indian market more powerfully, the chocolate manufacturers operating in the country also need to infuse more ethnic or localised character in their chocolate products through ingredients and packaging solutions. It is heartening to know that Mondelez India is also aiming to deepen its distribution in the Indian rural market. n

Dec-Jan ’18


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Of Flavours and Colours While colours work by increasing the visual appeal of the bakery products, flavours help bakers to develop a unique taste of the products By Jyotismita Sharma

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hey sound a little too cosmetic, but in reality both flavours and colours serve as key ingredients in bakery products. Colours work by increasing the visual appeal of the products and this is no mean achievement. Research works have proved that when it comes to the choice of food, vision is the main sense that people use as their guide. The primary function of flavours goes even deeper. They can not only enhance

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the taste by neutralising the foul smell of some essential ingredients, but can also help bakers to develop a unique taste of the products. Using flavours and other ingredients in specific proportions can help bakers produce refreshing taste.

Fruits of Flavours While appearance often becomes the basis for initial choice of a product, flavour holds the key to most subsequent bakery sales. According to experts, there are several ways to derive a unique flavour in bakery production. For example, the process of baking itself – during brown reaction and caramelisation — can bring about changes which can add flavour to the product. The flavour may also depend on the process of fermentation. For example, breads made from sour dough or overnight sponge would have a different flavour from those made from short sponges and straight dough process. The use of different varieties of dried and preserved fruits and

nuts to produce different types of flavours and finishes is also common in bakeries. And there are, of course, the flavour additives which can be natural, synthetic and imitation, with endless combinations of all the three. Natural flavour additives can be derived from ingredients such as honey, molasses, malt syrup, ground fresh fruit, cocoa, chocolate, etc., besides from the essential oil of citrus fruits such as oil of lemon and oil of orange and vanilla extract. But natural flavour additives may not always be sufficient in large-scale production as the quantity of flavours present in fresh fruits is very small. If the flavour from the fresh fruit was to be used singly alone in the formula, large quantities of ground, sliced fruit will be necessary to bring about the desired level of flavour. This will not only unbalance the formula but will make it impracticable. If this natural flavour is fortified with synthetic flavour it will have more taste

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a p p e a l t h a n t h e u s e of natural flavours alone. Likewise, imitation flavours are not sourced from nature, but they are used to reproduce the natural flavours. B u t b a ke rs n e e d to co n ce nt rate n ot o n l y i n creating unique flavours for the products, but they must also simultaneously ensure that no off flavours a re p ro d u ce d d u r i n g production, packaging and transportation. So it is important to know what can cause off flavours in baked products. The prime causes for bakery items having off flavours include shortening low in anti-oxidant, spoiled milk, musty flour, mouldy cake or bread crumbs, eggs which are not fresh, etc. Low-quality flavourings, or a little too much of the additives can also produce off flavour. Therefore, it is important to make the flavouring formula balanced. Excess of soda in the formula and too much of acidity in the product may also spoil the flavour, and consequently the baker’s efforts. Proper cleaning of utensils is another important job that helps maintain the integrity of flavours. For example, if a pan is not properly sanitised, the residual matter in it can lead to off flavour. Lack of ventilation or of proper air conditions in the bake house may also contribute to off flavour. It is not difficult to understand how improper storage of finished products, wrong and cheap wrapping materials and dirty transportation can ruin the flavours of the products.

Cogent Colours Colours are used in bakery products for myriad reasons, although their primary function is to enhance the visual appeal of the products. Colours can also help hide lack of some ingredients in the products. For example, the yellow colour can conceal inadequacies of butter and eggs in dough. Colours can also introduce varieties of the same product. But one should be very careful while using colours in food products as use of unpermitted colours can be health hazard. Maintaining the integrity of the colours from production to sale is another important issue. Colours should, therefore, be first tested on a trial basis before using them in production. This can help to check their reaction under long and adverse storage conditions. Knowing the use of the correct colours is also important as it can complement directly the flavour added in to the product. According to a manual brought by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), the colouring matter in food may be natural and synthetic colours. They may also be classified as (a) water soluble and (b) oil soluble. Natural colours consist of chlorophyll (extracted from the leaves of spinach), saffron, turmeric, curcumin, caramel (dark brown colour prepared by heating sugar until it is decomposed and then adding boiling water to form a thick syrup), etc. Synthetic colours are also of importance as they are widely used in different food products. They are classified as acidic and basic dyes. n

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P roduc t

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The Roll with a Hole B

agel is one of the many products of western origin which is gaining currency in the Indian market. The product, if marketed well, has impressive potential to gain popularity in the metros and other big cities of the country, where there are huge multitudes of people with less time on their hands; who are looking for tasty, filling and affordable snacking options, woptions which also do not take much time to have. Bagel is a bread product whose origin can be traced to the Jewish communities in Poland. One can find first mention of bagel in the early seventeenth century; in 1610 to be precise. One of the theories behind the origin of bagel is that it was created as a tribute to Ian Sobieski, the King of Poland, but the certainty of this theory is suspect, though

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this anecdote is quite popular. However, it has now been found that the genesis of bagel can be traced to ancient Egypt. Nowadays bagels are extremely popular in North America, though its usage in the continent gained momentum only during the last quarter of the 20th century. It is believed that bagels reached the US along with the East European immigrants. Among many other things, the great city of New York is also famous for its bagels. Bagel’s interiors are generally dense, chewy, and doughy and its exterior is generally brown and crunchy. Bagels are circular shaped with a hole and are often topped with sprinkling of poppy or sesame seeds. Bagels with salt sprinkled on the surface are also there. There are flat bagels too, which are known as a flagel, though they are highly uncommon. Wikipedia states

that “According to a review attributed to New York’s Village Voice food critic Robert Seitsema, the flagel was first created by Brooklyn’s  ‘Tasty Bagels’ deli in the early 1990s.” Wheat dough is the most important ingredient in a traditionally made bagel. The most basic and traditional bagel dough comprises wheat flour devoid of germ  or bran, salt, water, and  yeast leavening.  According to Wikipedia, “Bread flour  or other high  gluten  flours are preferred to create the firm, dense but spongy bagel shape and chewy texture.” The preparation of bagels involves boiling and then baking. The act of boiling thickens the crust of bagel, and endows it with a distinctively chewy quality. The boiling involved in its preparation also gives bagel a more shelf life than freshly baked

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bread as the boiling endows the bagel with a protective crust. However, ideally bagels should be partaken when they are fresh out of the oven. The infusion of a sweetener to the dough is a common characteristic of bagel recipes. This sweetener can be honey, barley malt, high fructose corn syrup or sugar. Bagels are available fresh or frozen, and come in varied flavours. Though conventionally bagels are made of yeasted wheat, but since the later part of the 20th century, there has been the influence of pumpernickel, rye, sourdough and other elements, in the dough recipe of bagels. In these health conscious times, multigrain bagel can be a smart option for the bakeries. Bagels can differ from one to another depending upon the ingredients used. For example, these days we are having cinnamon raisin bagels, carrot bagels, blueberry bagels or chocolate chip bagels, which can be tasty options to begin your day. Bagels can be a good breakfast option with coffee and can serve as an ideal evening snack with a cool beverage on a hot afternoon, and thus we can see that bagels

Dec-Jan ’18

do have the potential of widespread usage in India’s coffee cafes and bakery cafes. One can also have bagel sandwiches with vegetarian or non-vegetarian fillings, which can be quite a filling affair. It can be had as a an apt lunch option for time-starved executives in our fast-paced metro lives. Indianising bagels can also enhance

their popularity in the Indian bakery and confectionery industry. What about a paneer bagel or an onion garlic bagel? They can be appealing to the north Indian palate by intelligently combining globalisation with localisation. Already this trend has begun and the trend has lots of scope for interesting innovations. n

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P R O D U C T

P R EV I E W

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Giving the Professional Edge

Bakery Ingredients

Is your valentine upset with you? Do you want to make your children happy? Are you looking for a perfect gift to give to your close relatives on their wedding? Well, if you are facing any of the above m e n t i o n e d p ro b l e m s there is a very simple solution to each of them; Chocolates. Chocolates are good for your health too. Chocolate making companies earns a huge profit in today’s world. Because of the fact that chocolates are a necessity for the consumers, and do not have a close substitute, they can sell it any price they want to. And the craving for chocolates by the customers’ makes them buy these. You can also think of making chocolates by sitting at your home. You need to have some basic knowledge and you can start off with your work. Well, now the question arises of how to gain the basic knowledge? You need not worry regarding the same. CSDO is one such institution which will help to learn the techniques of making chocolate. You just need to learn the art, and it’s done! At CSDO the teachers are very much friendly and highly experienced. They help you learn each and every basic thing with full clarity and understanding. CSDO is not after making money, and thus, the fees is not very high. It can be easily afforded by everyone. Therefore, just get ready to start your own business and be independent. Craft and Social Development Organisation (CSDO) info@vocational-courses.co.in

KPL International offers a broad range of products for bakery industry, ranging from high quality and esteemed suppliers like Solvay, MGC, etc. The company caters to its customers by offering customised products as per their needs. It has established joint ventures, exclusive representation, distribution and business development for products fo c u s e d at e m e rg i n g markets. The company has warehouses pan-India offering strong supply chain to its customers in an effective manner. KPL’s range of products includes Solvay Bicar(R) Food Grade, which is globally approved and widely appreciated. Bicar® food is mainly used as a raising agent for baked goods. It is available in an extensive range of particle sizes for a wide variety of uses and is recognised as leavening agent of choice among professionals, home bakers and biscuit producers. Other product for shelf life enhancement by the company is Oxygen Absorber. It controls pest infestation, mold growth, rancidity caused due to fat oxidation, etc. Oxygen Absorbers are used in various applications such as bakery, snacks, fruit & vegetables, nutraceuticals, sauces, seasonings & condiments, dairy, etc. and are available in sachets and pouches. KPL also offers phosphates & non phosphates from Budenheim to seafood processing industry. KPL International Ltd. info@kplintl.com

Idli & Dosa Mix

CONVEYOR PIZZA OVEN

Tropilite has launched a wide range of mixes for making authentic restaurant quality dosa & idli. The Flexi Rice Idli Mix & Flexi Rice Dosa Mix are ideal for breakfast buffets & outdoor catering. You don’t need any more overnight soaking up of rice & daal, and cumbersome grinding. All premixes are available in convenient 1 kg pack. The mixes are costeffective, consistent and help manage hygiene standard by eliminating spillage & contamination arising from grinding operations. To make Flexi Rice Idli Mix, simply add 1.25 ltr water to 1 kg Flexi Idli Mix; mix it well and ensure no lumps are formed. Rest the batter for 5 minutes and steam the batter. For Flexi Rice Dosa, add 1.3 ltr water to 1 kg Flexi Dosai Mix, mix it well and ensure no lumps are formed. Rest the batter for 45 minutes and make dosa/uttapam.

For the first time made in India, Conveyor Pizza Oven can be seen at AKASA. The company has been feeding the food industry with supreme quality Indian products. Akasa Conveyor Pizza Oven is a compact, sleek and elegant product delivering exce l l e nt q u a l i ty pizzas in minimal t i m e . Fro m t h i s equipment one can get pizzas which are crisp as well as retain necessary moisture with its variable top and bottom loads. Its forward and reverse operation enables ease in usage of the oven. Its air-cooled sides keep the exterior cool to the touch. The equipment also has adjustable belt speed to control the baking of pizzas. It has top and bottom heating control for best desired results. It precisely regulates the heating elements for perfect baking every time. The equipment saves up to 20 percent on energy consumption. Moreover, the equipment is very user-friendly with indicator lights and high insulation fiber wiring and is easy to clean. It comes with detachable drip tray.

Tropilite Foods Pvt. Ltd. info@davars.com

AKASA International info@akasainternational.in

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

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A d v e r t is e r ’ s I n d e x

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I NTE R V I E W

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Passionate Towards Guest Satisfaction By Sharmila Chand

Nikhil Mishra is the Demi Chef De Parte at Novotel Imagica Khopoli, which is AccorHotels’ first theme park property in India. Bringing with him about nine years of experience in the hospitality industry, Chef Nikhil is a skilled culinary professional. His immaculate execution abilities, versatility, coupled with his forte to deliver positive results, make him the ideal choice for this role. Having completed his degree in hotel management from SIPS, Bhubaneswar, Orissa, Nikhil has worked with renowned hotels like Hilton Bangalore Embassy GolfLinks, The Park Hotel, Hyderabad, amongst others. The excerpts of the interview with the seasoned culinary professional are given below: What is/are the current trend/s in the Indian bakery industry?

What are your hot selling bakery items?

Healthy baking is vogue in the Indian bakery industry, these days. Using organically p ro d u ce d i n g re d i e nts , re p l a c i n g t h e traditional castor sugar with coconut sugar, having gluten-free & dairy-free pastries and breads are the trends as our consumers are increasingly getting inclined towards being health conscious. Moreover, these days you don’t need to go to culinary schools to be a baker—the number of Home Chefs/Home Bakers has increased enormously, and some of them can outshine industry professionals.

Anything sweet and creative will always be a hit amongst the masses. A few specialities up my sleeve are fruit cobblers, chocolate bombs & apple cinnamon struddle.

How did you become a Pastry Chef? You were inherently interested in it or entered this profession by default? Baking always came naturally to me since I was a child. I have always been passionate about the science that goes behind baking which most people don’t understand. The accuracy & creativity that goes into baking always helps fuel my creative urge.

Who are your idols, that is who all have inspired you? The baking gene has come from my mother so she is my number one idol and guru, whom I really look up to for polishing my creative edge. Another of my idol would definitely be Dominique Ansel — the Founder of the ever so delicious & creative ‘Cronut’.

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What about the health quotient? How do you take care of that aspect?  The eye with which consumers view bakery produce has taken a major shift during the recent years with many people showing interest towards healthy eating. It has only made Chefs more aware of various healthy ingredients, and in encouraging us to explore our creative side further. It is sometimes overwhelming on how as a baker I am able to deliver something that isn’t just tasty but also healthy, thereby diminishing the fad that all healthy food taste dull.

What are the challenges a Bakery Chef has to face in his/ her day-to-day job? Keeping up with the trend within limited budget is a challenge, as is the time management. Food storage is also a challenge as bakery produces are very delicate in terms of ingredients used & flavours. We need to store the ingredients as per SOPs or else we are bound to waste it.

What do you like about your job?

When I see a child enjoy his/her favourite pastry or a health fanatic binge on my gluten-free croissants, it gives me extreme satisfaction. Guest satisfaction is my mantra for personal gratification.

What is your strength as a Bakery Chef? My team is my strength. My team members make me be a better Chef and mentor. They encourage me to learn more & keep innovating. When you know that people look up to you, you are bound to be at your utmost best.

What is your working philosophy? It can be summed in three words — Love, Laugh, Learn. Love your job. Laugh with your guest. Learn from your gurus & team.

What are you passionate about besides baking? I am passionate about painting, and about any form of art where I can get to create something new.

How do you like to de-stress? A 10-minute meditation followed with some holy chants helps me to de-stress.

Lastly, what is your mantra for success? Go with the flow. If your cake didn’t turn out right crumble it up & make a mean brownie delight.

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Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Oct-Nov ’17

Bakery Review (Dec-Jan 2018)  

In this issue, we have covered some of the health, hygiene and safety concerns for the bakery industry, without which the industry cannot ha...

Bakery Review (Dec-Jan 2018)  

In this issue, we have covered some of the health, hygiene and safety concerns for the bakery industry, without which the industry cannot ha...

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