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E D I T O R I A L

Publisher cum Editor

Rajneesh Sharma

rajneeshhammer@gmail.com

Associate Editor

Swarnendu Biswas Resident Editor

Sharmila Chand (Delhi) Ashok Malkani (Mumbai) Layout & Design

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Production Assistant

Mamta Sharma

Business Co-ordinator

Pooja Anand

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Director Operations & Finance

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E-mail: hammerpublishers@vsnl.net © 2014 Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. No article can be reproduced in part or as whole without prior permission of the Publisher. Bakery Review is a bi-monthly magazine, printed and published by Rajneesh Sharma on behalf of Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 1202, Pragati Tower, 26 Rajindra Place, New Delhi. Printed at Swan Press, B-71, Naraina Industrial Area, Phase-II, New Delhi-110 028. Annual Subscription rate within India is Rs. 450 and overseas US $110, for surface mail. Single issue is available for Rs. 90 in India and US $25 overseas. Cheques are payable to Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

The profession of a Pastry Chef apparently looks sleek and stylish, and it is so indeed in reality too. But that is not all. At the same time there are lots of hard work and patience involved both in the creation and as well as in the day-to-day working of a Pastry Chef. A successful Pastry Chef needs not only creativity, but also precision, he/she not only needs to produce delectable desserts, but also needs to take care of the fact that his/her products have an aesthetic appeal. Succinctly, a Pastry Chef ’s creations should not only taste great, but they should also look good at least, if not great. Of course, the job does involve long and often erratic working hours, but for many of the creative Pastry Chefs, the look of satisfaction or bliss on their guests when they enjoy the desserts, more than make up for the daily grind. Besides being hardworking and innovative, the successful Pastry Chef also needs good knowledge of the ingredients used in the bakery business, some understanding of the biology of food safety, and should also have a basic sense of design. A design sense can facilitate him/her in the creation of visually appealing desserts. Besides these, networking and people skills can also be useful for a Pastry Chef. Networking can help the Pastry Chef to keep abreast of the market trends, and people skills can help him/her to get the most out of his/her team and in coordinating with other members of the restaurant’s kitchen without sweating too much. In the Cover Story of this issue, we have explored on the required qualities for a successful Pastry Chef and also touched upon some unique dessert creations of the recent years. The beginning of a bakery enterprise can be a lucrative business proposition in today’s post-modern urban India, as the Indian bakery industry is passing through a healthy growth phase in the country. The changing socio-economic scenario during the recent years has contributed towards increasing popularity of bakery products in the country. But that doesn’t mean opening and running a bakery enterprise, whether as a standalone outlet or as a retail bakery chain, is a cakewalk. It is not. One needs to take into account of several factors before investing; otherwise the chances of the bakery enterprise getting closed are pretty high. Selecting the right location, gauging the competition and the day-to-day operational, and as well as fixed costs correctly are the essential requirements for the survival in the bakery business. For a stand-alone bakery or a bakery cafe, a sound practical experience of working with bakery ingredients is very much helpful for the entrepreneur concerned. In the Business Story of this issue, we have explored on the factors that are needed to be considered before or while operating a bakery business. We have also given special focus on franchising in bakery operations and touched upon the concept of pilot franchising. Besides these highly relevant issues of interest, we have also showcased a wealth of information and perspectives, which we think could encourage our esteemed readers from the Indian bakery industry to spend some quality time between the covers of this publication.

Editorial Policy : Editorial emphasis in Bakery Review magazine is on

educational & informational material specifically designed to assist those responsible for managing Bakery & Confectionery business. Articles are welcome and will be published on the sole discretion of the editor.

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DEPARTMENTS

The Making of a Pastry Chef

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Events

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News Scan

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Profile

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Product Preview

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Interview

26 BUSINESS Beginning Bakery Business

32 FOCUS Desserts for the Festive Spirit

36 INGREDIENT Cover Pix: Dobla BV

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The Cultured Yogurt

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SIGEP 2014:

Attracting Business, Showcasing Creativity

SIGEP 2014 was being held in Rimini, Italy, during 18th-22nd January 2014. SIGEP is being acknowledged as one of the world´s most important events in the artisan gelato sector. Here one could get to see the very latest of raw materials, basic products, plant, machinery, furnishing and fittings for the artisan gelato and bakery trades. The 35th edition of SIGEP and RHEX Ristorazione attracted 173,904 trade visitors, which was an increase of almost 30,000 units compared to the 2013 edition of the event, when the biennial A.B.TECH Expo dedicated to bakery was held simultaneously with SIGEP. Overall, there was a 20.1 percent increase in visitors. There were 34,646 foreign trade visitors, who came from five continents and 600 accredited journalists at the show. SIGEP and RHEX hosted the proposals of a thousand companies

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and the great expo days at Rimini Fiera featured the very latest trends, which are useful for orienting strategies for 2014 for the Italian-made food sector. The expo event was inaugurated by Flavio Zanonato, Italy´s Minister for Economic Development, who acknowledged that the Rimini Fiera days were “an international showcase in which entrepreneurial culture managed to combine artisan tradition and innovation.” One of the important events at SIGEP 2014 was the 6th Gelato World Cup. The cup went to France. A duel was expected between France and Italy and that was what there was. In the end, the French artisans got the upper hand, with the team guided by Elie Cazaussus and made up of Christophe Bouret, Benoit Lagache, Jean Christophe Vitte and Yazid Ichemrahen. Second place went to Italy (Manager,

Beppo Tonon, members Stefano Biasini, Massimo Carnio, Marco Martinelli and Luca Mazzotta). Poland was third, with a team formed by Aleksandra Sowa, Mariusz Buritta, Maciej Pieta and Michat Doroszkiewicz. Eleven teams from five continents competed to win the World Cup. The participating teams were from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Italy, Morocco, Mexico, Poland, Spain and the USA. The competition was organised by Rimini Fiera – SIGEP and Gelato & Cultura. An American from Pennsylvania became the Pastry Queen at SIGEP 2014. Cher Harris beat ten opponents with her great regularity and strict observance of the rules. Behind her came Japan´s Tomomi Futakami and Laetitia Moreau from France. At SIGEP 2014, alongside the expo area dedicated to coffee, numerous championships dedicated to baristas were also being held, which included the Italian Cafeteria Barista Championship, which designated the Italian participant who will represent Italy at the World Barista Championship. The title was won by Giacomo Vannelli (Cortona, Arezzo), the second position was bagged by Eddy Righi (Rimini) and the third position went to Luca Mosconi (Leghorn). The LATTE ART contest was won by Chiara Bergonzi (Piacenza), while the winner of COFFEE IN GOOD SPIRITS was Francesco Corona (Matelica, Macerata). Manuel Sakay (Forte dei Marmi) won the AFFOGATO AL CAFFÈ contest, where second and third positions were won by Lucilla Peconi (Piacenza), and Ivan Valle (Verona) respectively. Roberto Cantolacqua Ripani from

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Tolentino (Macerata), won the first edition of the ´Star of Chocolate´ contest, which was held during SIGEP 2014. The second place went to Carmelo Sciampagna from Palermo, while Stefan Krueger from Merano came third. The Cake Design Zone was another highlight of SIGEP 2014. Paolo Santilli and Valentina Urbini, both from Rome, won the Coppa Italia for Cake Design, organised by Conpait (Italian Confectioners Confederation). The SIGEP 2014 also hosted The Italian Senior Pastry Championship. Emmanuele Forcone was elected as the

BAKERY REVIEW new Italian Senior Pastry Champion at the contest held at SIGEP with the patronage of Accademia Maestri Pasticceri (Academy of Italian Master Pastry Chefs), Conpait and Relais Dessert. At the Italian Junior Pastry Championship, Marco Serlini (20), from Rodengo-Saiano (Brescia) became the Italian Junior Pastry Champion. Second place went to 18-year-old Mattia Cortinoves from Bergamo, and Vincenzo Daloiso from Barletta came third. The contest´s theme was the Winter Olympic Games and was illustrated via an artistic work in sugar and chocolate pastilliage (Mattia Cortinovis won the prize for this test) and hazelnut-flavoured cream dessert (won by Lorenzo Marin, aged 20, from Conegliano Veneto). The prize for work zone organisation and cleanliness went to Marco Serlini. A life-size sculpture of Pope Francis, all made from chocolate, was completed at SIGEP 2014. The initiative, with charity aims, was realised by 20 participants

attending courses held by the Accademia Maestri Cioccolatieri Italiani (Academy of Italian Master Chocolatiers), led by Mirco Della Vecchia and Paolo Moro. The participants in the course worked on the preparation of the chocolate with cacao from a small cooperative on Lake Atitlan, in Guatemala. Then there was a creative contest named the Decor Challenge, where gelato was transformed into art. Contestants were master gelato artisans from all over Italy, who were judged by a panel of trade journalists and experts. Antonio Mezzalira and Jennifer Boero are the two gelato artisans who tied with the highest votes. Tubs of gelato were prepared and decorated as works to be admired. ´Pistaccio 2.0´ and ´Vacanze Romane´ were the flavours that won the competition. Some of the important events at RHEX Ristorazione 2014 were Food Factor, The Pizza Area Contests, and SEI + UNO among others.

FHA 2014 to Fill the Singapore Expo F

ood&HotelAsia 2014, with Wine&Spirits Asia 2014 being held alongside, will be held during 8th -11thApril 2014, at Singapore Expo. For the first time, FHA 2014 and Wine&SpiritsAsia 2014 will take up all the 10 halls of Singapore Expo. FHA 2014 will have focus on the key issues influencing the F&B and hospitality industry, paramount among them being the manpower crunch and the ways to ease it. In view of the acute shortage of

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manpower in the F&B and hospitality industry, the FHA 2014 International Conference will feature a panel discussion on ‘Plugging the Manpower Gap’ and an in-depth master class to provide the industry with practical solutions on how to deal with the manpower shortage issue. In addition, the FHA2014 exhibition will also showcase cutting-edge technology; the latest in automation in the industry from all over the world, and laboursaving devices and services to reduce dependence on workers. The fact that FHA looks to have outgrown its venue

raises the question of a location for the show – which is slated to grow even bigger – beyond 2014. Singapore’s second largest event after the Singapore Airshow, FHA has grown so large that from now on, Singapore Exhibition Services (SES), its organisers, will market its specialised shows as distinct events so that some of them can, if and when necessary, stand alone in the future. The mega show started off in 1978 with a 4,000-sq.m space in Hyatt Singapore’s basement car park, with only 213 exhibitors. Thirty-seven years on, the biennial show has grown by more than 50 times in size and by more than 13 times in terms of number of exhibitors. Today it has emerged as a premier trade show synonymous with the food and hospitality industry in Asia and beyond. FHA 2014, the 19th edition of the event, will have 2800 exhibitors from 70 countries, with 80 percent of them from overseas. The show is expected to attract 64,000 trade visitors from 95 countries, as compared to 54,000 in its 2012 edition. Each hall will have a specialised event.

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A Mega Exhibition for Snacks and Dairy Industry

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weet & SnackTec India and Dairy Universe India 2013, which was held during 10thth 12 December 2013, at the Gujarat University Convention & Exhibition Centre, Ahmedabad, received an overwhelming response. 5008 trade visitors across the country witnessed the exhibits displayed by 182 exhibitors from 17 countries. Following the tradition, the exhibition was inaugurated by the leading exhibitors of the show, which included Sanjeev Gupta from Kanchan Metals, Manoj Paul from Heat & Control, Narendra Kochar from Kiron Hydraulics, KK Menon from Menon Technical Services, and Ashwani Pande from Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt Ltd., and other dignitaries. The latest developments in the field of dairy, milking, processing, cooling systems, cold chain

management solutions, sweets and snack processing, packaging equipment & material, testing instruments, data management, automation solutions, distribution solutions, etc. were on display during the show. The complete gamut of exhibits on display attracted impressive visitors as the event came across as a one stop-solution of all their needs. Out of the total 182 exhibitors, 89 were from India. The exhibition area was spread across 5000 sq.m. Sweet & SnackTec India and Dairy Universe India 2013 attracted individual participation from foreign countries like Australia, Belgium, China, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, United Kingdom, and USA. The event had 450 delegates. Ashwani Pande, Managing Director, Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt. Ltd. in his welcome speech acknowledged the support and co-operation extended by all the exhibitors for supporting these trade fairs and making them huge success year on year.

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“This is a very appropriate platform provided by Koelnmesse YA Tradefair, not only to Indian exhibitors to widen their growth potential, but also to the international companies who are looking forward to get into the ever growing Indian market,” pointed out Sanjeev Gupta from Kanchan Metals. He urged all the companies to participate in bigger numbers in the next edition of the show. Manoj Paul from Heat & Control appreciated the decision to organise the show in Ahmedabad as many companies were looking forward to tap the huge potential of snack and dairy market in the western region of India, particularly of Gujarat, but were unable to do so due to absence of international class exhibition pertaining to the snack and dairy sectors, in the western region of India. Apart from the number of the visitors, the major highlight of the show was the quality of the visitors, which included top management from companies. This resulted in high conversion ratio of business deals finalised during the exhibition. The event hosted some concurrent seminars too. The National Seminar on ‘Quality Initiatives in Dairy Value Chain – Producer to Consumer’ was organised by Indian Dairy Association (Gujarat State Chapter) & Mansinhbhai Institute of Dairy & Food Technology during 10th – 11th December 2013; on the first and second day of the trade fair. The two day seminar was attended by 350 delegates coming from dairy cooperatives and private dairies from all across the country. The other concurrent seminar was titled ‘Emerging Global Trends in Ice Cream Industry,’ which was organised by Indian Ice Cream Manufacturers Association (IICMA). The seminar was held on 11th December 2013 and was well attended by leading ice cream manufacturers and related industries. Most of the 90 delegates in the conference included the Managing Directors and senior officials of leading ice cream brands from all across the country. The next edition of International FoodTec India, PackEx India, Dairy Universe India and Sweet & SnackTec India together will be organised during 14th-16th November 2014 in Mumbai, India.

EVENTS’ CALENDER Myanmar Hotels, F&B and Travel Show 2014 17-19 Feb 2014 Yangon, Myanmar Convention Centre www.mhft.sphereconferences.com/ Gulfood 2014 23–27 Feb 2014 Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Dubai www.gulfood.com HOSTECH by Tusid 12-16 March 2014 Istanbul, Turkey www.hostechbytusid.com Aahar 2014 10-14 March 2014 Pragati Maidan, New Delhi www.aaharinternationalfair.com EDT Expo 27-30 March 2014 Istanbul, Turkey www.cnredtexpo.com Alimentaria 2014 31 March -3 April 2014 Fira de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain www.alimentaria-bcn.com HOTELEX 2014 31 March -3 April 2014 Shanghai New International Exhibition Center, Shanghai,China www.hotelex.cn/ FHA 2014 8-11 April 2014 Singapore Expo, Singapore www.foodnhotelasia.com SIAL China 2014 13-15 May 2014 Shanghai New International Exhibition Center, Shanghai,China www.sialchina.com Thaifex- World of Food Asia 2014 21-25 May 2014 Impact Exhibition and Convention Center, Bangkok, Thailand www.worldoffoodasia.com

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Cadbury India to Come Krispy Kreme: New Outlet up with 5 Star Chomp and Eggless Recipe Cadbury India, part of Mondelez International, would enter the rough-chew segment of chocolates in February of this year, with 5 Star Chomp. Cadbury India, which accounts for 70 percent market share of the Indian chocolates market, is envisaging the presence of its 5 Star Chomp across 100,000 stores in the country, within a month of the launch of the new product. The new product will be positioned as a sub-brand of the 45-year-old brand of the company; the 5 Star, which happens to be one of the strong brands in Cadbury India’s repertoire. Positioning the to be launched product as a sub-brand of the nationally renowned 5 Star brand can save on the company’s marketing costs for 5 Star Chomp, and also facilitate the to be launched product’s brand recall. The soon to be launched chocolate bar will initially be only sold in 30 gm bars, and will be priced at Rs.15. The product may face competition from Mars’s Snickers, which is available at the same price point for a single bar. Later, following the launch, based on the market reaction, Cadbury India may come up with both smaller and bigger packs of 5 Star Chomp than the 30 gm bar. Caramel, nougats and crunchy peanuts will be part of the ingredients of 5 Star Chomp. Presently, the rough-chew segment of the Indian chocolates market is experiencing healthy growth.

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In the recent past, Delhi got its first Krispy Kreme retail outlet. This is the ninth outlet in the country carrying the Krispy Kreme brand. The 76-year-old US-based doughnuts major entered the Indian market in January 2013, and besides the recently opened Delhi outlet, there are eight franchised stores of Krispy Kreme in Bangalore. Bedrock Foods is Krispy Kreme’s franchisee for northern India. According to Jeffrey B. Welch, the President (International), Krispy Kreme Doughnut Corporation, the newly opened Delhi outlet is a factory style outlet which has the imported doughnut-making machine having the capacity to roll out 65 dozens of doughnuts per hour. The store is selling 16 varieties of doughnuts which are priced in the range of 50-65 for a pair of doughnuts. Besides of course, there are coffee, tea and iced beverages on offer. The store, located in South Delhi, also has Krispy Kreme’s ‘Doughnut Theater’ viewing area which affords customers to watch the doughnuts being cooked, filled and topped. This of course, can add to the desire of savouring the appetising doughnuts. Krispy Kreme is making proactive efforts to match the Indian tastes. It has come up with eggless doughnuts, which can interest the large vegetarian section of Indian consumers and potential Indian consumers of Krispy Kreme’s doughnuts. Krispy Kreme also is offering doughnuts infused with mango to satiate the north Indian palate. Here it deserves a mention that according to a senior official of Krispy Kreme Doughnut Corporation, about 200 of the 700 Krispy Kreme Doughnuts’ outlets are in the Asia-Pacific region.

GAIA’s Sugar Free Bites Combining the miracles of nature with the wonders of science, GAIA has been producing a range of nutritional supplements and natural substitutes which facilitate the body’s natural regeneration. The portfolio of the Delhi-based company includes nutritional supplements, green teas, green ice teas, muesli, cookies, Stevia tablets and sachets as well as health bars. Recently GAIA has come up with GAIA LITE Sugar Free Bites. These bites have no added sugar, are without cholesterol and are made of six nutritious grains. These bites are available at leading harmacies and general stores. They can be healthy snacking options. Parents can even allow their children to binge on them without health apprehensions as they contain no sucralose.

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Dunkin’ Donuts Goes for Makeover of Stores and Expansion

Lactalis Enters India

On December 2013, Dunkin’ Donuts, the US-based café chain, revamped its menu for the Indian market. Now it is undertaking facelift of its stores across the country to attract a more younger crowd. According to Dev Amritesh, the President and COO of Dunkin’ Donuts division at Jubilant FoodWorks, the company which manages the franchise for Dunkin’ Donuts in India and was responsible for launching Dunkin’ Donuts brand in India, in April 2012, the new Dunkin’ Donut stores in India will have more place to hang out like a college canteen,

without compromising on the aspirational element. “The new store launches will don the new look which is targetted more towards the urban, discerning adults,” he maintained. The existing stores will also be revamped accordingly to maintain uniformity in look and feel. By January 2014, Dunkin’ Donuts had 21 stores across Delhi, NCR, Jalandhar, Chandigarh and Dehradun and there will be nine more Dunkin’ Donuts outlets in India by March. The chain will have its presence in Mumbai in the near future, which will be followed by its expansion in west and south of the country. According to Amritesh there are plans to come up with 80-100 Dunkin’ Donuts stores in the country by 2017. According to Jubilant FoodWorks, Dunkin’ Donuts in India is positioned as a food café, occupying the sweet spot between cafés and quick service restaurants.

Groupe Lactalis SA or Lactalis, the largest player in the world in the dairy segment, has acquired 100 percent stake in Tirumala Milk Products Pvt. Ltd, which happens to be the second largest private dairy company from south India. Tirumala has a processing capacity of 1.66 million litres per day across 7 plants. For the last seventeen years, the company has been involved in the manufacturing, marketing, sale and distribution of a wide range of branded dairy products. Tirumala was founded in 1996 by D. Brahmanandam, B. Brahma Naidu, B. Nageswara Rao, Dr. N. Venkata Rao and R. Satyanarayana. Tirumala raised equity investment in 2010 from First Carlyle Ventures III and First Carlyle Growth VII, affiliates of The Carlyle Group (Carlyle), a global alternative asset manager. This transaction marks Lactalis’ entry into India. Commenting on the transaction, D. Brahmanandam, Co-Founder & Managing Director of Tirumala said: “We are extremely happy to have partnered with Carlyle, who provided numerous value creation activities and acted as a catalyst in the growth of the company over the past few years. Tirumala is the partner of choice for Lactalis, and is well poised to emerge as a national brand with market leadership position.” Shankar Narayanan, Managing Director, Carlyle India said: “Tirumala’s founders have built an extremely successful business with strong franchise value. Carlyle’s investment in Tirumala exemplifies its ability to partner with entrepreneurs to create value for all stakeholders. During Carlyle’s investment, the company’s revenues grew two and a half times and profits more than quadrupled. We wish the company continued success while going forward.”

PepsiCo to Plant Huge Investment PepsiCo has announced the setting up of its largest beverage plant in the country. The plant will come up at Sri City, Andhra Pradesh. It will be more accurate to say that Sri City, which is a special economic zone in Chittoor district, is located in the border of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. The plant to be spread across 80 acres, will involve an investment of Rs. 1230 crore. The ambitious plant will be completed in three phases. The first phase of the project entails an investment of Rs.450 crore. The first phase will attain completion by the third or fourth quarter of the financial year 2015. The second phase will have an investment of Rs 400 crore, and it will commence in 2015. In the third phase PepsiCo will inject another Rs.380 crore. The third phase of the project is expected to begin in 2017 Each of the three phases will be endowed with a production capacity of around 1.2 million litres a day. This plant will produce the entire range of beverages of

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the snacks and beverage giant, which will also include the sports drink Gatorade. It is expected that the plant at its full operational capacity will generate approximately 8000 direct and indirect jobs. After completion, the Sri City plant will have eight production lines. According to the Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, N Kiran Kumar Reddy, 50,000-60,000 mango farmers in the region will be benefited because of the fact that an estimated 2 lakh metric tonnes of mangoes per year will be acquired by PepsiCo for its juice business. According to the Chairman and CEO of PepsiCo India, D. Shivakumar, the plant at Sri City will give an impetus to PepsiCo India’s production capacity and support the growing demand for beverage products of PepsiCo India. He also informed that the Sri City facility will play a crucial role in the growth plans of PepsiCo in India. This plant is slated to be PepsiCo’s second plant in Andhra Pradesh, its first one being a beverage manufacturing plant at Medak district of the state.

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Parle Cuts Prices Parle Products has introduced price cuts of some of its popular and mass market brands, which many industry experts claim could pave the way to a price war in the mass-end biscuits segment. Yes, the rivals of Parle Products following price cuts in their mass market biscuit products now seem to be a possibility in the near future. Parle Products’ Parle G brand has been subjected to an indirect price reduction. Earlier a pack of 72 gm of Parle G biscuits used to cost Rs. 5, but now for Rs.5, one can get a Parle G biscuits packet of 75 gm. According to Religare report, this makes Parle G 10 percent cheaper than Britannia’s Tiger. Parle Products has also lowered the price of its Bourbon biscuits by 17 percent. Its price has now been reduced from Rs.24 for a pack of 150 gm to Rs.20. This price reduction is despite the fact that the price of wheat has experienced a hike of up to 8 percent during the last six months. These discounts in price can attract more consumers to Parle Products. Many analysts are suggesting that this reduction in prices of some of the Parle Products’ mass-market brands is a reaction to the slow growth in the glucose biscuits segment, and is eyed with the objective to enhance the volumes. Here it deserves a mention that the glucose biscuits market is experiencing a slowing down in the country as compared to its pace of growth witnessed a decade earlier.

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Amul’s Diary of Developments Now ATM will also dispense milk. On January 2014, Amul came up with the unique ATM, which is known as ‘Any Time Milk’ vending machine. The first of such a machine was installed at the gate of Amul Dairy in Anand, Gujarat. This ATM also operates 24/7. In exchange of a 10 Rs. currency note, the innovative ‘Any Time Milk’ machine dispenses a 300 ml pouch of Amul Taaza milk. This ATM is endowed with refrigeration facility and has the capacity to store 150 pouches of 300 ml milk. Managing Director of Amul Dairy, Rahul Kumar informed that in future besides milk a whole range of dairy products would be dispensed through these machines. Already Anand is having six such ATMs. According to Ramsinh Parmar, Chairman, Amul Dairy, initially there are plans to install these ATM machines at each of the 1100 village-level milk collection centres in Kheda and Anand districts of Gujarat. Amul Dairy and Kheda District Cooperative Bank are in talks to work out financial aspects of this innovative project. This move does have the potential to facilitate the Indian dairy industry and can also increase the milk consumption in the country, as people who could not afford 500 ml pouches could have 300 ml versions of Amul’s milk. Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd., which runs Amul, has plans to replicate this ATM model of dispensing milk across major cities of the country, in the near future. Amul Dairy is also establishing a cattle feed factory, which would be having a capacity to manufacture 1,000 tonnes a day, with the objective of securing animal feed supplies for the milk producers. Amul Dairy has made an investment to the tune of Rs.100-150 crore for setting up the plant, which will be located in the Kheda district of Gujarat. The forthcoming plant is likely to be a reality within a year. According to an expert from the dairy industry, cattle feed accounts for around 70 percent of the milk costs. Thus a larger capacity for cattle feed can be translated into lower milk costs, which is very much required in India. With the operation of this forthcoming plant, Amul can become Asia’s largest cattle feed manufacturer having a capacity of over 2,000 tpd. According to Parmar, initially the plant will produce around 700 tonnes of cattle feed, and subsequently, the production would be enhanced. Here it deserves a mention that Amul Dairy is expected to notch a turnover ranging between Rs.3100-3200 crore during the ongoing fiscal.

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Bread and Rolls Have Major Share of India’s Bakery and Cereals Market According to the recently published report titled ‘The Indian Bakery and Cereals Market: What Consumers Eat and Why’ by Canadean, the market

valuation shows that bread & rolls account for one-third of the bakery & cereals market in India, over twice the size of the second-largest product category, the sweet biscuits. The report also notes that the bakery & cereals tend to record a very high private label penetration rate in India given the undeveloped and fragmented state of the Indian retail market, as private labels are typically most successful in mature and concentrated retail environments. The report observed that a significant ‘attitude-behavior’ gap exists between the share of consumers citing that a trend influences their consumption and the actual share of the market value these trends influence. “This is because consumers don’t always act on these trends – the result is that overall trend influence is limited, but has the potential to grow,” pointed out the report. The report by Canadean also reveals that older consumers record the lowest consumption of cereal bars in India. However, the age group does record significant numbers of medium and light frequency consumers, presenting a core base whom suppliers can encourage to consume their products more often.

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Veeba Food Services Emerges on the F&B Space Viraj Bahl of the erstwhile Fun Foods Private Limited, (the company was later taken over by a Germany-based company), has re-entered the processed food space wth Veeba Food Services. Veeba Food Services is now backed by the Bahl family and the company’s plant is up and running in the Neemrana reigon of Rajasthan. This plant is a state-of-the-art manufacturing facility located in one of the best industrial areas on the Indian Golden Quadrilateral (the road connecting all the 4 Indian metros). The size of the plant is reportedly more than 35000 square feet and more than the same size is available for future expansion. The plant is ISO 22000:2005 certified by TUV and is said to be one of the youngest plants to get such a prestegious certification. “The industry has been extremely kind to us. Within a short span of six Viraj Behl months we are already key vendors

to Domino’s Pizza & Dunkin’ Donuts. It is needless to say that we have passed their extremely stringent quality audits,” explained Viraj Behl. According to him, the new company also has a robust distribution network already in place exclusively catering to the HORECA clientele across the country. The impressive product range of Veeba Food Services Private Limited include mayonnaise, tomato ketchup, salad dressings, chocolate toppings and other fruit toppings to name a few. Bahl informed that the research and development team is headed by his brother and according to him, it is one of the best in the country. They are equipped to provide a one-stop solution for all clients, whether big or small. Besides sound knowledge about the sauce/emulsion business, Bahl believes that unwavering passion for food that people at Veeba Food Services have are among the strengths of the company that would strive it ahead towards the path of growth. “This is one business, which one shouldn’t enter if she/he doesn’t have a passion for it,” asserted Bahl with passion.

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Adding Quality to Bakery Recently, Bakery Review got the opportunity to have an interesting discussion with Tahir Shaikh, the Director & Founder, Suisse Gourmet & Bake Ingredients Pvt. Ltd. According to him, “Suisse Gourmet & Bake Ingredients Pvt. Ltd. is a first of its kind Indo-Swiss association for developing and manufacturing innovative bakery solutions and ingredients. It was the coming together of RAS Group from India and Trade N Bake from Switzerland.” SwissBake is the brand of the company. The company, which has been operating in the Indian market since 2012, has been engaged in producing a range of quality bakery ingredients for the bakery industry. The excerpts of the interview follow: 18

How do you see the future of bakery industry in India? The Indian bakery industry is currently among the most vibrant segments within the food processing industry in India with an estimated CAGR of 12 to 15 percent for the premium bread segment and about 10 percent for the confectionery segment. With more and more Indians being exposed to European and American cuisines and a significant expat population looking at India for education and work, we expect the demand for authentic specialty bakery products in India to grow significantly. Suisse Gourmet & Bake Ingredients believes that the marketplace will get more crowded in the near future with enterprising players looking to enter into the Indian market through trade partners. However, only the ones who understand local customer needs or will understand local customer needs stand or would stand a chance of building a loyal customer base in the long-run. Constant focus on continuous product innovation

and local customisation of products will ensure our survival in the Indian marketplace. How long you have been in the Indian market and how you see the future of your company? We have been operating in the Indian market space since 2012. The last two years have given us invaluable learning about the Indian market nuances. What is encouraging is the acceptance of our SwissBake products from the leading hotel chains and specialty bakeries in India. This has pushed our Swiss-based R&D team to bring in latest European launches to the Indian markets with a short turnaround time. Which are the major market segments you are looking at? Our core driver of business in the industry continues to be the specialty bakeries — whether in the high-street or inside the precincts of leading star hotels. A whole new aggressive segment is the specialty/fine dining

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BAKERY REVIEW restaurants and artisan bakeries, which are emerging in leading metro cities of India. SwissBake is also gaining popularity with the institutional bakers across the country, who cater to mass baking requirements of their chain outlets. Interestingly, the market for natural and clean label bakery ingredients is yet untapped in India and we believe there is a long-term opportunity in this segment. Our focus is on promoting clean label bread improvers and natural bakery ingredients for high-end bakers in India. What are the major product segments you have introduced in India? Our major product offerings are European bread mixes for various products like pretzels, sour dough breads, dark multi-grain breads, German pumpernickel, ciabatta, corn breads, rye breads, whole wheat baguettes, gluten free range, pizza, donut, pancakes, etc. We have one of the widest range of bakery ingredients that also includes clean label bread improvers, specialty flours and various pastry mixes. Another of our star product segment is specialty French flours like Type 65, Type 55 and Type 45, which are required for various versions of international premium breads & confectionery products. What do you think is unique about your products, which are offered to the Indian market? What makes our products unique is the strength of our formulation and our no compromise on quality. One important point to mention is that our Swiss partners have ensured that the products we offer to our customers are totally customised to the available Indian low protein flour which enables production of authentic European bakery products in Indian conditions without use of any additional flour correctors or improvers. Also as per European trend of clean label ingredients, we have taken maximum care to ensure that we use natural raw materials in our products and keep them away from the infusions of artificial colouring and flavouring agents or additives.

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How you are ensuring the quality of your bakery ingredients in India? Firstly all the critical ingredients like rye meal, sour dough powders, enzymes, etc. that goes in to our recipes are directly sourced from around the globe after approval from our Swiss laboratory. Secondly, we have our own in-house flour milling operations in India, which ensures that the flour we use in our mixes is manufactured as per the exact standard requirement of our Swiss formulations. Finally, all the batch productions are tested in our fully equipped domestic trial bakery to evaluate the quality of the final baked product. The entire range of our products for the Indian market are being manufactured in our own state-of-theart, fully automated blending facility with in-house wheat milling unit located here in India, which helps provide us with stringent control on the production process. Our production facility, which is ISO, HACCP and Halal certified, offers an international quality assurance that we think is essential for the global as well as domestic clients and their discerning customers. Kindly give a brief outline of your R&D facility in India Our Mumbai-based R&D center and trial kitchen is well equipped to check the quality standards of incoming raw materials and also to conduct batch wise

Backgrounder “RAS Group was founded in 1970 mainly as an agro-processing company, which over the years has been transformed into an integrated entity with business interests in grain sourcing, flour milling, distribution, warehousing and transportation. Trade N Bake is one of the market leaders in Switzerland in the field of bakery innovation, bakery consulting and bakery product development. Master Chef Josef Eicher from Trade N Bake who is also our Technical Director, has over 35 years of experience in providing expert assistance to leading bakers and food manufacturers in Germany & Switzerland.” – Tahir Shaikh.

The Research Arm Josef Eicher is the Technical Director of Suisse Gourmet & Bake Ingredients Pvt. Ltd. He has rich experience of 40 years in the field of bakery consultancy & product development for European markets. He is the main arm behind the research & development activities of Suisse Gourmet & Bake Ingredients Pvt. Ltd. Eicher is continually working on research and development projects, aiming to find innovative bread offerings and new formulations for the bakery industry. testing of finished bakery mixes. Our team of expert Bakery Chefs bake randomly selected products from our production batches to ensure that the desired results are being achieved before we dispatch our bakery mixes to our esteemed clients. How do you plan to educate and develop the market for your products in India? In our humble opinion, it is our customers (Chefs and bakers) who are actually educating us. In serving them, we are able to put to test our customisation skills. As we learn from these experiences, our quality and taste of final products and good word of mouth are what will propel SwissBake into being a trusted brand across the country. Further in order to make access easier, SwissBake has a strong web presence, robust digital media engagements and an impressive blend of traditional marketing mix. To engage on a personal level, a trained team of sales personnel and demo Chefs are being deployed. We are also in the process of building a strong distribution network across the country. In the long-run, our decade long ethics, non-compromising sourcing policy and innovative approach are what will together build our brand SwissBake in India. Tahir Shaikh is the Director& Founder of Suisse Gourmet & Bake Ingredients Pvt. Ltd. He has rich experience of seven years in cereal milling and agro processing techniques. The focus of his expertise lies in marketing and distribution.

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The MAKING OF A Pastry Chef

Apparently, an average working day of a Pastry Chef seems hunky dory where he/she is seen making all those endearing delicacies for people. But ask a Pastry Chef about his/her experiences and you find that hard work and innovativeness are at the core of his/her success. The diners are not satisfied having the same desserts day-in-and-day-out. They would like to have something new to tickle their taste buds every now and then. A Pastry Chef works long hours and at a salary that is nothing to crow about. But a person who is bitten by the creative bug and who is willing to accept challenges can find ample satisfaction at the happy expressions of the diners who taste his/her new sweet delicacies. Ashok Malkani finds that Pastry Chefs often create new dishes by giving a twist to the old desserts. 20

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ention the word Chef and many people conjure up the image of a person who can create dishes that would satiate the palate of the most fastidious gourmand. A great Pastry Chef creates culinary fantasies with chocolate and cream and other ingredients. The Pastry Chef ’s creative repertoire could be described as sweet and lip smacking. Pastry Chefs create delicious cakes, pastries, pies, cookies and breads and several other bakery and confectionery products. In the pastry sub-stations of hotel or restaurant kitchens, they are engaged in creating delicious products that are also by and large, aesthetic to look.

A Creative and Challenging Profession Though their job is arduous, a Pastry Chef usually gets the opportunity to employ creativity to the fullest to come up with tempting desserts. As Pastry Chef named Manoj Painuly of DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pune -Chinchwad, aptly puts it, “Being a Pastry Chef is a pretty attractive job. It gives the opportunity to develop and test inventive dessert recipes and sample some of the world’s finest ingredients, confections, and sweets. Having said that, I must add that being a Pastry Chef requires great dedication to the craft. Everything you make must also look beautiful, besides tasting great. Artistic presentation is more important for desserts than for any other part of the meal. As far as desserts are concerned, people want something that is a feast for their eyes as well as their palates, and only

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then appreciation follows.” Yes, almost all Pastry Chefs I have talked to believed that there are two sides of the coin. From developing and tasting new and inventive dessert recipes to sampling some of the world’s finest ingredients, confections, and sweets, there is, admittedly, much to love about a job like this. But it is not all fondant, crepes, and crème brulée — make no mistake about it, this is a tough, challenging and demanding role that only those who are truly dedicated to the craft can survive and thrive in. According to a renowned Pastry Chef, “The restaurant kitchen is a place that tests every milligram of your essence, where a perfectly balanced recipe of humility, hubris, and actual skill is needed.” Gina DePalma, Pastry Chef and author of the book Dolce Italiano:

Chef Manoj Painuly

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Desserts from the Babbo Kitchen, also shares Manoj’s views. She avers, “Working in any restaurant is hard life. It involves long hours on your feet, lots of repetitive tasks that must be done with precision and consistency, constant pressure. The challenge is to keep the passion for this kind of life going.” And the health conscious wave has made the job of the creators of desserts even more challenging than before. Gina pointed out in an article in a renowned newspaper, “Our job is a daily exercise in doing more with less, a pittance of space, equipment, staff and budget. No matter how many avowed sweet toothers we satisfy, there is always the subtext that pastry is fluff and fancy, compared to the serious work of cleaning veal kidneys or butchering a halibut. Sweets are an endnote, the option at the end of the meal that many skip, a logical place to edit out the extra calories.” Chef Manoj believes that the day to day difficulties in a Pastry Chef ’s life are “the fast changing

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trends, the temperature fluctuations and upkeep of equipments.”

Learning to Grow Be that as it may, you will find several top notch Pastry Chefs quite satisfied with their jobs. Chef Savio Fernandes of JW Marriott Hotel Mumbai, one of the most well-known Pastry Chefs in India, is quite satisfied with what he is doing. But how do these Chefs dream up all those sweet and delicious dishes? Among the world’s top Pastry Chefs, you will find some self-taught practitioners who learnt their skill through on-the-job experience and apprenticeships, as well as classically trained Chefs who gained their skills through a traditional culinary institute’s education. “I have gained most from the expatriate Chefs with whom I have worked with,” asserted Chef Savio Fernandes. Many of those who are already established in the field recommend a traditional education to ensure that aspiring Pastry Chefs are well-versed in the fundamental practices and concepts of creating pastries. Ideally, hands-on training at the bakery or kitchen of a food service establishment should complement the formal training. “There are some very good culinary schools, but in general, I think it is worth getting some experience either in a restaurant kitchen or bakery before you decide to invest a lot of money in education,” expressed one Pastry Chef. But innovation must complement education and training, if a Pastry Chef wants to make a mark in his/her career. “In our profession, innovation is the want of every hour,” asserted Chef Manoj. Especially in the post-modern urban India, with the advent of the informed global traveller on India’s

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gastronomical landscape, Chefs have been encouraged and as well as induced to experiment with flavours and textures; in order to survive and outpace the competition. Reading and networking also facilitate to keep you abreast of the trends. “I read a lot and network with various Pastry Chefs in the city because we are so few,” stated Chef Savio. The Pastry Chef also needs to hone his/her people skills. In fact, his people skill is one of the reasons why Chef Savio took up to writing a book that combines people and pastry. “It is a coffee table book in which I have created recipes and cakes around people I like,” pointed out Savio. “New recipes are created by a mixture of reading, surfing the net as well as your own imagination. It should be according to the demands of time. We use our own imagination to set new trends,” explained Chef Manoj.

Multi-tasking and Innovation And a person deciding upon being a Pastry Chef should know that during the course of a typical day on the job for a

Chef Vijay Pandey

Chef Vikas Bagul

Pastry Chef, he/she may be called upon to perform many mundane tasks, some of which are purely administrative and logistical and don’t involve actual food preparation. Some of the common responsibilities of Pastry Chefs include working with other members of the kitchen staff to devise dessert menus that complement the rest of the menu offerings, developing and testing new pastries and desserts, preparing menus and budgets for the pastry department, procuring ingredients and maintaining the pastry department’s inventory of supplies, and overseeing the training and work of apprentices and assistants. All these multi-tasking must go handin-hand with innovativeness. A good Pastry Chef should have certain personal characteristics, specific knowledge and specialised skills. A Pastry Chef needs to keep experimenting to come up with something new. Making desserts often requires several components that must be assembled individually and then brought together to create the final product. Every ingredient has to be measured precisely and added in the correct way and in the correct order. Thus successful Pastry Chefs need to be organised and detail-oriented. Innovativeness is called for when you need to introduce new desserts, which is becoming the order of the day. New desserts are being dished out regularly. Chef Savio has come up with Boondi Cheesecake and Gulab Jamun Brulee. “Taking into account of the Indian palate and my love for desi desserts, I decided

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to add my personal touch to classic treats like the brulee and the cheesecake,” informed Chef Savio. Yes, those days, when Chefs were expected to adhere to the original recipes of a restaurant in totality, are thankfully long gone. Experimenting with new recipes is the order of the day. “The meringue does have the possibility to have a lot of experimentation with the fillings,” proffered Chef Tanmoy Savardekar of The Winking Macaron, Bangalore. Chef Tanmoy has come up with macarons having several innovative fillings such as dark chocolate and star anise, peanut butter, vanilla caviar and salted caramel. “Desserts are the sweet endings to a meal. Even if my appetiser and main course are not that great, I know that my desserts will cover up the bad experience,” viewed Chef Tanmoy. Chef Vijay Pandey of Azok, Juhu, Mumbai, is also enthusiastic on innovations. He has come up with a dessert called Threesome. “When people think of a mousse, they conjure up the image of a dessert having a smooth texture. We wanted to play with that, hence we decided to have a layered dessert called the Threesome, comprising Baileys, Madras Coffee and chocolate with Chivas Regale truffle. You can begin at the base, and proceed to dig into the Madras Coffee Mousse, followed by Chocolate Mousse, topped with Baileys Irish Cream Mousse and chocolate

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Chef Savio Fernandes

curls. We have also departed from the monotony of the textures with a crunchy chikki ball which infuses that extra punch as a result of the Chivas Regale,” explained Pandey. To sum up, these days innovativeness is a must for the Pastry Chefs engaged in the Indian bakery and confectionery industry. And many patisseries are introducing novel groundbreaking desserts. Some years back, I experienced a unique gulab jamun at Punjab Grill at Lower Parel, Mumbai The restaurant was serving Gulab Jamun which were either filled with melted Swiss white chocolate, Nutella or honey-almond paste. Couple of years back, this writer also got to experience at the Bonobo in

Mumbai, a unique kulfi spruced with grilled seasonal fruits. Marinated in honey, chilli powder, cumin powder and cinnamon powder, the fruits were tipped into a hot tandoor, which endowed them with a smoky flavour. One of the partners of the oultet, Sahil Timbadia, pointed out that the spicy, smoky flavour of the fruit contrasted amazingly well with the sweet and creamy taste of kulfi. I couldn’t exactly fathom whether it was the customer’s curiosity or the amazing taste of the kulfi which contributed to its brisk sales. May be it was a mix of both the factors. The Chocolate Berried Treasure by Chef Vikas Bagul, the Executive Pastry Chef at The Oberoi, Mumbai, can reflect the fantasy of an ardent chocolate lover. It comprises raspberry jelly, chocolate crisp, biscuit chocolate, raspberry chocolate mousse, chocolate meringue and ginger basil ice cream. However, not just creation of new desserts but their presentation is also extremely important for the success of a Pastry Chef. Artistic presentation has more weightage for desserts than for any other forms of meal in a formal lunch or dinner. People want their desserts to be appealing to their eyes as well as their palates.

Choosing to Become a Pastry Chef? And if you want to be a successful Pastry Chef, you must realise that it is not a routine job. Even if you have spent your whole life dreaming about whipping up desserts in a five-star restaurant, upscale bistro, or corner patisserie, consider both sides of this career path before you make a final decision. The hours at this profession tend to be long and exhausting, and a typical work day of a Pastry Chef may have no room for a break. However, the work of Pastry Chefs is usually not that fast-paced as that of other kitchen operations in a food service business, as many components of the desserts and pastries are made in advance. Pastry Chefs usually get to carry out their work with a level of creative expression that can be rare among kitchen positions. “Career is all about learning. And when we speak of the career of Pastry Chef, the learning element is never ending. At the same time I must add that

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BAKERY REVIEW being a Pastry Chef or Chef de Patisserie is a wonderful career choice for anyone who is artistic and logical, practical and creative at the same time. It is a career with rich opportunities, where you get to make rich, wonderful and beautiful desserts,” elaborated Chef Manoj. But the job of Pastry Chef does not only involve dexterity in baked creations and their presentation. “A good Pastry Chef also needs an understanding of the scientific principles of his/her craft,” observed Chef Manoj. As a Pastry Chef one gets to work with perishable and fragile food products and thus he/she requires good understanding of the biology of food safety. For being a successful Pastry Chef, you also need to have a basic sense of design, which will help you to create visually appealing desserts. And besides these knowledge and skills and the innovative streak, Pastry Chefs also need to have stamina and sound health to carry out a demanding profession successfully. And he/she needs loads of patience, for desserts can require

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extensive preparation. Along with these, the people skills, networking skills and business skills are also important for this profession. In short, one may say that the preparation of pastries and other desserts has elements of both science and art. They require science’s precision and artistic expression. They require technical skills and creativity in ample dosages, as

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well as knowledge about nutrition and food safety. But if one is born with an innovative streak and has or is ready to acquire all the above-mentioned attributes through training and hard work, the career of a Pastry Chef can be an extremely rewarding experience. For, as most of the Chefs agree, the success of a patisserie often depends largely on the Pastry Chef. 

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Beginning

Bakery Business In India, the bakery industry is the third highest revenue earner in the processed food sector. According to a report by Research and Markets, the market size of the Indian bakery industry is expected to touch $7.6 billion by 2015. According to an ASSOCHAM study of 2011, the bakery industry of India was going through a steady annual growth rate of 8 percent. The changing socioeconomic scenario has contributed towards making bakery products gaining greater popularity in the country, during the recent years. All these factors together indicate a promising future for the Indian bakery industry. However, every business is fraught with the danger of failure. Ashok Malkani explores the prospects for the franchisees in bakery operations and discusses the pros and cons about becoming a franchisee in the Indian bakery business. There is also the concept of pilot franchisee, which is another option open for Indian entrepreneurs or potential entrepreneurs thinking of entering the Indian bakery business. 26

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ccording to a research from Global Industry Analysts, the global baked goods industry is expected to exceed 310 billion USD in 2015. It is natural as now people are having less and less time to cook elaborate meals, thereby leading to an increase in ready to eat snacking options, where bakeries can and does play a crucial role. According to the same report, the demand for baked and pastry goods is being driven by changing lifestyles, which leaves little time to prepare meals. Busy consumers are increasingly quick to buy convenient baked snack foods such as wraps and sandwiches. The impressive growth rate of the Indian bakery industry is a welcome reality of our times. It is driven by necessity as well as lifestyle factors. The demands of busy life are necessitating increased consumption of breads and biscuits, whereas the increased disposable incomes and globalisation are inducing lifestyle shifts where consuming gourmet bakery products like specialised pastries and designer cakes or breads spruced with pumpkins, blueberries and other fruits is gaining currency.. With the growth of the bakery industry in India, we are seeing the mushrooming of a number of

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BAKERY REVIEW bakery chains, and coffee café chains selling bakery products, operating in the country. At the same time, the mushrooming growth of coffee café chains across the country can lead to greater impetus to the bakery business. According to India Food Services Report 2013 by National Restaurant Association of India, “currently there are around 100 chain cafes and bakery brands with an estimated 3100 to 3200 outlets. Market leaders include Café Coffee Day and Barista Lavasa with presence across all four formats – lounge, café, express and kiosk.” Indian bakery industry is not only an industry with promising growth, but it is an industry which also has the potential to achieve high profit margins. The bakery industry is believed to generate over 50 percent profits on some products. Moreover, bakery business can be initiated with a modest investment and from one’s home also But that doesn’t mean that bakery business is an easy route to earn money; it has its own challenges. Success in

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bakery business requires a combination of sustained hard work and creativity, besides of course knowledge about the ingredients and the prevailing market trends.

Look Before You Leap Before you venture into the bakery

business it is necessary that you study all the pros and cons. There are a few things an entrepreneur or a potential entrepreneur venturing into opening a stand-alone bakery outlet or a stand-alone bakery café should explore upon. Firstly, the entrepreneur or the

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potential entrepreneur should ascertain whether the locality where he/she is planning to start the business has a ready market for bakery products or not. The entrepreneur or the potential entrepreneur should also gauge his/her competition if any in the locality very carefully, and do some deep introspection on what novelty in terms of products, presentation and packaging he/she can offer to his/her potential clientele. The person thinking of investing in a bakery shop or a bakery café should also have some degree of knowledge about the intricacies of the day-to-day working of the bakeries, and of the bakery ingredients; in fact more knowledge or practical experience he/she would be having in this regard, the better it would be for his/her business in the future. The knowledge of bakery operations and bakery ingredients should be complemented with the knowledge of current trends in the bakery business. Besides deciding upon the investment that is to be made, a thorough evaluation of the fixed and variable costs (two examples of the fixed costs are the interest payments on capital invested on loan, and rent, two examples of variable costs are salary and the price of raw materials) and the projected profits are to be made, along with a clear idea of the time period which would be taken for break even. For investing in a retail bakery chain, or in a bakery café chain, the entrepreneur or the potential

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entrepreneur has to gauge the market potential of his/her investment not only in a particular locality, but across various localities of a city/various cities, state/s, or country, depending upon the scale of operations he/she has envisaged. Succinctly, he/she needs to have a macro perspective of the business, besides of course deep pockets. For those thinking of opening a bakery café chain or a retail bakery chain, more than the knowledge about the intricacies of the day-to-day bakery operations and of the bakery ingredients, knowledge about the macro perspective of the bakery business is needed, though the knowledge of the former two can also be facilitating factor while overseeing the day-to-day

performances of the Managers. Prudent evaluation of costs and profits and a clear idea of the time period that would be required to break even are needed for bakery café chains and retail bakery chains too as in their stand-alone versions. As far as bakery café chains and retail bakery chains are concerned, the entrepreneur has to build one central bakery from where these chain wide operations would get their supplies.

Franchisee to Growth And one can get the support of an established brand at the beginning of one’s bakery business by opting to become a franchisee of a renowned player in the bakery business. The spurt in the demand for bakery products is providing business opportunities to the franchisees, which though may not require great investment can yield lucrative profits. Besides well-established brand name, franchisors may also provide their franchisees with recipes, guidance, training, and as well as marketing and advertising support. In India franchising is estimated to be worth 22 billion USD (about Rs 1. 2 lakh crore). What is more franchising business in India is showing an impressive growth rate of 30 percent per year, on an average. And bakery is one of the sensible opportunities to explore franchising option. Many of the renowned bakery players like Cookie Man, Monginis and Birdy’s have opted for the franchise route. An expert viewed that the potential of expansion of the brand through

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franchising is quicker than through company-run outlets. The franchisees can contribute to the capital of the franchisor, and in turn gets the backing of an established brand which can help them get an edge over competition. It is a win-win situation in both ways. However, there are riders. If the franchisee does not deliver the products of a certain quality that is associated with the brand which he/she is carrying, not only the business of the franchisee but the long-standing reputation of the franchising company can suffer. Simply relying on the brand name, without delivering the quality of products to match the reputation of the franchisor would not help the franchisee bakery business (or rather any business) to thrive. Besides quality of your baked creations, as a franchisee bakery business, you need to have knowledge as well as control over food safety measures, and health and hygiene issues so that spoilage and wastage is kept to a minimum and the image of cleanliness & hygiene is emanated to the consumers. Minimising wastage would lead to quicker break-even and the image of cleanliness may generate repeat business. Before starting his/her bakery business by investing to become a

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franchisee, the entrepreneur or the potential entrepreneur should do his/her homework, which of course include market research about his/her prospective business. Otherwise adversity in the business may caught the entrepreneur unawares, whose perpetuation without astute handling may lead to closure of the shop. And the players going for franchisee route, like the players going for standalone bakeries without support of any brand name, shouldn’t expect profits from the first day either. In franchising, any beginner firstly needs to put his/her best efforts in the initial 6-8 months without expecting profits from the very first day. He/she must realise that retail is a long-term business, irrespective of with or without franchising support. Also, personal involvement in the bakery business, especially during the initial phase, is extremely important, and that is true for the franchisees too. In fact, besides getting the huge brand advantage many other factors of consideration are similar for the franchisees entering the bakery business and entrepreneurs entering the bakery business without the franchise support.

Factors for Consideration Besides deciding on the right location,

ascertaining and gauging the competition wisely, keeping stringent control on product quality and a careful eye on costing, hiring the right staff and keeping them motivated is also very important in the bakery business, as this business depends a lot on human expertise. All these factors need consideration for franchisees entering the bakery business too. Bad or inappropriate location can lead to the failure of a franchisee despite the leverage of brand support. Similarly failure to meet the customer expectations in terms of quality of products and their presentation or even failure to meet customer expectations regarding products and presentation that the franchiser has instilled among them may also result in closing the shop of the franchisee. Yes, of course, inadequate support from the franchisor may lead to business disturbances in the franchisee operations, and in this regard the entrepreneurs or the potential entrepreneurs thinking of entering the bakery business should be sure of adequate support of the franchisor in their desired directions before taking the plunge. Failure to motivate the staff to excel or not having the right business model may also harm the business of the

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BAKERY REVIEW franchisees entering the bakery business.

Being Pilot Franchisee For those who are apprehensive of failure as a franchisee, they can explore the concept of pilot franchising. Pilot franchising can be beneficial for the franchisor’s brand reputation too. A business owner who is considering expansion through franchising can ascertain the viability or profitability of his/her franchising model by carrying out a pilot franchise before embarking on full-fledged franchising. To understand pilot franchising one must understand the term pilot franchisee. The term pilot franchisee stands for the first franchisee appointed by the franchisor to evaluate or ascertain or estimate the extent of viability or success of his/her franchise operations. Pilot franchising enables the franchisee to evaluate the franchise business model before investing his/her time and money into it. The franchisor can enter into an agreement with a pilot franchisee for a given time frame to test the financial viability or success of his/her franchising

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operations. If the pilot franchise or test franchise does well, the franchisor can make his/her pilot franchisee as his/her first official franchisee. However if the endeavour fails, the pilot franchisee would still gain rich experience and earnings as well (as per agreement with the franchisor). It is a test drive of sorts for the franchisee and the franchisor in the franchising route, which can be topsy-turvy too. There are various advantages of becoming a pilot franchisee in the bakery business. Firstly it costs less for the franchisee as the franchisor himself/ herself is likely to be new to franchising in the bakery business. Moreover, being the only franchisee for the time being,

the pilot franchisee is likely to get individual and personalised attention of the franchisor. There is also the possibility of the pilot franchisee graduating into master franchisee, when the said franchise operation gets successful. Moreover, the pilot franchisee can have greater say in the territorial rights as compared to other franchisees who may follow when there is a smooth ride. However, the pilot franchisee may have to contend with the disadvantage of not having a tried and tested model of franchising before him/her, as the franchisor is also likely to be new to franchising in the bakery operations. Bakery business in post-modern India has great potential to succeed, whether though franchising or through non-franchising route. However, being a franchisee of an established brand can help the entrepreneur or the potential entrepreneur to have the much needed edge in his/her bakery operations, which may help him/her to beat the competition more successfully. With inputs from Swarnendu Biswas.

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Desserts

for the Festive Spirit By Sharmila Chand Chocolate Chips Orange Zest Vanilla Sugar

50 gm 1 Small Orange To Taste 25 gm

II. Vanilla Panna Cotta

H

ere we offer some sweet sensations which can spruce up the delight factor in the forthcoming Valentine’s Day and other future celebrations too. Chef Harmender Mathur, Executive Pastry Chef, The LaLiT New Delhi, shares some of his favourite French & Italian dessert recipes here, which are given below:

I. Cannoli This dessert is just right for all those who believe in classic, gooey romance! Cannoli is found in most cafés across Italy. These Sicilian pastry desserts consist of tube-shaped shells of fried pastry dough, filled with a sweet, creamy filling usually containing fresh ricotta cheese, mixed candied fruits, chocolate chips and orange zest. Ingredients: Flour 500 gm Rum 10 gm Baking Powder Half tsp Oil 30 ml Sugar 60gm Salt Pinch Vanilla Pinch Method: Make smooth dough by mixing all the above mentioned ingredients. Keep it in the refrigerator for 2-3 hours. After 2-3 hours, pull out the dough and roll it in thin sheets. Use a medium size, round cutter to get those perfect, equal sized sheets. Roll the sheets over metal tubes and join the corners with wet fingers to make sure they do not open while frying. Fry until the product attains golden brown colour. Cool it down and fill the shell with cheese filling. Filling Ricotta Cheese 300 gm Honey 60 ml Candied Peel 75 gm

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Having originated in the northern Italian region of Piedmont, Panna Cotta is famous throughout Italy and is served with wild berries, caramel, chocolate sauce or fruit coulis. Ingredients: Cooking Cream - 500 ml Sugar -50 gm Mascarpone Cheese -125 gm Gelatin Sheets - 4 Vanilla Bean -1 Pod Method: Soak gelatin and leave in ice-cold water and keep it aside. Warm cream and sugar together with vanilla bean pod in a thick bottom pan (do not boil, just keep the mixture lukewarm). Add mascarpone cheese to it and stir well, making sure that there are no lumps being formed. Melt gelatin and add it to the mix. Pour the mix into glass bowl or ceramic cups. Refrigerate for couple of hours or until it gets set. Serve chilled with your choice of fruit puree.

III. Rum Baba Rum Baba is a decadent dessert. It is a lovely yeast-risen cake studded with dried fruit and soaked in hot rum syrup. This recipe features the delicate flavour of citrus, imparted by just a hint of orange and lemon zest. Likewise, a small amount of warm vanilla

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F O C U S

BAKERY REVIEW is added to the soaking syrup to cut down on the rum’s boldness. The result is Rum Baba; full of complex layers of flavours. The dessert requires a preparation time of 1 hour and 40 minutes, on an average. The cooking time is 25 minutes approximately. So the Rum Baba’s conception to reality takes about 2 hours and five minutes approximately. Ingredients: Cake 1 Tablespoon of Dry Yeast 3 Tablespoons of Warm Water 3 Eggs, beaten 2 Cups of all-purpose Flour 2 Tablespoons of Granulated Sugar 1 Teaspoon of Orange Zest 1 Teaspoon of Lemon Zest 1 Teaspoon of Salt 1/2 Cup of Butter, softened 3/4 Cups of Golden Raisins or Dried Currants 3 Tablespoons of Dark Rum 12 Baba Molds Rum Syrup 3 Cups of Water 2 Cups of Granulated Sugar 1/2 to 2/3 Cups of Dark Rum (to taste) 1 1/2 Teaspoons of Vanilla Extract 2/3 Cups of Apricot Preserves, heated Sweetened Whipped Cream, for garnish Method: Stir the yeast and the warm water together in a large bowl and allow the yeast to dissolve for five minutes. Now lightly beat the eggs into the yeast and water. Mix the flour, sugar, citrus zest, and salt together and then stir the mixture into the yeast and eggs. Knead the dough with the softened butter for about five minutes, until it turns soft and elastic. Cover the dough and allow it to rise for 1 hour; until it doubles in size. While the dough is rising, soak the raisins or currants in three tablespoons of rum. Once the dough has doubled, beat the rumsoaked fruits into it. Grease the Baba molds and divide the dough among them. Pre-heat an oven to 400 degree F. Cover the molds and allow the dough to rise for 30 to 45 minutes, until the dough has just started to rise above the molds’ edges. Uncover the Babas and bake them for 20 to 25 minutes, until they turn golden brown and begin to pull away from the sides of the molds. Immediately remove the Babas from the molds and allow them to cool on a wire rack. While the Babas are cooling, make the rum soaking syrup. In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil for 5 to 10 minutes, until the syrup has thickened. Remove the syrup from the heat and stir the

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rum and vanilla extract into the mixture. Place the Babas into the hot rum syrup and turn them several times, allowing them to soak up the syrup. They will swell and absorb most of the syrup. Carefully transfer each Baba onto a dessert plate and brush with a generous amount of heated apricot preserves. Garnish the Babas au rhum with Vanilla Chantilly cream and serve immediately. This Rum Baba recipe makes for 12 servings.

Recipe for Signature Valentine’s Dessert ‘Sao Thome’ Single Origin Chocolate Mousse with Lemon Soil, Berry Caviar and Gold Leaf By Executive Chef, Neeraj Tyagi, The Claridges, New Delhi Ingredients

Unit

Qty

Eggs Breakfast Sugar Butter Chocolate Sou Thome Strawberries Gooseberries Blueberries Lemon Flour Corn Flour Gold Leaf Gelatin Elle and Vire Cream Rich Cream Whipping

Nos. Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Nos. Kg Kg Litre

40 1 0.8 2 0.1 0.05 0.05 0.2 0.5 0.02 2 0.005 0.2 0.25

Method Separate the yolk and whites. Now whisk the egg white with breakfast sugar. Make a mixture of melted butter and chocolate, now add the prepared egg and sugar mixture. Bake the mixture at 160 degrees for 1 hour. Let it cool and cut the cake base into two layers. For the Mousse Take 4 eggs’ yolk and 150 gm sugar on double boiler and make sabayon. Add whipping cream and 150 gm melted chocolate and gelatin simultaneously. Now layer the mousse over cake and garnish with fruits. For Lemon Soil Mix butter, lemon, corn flour and rub it and dry at 100 degrees in oven.

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BAKERY REVIEW

that they are induced to visit your bakery again and again; for years to come.

Display, Feedback and Research

From

Baking to

Success By Swarnendu Biswas

R

nning a bakery operation successfully requires the consideration of various factors. It involves much more than just displaying the regulars like fresh breads, cakes, pastries, muffins and other assorted bakery products. Of course, freshness in bakery products is a crucial aspect behind running of bakery operations, which should not be overlooked or compromised. Ideally nothing should be showcased on the shelves of your bakery that are older than a day unless it is accompanied by a substantially reduced price. It is wise to remember that the fresh baked aroma emanating from

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bakery shops facilitates in triggering in impulse sales in those bakeries, and it is wiser to use this knowledge to your advantage. However, besides placing a great premium on freshly baked products, introspection and consequent efforts on various other facets of your bakery operations are needed to make your bakery business a success story. As an operator, you must visualise what will attract your existing consumers and potential consumers into your bakery. You must follow this visualisation with pragmatic and creative ways to attract your existing and potential consumers, so

If you want to serve your consumers to the best of your abilities, it is important that you know their baked preferences really well. It is better to undertake an informal survey of your current and potential consumers to see what they think of your bakery items, and what they think you could do to make your bakery better. Also ask them about your products range and the service of your staff. You should try to gauge whether your products are in abreast with the latest consumer trends. These questions deserve answers through customer feedback. You must also study your competition well through research if you want to stay ahead of them. As a bakery operator, you should build your bakery displays in a manner which would enable the existing and potential customers or simply visitors to your bakery outlet to see your products from across the facility. It is better to include fresh fruits, fresh and dried flowers, in addition to ears of wheat and corn in your product displays. You may use custom-designed wood tilted racks or simply dishes or rattan baskets or all of them, but use bright colours in your display, which would nicely complement the predominant brown and beige shades in the bakery shop. Also label each item to introduce total transparency. Furthermore, signage should be concise and articulate and their primary purpose would be to inform your existing and potential customers about your products. Fancy creativity in signage is not bad, but it should not distract the consumers from its main objective. If you go for handwritten signage, ensure that they are legible and appealing at the same time. Otherwise, along with your signage, the potential customers may ignore your products too. Employ cross merchandising and it may augment your sales. Simply market your related bakery products together and their sales can increase. For example, give some discount on your organic cakes for the purchase of a packet of healthy breads. Or display some exotic

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O P E R A T I O N S

BAKERY REVIEW coffees along side your high-end muffins or pastries and your discerning target consumers may be even more interested in buying them. Also what about the combination of cream cheese and bagels, or fruit and lemon cakes with whipped cream? Yes, ideally they should be displayed in tandem to get optimum sales out of them.

Lighting and Cleaning Lighting of your bakery facility can also play a crucial role to your revenues. Do not go overboard with your lighting so that the existing and potential consumers’ attention diverts from the bakery products to the lighting itself, and neither do keep your facility enveloped in dim light. Your bakery is not a disco or a bar. Always remember that lighting in bakery should be done with the objective of infusing life to your bakery products while at the same time clearly showcasing the details of your products. They should also show how spic and span your bakery is. Therefore, it is always better to opt for warm, comfortable, understated lighting

Dec-Jan ’14

that embodies elegance and class, and exudes transparency. Of course, it doesn’t deserve a mention that cleanliness in your bakery operations is of paramount importance. Cleanliness in your bakery operations should be comprehensive and should extend from your floor to food counter and display racks to the staff ’s uniforms and the hygienic measures employed by them. You also must ensure that your trained staff does not forget to wear hairnets, disposable gloves and hats while handling bakery items. It is likely that customers in these health conscious times will prefer a spotlessly clean bakery with ordinary products over an untidy bakery with wonderful products, provided pricing of their products remains more or less the same.

Servicing Trends Keep abreast with the prevailing consumer trends. In the Indian context this entails that if your bakery is located in an up-market locality of a metropolitan city or any other big city

of India, try to stock an impressive range of healthy bakery products, which are low on fat or cholesterol. But wherever your bakery is, it is better to introduce variety in your items time and again, so as to prevent your target consumers from getting bored. Also make sure that all the favourite items of your target consumers are always on the stock. Customer service in your bakery operations should ideally be impeccable, yet personalised and friendly. Try to offer the best possible service to your consumers within your existing infrastructure and financial capabilities, with a prompt pace and a smiling face. At least one or two staff should be trained enough to impart valuable information on your displayed bakery items so as to help your target consumers arrive at a decision. But at the same time, they should be restrained enough to not thrust their choices on the existing and potential consumers. All these factors together can facilitate to make your bakery operations a success story worth emulating in the industry. 

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BAKERY REVIEW

The Cultured Yogurt Y

ogurt is a semi-solid, processed and fermented milk product, mostly prepared from cow’s milk. Yogurt is produced by the act of bacterial fermentation of milk. The bacteria used to make this dairy product are known as ‘yogurt cultures.’ Although milk from various domestic animals are used for yogurt production, but most commercial yogurt production units across the globe now use cow’s milk to maintain a consistent taste. However, yogurt can be prepared with any type of milk; be it from cow, buffalo, goat, and sheep. But nowadays, soymilk is also seen as a newage component for commercial yogurt preparation. Since time immemorial, this form of curd is being consumed in almost every part of the world with variations in forms and taste. Generally taste and texture of yogurt differs according to the quality of the milk used, which varies from one region to another. It is still among the most popular dairy items of our day-to-day menus, whether we live in cosmopolitan or rural India.

Curdling Up Yogurt is a semi-solid, processed and fermented milk product, mostly available with a consistency similar to that of thick, creamy and whisked curd. To relish yogurt, one has to use good quality milk that contains a higher concentration of solids than normal milk. The milk that possesses more solid content bestows a thicker and firmer texture to the yogurt. In its preparation route, milk is processed and pasteurised for attaining a good output. Often, most producers add nonfat dry milk (NFDM) or milk powder to thicken the milk. Inoculating certain bacteria into milk, which work as starter culture, makes yogurt. They are commonly known as streptococcus thermophilus and lactobacillus bulgaricus. Yogurt is processed and packaged in such a way that it has longer shelf life than the natural curd. Curd is prepared by seeding natural bacteria

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called lactobacillus, thus the milk does not need to be processed before making curd. However, before preparing yogurt, milk has to be processed and then it is inoculated with starter culture and other additives that infuse flavour and aroma. The sweetened form of yogurt is available in various mouth-watering flavours and attractive packaging. Various types of milk can be used for producing yogurt, such as whole milk, partially skimmed milk, skimmed milk or full cream. Despite this, for yogurt production, one needs to confirm certain criteria in regard to quality of raw milk for yogurt production. It helps to ensure good development of yogurt culture. The milk with low bacteria count is preferred for making yogurt, as it helps to keep the product for longer duration. The milk should be free from antibiotics, sanitising chemicals, mastitis milk, colostrums, and rancid cream. Also, it is ensured that there is no contamination by bacteriophages.

Thickening and Stabilising In Europe, yogurt tends to be ‘runny’, but in USA people prefer to eat a little thicker and firm yogurt, hence the concentration of powdered milk depends on the choice of required consistency in yogurt. In the era of health food, soymilk with its high protein content is replacing the natural one. This is even evident in the yogurt market where it is made with soymilk in many countries. Still this has a major disadvantage. Soymilk does not contain lactose, and absence of lactose and certain type of carbohydrate sugar deters the fermentation, which becomes a major obstacle in the growth of yogurt culture. Besides this, soymilk should be blended with some thickening agents like gelatin, pectin or agar powder. One needs to dissolve the agar powder in cold water and then bring it to a boil before using it. In the process of preparing yogurt, one needs other dairy products as ingredients such as concentrated skimmed milk, nonfat dry milk, whey and lactose. These are

often used to increase the non-fat solid contents in the milk. A certain amount of sweetener is added for the sweetened form of yogurt. It can be glucose or sucrose, or high intensity sweeteners e.g. aspartame, etc. Besides all these, one needs to add some stabilisers that give yogurt a firm consistency, which could be in the form of gelatin, carboxymethyl cellulose, locust bean Guar, alginates, carrageenans and whey protein concentrates. Consider the fact that absence of lactose content or some type of carbohydrate sugar will not allow the culture to grow. To eschew this state, it becomes necessary to add some amount of sugar, glucose or sucrose at a rate of about 2 to 3 percent by weight of the whole mixture. Some of the famous yogurt recipes are the Continental, French, and Swiss. Two popular traditionally Indian forms of yogurt are delightfully consumed as desserts in India. One is mishti doi, which is flavoured with caramel sugar and served in earthen pots and other is shreekhand, which is sweetened after draining the whey from the set curd.

Yogurt Beverage In the field of cold beverages, many varieties of yogurt drinks are gaining popularity. These products are essentially prepared in stirred style in which total solids content do not exceed more than 11 percent. Manufacturing procedure of yogurt beverage differs from normal yogurt process where the mixture is homogenised further to reduce viscosity. The required flavours and colours are added invariably in the mixture while processing. Heat treatment is applied at the end of the process to extend the storage life of the product. HTST pasteurisation with aseptic processing at 2-4°C give a shelf life of several weeks, whereas UHT processes with aseptic packaging give a shelf life of several weeks at ambient temperature. ■

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P R O D U C T

P R E V I E W

BAKERY REVIEW

Fondant

Multi-purpose Pastry Mat

Tropilite Fondant is an extremely versatile product which is used for several kinds of icing -like substances used to decorate cakes, mould features and to create cake sugar crafts. It is a very sweet edible sugar dough usually made of glucose with other stabilisers and emulsifiers, which is sometimes also referred as sugar or gum paste. It is very smooth and flexible in nature which allows getting it rolled into very thin fine layers. If you loved playing with clay as a kid, you will love decorating with fondant. You can roll it out as well as cut it, imprint designs, create dazzling colour effects and mould it into any shape. Fondant is flexible, easyto-shape icing that lets you do it all: create easy heart or flower cut-outs and simple hand-shaped ball or ruffle borders. It is a non-stick cake icing which can be perfectly rolled out by hand using a rolling pin. It produces a smooth finish to any cake and may also be used as a modeling paste. Tropilite Fondant a dough-like paste, which is extremely versatile. It gives the cake a beautiful porcelain look surface that can be painted, piped, stamped and quilted. White fondant can be tinted in any colour. It can be rolled very thin for petal flowers, leaves and very detailed decorations. You can use Tropolite Fondant to make sugar decorations, cutouts, plaques, frills, impressed patterns, little flowers, cupcakes toppers, flowers, 3 D figures, bows, cake toppers, straps for hand bags, and belt buckles. Fondant and gum paste become more elastic and pliable as it is worked (kneaded). As we know that older the product, the longer you will be required to knead it. When fondant has been freshly made, it requires no kneading. As the product sits in its airtight container, it will still naturally dry out with time. If the product feels dry, hard or crumbly, then it will generally require a longer kneading time. Fondant and gum paste can be kneaded by hand or with the kneading arm of a mixer. Before using the Tropilite Fondant you just need the right amount of additive while kneading and rolling. Adding too much of any one of the additives could alter or ruin your fondant. We generally recommend using a small amount of cornstarch to the surface of fondant when kneading and rolling. If the fondant feels soft and sticky, you may find that you need a bit more cornstarch to firm it up a bit. If the fondant feels super sticky for some reason, it may help to lightly sprinkle cornstarch directly on the product before kneading. Cake prepared by fondant should remain left at room temperature on the counter. If you are covering a fondant cake layer with dairy –based cream, then provide a cake refrigeration condition for setting. It would be better to cover your cake or seal it in plastic poly, otherwise due to high humidity water droplets would appear on the decorated cake. Tropilite Foods Pvt. Ltd. info@davars.com

FoglioChef - the 100 percent food-grade SL70 silicone multi-purpose pastry mat withstands high and low temperatures ( + 260 C and - 60 C ), adheres perfectly to the work surface, is non-sticky, hygienic and easy to clean. The concentric circles and cm / inch scale marked on

its surface will help you roll out pastry and dough to precisely the right size. FoglioChef can be used in any type of oven, is dishwasher safe and can be rolled up again after use and also could be stowed at a small place. The New India Electric & Trading Co. nietco@hotmail.com

Frozen Freshness Gurgaon-based Samridhi Frozen Food Pvt. Ltd. is a producer of fruit juice in pet bottles. The company is also engaged in exporting and supplying of wide range of frozen fruits & vegetables, tomato products & canned products. The products of the company have presence across major parts of the country. The company envisages to have a pan-Indian presence. The company is equipped with impressive infrastructural facilities to produce fruit drinks of up to 2000 litres per hour. Not only Samridhi Frozen Food Pvt. Ltd.’s range of frozen products is being stored in the company’s warehouse unit at the suitable temperature, the latest technology for packaging is also employed so that these products can retain their natural taste and freshness. The company’s IQF production capacity is 2500 Kg per hour and its products are being manufactured as per international standards. The company has been engaged in doing business with retail giants like Bharti Walmart, Spencer’s and Carrefour among others. Samridhi Frozen Food Pvt. Ltd. samridhi.sanjay@gmail.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

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Being Innovative in Baking By Sharmila Chand

Anoop Paul, Pastry Chef, The Suryaa, New Delhi, is a trained Chef from the prestigious Institute of Hotel Management, Catering & Nutrition, Pusa, New Delhi. Chef Anoop Paul loves his pans and ovens. He began his career in 2009 as a Kitchen Management Trainee. After two years of extensive training he chose bakery & confectionery as his area of specialisation. Presently, he has been working with The Suryaa, New Delhi, heading the Bakery & Confectionery department of the hotel. The excerpts of the interview follow: What is the current trend in the Indian bakery industry? Freshly baked stuff, straight out of the oven, low calorie products, multigrain breads, fresh fruit-based desserts can be together construed as a consumption trend in the Indian bakery industry. How did you become a Pastry Chef? I was always interested in cooking, but before the end of my college days, I never knew that I would end up choosing it as a career. During my third year of B.Com, I realised that my potential lies in culinary arts. That is when I decided to make a career in this direction. Who is/are your idol/s, who all have inspired you? The greatest inspiration has been my mother, who is a great cook herself. I have also had the opportunity to train and work under Chef Devraj Halder, whom I have always respected for his knowledge and planning. What is/are your hot selling bakery item/s? My hot selling item is Fresh Fruit Cake, which I think is the most unique looking cake around the town. What about the health quotient? How do you take care of that aspect? With more and more people becoming health conscious we have to cater to their needs. So we do offer sugar free, low calorie desserts and healthy breads.

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What is your favourite tool and why it is so? It is a small palette knife that I always carry at work. It is very handy while working on tiny desserts. What are the challenges a Pastry Chef or a Bakery Chef has to face in his/her job? Please discuss three of them Working with perishable items is quite a challenge. It requires a very planned and controlled usage of ingredients. The hours are the most difficult part; breaks are kept to a minimum. The job is physically demanding, which is one of its challenges. If you choose to be a Pastry Chef or a Bakery Chef, you need to be really determined, because the bakery industry requires a lot of erratic hours, hard work and physical endurance and above all patience. What do you like about your job? The opportunity to be creative and expressive makes this job very interesting. The satisfaction that you get when you see your customers appreciating your creation is the best part of our profession. What you don’t like about your job? In this job, the social life tend to suffer. I miss out on the amount of fun that my friends have. What is your strength as a Pastry Chef? A Chef ’s strength comes from having a

good team; we at The Suryaa, New Delhi have a very good bakery team that is hard working, receptive and updated to the market trends. What is your working philosophy? I try to be innovative at every step of whatever I do, be it formulating a recipe, trying new plating methods or crafting an edible decorative showpiece. I believe that innovation helps overcome monotony and making things interesting. What are you passionate about besides baking? Besides baking, I am passionate about music. If I am not working then in all probability you would find me doing something related to music, either listening or playing. How do you like to de-stress? I de-stress by spending time with my family, listening to some good classic rock or probably by going on a drive. What are your dreams? My wish is to be a small part of the wedding celebrations of newly married couples. I want to make this experience special for them through my custom made wedding cakes. I hope to start a business venture of my own, built on the same lines. Lastly, what is your mantra for success? It is never too late to pursue what you love.

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Bakery Review (Dec - Jan 14) Business Magazine for Bakery & Confectionery Professionals  

(Please get Registered for FREE on issuu.com) We have gone beyond the apparently perceived style and glamour of a Pastry Chef’s profession....

Bakery Review (Dec - Jan 14) Business Magazine for Bakery & Confectionery Professionals  

(Please get Registered for FREE on issuu.com) We have gone beyond the apparently perceived style and glamour of a Pastry Chef’s profession....

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