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12 BAFTA NOMINATIONS CONGRATULATIONS & GOOD LUCK TO ALL OUR NOMINEES 12 YEARS A SLAVE: Best Film | Director - Steve McQueen | Adapted Screenplay - John Ridley Leading Actor - Chiwetel Ejiofor | Supporting Actress - Lupita Nyong’o | Supporting Actor -

Michael Fassbender | Original Music - Hans Zimmer | Cinematography - Sean Bobbitt Editing - Joe Walker | Production Design - Adam Stockhausen & Alice Baker FOR THOSE IN PERIL: Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer -

Paul Wright (Director/Writer) & Polly Stokes (Producer) THE SELFISH GIANT: Outstanding British Film - Clio Barnard & Tracy O’Riordan

FROM THE TEAM AT FILM4

CONTENTS

62

Peppered with sharp wit, emotions run high in this provocative adaptation of a scandalous true story about an aged mother looking for her adopted son. Words by Catherine Shoard

WELCO M E HRH The Duke Of Cambridge, KG, President of the Academy

SPECIA L AWA RDS

7

John Willis, Chairman of the Academy

68

9

Olaf Swantee, CEO EE

6

13

The nominations in full

39

Juries and Chapters

80

12 Years A Slave

46

97

Films take us on extraordinary journeys. They immerse us in another world. Our photographic essay explores BAFTA-winning and nominated fi lm talent whose work excels at connecting with an audience on an emotional level. By Dr Andy Gotts MBE MA

American Hustle An irresistible, often uproarious black comedy, based on the true story of the FBI’s attempt to entrap corrupt politicians. Words by Matthew Leyland

52

90

In Memoriam

115

Officers of the Academy

116

Partners of the Academy

119

Film Awards Partners

121

Film Awards Gift Providers

Captain Phillips Almost unbearably taut, this hijack thriller becomes increasingly claustrophobic as the tension is relentlessly cranked up. Words by Helen O’Hara

56

Cinemmersive: A Photographic Essay

Gravity An atmospheric and spectacular modern take on the disaster fi lm, boasting groundbreaking visual effects. Words by Jonathan Crocker

123 Film Awards Meal: Behind the Menu 127 Acknowledgements 128 End Credits

5

An unfl inching and intense exploration of slavery, set to the backdrop of steamy 19th century Louisiana. Words by Nev Pierce

Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema Artist, visionary, provocateur – all have been used to describe this year’s Special Award recipient, fi lmmaker Peter Greenaway. Words by Rich Matthews

BEST FILM NOMINEES 42

The Fellowship She’s played everything from East End trophy wife to sovereign of an empire – Dame Helen Mirren is the recipient of the Academy’s highest accolade. Words by Quentin Falk

NOM INATIONS

C O N T E N T S

Philomena

6 HRH The Duke Of Cambridge, KG President of the Academy

WELCOME

Have an excellent evening.

John Willis Chairman of the Academy

7

W E L C O M E

— BAFTA Chairman’s Message

he EE British Academy Film Awards are a celebration of the very best in international fi lm in the past year, as delivered by the world’s greatest practitioners, and what a remarkable year it has been. BAFTA’s Film Awards are, of course, a particularly British celebration of excellence: we’ve added an extra nomination to the Outstanding British Film category, recognising just how many incredible fi lms worthy of the honour are being created with significant UK involvement. This adds to our other exclusively British awards which include Outstanding Debut By A British Writer, Director Or Producer and Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema. It is also rewarding to see so much British talent at the heart of the nominated fi lms made outside of the UK. However, BAFTA is part of an international fi lm culture and tonight’s ceremony is a celebration of the most remarkably talented individuals working in front of and behind the camera, wherever they hail from. Congratulations to all the nominees this evening. Tonight is a retrospective of sorts, but tomorrow we look to the future: our charitable work is built on taking your outstanding achievements and inspiring the next generation of talent. BAFTA’s charitable work is about expanding the horizons of young people, ensuring that the most talented aren’t dissuaded from considering a career in fi lm, television or games, whatever their background. Our year-round programme of learning events and initiatives – more than 250 a year – are open to the public and reflected on our BAFTA Guru website, where BAFTA nominees and other expert practitioners share their knowledge through Q&As, masterclasses, lectures, career tips and advice. There are few better ways to impart knowledge and wisdom than through direct interaction and personal mentoring, in person or online – it can help them take a career-defi ning step into the industry. Many of you can name the person that opened the door for you, who helped guide you into your craft and the world you’re very much part of today. So in 2014, we’re campaigning to extend young people’s networks by increasing our pool of mentors, and people offering work placements at their companies. Please support Give Something Back, our new campaign supporting young creative people, by visiting bafta.org to fi nd out ways in which you can help. And thank you to those who already have. Finally, congratulations to the leading lady of her generation, Dame Helen Mirren, who receives the Fellowship this evening, and to Peter Greenaway, the innovative fi lmmaker who is justly rewarded with the Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema award.

WELCOME

It’s going to be a wonderful evening, so let’s settle in, enjoy and celebrate the very best of creativity in fi lm.

Olaf Swantee CEO, EE

9

W E L C O M E

— Sponsor’s Message

s CEO of EE, it is my pleasure to once again be partnering with BAFTA – a relationship that is now in its 16th year. The EE British Academy Film Awards is the most important night in the UK fi lm industry calendar, and the international and domestic talent walking the red carpet tonight is testimony to its continued importance, both here and across the globe. Like BAFTA, EE has grown, evolved and innovated over the years. For us, that has never been more exciting than over the past 18 months, when we pioneered superfast 4G technology and created a new digital backbone for the UK. Our 4G service has expanded rapidly across the country, and the UK is now a global leader in data speeds, with the EE network capable of delivering up to 300mbps – that’s three times faster than the fastest fi xed-line broadband speeds. And it’s those kinds of speeds that are changing industries and opening up more opportunities for connectivity and creativity than ever before. The fi lm industry is a great example. Behind the scenes, we are helping teams speed up production times, enabling the faster coding of fi lms, and giving editors the power to work in isolated locations anywhere in the world. Audiences are also benefiting from our superfast 4GEE network with customers accessing fi lms anywhere, anytime, whether they are at home, or out and about. These truly are exciting times for the fi lm industry and its fans. As tonight’s lead sponsor, we are proud to present our own award – the EE Rising Star Award, which identifies and celebrates the best in emerging talent. Established nine years ago, in honour of casting director Mary Selway, the award recognises a young actor or actress who has demonstrated exceptional talent and ambition, and has begun to capture the imagination of the British public. It remains the only one of tonight’s awards to be voted for by the British public, and its roll call of previous winners includes Tom Hardy, Kristen Stewart, Noel Clarke, James McAvoy and Adam Deacon, with Juno Temple winning the award in 2013. I would like to take this opportunity to thank our EE Rising Star jury for their expertise, time and commitment in selecting the shortlist of five Rising Stars: Pippa Harris (jury chair), Gemma Arterton, Kirk Jones, Peter Czernin, Priya Elan, Charles Gant, Chris Hewitt, Larushka Ivan-Zadeh, Mark Kermode, Kate Lee, Karen Lindsay-Stewart and Martin Robinson.

Warner Bros. Pictures Congratulates Our Nominees At The EE British Academy Film Awards In 2014

Best Film

ALFONSO CUARÓN DAVID HEYMAN Director

ALFONSO CUARÓN Original Screenplay

ALFONSO CUARÓN JONÁS CUARÓN Leading Actress

SANDRA BULLOCK Original Music

STEVEN PRICE

Original Screenplay

WOODY ALLEN

Make-Up & Hair

Cinematography

Make-Up & Hair

GLENN FREEMANTLE SKIP LIEVSAY CHRISTOPHER BENSTEAD NIV ADIRI CHRIS MUNRO

Outstanding British Film

ALFONSO CUARÓN DAVID HEYMAN JONÁS CUARÓN Editing

Special Visual Effects

ALFONSO CUARÓN MARK SANGER Production Design

TIM WEBBER CHRIS LAWRENCE DAVID SHIRK NEIL CORBOULD NIKKI PENNY

Leading Actress

Supporting Actress

ANDY NICHOLSON ROSIE GOODWIN JOANNE WOOLLARD

CATE BLANCHETT

PETER SWORDS KING RICHARD TAYLOR • RICK FINDLATER

MAURIZIO SILVI KERRY WARN

Sound

EMMANUEL LUBEZKI

SALLY HAWKINS

Special Visual Effects

JOE LETTERI • ERIC SAINDON DAVID CLAYTON • ERIC REYNOLDS

Costume Design

CATHERINE MARTIN

Special Visual Effects

Production Design

CATHERINE MARTIN BEVERLEY DUNN

HAL HICKEL • JOHN KNOLL • LINDY DE QUATTRO • NIGEL SUMNER

© 2014 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved.

L’Instant Champagne, with Vitalie Taittinger.

Vitalie Taittinger is an active member of the family Champagne House.

Champagne for the Independently Minded

Official Champagne to BAFTA Champagne Taittinger is widely stocked in national retailers such as Majestic Wine Warehouse, Asda, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Waitrose, Harrods, Fortnum & Mason, www.yourfavouritewines.com, as well as many independent wine merchants.

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Film Finances congratulates all of this year’s BAFTA Nominees and is proud to have been the Completion Guarantor of Good Vibrations, Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom, Philomena and Rush.

Film Finances, the world leader in the provision of Completion Guarantees for the Film and Television Industry since 1950.

T H E

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N O M I N A T I O N S

EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS IN 2014

THE NOMINATIONS

THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY UK THANKS THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS NOMINEES

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM John Lee Hancock, Alison Owen, Ian Collie, Philip Steuer, Kelly Marcel, Sue Smith

ANIMATED FILM Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee

LEADING ACTRESS Emma Thompson OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER Kelly Marcel ORIGINAL MUSIC Thomas Newman COSTUME DESIGN Daniel Orlandi

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Bryan Grill, Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Dan Sudick

© Disney 2014

ANIMATED FILM Dan Scanlon

ADAPTED SCREEN PL AY

DESPICABLE ME 2 Chris Renaud, Pierre Coffin

12 YEARS A SLAVE John Ridley

BEHIND THE CANDELABRA Richard LaGravenese

T H E

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Billy Ray

FROZEN Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee

PHILOMENA Steve Coogan, Jeff Pope

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET Terence Winter

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY Dan Scanlon

15

N O M I N A T I O N S

ANIM ATED FILM

Proud airline partner

BEST FILM

BRITISH SHORT ANIM ATION

T H E

A MERICAN HUSTLE Charles Roven, Richard Suckle, Megan Ellison, Jonathan Gordon

EVERYTHING I CAN SEE FROM HERE Bj酶rn-Erik Aschim, Friederike Nicolaus, Sam Taylor

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca

I A M TOM MOODY Ainslie Henderson

GRAVITY Alfonso Cuar贸n, David Heyman

PHILOMENA Gabrielle Tana, Steve Coogan, Tracey Seaward

SLEEPING WITH THE FISHES James Walker, Sarah Woolner, Yousif Al-Khalifa

17

N O M I N A T I O N S

12 YEARS A SLAVE Anthony Katagas, Brad Pitt, Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Steve McQueen

ORBIT EVER AFTER

KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES

SEA VIEW

FOR THOSE IN PERIL

SHELL

FROM BRITISH SHORT FILM TO BEST FILM

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN

THE GREAT BEAUTY

(and everything in between)

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE NOMINEES SUPPORTED BY THE BFI FILM FUND

WADJDA

BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOUR

THE SELFISH GIANT

PHILOMENA

BRITISH SHORT FILM

CI N E M ATO G R A PHY

ISLAND QUEEN Ben Mallaby, Nat Luurtsema, Emma Hughes

12 YEARS A SLAVE Sean Bobbitt KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES Megan Rubens, Michael Pearce, Selina Lim

N O M I N A T I O N S

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Barry Ackroyd

T H E

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ORBIT EVER AFTER Chee-Lan Chan, Jamie Stone, Len Rowles

GRAVITY Emmanuel Lubezki ROOM 8 James W. Griffiths, Sophie Venner

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS Bruno Delbonnel SEA VIEW Anna Duffield, Jane Linfoot

NEBRASKA Phedon Papamichael

COSTUME DESIGN

A MERICAN HUSTLE Michael Wilkinson

DIRECTO R

12 YEARS A SLAVE Steve McQueen

A MERICAN HUSTLE David O. Russell

T H E

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N O M I N A T I O N S

BEHIND THE CANDELABRA Ellen Mirojnick

THE GREAT GATSBY Catherine Martin

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Paul Greengrass

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN Michael O’Connor

SAVING MR. BANKS Daniel Orlandi

GRAVITY Alfonso Cuarón

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET Martin Scorsese

New Zealand’s Most Awarded Winery OFFICIAL WINE SUPPLIER T O B A F TA

Villa Maria wines are widely available in the UK from Booths, Majestic, Morrisons, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, www.nzhouseofwine.co.uk and many independent retailers. For further information please visit www.villamariaestate.co.uk

V I L L A M A R I A E S TAT E . C O . U K

D O CU M EN TA RY

THE ACT OF KILLING Joshua Oppenheimer

EDITING

12 YEARS A SLAVE Joe Walker

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Christopher Rouse

T H E

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N O M I N A T I O N S

THE ARMSTRONG LIE Alex Gibney

BLACKFISH Gabriela Cowperthwaite

GRAVITY Alfonso Cuarón, Mark Sanger

RUSH Dan Hanley, Mike Hill

TIM’S VERMEER Teller, Penn Jillette, Farley Ziegler

WE STEAL SECRETS: THE STORY OF WIKILEAKS Alex Gibney

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET Thelma Schoonmaker

Universal Pictures

would like to thank the British Academy of Film and Television Arts and proudly congratulate its nominees Animated Film

Director Leading Actor Adapted Screenplay Editing

Documentary

Sound

universalpicturesuk

@universaluk

www.universalpictures.co.uk

universalpicturesuk

FI L M N OT I N TH E ENGLISH LANGUAGE

LEADING ACTO R

THE ACT OF KILLING Joshua Oppenheimer, Signe Byrge Sørensen

BRUCE DERN Nebraska BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOUR Abdellatif Kechiche, Brahim Chioua, Vincent Maraval

N O M I N A T I O N S

CHIWETEL EJIOFOR 12 Years A Slave

T H E

25

THE GREAT BEAUTY Paolo Sorrentino, Nicola Giuliano, Francesca Cima

CHRISTIAN BALE American Hustle METRO MANILA Sean Ellis, Mathilde Charpentier

LEONARDO DICAPRIO The Wolf Of Wall Street WADJDA Haifaa Al-Mansour, Gerhard Meixner, Roman Paul

TOM HANKS Captain Phillips

THANKS THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR NOMINEES

BEST FILM GABRIELLE TANA, STEVE COOGAN, TRACEY SEAWARD OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM STEPHEN FREARS, GABRIELLE TANA, STEVE COOGAN, TRACEY SEAWARD, JEFF POPE ADAPTED SCREENPLAY STEVE COOGAN, JEFF POPE LEADING ACTRESS JUDI DENCH

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM JOHN LEE HANCOCK, ALISON OWEN, IAN COLLIE, PHILIP STEUER, KELLY MARCEL, SUE SMITH OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER KELLY MARCEL (WRITER) LEADING ACTRESS EMMA THOMPSON ORIGINAL MUSIC THOMAS NEWMAN COSTUME DESIGN DANIEL ORLANDI

COSTUME DESIGN MICHAEL O’CONNOR

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER COLIN CARBERRY, GLENN PATTERSON (WRITERS) bbc.co.uk/bbcfilms

LEADING ACTRESS

MAKE UP & HAIR

A MERICAN HUSTLE Evelyne Noraz, Lori McCoy-Bell, Kathrine Gordon

A MY ADA MS American Hustle BEHIND THE CANDELABRA Kate Biscoe, Marie Larkin

THE BUTLER Debra Denson, Candace Neal, Robert Stevenson, Matthew Mungle

27

T H E

N O M I N A T I O N S

CATE BLANCHETT Blue Jasmine

EMMA THOMPSON Saving Mr. Banks THE GREAT GATSBY Maurizio Silvi, Kerry Warn

JUDI DENCH Philomena

SANDRA BULLOCK Gravity

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG Peter Swords King, Richard Taylor, Rick Findlater

T h e s e n s e o f A R R iVA L T h e U n R iVA L L e D s e R V iC e T h e s AV oy s U iT e w e L C o m e The luxury of a stay at The Savoy now begins before you even check in. Book a One Bedroom Suite or above at The Savoy and receive: – Round-trip transfers from all London airports and railway stations – Courtesy car drop off within a 3 mile radius (subject to availability) – Beverages from the in-room private bar – Pressing of one garment per person – Dedicated 24 hour butler service – High-speed wi-fi – Welcome amenity Rates from £1,026 inc VAT. To make a reservation, please telephone +44 (0)20 7836 4343 or email savoy@fairmont.com fairmont.com/savoy

Follow us:

ORIGINAL MUSIC

12 YEARS A SLAVE Hans Zimmer

ORIGINAL SCREEN PL AY

A MERICAN HUSTLE Eric Warren Singer, David O. Russell

BLUE JASMINE Woody Allen

T H E

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N O M I N A T I O N S

THE BOOK THIEF John Williams

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Henry Jackman

GRAVITY Alfonso Cuar贸n, Jon谩s Cuar贸n

GRAVITY Steven Price

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

SAVING MR. BANKS Thomas Newman

NEBRASKA Bob Nelson

We are proud to support the EE British Academy Film Awards and congratulate the achievements of RUSH and all tonight’s nominees

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM SUPPORTING ACTOR Daniel Brühl

EDITING Dan Hanley, Mike Hill

SOUND Danny Hambrook, Martin Steyer, Stefan Korte, Markus Stemler, Frank Kruse

O U TSTA N D I N G B RITISH FI L M

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

GRAVITY Alfonso Cuarón, David Heyman, Jonás Cuarón

COLIN CARBERRY (WRITER), GLENN PATTERSON (WRITER) Good Vibrations

KELLY MARCEL (WRITER) Saving Mr. Banks

PHILOMENA Stephen Frears, Gabrielle Tana, Steve Coogan, Tracey Seaward, Jeff Pope

T H E

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N O M I N A T I O N S

MANDELA: LONG WALK TO FREEDOM Justin Chadwick, Anant Singh, David M. Thompson, William Nicholson

RUSH Ron Howard, Andrew Eaton, Peter Morgan

SAVING MR. BANKS John Lee Hancock, Alison Owen, Ian Collie, Philip Steuer, Kelly Marcel, Sue Smith

KIERAN EVANS (DIRECTOR/WRITER) Kelly + Victor

PAUL WRIGHT (DIRECTOR/WRITER), POLLY STOKES (PRODUCER) For Those In Peril

THE SELFISH GIANT Clio Barnard, Tracy O’Riordan

SCOTT GRAHAM (DIRECTOR/WRITER) Shell

Congratulations to all nominees Pinewood Pictures: financing and distributing Global Independent Film and Television www.pinewoodgroup.com/filmfinance

Belle © 2014 David Appleby

Our Robot Overlords © 2014 Mediator 452 Ltd

Dom Hemingway © 2014 Nick Wall

PINEWOOD STUDIOS GROUP 6 countries, over 1 million sq ft of stage and studio space CANADA | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC | GERMANY | MALAYSIA | UK | USA www.pinewoodgroup.com PW EE BAFTA Film Awards 2014 R4.indd 1

20/01/2014 11:48

Casting Extras for BAFTA nominees and winners in Film & Television for 15 years... from Stephen frearS director of the

judI

dENCh

queen

STEVE

COOGAN

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Philomena, Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit, Cuban Fury, The Duchess, About Time, Sherlock, Da Vinci’s Demons, Breathless and Atlantis.

london: 020 7269 7910 CArdiFF: 02920 444 082 mAddogCAsTing.Com Inspired by the true story of a search for a lost son

IN CINEMAS NOVEMBER 1 ST

PRODUCTION DESIGN

12 YEARS A SLAVE Adam Stockhausen, Alice Baker

SOUND ALL IS LOST Richard Hymns, Steve Boeddeker, Brandon Proctor, Micah Bloomberg, Gillian Arthur

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Chris Burdon, Mark Taylor, Mike Prestwood Smith, Chris Munro, Oliver Tarney

T H E

GRAVITY Glenn Freemantle, Skip Lievsay, Christopher Benstead, Niv Adiri, Chris Munro

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N O M I N A T I O N S

A MERICAN HUSTLE Judy Becker, Heather Loeffler

BEHIND THE CANDELABRA Howard Cummings, Barbara Munch-Cameron INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS Peter F. Kurland, Skip Lievsay, Greg Orloff, Paul Urmson GRAVITY Andy Nicholson, Rosie Goodwin, Joanne Woollard RUSH Danny Hambrook, Martin Steyer, Stefan Korte, Markus Stemler, Frank Kruse

THE GREAT GATSBY Catherine Martin, Beverley Dunn

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS NOMINEES THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

JOE LETTERI

ERIC SAINDON

DAVID CLAYTON

ERIC REYNOLDS

IRON MAN 3 GUY WILLIAMS

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug © 2013 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Inc., Iron Man 3 ©2013 Marvel Studios., © Weta Digital 2014. All rights reserved.

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

SUPPORTING ACTO R

GRAVITY Tim Webber, Chris Lawrence, David Shirk, Neil Corbould, Nikki Penny

BARKHAD ABDI Captain Phillips THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, Eric Reynolds

N O M I N A T I O N S

BRADLEY COOPER American Hustle

T H E

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IRON MAN 3 Bryan Grill, Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Dan Sudick

DANIEL BRÜHL Rush PACIFIC RIM Hal Hickel, John Knoll, Lindy DeQuattro, Nigel Sumner

MATT DA MON Behind The Candelabra STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Ben Grossmann, Burt Dalton

MICHAEL FASSBENDER 12 Years A Slave

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

JENNIFER LAWRENCE American Hustle

T H E EE R I S I N G STA R AWA R D VOTED FOR BY THE PUBLIC

DANE DEHA AN

GEORGE MACKAY

T H E

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N O M I N A T I O N S

JULIA ROBERTS August: Osage County

LUPITA NYONG’O

LUPITA NYONG’O 12 Years A Slave

OPRAH WINFREY The Butler

SALLY HAWKINS Blue Jasmine

WILL POULTER

LÉA SEYDOUX

Nominations correct at the time of press.

JURIES AND CHAPTERS JURIES British Short Animation

A N D J U R I E S

British Short Film — Lisa Bryer (chair) Martina Amati Andrew Curtis Leo Davis Christopher Figg Amelia Granger Nina Kellgren Charlotte Macleod Robert Miller Diana Phillips Carter Pilcher Andy Price

Outstanding British Film — Nik Powell (chair) Nicolas Chaudeurge Noel Clarke Andy Curtis Andrea Gibb Ben Gibson Pippa Harris Mark Herbert Justin Johnson Kate Muir Jason Solomons Julia Stannard Eve Stewart Kenith Trodd Penny Wolf

Craft Chapters — Cinematography Costume Design Directing Editing Make Up & Hair Music Production Design Screenplay Sound Special Visual Effects

Opt-in Chapters

Outstanding Debut By A British Writer, Director Or Producer

— Animation British Short Animation and British Short Film Documentary Film Not In The English Language Outstanding British Film

— Stephen Woolley (chair) Peter Bradshaw Moira Buffi ni Kate Lee Hannah McGill Michael Parker Tanya Seghatchian Peter Straughan James Watkins

Craft chapters are made up of Academy members with specialist experience in the relative field; opt-in chapters are open to all members who are willing to commit to watching the eligible fi lms. For full details on the voting process, please visit: www.bafta.org/film/awards

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C H A P T E R S

— Justin Johnson (chair) Sarah Cox David Freedman Oli Hyatt Julian Jarrold Martin Pope Dave Prosser Sarah Smith Cara Speller John Walsh

CHAPTERS

Official Beer Partner

abc would like to congratulate all of tonight’s BAFTA nominees and winners

www.ingeniousmedia.co.uk

F I L M

N O M I N E E

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B E S T

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12 YEARS A SLAVE Words by

Nev Pierce Nev Pierce is editor-at-large for Empire

“Now 33 per cent of black males in jail, that’s 55 per cent of black students will fail, they say 85 per cent black folks forgot we were slaves – what’s up inside this box?” ‘Escapism’, Public Enemy To say 12 Years A Slave is an education and an entertainment feels contradictory and damning, but this is intended as nothing other than high praise: this is a film of rare and exquisite balance. It informs through immersion and transports with its performances and beauty – both loving and pitiless. There are shockingly few fi lms related to slavery and those that ping on awards’ radars tend to be grand narratives with white protagonists, such as Amistad (1997) or the BAFTA-nominated Lincoln (2012) – fi ne stories, but told from the

OTH ER N O M I N ATED CATEGORIES Adapted Screenplay; Cinematography; Director; Editing; Leading Actor; Original Music; Production Design; Supporting Actor; Supporting Actress

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BEST FILM NOMINEES Anthony Katagas, Brad Pitt, Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Steve McQueen

outside. Instead, Steve McQueen puts us inside the experience. The director had been looking for a way to explore 19th century slavery when his wife gave him the memoir of Solomon Northup, a free citizen of 1840s’ New York who was abducted and sold into slavery in the South. McQueen and screenwriter John Ridley use this remarkable man as our conduit into a horror not often enough imagined. We stand beside him as he suffers, from the frank evil of Paul Giamatti’s slave trader, to the tortured menace of Michael Fassbender’s plantation owner. Though perhaps the most troubling character is Benedict Cumberbatch’s more kindly slaver Ford, who smothers conscience with fear, prompting the question: would we do the same? One criticism has been that Northup is too passive a protagonist, which seems a slightly peculiar observation to make of a true story about a man stuck in slavery. The fi lm shares something of the formalist approach of McQueen’s previous fi lms Hunger (2008), which won the Outstanding Debut BAFTA in 2009, and double BAFTAnominee Shame (2011) – both about being trapped, either physically or mentally – and perhaps a more conservative style or ostentatiously heroic lead might have made for a more accessible picture, but it wouldn’t be as honest. We’re used to a certain degree of self-determination in our characters – and our lives – which the grind of this reality does not allow. (It is a reality not simply of the past, either: charities such as Love146 are working to highlight and end the contemporary problem. The United Nations estimates there are 20.9 million people enslaved today.) Still, Northup does consider escaping and fights to be free, while Chiwetel Ejiofor’s miraculous performance ensures that, even in his silent struggles, the soul of the character speaks. Perhaps a sense of Solomon’s passivity is exaggerated because the fi lm arrives a year after the shot-for-the-hip, Western wish-fulfi lment fantasy of Django Unchained (2012). It won’t be long, if it hasn’t happened already, before some enterprising cinema plays them in a double bill. But the running order can now be reversed, as it should be. Watch McQueen’s picture first, because before you can play with the truth, people need to know the truth. It can set them free.

F I L M

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N O M I N E E

Matthew Leyland is reviews editor for Total Film

F I L M

Words by

Matthew Leyland

B E S T

AMERICAN HUSTLE

N O M I N E E F I L M B E S T

is a force of nature, crowned by a blonde tornado of hair. Just don’t let her near a microwave! There’s also Jeremy Renner, whose Carmine is as cuddly a corrupt mayor as you will ever meet. Our heroes fl irt, fight, form fragile alliances… front and centre throughout, the tangled to-andfro of human relationships brings an organic vibe to an often mechanical genre. Not only giving the con caper a fresh twist, Russell also spring cleans the ’70s – the decade fashion forgot, but fi lms never do. The vibrant stylings feel more lived-in than kitsch, while familiar chart hits get their groove back via some impeccable song-to-scene matchmaking: the hot throb

BEST FILM NOMINEES Charles Roven, Richard Suckle, Megan Ellison, Jonathan Gordon

OTH ER N O M I N ATED CATEGORIES Costume Design; Director; Leading Actor; Leading Actress; Make Up & Hair; Original Screenplay; Production Design; Supporting Actor; Supporting Actress

of ‘I Feel Love’ set to Sydney/Richie’s dirty discodancing, or the mood-swinging ‘Live And Let Die’, transformed into a showstopping anthem for the mood-swinging Rosalyn. Despite a glancing reference to Watergate/ Vietnam, American Hustle doesn’t have a political axe to grind. It’s a group portrait of dishonest people from a sincerely talented fi lmmaker capable of turning a revolving laundry rack into a romantic idyll. And one whose screwball brilliance kicks in as soon as the needle drops: “Some of this actually happened,” winks the opening caption (a nod to the story’s loose roots in the real-life Abscam operation). Only the facts have been changed, for our supreme entertainment.

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airpieces trump set pieces in American Hustle. That’s not a criticism: David O. Russell’s fi lm flaunts an attention to character detail rare among con capers. Usually, plot is the main motor, tautly snaking its way through multiple switchbacks en route to the grand fi nal rug-pull. There’s one of those here, but we’re drawn in by a different kind of rug: the one seasoned trickster Irving (Christian Bale) carefully pastes to his head in the opening scene. As well as a mesmerising display in itself, it’s an intro that neatly fl ags up the fi lm’s themes of (false) appearances, (shifting) identities and making oneself (comb-)over. As slippery as the characters are, we’re able to latch on to them. Firstly, because Russell and co-writer Eric Singer unmask vulnerabilities, explore fl aws and extend empathy. “More than anything, I want you to fall in love with them,” says the director of his hustlers. Secondly, because of a starry cast setting their collective charisma to full beam. Beer-bellied but light on his feet, Bale hasn’t flexed his comic chops so enjoyably since American Psycho (2000) – the difference being that Irving is a rogue we can root for: a basically decent desperado whose small-time swindling lands him at the centre of a big-time FBI-sponsored scam involving fake sheiks and dodgy politicians. His partner in crime is exstripper Sydney: Amy Adams dressed to kill (and thrill, given the – tactical – amount of midriff on show) in a performance that turns on a dime from smooth criminality to raw emotion. While Bale and Adams do the heavy grifting, Russell re-enlists his Silver Linings Playbook (2012) players Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence (both BAFTA-nominated for their performances in that fi lm, which also won Russell the Adapted Screenplay prize) in roles where they again essay controlled explosiveness. As tightly wound as his (magnificent) perm, Cooper is Richie, the ambitious FBI agent orchestrating the sheik-down; just because he’s on the right side of the law doesn’t make him any less given to bad, mad decisions. And Lawrence – as Irving’s wild wife Rosalyn –

THE BRITISH FILM COMMISSION CONGRATULATES ALL OF TONIGHT’S NOMINEES We are especially proud of the talent recognised for British Film Commission-assisted features produced in the UK, including Gravity, Captain Phillips and Rush which made excellent use of UK studios, talent and cutting-edge VFX facilities. The British Film Commission works to attract filming to the UK. Contact us for: • Guidance on the UK’s generous film and television tax reliefs • Free bespoke production support • Expertise throughout the UK via a network of industry partners • Highly knowledgeable and experienced teams based in the UK and US • Assistance with sourcing the UK’s crew, talent, facilities, studios and locations The British Film Commission thanks its gold founding sponsors:

The British Film Commission is supported by

www.britishfilmcommission.org.uk @FilmInUK_BFC

MICHAEL G WILSON & BARBARA BROCCOLI C O N G R AT U L AT E A L L O F TO N I G H T ’ S N O M I N E E S AND WINNERS

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he true story of Captain Phillips made newspapers around the world in April 2009, which means that most viewers will have an inkling how this story ends. But the great achievement of Paul Greengrass’ fi lm is to find the humanity behind the headlines, and to put the hijacking of the cargo ship Maersk Alabama in a wider context – all while ratcheting up the tension unbearably. The fi lm builds a clash between two captains and, through them, two cultures. There’s an inevitability to it: early scenes cut between the two preparing their respective voyages, one in comfort and one under pressure to deliver. Tom Hanks’ Captain Phillips is the professional, detail-oriented American charged with seeing a huge container ship safely to its destination. Newcomer Barkhad

Abdi, as Muse, is the scrappy Somali, fighting for opportunity in a system ruled by warlords and determined to make a big score by hijacking a Western ship. Both men are clever and resourceful – Phillips sees off the pirates’ first attempt to board his ship, but Muse too is prepared, and exploits a gap in their defences to devastating effect. One sails an enormous, high-tech vessel laden with consumer goods. The other uses a rusty launch that looks barely seaworthy to chase after his enormous prey, like ants hunting elephants. Director Greengrass shows his cinéma verité roots (Bloody Sunday [2002]) as clearly as his action movie credentials (The Bourne Supremacy [2004], United 93 [2006]), taking a forensic approach to the hijacking and fi nding tension in the detail of Captain Phillips’ ordeal. As Phillips is taken

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Helen O’Hara writes for Empire and Empire Online

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roll. But the fi lm also shows boundless empathy – although never sympathy – for Abdi’s Muse, too, a figure who is as terrifying as he is terrified. It’s in his refusal to demonise the aggressors here that Greengrass’ fi lm finds its power. Paul Greengrass has claimed that the fi lm is not political, and that’s strictly true. But in highlighting certain realities of the modern world – the long chain of violence that ends with the dirt-poor pirates; the contrast between our luxury goods and the countries that supply them – it’s an intensely powerful fi lm. The sight of three enormous US warships bearing down on a tiny lifeboat holding four skinny desperados speaks volumes about the relative power of each here. But even as these behemoths loom outside, Phillips still has a gun to his head, and so power remains a complex thing.

BEST FILM NOMINEES

OTH ER N O M I N ATED CATEGORIES

Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca

Adapted Screenplay; Cinematography; Director; Editing; Leading Actor; Original Music; Sound; Supporting Actor

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hostage and endures tense days in a cramped boat with the increasingly desperate (and still heavily armed) young men, the viewer is right beside him. When one pirate breaks a window on the tiny craft, desperate for air after days at sea, you can feel the salt breeze in the cinema. As Phillips, Tom Hanks has rarely been better. He is perhaps the most straightforwardly heroic lead of any of this year’s nominated fi lms, innovating and improvising at the point of a gun barrel to spare his crew, help the US Navy as they attempt to rescue him and, in extremis, fashion a last missive to his wife and family. But he is not simply an action man or some sort of warrior. The final scene, in which a rescued Phillips breaks down and sobs with relief following his rescue, is a portrayal of naked trauma that lingers long after the credits

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GRAVITY Words by

Jonathan Crocker

pace is just 80 miles away from every one of us. Closer than most people are to their own national capitals. But it feels much further than it should. NASA’s moon landings were meant to be the dawn of an epic age of space travel, lunar bases and missions to Mars. It didn’t happen. And Earth’s dreams of galaxies far, far away have faded over the past four decades. In his final public interview, Neil Armstrong lamented what humanity really lost: the belief that anything is possible. Armstrong, though, died a year too soon to see Gravity’s bravura 13-minute opening shot, a 375-mile high launch pad from which director Alfonso Cuarón’s spectacular odyssey makes your senses fl oat with new wonder at both space and cinema. At fi rst, you’re marvelling at Cuarón and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki’s gamechanging digital accomplishments. Soon, you just… let go. The 3D technology disappears behind an enveloping sensorial experience that sends us into the void like no other fi lm in history. Never mind whether or not you can ‘hike’ across space with a fi re extinguisher. Awe trumps accuracy and quite rightly. It’s how Gravity makes you feel that makes it real. When a mid-orbit disaster leaves two spacewalking astronauts – rookie engineer

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Jonathan Crocker is head of content and UX at Human After All

Sandra Bullock and star cowboy George Clooney – spinning helplessly away into the big nothing, Cuarón’s camera hauls us in close. We travel through Bullock’s visor. Her face petrifies with full-screen fear. Her gulping breaths fi ll our ears. Then, audaciously, we turn to gawp through her eyes at Gravity’s impossibly poignant backdrop: the endless darkness of space and the gleaming marble of Mother Earth. Micro-plotting their survival saga on the most epic canvas in existence, co-writers Cuarón and his son, Jonás, leave us hanging right here for the rest of the fi lm – oscillating between contemplation and desperation, astonishment and terror, serenity and anxiety.

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BEST FILM NOMINEES Alfonso Cuarón, David Heyman

OTH ER N O M I N ATED CATEGORIES Cinematography; Director; Editing; Leading Actress; Original Music; Original Screenplay; Outstanding British Film; Production Design; Sound; Special Visual Effects

Not least thanks to recurring maelstroms of lethal space debris from an exploded satellite that decimate everything in their path, death arrives in silence. And in these moments, you forget to breathe. Cosmic metaphors float easily in this kind of space: a simple story about the human refusal to ever let go of life, even against inevitable, eternal nothingness. Indeed, Bullock’s heavenly body curling into a zero-G foetal position – a simultaneous feat of effortlessly evocative simplicity and gurn-inducing technical complexity – is a spectacle to sit next to Méliès’ rocket in the moon’s eye and Kubrick’s space stations waltzing to Strauss.

Best of British Pact congratulates the UK independent production companies behind many of this year’s BAFTA nominations.

Baby Cow Films and Magnolia Mae Films for Philomena Adapted Screenplay, Best Film, Outstanding British Film, Leading Actress Magnolia Mae Films for The Invisible Woman Costume Design Origin Pictures for Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom Outstanding British Film Revolution Films for Rush Editing, Outstanding British Film, Sound, Supporting Actor Revolution Films for Good Vibrations Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer Ruby Film and Television for Saving Mr Banks Costume Design, Leading Actress, Original Music, Outstanding British Film, Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer Warp Films for For Those in Peril Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Producer or Director

Pact is the Producers Alliance for Cinema and Television

congratulates our clients on their EE British Academy Film Awards in 2014 nominations Best Film 12 YEARS A SLAVE

Adapted Screenplay

JOHN RIDLEY

DEDE GARDNER ANTHONY KATAGAS JEREMY KLEINER STEVE MCQUEEN* BRAD PITT

12 YEARS A SLAVE

RICHARD LAGRAVENESE

BEHIND THE CANDELABRA

BILLY RAY

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

STEVE COOGAN

DANA BRUNETTI MICHAEL DE LUCA

PHILOMENA

TERENCE WINTER

PHILOMENA

STEVE COOGAN**

WOLF OF WALL STREET

Outstanding British Film MANDELA: LONG WALK TO FREEDOM

BRUCE DERN

Leading Actor NEBRASKA

WILLIAM NICHOLSON***

CHIWETEL EJIOFOR†

PHILOMENA

12 YEARS A SLAVE

STEVE COOGAN

TOM HANKS

RUSH

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

SAVING MR. BANKS

CATE BLANCHETT††

RON HOWARD PETER MORGAN**

Leading Actress BLUE JASMINE

JOHN LEE HANCOCK

SANDRA BULLOCK GRAVITY

Film Not In The English Language BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOUR

Supporting Actor

ABDELLATIF KECHICHE

BRADLEY COOPER AMERICAN HUSTLE

Animated Film FROZEN

MICHAEL FASSBENDER‡

Director

JENNIFER LAWRENCE

12 YEARS A SLAVE

JENNIFER LEE

Supporting Actress

STEVE MCQUEEN

AMERICAN HUSTLE

12 YEARS A SLAVE

JULIA ROBERTS

DAVID O. RUSSELL

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY

PAUL GREENGRASS

British Short Film ROOM 8

AMERICAN HUSTLE CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

JAMES W. GRIFFITHS

Original Screenplay

EE Rising Star Award

ERIC WARREN SINGER DAVID O. RUSSELL

DANE DEHAAN LÉA SEYDOUX‡‡

AMERICAN HUSTLE

and salutes

DAME HELEN MIRREN BAFTA Fellowship

* Shared representation with Casarotto Ramsay & Associates ** Shared representation with Independent Talent *** Shared representation with The Agency † Shared representation with Markham, Froggatt and Irwin

†† Shared representation with RGM Artists Group ‡ Shared representation with Troika Entertainment ‡‡ Shared representation with Adequat

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PHILOMENA Words by

Catherine Shoard Catherine Shoard is fi lm editor for Guardian News & Media

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teve Coogan has been in five fi lms over the last year. But only one of them – and that includes the Alan Partridge movie – can really claim to be a passion

project. It sprang from Coogan reading an article by former spin doctor Martin Sixsmith about helping a retired Irish nurse track down her son, who’d been sold for adoption by nuns 50 years previously. He bought the rights to Sixsmith’s book (before he’d even got a copy), co-wrote a script, wrangled Stephen Frears to direct, Robbie Ryan to shoot, Alexandre Desplat to score and Judi Dench to take the title role (Coogan also co-stars and produces). What fuelled his mission was, in part, moral indignation – against sexual hypocrisy, against institutional complacency and against suspect journalism. It was also that he identified a brilliant comedic conceit.

Coogan and co-writer Jeff Pope’s stroke of genius was in shifting Sixsmith’s relationship with Philomena centre stage. On the page, Philomena is sad reportage of mother and son. On screen, it’s reborn as an odd couple road trip as the Oxbridge snit and gentle pensioner rattle round Ireland and America, through red tape and over dead ends, in search of the truth. Dench was 78 at the time of the shoot, but she skips round the obstacle course of comedy and drama without breaking sweat, while Coogan moves to the backseat and donates her the best lines. Theirs is a fantastic winning friction that recalls, if anything, Alec Guinness and Katie Johnson in the twice BAFTA-winning The Ladykillers (1955).

BEST FILM NOMINEES Gabrielle Tana, Steve Coogan, Tracey Seaward

OTH ER N O M I N ATED CATEGORIES Adapted Screenplay; Leading Actress; Outstanding British Film

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The man with the plan who thinks he’s smart; the old woman forever benignly scuppering it. What complicates this dynamic further is that, technically, it’s Dench who is the deviant, not the character played by Coogan. It is the sweet geriatric who is accused of “carnal incontinence”, who still hankers after forgiveness for her shame. She is also, in another twist, an unlikely cheerleader for sexual pleasure. Her original roll in the hay (the biblical references include straw, a donkey and a dropped apple) was, she says, “like floating on air… I thought anything that feels so good must be wrong”. Sixsmith – a lapsed Catholic, like Coogan – defends her, spits at religion. But his liberal righteousness is pinpricked by Philomena herself, whose capacity for forgiveness is shown to be not blind faith but clear-eyed pragmatism. It’s confounding. And it’s this that makes the film so gripping: for something so populist, it’s very unpredictable. Philomena is a fi lm whose warm embrace by critics and audiences alike isn’t hard to fathom. It doesn’t preach or patronise. It’s bright and sharp on the ethics of storytelling – Martin has qualms about selling his subject to the glossies, as well as about the whole notion of the ‘human interest story’ – but it never gets too meta. The impulse to make Philomena may have arisen from outrage. Yet it’s resolved with a compassion that trips you up scene after scene. You can stand on a soapbox and still honour the pulpit.

W E P ROUD LY CON GRAT U LAT E OU R C LIENTS O N T HEIR E E B RI TI SH ACA D E MY FILM AWARDS NO MINAT IO NS A DA P T E D S C R E E N P L AY

Philomena

JEFF POPE BRITISH SHORT FILM

Orbit Ever After

JAMIE STONE C I N E M AT O G R A P H Y

LEADING ACTOR

CHRISTIAN BALE American Hustle

OU T S TA N DI NG DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER

Saving Mr. Banks

KELLY MARCEL LEADING ACTRESS

AMY ADAMS American Hustle

PRODUCTION DESIGN

EMMA THOMPSON

CATHERINE MARTIN

Saving Mr. Banks

The Great Gatsby

BRUNO DELBONNEL Inside Llewyn Davis

ORIGINAL MUSIC

SUPPORTING ACTOR

HANS ZIMMER

DANIEL BRÜHL

COSTUME DESIGN

12 Years A Slave

Rush

The Great Gatsby

HENRY JACKMAN

MATT DAMON

Captain Phillips

Behind the Candelabra

ORIGINAL S C R E E N P L AY

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

CATHERINE MARTIN DANIEL ORLANDI Saving Mr. Banks

DIRECTOR

MARTIN SCORSESE

Nebraska

BOB NELSON

The Wolf of Wall Street

OU T S TA N DI NG BRITISH FILM E E RI S I NG S TA R

WILL POULTER

Philomena

JEFF POPE Rush

EDITING

12 Years A Slave

JOE WALKER BEST FILM

American Hustle

CHARLES ROVEN RICHARD SUCKLE

ANDREW EATON Saving Mr. Banks

KELLY MARCEL

OPRAH WINFREY The Butler

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DAME HELEN MIRREN ACA D E MY FELLOWSH IP Words by

Quentin Falk Opening portrait

Film stills

Ian Derry

Rex Features

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The Queen (2006)

elen Mirren’s first BAFTA nomination was exactly 30 years ago, for her role as a tragic young Catholic widow in Cal (1984), set during the Irish Troubles of the early 1980s. Ten BAFTA nominations and four wins on – including three on the spin for her feisty, acerbic DCI Jane Tennison in ITV’s Prime Suspect – Mirren, now Dame Helen, has become a national treasure. If the “rough, messed up” (her words) Scotland Yard cop fi rst defi ned her screen image internationally, then that would change even more spectacularly a decade later when she gained even greater global popularity, kudos and many more awards playing our reigning monarch on the big screen in The Queen (2006). It’s clear, however, that the award this year of BAFTA’s prestigious Fellowship – she’s only the 10th woman in the Academy’s entire history to receive it – has an extra special meaning for her. “I think,” she mused, “we all know that winning awards for performance is a bit of a questionable process. The first thing you tend to feel when you win an award is guilt because you know how the other people who are up for it feel as you’ve been there yourself. This is very different, a recognition, hopefully, of a body of work, a lifetime of a certain attitude and approach to work. That’s how I see it. It’s not, for a change, about being the ‘best’ of anything, as it were, and I really like that.” And, she laughed, “it really has been a lifetime, rather terrifying to realise that,” before reflecting more closely on a remarkable stage and screen career across almost half a century, which fi rst sprang to life from the mid-1960s when she became a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, taking on over the succeeding years some great classical and contemporary roles. “My overriding ambition from a young age,” recalled the London-born daughter of AngloRussian parentage, “was to be in the theatre. I was so caught up in the romantic fantasy of those great actresses of the late 19th century, like Eleonora Duse and Sarah Bernhardt. They were part of my romantic vision. Above all, I wanted to be a great classical theatre actress, and that’s what I worked towards from the very start.”

Red 2 (2013)

Caligula (1979)

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“The Fellowship is recognition of a lifetime of a certain attitude and approach to work. It really has been a lifetime, rather terrifying to realise that.”

The Long Good Friday (1980)

Her progress towards the big screen was an altogether more halting affair – “a slow burn”, she describes it – beginning as an uncredited extra when barely out of her teens, painting Laurence Harvey’s toenails in the 1966 Cold War comedy, The Spy With A Cold Nose (the spy in question being a pedigree bulldog with a listening bug grafted inside its stomach). “I didn’t really go to the cinema very much when I was young, and I suppose the only kind of fi lm actress I would have wanted to be then was one of the European greats, like Anna Magnani,

The Last Station (2009)

Jeanne Moreau, Monica Vitti or, my father’s particular favourite, Simone Signoret.” After a brief, early flurry of fi lm – Michael Powell’s Age Of Consent (1969) in which she was bravely, and memorably, naked on the Great Barrier Reef, Ken Russell’s Savage Messiah (1972) and O Lucky Man! (1973), for Lindsay Anderson – it would be a number of years before the cinema properly beckoned again. Mirren was almost in her mid-30s by the time she played, to great acclaim, Bob Hoskins’ upper-crust gangster moll in The Long Good Friday (1980).

hotelchocolat.com

PHOTOGRAPH BY

Andrew Montgomery

The Official Chocolatier to the British Academy of Film and Television Arts

SELECT FILMOGRAPHY Red 2

2013

Hitchcock

2012

Arthur

2011

Red

2010

Brighton Rock

2010

The Tempest

2010

The Debt

2010

The Last Station

2009

State Of Play

2009

National Treasure: Book Of Secrets

2007

The Queen

2006

Shadowboxer

2005

The Clearing

2004

Calendar Girls

2003

Happy Birthday (also directed)

2001

Gosford Park

2001

Last Orders

2001

Greenfi ngers

2000

Teaching Mrs Tingle

1999

Critical Care

1997

Some Mother’s Son

1996

The Madness Of King George

1994

The Hawk

1993

Where Angels Fear To Tread

1991

The Cook, The Thief, His Wife And Her Lover

1989

The Mosquito Coast

1986

2010

1984

Cal

1984

Excalibur

1981

The Long Good Friday

1980

Hussy

1980

Caligula

1979

O Lucky Man!

1973

Miss Julie

1972

Savage Messiah

1972

Age Of Consent

1969

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

1968

F E L L O W S H I P

“I came into that with my arrogance, and ignorance of the medium, still well in place, blithely re-writing the script which was, I think, ultimately to the advantage of the fi lm,” she says. “However, I still felt very insecure about fi lm. When I was young, the fi lm set was an incredibly masculine place in what was still a very sexist world. For a woman walking on to sets then, it was a very lonely business and you had somehow to negotiate your way through it. I really didn’t know what I was doing,” Just a handful of years after that, she was reported, rather sensationally, and still confi rms it today, as believing she’d somehow “lost” her “talent” while making Cal in Ireland. “I really felt I was all at sea,” she says. “It was frightenedrabbit-in-the-headlights type of acting. I fi nally realised how ignorant I was about the whole thing and that I must start learning much more about the process, as it’s such a wonderful and powerful form of storytelling.” The breakthrough – that eureka moment – came, she explained, “doing Prime Suspect. It was pretty late by then, I was already into my 40s. But the experience of doing so many hours of work, with so many good directors, meant I could fi nally walk on those sets with a proper kind of authority.” There were six Prime Suspect miniseries spanning 12 years, concluding fi nally in 2003 – the same year she became a Dame in the Queen’s Birthday Honours – with Tennison, having risen to the dizzy heights of detective superintendent, perched on the edge of retirement.

Some Mother’s Son (1996)

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“I came to The Long Good Friday with my arrogance, and ignorance of the medium, well in place. However, I still felt very insecure about film.”

CELEBRATING 6 YEARS AS THE OFFICIAL HAIR STYLIST TO THE EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS

NEW VOLUME & BOUNCE THICK & FULL 3D BOOSTING CRÈME ‘MY HAIR LOOKS FABULOUS AND FEELS THICKER AND FULL OF BODY’ Fiona Arthur, Edinburgh www.charlesworthington.com @CWHairLondon

ALICE EVE British Actress

By then, she had made such fi ne fi lms as The Madness Of King George (1994), Gosford Park (2001) and Calendar Girls (2003), before The Queen would further ignite work here and in Hollywood, including State Of Play, The Last Station (both 2009), The Debt (2011), a pair of Red all-star action-comedy spectaculars (2010, 2013), and Hitchcock (as Mrs H), which snared her most recent BAFTA performance nomination last year. Theatre, still her fi rst love, has continued to punctuate her screen career with, most recently, an Olivier award-winning return to regal ways

as Elizabeth II in Peter Morgan’s The Audience, which traces her varied relationships with 12 PMs – her “Dirty Dozen”, as she calls them – across The Queen’s 60 years; a role she hopes to take to Broadway later this year. “I am a complete Elizabethan,” Mirren concludes. “My whole life will, in a sense, have been defi ned by being alive during her reign. Although I hope my whole career won’t also be defi ned by playing her, it’s still an amazing thing to me that I’ve been able to creatively engage with it.”

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A C A D E M Y

Hitchcock (2012)

The Madness Of King George (1994)

Arthur (2011)

FELLOWS OF THE ACADEMY 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1976 1977 1978 1979 1979 1980 1980 1981 1981 1982 1984 1985 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1992 1993 1993 1994 1995 1996 1996 1996 1996 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997

1999 2000 2000 2000 2001 2001 2001 2002 2002 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004 2004 2005 2005 2006 2006 2007 2007 2007 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010 2011 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 2013

Names and honours correct at time of presentation.

A C A D E M Y

1986

1999

Sean Connery Bill Cotton CBE Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise Elizabeth Taylor Michael Caine Stanley Kubrick (posthumous) Peter Bazalgette Albert Finney John Thaw Dame Judi Dench Warren Beatty Merchant Ivory Productions Andrew Davies Sir John Mills Saul Zaentz David Jason John Boorman Roger Graef John Barry OBE Sir David Frost OBE Lord Puttnam CBE Ken Loach Anne V. Coates OBE Richard Curtis CBE Will Wright Sir Anthony Hopkins CBE Bruce Forsyth CBE Terry Gilliam Nolan Bushnell Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders Vanessa Redgrave CBE Shigeru Miyamoto Lord Bragg Sir Christopher Lee CBE Peter Molyneux OBE Sir Trevor McDonald OBE Martin Scorsese Rolf Harris CBE Sir Alan Parker Gabe Newell Michael Palin CBE

T H E

1984

1998

O F

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1983

1998

F E L L O W S

1981

Alfred Hitchcock Freddie Young OBE Grace Wyndham Goldie David Lean Jacques Cousteau Sir Charles Chaplin Lord Olivier Sir Denis Forman Fred Zinnemann Lord Grade Sir Huw Wheldon David Attenborough CBE John Huston Abel Gance Michael Powell Emeric Pressburger Andrzej Wajda Sir Richard Attenborough CBE Sir Hugh Greene Sam Spiegel Jeremy Isaacs Steven Spielberg Federico Fellini Ingmar Bergman Sir Alec Guinness CH, CBE Paul Fox Louis Malle Sir John Gielgud David Plowright Sydney Samuelson CBE Colin Young CBE Michael Grade CBE Billy Wilder Jeanne Moreau Ronald Neame CBE John Schlesinger CBE Dame Maggie Smith Woody Allen Steven Bochco Julie Christie Oswald Morris OBE Harold Pinter CBE David Rose

HACKETT.COM

HACKETT LONDON IS PROUD TO BE THE OFFICIAL MENSWEAR STYLIST FOR T HE EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS IN 2014

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ETER

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O U TSTA N D I N G B RIT ISH CO NTRIBUTIO N TO CIN E M A Words by

Film stills

Rich Matthews

Rex Features

know nothing about you, but I do know two things – two people f*cked to make you and I’m sorry, you’re going to die,” smiles fi lmmaker Peter Greenaway. The recipient of this year’s BAFTA for Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema has always been a forthright, singular artist, a Welsh-born iconoclast known for his painterly cinematic style and penchant for pushing boundaries. Indeed, his to-the-point analysis of all of us reflects his ongoing fascination with sex and death – the twin forces of Eros

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The Draughtsman’s Contract (1982)

and Thanatos from Greek mythology – that permeates his work. Even a cursory familiarity with his fi lms – with the prime example being The Cook, The Thief, His Wife And Her Lover (1989) – exposes Greenaway’s examination of what he refers to as the very beginning and the very end. “We’re all extremely, deeply fascinated – whether you’re a nun or a serial killer – with these issues,” he explains. “A novelist like Balzac might have said that money was important, but money’s only there to manipulate the sex and the death anyway. You could say that Shakespeare’s plays are about power, but that power is circulating around notions of beginnings and ends, starts and finishes.” Going back to his own start, Greenaway hails from Newport in Gwent, and began his artistic life as a painter before branching out into film in 1966, making his striking debut, The Falls, in 1980, followed by his first traditional narrative feature, The Draughtsman’s Contract, in 1982. What followed was a run of richly creative, visually arresting and thematically challenging films that, he says, “push the edges”, from A Zed & Two Noughts (1985) and The Belly Of An Architect (1987) through to Nightwatching (2007) and Goltzius And The Pelican Company (2012). Plenty of sex and death is explored to be sure. “Somebody once asked me, ‘Why, Mr Greenaway, did you move from painting to cinema?’ and rather cheekily I said, ‘Paintings don’t have soundtracks,’” he laughs. “That’s a simplification because cinema has so many elements, but it’s basically true. I was often criticised in England for being far too concerned with form and not content, but for a long time the French have said there’s no such thing as content anymore – the language is the content. I always have this eye for the emotion of the pictorial image and try very, very hard to use all the contemporary gizmos I can – there’s practically a new one every afternoon now – to expand fi lmmaking language.” Receiving an award like the Academy’s Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema can be misconceived as the bell tolling at the end of a career – or even a life, given Greenaway’s obsessions – and this immediately occurred to him upon hearing about the award.

The Pillow Book (1996)

O U T S T A N D I N G

“I always have this eye for the emotion of the pictorial image and try very hard to expand filmmaking language.”

Goltzius And The Pelican Company (2012)

C O N T R I B U T I O N

84

B R I T I S H

The Cook, The Thief, His Wife And Her Lover (1989)

T O

“Journalists have often said that you’re only allowed to make three good fi lms,” he smiles. “I hope I have a bit more time to make those good three fi lms, but that’s probably not true anymore. So I think my reputation will probably be associated with The Draughtman’s Contract, The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, And Her Lover, and The Pillow Book. But I have made 15 fi lms and we’re working on the 16th now. Cinema’s a lottery – you can have a great script, great actors, everything you need; put it in the oven; take it out and…” A lot of Greenway’s recent output has been outside of conventional cinema, including exhibition and installations in Venice’s Palazzo Fortuny, Barcelona’s John Miro Gallery and the Louvre in Paris, and he believes this reflects the changing nature of how we consume and create images.

C I N E M A

“Didn’t David Hockney say that if you’re English and you can still boil an egg when you’re 70, they’ll give you a medal?” he says, wryly. “But it sounds rather grand. I was a little surprised. I’m a bit of an outsider as a fi lmmaker. I haven’t lived in England now for about 20 years. I live in Amsterdam and I feel like a European now. I’m at an age that my next great adventure must be death, though the last three fi lms I’ve made are not inherently about that, they’re more about notions of immortality through art. Although, if you seek immortality, you shouldn’t be a fi lmmaker. Cinema is very ephemeral, it needs so much technology to reproduce it. The first 30 years of cinema was silent and who watches silent cinema anymore?” So how does he feel he’ll be remembered for his work?

SELECT FILMOGRAPHY Goltzius And The Pelican Company

2012

Peopling The Palaces At Venaria Reale

2007

Nightwatching

2007

A Life In Suitcases

2005

The Tulse Luper Suitcases

The Baby Of Mâcon (1993)

2001 – 2004

The Death Of A Composer: Rosa, A Horse Drama

1999

8 1/2 Women

1999

The Pillow Book

1996 1993

Darwin

1992

Prospero’s Books

1991

The Cook, The Thief, His Wife And Her Lover

1989

Drowning By Numbers

1988

The Belly Of An Architect

1987

A Zed & Two Noughts

1986

1980

T O C I N E M A

“Journalists say you’re only allowed to make three good films. I hope I have a bit more time to make those three good films.”

C O N T R I B U T I O N

86

1982

The Falls

B R I T I S H

The Draughtsman’s Contract

“Our ability now to make and manipulate images is much more profound,” he says. “I don’t think it belongs in dark cinemas anymore. Man’s not a nocturnal animal. The developments outside of cinema are far more exciting than those in it. If you think, as many do, that cinema is the seventh art – that comes with a responsibility. Most films stay within the aegis of simply being a fi lm. But we’re moving into new ground now – our grandchildren will say, ‘Cinema? What on earth was that?’” Greenaway is, as he says, “busier than I’ve ever been,” and it’s not coming from established cinema either. “It’s from institutions all over the world that view the moving image as an extraordinary tool,” he explains. “There are certain freedoms and opportunities – multiple screens, technology associated with the theatre and opera house – that I’m making use of. We’re producing a lot more entertaining, exciting and cutting edge work than when I was associated with orthodox cinema.” But that doesn’t mean Greenaway has left cinema behind – if anything he’s looking back at its past through the prism of modern technology. He has three new fi lms planned, including his current project, which he’s working on in Mexico. This fi lm is about the pioneering Russian director and fi lm theorist Sergei Eisenstein, which he describes as being “about understanding the end, understanding notions of mortality. I’ve put my own doubts in Eisenstein’s mind, with a certain sense of circumspection and an amount of arrogance.”

O U T S T A N D I N G

The Baby Of Mâcon

freuds is proud to be entering its seventeenth year as the retained agency for the EE British Academy Film Awards. For further information contact Kate Lee, Director, +44(0)20 3003 6349, kate@freuds.com

“I want to come to a film with as much enthusiasm, excitement and openness as I can.” O U T S T A N D I N G

A Zed & Two Noughts (1986)

C O N T R I B U T I O N

88

B R I T I S H T O

Eisenstein, often credited as the father of montage, is a fellow fi lmmaker that Greenaway clearly admires. Indeed, he describes him as “one of the few visionary minds in the whole history of cinema,” adding, “Cinema is dying, so maybe now is the time to celebrate its greatest exponent.” Greenaway is very clear that he means the death of “cinema”, not the death of visual storytelling – far from it. He simply believes that the moving image cannot and should not be constrained by the format. “There’s only one good seat in a cinema and it’s where the pictures were taken,” he explains. “When I watch, I don’t want to be interrupted by somebody

else, I don’t want to share an emotional involvement with anybody else. I want to make direct contact with the imagination of the fi lmmaker. I want to come to a film with as much enthusiasm, excitement and openness as I can. I want to learn something, to have a sensual, emotional and intellectual experience in a way that I have always assumed that serious fi lmmakers would want me to.” At 71 years old, Greenaway wants you to engage with his work in that intense way and he’ll keep pushing the boundaries of how we consume the moving image to do it. His contribution to cinema is far from over.

C I N E M A

Portrait by Reinier van Brummelen

IN MEMORIAM

Actress 03 September 1932 — 28 July 2013

Shamshad Begum

Anwar Brett

Singer 14 April 1919 — 23 April 2013

Critic, Journalist 23 July 1966 — 24 November 2013

Hamidou Benmessaoud

Richard Briers

Actor 02 August 1935 — 19 September 2013

Actor 14 January 1934 — 17 February 2013

Chinua Achebe

Alberto Bevilacqua

Sid Brooks

Writer 16 November 1930 — 21 March 2013

Writer, Filmmaker 27 June 1934 — 09 September 2013

Executive 05 January 1922 — 24 May 2013

David Anderson

Paul Bhattacharjee

John Calvert

Assistant Director, Producer 17 September 1940 — 04 August 2013

Actor 04 May 1960 — 12 July 2013

Magician, Actor 05 August 1911 — 27 September 2013

Rona Anderson

Antonia Bird

David Campling

Actress 03 August 1926 — 23 July 2013

Director 27 May 1951 — 24 October 2013

Editor, Sound Editor 02 November 1938 — 09 May 2013

Allan Arbus

Karen Black

Vincenzo Cerami

Photographer, Actor 15 February 1918 — 19 April 2013

Actress 01 July 1939 — 08 August 2013

Writer 02 November 1940 — 17 July 2013

James Avery Actor 27 November 1945 — 31 December 2013

Les Blank

Patrice Chéreau

Director 27 November 1935 — 07 April 2013

Director, Writer 02 November 1944 — 07 October 2013

Conrad Bain

Michel Brault

Park Chul-soo

Actor 04 February 1923 — 14 January 2013

Director, Cinematographer 25 June 1928 — 21 September 2013

Director 20 November 1948 — 19 February 2013

Aleksei Balabanov

Marc Breaux

Tom Clancy

Filmmaker 25 February 1959 — 18 May 2013

Choreographer 03 November 1924 — 19 November 2013

Writer 12 April 1947 — 01 October 2013

90

The following pages honour the esteemed contribution to the film industry by those individuals who have sadly died in the last 12 months. To learn more about their many achievements, visit bafta.org/heritage/inmemoryof

M E M O R I A M

Eileen Brennan

Actress 09 March 1946 — 12 January 2014

I N

Alexandra Bastedo

M E M O R I A M

Diane Disney Miller

Joan Fontaine

Writer, Producer 20 July 1914 — 14 February 2013

Philanthropist 18 December 1933 — 19 November 2013

Actress 22 October 1917 — 15 December 2013

Brian Comport

Ray Dolby

Bryan Forbes

Writer 16 April 1938 — 05 September 2013

Audio Engineer 18 January 1933 — 12 September 2013

Actor, Writer, Director, Producer 22 July 1926 — 08 May 2013

Joe Conley

Deanna Durbin

Actor 03 March 1928 — 07 July 2013

Actress, Singer 04 December 1921 — 20 April 2013

Jeanne Cooper

Roger Ebert

Actress 25 October 1928 — 08 May 2013

Film Critic 18 June 1942 — 04 April 2013

Damiano Damiani

Marta Eggerth

Writer, Director 23 July 1922 — 07 March 2013

Actress, Singer 17 April 1912 — 26 December 2013

Nigel Davenport

Christopher Evan Welch

Actor 23 May 1928 — 25 October 2013

Actor 28 September 1965 — 02 December 2013

Franco de Gemini

Dennis Farina

Musician 10 September 1928 — 20 July 2013

Actor 29 February 1944 — 22 July 2013

Denys de La Patellière

Syd Field

Director 08 March 1921 — 21 July 2013

Writer 19 December 1935 — 17 November 2013

Lorella De Luca

Rick Finkelstein

Actress 17 September 1940 — 09 January 2014

Executive 15 September 1949 — 01 October 2013

Rupert Dilnott-Cooper

Susan Fitzgerald

Executive 01 January 1954 — 20 May 2013

Actress 28 May 1949 — 09 September 2013

CBE

Stanley Forman Director, Producer, Distributor 26 December 1921 — 07 February 2013

Steve Forrest Actor 29 September 1925 — 18 May 2013

Michelle Fox Producer 10 December 1958 — 22 May 2013

91

I N

Richard Collins

Michael France Writer 04 January 1962 — 12 April 2013

Jesús (Jess) Franco Director 12 May 1930 — 02 April 2013

Stuart Freeborn Make Up Artist 05 September 1914 — 05 February 2013

Sir David Frost Broadcaster, Executive, Producer 07 April 1939 — 31 August 2013

OBE, Kt

Elspet Gray

Julie Harris

Actress, Singer 22 October 1942 — 08 April 2013

Actress 12 April 1929 — 18 February 2013

Actress 02 December 1925 — 24 August 2013

James Gandolfi ni

Richard Griffiths

Actor 18 September 1961 — 19 June 2013

Actor 31 July 1947 — 28 March 2013

Animator, Special Effects Director 29 June 1920 — 07 May 2013

Giuliano Gemma

Michael Grigsby

Doreen Hawkins

Actor 02 September 1938 — 01 October 2013

Filmmaker 07 June 1936 — 12 March 2013

Actress 13 July 1919 — 15 June 2013

Aleksey German

Alfredo Guevara

Marta Hefl in

Director 20 July 1938 — 21 February 2013

Film Director 31 December 1925 — 19 April 2013

Actress 29 March 1945 — 18 September 2013

Murray Gershenz

Haji

Jane Henson

Actor 12 May 1922 — 28 August 2013

Actress 24 January 1946 — 09 August 2013

Puppeteer, Co-creator of The Muppets 16 June 1934 — 02 April 2013

Leslie Gilliat

Gerry Hambling

Barbara Hicks

Producer 29 May 1917 — 13 July 2013

Editor 14 June 1926 — 05 February 2013

Actress 12 August 1924 — 06 September 2013

Peter Gilmore

Vic Hammond

Anthony Hinds

Actor 25 August 1931 — 03 February 2013

Grip 07 May 1945 — 24 April 2013

Producer, Writer, Executive 19 September 1922 — 30 September 2013

Jim Goddard

Tim Hampton

Joe Hobbs

Director, Designer, Painter 02 February 1936 — 17 June 2013

Producer 25 February 1948 — 11 March 2013

Military Costume Designer 14 November 1961 — 27 December 2013

Bob Godfrey

David Harcourt

Marty Hornstein

Animator 27 May 1921 — 21 February 2013

Camera Operator 27 September 1915 — 05 May 2013

Production Manager 15 August 1932 — 19 December 2013

Gary David Goldberg

Gerry Harrington

Bernard Horsfall

Director, Writer, Producer 25 June 1944 — 22 June 2013

Agent, Manager 02 July 1962 — 09 February 2013

Actor 20 November 1930 — 28 January 2013

OBE

(born: Barbarella Catton)

Ray Harryhausen

I N M E M O R I A M

92

Annette Funicello

M E M O R I A M I N

Alfredo Landa

Jackie Lomax

Actor 02 August 1938 — 01 July 2013

Actor 03 March 1933 — 09 May 2013

Singer, Songwriter 10 May 1944 — 15 September 2013

Iain Johnstone

Tom Laughlin

Bill Lovell

Grip 04 February 1955 — 19 September 2013

Actor 10 August 1931 — 12 December 2013

Digital Product Manager 20 August 1954 — 13 March 2013

Michael J Kagan

Ed Lauter

Olga Lowe

Producer 16 July 1926 — 10 November 2013

Actor 30 October 1938 — 16 October 2013

Actress 14 September 1919 — 02 September 2013

Fay Kanin

Georges Lautner

Bigas Luna

Writer 09 May 1917 — 27 March 2013

Director, Writer 24 January 1926 — 22 November 2013

Writer, Director 19 March 1946 — 06 April 2013

Pat Keen

Elmore Leonard

AC Lyles

Actress 21 October 1933 — 01 March 2013

Novelist, Writer 11 October 1925 — 20 August 2013

Producer 17 May 1918 — 27 September 2013

Jim Kelly

Richard LeParmentier

Richard Lyon

Actor 05 May 1946 — 29 June 2013

Actor, Writer 16 July 1946 — 15 April 2013

Actor 08 October 1934 — 16 October 2013

Jean Kent

Gail Levin

Mario Machado

Actress 29 June 1921 — 30 November 2013

Documentary Filmmaker 20 June 1946 — 31 July 2013

Actor 22 April 1935 — 04 May 2013

Wojciech Kilar

Harry Lewis

Angus MacKay

Composer 17 July 1932 — 29 December 2013

Actor 01 April 1920 — 09 June 2013

Actor 15 July 1926 — 08 June 2013

Greg Kramer

Carlo Lizzani

Richard Matheson

Actor 1961 — 08 April 2013

Director, Writer, Critic 03 April 1922 — 05 October 2013

Writer 20 February 1926 — 23 June 2013

Bernadette Lafont

Roger Lloyd-Pack

Iain McColl

Actress 28 October 1938 — 25 July 2013

Actor 08 February 1944 — 15 January 2014

Actor 27 January 1954 — 04 July 2013

93

Paul Jenkins

Dale Robertson

Actor 23 December 1918 — 10 October 2013

Actor 14 July 1923 — 27 February 2013

Édouard Molinaro

Eleanor Parker

Joseph Ruskin

Director, Writer 13 May 1928 — 07 December 2013

Actress 26 June 1922 — 09 December 2013

Actor 14 April 1924 — 28 December 2013

Sara Montiel

Margaret Pellegrini

Otto Sander

Actress, Singer 10 March 1928 — 08 April 2013

Actress 23 September 1923 — 07 August 2013

Actor 30 June 1941 — 12 September 2013

Juanita Moore

Bill Pertwee

Richard Sarafian

Actress 19 October 1914 — 01 January 2014

Actor 21 July 1926 — 27 May 2013

Director 28 April 1930 — 18 September 2013

Tommy Morrison

Ted Post

Lou Scheimer

Boxer, Actor 02 January 1969 — 01 September 2013

Director 31 March 1918 — 20 August 2013

Animation Producer 19 October 1928 — 17 October 2013

Gerard Murphy

Nosher Powell

August Schellenberg

Actor 14 October 1948 — 26 August 2013

Stuntman, Actor 15 August 1928 — 20 April 2013

Actor 25 July 1936 — 15 August 2013

Hal Needham

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

Alan Sharp

Stuntman, Director 06 March 1931 — 25 October 2013

Writer 07 May 1927 — 03 April 2013

Writer 12 January 1934 — 08 February 2013

Ken Norton

Franca Rame

Sir Run Run Shaw

Boxer, Actor 09 August 1943 — 18 September 2013

Actress, Writer 18 July 1928 — 29 May 2013

Producer, Executive 23 November 1907 — 07 January 2014

Milo O’Shea

Harry Reems

Pran Sikand

Actor 02 June 1926 — 02 April 2013

Actor 27 August 1947 — 19 March 2013

Actor 12 February 1920 — 12 July 2013

Peter O’Toole

Robert Relyea

Mel Smith

Actor 02 August 1932 — 14 December 2013

Producer 03 May 1930 — 05 March 2013

Actor, Writer, Director 03 December 1952 — 19 July 2013

CBE

M E M O R I A M

94

Kumar Pallana

Set Decorator 20 July 1942 — 19 August 2013

I N

Stephenie McMillan

M E M O R I A M

Armando Trovajoli

Jonathan Winters

Actress 19 January 1923 — 31 May 2013

Composer, Musician 02 September 1917 — 28 February 2013

Comedian 11 November 1925 — 11 April 2013

Graham Stark

Luciano Vincenzoni

Aubrey Woods

Actor 20 January 1922 — 29 October 2013

Writer 07 March 1926 — 22 September 2013

Actor, Writer 09 April 1928 — 07 May 2013

Bert Stern

Paul Walker

Olwen Wymark

Photographer, Filmmaker 03 October 1929 — 26 June 2013

Actor 12 September 1973 — 30 November 2013

Writer 14 February 1932 — 14 June 2013

Risë Stevens

Bill Wallis

Cy Young

Actress 11 June 1913 — 20 March 2013

Actor 20 November 1936 — 06 September 2013

Film Researcher, Editor, Former Governor of the BFI 05 December 1941 — 12 October 2013

Jack Stokes

Scott Ward

Animation Director 02 April 1920 — 20 March 2013

Cinematographer 16 May 1966 — 29 January 2013

Patsy Swayze

Sheila Whitaker

Choreographer 07 February 1927 — 16 September 2013

Film Programmer, Festival Director 01 April 1936 — 29 July 2013

Vadim Yusov

Esther Williams

Saul Zaentz

Actress 08 August 1921 — 06 June 2013

Producer 28 February 1921 — 03 January 2014

John Wilson

Carmen Zapata

Animator 07 August 1919 — 20 June 2013

Actress 15 July 1927 — 05 January 2014

Anna Wing

The Academy has made every effort to compile an accurate In Memoriam listing of film practitioners between 23 January 2013 and 22 January 2014.

Andy Young Preview Theatre Owner 15 July 1950 — 28 October 2013

Cinematographer 20 April 1929 — 23 August 2013

Gilbert Taylor Cinematographer 21 April 1914 — 23 August 2013

Frank Thornton Actor 15 January 1921 — 16 March 2013

Audrey Totter Actress 20 December 1917 — 12 December 2013

Barbara Trentham Actress 27 August 1944 — 02 August 2013

Actress 30 October 1914 — 07 July 2013

95

I N

Jean Stapleton

E S S A Y P H O T O G R A P H I C C I N E M M E R S I V E :

A

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CINEMMERSIVE A Photographic Essay by Dr Andy Gotts

MBE MA

Films take us on extraordinary journeys, from the kitchen sink to strange new worlds. They immerse us in another place, another time, another life. Capturing some of the best practitioners of the cinemmersive experience, all of the artists and crafts people featured are previous BAFTA winners and nominees.

A

P H O T O G R A P H I C

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C I N E M M E R S I V E :

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P H O T O G R A P H I C

100

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P H O T O G R A P H I C

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C I N E M M E R S I V E :

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E S S A Y

WINS AND NOMINATIONS JAVIER BARDEM Win Supporting Actor, 2008 – No Country For Old Men Also two nominations.

CATE BL ANCHET T Wins

Leading Actor, 1983 – Gandhi Most Promising Newcomer To Leading Film Roles, 1983 – Gandhi Also one nomination.

SIR IAN MCKELLEN Nominations Supporting Actor, 2004 – The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Leading Actor, 2002 – The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring Leading Actor, 1997 – Richard III Adapted Screenplay, 1997 – Richard III (with Richard Loncraine)

G EO RG E CLO O N E Y Win Best Film, 2013 – Argo

STEVE MCQUEEN Win

CBE

(with Grant Heslov and Ben Affleck)

Special Achievement By A British

Also nominated eight times.

Director, Writer Or Producer In

Leading Actress, 2008 – La Vie En Rose Also one nomination.

CLINT EASTWOOD Nominations

DA N I EL DAY- L E W I S Wins Leading Actor, 2013 – Lincoln Leading Actor, 2008 – There Will Be Blood Leading Actor, 2003 – Gangs Of New York Leading Actor, 1990 – My Left Foot Also two nominations.

JOHN HURT Win

CBE

Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema, 2012 Supporting Actor, 1979 – Midnight Express Actor, 1981 – The Elephant Man Also nominated three times.

SIR SIDNEY POITIER Win Foreign Actor, 1959 – The Defi ant Ones Also nominated five times.

MICKEY ROURKE Win Leading Actor, 2009 – The Wrestler

MERYL STREEP Wins Leading Actress, 2012 – The Iron Lady Leading Actress, 1982 – The French Lieutenant’s Woman Also nominated 12 times.

TILDA SWINTO N Win Supporting Actress, 2008 – Michael Clayton Also two nominations.

With thanks to Margo Holder and Lancôme for selected shoots.

E S S A Y

Director, 2009 – Changeling Film, 1993 – Unforgiven Director, 1993 – Unforgiven

Also two nominations.

P H O T O G R A P H I C

M A RI O N COTI LL A RD Win

A

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Their First Feature Film, 2009 – Hunger

C I N E M M E R S I V E :

Supporting Actress, 2005 – The Aviator Leading Actress, 1999 – Elizabeth Also nominated three times.

SIR BEN KINGSLEY Wins

Rex Features photography winners for over 60 years

REX - the official photographers to BAFTA congratulate all the nominees

www.rexfeatures.com

Richard Attenborough with Audrey Hepburn - winners of the British Actor Award and British Actress Award in 1965

Exterion Media, Official Outdoor Media partner of BAFTA, would like to congratulate all award winners and nominees. For further information on Exterion Media’s portfolio of advertising solutions, please contact Michelle Gardiner on 020 7428 3656 or email michelle.gardiner@exterionmedia.co.uk www.exterionmedia.co.uk

OFFICERS OF THE ACADEMY OFFICERS HRH The Duke of Cambridge, KG Academy President Duncan Kenworthy OBE Academy Vice-President Sophie Turner Laing Academy Vice-President

O F O F F I C E R S

— John Willis Chairman of the Academy Anne Morrison Deputy Chairman of the Academy and Chairman, Learning and Events Committee Harvey Elliott Chairman, Games Committee Pippa Harris Deputy Chairman, Film Committee Jane Lush Deputy Chairman, Television Committee Andrew Newman Chairman, Television Committee Nik Powell Chairman, Film Committee — Medwyn Jones Chairman, Commercial Committee Tanya Seghatchian Co-optee Janet Walker Chairman, Finance and Audit Committee — Amanda Berry OBE Chief Executive Kevin Price Chief Operating Officer

Elected Members of the Film Committee — Nik Powell Chairman Pippa Harris Deputy Chairman — David Arnold Andrew Curtis Christopher Figg Justin Johnson Luke Parker Bowles Kenith Trodd Clare Wise Penny Wolf

Elected Members of the Television Committee — Andrew Newman Chairman Jane Lush Deputy Chairman — Richard Boden James Dean Neil Grant Olivia Lichtenstein Krishnendu Majumdar Simon Spencer Graham Stuart Brian Woods

Elected Members of the Games Committee — Harvey Elliott Chairman — Georg Backer Paul Jackson Ray Maguire Johnny Minkley

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T H E

A C A D E M Y

Board of Trustees

COM MIT TEES

— Barco Brightcove Channel 4 CTV Deloitte

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BAFTA Cymru — AB Acoustics Audi Autograffeg Avanti Bamboo Dental Bauhaus BBC Cymru Wales Bluestone National Park Resort Capital Law Cardiff & Vale College Cardiff Council The Celt Experience Champagne Taittinger Commercial Radio Systems ELP

A C A D E M Y

Academy Supporters

Dolby The Farm Lipsync Portaprompt Quixel

T H E

— 88 Rue Du Rhone Audi Badoit British Airways Champagne Taittinger Evian Fortnum & Mason Grolsch Hotel Chocolat PaperlinX Republic Of Photography Sargent-Disc Villa Maria

O F

BAFTA’s partners have shown great loyalty in their year-round association with the BAFTA brand, and share our commitment and passion for the industries we represent. We warmly thank them for their commitment to the Academy and our work of promoting excellence in the film, television and games industries.

Academy Partners

P A R T N E R S

PARTNERS OF THE ACADEMY

A C A D E M Y T H E O F P A R T N E R S

BAFTA Scotland — Accessorize Audi BBC Scotland British Airways Burn Stewart Distillers Champagne Taittinger Channel 4 Cineworld The Corinthian Club Creative Scotland Cusquena Deloitte Designs by M Edit 123 Evian Grolsch Grosvenor Cinema Hotel Chocolat Inverarity Morton M.A.C. Cosmetics Material

MCL Noble Isle PaperlinX Procam PRS For Music Rekorderlig Sound Acoustics STV Wire Media For further information on partnership opportunities, please contact:

Louise Robertson +44 (0)20 7292 5844 louiser@bafta.org

Natalie Moss +44 (0)20 7292 5846 nataliem@bafta.org

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Ethos First Great Western Gorilla Hotel Chocolat ITV Cymru Wales MA Lighting Mela Media The National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales NEP Cymru Orchard NEP PaperlinX PRG Red Touch Media S4C St David’s The St David’s Hotel & Spa Trosol Universal Production Music University of South Wales Wales Millennium Centre Welsh Government

Helping you to shine Congratulations to the winners and nominees of the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2014. Deloitte have been the scrutineers of the BAFTA awards for eight years and we are proud of our long-standing association with BAFTA and wider relationships in the media sector. Whether or not today is your day in the spotlight, find out how we’re helping the industry stand out by visiting www.deloitte.co.uk/tmt

Š 2014 Deloitte LLP. All rights reserved.

P A R T N E R S A W A R D S

British Airways

Asprey

Official Airline

Official Jeweller and Nominees Party Host

Lancôme

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Official Beauty

Official Menswear Stylist

Grolsch

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Official Beer

Official Outdoor Media

Evian

PaperlinX

Official Bottled Water

Official Paper

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Official Bottled Water

Official Photobooth

Audi

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Official Car

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Official Cinema Media

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F I L M

With enduring thanks to all the Official Partners to the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2014.

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FILM AWARDS PARTNERS

A N Y A H I N D M A R C H .C O M

P R O V I D E R S G I F T A W A R D S F I L M

A huge thanks to the following brands which have generously provided gifts for this year’s nominees and citation readers.

88 Rue Du Rhone

Grolsch

An exclusive discount voucher across a stunning range of timepieces.

Sleek, black notepad with embossed Grolsch branding.

www.88rdr.com

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Anya Hindmarch

Hackett

Exclusively designed BAFTA Tote bag.

Refined and stylish Hackett dress studs.

www.anyahindmarch.com

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Asprey

Hotel Chocolat

A beautiful Asprey pocket mirror and bullskin leather case.

An exclusive dining offer at the new Rabot Estate restaurant.

www.asprey.com

www.hotelchocolat.co.uk

Champagne Taittinger

Lancôme

A bottle of Champagne Taittinger Brut Réserve NV in a gift box.

A selection of Lancôme’s must-have skincare and make up products.

www.taittinger.com

www.lancome.co.uk

Charles Worthington

Noble Isle

A selection of products from the Salon At Home Collection.

Aromatic candle, handmade with natural British extracts.

www.charlesworthington.com

www.nobleisle.com

Cocorose London

The Savoy

Exclusively designed foldable ballet pumps.

The ultimate cocktail book from the world-renowned American Bar.

www.cocoroselondon.com

www.fairmont.com/savoy-london

Cross

Villa Maria

A sophisticated instrument for effortless writing.

A tour, wine tasting and lunch at the Villa Maria winery, Auckland.

www.cross.com

www.villamaria.co.nz

Evian

The Vineyard Hotel

A refreshing, moisturising brumisateur facial spray.

A luxurious overnight stay, dinner and cellar tour.

www.evian.com

www.the-vineyard.co.uk

Fortnum & Mason A specially selected, bespoke blend of finest quality loose leaf tea. www.fortnumandmason.com

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FILM AWARDS GIFT PROVIDERS

Sargent-Disc congratulates the nominees of the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2014.

Academy Partner

Sargent-Disc is committed to service excellence. Find out more at www.sargent-disc.com

Payroll & Residuals

Corporate Payroll

Auto Enrolment

SD Online

Production Card

Production Services

Production Accounting

Vista Accounting

Movie Magic Scheduling

Movie Magic Budgeting

Training

Academic Partnerships

AD Events Ltd are especially proud to support BAFTA with the design and production of tonight’s dinner and after-party

T: +44(0) 20 7635 7372 E: enquiries@adevents.co.uk W: www.adevents.co.uk

BEHIND THE MENU Words by

Portraits

Toby Weidmann

Ian Derry

B E H I N D

t’s often said that three is a magic number, and that’s certainly true with regards to tonight’s specially crafted menu. The culmination of weeks of trialling and tastetesting, the Film Awards meal was created by a triumvirate of talented chefs: Nigel Boschetti, executive chef at Grosvenor House Hotel; Anton Manganaro, head chef at BAFTA 195 Piccadilly; and Jon Bentham, executive chef at Hotel Chocolat. Together they have crafted a perfectly balanced and original menu, with a specific British (and BAFTA) fl avour. “The inspiration came from a desire to use seasonal produce,” explains Boschetti. “We like to source as locally as possible. That can mean using cheeses from Somerset or the north of England, it doesn’t necessarily mean from London. We do like to use good quality British produce.” Manganaro adds: “Nigel was the main driver behind the dinner menu, I just tweaked it a little. For instance, I swapped wasabi in the starter for British horseradish. That’s my focus at BAFTA. It is the British Academy after all. We have some great suppliers and you’ll see that coming out in the

canapés I created for the Champagne Taittinger reception at the Royal Opera House. I like using British ingredients quite simply because you don’t have to mess about with them – the flavours are so good if you choose the right ingredients.” For chocoholics, tonight’s dessert should have you salivating long before it arrives at the table. Created by Chef Bentham specifi cally for this event, the pudding utilises cacao beer, St Lucian milk chocolate, praline and caramel. As Bentham says, it should deliver “the wow factor. It’s all about the fl avour. We’ve also featured a BAFTA mask on the dessert, which we’ve sprayed gold. I think this is a nice touch, and it certainly epitomises BAFTA.” Naturally, preparing the whole meal is a massive operation, with more than 36 chefs used throughout the day of the Awards to feed the expected 2,000 guests. This would be a daunting proposition for even the most experienced chefs, but for Boschetti, Manganaro and Bentham, it’s all in a day’s work. As Boschetti says: “If we’ve done our job properly, then there’s no need to be nervous.” Bon appétit!

From left to right: Nigel Boschetti, Jon Bentham, Anton Manganaro

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T H E

M E N U

TO EN SU R E T H E EE B R I T I S H A C A D E MY FI L M AWA R DS R E M A I N S A U N I Q U E E V E N T, T O N I G H T ’ S F O O D H A S B E E N S P E C I A L LY C R A F T E D B Y T H R E E C U L I N A R Y M A S T E R S …

“ENGAGING OVER 2.1 MILLION DAILY ON MOBILE, TABLET, ONLINE AND PRINT”

THE TELEGRAPH IS PROUD TO BE AN OFFICIAL PARTNER TO THE EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS

Outside Broadcasts for Winners

Contact: Adam Berger: adam@ctvob.co.uk or Bill Morris: bill@ctvob.co.uk / 020 8453 8989 / www.ctvob.co.uk Photo credits: Ryder Cup: Rex Features. BRIT Awards: David Fisher / Rex Features. NFL: David Fisher / Rex Features. The Ashes: AFP / Getty Images BAFTA Awards: BAFTA. Open Championship Golf Tournament: Hugh Routledge / Rex Features

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

EE – our title sponsor Nik Powell, Pippa Harris and members of the Film Committee John Willis, Chairman Film voting juries and members Film companies and distributors for their invaluable assistance Stephen Fry, our Host Edith Bowman – Host, BBC Three Red Carpet show All staff at the Academy

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A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S

The Academy wishes to thank…

AD Events International Limited – Design of the Awards dinner and after party BBC Brighter Connections – online voting Cineworld – regional tour partner Covent Garden London freuds Grosvenor House, a JW Marriott Hotel Helen Preece – Red Carpet Consultant Royal Opera House Smart AV West Design – Royal Opera House Red Carpet and Press Area production Whizz Kid Television Zoë Ball – Host, BAFTA fi lmed content

Film Awards trailer created by Empire Design for BAFTA Supported by DCM, Dolby, Pearl And Dean, The Farm, LypSync and Universal Music

END CREDITS At BAFTA — Head of Film Deena Wallace Acting Head of Film Emma Baehr Head of Production Clare Brown Awards Event Producer Helen Kierney

Awards Team Kelly Smith, Bradley Down, Rob Jones, Georgina Norton, Kemuel Solomon, Jim Bradshaw, Nicki Wedgwood

Voting David Lortal, Steve Noble, Sam Rhodes

Managing Editor Christine Robertson Ad Sales Phil Eacott Contributors Jonathan Crocker Quentin Falk Matthew Leyland Rich Matthews Helen O’Hara Nev Pierce Catherine Shoard Picture Editor Janette Dalley Photography Essay Dr Andy Gotts MBE MA Tel: +44 (0)845 045 0078 www.andygotts.com

Design & Art Direction Human After All +44 (0)20 7729 7694 www.humanafterall.co.uk

Art Director Paul Willoughby

Ticketing Gabby Taranowski, Siobhan Pridgeon

Designer Evan Lelliott

In-house Graphic Designer Adam Tuck

Producer Andy Tweddle

Online Pippa Irvine, Genevieve Smith, Oli Goldman

Production Manager Hannah El-Boghdady

In-house Press & PR Nick Williams Accounts Giles Barnett BAFTA Productions Cassandra Hybel, Ryan Doherty, Daniel Dalton, Georgina Cunningham

Printing Team Impression Tel: +44 (0)113 272 4800 hello@team-impression.com www.teamimpression.com

The Academy chooses Munken Polar and Regency Gloss, supporting excellence in print. Printed on Munken Polar 240g / m2 and 150g / m2 and Regency Gloss 130g/ m2. Supplied by PaperlinX. www.paperlinx.co.uk

Published by British Academy of Film and Television Arts 195 Piccadilly London W1J 9LN Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 0022 reception@bafta.org www.bafta.org

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the Publishers cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of BAFTA. © BAFTA Publishing 2014

Cover Illustrations La Boca Tel: +44 (0)203 220 0387

All nominees imagery used with kind permission from the distributors/fi lmmakers.

www.laboca.co.uk

Rising Star images courtesy of EE.

C R E D I T S

Partnerships Louise Robertson, Natalie Moss, Amy Elton

— Editor Toby Weidmann

E N D

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Production Coordinator Sophie Klein

For the Brochure

IMDb CONGRATULATES THE WINNERS AND NOMINEES AT THE EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS IN 2014

www.imdb.com


EE British Academy Film Awards In 2014 programme – Gravity