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2017

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congratulates our clients on their 2017 EE British Academy Film Awards nominations Best Film LA LA LAND JORDAN HOROWITZ MARC PLATT

Original Screenplay BARRY JENKINS MOONLIGHT

MOONLIGHT DEDE GARDNER JEREMY KLEINER

Adapted Screenplay TOM FORD NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

Outstanding British Film

Leading Actor ANDREW GARFIELD*** HACKSAW RIDGE

FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM DAVID YATES* STEVE KLOVES LIONEL WIGRAM

Leading Actress EMILY BLUNT**** THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN

Film Not In The English Language JULIETA PEDRO ALMODÓVAR

MERYL STREEP FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS

MUSTANG DENIZ GAMZE ERGÜVEN

NATALIE PORTMAN† JACKIE

Documentary 13TH AVA DUVERNAY

Supporting Actor HUGH GRANT FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS

THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK THE TOURING YEARS RON HOWARD

JEFF BRIDGES HELL OR HIGH WATER

WEINER JOSH KRIEGMAN ELYSE STEINBERG

Supporting Actress NICOLE KIDMAN†† LION

Director DENIS VILLENEUVE** ARRIVAL

VIOLA DAVIS FENCES

TOM FORD NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

British Short Film HOME DANIEL MULLOY

Animated Film KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS TRAVIS KNIGHT

EE Rising Star Award ANYA TAYLOR-JOY†††

*Shared representation with Casarotto Ramsay & Associates **Shared representation with Claude Girard Agency ***Shared representation with Gordon and French ****Shared representation with The Artists Partnership

†Shared representation with Adéquat ††Shared representation with Shanahan Management †††Shared representation with Troika Entertainment


The Director’s Cup

CoCo-host – Official Nominees’ Party ww www.nespresso.com


We proudly congratulate our EE British Academy Film Awards Nominees LEADING ACTOR

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC

VIGGO MORTENSEN

SON OF SAUL

LÁSZLÓ NEMES

SUPPORTING ACTOR ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

HIDDEN FIGURES

AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON

THEODORE MELFI

*

LION

LUKE DAVIES

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS

CINEMATOGRAPHY

CAMILLE GATIN

ARRIVAL

BRADFORD YOUNG

PRODUCER

LA LA LAND

ANIMATED FILM

LINUS SANDGREN

FINDING DORY

LION

ANDREW STANTON

GREIG FRASER

Shared representation with: *Hamilton Hodell

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CONTENTS

WELCO M E

SPECI A L AWA R DS

8 HRH The Duke Of Cambridge, KG,

62 The Fellowship

From eating 15 schnitzengruben and being at one with the Schwartz to implanting the brain of Abi Normal and spending springtime with a certain mustachioed dictator, Mel Brooks has made us cry with laughter for decades. The actor, writer, director and producer of so many classic comedies is the recipient of BAFTA’s highest honour. Words by Neil Smith

President of the Academy 9 Amanda Berry obe, Chief Executive

of the Academy / Jane Lush, Chair of the Academy 11

Marc Allera, CEO, EE

N O M I N AT I O NS 15 The Nominations in full

72 Outstanding British

Contribution to Cinema The recipient of this year’s Special Award is a company that straddles three sides of the business – production, distribution and exhibition. With a history spanning more than 80 years, no company has done more to enlighten UK audiences to the wonders of world cinema than Curzon. Words by Tim Murray

40 Juries & Chapters

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES 43 Arrival

An absorbing science fiction thriller that revels in its contemplative meditations on life, the universe and everything. Words by Larushka Ivan-Zadeh 47 I, Daniel Blake

C A P T U R I N G H ISTO RY:
 A PH OTO G R A PH I C ES SAY

A damning indictment of the UK benefits system and poverty levels, this brutal social drama tackles a deeply incendiary subject. Words by Cath Clarke

81 Celebrating BAFTA’s 70th anniversary

through the prism of the Film Awards, courtesy of photography taken from the BAFTA Archive.

51 La La Land

A ravishing love story, packed with rapturous song and dance numbers that homage the classic musicals of the 1940s and 1950s. Words by Simon Thompson

100 In Memoriam

55 Manchester by the Sea

A raw and powerful portrayal of grief, tenderly told in a way that is both immeasurably beautiful and inescapably moving. Words by David Jenkins

109 Officers of the Academy 111 Partners of the Academy

59 Moonlight

113 Film Awards Partners

A coming of age film with a difference, this sublime drama artfully flips the notion of predetermination of the self on its head. Words by Catherine Bray

115 Film Awards Gift Providers 117 Acknowledgements & Credits

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H R H T H E D U K E O F C A M B R I D G E, KG President of the Academy

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WELCOM E EE

BRITISH

TO

ACA DE MY

THE FIL M

AWA RDS

W

elcome to the EE British Academy Film Awards, BAFTA’s annual celebration of the greatest achievements in film. We are well-known for celebrating excellence and championing creativity through our Awards, but many people are unaware of the breadth of our charitable activity. BAFTA matters so much because it is committed to identifying talented individuals, and making sure they receive the encouragement, professional support and advice that will enable them to succeed. We do a lot of work in this area, all A M A N D A B E R R Y OBE year round, in the UK, the US and Asia. It’s an important Chief Executive of the Academy point to make at this time, because we are all aware that the future of our industry depends on diverse voices and talents coming through, both on camera and behind it. With regard to diversity, we recently announced some important changes to eligibility for the British categories from 2019, and we couldn’t have done that without the outstanding support of the industry. We need everyone to think about the opportunities they could offer, and to ensure talented individuals from all backgrounds are given every opportunity to succeed. There is a groundswell of support for change and we look forward to making genuine progress in the coming years. JANE LUSH Tonight we are delighted to bestow the Academy’s Chair of the Academy highest honours to Mel Brooks, the iconic and inspirational film-maker and comedian who receives the Fellowship, and Curzon, which has been championing bold and visionary film-making for the last 80-plus years and receives the award for Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema. Our sincere thanks to the Film Committee and BAFTA matters its chair and deputy chair, Dame Pippa Harris and Marc Samuelson; to Anne Morrison, deputy chair so much because it is of the Academy; to the incredible BAFTA staff; and to EE and all of our partners. Thank you to each committed to identifying and every one of you for your continued support and belief in what we do. Please do take a moment to look at the cover talented individuals. of this year’s brochure, which reflects our passion for film – it’s an interwoven story of the array of talent and creative collaboration at the heart of great film-making. We hope you like it. Have a wonderful evening.

FOLLOW US #EEBA F TA s

bafta.org

/BA F TA

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@BA F TA

BA F TA

BA F TA


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WELCOM E

FROM

I

OUR

SPONSO R

’m delighted to welcome you to this year’s celebration of film, the 20th year of EE’s partnership with BAFTA. In those 20 years, there’s probably not been a more globally tumultuous year than the one we have just experienced. In such times, it’s often cinema that we turn to for escapism, or simply a message of hope, to remind ourselves of the belief that you can make things better, and that a fertile imagination can really change the world. It is said that cinema, even in its most far-out forms – perhaps in la-la land – holds some sort of mirror to our MARC ALLERA society. Often it’s more direct, such as Hell or High Water or CEO, EE I, Daniel Blake, both of which moved me in different ways this year. Sometimes, it’s done more subtly; Zootropolis, for example, taught children in a witty and charming way that it really is better if we all just get along. New and emerging talent is at the heart of EE’s relationship with BAFTA. It’s one of EE’s great privileges to work with a judging panel – comprising of chair Marc Samuelson, Lucy Bevan, Edith Bowman, Leo Davis, Lena de Casparis, Andrew Dickens, Mark Herbert, Larushka Ivan-Zadeh, James King, Thomas Macklin, Lee Magiday, Will Poulter, Susanna White and Terri White – to pour over prospective candidates for this year’s EE Rising Star category. It was lovely, in particular, to see former winner Will there, who was, of course, excellent in last year’s Best Film, The Revenant. On the subject of former winners, 2016’s EE Cinema, even in its Rising Star, John Boyega, is about to appear in a film, The Circle, all about what happens when most far-out forms, holds the world becomes completely connected – an interesting topic, for sure. When I was younger, we a mirror to our society. would watch films about this strange place where you could converse with people via video or small devices attached to your person. Some even imagined drones that would automatically perform tasks while connected wirelessly to some sort of global computer system. It’s amazing to think that we now live in the future. Twenty years ago, when our relationship with BAFTA began, it seemed very far, far away. I write all of this knowing that, in the future, you will be reading it at the annual celebration of everything that is great about British cinema. I’m looking forward to the evening, and I hope that you enjoy it as much as I will.

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Champagne for the Independently Minded

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With 288 hectares of their own vineyards, Taittinger is the second largest grower in the region and is passionate about nature and taking care of the environment. Being ‘Green’ is in their everyday DNA, working with Mother Nature to produce the best Chardonnay (for floral elegance), Pinot Noir (for regal richness) and Pinot Meunier (for fruity roundness). E R Pick too early, and the wines would be lean; U T pick too late, and they would lack structure A N and durability. R

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Some 18 metres underground the UNESCO 4 th Century Roman cellars form Taittinger’s heart. R AGEING Here, their crème de la crème cuvée –

Comtes de Champagne ‘Blanc de Blancs’

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(100% Chardonnay) – is left to gently mature and is only released after a minimum of 8 years.

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The blending of Taittinger Brut Reserve’s three grape varieties, from a range of vintages, is an art. The elegant balance of the Chardonnay rich Taittinger style is vital.

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Champagne Officiel de BAFTA depuis 2003.

Official Champagne to BAFTA 1 3


BEFORE YOU WALK THE RED CARPET, FLY IT.

Proud to be the official airline of the EE British Academy Film Awards.

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American Airlines, the Flight Symbol logo and the Tail Symbol are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld alliance, LLC. © 2016 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.


THE

NOM I NATIONS

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WALT DISNEY STUDIOS MOTION PICTURES, UK THANKS THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR NOMINEES

ANIMATED FILM Andrew Stanton

ANIMATED FILM Ron Clements, John Musker

ANIMATED FILM Byron Howard, Rich Moore

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Richard Bluff, Stephane Ceretti, Paul Corbould, Jonathan Fawkner PRODUCTION DESIGN John Bush, Charles Wood MAKE UP & HAIR Jeremy Woodhead SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Robert Legato, Dan Lemmon, Andrew R. Jones, Adam Valdez

MAKE UP & HAIR Amanda Knight, Neal Scanlan, Lisa Tomblin SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Neil Corbould, Hal Hickel, Mohen Leo, John Knoll, Nigel Sumner 1 6

© Disney 2017


TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

A DA PTED S C R EEN P L AY A R R I VA L

H AC KS AW R I D G E

Eric Heisserer

Andrew Knight, Robert Schenkkan

HIDDEN FIGURES

LION

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

Theodore Melfi, Allison Schroeder

Luke Davies

Tom Ford

A NI M ATED FILM FI N DI N G DORY

KUBO AND

Andrew Stanton

THE T WO STRINGS

Travis Knight

MOANA

ZOOTROPOLIS

Ron Clements, John Musker

Byron Howard, Rich Moore

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TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

BEST FIL M A R R I VA L

I, DANIEL BL AKE

Dan Levine, Shawn Levy, David Linde, Aaron Ryder

Rebecca O’Brien

LA LA LAND

M A N C H E S T E R BY T H E S E A

MOONLIGHT

Fred Berger, Jordan Horowitz, Marc Platt

Lauren Beck, Matt Damon, Chris Moore, Kimberly Steward, Kevin J Walsh

Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Adele Romanski

BRITISH SHORT A NI M ATION THE ALAN DIMENSION

Jac Clinch, Jonathan Harbottle, Millie Marsh

A LOVE STORY

TOUGH

Khaled Gad, Anushka Kishani Naanayakkara, Elena Ruscombe-King

Jennifer Zheng

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THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY THANKS

THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND IS PROUD TO CONGRATULATE OUR BAFTA AWARDS NOMINEES

Adapted Screenplay

LUKE DAVIES Supporting Actor

DEV PATEL Supporting Actress

NICOLE KIDMAN Original Music

DUSTIN O’HALLORAN HAUSCHKA Cinematography

GREIG FRASER 2 0


TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

BRITISH SHORT FILM CONSUMED

HOME

Richard John Seymour

Shpat Deda, Afolabi Kuti, Daniel Mulloy, Scott O’Donnell

MOUTH OF HELL

T H E PA R T Y

S TA N D BY

Bart Gavigan, Samir Mehanovic, Ailie Smith, Michael Wilson

Farah Abushwesha, Emmet Fleming, Andrea Harkin, Conor MacNeill

Jack Hannon, Charlotte Regan

CINEM ATOGR APHY

A R R I VA L

H E L L O R H I G H WAT E R

Bradford Young

Giles Nuttgens

LA LA LAND

LION

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

Linus Sandgren

Greig Fraser

Seamus McGarvey

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Proudly congratulates its nominees and wishes all a successful evening.

ALLIED COSTUME DESIGN Joanna Johnston

FENCES SUPPORTING ACTRESS Viola Davis

PARAMOUNT PICTURES UK Building 5, Chiswick Park, 556 Chiswick High Road, London W4 5YF www.Paramount.co.uk ©2017 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

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TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

COSTUME DESIGN ALLIED

FA N TA S T I C B E A S T S A N D

Joanna Johnston

WHERE TO FIND THEM

Colleen Atwood

FLORENCE FOSTER

JACKIE

LA LA LAND

JENKINS

Madeline Fontaine

Mary Zophres

A R R I VA L

I, DANIEL BL AKE

Denis Villeneuve

Ken Loach

LA LA LAND

M A N C H E S T E R BY T H E S E A

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

Damien Chazelle

Kenneth Lonergan

Tom Ford

Consolata Boyle

D I R EC TO R

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TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

D O CU M EN TA RY 13 t h

T H E B E AT L E S:

Ava DuVernay, Spencer Averick, Howard Barish

E I G H T D AY S A W E E K – THE TOURING YEARS

Ron Howard, Brian Grazer, Scott Pascucci, Nigel Sinclair

THE EAGLE HUNTRESS

NOTES ON BLINDNESS

WEINER

Otto Bell, Stacey Reiss

Peter Middleton, James Spinney

Josh Kriegman, Elyse Steinberg

EDITING A R R I VA L

H AC KS AW R I D G E

Joe Walker

John Gilbert

LA LA LAND

M A N C H E S T E R BY T H E S E A

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

Tom Cross

Jennifer Lame

Joan Sobel

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The OďŹƒcial Chocolatier to the British Academy of Film and Television Arts

New Rare & Vintage collection now available 20 bars, 6 countries, upgrade to the best chocolate in the world.

hotelchocolat.com 2 6


TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

FI L M N OT I N THE ENGLISH L ANGUAGE D H E E PA N

J U L I E TA

Jacques Audiard, Pascal Caucheteux

Pedro Almodóvar, Agustín Almodóvar

M U S TA N G

SON OF SAUL

TONI ERDMANN

Deniz Gamze Ergüven, Charles Gillibert

László Nemes, Gábor Sipos

Maren Ade, Janine Jackowski

ANDREW GARFIELD

CASEY AFFLECK

Hacksaw Ridge

Manchester by the Sea

JAKE GYLLE N HA AL

R YA N G O S L I N G

VIGGO MORTENSEN

Nocturnal Animals

La La Land

Captain Fantastic

LEADING A C TO R

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TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

LEADING ACTRESS A MY ADA MS

E M I LY B L U N T

Arrival

The Girl on the Train

EMMA STONE

M ERYL STREEP

N ATA L I E P O R TM A N

La La Land

Florence Foster Jenkins

Jackie

MAKE UP & HAIR DOCTOR STR ANGE

FLORENCE

Jeremy Woodhead

FOSTER JENKINS

J Roy Helland, Daniel Phillips

H AC KS AW R I D G E

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

ROGUE ONE:

Shane Thomas

Donald Mowat, Yolanda Toussieng

A S TA R WA R S S T O RY

Amanda Knight, Neal Scanlan, Lisa Tomblin

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AMERICAN HONEY Andrea Arnold OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM NOMINEE

FILM4 2017 T2 TRAINSPOTTING Danny Boyle / BILLY LYNN’S LONG HALFTIME WALK Ang Lee / FREE FIRE Ben Wheatley / TRESPASS AGAINST US Adam Smith / UNA Benedict Andrews / HOW TO TALK TO GIRLS AT PARTIES John Cameron Mitchell / THE OATH Baltasar Kormákur / JOURNEYMAN Paddy Considine / OLD BOYS Toby MacDonald / THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Martin McDonagh / DARK RIVER Clio Barnard / BEAST Michael Pearce / LEAN ON PETE Andrew Haigh / YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE Lynne Ramsay / THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER Yorgos Lanthimos / I AM NOT A WITCH Rungano Nyoni / MARY MAGDALENE Garth Davis / MARADONA Asif Kapadia / DISOBEDIENCE Sebastián Lelio / AMERICAN ANIMALS Bart Layton

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TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

ORIGINAL MUSIC A R R I VA L

JACKIE

Jóhann Jóhannsson

Mica Levi

LA LA LAND

LION

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

Justin Hurwitz

Dustin O’Halloran, Hauschka

Abel Korzeniowski

H E L L O R H I G H WAT E R

I, DANIEL BL AKE

Taylor Sheridan

Paul Laverty

LA LA LAND

M A N C H E S T E R BY T H E S E A

MOONLIGHT

Damien Chazelle

Kenneth Lonergan

Barry Jenkins

ORIGINAL S C R EEN P L AY

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TO ALL TONIGHT’S NOMINEES SUPPORTED BY THE BFI FILM FUND 3 2

AMERICAN HONEY THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS THE HARD STOP I, DANIEL BLAKE NOTES ON BLINDNESS

#BFIBacked #lotteryfunded


TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

O U TS TA N D I N G B R I T I S H F I L M

AMERICAN HONEY

DENIAL

FA N TA S T I C B E A S T S A N D

Andrea Arnold, Lars Knudsen, Pouya Shahbazian, Jay Van Hoy

Mick Jackson, Gary Foster, Russ Krasnoff, David Hare

WHERE TO FIND THEM

I, DANIEL BL AKE

NOTES ON BLINDNESS

UNDER THE SHADOW

Ken Loach, Rebecca O’Brien, Paul Laverty

Peter Middleton, James Spinney, Mike Brett, Jo-Jo Ellison, Steve Jamison

Babak Anvari, Emily Leo, Oliver Roskill, Lucan Toh

David Yates, David Heyman, Steve Kloves, JK Rowling, Lionel Wigram

O U TS TA N D I N G DEBUT By a British Writer, Director or Producer BABAK ANVARI ( WRITER/DIRECTOR), EMILY LEO, OLIVER ROSKILL , LUCAN TOH (PRODUCERS)

GEORGE A MPONSAH ( WRITER/DIRECTOR/ PRODUCER), DIONNE WALKER ( WRITER/PRODUCER)

Under the Shadow

The Hard Stop

JOHN DONNELLY ( WRITER), BEN A WILLIA MS (DIRECTOR)

MIKE CAREY ( WRITER), CA MILLE GATIN (PRODUCER)

The Pass

The Girl with All the Gifts

PETER MIDDLETON ( WRITER/ DIRECTOR/PRODUCER), JA MES SPINNEY ( WRITER/ DIRECTOR/PRODUCER), JO -JO ELLISON (PRODUCER)

Notes on Blindness

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TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

PRODUCTION DESIGN DOCTOR STR ANGE

FA N TA S T I C B E A S T S A N D

Charles Wood, John Bush

WHERE TO FIND THEM

Stuart Craig, Anna Pinnock

HAIL, CAESAR!

LA LA LAND

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

Jess Gonchor, Nancy Haigh

David Wasco, Sandy Reynolds-Wasco

Shane Valentino, Meg Everist

A R R I VA L

D E E P WAT E R H O R I Z O N

Sylvain Bellemare, Claude La Haye, Bernard Gariépy Strobl

Dror Mohar, Mike Prestwood Smith, Wylie Stateman, Renee Tondelli, David Wyman

FA N TA S T I C B E A S T S A N D

H AC KS AW R I D G E

LA LA LAND

WHERE TO FIND THEM

Peter Grace, Robert Mackenzie, Kevin O’Connell, Andy Wright

Mildred Iatrou Morgan, Ai-Ling Lee, Steve A Morrow, Andy Nelson

SOUND

Niv Adiri, Glenn Freemantle, Simon Hayes, Andy Nelson, Ian Tapp

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Colleen Atwood

Stuart Craig Anna Pinnock

Niv Adiri Glenn Freemantle Simon Hayes Andy Nelson Ian Tapp

David Yates, J.K. Rowling David Heyman, Steve Kloves Lionel Wigram 3 6

Tim Burke Pablo Grillo Christian Manz David Watkins


TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS A R R I VA L

DOCTOR STR ANGE

Louis Morin

Richard Bluff, Stephane Ceretti, Paul Corbould, Jonathan Fawkner

FA N TA S T I C B E A S T S A N D

THE JUNGLE BOOK

ROGUE ONE:

WHERE TO FIND THEM

Robert Legato, Dan Lemmon, Andrew R Jones, Adam Valdez

A S TA R WA R S S T O RY

Tim Burke, Pablo Grillo, Christian Manz, David Watkins

Neil Corbould, Hal Hickel, Mohen Leo, John Knoll, Nigel Sumner

SUPPORTING A C TO R AARON

D E V PAT E L

T AY L O R - J O H N S O N

Lion

Nocturnal Animals

HUGH GRANT

JEFF BRIDGES

MAHERSHAL A ALI

Florence Foster Jenkins

Hell or High Water

Moonlight

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TH E

NOMI N A TI O N S

SUPPORTING ACTRESS H AY L E Y S Q U I R E S

MICHELLE WILLIAMS

I, Daniel Blake

Manchester by the Sea

NAOMIE HARRIS

NICOLE KIDMAN

V I O L A DAV I S

Moonlight

Lion

Fences

A N YA T AY L O R - J O Y

L A I A C O S TA

RUTH NEGGA

TOM HOLL AND

THE EE RISING S TA R AWA R D Voted for by the public

LUCAS HEDGES

Nominations are correct at the time of going to print. BAFTA reserves the right to make changes to the names listed at any time up until 12 February 2017.

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J URIES

&

CHA PTERS

JURIES

B R I T ISH SH O RT A N I M AT I O N Iain Harvey (Chair) Julie Baines Gill Bradley Michael Chapman Temple Clark Sarah Cox GaĂŤlle Denis Iain Gardner Akiya Henry Justin Johnson Robin Lyons B R I T ISH SH O RT FI L M Andrew Curtis (Chair) Bola Agbaje Richard Conway Anna Duffield Amit Gupta Ian Haydn Smith Kelly Valentine Hendry Hong Khaou Michael Price Paul William Smith With thanks to Mahalia Belo and Sally Phillips for their help in the longlisting stages.

O U TSTA N D I N G B R I T ISH FI L M Pippa Harris (Chair) Lisa Bryer Sally El Hosaini Gillian Hawser Tom Hooper Asif Kapadia Georgina Lowe Sophie Okonedo Allon Reich Marc Samuelson Kenith Trodd

CHAPTERS

O U TSTA N D I N G D EB U T BY A B R I T ISH WR I T ER, D I R EC TO R O R PRO D U CER Tanya Seghatchian (Chair) David Arnold Moira Buffini Anthony Chen Charles Gant Mark Gatiss Jinx Godfrey Elizabeth Karlsen William Nicholson Clare Stewart With thanks to Olivia Colman, Joe Cornish, Kevin Macdonald and Gabrielle Tana for their help in the longlisting stages.

EE R ISI N G STA R Marc Samuelson (Chair) Lucy Bevan Edith Bowman Leo Davis Lena de Casparis Andrew Dickens Mark Herbert Larushka Ivan-Zadeh James King Thomas Macklin Lee Magiday Will Poulter Susanna White Terri White With thanks to Charles Gant for his help in the longlisting stages.

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CR A F T CH A P T ERS Cinematography Costume Design Directing Editing Make Up & Hair Music Production Design Screenplay Sound Special Visual Effects O P T- I N CH A P T ERS Animation British Short Animation and British Short Film Documentary Film Not in the English Language Outstanding British Film Craft chapters are made up of Academy members with specialist experience in the relative field. Opt-in chapters are open to all members who are willing to commit to watching the eligible films. Special Awards are the gift of the BAFTA Board and sector committees. For full details of the voting process, please visit: www.bafta.org/film


KARLIE KLOSS

ATELIERSWAROVSKI.COM


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A R R I VA L WO R DS BY L A RUSH K A I VA N -Z A D EH

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L

anguage is the first weapon drawn in a conflict.” When linguistics professor Louise Banks (Amy Adams) wrote that in the preface to one of her books, she little expected to find herself on the front line of an alien invasion. Yet, as mysterious UFOs hover silently above 12 different points on the Earth, Banks is swiftly enlisted for a very special operation. Her task is to attempt to communicate with the giant tentacled creatures that loom inside these vast, ominous ships. With the threat of planetary destruction literally hanging in the air, she focuses down to asking them a single question: “What is your purpose on Earth?” The big question for all of us, of course. There have been many ‘first contact’ movies, but Arrival is a breed apart. Undoubtedly one to bracket under ‘intelligent science fiction’, it is ambitious, intricately woven and remarkably

controlled. And it’s determined to gracefully upset the genre’s clichés. At its heart is a woman. And it is very much a woman, not a girl. A woman who is mourning the loss of her only daughter, as we learn via a heartbreaking opening cradle-to-grave montage, its deft editing recalling that of Pixar’s Up. Delivering another quietly mesmerising performance, Adams forms the empathetic human core of this cerebral movie. Like the complex, conflicted female leads of two of director Denis Villeneuve’s previous films, Incendies and Sicario, her character is questing after truth in a male-dominated world. But where does that truth finally lie and what other dark secrets will be uncovered on this journey? Elegantly expanded from Ted Chiang’s short story, Eric Heisserer’s screenplay is unashamedly stimulating for the grey matter. He and Villeneuve are unafraid to intellectually play around

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AR RI V A L

In today’s world of jittery geopolitics, Arrival’s anxieties have never felt more urgent. with abstract concepts concerning the nature of language, philosophy and mnemonics, to create a film that has also almost miraculously connected with an enthusiastic mainstream audience. And in today’s world of jittery geopolitics, its anxieties have never felt more urgent. Having said that, Arrival proceeds at a solemn and stately pace. Accompanying it is a spare, ethereal score from Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson, a Villeneuve regular. Laced through that is an

extraordinary soundscape, booming with uneasy menace. And then there’s the mistily sombre photography, lensed by Selma’s cinematographer, Bradford Young. All these elements meld to conjure Arrival’s uniquely cool, crepuscular atmosphere. Those looking for hints of what director Villeneuve will do with the much-anticipated Blade Runner sequel will note that he uses special effects sparingly, to all the more tinglingly memorable effect. For example, the ‘wow’ moment where Adams and her fellow boffin ( Jeremy Renner) find themselves adrift in zero gravity as they enter the weird, stony funnel of the alien craft. Visually nothing is quite as expected, everything deliberately, thoughtfully, slightly aslant. Ultimately unfathomable, Arrival is a film that puzzles and thrums in your mind. Its looping storyline daringly stretches the limits of cohesive narrative. A moving science fiction that envelopes the profound riddles of time, memory, birth, human choice and loss within its high reaching orbit. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh is a film commentator and chief critic at Metro

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Dan Levine, Shawn Levy, David Linde, Aaron Ryder

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Adapted Screenplay, Cinematography, Director, Editing, Leading Actress, Original Music, Sound, Special Visual Effects

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THANKS THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR NOMINEES

BEST FILM REBECCA O’BRIEN OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM KEN LOACH, REBECCA O’BRIEN, PAUL LAVERTY DIRECTOR KEN LOACH ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY PAUL LAVERTY SUPPORTING ACTRESS HAYLEY SQUIRES

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I, DA NIEL BL A KE WO R DS BY C AT H CL A R K E

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here is a scene in I, Daniel Blake – that scene – which people who have seen the film don’t exactly discuss, so much as exchange meaningful glances about. Set in a food bank in Newcastle, a young mum, practically blacking out with hunger, rips the lid off a tin and scoops baked beans out with her fingers, shoveling them down cold. She’s not thinking; basic need kicks in. As with all the details in Ken Loach’s film about modern poverty, what makes the scene so devastating is the almost certainty that somewhere, right now, a woman is telling her kids: ‘Mummy isn’t hungry today’, when they ask why she’s not eating dinner. The woman in Loach’s drama is fictional; we know that. But she feels real, and that’s perhaps why we don’t want to talk about this – the most shameful and humiliating moment in

her life. Instinctively, we feel the need to protect her. I, Daniel Blake has a relationship to documentary. Made in 10 weeks on location in Newcastle in autumn 2015, the script emerged out of research by Loach – now 80, reports of his retirement greatly exaggerated – and his long-time scriptwriter Paul Laverty. Travelling up and down the UK, the first person they met was a 19-year-old man living in a hostel; his fridge was empty and the previous week he hadn’t eaten for three days. In Glasgow, Laverty heard the story on which the food bank scene is based: a woman so hungry she stood in a church hall eating cold beans. Out of conversations with ordinary people, Laverty wrote the fictional stories of Katie (BAFTA nominee Hayley Squires), a single mum holding it together

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I ,

DANI EL

Roger Ebert described the movies as “a machine that generates empathy”. He might have been talking about I, Daniel Blake.

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Rebecca O’Brien

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Director, Original Screenplay, Outstanding British Film, Supporting Actress

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B LA K E

for her kids, and Daniel Blake, a 59-yearold carpenter recovering from a heart attack. Dan is the sort of man Woody Guthrie might have penned a song about – a grafter and a worker, a man who could build you a house if you gave him a plot of land (even if he can’t format his CV into the correct font). Stubbornness and humour get Dan get through the sheer slog of the benefits system. It’s a cracking performance by stand-up comedian Dave Johns. The film critic Roger Ebert perfectly described the movies as “a machine that generates empathy”. He might have been talking about I, Daniel Blake. And it’s not battering-ram bleak. Optimism shines through. Everywhere you look in the film, you will find small acts of kindness: the nice ladies who volunteer at the food bank (played by actual nice lady volunteers), scrupulous not to treat their clients as ‘charity cases’; or the shop manager who behaves like a human being, not an employee of a supermarket chain with protocols to follow. Ken Loach has made more than 50 films, and he’s the UK’s most successful director (if you’re measuring in Palme d’Ors; Loach and his team have two). Fifty years ago, he made Cathy Come Home (1966), the seminal television drama about homelessness and social injustice in the 1960s that imprinted the image of a mother’s children being torn away and put in care. In 50 years’ time, when people look back to the era of austerity, food banks, zero hours contracts, benefits sanctions and unaffordable housing, will it be the young mum in the food bank that they remember? Cath Clarke is the UK film editor of Time Out


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LA LA LAND WO R DS BY SI M O N T H O M PS O N

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onsider this. You’re reading this piece because La La Land has been nominated for Best Film at the BAFTA Film Awards, yet La La Land was a film that almost didn’t happen. No studio wanted to finance Damien Chazelle’s project without compromising his vision. Today, that same film has a total of 11 BAFTA nominations. From the second that Chazelle had that lightbulb moment to its production, lock of the edit of the final film and its first rapturous screening, La La Land was never just a film, but a dream that became a reality. Written and directed by Chazelle, the film follows a musician, played by Ryan Gosling, and an aspiring actress, played by Emma Stone, who meet and fall in love in Los Angeles. The film’s title refers both to the city of Los Angeles and to the idiom for being out of touch with reality. While La La Land is an original and personal

piece, its inspirations flow through its veins. Chazelle himself has cited the likes of Sheeler and Strand’s Manhatta (1921) and Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera (1929) as key influences, as much as Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) and The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967) and Kelly and Donen’s Singin’ in the Rain (1952), among others. Look deeper, as you should at Los Angeles itself, and it’s not impossible to see the beating heart of films such as Robert Greenwald’s Xanadu (1980) and even James Frawley’s The Muppet Movie (1979) helping force blood through this beautiful beast and give it life. In an interview with The New York Times, Chazelle said that, “LA, even more so than any other American city, obscures, sometimes neglects, its own history. But that can also be its own magical thing, because it’s a city that reveals itself bit by bit, like an onion, if you take the time

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LA

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La La Land was never just a film, but a dream that became a reality.

to explore it.” La La Land is a film that embodies that imagery in every single frame, every single beat. While the sublime and remarkable Gosling and Stone are the face of the film, the glue that binds the whole spectacle together is rarely seen but always heard: the soundtrack. However, the film’s soundtrack is not just the magical body of work of composer Justin Hurwitz; it’s the latent hum of the city, the bleating and pinging of horns and mobile phone notifications, the muttering, laughter, tears and general city bustle that fills the belly of the film, which the wonderful score dances over and through. Hurwitz’s lilting and honeyed touches and bold yet nuanced licks put the breath in the lungs of the city, giving this classic boy-meetsgirl story an exciting and refreshing twist. Although heaped in nostalgia for the musicals of yesteryear, his refrains have become part of contemporary pop culture.

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La La Land, an exquisitely controlled work without losing any of its fire, is inside everyone who has ever dreamed. It’s the story of anyone who has ever tried, which makes it all the more remarkable that it’s a story that was almost never told. Simon Thompson is a British film journalist based in Los Angeles, working with Reuters, BBC, Sky News and others

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Fred Berger, Jordan Horowitz, Marc Platt

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Cinematography, Costume Design, Director, Editing, Leading Actor, Leading Actress, Original Music, Original Screenplay, Production Design, Sound


Film Finances congratulates all of this year’s BAFTA Nominees and is proud to have been the Completion Guarantor of Denial, Jackie, La La Land and Nocturnal Animals

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M A NCHESTER BY T H E S E A WO R DS BY DAV I D J EN K I NS

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er the writings of the Old Testament, Dante and more literary fabulists than you’d care to mention, Hell, as a place, is pretty damn hot. Flames, molten rock, twirling plumes of grey-black smoke, the tortured shrieks of the eternally damned – these are the collectively acknowledged sights and sounds of the big place downstairs. In Kenneth Lonergan’s Manchester by the Sea, Hell is conceived quite differently – as a nondescript Massachusetts port town populated by monosyllabic longshoremen and their cheery, child-rearing wives. In the early months, the walkways are glazed with ice and you can see your breath in the air. Yet no place, however quaint, is immune to the burning spectre of human suffering. And so it is that Lee Chandler, magnificently played by Casey

Affleck, is obliged to dance with the devil. A moment of absent-minded whimsy – a misplaced piece of cosmetic punctuation in life’s epic poem – alters everything for Lee. Manchester becomes his own private hell. Though this would appear to be describing some depressive trawl through the dankest recesses of the psyche, Lonergan’s film, his third as a director, is in reality a perversely uplifting and affirmative experience. It offers an agonisingly poignant celebration of individuality (not individualism) and endurance. It depicts the ways in which we improvise methods to deal with adversity, forge connections and just drag our underpaid, under-loved keisters through the day. And yet the tragedy at the centre of the story is that this very individuality is the trait that makes our fellow man all

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MANCH ES TER

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Lonergan’s sublime everyman elegy taps into the ecstasy and agony of existence. but unknowable. Lee, a melting reactor core of sad-sack melancholy, is first seen carrying out his humiliating chores as the janitor of a small housing tenement that’s a decent drive from Manchester. He appears to despise his clients, even those who have the hots for him. The film, in essence, acquits him of his ill behaviour. It asks that we think hard before needlessly antagonising those around us, because they might just be propped on the edge of sanity and looking down into the abyss. And for good reason. Soon, Lee is coerced into caring for his nephew, Patrick (a lovable, sliver-tongued

rogue, played by Lucas Hedges), once his big brother succumbs to a degenerative heart condition. He is reacquainted with Manchester. The landscape becomes an all-enveloping grief trigger: its eerie small-town mediocrity, its wood-panelled drinking holes, the awkwardly prolonged glances of concerned townsfolk (some supportive, others vindictive), its frozen graveyard and an old flame (Michelle Williams in full heartbreaker mode). Lonergan’s sublime everyman elegy taps into the ecstasy and agony of existence, the crushing impermanence of things, the faded innocence of youth, the cruel nature of responsibility, the personal prison of guilt and memory, what it means to be a human and to live with and care for other humans. Every frame, every cut, every word, every syllable, every sound and every nuance is calculated to perfection and freighted heavily with implication and substance. Lonergan does not pity Lee, but he does empathise with him. His film is the story of how Lee discovers that, like all awful places, Hell too has an exit sign. David Jenkins is the editor of Little White Lies magazine

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Lauren Beck, Matt Damon, Chris Moore, Kimberly Steward, Kevin J Walsh

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Director, Editing, Leading Actor, Original Screenplay, Supporting Actress

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MICHAEL G. WILSON AND BARBARA BROCCOLI C O N G R AT U L AT E A L L O F T O N I G H T ’ S B A F T A N O M I N E E S A N D W I N N E R S.

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MOONLIGHT WO R DS BY C AT H ER I N E B R AY

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oming of age stories can take many forms. Often, they turn on a pivotal event or period in time; that one perfect summer, say, or a fatal character flaw that expresses itself in a single tragic mistake. Moonlight is a coming of age tour de force that eschews stagily convenient turning points. Perhaps because of their shared experience growing up on the same Miami housing project where the film is set and was filmed, writer-director Barry Jenkins and playwright Tarell McCraney (who has a ‘Story By’ credit) instead have gracefully developed a naturalistic yet fiercely poetic narrative, spanning close to two decades in the life of its young protagonist, Chiron. None of which is to imply that this remarkable film is not suffused with defining moments that catch our attention

and hold it in a vice-like grip; it is surely impossible to watch the moment when nine-year-old Chiron (played brilliantly with watchful, wide-eyed vulnerability by newcomer Alex Hibbert) realises his amiable father substitute (a hugely and confoundingly likeable performance from Mahershala Ali) is also the dealer supplying crack to his struggling mother (Naomie Harris) without feeling crushed on his behalf. Yet crucially, there is none of the artifice that suggests character and destiny are forged in a single moment, as plucked from a screenwriting ‘how-to’ book’s list of useful inciting incidents. Rather, Chiron and those around him are characters we witness being sanded and worn from moment to moment, evolving along a path that might plausibly end

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MOONLI G HT at any one of a number of destinations, confounding a more schematic approach. None of this subtle work would have borne fruit without powerhouse performances across the board from a revelatory cast. Played as a beanpole thin teenager by Ashton Sanders, the adolescent Chiron is so heartbreakingly nervous and unsure of himself that it makes you want to step right into the picture and somehow help him. On witnessing Chiron’s transformation into a toughened 20-something, that impulse endures, so clearly does Trevante Rhodes convey the deep well of feeling beneath the protective carapace of macho posturing that is essential to his survival. It is a tribute to the skill of the filmmakers that Moonlight is so compelling that it feels like it passes in the blink of an eye, and yet is so real and plausible that it simultaneously feels like years have passed, years during which we have lived with the characters, felt their pains, their attractions, their confusions and their passions. This

transfusion of empathy is perhaps the greatest power film has at its disposal, a gift that, when employed in the service of such a humane piece of cinema, shows us what art is capable of at its finest. It doesn’t feel like an exaggeration to say that Moonlight’s overwhelmingly positive reception also represents, in a sense, a coming of age for film culture – a film about the life of a gay black teenager, however finely crafted, is unlikely to have been received as warmly even 10 years ago. Catherine Bray is a writer, producer and Variety film critic

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Adele Romanski

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Original Screenplay, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress

A transfusion of empathy is perhaps the greatest power film has at its disposal. 6 1


MEL BROOKS T H E FEL LOWSH I P Words by Neil Smith

Images from Rex Features, BFI

O

ne has to go back to 1964 to find the first time the man born Melvin Kaminsky, on 28 June 1926, made an impact on BAFTA’s voters. That was the year a three-minute short called The Critic shared its Animated Film award (with Automania 2000), an accolade that was at that time open to works of any length. The film is simplicity itself. Over a montage of surreal abstract imagery, a 71-year-old man is heard muttering discontentedly in a thick Russian accent. “What the hell is this?” he mumbles as shapes swirl to a harpsichord suite by Bach. “It’s garbage, that’s what it is!” The speaker is Mel Brooks, essentially reprising the 2000 Year Old Man character he’d previously honed on television and record. Hailed by one newspaper as “the epitome of wit”, The Critic also won that year’s Academy Award for Best Short Subject (Cartoons). Brooks’ film career actually began a decade earlier, when sketches he’d penned for a Broadway stage revue were repackaged for the screen in 1954’s New Faces. He would have to wait until 1967, though, for his first hit. As a teenager, Brooks spent six months gophering for a shabby impresario who funded his productions by bilking old ladies out of their savings. Years later, this same individual inspired Brooks to create Max Bialystock – a dodgy showman who realises the easiest way to make a mint is to stage a flop. The Producers, of course, was anything but, giving Brooks not just his first commercial success but also an Academy Award for best original screenplay. Its chief achievement, though, was to mark the arrival of a bold comedic voice: one who, as the glorious “Springtime for Hitler” number proved, was not afraid to test the boundaries of taste in the service of satire. “If you get on a soapbox and argue with Hitler, you’re going to lose,” the director explains. “But if you make him seem foolish and silly, you’ve won the argument.”

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Brooks’ follow-up work, 1970’s The Twelve Chairs, was a different beast entirely: an adaption of a 1928 Russian novel about three men on the trail of a fortune concealed inside an item of dining room furniture. This, however, was merely the warm-up act to another Brooks classic: 1974’s Blazing Saddles, an outrageous Western spoof that earned the director and his writing team a BAFTA nomination for Screenplay. “I adore Westerns; they got me through my childhood,” Brooks says. “So the film is certainly a gorgeous salute to the genre. But it also has something to say about racial prejudice. I’ve always got another ball to pitch in my back pocket.” Having mercilessly skewered one venerable film genre, Brooks promptly pilloried another with Young Frankenstein, a pitch-perfect parody of the Universal Studios creature feature shot in shimmering black and white. The idea was Gene Wilder’s, who had pitched the project to Brooks during a

break in filming on Blazing Saddles. The film’s anarchic sensibility, though, was all Brooks, who used such outlandish notions as Peter Boyle’s Monster performing “Puttin’ on the Ritz” to exorcise a juvenile terror of Boris Karloff’s bolt-necked original. “When I was five years old, I was convinced he was going to climb up the fire escape and eat me,” Brooks remembers. “My mother said, ‘He lives in Transylvania, Melvin. How’s he going to find you five floors up in Brooklyn?’”

“If you get on a soapbox and argue with Hitler, you’re going to lose. But if you make him seem foolish and silly, you’ve won the argument.” For a man blessed with such a facility with words, the idea of making a silent film must have surely been anathema. Yet, that was exactly the challenge Brooks set himself in 1976’s Silent Movie, an all-star homage to the pre-sound film era whose only word of dialogue – “Non!” – came from French mime artist Marcel Marceau. A different proposition awaited him in High Anxiety, a loving parody of Alfred Hitchcock’s work that amusingly referenced such classics as Psycho (1960), The Birds (1963) and North by Northwest (1959). Hitch (made a BAFTA Fellow himself in 1971) welcomed the compliment, sending Brooks a case of wine as a token of thanks. (“He was very gracious and helpful and we stayed friends until his death,” says Brooks.)

Above left: Blazing Saddles (1974) Left: Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993) Opposite page: The original Young Frankenstein poster Previous page: Celebrating the 40th anniversary of Young Frankenstein, 2014

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Left: Silent Movie (1976) Below left: High Anxiety (1977)

SELECT FILMOGRAPHY ( A S AC TO R , U N L E S S S TAT E D )

2015 Hotel Transylvania 2 (voice) 2005 The Producers (voice) ** 2005 Robots (voice) 1999 Screw Loose 1995 Dracula: Dead and Loving It **** 1994 The Little Rascals 1993 Robin Hood: Men in Tights **** 1992 The Vagrant * 1991 Life Stinks **** 1987 Spaceballs **** 1987 84 Charing Cross Road * 1983 To Be or Not to Be ** 1982 Frances * 1982 My Favorite Year * 1981 History of the World: Part I **** 1980 The Elephant Man * 1979 The Muppet Movie 1977 High Anxiety **** 1976 Silent Movie *** 1974 Young Frankenstein *** 1974 Blazing Saddles *** 1970 The Twelve Chairs *** 1967 The Producers *** 1963 The Critic (Short) (voice/creator)

Brooks’ subsequent targets have included the historical epic (History of the World: Part I, 1981), the sci-fi blockbuster (Spaceballs, 1987) and one of Britain’s most beloved outlaws (Robin Hood: Men in Tights, 1993). Yet it would be wrong to presume this writer, director and occasional leading actor (see the 1983 remake of To Be or Not to Be [1983] and his own Life Stinks [1991]) has devoted himself entirely to comedy. Through his Brooksfilms production company, Brooks has helped to usher to the screen such acclaimed and award-winning dramas as Frances (1982), The Elephant Man (1980) and 84 Charing Cross Road (1987). “Eighty-five point seven per cent of my life has been devoted to comedy, but the other 14.3 per cent has been devoted to drama,” he calculates. “I decided

B A F TA AWA R D S & N O M I N AT I O N S

1975 Screenplay nomination, Blazing

Saddles – Mel Brooks, Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor, Alan Uger 1964 Animated Film winner, The Critic

*Executive

producer or producer only producer ***Also writer and director ****Also writer, director and producer **Also

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Left: Spaceballs (1987) Below left: The Producers (1967) Below: Hotel Transylvania 2 (2015)

Brooksfilms would be a shelter for all of the secret serious films I wanted to make.” In 1984, meanwhile, he enjoyed chart success when his “Hitler Rap” reached number 12 in the UK hit parade. “Why the hell does England get things America doesn’t get?” he muses. “I should be living in London, but the weather in LA is so much nicer.” Brooks’ attentions of late have been focused on Broadway, home to both the hugely successful Producers musical (itself filmed in 2005) and a stage version of Young Frankenstein. He has also been back on the road, taking to the stage after special screenings of Blazing Saddles to field questions from the audience. (“I just sold out the Radio City Music Hall in New York!” he says proudly.) Turning 90 last year, it seems, has done little to sap his energy – or, indeed, his

“Why the hell does England get things America doesn’t? I should be living in London, but the weather in LA is so much nicer.” irrepressible sense of humour. “I think I’ve got more awards than any guy who ever lived, but this is still a thrill,” he says of the Fellowship. “I never like to be sentimental but really, it’s quite an honour. I’d like to say I feel unworthy of it, but that would just be bullshit. I feel absolutely worthy and I’m very happy BAFTA feels the same way…” Neil Smith is a journalist, critic and member of the UK Critics’ Circle

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FELLOWS 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1976 1977 1978 1979 1979 1980 1980 1981 1981 1981 1982 1983 1984 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1992 1993 1993 1994 1995 1996 1996 1996 1996 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997 1998 1998 1999

O F

Alfred Hitchcock Freddie Young obe Grace Wyndham Goldie David Lean Jacques Cousteau Sir Charles Chaplin Lord Olivier Sir Denis Forman Fred Zinnemann Lord Grade Sir Huw Wheldon David Attenborough cbe John Huston Abel Gance Michael Powell Emeric Pressburger Andrzej Wajda Sir Richard Attenborough cbe Sir Hugh Greene Sam Spiegel Jeremy Isaacs Steven Spielberg Federico Fellini Ingmar Bergman Sir Alec Guinness ch, cbe Paul Fox Louis Malle Sir John Gielgud David Plowright Sydney Samuelson cbe Colin Young cbe Michael Grade cbe Billy Wilder Jeanne Moreau Ronald Neame cbe John Schlesinger cbe Dame Maggie Smith Woody Allen Steven Bochco Julie Christie Oswald Morris obe Harold Pinter cbe David Rose Sean Connery Bill Cotton cbe Eric Morecambe & Ernie Wise

THE 1999 2000 2000 2000 2001 2001 2001 2002 2002 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004 2004 2005 2005 2006 2006 2007 2007 2007 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010 2011 2011 2011 2012 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014 2014 2015 2015 2015 2016 2016 2016

ACA DE MY Elizabeth Taylor Michael Caine Stanley Kubrick (posthumous) Peter Bazalgette Albert Finney John Thaw Dame Judi Dench Warren Beatty Merchant Ivory Productions Andrew Davies Sir John Mills Saul Zaentz David Jason John Boorman Roger Graef John Barry obe Sir David Frost obe Lord Puttnam cbe Ken Loach Anne V Coates obe Richard Curtis cbe Will Wright Sir Anthony Hopkins cbe Bruce Forsyth cbe Terry Gilliam Nolan Bushnell Dawn French & Jennifer Saunders Vanessa Redgrave cbe Shigeru Miyamoto Lord Bragg Sir Christopher Lee cbe Peter Molyneux obe Sir Trevor McDonald obe Martin Scorsese Sir Alan Parker Gabe Newell Michael Palin cbe Dame Helen Mirren Rockstar Games Julie Walters cbe Mike Leigh David Braben obe Jon Snow Sir Sidney Poitier John Carmack Ray Galton obe & Alan Simpson obe

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LAIS RIBEIRO CARRYING THE LUISA CLUTCH, PHOTOGRAPHED BY GRAYSON HOFFMAN

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C U R ZO N O U TSTA N D I N G B R I T ISH CO N T R I B U T I O N TO CI N E M A Words by Tim Murray

Images from Curzon

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n a year where companies across many sectors of the film industry have experienced problems, with consolidation, administration and any number of other woes being the order of the day, one company that straddles three sides of the business has gone from strength to strength. Curzon’s successes in production, distribution and exhibition, the keystones of the industry that it works in, are testament to the way chief executive Philip Knatchbull has pieced together the separate components of the different strands of what is now a fully vertically integrated film operator. Its Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema (OBCC) award celebrates the company’s rich heritage, stretching back to the launch of the exhibitor, the distributor’s championing of world cinema and foreign language fare in the UK, as well as noting its recent successes in pushing forward a digital offering and developing a respected independent film and world cinema video-on-demand (vod) operation. Knatchbull took the Curzon brand, an 85-year-old theatrical exhibition institution in London and a pioneer of foreign language films in the capital, and paired it with another long-term stalwart of the arthouse scene, Artificial Eye. In the 10 years since the creation of the Curzon Artificial Eye powerhouse, it has also added a cutting edge vod service in the shape of Curzon Home Cinema. Inevitably, it’s slowly but surely moving into production. Curzon is now a modern, dynamic, fit-for-the-future media film company, one that is fully aware of its heritage and still excelling at bringing world cinema to UK homes, with its digital vod offering taking it into the future. As Knatchbull says about the BAFTA honour: “[This is] an award for all at Curzon; the people you have, the people you surround yourself with. It’s a cliché, but we’re so lucky – the people I have around me for this journey really are extraordinary.” Curzon’s recent history and the story of how the new company built on key industry cornerstones is, Knatchbull notes, “quite a simple one”. Installed as chief executive at the Curzon cinema chain in 2006, Knatchbull – whose CV included stints in the

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“I see it as a three-legged stool. Curzon Cinemas is the shop front; Curzon Artificial Eye is the content; and we have Curzon Home Cinema, too.”

Above: 45 Years (2015), nominated for Outstanding British Film in 2016 Left: Ida (2013), winner of Film Not In The English Language in 2015 Below: A vintage image of the Bloomsbury, then known as the Gate 2 (circa 1983). It was acquired by Artificial Eye in 1986 and renamed the Renoir, before being refitted and renamed as the Curzon Bloomsbury in March 2015 Opposite: Curzon Home Cinema Previous page: The state-of-the-art Curzon Mayfair

financial world, film production and technological insight – set his sights on something more than theatrical exhibition. “I wanted to create a vertically integrated company,” he says. He targeted Artificial Eye, which, like Curzon, was a groundbreaking company, albeit on the distribution side. Both were pioneers in their respective fields, opening up and promoting a world of cinema to wider audiences in London and beyond. He approached the enigmatic Andi Engel, who alongside Pam Balfry was one of the founders of the distributor, who initially gave him the kind of typically blunt reply one would have expected. However, after praising his chutzpah, Engel opened negotiations in 2006, shortly before his death in December that year. After adding the distributor to its expanding operation, now known as Curzon Artificial Eye, the company set about launching its own video-on-demand operation, Curzon Home Cinema, in 2010.

“I see it as a three-legged stool, and thought it was a business model that would work,” explains Knatchbull. “Cinemas are the retail side of the business, the shop front; Curzon Artificial Eye is the content side of the business, with production and development; and we have Curzon Home Cinema, too.”

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CUR ZO N

IN

13

NUM BERS

11/01/16

The date that 45 Years was released day-and-date at the UK box office and on DVD. Andrew Haigh and Tristan Goligher’s film became the first day-anddate release to cross the £1m mark at the UK box office. It was nominated for Outstanding British Film in 2016.

The number of venues in the Curzon Cinemas chain, with locations in Aldgate, Bloomsbury, Canterbury, Chelsea, Knutsford, Mayfair, Richmond, Ripon, Sheffield, Soho, Stafford, Victoria and Wimbledon.

55

15

The number of different countries represented on Curzon Artificial Eye’s video back catalogue.

The percentage discount Curzon Cinema Members receive on their film rentals from Curzon Home Cinema.

89

750

The number of languages featured in Curzon Artificial Eye’s films, from Albanian through to Zulu.

There are currently more than 750 films available to watch on Curzon Home Cinema.

1934

16

The year Curzon was founded, by Harold Wingate.

The number of BAFTAs Curzon Artificial Eye’s films have accumulated. In 2015, its films were nominated for eight BAFTAs, including having four out of five nominations in the Film Not In The English Language category. It won three: Still Alice (Leading Actress), Ida (Film Not In The English Language) and Citizenfour (Documentary).

1976

The year Artificial Eye was founded by Andi Engel and Pamela Balfry. It was acquired by Curzon in 2006 to form Curzon Artificial Eye.

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34

The number of years since vod service Curzon Home Cinema was launched.

The percentage of Artificial Eye films to win the Film Not In The English Language award since the category’s introduction in 1983 (12 wins in 33 years).

2.6 million

The amount in pounds sterling that Still Alice took at the box office, the company’s highest grossing film ever. It won Julianne Moore the Leading Actress award in 2015.

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Even before Curzon Home Cinema launched, the distribution arm had broken the mould after inking a deal with Sky, which saw films jointly marketed by the cable and satellite giant and Artificial Eye, available simultaneously through Curzon cinemas and Sky’s movie channels. Emboldened by the success, despite other exhibitors refusing to play ball and keeping the 16-week theatrical to home entertainment window intact, the vod arm has continued to look at the existing model to, as Knatchbull wryly notes, “see how we can change it”. He continues: “Day-and-date works for certain types of films, and I still believe in the theatrical window. We don’t believe in mass day-and-date releases, not everywhere.” But he believes that while Hollywood films may benefit from the full four-month window, it doesn’t work for the kind of films that Curzon Artificial Eye releases. Similarly, he wants to ensure that dayand-date vod and theatrical releases don’t turn into a graveyard for films not quite good enough for a wider bow at cinemas.

“There’s a difference between dayand-date films,” he says. “For some, it’s a dumping ground for failed theatrical films, dressed up as theatrical releases, priced at a premium and trying to get a cinema review… We’re not in that business. “We’re in the four and five star Palme d’Or winning business, films we’re giving a proper cinema release to.” In an increasingly tough marketplace, it is, he maintains, essential. “Day-and-date means we can have a united marketing campaign, promoting both. The cinema release helps act as a marketing tool for the video-on-demand, it’s a virtuous circle.” It’s paying off too, says Knatchbull. There have been huge successes – 45 Years is one of the most successful day-anddate releases in the UK ever – while the on-demand business continues to grow steadily. “The numbers are going up every week,” he says, “they’re still small, but they do go up.”

“[This is] an award for all at Curzon... It’s a cliché, but we’re so lucky – the people I have around me for this journey really are extraordinary.”

Above: Julianne Moore backstage after winning Leading Actress in 2015 for Still Alice Left: A vintage photo of Curzon Soho, when it was the Columbia, circa 1962. Curzon acquired the site in 1985

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C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s t o a l l o f t h i s y e a r ’s B A F TA winners and nominees.

T h e o f f i c i a l p o s t p r o d u c t i o n p a r t n e r t o B A F TA w w w. f a r m g r o u p. t v @thefarmgroup #farm4life 7 7


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Above: Curzon Aldgate is the company’s newest London venue, opened in January 2017 The business has been aided by its similarly groundbreaking home entertainment imprint. Initially launched more than a quarter of a century ago on the back of the barnstorming theatrical success of Cyrano de Bergerac (1990), its vast catalogue has brought classic world cinema titles and directors back into the public eye. What’s more, it continues to add to the company’s coffers. “I keep thinking it’s going to fail,” Knatchbull smiles, “and every year it decreases, but only marginally. It’s got an older demographic, which helps, as those customers haven’t switched to digital as fast as the youngsters. And our titles have much longer tails for collectors.” So what next for the company? In a time when some independents are nervously looking over their shoulders, Curzon is aiming to go from strength to strength. There are more cinemas planned to add to the Curzon empire (which currently stands at 13), as Knatchbull notes: “The cinemas are the least challenged side of the business. If you create the right place, with the right food, the right films and give them comfort, you’ll always find an audience. We’re building two new cinemas a year, as we have done for the last three or four years. It’s capital intensive, but a nice revenue stream.”

And, as Knatchbull concludes, more films, more finance at an earlier stage by Curzon, and, he hopes, more growth for the home cinema arm, too. One day, he concedes, the Artificial Eye name may disappear as the overall Curzon brand grows, but he believes that original co-founder Andi Engel would support what the company is achieving, “As a company, we want everything to go with the brand name. In business terms, it makes perfect sense to have one unified brand. I think people thought when we bought Artificial Eye, we were going to destroy the brand, but I hope Andi would be proud of what we’ve managed to do.” It certainly has the kind of slate that it needs going forward (“We’ve got new films from Lars von Trier, Michael Haneke, the Dardenne brothers, Xavier Dolan and Borg/McEnroe”) and, Knatchbull concludes, all the other elements are in place, too. “I always said you need to have three things in this business – you need to have the investment, you need to have the vision and you need to have the team to deliver that. We’ve got all those now.” Tim Murray is editorial director of UK industry trade publication, The Raygun, www.theraygun.co.uk

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Exterion Media, proud to be a supporter of the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2017 noel.nallen@exterionmedia.co.uk T: 020 7428 5544 @ExterionMediaUK

www.exterionmedia.co.uk

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EXPERIENTIAL PHOTOGRAPHY & LUXURY PHOTOBOOTHS P R O U D PA R T N E R S o f BA F TA S I N C E 2 0 1 0

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C A PT URING HISTORY A PHOT OG R APH I C E S S A Y C E LE B R AT I N G 70 Y E A R S O F B A F TA

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s BAFTA celebrates its 70th anniversary in 2017, it’s an opportune time to look back on the Film Awards’ rich heritage. The Awards were first held in 1949, two years after the original British Film Academy’s founding, with the aim of “celebrating and encouraging excellence in film”. Although initially very industry-focused, the Awards evolved in harmony with the organisation’s growth, not only attracting a greater public profile in its homeland but also a well-regarded international reputation, too. While the Academy has changed immeasurably since its early days – merging with various other industry bodies over the years to best represent the film, television and games industries – ‘excellence’ is a still a word that is very much at the heart of present-day BAFTA. It informs the Academy’s work as a charity, supporting, promoting and developing the art forms of the moving image. It’s also the benchmark for a BAFTA nomination, with the coveted golden mask trophy representing the very best in originality, artistry and creativity. Raiding BAFTA’s cherished archive, this year’s essay provides a photographic morsel of this legacy of excellence. Featuring incredible imagery captured over the decades, it offers a precious glimpse into the past and marks how the Film Awards has evolved to best reflect its industry.

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The 1979 ceremony, held at Wembley Arena


T H E NA S C E N T YE AR S (1947-1969) The films that followed the end of World War II were understandably very war focused, highlighting both the heroics of the Allied forces and exploring its human cost. A surprising emergence in the 1950s was the popularity of homegrown comedies, most notably from Ealing Studios, but also the Doctor in the House and Carry On films, which helped keep the UK industry healthy during the economic austerity that followed the war. Towards the end of the decade, British film-makers saw the need to create films that had broader appeal and there was a genuine push by some of the industry’s leading lights, including David Lean and Carol Reed, towards bringing more internationally attractive stories to the screen. The 1960s also saw a major sea change as directorial auteurs became a prominent force. Instigated by the French New Wave of Truffaut and Godard, the UK’s output also started to weave more social and political conscience into its films: the British New Wave (often disparagingly called ‘kitchen sink dramas’) was born. The tensions of the Cold War also marked the re-emergence of the spy genre, led by the action-packed Bond franchise.

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1953: The first performance categories are added, for British and Foreign actors and actresses (won by Ralph Richardson, Vivien Leigh, Marlon Brando and Simone Signoret). A strong theatre heritage is credited for the wealth of acting talent produced by the UK. Dame Judi Dench is our most decorated actor with six wins, her first in 1966 (for Four in the Morning) to her most recent in 2002 ( Iris). She’s pictured with her Supporting Actress trophy (for A Handful of Dust) in 1989 with her late husband, Michael Williams.

The first Film Awards were held on 29 May 1949, celebrating films from 1947 and 1948. There were four categories: Film From Any Source (won by The Best Years of our Lives and Hamlet ), British Film (won by Odd Man Out and The Fallen Idol ), Documentary (won by The World is Rich and Louisiana Story) and a Special Award (presented to Atomic Physics). A United Nations Award, for the film that embodied the principles of the United Nations Charter, was announced but not presented in the iuaugural year. In 1950, Ealing comedies Whisky Galore!, A Run for your Money, Passport to Pimlico and Kindhearts and Coronets were all nominated for British Film. Two years later, The Lavender Hill Mob would win the amalgamated Film And British Film category, with other Ealing nominations in the 1950s including The Man in the White Suit, The Maggie and The Ladykillers.

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1955: The first craft award is added: British Screenplay, won by George Tabori and Robin Estridge for The Young Lovers. In 1964, British Cinematography (split between Colour and Black And White) is added, won by Ted Moore for From Russia with Love and Douglas Slocombe for The Servant, respectively. British Art Direction and British Costume Design (also split between Colour and Black And White) are added in 1965, only to be later merged into single categories in 1969 as colour became dominant, and the ‘British’ tag was also dropped. Slocombe (photographed in 2007) won three Cinematography awards in total and a Special Award. He died in February 2016, aged 103. 1958: The Bridge on the River Kwai wins three BAFTAs, namely British Actor (Alec Guinness), British Screenplay (Pierre Boulle) and Film And British Film. A huge international hit, David Lean’s war epic was the first film to win BAFTA’s ‘Best Film’ award while also sitting atop the year’s worldwide box office chart. Lean and Guinness, two greats of British cinema, share a smile in 1989, as the former honours the latter with the Fellowship.

1961: Karel Reisz’ influential drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning collects three awards: Film And British Film, British Actress (Rachel Roberts) and Most Promising Newcomer (Albert Finney, who is also nominated for British Actor). The film is nominated for British Screenplay (Alan Sillitoe), too. Finney (pictured in 2001 with ceremony host Stephen Fry, after being presented with the Fellowship) is the Film Awards’ most nominated performer, with nine in total.

1969: A rash of categories are added, illustrating how the Awards have evolved to better represent film crafts. The Graduate produces the first winners for Direction (Mike Nichols) and Editing (Sam O’Steen); while 2001: A Space Odyssey wins the first (and now defunct) Soundtrack award (Winston Ryder). John Barry (captured here in 2005 for his Fellowship) collects the inaugural Original Film Music for his score to The Lion in Winter.


1960: Hayley Mills was only 14 when she won Most Promising Newcomer, having made her big screen debut the previous year in Tiger Bay. However, Drew Barrymore remains the youngest ever BAFTA nominee, also in this category, for her role in ET: The Extra-Terrestrial (in 1983) at the tender age of seven.

1963: Newcomer Tom Courtenay finds himself in very fine company with fellow BAFTA winners Sam Spiegal (Best Film – Lawrence of Arabia producer), Leslie Caron (British Actress – The L-Shaped Room) and Peter O’Toole (British Actor – Lawrence of Arabia).

1985: Dr Haing S Ngor wins both the Leading Actor and Most Promising Newcomer awards for The Killing Fields. Only two others have ever done this: Judy Davis for My Brilliant Career (in 1981) and Ben Kingsley for Gandhi, pictured right, in 1983. Ngor was tragically murdered in 1996, robbing the world of his talent too soon.

THE NEX T G E N E R AT I O N Discovering, nurturing and shining a light on the stars of the future is one of BAFTA’s key charitable aims. Various categories have highlighted emerging talent, starting with the introduction of the Most Promising Newcomer award in 1953 (won by Claire Bloom). The categories’ titles may have changed over the years – today, we celebrate the Outstanding Debut By A British Writer, Director Or Producer and the publically voted EE Rising Star awards – but the intent remains the same: to identify the voices that will shape the film industry in the future.

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The list of winners of BAFTA’s new talent performance categories is impressive: Julie Andrews, Eric Barker, Claire Bloom, John Boyega, David Bradley, Dennis Christopher, Noel Clarke, Tom Courtenay, Judy Davis, Adam Deacon, Judi Dench, Faye Dunaway, Peter Egan, Albert Finney, Jodie Foster, James Fox, Joel Gray, Eva Green, Dominic Guard, Georgina Hale, Tom Hardy, Dustin Hoffman, Isabelle Huppert, Ben Kingsley, David Kossoff, Shia LaBeouf, Phyllis Logan, Paul Massie, James McAvoy, Vivien Merchant, Hayley Mills, Dr Haing S Ngor, Jack O’Connell, Valerie Perrine, Joe Pesci, Will Poulter, Christopher Reeve, Paul Scofield, Kristen Stewart, Juno Temple, Rita Tushingham, Jon Voight, Eli Wallach and Norman Wisdom. In 1999, the Carl Foreman Award For Most Promising Newcomer In British Film was introduced into the Awards to recognise the behind-the-scenes British talents who were taking a creative lead for the first time. This morphed in 2002 into the Carl Foreman Award For Special Achievement By A British Director, Writer Or Producer In Their First Feature Film before changing its name again to the current Outstanding Debut award. The list of winners are: Naji Abu Nowar & Rupert Lloyd, Andrea Arnold, Amma Asante, Stephen Beresford & David Livingstone, Paddy Considine & Diarmid Scrimshaw, Kieran Evans, Matt Greenhalgh, Joel Hopkins & Nicola Usborne, Duncan Jones, Asif Kapadia, Richard Kwietniowski, Bart Layton & Dimitri Doganis, Steve McQueen, Chris Morris, Pawel Pawlikowski, Lynne Ramsay, Joe Wright and Emily Young.

2005: Amma Asante poses for a 20"x24" Polaroid portrait after collecting her Special Achievement By A British Director, Writer Or Producer In Their First Feature Film award.

2007: Orange Rising Star winner Eva Green has fun backstage with the previous year’s recipient, James McAvoy.

2016: Outstanding Debut winners Naji Abu Nowar and Rupert Lloyd pose for the cameras with citation readers, Dakota Johnson and Will Poulter (who won the 2014 EE Rising Star).


This page (clockwise from top) Annette Bening (photographed in 2012) Actress: two nominations, one win Dev Patel & Noel Clarke (2009) Patel, actor: two nominations; Clarke, actor, writer, director: Orange Rising Star (2009) Gugu Mbatha-Raw (2015) Actress: EE Rising Star nomination (2015) Lord Puttnam (2005) Producer: two nominations, two wins, Fellowship (2006), Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema (1982) Steve McQueen (2014) Director, producer, writer: three nominations, two wins Emily Blunt (2010) Actress: three nominations, including Orange Rising Star nomination (2007)

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F U LL F OC U S Since 2005, the Film Awards brochure photographic essay has lovingly captured some of the world’s most remarkable talents, from newcomers to legends of the industry. Collected here are just a few of the many talented practitioners who have been featured over the years...

This page (clockwise from top left) Alan Rickman (2007) Actor: three nominations, one win Sandy Powell (2015) Costume design: 11 nominations, two wins John Richardson (2016) Special visual effects: seven nominations, two wins Angela Allen mbe (2006) Script supervisor: Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema (2005) Pedro AlmodĂłvar (2012) Director, writer: seven nominations, five wins 8 7


CH AN G I N G T I M E S (1970-1999) The civil rights and counter-culture movements of the 1960s had a lasting impact on the films of the 1970s, which started to provocatively challenge previous cinematic norms. With the rise of television as an affordable, family-friendly past-time, cinema became more controversial, shocking and extreme, especially in its depictions of drug use, sex and violence. A new wave of US film-makers (Coppola, Scorsese, Spielberg and so on) arose and dominated the latter half of the decade, while improvements in technology saw the emergence of the blockbuster as a force to be reckoned with at the worldwide box office. Strangled by tax break cuts and the dominance of big budget Hollywood, the 1980s was a trying time for British cinema, but it found a niche in producing high-quality period costume dramas, led by Goldcrest, Merchant Ivory and Handmade. British film-making’s resurgence was bolstered by Working Title in the 1990s and the international success of its romantic comedies, while the emergence of Channel 4 Films/Film4 reinvigorated the edgier side of British cinema (and helped launch many a career to boot).

1972: Sunday, Bloody Sunday wins Best Film, Editing (Richard Marden, not pictured), Direction (John Schlesinger, far left), Actress (Glenda Jackson, centre) and Actor (Peter Finch, second from right). BAFTA has never shied away from recognising controversial films: in the 1970s alone, Best Film was won by Cabaret (in 1973) and One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1977), with nominations for: Kes (1971), A Clockwork Orange (1973), Don’t Look Now (1974), Taxi Driver (1977) and The Deer Hunter (1980), among others.

1979: Derek Meddings, representing the special effects team for the groundbreaking Superman, is presented with the very first Michael Balcon Award for Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema by BAFTA president HRH Princess Anne and David Deutsch (vice-chair for film). Although the standalone Special Visual Effects category was not introduced until 1983, BAFTA was quick to realise how much importance this craft would have on the industry in the decades to come; the UK has built up a very well-respected SFX reputation ever since. Jill, the daughter of BAFTA founding member Michael Balcon, is in the background.

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1987: Sir David Attenborough presents Claude Lanzmann with the Flaherty Award (for documentary) for Shoah. With many of BAFTA’s founders being documentarians, the category had been a staple since the very first Awards. However, it was discontinued in 1991 as the form became more the purview of television. Michael Moore and the like did much to bring documentaries back to cinema in the 1990s and 2000s and the category was reintroduced in 2011, won by Senna.

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1983: Rohini Hattangadi accepts her Supporting Actress award for Gandhi. Richard Attenborough’s film is the most nominated film ever at BAFTA with 16, winning five: Best Film, Direction, Actor and Most Promising Newcomer. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid won nine BAFTAs in 1971, taking awards for Best Film, Actor, Actress, Cinematography, Direction, Editing, Screenplay, Soundtrack, and the Anthony Asquith Memorial Award (for musical score). It remains a BAFTA record. Film Not In The English Language was added in 1983, won by Christ Stopped at Eboli, released in the UK by Artificial Eye. The Film and Television Awards were a joint affair from 1968 to 1997. The Awards were eventually split to give equal weight to both art forms... and shorten the length of the ceremony! Nick Park dominated the Short Animation category in the 1990s, winning three times. He won his first in 1990 for A Grand Day Out (having been nominated for Creature Comforts with Sara Mullock the same year). He has five Film awards and eight BAFTAs in total.

1988: The rise of television and the struggles of the British film industry in the 1970s-1980s meant many practitioners worked across both art forms. Nowhere is that better illustrated than by the Monty Python team. Having made their names on the small screen, they went on to create, write, direct and star in some of the best comedy films of the era. Their efforts were rewarded with the Michael Balcon Award in 1988. From left to right: Michael Palin, Graham Chapman, (ahem!) John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones and, er, Eric Idle.

1993: Producer Stephen Woolley (pictured) and director Neil Jordan win the first Alexander Korda Award for Outstanding British Film for The Crying Game. It marked the return of the ‘British Film’ category, which had not been presented since 1968, and was a deliberate move to recognise and reward excellence in British film-making within the global forum of the Awards.

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C O VE R S T O R I E S

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Noma Bar is a multi award-winning Israel-born artist and illustrator The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Frost/Nixon, Milk, The Reader, Slumdog Millionaire

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Tavis Coburn graduated from California’s College of Design Avatar, An Education, The Hurt Locker, Precious, Up in the Air

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Adam Simpson is an Edinburgh College of Art and Royal College of Art alumni Black Swan, Inception, The King’s Speech, The Social Network, True Grit

Eda Akaltun was born in Istanbul and studied at Central St Martins in London The Artist, The Descendents, Drive, The Help, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

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For the last few years, BAFTA has commissioned some of the world’s best modern artists and illustrators to create bespoke artwork for its brochure covers, beautifully capturing the heart, emotion and dynamism of film in still form. They are the perfect complement to the artistry and creativity of the five nominated films in the Best Film category. Here are all the covers collected together for the first time, with the eventual winner marked in bold...

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Jonathan Burton originates from the UK but now lives in France Argo, Les MisĂŠrables, Life of Pi, Lincoln, Zero Dark Thirty

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Created by independent London-based design studio La Boca* 12 Years a Slave, American Hustle, Captain Phillips, Gravity, Philomena

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French artist Malika Favre won several design awards for her BAFTA artworks* Birdman, Boyhood, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Imitation Game, The Theory of Everything

Levente Szabo is a freelance illustrator from Hungary* The Big Short, Bridge of Spies, Carol, The Revenant, Spotlight *creative direction by Human After All 9 1


1981: Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, two legends of the screen and among the original founders of BAFTA, are presented with the Fellowship by Academy chair Mike Wooller and actress Deborah Kerr (Awards host David Frost, presented with a Fellowship himself in 2005, is also pictured).

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1976: Although not strictly a Film Awards photograph, this picture of Sir Charles Chaplin receiving his Fellowship from HRH Princess Anne and Sir Richard Attenborough (vice-president of the Academy) in 1976 is historic for several reasons. Not only was this the royal opening of BAFTA 195 Piccadilly, but it also marked the first time that the Mitzi Cunliffe-designed ‘mask’ trophy was presented as a ‘BAFTA’. The now internationally-recognised trophy had originally been designed for the Guild of Television Producers and Directors Awards. In the background is Lady Chaplin (Oona O’Neill).

The first Fellow of the Academy was Alfred Hitchcock in 1971. The award was presented in recognition of the very highest standards of work in film and/or television. The first woman to be presented with the Fellowship was French actress Jeanne Moreau in 1996. The OBCC was first presented at the Awards in 1979. It was originally called The Michael Balcon Award, in honour of the great British producer who was also one of the founding members of BAFTA. The award has been increasingly used to honour the often unsung heroes and heroines of British cinema.

1993: Two for one – Lord Attenborough was made a Fellow in 1983, with Dame Maggie Smith joining him in 1996. They are pictured together here at the 1993 ceremony, where the Fellowship was actually presented to Sir Sydney Samuelson.

2002: James Ivory, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala and Ismail Merchant have fun with the press. Merchant Ivory Productions is the only film company to be presented with the Fellowship in the history of the award, illustrating just how important their movies were in helping to revive a flagging British film industry in the 1980s and 1990s.


T HE SPE C I AL O N E S The Film Awards have presented several Special Awards over the years. Today, the Academy’s highest honour is the Fellowship, presented to (usually) an individual who has made a significant contribution to cinema on an international scale. With our uniquely British perspective, BAFTA also can’t help but celebrate the influence the UK has had on the film industry, which we do through the Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema award (OBCC). Neither of these awards are decided by vote; they are the gift of the BAFTA Board and sector committees.

2014: Citation reader Jeremy Irons with 2014 Fellow, Dame Helen Mirren, backstage at the Royal Opera House. Mirren was presented with the award by current BAFTA president, HRH The Duke of Cambridge, who affectionately joked he should probably call her “granny” after her performance as Queen Elizabeth II in the 2006 film, The Queen, which won her the Leading Actress award.

2016: Sir Sidney Poitier posed for this special photograph at his home ahead of receiving his Fellowship last year. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to ill-health, but was presented with the trophy by his daughter Sydney Tamiia Poitier and actor Jamie Foxx, broadcast via video message. Poitier was the first black actor to win a BAFTA (then known as a British Film Academy award) for his role in The Defiant Ones, presented in 1959.

2016: Photographed here at a recent BAFTA Q&A, director Ken Loach was presented with the OBCC in 1994 and then the Fellowship in 2006 for his instrumental work across film and television. Along with the likes of Lindsay Anderson, Jack Clayton, Karel Reisz, Tony Richardson and John Schlesinger, Loach was a key figure in the birth of the provocative and socially conscious British New Wave in the 1960s.


CURR E N T AF F AI R S (2000-current) While it’s difficult to define the practical and thematic changes of the most recent era of film-making – simply because it’s still a little too close – there are certainly some identifiable trends. The modern blockbuster remains a box office force, but perhaps transcending that is the ‘franchise movie’. This is nothing new – Disney potentially created the movie franchise back in the 1920s, while James Bond certainly encapsulated it in the 1960s and ever onwards – but it’s come more to the fore in the past decade, with The Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, the Marvel-verse, DC-verse, Pirates of the Caribbean and so on, redefining the straightforward sequel formula. Animated movies – especially of the computer-generated variety – went through a renaissance courtesy of the Disney-Pixar relationship of the mid-1990s. Meanwhile, films not in the English language continued to enjoy resounding box office successes, often from the most unlikely of sources.

2004: The Lord of the Rings trilogy is the most celebrated modern film franchise, collecting 36 BAFTA nominations altogether and winning 13. Harry Potter comes in a close second with 29 nominations (across seven films). Director Peter Jackson is pictured on the red carpet, ahead of collecting three BAFTAs for The Return of the King, from its haul of five: Best Film (with Barrie M Osbourne and Fran Walsh); Adapted Screenplay (with Walsh and Philippa Boyens); and the now defunct Orange Film Of The Year.

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2005: BAFTA chief executive Amanda Berry enjoys double 007 at the post-ceremony dinner, with Pierce Brosnan and Daniel Craig. The very successful James Bond franchise has been nominated 28 times (20 of which have come from Craig’s era).

George Clooney was part of the Argo production team that won Best Film in 2013. It was another feather in his cap, as the individual nominated in the most categories: Director, Leading Actor, Supporting Actor, Adapted Screenplay, Original Screenplay and as a producer. Shrek is the only animated film to be nominated in the Best Film category (in 2002), losing out to the first Lord of the Rings movie. It did win Adapted Screenplay though. The highest grossing film of the modern era, Avatar, won two BAFTAs from eight nominations (Production Design and Special Visual Effects) in 2010.

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2013: EE Rising Star nominee Suraj Sharma and Director nominee Ang Lee check out the year’s brochure featuring their film, Life of Pi, on the cover. Lee has won the award twice, back when it was called the David Lean Award for Achievement in Direction (for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon in 2001, and Brokeback Mountain in 2006). Although not in name, the Director award is still presented in memory of BAFTA’s first chairman, Sir David Lean.

2007: The return of the Animated Film category after an absence of a quarter of a century sees George Miller (left) collect the award for Happy Feet. Next to him is the film’s composer, John Powell, nominated for Original Film Music. Of the 34 nominees since, only nine have not been computer generated. The original category (1955-1982) was a mix of featurelength films and shorts. The latter has had its own category since 1983, although from 2013 it has specifically celebrated British Short Animation.

2014: Martin Scorsese is nominated for Director for the ninth time for The Wolf of Wall Street, starring Leonardo DiCaprio. Scorsese is BAFTA’s most nominated director, but only has one win (for Goodfellas in 1991). His long-time collaborator Thelma Schoonmaker is also nominated for the ninth time in the Editing category for the same film (she has two wins, for Goodfellas and Raging Bull). DiCaprio won his first BAFTA last year for The Revenant, after three previous nominations.

2016: EE Rising Star winner John Boyega, of the blockbusting Star Wars: The Force Awakens, meets fans on the Red Carpet before the ceremony. The film would win in the Special Visual Effects category, but surprisingly the sci-fi saga has only won twice before, both times for its music.


The 2016 winners group photo

E S S AY C RE DI TS Gugu Mbatha-Raw & Sandy Powell: BAFTA/Chris Floyd John Richardson: BAFTA/Phil Fisk Alan Rickman: BAFTA/Jake Gavin Steve McQueen: Andy Gotts mbe

Essay Toby Weidmann Researchers Louise Anderson Sophia Hall

Changing Times Claude Lanzmann & Stephen Woolley: BAFTA/Doug McKenzie Other images: BAFTA

BAFTA Photography Manager Claire Rees PH OTO G R A PHY

The Special Ones Richard Attenborough, Maggie Smith: BAFTA/Doug McKenzie Ken Loach: BAFTA/Des Willie Helen Mirren: BAFTA/Rich Hardcastle Sidney Poitier: BAFTA/Phil Fisk Other images: BAFTA

The Nascent Years John Barry: BAFTA/Michele Turriani Douglas Slocombe: BAFTA/Jake Gavin All other images: BAFTA The Next Generation Naji Abu Nowar, Dakota Johnson, Rupert Lloyd, Will Poulter: BAFTA/Richard Kendal Amma Asante: BAFTA/Michele Turriani Eva Green, James McAvoy: BAFTA/Liam Daniel Other images: BAFTA Full Focus Angela Allen & David Puttnam: BAFTA/Michele Turriani Pedro Almodรณvar & Annette Bening: BAFTA/Ian Derry Emily Blunt: BAFTA/Julian Broad Noel Clarke, Dev Patel: BAFTA/Ellis Parrinder

Current Affairs Amanda Berry, Pierce Brosnan, Daniel Craig: BAFTA/Greg Williams John Boyega: BAFTA/Jonathan Birch Leonardo DiCaprio, Martin Scorsese: BAFTA/Rich Hardcastle Peter Jackson: BAFTA/Richard Kendal Ang Lee: BAFTA/Simon Leigh George Miller, John Powell: BAFTA/Marc Hoberman Above BAFTA/Richard Kendal

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Delivering Excellence…

CTV Outside Broadcasts Ltd - 3 The Merlin Centre, Lancaster Road, High Wycombe, HP12 3QL Adam Berger: adam@ctvob.co.uk / Bill Morris: bill@ctvob.co.uk / hello@ctvob.co.uk / 020 8453 8989 / www.ctvob.co.uk Photo credits: BAFTA Awards: BAFTA/Richard Kendal. Brit Awards: David Fisher/REX/Shutterstock. Badminton Horse Trials: Sandra Mailer/REX/Shutterstock Open Golf Championship: Mark Newcombe/REX/Shutterstock. Remembrance Service: Ray Tang/REX/Shutterstock. Cricket: Pakistan Tour of England: Matt West/BPI/REX/Shutterstock Rugby World Cup: Matt Bunn/BPI/REX/Shutterstock. Victoria’s 9 7Secret Fashion Show: David Fisher/REX/Shutterstock


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Helping you to shine Deloitte have been the scrutineers of BAFTA’s awards for eleven years, alongside supporting the wider media industry through research and insights as well as bringing relevant and innovative solutions to the most important issues for our clients. Whether or not today is your day in the spotlight, find out how we’re helping the industry to stand out by visiting www.deloitte.co.uk/tmt

© 2017 Deloitte LLP. All rights reserved. 9 9


IN ME MORIA M The following pages honour the esteemed contribution to the film industry by those individuals who have sadly died in the last 12 months. To learn more about their many achievements, visit bafta.org/heritage/inmemoryof

B I L LY C H A P I N

Actor

28 December 1943 – 2 December 2016

ROBERT BALSER

MICHAEL CIMINO

Production Designer

Animator, Director

Screenwriter, Director

5 February 1921 – 10 March 2016

25 March 1927 – 4 January 2016

3 February 1939 – 2 July 2016

GUNNAR ALMER

W I L L I A M P E T E R B L AT T Y

FR ANCO CITTI

Deputy Head – International Department, Swedish Film Institute

Author, Screenwriter, Director

Actor

7 January 1928 – 12 January 2017

23 April 1935 – 14 January 2016

ALICE ARLEN

TERRY BR AI N

JIM CLARK

Screenwriter, Producer

Animator, Writer

Editor, Director

6 November 1940 – 29 February 2016

9 May 1905 – 25 March 2016

24 May 1931 – 25 February 2016

ALEXIS ARQUETTE

CHARMIAN CARR

TOM CLEGG

Actress

Actress

Director

28 July 1969 – 11 September 2016

27 December 1942 – 17 September 2016

16 October 1934 – 24 July 2016

KENNY BAKER

JOHN CARSON

ADRIENNE CORRI

Actor

Actor

Actress

24 August 1934 – 13 August 2016

28 February 1927 – 5 November 2016

13 November 1930 – 13 March 2016

SIR KEN ADA M

obe

1954 – 2 August 2016

1 0 0


IN

M E MORIA M

R AO U L C O U TA R D

J E R RY D OY L E

BERNARD FOX

Cinematographer

Actor

Actor

16 September 1924 – 8 November 2016

16 July 1956 – 27 July 2016

11 May 1927 – 14 December 2016

PAU L C O WA N

ANNE MARIE

GLENN FREY

Producer

‘ PAT T Y ’ D U K E

Singer, Songwriter, Guitarist, Actor

3 September 1939 – 6 October 2016

Actress

6 November 1948 – 18 January 2016

DEREK CUNNINGHAM

ROGER DUMAS

IAN FULLER

Director, Writer

Actor

Sound Editor

21 September 1941 – 15 October 2016

9 May 1932 – 3 July 2016

3 September 1938 – 15 April 2016

D E D D I E DAV I E S

TO N Y DYS O N

M A K I KO FU TA K I

Actress

Special Effects Designer

Animator

2 March 1938 – 21 December 2016

13 April 1947 – 3 March 2016

19 June 1958 – 13 May 2016

PENNY DELAMAR

CARRIE FISHER

DANIEL GERSON

Make Up Artist

Actress

Writer, Actor

31 December 1942 – 5 September 2016

21 October 1927 – 27 December 2016

1 August 1966 – 6 February 2016

JEAN- CL AUDE DERET

PA D DY F L E T C H E R

ANTONY GIBBS

Screenwriter

Writer, Actor

Editor

11 July 1921 – 12 December 2016

3 January 1946 – 7 October 2016

17 October 1925 – 26 February 2016

14 December 1946 – 29 March 2016

1 0 1


IN

M E MORIA M

SUE GIBSON

CURTIS HANSON

DAV E H O L L A N D

Cinematographer

Director

Stunt Performer, Actor

8 November 1952 – 27 July 2016

24 March 1945 – 20 September 2016

14 April 1950 – 12 February 2016

RODNEY GIESLER

R O B I N H A R DY

DAV I D H U D D L E S T O N

Director, Writer, Producer

Director, Writer

Actor

2 February 1931 – 21 April 2016

2 October 1929 – 1 July 2016

17 September 1930 – 2 August 2016

FREDERIC GOODE

RICKY HARRIS

NORMAN HUDIS

Director

Actor

Writer

20 August 1927 – 2 June 2015

5 October 1962 – 26 December 2016

27 July 1922 – 8 February 2016

MERLE HAGGARD

J E F F R E Y H AY D E N

SIR JOHN HURT

Singer, Songwriter

Director

Actor

6 April 1937 – 6 April 2016

15 October 1926 – 24 December 2016

22 January 1940 – 27 January 2017

DAN HAGGERT Y

GORDON

GEORGE S. IRVING

Actor

‘DREWE’ HENLEY

Actor

19 November 1942 – 15 January 2016

Actor

1 November 1922 – 26 December 2016

G U Y H A M I LTO N

ARTHUR HILLER

G E O R G E K E N N E DY

Director, Screenwriter

Director

Actor

16 September 1922 – 20 April 2016

22 November 1923 – 17 August 2016

18 February 1925 – 28 February 2016

1940 – 14 February 2016

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c be


IN

M E MORIA M

MOHAMED KHAN

DON MARSHALL

G I L PA R R O N D O

Director, Screenwriter, Actor

Actor

Set Decorator, Production Designer

26 October 1942 – 26 July 2016

2 May 1936 – 30 October 2016

17 June 1921 – 24 December 2016

A B BA S K I A R O S TA M I

GARRY M ARSHALL

J U L I E P AY N E

Director

Writer, Director, Actor, Producer

Producer, Executive

22 June 1940 – 4 July 2016

13 November 1934 – 19 July 2016

17 July 1951 – 15 June 2016

BURT KWOUK

obe

GEORGE MARTIN

c be

E LV I O P O R T A

Actor

Producer, Composer, Musical Director

Writer, Director, Actor

18 July 1930 – 24 May 2016

3 January 1926 – 8 March 2016

22 May 1945 – 26 December 2016

D I C K L AT E S SA

JOSEPH MASCOLO

JOE POWELL

Actor

Actor

Stunt Performer

15 September 1929 – 19 December 2016

13 March 1929 – 8 December 2016

21 March 1922 – 30 June 2016

JOHN LEGARD

M ARNI NIXON

PRINCE

Editor, Producer, Writer

Singer

Singer-Songwriter, Actor

24 November 1924 – 14 January 2017

22 February 1930 – 24 July 2016

7 June 1958 – 21 April 2016

E UA N L LOY D

BILL NUNN

OM PURI

Producer, Director

Actor

Actor

6 December 1923 – 2 July 2016

20 October 1953 – 24 September 2016

18 October 1950 – 6 January 2017

1 0 3

obe


IN

M E MORIA M

JACQUES RIVET TE

DOUGL AS SLOCOMBE

Conductor

Director, Writer

Cinematographer

26 March 1916 – 22 June 2016

1 March 1928 – 29 January 2016

10 February 1913 – 22 February 2016

C H O R A M A S WA MY

ANDREW SACHS

LIZ SMITH

Actor

Actor

Actress

5 October 1934 – 7 December 2016

7 April 1930 – 23 November 2016

11 December 1921 – 24 December 2016

A H M E D R AT E B

P H I L I P S AV I L L E

TREVOR STEEDM AN

Actor

Director, Actor, Writer

Stunt Performer, Actor

23 January 1949 – 14 December 2016

28 October 1930 – 22 December 2016

25 May 1954 – 25 June 2016

NANCY REAGAN

ETTORE SCOL A

BRIAN STEVENS

Actress

Writer, Director

Animation Producer

6 July 1921 – 6 March 2016

10 May 1931 – 19 January 2016

7 August 1932 – 19 April 2016

HARRY R ABI N OWITZ

SIMON RELPH

c be

m be

SIR PETER SHAFFER

c be

m be

WOLFGANG SUSCHITZK Y

Producer, Assistant Director

Writer

Cinematographer

13 April 1940 – 30 October 2016

15 May 1926 – 6 June 2016

29 August 1912 – 7 October 2016

DEBBIE REYNOLDS

BILL SHEPHERD

BA R BA R A TA R B U C K

Actress

Producer

Actress

1 April 1932 – 28 December 2016

16 November 1942 – 24 June 2016

15 January 1942 – 26 December 2016

1 0 4

obe


IN

M E MORIA M

KIT WEST

RICHARD WILSON

Writer

Special Effects Supervisor

24 May 1928 – 20 November 2016

6 February 1936 – 16 April 2016

CEO of Cinema and Television Benevolent Fund, Television Executive

VA N I T Y

R AY W E S T

CLARE WISE

( D E N I S E M AT T H E WS )

Sound Mixer

Executive, Producer

Actress, Singer-Songwriter

29 November 1925 – 17 February 2016

19 November 1964 – 13 September 2016

P E T E R VA U G H A N

MICHAEL WHITE

JAKE WRIGHT

Actor

Producer

Assistant Director, Production Manager

4 April 1923 – 6 December 2016

16 January 1936 – 7 March 2016

21 May 1922 – 19 February 2016

R O B E R T VA U G H N

M ARGARET WHIT TON

M I C H I Y O YA S U D A

Actor, Director

Actress

Animator, Colour Designer

22 November 1932 – 11 November 2016

30 November 1949 – 4 December 2016

28 April 1939 – 5 October 2016

ABE VI GODA

GENE WILDER

ANTON YELCHIN

Actor

Actor, Writer

Actor

24 February 1921 – 26 January 2016

11 June 1933 – 29 August 2016

11 March 1989 – 19 June 2016

A N D R Z E J WA J DA

DOUGLAS WILMER

Director, Writer

Actor

6 March 1926 – 9 October 2016

08 January 1920 – 31 March 2016

The Academy has made every effort to compile an accurate In Memoriam listing of film practitioners between 16 January 2016 and 20 January 2017.

WILLIA M TREVOR

4 January 1959 – 15 February 2016

k be

1 0 5

18 August 1957 – 7 August 2016


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CELEBRATING WORLD CLASS TALENT

NOW PLAYING UNTIL 26 FEB CIRQUEDUSOLEIL.COM | 1 ROYALALBERTHALL.COM 0 7


ILLUMINATING BAFTA G r eat Wor k S t a rt s H e re

BAFTA believes our collective industries need to burn brightly with the best, most diverse talent from all backgrounds. But we can’t do it without your help. We are launching a fundraising campaign to increase our charitable education programme and redevelop BAFTA 195 Piccadilly into an international centre of excellence. Together we can change people’s lives and safeguard the future of excellence in film, television and games. For more information on how you can support, contact: Andrew Overin, Head of Fundraising, andrewo@bafta.org

1 0 8


OFFICERS

O F

THE

ACA DE MY

OFFICERS

COMMITTEES

HRH The Duke of Cambridge, KG Academy President

EL EC T ED M E M B ERS O F T H E FI L M CO M M I T T EE Pippa Harris ‒ Chair Marc Samuelson ‒ Deputy Chair Rosie Alison Noel Clarke Andrew Curtis Gillian Hawser Pippa Markham Lynda Myles David Thompson Kenith Trodd

BOA R D O F T RUST EES Jane Lush Chair of the Academy Anne Morrison Deputy Chair of the Academy Nick Button-Brown Chair, Games Committee Dame Pippa Harris dbe Chair, Film Committee

EL EC T ED M E M B ERS O F T H E T EL E V ISI O N CO M M I T T EE

Krishnendu Majumdar Chair, Television Committee Emma Morgan Deputy Chair, Television Committee

Krishnendu Majumdar ‒ Chair Emma Morgan ‒ Deputy Chair Otto Bathurst Helen Bullough * Daniel Isaacs Laurence Marks Elizabeth McIntyre Sara Putt Maxine Watson Hannah Wyatt

Sara Putt Chair, Learning & New Talent Committee Marc Samuelson Deputy Chair, Film Committee

Sara Geater Chair, Commercial Committee Paul Morrell obe Co-optee

EL EC T ED M E M B ERS O F T H E GA M ES CO M M I T T EE

Samir Shah obe Co-optee

Nick Button-Brown ‒ Chair Georg Backer Tara Saunders Lee Schuneman * Jo Twist

John Smith Chair, Finance and Audit Committee

Amanda Berry obe Chief Executive

*Children’s

Kevin Price Chief Operating Officer

1 0 9

Representatives


ASIA PACIFIC EUROPE MIDDLE EAST NORTH AMERICA

Creative ideas technical reality

Tel: +44 (0)1293 582000 | www.ct-group.com Digital

Display

Audio

Email: nmaag@ctlondon.com

Video

AD Events Ltd are especially proud to support BAFTA with the design and production of tonight’s dinner and after-party

T: +44(0) 20 7635 7372 E: enquiries@adevents.co.uk W: www.adevents.co.uk 1 1 0


PA RTNERS

O F

BAFTA’s partners have shown great loyalty in their year-round association with the BAFTA brand, and share our commitment and passion for the industries we represent. We warmly thank them for their commitment to the Academy and our mission to support, develop and promote excellence in the film, television and games industries.

A C A D E MY PA RT N ERS Audi UK Badoit Champagne Taittinger Deloitte evian Hotel Chocolat Republic of Photography Taylor Bloxham Villa Maria A C A D E MY S U P P O RT ERS Alpha Grip Barco Brightcove Channel 4 CTV Outside Broadcast Dolby The Farm Portaprompt B A F TA C YM R U AB Acoustics Aberystwyth University Audi UK BBC Cymru Wales BFI/Ffilm Cymru Wales Bluestone National Park Resort Buzz Magazine Capital Law Cardiff Airport Cardiff and Vale College Champagne Taittinger Chapter Arts Centre Cineworld Cardiff Cuebox Deloitte Da Mhile Distillery DW Design EA ELP

Ethos The Galashan Trust Galeri Caernarfon Genero Gorilla HMV Holiday Inn Express Hotel Chocolat Ken Picton Mad Dog Casting Minuteman Press Pinewood Studios Group Pontio Premier Executive Travel Prince’s Gate Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama S4C SEGA Sony Technology Spiros Catering St David’s Hall St David’s Hotel & Spa Sugar Creative Tiny Rebel Games Trosol Ubisoft University of Glyndwr Wrexham University of South Wales University of Wales Trinity Saint David Villa Maria Welsh Government Working Word B A F TA S COT L A N D Arran Aromatics Audi UK BBC Scotland Blue Moon Brewing Company Blue Parrot Company British Airways Champagne Taittinger

THE

ACA DE MY

Channel 4 Cineworld Creative Scotland Deloitte Designs by M Edit 123 evian The Galashan Trust Glenfiddich Grosvenor Cinema Hotel Chocolat Ishga M.A.C Cosmetics Material Works MCL Create Oracle Academy Radisson Blu Hotel, Glasgow Rainbow Room International Rekorderlig Skills Development Scotland STV Taylor Bloxham Wire B A F TA LOS A N G EL ES Adrian Flambard AFEX AKA Hotel Residences AMD American Airlines BBC America The Beazley Group Best Practices Laboratory British Film Commission Burberry The Camera House Creative Artists Agency Dana and Albert R Broccoli Charitable Foundation Deadline The Farm LA The Four Seasons Hotel Los Angeles at Beverly Hills FremantleMedia North America The GREAT Britain campaign Heineken The Hollywood Reporter ICM Partners Jaguar Land Rover Kodak Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park London Mark Pigott Pinewood Studios Group

1 1 1

Ruffino Screen International Tanqueray Technicolor United Talent Agency Violet Grey William Morris Endeavor The Wrap B A F TA N E W YO R K AMC BBC America Diageo The East India Company Elemis The GREAT Britain Campaign HBO The Hollywood Reporter The Republic of Tea Retro Report The Savoy Schweppes The Standard Tribeca Shortlist Variety B A F TA I N A S I A Champagne Taittinger M·A·C Cosmetics The Peninsula Beijing and Hong Kong Swarovski

For further information about partnership opportunities, please contact: Louise Robertson +44 (0)20 7292 5844 louiser@bafta.org Natalie Moss +44 (0)20 7292 5846 nataliem@bafta.org


1 1 2


FIL M

AWA RDS

PA RTNERS

With enduring thanks to all the official partners to the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2017.

EVIAN

AMERICAN

EXTERION MEDIA

AIRLINES

Official Outdoor Media

Official Bottled Water

Official Airline

AT E L I E R

H OT E L C H O C O L AT

S WA R OV S K I

Official Chocolate

Official Jewellery

AUDI UK

LANCÔME

Official Car

Official Beauty

BADOIT

NESPRESSO

Official Bottled Water

Co-Host ‒ Official Nominees’ Party

BOT TLETOP

REPUBLIC OF

Official Bag

PHOTOGR APHY

Official Photobooth

C H A M PAG N E

T H E S AVOY

TA I T T I N G E R

Official Hotel

Official Champagne

CHARLES

T AY L O R B L O X H A M

WORTHINGTON

Official Hair Stylist

Official Printer and Paper Supplier

D I G I TA L

VILLA MARIA

CINEMA MEDIA

Official Wine

Official Cinema Media

1 1 3


1 1 4


FIL M

AWA RDS

GIF T

A huge thanks to the following brands which have generously provided gifts for this year’s nominees and citation readers.

PROVIDERS

EVIAN

evian ‘Fruits & Plants’ drink and facial brumisateur spray, increasing hydration and freshness. www.evian.com

AMERICAN

H OT E L C H O C O L AT

AIRLINES

Rare And Vintage: The Curated Collection, a library of the finest chocolate crafted from highly-prized cocoa. www.hotelchocolat.com

With the gift of Five Star Service, start your journey to the US with VIP treatment through the airport. www.americanairlines.co.uk

AT E L I E R

LANCÔME

S WA R OV S K I

Engraved crystal paperweight. www.atelierswarovski.com

La Vie Est Belle fragrance – the essence of beauty, disguised in a bottle. www.lancome.co.uk

BOT TLETOP

NESPRESSO

Tote bag by the award-winning sustainable luxury fashion brand, in partnership with Artisan.Fashion in Kenya. www.bottletop.org

PURE Collection set of two Cappuccino Cups & Saucers and the U Pure Cream Coffee Machine by Krups. www.nespresso.com

C H A M PAG N E TA I T T I N G E R

Bottle of Champagne Taittinger Brut Réserve NV in a gift box. www.taittinger.com

CHARLES WORTHINGTON

Shine like diamonds – with New Diamond Shine Hairspray and All Over Gloss Spray. www.charlesworthington.com

T H E S AVOY

Leather-bound black, ruled notebook, embossed with lettering, courtesy of our Official Hotel Partner. www.fairmont.com/savoy-london

VILLA MARIA

A tour, wine tasting and lunch at the Villa Maria winery, Auckland. www.villamaria.co.nz

1 1 5


1 1 6


ACKNOWLEDGE M ENTS

T H E AC A D E MY WISH ES TO T H A N KÉ

EE Our title sponsor

Film companies and distributors for their invaluable assistance

Pippa Harris, Marc Samuelson and members of the Film Committee

Stephen Fry our Host

Jane Lush Chair of the Academy

Zoë Ball Host, BAFTA Online Content

Film voting juries and members

All staff at the Academy

AD Events International Limited Design of the Awards dinner and after party www.royalalberthall.com

Amaluna by Cirque du Soleil

West Design Royal Albert Hall Red Carpet and Press Area production

Creative Technology Limited freuds

Whizz Kid Television Grosvenor House A JW Marriott Hotel

Film Awards trailer created by Über Design for BAFTA Supported by DCM, Dolby, Pearl And Dean, Pinewood, Procam and The Farm Group

1 1 7


KNOW

ANY

FILMMAKERS? HELP SPREAD THE WORD ABOUT GURU LABS – A WEEKEND OF TAILORED SUPPORT FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF TALENT FIND OUT MORE AT GURU.BAFTA.ORG/GURULABS

Welcome to the world’s most famous stage for the EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS We hope you have a wonderful time @RoyalAlbertHall

/RoyalAlbertHall 1 1 8

#RoyalAlbertHall


END

CREDITS

AT BA F TA

Director of Awards & Membership Emma Baehr

Director of Production Clare Brown Awards Event Producer Lucy Waller

Head of Film Awards Jim Bradshaw

Head of Production Cassandra Hybel Production and Event Team Ryan Doherty, Daniel Dalton, Georgina Cunningham, Ciara Teggart, Jamie Ryan, Emily Mazzeo, Jo Cole, Keren Eliot, Helen Preece, Looloo Murphy

Awards and Voting Team Kelly Smith, Pruthvi Pandit, Imogen Faris, David Lortal, Sam D’Elia, Serena Deakin, Georgina Norton, Ben Jefferson, Natalie Gurney, Dale Ellis, Gemma Thomas, Timothy Hughes, Ollie Ship

Director of Partnerships Louise Robertson Partnerships Team Natalie Moss, Amy Elton, Stephen Berti, Georgi Taroni

Communications Team Nick Williams, Clare Isaacs, Oli Goldman, Jess Lenten, Emma Raczkowski, Abi Fiedler

Ticketing Gabby Taranowski Accounts Joe Baxter

1 1 9


BRO CHURE

CREDITS

AT BA F TA

PR I N T I N G

Editor Toby Weidmann

Taylor Bloxham www.taylorbloxham.co.uk

Design Joe Lawrence

The Academy chooses Soporcel, supporting excellence in print. Printed on Soporcel uncoated. Supplied by Taylor Bloxham.

Ad Sales Amy Elton Stephen Berti

The carbon impact of this paper has been measured and balanced through the World Land Trust, an ecological charity.

Contributors Catherine Bray Cath Clarke Larushka Ivan-Zadeh David Jenkins Tim Murray Neil Smith Simon Thompson

Published by British Academy of Film and Television Arts 195 Piccadilly London w1j 9ln Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 0022 reception@bafta.org www.bafta.org

Photography Manager Claire Rees Picture Editors Hannah Hutchins Jordan Anderson

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the Publishers cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of BAFTA.

CR E AT I V E D I R EC T I O N AKQA www.akqa.com +44 (0) 207 780 4786 info@akqa.com

All nominees imagery used with kind permission from the distributors/film-makers. Rising Star images courtesy of EE. Jane Lush portrait photography by Caroline True

Cover Illustration David Doran daviddoran.co.uk

Š BAFTA 2017

1 2 0


Our congratulations to all nominees. From your friends at

Celebrate this year’s nominees and winners at itunes.com/bafta


2

EE British Academy Film Awards in 2017 programme  

The official programme given to attendees of the EE British Academy Film Awards on 12 February 2017. The cover features bespoke artwork crea...

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