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VOLUME 45, ISSUE 36

Monday, February 17, 2014

Katherine Brow

City hosts 10th Winter Fest

Festival workers spent 72 hours creating snow, brought in 100 dump trucks worth to Capitol Square Katie Hicks Herald Contributor

THE CHARITABLE STORY BEHIND THE UW BOOKSTORE’S “WOOF” NOTEBOOKS ARTS 6

For first-time Madison Winter Festival attendants Cora and Grant Peters, eleven and seven-yearsold, cross-country skiing was the highlight of the weekend. Workers began setting up for the 10th annual Madison Winter Festival Friday, and the event ran

from Saturday through Sunday afternoon, hosting Madison area families with activities ranging from curling to snow sculpting. Yuriy Gusev, festival director and executive director of the Central Cross Country Ski Association, said a partnership with Madison parks allows festival workers to make all the

snow with a snow making system. “It takes about 72 hours to make all the snow then we bring in about 100 dump trucks, so it’s quite a bit,” Gusev said. Once the snow is brought in, volunteers spread the snow around the square with bulldozers, which takes around four-and-a-half hours, Gusev said. After

the festival, it takes around three to four hours to remove, he said. The Madison Winter Festival has become a popular tradition for families, according to Gusev. According to the festival’s website the event draws more than 20,000 people on average, including spectators, winter enthusiasts and athletes.

He added a wide variety of Madison organizations get involved in festival events relating to their cause. “We have a curling club involved in the curling area, Blackhawk Ski Club is involved in ski jumping and the Humane Society is involved with dog jogs,” Gusev said.

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Student debt bill rejected Following concerns over effectiveness, Assembly tosses ‘Higher Ed, Lower Debt’ Joel Drew Herald Contributor

Claire Larkins The Badger Herald Compliance with sprinkler codes may cost fraternities and sororities between $200,000-$500,000, while some opt to make full-blown renovations.

Sprinkler law forces changes Greek houses on Langdon undergo renovations following state requirement Eden Finer Herald Contributor With the creation of a state law stating that houses must be equipped with a sprinkler system for safety reasons, some Greek houses off University of Wisconsin’s campus are opting to take the opportunity for full-blown renovations. Reporting from the Wisconsin State Journal

said the concern for fires at Greek houses arose after a fire destroyed the former structure of Sigma Phi Epsilon in 2008. A 2006 state law set the requirement that fraternities and sororities install sprinkler systems by Jan. 1 of this year, according to the story. Eric Flanagan, a foundation board member for Delta Upsilon, said he’s seen no complications with meeting the sprinkler

requirements. He said the fraternity learned of the plan in 2006 and took it as an opportunity to update a house that had not been renovated since the 1960s. “At that point we decided we would do a full renovation of the house to coincide with the sprinkler requirements, we’re doing a full $2.1 million historical renovation of the inside of our house,” Flanagan said. “The outside of the

house, since it’s a historical building, will remain the same but it’s a full-gut rehab on the inside.” Flanagan said the money for this makeover was made possible in part by an anchor donor, John Morgridge, who was a UW Alum and a prior president of Delta Upsilon. Morgridge agreed to match any funds raised by the fraternity,

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A bill that would have allowed students to refinance their loan interest rates was voted down in Assembly Thursday, following concerns about its effectiveness. The “Higher Ed, Lower Debt” bill, introduced by Sen. Dave Hansen, D-Green Bay, and Rep. Cory Mason, D-Racine, aimed to give students financial support in the midst of a growing student debt crisis in Wisconsin and across the nation. Republican legislators voiced their concerns with the mechanics of the bill, before it was voted down in the Assembly with a 60-38 vote, and an Associated Students of Madison representative also said there were questions about the bill’s effectiveness. According to the U.S. Federal Reserve, there are 753,000 Wisconsin residents with federal student loan debt, not including private student loan debt.

The Institute for College Access and Success ranked Wisconsin eighth nationally for new graduates with debt, and 14th for average amount of loan debt. Rep. Dave Murphy, R-Greenville, said the bill had good intentions but bad mechanics. “This bill does not succeed at helping students and would not change anything,” Murphy said. “We have to go back to the drawing board.” Democratic supporters argued the bill would have reduced interest rates for students across Wisconsin. In a statement, Sen. Chris Larson, D-Milwaukee, said interest rates could be as low as 3.5 to 4 percent and would potentially save students hundreds of dollars a year. In addition to lowering interest rates the bill intended to provide services to better educate students and parents about student loans, the best and

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Propane prices expected to drop as temperatures rise Worst of shortage appears over after extreme cold, cost decreases to $3.68 Kevin Heitzer Herald Contributor Through the cold Wisconsin months, soaring propane prices across the state led to a heavy burden on

many families and businesses in the northern region of Wisconsin, but things are looking up as propane prices drop. According to the U.S Energy Information Association (EIA), propane prices reached their peak in early February at almost $6 per gallon. As prices dropped to $3.68 per gallon as of Feb. 10, it appears the brunt of the shortage is over.

One of the main factors behind the decreased supply and increased price of propane was the extreme cold America’s Midwest has seen this winter. According to the National Weather Service, the historical average temperature during the months of January and February is 15 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit, compared to this winter’s average at 5 degrees.

This led to an outward shift in demand for propane due to the need for consumers to use more heating sources. The propane shortage is a weather-driven issue, Roy Willis of the Propane Education and Research Foundation, said. “Another prolonged cold snap could strain supplies and prices for the next couple of months,” Willis said. “Winter isn’t done with us.”

© 2014 BADGER HERALD

This increase in need has not been alleviated by supply due to a late drying season for farmers and pipeline maintenance issues, Gov. Scott Walker said in a statement. “Our goal with these actions … is to make sure if we have propane anywhere in or near the state of Wisconsin, we want to get it to where it’s needed, and that’s in the tanks of the end users all across the

state,” Walker said. Propane is also seen as a growing commodity in the country. According to the EIA, the U.S. currently exports 410,000 barrels a day, a large increase from the 100,000 barrels being exported just four years ago. These concerns have led to targeted responses from the Wisconsin government

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The Badger Herald | News | Monday, February 17, 2014

Music and arts district proposed in city Advocates say proposals would attract visitors, enhance culture, fund creative economic development Alex Arriaga Print City Editor

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FORECAST

Organizations around Madison are collaborating on plans to develop a music and arts district in Madison that could attract visitors and add to the culture of the city. Willy Wash, a grassroots group dedicated to redeveloping areas on the East side of the city with music in mind, is a driving force in developing a plan for music in the area. Rick Tvedt, executive director of Madison Area Music Association, said in an email to The Badger Herald that the project is still in its beginning phases and it is too early to reveal a lot about it, but there has been discussion in Willy Wash meetings. Tvedt said he has had an idea for a building on East Washington for more than 10 years. He said Willy Wash reformed recently after having been originally formed in 2009, and he got involved with the project because of his plans for the building. “I can envision the East Washington corridor as

a magnet for the arts, a district,” Tvedt said. “This is what all the best music cities have, is a conveniently centralized district.” The basic premise of the group is that they would like to see music, arts and food be a main ingredient in the development of the area, Tvedt said. Tvedt said the group is now assembling a team along with volunteers from the University of Wisconsin to explore the possibilities of the project. “I’ve always been a proponent of Madison music having been a musician myself for a long time,” Tvedt said. “The ideas coming from the Willy Wash group, and other ideas that are in play, could bring dramatic change to the city in terms of music. The key to a successful music city is the participation of municipal powers.” Tvedt said he recently joined the Madison Arts Commission and is interested in working toward solutions and innovations. He said there is an opportunity in the area

right now with the schools nearby and the proposed developments. He said he sees the project he is working on as a destination point that would draw visitors to the city. Anne Katz, executive director at Arts Wisconsin, said she lives in the neighborhood and supports the idea of bringing in more arts. The plan has a lot of promise and there are a lot of people involved with good ideas and connections, she said. Katz said the Willy Wash group has been meeting with several stakeholders including city alders and the mayor. She said they have a big picture now and are moving toward shaping more specific plans. Arts Wisconsin is one of the groups advising Willy Wash, Katz said. They are currently working on the Creative Economy Development Initiative, a bill in the State Legislature that would fund creative economic development like the Willy Wash plan, she said. More public art and music festivals in the area

Chris Lotten The Badger Herald Organizations seek to redevelop areas of city’s east side with music in mind.

are some ways Katz said she would like to see an increase in arts in the area. “What I’m most interested in is that these festivals continue and thrive. They’re free to attend but they’re not free to do,” Katz said. “I want

to make sure that these wonderful community festivals continue and are free to the public. Willy Wash can help bring attention to and grow these events.” Olivia Main contributed to this article.

UW celebrates Black History Month University to host forums and festival for students to experience new cultures through ‘uniting power’ of arts Grace Alexander Herald Contributor The University of Wisconsin is celebrating Black History Month by placing an emphasis on relationships and selfreflection with two major events: the Wisconsin Association for Black Men’s sixth Annual Male Initiative Forum and the first Annual Multicultural Theatre Festival. Wisconsin Association for Black Men Sixth Annual Male Initiative Forum. The theme of this year’s forum is ‘Man in the Mirror: Is Your SelfIdentity a Reflection of Your Interpersonal Relationships?,’ according to a UW statement. The theme focuses on the challenges facing AfricanAmerican males maturing

in relationships, school and overall development, the statement said. The event will feature keynote speaker, founder of the Nehemiah Center and UW alum Dr. Alex Gee, the statement said. Peter Balogun, copresident of WABM, said this year’s topic was chosen because there is a noticeable disconnect within the African-American community and the event will benefit the community. “This event is hoped to foster and continue to grow relationships within the African-American community,” Balogun said. “It will also help people see the importance of why we need those relationships.” The event will take place Friday and Saturday. The workshop Saturday that follows the lecture

will focus on relationships, and discuss personal relationships with family and friends, romantic relationships, professional development and selfgrowth, the statement said. Justin Williams, copresident of WABM, said the forum will work on building relationships as a community, mending relationships and strengthening already healthy ones. “The forum will focus on interpersonal relationships and how they shape who we are and our self-identity,” Williams said. Although the forum focuses on the challenges facing African-American men, the topics discussed are relevant to everyone, UW Interim Vice Provost and Chief Diversity Officer, Patrick Sims, said in the

statement. The First Annual Multicultural Theatre Festival. The theatre festival features two different works: “Jungle Kings” and “Moonshine,” according to a statement from UW. Both works will be shown in Lathrop Hall and are free and open to public, the statement said. “Jungle Kings” is a play about a young man imprisoned for a ganginitiation crime, the play’s writer and director Rainn Wilson said in the statement. Wilson has previously worked with the “at risk” youth in after-school programs and the juvenile prison system, she said in the statement, adding that she wrote the play for the youth. “They needed their voices to be channeled in a way that

people would listen,” Wilson said. “Moonshine,” is a dancefocused performance which will include elements of African, Caribbean and contemporary dance, hiphop, spoken word, poetry, drumming, chanting and singing, the statement said. Sims said original works offer students new ways to experience many cultures through the “uniting power” of the arts. “The festival is a response to provide all students, in particular students of color, an opportunity to reflect and express their heritage, culture and tradition through performance, song and dance,” Sims said. “Jungle Kings” will have multiple shows throughout the weekend and “Moonshine” will have one performance Friday.

“We love to sponsor an event that makes dreamers of all ages go out there, try something new and find something that they are truly passionate about,” Fisher said. The company sponsored the hockey, curling and ski jump activities, and Fisher said their location was busy with families and kids of all ages getting hot cocoa and taking pictures with the medals they won at the events happening right outside. This year the curling station received help from a former Olympian, which made the event all the more special, Fisher said.

“We hosted Maureen Clark this year, previously Maureen Brunt, who was on the 2006 U.S. Olympic curling team,” Fisher said. “It was nice having someone out there who has done the work of being an Olympian introducing children to such a wonderful sport.” The festival also featured ice sculpting, running, cyclo-cross, sit-skiing, sledding, tubing and snowshoeing. The Wisconsin High School Nordic Ski State Championships for sprints also took place Saturday, according to the festival’s website.

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contribute to the economy when they graduate.” Some members of ASM were active in trying to bolster support for the bill in legislature and had student leaders at the public hearings in both the Assembly and Senate, providing personal testaments to how student debt has affected their lives. However, Morgan Rae, ASM Legislative Affairs chair, said she was not surprised the bill did not work out. “There were a lot of general concerns with the bill and how effective it would be if it did pass,” Rae said. “We are happy though because this is a step in the right direction.” A similar bill is being circulated and promoted on the federal level, which would be far more effective if enacted, Rae said.

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TODAY

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One of the returning sponsors this year was DreamBank, a community center sponsored by American

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Flanagan said. Currently, Delta Upsilon has raised $1.6 million total, Flanagan said. Flanagan said the house is currently closed and the renovations will be in full swing from March until August. The house will reopen in time for the fall semester, he said. Ald. Scott Resnick, District 8, said cost was a major obstacle in the renovation efforts. Each house needs to comply with the sprinkler codes, which can cost anywhere from $200,000 to $500,000, Resnick said. “This can obviously be somewhat burdensome to sorority and fraternity houses,” Resnick said. “However it also does provide not only increased safety for the members but a chance to revamp many of

Family Insurance that opened in October and has sponsored Madison Winter Festival for its second year now. Amy Jo Fisher, manager of DreamBank, said she remembers attending

the houses that haven’t seen some of the TLC that is otherwise needed.” Resnick said any fraternities or sororities that do not comply with the rules would be facing significant hardships as well as financial penalties during their next inspection. He said many of the houses have either decided to update their house or enter new construction projects, such as Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Delta Upsilon. Despite the cost, Resnick said he thinks the renovations are worth it. He said the sprinkler requirements make sure the houses are safe. Ald. Ledell Zellers, District 2, said a big concern was keeping

the event for years as a spectator before becoming a part of it. She said DreamBank plays a role in the event because it aligns well with their mission of promoting youth to achieve their dreams.

the housing affordable, but that renovations and modernization were a positive move. Zellers said renovating and modernization can be a good step. She said it can be done on the interior while maintaining the traditional look on the exterior to keep the Langdon area’s distinctive look and feel. “I think that’s really important because [...] it is the epicenter and heart of Greek life for UW-Madison as well as the co-op culture and I think that people really value that look and feel,” Zellers said. “So, modernizing on the inside is great. I think that’s fabulous, while keeping the traditional look on the outside.”

worst private loan lenders and ensure that students receive loan counseling so every student can make an informed decision about student loans, Larson said. However, Murphy said Republican estimates on the actual effectiveness of the bill were much lower than Democrat expectations. If the bill were passed it would only be able to lower rates to as low as 8 percent, he said. Rep. Dana Wachs, D-Eau Claire, said in a statement that he was disappointed in the inaction on the bill. “There is over a trillion dollars of student loan debt in this country, and this is the kind of debt that people cannot get out of,” Wachs said. “The Assembly Republicans talk about growing the economy, yet they won’t give our students a better chance to


The Badger Herald | News | Monday, February 17, 2014

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University health clinic plans to be reworked Residents would like higher density, taller buildings, less space for parking Jamie DeGraff Herald Contributor Plans for a new University of Wisconsin health clinic are being reworked after a salty reception from officials who claim the original plan offered too much parking and not enough public space. Ald. Marsha Rummel, District 6, said the initial phase of the plan includes a UW health clinic, and future stages may include a grocery

store, housing, retail space and a potential relocation of Hawthorne Library. Gorman and Company, which is in charge of the redevelopment at East Washington Avenue and Milwaukee Street, plans to swap the original surface parking structure plan with the installation of a structured lot, Rummel said. The possibility of elevating the height of commercial buildings to six floors from four is also being considered as a method for increasing the density of the complex, Rummel said. Lisa Brunette, UW Health Marketing Affairs spokesperson, said there are

many reasons for adding a new clinic to this developing area. “The proposed clinic at Union Corners would replace the current East Towne Clinic which opened more than 30 years ago and is an extremely busy primary-care site,” Brunette said. “We need a site that will support efficient work flows and expected continuing increases in demand. And the fact that the Union Corners site is closer to downtown is attractive to us as well.” Brunette said as currently planned, the Union Corners clinic would offer urgent care, primary care, gen X-Ray, health education, obstetrics, mammography and physical

therapy. She said they are expanding adult medicine primary care, doubling the space due to the aging population. Ald. Larry Palm, District 12, said he was optimistic yet cautious upon hearing the possibility of the proposed changes. Palm said he was surprised Gorman and Company proposed the lower-density plan originally presented. “I strongly support aggressive density and redevelopment of the site,” Palm said. “I would not accept anything less.” Palm said Gorman and Company underestimated what features residents

wanted in the complex during the last proposal, such as higher density, taller buildings and fewer parking spaces. Palm said one of the primary changes in the plan he and other supporters would like to see is locating taller buildings closer to East Washington Avenue and farther from the existing houses in the neighborhood, which is the exact opposite of the original proposal. “The shortest building was at the corner of East Washington and Milwaukee, while the tallest building was right up against houses,” Palm said. “That is unacceptable as well.” Rummel said there will

be a larger neighborhood meeting on March 1, and an official submission from the developers on March 15. Rummel said the developers are refining the project according to feedback from the city. She added that the developing company has been more attentive to the desires of the neighborhood and the Urban Design Commission. “It’s not on top of somebody where 28 feet away you’re going to take away their views,” Rummel said. “There’s a lot of breathing room there to do some good city building. So our goal is to do some good city building.” Alex Arriaga contributed to this article.

UW tested solar panels may be used in South Pole After withstanding -60 degrees C, may be used for IceCube Neutrino facility area Rachel Jones Print Campus Editor New solar panels created by Sunpreme and tested at the University of Wisconsin have passed preliminary tests and could be on their way to usage at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in South Pole. The panels tested at UW’s Physical Sciences Laboratory passed test conditions of extreme low temperatures necessary to be used at the IceCube’s location, according to a Sunpreme statement. The IceCube detects subatomic particles called neutrinos, which have no mass and the ability to travel through walls. Running a scientific base at the South Pole takes a lot of energy, Matt Newcomb, a programmer with the IceCube team, said. IceCube plans to use the UW tested solar panels to offset heavy energy requirements at the South Pole, and Newcomb said he hopes the National Science Foundation will choose to fund the construction of solar panels for IceCube. Newcomb said the base currently relies on diesel fuel flown directly to the base, which takes about a year from the time the order is placed. Not only is energy hard to get, but it is also expensive, he said. “Here it costs about 10 cents per kilowatt of energy, but at the South Pole it costs about $1.65 per kilowatt of energy,” Newcomb said. “You can imagine how quickly that adds up.” The solar panels were tested at the UW Physical Sciences Lab, which houses several deep freezers that get down to -60 degrees Celsius, Newcomb said. The solar panels were first placed into the freezers and allowed to “cold soak” for a few days, he said. Newcomb said the main problems at temperatures that

cold were structural. Materials get brittle at temperatures of -60 degrees and can easily break, he said. “The first test was enlightening,” Newcomb said. “I remember the rubber around the panels got so brittle that it shattered at the tap of a hammer. It didn’t just break — it shattered.” The job was to first test the panels provided from the manufacturer and then to recommend changes and adjustments, Newcomb said. Once the panels were structurally sound at such temperatures, the team began testing the output voltages, he said. Because the temperatures were so low, the manufacturer could not guarantee that the output power would remain in the desired range, Newcomb said. After a few “trial and error tests” the panels seemed to be functioning properly, he said. Francis Halzen, principal investigator of the IceCube team, said the solar panels would use about four watts of power to operate, which would be a small amount of power used compared to the power use of the entire base. “They have the potential of generating a lot of IceCube’s power,” Halzen said. “They will be configured to cover the sides and roof of the building at the center of the detector that houses electronics and computers.” Newcomb said the record low for the South Pole is -83 degrees. He said he is confident that the panels will function sufficiently even at temperatures lower than the tested range on -60 degrees. It was impossible to test the panels at -80 degrees because the facility’s largest freezers only get down to -60 degrees, Newcomb said. Drawing from experience, he said he is confident that if the panels can function properly at -55 degrees, they will function perfectly fine at temperatures lower than that. “We have a few freezers that get down to -80, but they’re nowhere near large enough to do the testing for the panels,” Newcomb said.

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons If the solar panels are funded and implemented, they would have the potential to generate a lot of power for the IceCube Observatory.

Physics lab to close in March, employees displaced Federal cuts force lab closure, but UW’s funding has seen little impact Nyal Mueenuddin Print State Editor A unique particle accelerator housed in a University of Wisconsin physics lab has attracted scientists from across the world and nation for years, but due to federal cuts the lab has officially been slated for closure on March 7. The Synchrotron Radiation Center allows scientists to examine the composition and

PROPANE, page 1 in addition to federal relief efforts. In his weekly radio address, Walker said the state had released $8.5 million in emergency benefits to help vulnerable citizens. Walker also enacted a deal with the state of Texas that granted Wisconsin truck

chemical structure of a given material, Joe Bisognano, the lab’s director, said. After funding cuts from the National Science Foundation and the lab announced its preparations for closure, UW provided the lab with shortterm funding as alternatives were sought. Bisognano said he has been looking for other sources for funding over the past several years, but with a shortfall of approximately $5 million, he has announced that the lab will be forced to close in March. The lab’s dozen technical workers will be left without jobs, and will have to seek employment elsewhere, Bisognano said. The lab’s

drivers special permission to meet Texas’s motor vehicle regulations, which should lead to an easier supply chain going toward Wisconsin. According to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, a pipeline that ran from Texas to Chicago was reversed, which has increased propane supply to Wisconsin and many other

other personnel have found jobs at other national labs, at UW and in industry, while others are retiring, a statement from UW said. “Over the past few years, we’ve developed an infrared beam that can measure the structure and the chemical identity of the target material at the same time,” Bisognano said in a statement. “This device is the best in the world, and that’s probably the saddest part about shutting this down.” The closing of this particular lab raises questions among educators and researchers regarding the effects and implications of federal budget cuts to basic

Midwestern states greatly affected by the gas shortage. Bennett Bonack, the Lakeland and Three Lakes division manager of Gasco Propane, said the propane issue seems to have been overblown. “I do not think this as big of a deal as people are making it out to be,” Bonack said “Prices should return to normal around the

research. Bisognano said though the closing of this site was an unfortunate loss, places like SRC are being shut down across the country, which he said was a shortsighted move by policy makers looking to bolster the country’s economic recovery. “The scientific community is really being squeezed,” Bisognano said. “Our children will be left a country without a scientific base and without the ability to compete in hightech.” Wesley Smith, a professor of physics at UW and a member of the team of UW researchers that won the Nobel Prize for Physics last

summer.” Propane is the primary heating source for 5 million families within the country and the typical usage for propane lasts until the end of March, according to the U.S. Energy Information Foundation. As temperatures continue to rise through the spring, prices are expected to drop, as well, Bonack said.

year, spoke out against the continued federal cuts to basic research too, saying that there is no greater investment you can make in the future of a country than to invest in basic scientific research. “The one thing that correlates the highest to prosperity is investment in basic research,” Smith said. “Investment in research is what drives the economic engine.” Smith said as a society people are still surrounded by and living off the basic research done at the beginning of the 20th century and that “it is now our turn” to invest in children’s futures. Smith said it was essential

that the federal government support basic research, especially in times of economic hardship because private industries will not make the investments independently as the benefits of such research are much longer term. Private industries are more interested in marketing research than basic research, Smith said. Despite the closing of the SRC, Smith said UW has not been hit by huge research cuts. In 2012, UW was ranked third in the nation for research funding with more than $1 billion, behind Johns Hopkins University and the University of Michigan, according to the NSF.


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The Badger Herald | News | Monday, February 17, 2014

MADD fails Wis. for drunken driving prevention Charlie Burnett Herald Contributor Raising concerns and pushing for change, the Mothers Against Drunk Driving have given Wisconsin a failing grade in regards to drunken driving prevention, giving the state a mere two out of five stars. With 200 drunken driving deaths, 33,579 arrests and 8,088 five-time offenders, Wisconsin is ranked third in the country for operating while intoxicated issues, according to the report. The report said the state fails to meet three standards set by MADD – the lack of sobriety police checkpoints, no requirement for ignition interlock systems for previous offenders and the fact that it is

still legal for an individual to refuse a chemical sobriety test. Wisconsin is the only state that has a law prohibiting sobriety checkpoints and the only state where a first offense DUI is only a traffic violation, as opposed to a crime, according to the report. A Center for Disease Control study showed that using checkpoints can reduce alcohol related crashes and fatalities by 18 to 24 percent. Previous legislative attempts at implementing sobriety checkpoints in Wisconsin have failed. Ignition interlock systems have proven to be very effective too, MADD Wisconsin spokesperson, John Vose, said. “What doesn’t work is taking

away people’s cars and licenses. If someone needs to drive, say for their job, they will with or without a license,” Vose said. “The only way to make sure someone doesn’t get behind the wheel when they’ve been drinking is the ignition lock systems.” Rep. Jon Richards, D-Milwaukee, who is running for attorney general, introduced a bill earlier this month which would require any individual pulled over for drunken driving to have an ignition lock system installed in their automobiles, regardless of their blood alcohol content upon arrest. Ignition lock systems generally require the driver to pass a breathalyzer test

before their car will start and are required in most states for all people convicted of a drunken driving offense. Wisconsin only requires them for some repeat offenders, according to the report. Vose said some critics argue the system can be avoided by having someone else take the breathalyzer in place of the driver, but he said new technologies have made the systems difficult to dupe. “There are a lot of myths out there about ignition interlock systems that, unfortunately, a lot of legislators buy into,” Vose said. “If these systems are so flawed then why are they so

effective in stopping drunken driving in states that require them after the first offense?” Rep. Jim Ott, R-Mequon, and Sen. Alberta Darling, R-River Hills, proposed a package of bills last year aimed at cracking down on drunk drivers. Two of the six proposed bills have already passed the Assembly, but have not been taken up in the Senate. One of the bills that passed the Assembly would make driving with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.15 or greater a crime as opposed to merely a civil violation. The other requires that first time offenders to show up in court so they can either plead guilty, not guilty or no contest.

“The main reason [for the bills], in a nutshell, is to provide a deterrence to bad behavior,” Ott told The Badger Herald when he introduced the bills in March. “The thinking is if you increase the penalties for wrongdoing, it should decrease the amount of wrongdoing.” Lt. Carl Strasburg of the Madison Police Department, said in an email to The Badger Herald that MPD thinks changing this law would help to enforce the laws. “MPD does support making first offense drunken driving, or driving under the influence a crime/ misdemeanor,” Strasburg said.

Andy Fate The Badger Herald ASM’s Sustainability Committee is seeking to implement reusable to-go boxes in the dining halls.

UW looks at ways to recycle wasted food University seeks effective ways to reduce waste and reclaim energy Johanna Lepro-Green Herald Contributor College campuses across the nation waste an average of 40 percent of their food, and at University of Wisconsin, about 30 tons of compost are removed from dining halls each month. According to a study by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, food waste makes up 23.9 percent of the total waste generated by schools and is the most common type of waste produced on college campuses. UW’s Dining Services reduces environmental impact through the use of compost bins and biodegradable products, according to the Office of Sustainability website. Will Mulhern, chair of the Sustainability Committee, said although there are a lot of systems in place at UW to reduce campus waste, there is still more that could be done to create a more sustainable and eco-friendly community on campus. Mulhern said the committee plans on

focusing its efforts this spring into using reusable to-go boxes in the dining hall. The Sustainability Committee also hopes to connect multiple organizations on campus focused on food and sustainability together, so they can work together to reduce waste on campus, Mulhern said. Mulhern said he hopes to connect Slow Food, an educational organization on campus dedicated to promoting engagement with the food system and UW Dining and Culinary services in order to find more effective ways to reduce waste and implement changes on campus. Craig Benson, the director of the Office of Sustainability, said the organization’s main mission is to create value in waste on campus. Because dumping food does not have value, Benson said the Office of Sustainability is focused on providing compost bins at dining service locations on campus, including Union South. Benson said he hopes the campus will eventually be able to reclaim energy from the food that is composted on campus by using anaerobic digestion, in which biodegradable

material is broken down in order to produce fuels. Luke Van Den Langenberg, a member of WE Conserve, said because recycling and trash are picked up by campus trucks, and those trucks pick up at different locations, calculating the total amount of food waste produced by dining services is difficult. The City of Madison is also looking at ways to reduce food waste and is considering building a biodigester to make energy from food waste, Langenberg said. UW might collaborate with the city and provide food waste from campus to the biodigester in order to produce energy, he said. To create an effective sustainable food system on campus, Benson said UW must promote healthy, organic food in the dining halls. Benson said he believes the most important step to reducing food waste on campus is to create awareness among students, faculty and staff. “We need to be good stewards of the world we live in,” Benson said. “When we buy food on campus, we should only buy what we need, not just what we want.”


OPINION

Editorial Page Editors Briana Reilly and Garth Beyer breilly@badgerherald.com, gbeyer@badgerherald.com

The Badger Herald | Opinion | Monday, February 17, 2014| 5

Challenge the mentality surrounding mental health Allison Ebben Columnist After watching the daily news flash before my eyes, I felt sick. Nearly a month after the incident, I am still thinking about her. Madison Holleran, a college freshman and track star at the University of Pennsylvania jumped to her death on Jan. 18. Madison told her parents she had felt overwhelmed by school and had even had suicidal thoughts but insisted on returning to college. Her father, James told the New York Post that the overwhelming pressures in the classroom and out on the track are what eventually pushed her over the edge and resulted in her death. Mental health is not something mentioned often,

especially in day-today conversation. People tend to shy away from the topic believing there is no “real problem” with today’s youth. However, the amount of college students suffering from a mental illness is astounding. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, more than 25 percent of college students have been diagnosed or treated by a professional for a mental health condition within the past year. Furthermore, colleges across the country have reported large increases in enrollment. At the same time, college counseling centers have also observed an increase in the prevalence and severity of mental health issues

experienced by students and an increase in the number of students taking psychotropic medications. College is a difficult transition for many adolescents, which may cause feelings of confusion, depression, anxiety and loneliness. The pressures of perfecting grades, maintaining a social life, attending clubs, being active and attaining enough sleep prove to be too much for some students. It’s also been reported that suicide is the second leading cause of death for college students. And the number one cause of suicide for college student suicides (and all suicides) is untreated depression. Along with several other campuses, the need for health facilities

at the University of Wisconsin has grown. University Health Services has recently proposed $1.2 million in renovations to include mental health, primary care, violence prevention and communications. They plan to expand the already existing facilities. While mental health awareness is slowly becoming more prominent, it is important to remember that depression, anxiety or bipolar disorders do not define a person. However, it is most important to remember that help is readily available in our community. Mental health is so often stigmatized that people find it hard to share their problems and experiences with their therapist and more difficult to share them with

friends. Speaking from personal experience, I have never once publicly announced my struggles. As a student who has coped with anxiety since the age of 14, it is safe to say that I am close to overcoming it. Although I do have my worrisome moments, I am nowhere near where I was years ago. For those suffering from depression, there is help for you. In a culture that focuses on perfect ACT scores, March Madness and ridiculous reality television and celebrities, it is easy to see why the youth today are the way they are. Materialistic things have pushed their way to the forefront of media while real issues sit stagnant on the back burner. In today’s society,

there are little to no positive connotations associated with mental health; instead individuals fear that they will be labeled “crazy,” or even worse, “psychotic.” It is time to take a step in the right direction because mental health is important. Here’s to not just hoping for change, but to taking a stand and making it happen. To Madison and any others who have taken their lives: May you rest in peace knowing that you have positively impacted the world although your stay was much too brief. You are missed each and every day. Allison Ebben (arebben@wisc.edu) is a freshman majoring in nursing with a certificate in gender and women’s studies.

IN THIS ARTICLE • 1 in 4 • • • •

ADULTS 18-24 HAVE A DIAGNOSEABLE MENTAL ILLNESS

• 7 percent • •

OF COLLEGE STUDENTS SERIOUSLY CONSIDERED SUICIDE IN THE PAST YEAR

• • • •

SOURCE: NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Rec Sports rethought Next month, University of Wisconsin students will vote on facility upgrades for the Division of Recreational Sports. The entire project, after months of student feedback and adjustments to the plan, will cost approximately $223 million. Of that $223 million, more than $97 million has already been committed through alternative funding sources. The remaining amount comes out to about $108 per student per semester. That number will likely go down as additional private funding is secured, but the potential costs do not tell the whole story. The four main recreational facilities on campus were built in 1957, 1964, 1968 and 1983. Those facilities need tens of millions of dollars in repairs (right now!) just to get up to code. This is the result of past Rec Sports leadership asking for less than they needed over the last three decades. The new leadership in Rec Sports has already communicated to student government that increases should be expected for the next several years if students do not support the plan on the referendum (which, unlike the Union South and Memorial Union, will only charge students as the phases of the plans are completed). Facilities Planning and Management estimates that would be around double what students pay now, and that does nothing to address the space needs. Rec Sports is not entering a facility “arms race” with anyone on campus, in the Big

Ten or across the country. New leadership has put a plan together that meets student needs (which they are not coming close to doing now), and can sustain the campus for decades ahead. “Purdue builds an Olympicsize pool, and Indiana wants one?” Well, Rec Sports in Madison asked students if they wanted to pay approximately $30 million dollars for a competition pool, and they said no. Guess what! Rec Sports listened. I don’t know what that means for our swim team, but that’s something for UW’s Division of Athletics to consider. (Another common misconception is that Rec Sports and Athletics are the same thing. They are not, and it’s not Rec Sports that benefits from Athletic Revenue). I was a sophomore during the NatUp proposal in 2010, which failed something like 6,000 to 8,000 votes, the highest in Associated Students of Madison history. Coincidentally, a group called NoNewSegFees was spreading misinformation about the plan, and the Teaching Assistants’ Association was with them, vehemently opposing the proposal. That spring, roughly 6,000 more graduate students voted than an average election. Essentially, a group that makes up about a quarter of this campus decided for the other three quarters that this wasn’t going to happen. That being said, this Rec Sports Master Plan is not NatUp. NatUp was a patch job, and long term, the new

plan is much, much better, and blows the proposal that was NatUp out of the water. Student fees will be kept down until major phases are completed, and it will put our campus in a position to provide a better UW experience until our grandkids are here. Does student turnover create short memories? Maybe. But what would concern me more is that student turnover creates nearsightedness. To those who see beyond their time on campus: You aren’t being asked to pay for the whole thing, or anything, really, just to plant the seed. A vote of “yes” plants that seed. To those who only care about right now: You should also be voting yes, because if students vote “no,” Rec Sports will ask for a lot of money, and they’ll ask for it starting next semester, because they will have to. “A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.” I’m pretty sure a president said that, but the point is, passing this problem on to future badgers is going to cost us more, both in the short term and the long term. If you have questions, ask them. If you have concerns or suggestions, voice them at http://uwmadisonrecsports. wordpress.com/ Rec Sports is listening. Joe Vanden Avond (vandenavond@uwalumni. com) graduated from UW in 2013 with degrees in philosophy and political science.

Kirby Wright The Badger Herald If the Rec Sports plan gains student approval, the SERF is one of the facilities that will be completely rebuilt.

The origin of great ideas: another person’s mind Garth Beyer Editorial Page Editor If you asked any of my friends, family or blog readers what I do, they would say that I’m a writer. Not an exceptional one. Not a poor one. But a writer, nonetheless. With that, I can confidently say that the source of much of my writing comes from many other’s ideas. I stole them, and I’m not ashamed. I’m not ashamed of the A’s I get on my writing assignments because I take someone’s idea. I’m not ashamed of my blog readership because I steal other bloggers’ ideas. I’m not ashamed of all

the ideas I’ve taken by observation throughout the day and written down in my journal at night. I’m not ashamed because I’ve built off every idea. All ideas you read in your textbooks, catch online or hear from your friends and colleagues can be traced back to a single stolen idea. That is, until those who took the idea thought to themselves, “This could be better if ... “ Great ideas aren’t just made up out of thin air. Great ideas are nothing like epiphanies. Great ideas are made when people steal an idea and make it better. Recently the Wisconsin Alumni Research

Foundation sued Apple Inc. for allegedly infringing on a U.S. patent on computer technology. I’m far from empathetic about the situation, but there’s a logical explanation for WARF’s pursuit. If you create something and then someone steals your idea — replicating it for profit and refusing to attribute the ideas origin — then, yes. Sue them. (My only concern is that by the time the lawsuit is concluded, the idea for the computer technology will have been improved upon tenfold by others who stole the idea). Passionately stated by Seth Godin, “The essential thing to remember, though,

is that every project is the work of a thousand generations, of decisions leading to decisions, of the unpredictable outcomes that come from human interactions.” I’m shocked at how adamant the University of Wisconsin is regarding patents and plagiarism. As a research-based institution, you would think to hear professors propagate to students something along the lines of “Don’t take any other author’s words unless you plan on expanding on them in a way that was not originally done.” Instead, students are excessively reminded (and for those GPA-dependent

students who over-think professors’ instructions, scared shitless) to not take anyone’s ideas. That is stealing. How hard is it to tell students to take any author’s work, attribute what is word-for-word and develop the work into something better than what it was. That is how progress is made. Are we not teaching students to strive for progress on campus? The answer is that we say we are striving for progress, but we find ourselves boxed into guidelines and filled with fear of crossing any one of them. It’s a grave mistake how we are thinking about

ideas in an industrialist way (mine, mine, mine). If you stole my wallet or my ego or my books, you would cause real harm and stress to me. But my ideas? Please, take them. The more you take the stronger we all become. Oh, and by the way, I stole this idea from a blog post on www.blog.ted. com. All I can hope for is that I made it better. And if I didn’t, at least I tried. Something we might all want to take more risks to do, whether academically or not. Garth Beyer (gbeyer@ badgerherald.com) is a senior majoring in journalism.

Your Opinion - Send your letters to the editor and guest columns to oped@badgerherald.com oped@badgerherald.com.. Publication is based on space and takes into account relevance and quality. Letters should be sent exclusively to the Herald. Unsigned letters will not be published. All submissions may be edited by the Herald for length and style. Reader feedback on all articles and columns can be posted at badgerherald.com badgerherald.com,, where all print content is archived.


ARTS

ArtsEtc. Editor Erik Sateren arts@badgerherald.com

6 | The Badger Herald | Arts | Monday, February 17, 2014

Paying it forward ... with notebooks Elise Romas

ArtsEtc. Staff Writer This past year a colorful new assortment of notebooks with canine characteristics reached the shelves of the University Bookstore here in Madison. You may have given “paws” to the WOOF logo as you strolled down the paper aisle in that frantic lastminute rush to fetch some school supplies before the new semester. Perhaps you stopped to admire the howling pup on the cover or even purchased one out of sheer adoration. But you probably didn’t know that “WOOF” isn’t just what the dog says or merely some vibrant notebook with a dog graphic on it. WOOF Supplies is a charitable organization that seeks to enhance educational opportunities for underprivileged students in the U.S. WOOF is an acronym for “Working On Our Future,” and it aspires to do just that. The slogan says it all:

“You buy one, we give one.” For every WOOF notebook purchased, a one subject, 70-page notebook will be donated to the Kids In Need Foundation (KINF). From here, the KINF supply the teachers in need with these notebooks, and the teachers then distribute the notebooks to students. In addition to donating these paper goods to the KINF, the environmentallyconscious WOOF has also partnered up with another charity organization, Plant-It 2020. It’s estimated that one tree can make about 100 notebooks. WOOF has promised that for every 50 notebooks it sells, Plant-It 2020 will plant two trees in Latin America or Southeast Asia to make up for the resources used. WOOF co-owner Jackson Angell — a student at the University of Wisconsin — stresses the importance of the organization being a friend to the environment.

“For a social cause, we also just need to be environmentally friendly and take advantage of the resources that we already have,” Angell said. WOOF was co-founded by Alex Olmanson (University of Denver), Chris Olmanson (Boston College) and Jason Angell (UW-Madison). The three college students are friends from their Wayzata, Minn., high school. The three founders have all traveled abroad to various third world countries and have shared a similar experience and compelled emotion to make a difference. On the official WOOF website, co-owner Chris Olmanson writes, “My dream for this company is to expand to all school supplies and be a force for continuing to improve education in the United States.” He realized this vision after a personal and eye-opening experience abroad that

compelled him to make a difference. During his four-month period of living in El Salvador, Olmanson developed an emotional connection with a native family that reminded him of his own. Among the family of five children, the eldest daughter, Rosa, had no choice but to drop out of school due to her financial state, as she was not able to purchase the proper school supplies she needed to stay the semester. Rosa is just one of many impoverished students in El Salvador who don’t have enough money to afford school supplies. According to Olmanson, hundreds of thousands of kids in El Salvador have this problem, and it’s a problem for millions of students in the United States. When students can’t afford the proper materials for the classroom, some students go to school without them, which leads to many of these children eventually

dropping out. Although students may drop out of school for many reasons, Olmanson says he wants to make sure that lack of course materials isn’t one of them. His two life-long friends had similar mindsets after their experiences of traveling abroad as well. “When my co-founders and I heard that students were dropping out of schools because they didn’t have proper supplies, we were devastated,” Angell said. So the three savvy friends got together in August 2013 and collectively agreed that by creating an organization like WOOF, they’d be able to make a difference in the lives of others. And so WOOF was born, and it took off quickly. No time was wasted as Angell and the Olmansons brought the news of their newfound organization back to their respective colleges and beyond. WOOF notebooks are even being sold through Wayzata High School in

Minnesota. The promotion and presentation of WOOF notebooks has tailwagging potential. The three friends hit the ground running with advertising, taking full advantage of social networking sites and establishing both Twitter and Facebook pages to promote their cause. To the perspective reader, this all sounds too good to be true: how does WOOF accomplish and keep its promise? To assure consumers that their leashes aren’t being tugged, WOOF has uploaded the receipt copies of its finalized agreements with both Plant-It 2020 and the Kids In Need Foundation. WOOF is a company dedicated to encouraging financially-struggling students to strive for success in school. It’s an organization that works to ensure that schools can have the supplies that they need in order to further students in their education. That’s something worth wagging your tail at.

New ‘Robocop’ lacks original film’s topical themes Remake’s boring script hampers potential of cast, defined characters Selena Handler

ArtsEtc. Staff Writer The 2014 remake of “Robocop” is a dull attempt at repurposing the dystopian plot of the 1987 original in a more modern context. This apparently meant for the filmmakers drowning out the absurdities of the plot and the poorlywritten screenplay with ostentatious gun fights and advanced CGI that adds visual realism where authenticity is lacking within its story. The movie follows the

story of Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman, “Lola Versus”), a Detroit cop, who is nearly killed by a criminal gun. His only choice for survival is to have Omnicorp — a massive corporation that makes drones for the war efforts overseas — remodel his decrepit body with machinery resembling their drones. The corporation essentially uses Murphy as a guinea pig in its attempt to gain the support of the American people so they can make a larger profit. With every attempt to control Murphy, the corporation takes away more of his humanity and thusly the conflict between the corporate machine and human nature begins. The brilliance of the original “Robocop” lied

in its ability to foresee the near future in a way that was relevant to its time. It prophesied the corruption that big business could have on the government and the risks in outsourcing public goods for profit. This 2014 remake falls flat of this dystopian-like image of the near future, as it feels much more like a temporally confused satire that draws on our fears of the past in a future setting. The use of a selfaffirming “newscaster”, played by Samuel L. Jackson (“Oldboy”) in a wispy bouffant hairdo, would have been an incredible foreshadowing of Fox News and MSNBC when the 1987 original came out. His strong rhetoric is reminiscent of

Cold War-era propaganda films like “Red Dawn,” (also recently remade), but his place as a news reporter in a virtual world makes it seems like an overdramatized impersonation of a conservative news show today. Also the film begins by showing the efficacy of drones maintaining law and order in Tehran, Iran. After President Obama’s last State of the Union speech, scaling up forces on overseas policing missions seems like something that will not be a major concern in the future. Perhaps it will be, but the scene feels like one you could have watched on the news three years ago rather than in the purported year of 2028. The film’s cast is full

of talented actors and actresses. But when these actors are matched with the screenplay, they come off as amateurs. Joel Kinnaman and Michael K. Williams (“12 Years a Slave”) — who plays Alex’s cop partner and cohort in bringing justice to the evil Omnicorp company — are no strangers to the crime drama genre. Kinnaman played the unorthodox and naïve detective in the AMC original series “The Killing.” On “The Wire,” Michael K. Williams plays a complex criminal who robs drug dealers with a massive shotgun but who secretly has a strong personal morality and a tender heart. Despite the potential for complexity of character, the film’s script does not

allow for Williams or Kinnaman to showcase their talents. Their roles are extremely one-dimensional, the type of good-cop, goodcop dynamic that’s not conducive to any model of realism. They’re both officers of the law who fight unwaveringly for justice despite multiple attempts on their lives. Even in the end, Murphy defies all odds and science to fight the evil corporation and subsequently fight for American liberties; a nice sentiment, but one that would have had greater meaning in the Cold War era or, more likely, in the Gilded Age.

ROBOCOP

Big Gigantic gets saxy for sold-out Orpheum Boulder EDM duo floods oft-visited Madison with hits, good, bassy vibes Cam Ariana

ArtsEtc. Staff Writer People get hyped when Big Gigantic comes to town. To no one’s surprise, the electronic duo’s Thursday night show at the Orpheum Theater sold out the same day. Swarms of fans filled the venue fairly early,

ready to get down to the signature sax and groovy beats that Big Gigantic is so well known for. When Big G finally took the stage around 11 p.m., saxophonist/producer Dom Lalli grabbed the microphone, shouted, “Madison, let’s go!” and kicked off the energized set with their party-starting single, “Let’s Go!” For nearly two hours, Lalli and drummer Jeremy Salken rocked the Orpheum stage, performing many songs

from their new album, The Night Is Young and a selection of others. Early in the set they covered Knife Party’s “Bonfire,” much to the delight of the crowd. Things got a bit crazy at that point. I may or may not have gotten kicked in the head by someone crowd-surfing. The crowd seemed sufficiently pumped up, and Big G went on to play “Rise and Shine” from their NOCTURNAL album, another crowd favorite. Big Gigantic always

does a tremendous job of bringing top-notch production with them on tour. Elaborate light displays set the mood for the songs being played. Behind the duo, LED screens displayed hilarious visuals — sharks, chomping mouths and a whole lot of cats shooting laser beams out of their eyes. It all contributed to the wild and fun atmosphere you’re bound to experience at a Big Gigantic show. The set came to a close a little before 1

a.m. with their remix of Macklemore’s “Can’t Hold Us.” Lalli and Salken hurried off the stage after thanking the crowd, but the sold-out Orpheum wasn’t ready to call it quits. Almost immediately, the crowd began chants for an encore, and I can only assume Big G was expecting it, because they were back on the stage probably a minute after they’d left. They played their “I Need a Dollar” remix, one of their first songs that skyrocketed in

popularity. Lalli rocked a wild solo on his saxophone then closed the set with their drowsy yet groovy new track, “Shooting Stars.” Big Gigantic has now played in Madison three times in the last two years and their fan base only continues to grow. If you didn’t get the chance to see them this time around, fear not — it’s only a matter of time before they’re back in town to rock the joint even bigger and better than before.


DIVERSIONS

Comics Editor Stephen Tyler Conrad comics@badgerherald.com

Monday, February 17, 2014 | Diversions | The Badger Herald | 7

HERALD COMICS

WHITE BREAD & TOAST

PRESENTS

MIKE BERG

toast@badgerherald.com

CROSSWORD 1

2

3

4

5

14

6

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8

15

17

18

24

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26 30

34

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39

43

44

47

48

52

40

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27

28

49

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53

37 42

46 51

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58 61

13

31

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38

12

22

29 33

11

19 21

23

10

16

20

32

9

59

62

63

64

56

57

60

65

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69

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71

Puzzle by James Tuttle ACROSS 1 Attack with a knife 5 “Oops-a-daisy” 9 Hypermasculine 14 See 2-Down 15 Duet minus one 16 Patriot Ethan of the Revolutionary War 17 *Flying 19 “Silly” birds 20 Renter’s document 21 “No idea” 23 Mormons, in brief 24 *One placed between warring parties 29 Ivy League school in Philly 30 Encountered 31 Doc grp. 32 *Contestant’s help on “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” 36 Like some cereals 38 Colored part of the eye 39 Softly, in music

42 Born and ___ 43 Serving on a skewer 45 *King, queen or jack 47 Brian who composed “Music for Airports” 48 The “L” of L.A. 51 Squabbles 52 *Piece of furniture that might be under a chandelier 55 “There ___ is, Miss America” 58 Epic work by Virgil 59 Quick 61 Hybrid kind of battery 63 Vacation lodging purchase … or an arrangement between the two halves of the answer to each starred clue? 66 Desert flora 67 Battery 68 Port of Yemen

HERALD COMICS

69 “America’s Finest News Source,” with “The” 70 Car parts that have caps 71 Hotel and hospital features

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

18 Push back, as an attack 22 Hawaiian strings, for short 25 “Idylls of the King” lady 26 ___ Domini 27 Mideast bigwig: Var.

DOWN Shower unit ___ and 14-Across (reliable) Surrounding glows Risks It’s between Can. and Mex. ___ lane Kind of acid in soapmaking World Series of Poker game X-Men villain Coeur d’___, Idaho 1963 Elizabeth Taylor role Guys First number dialed when calling long distance

28 Early stage of industrial work, for short 29 Mexican money 32 Had a crush on 33 Resident of Tehran 34 Eponym of a number series that begins 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, … 35 Munchkin 37 Kindergarten basics 40 Bit of pasta, for short 41 Green science: Abbr. 44 Not be conspicuous 46 Pitchers 49 Mined metal 50 Hilarious person, in slang 53 “Far out!” 54 Fond farewell 55 Digging tool 56 Put on the payroll 57 Perfect places 60 Ill-fated captain 61 Sgt., e.g. 62 Suffix with Dickens 64 Cubs and White Sox org. 65 Windy City trains

2

3

Rocky the Herald Comics Raccoon™

So you woke up with bite marks and leaves in your hair? You must have either passed out in the woods or at a co-op party.

5

14

6

7

8

NONSENSE? Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9.

43

35

48

NONSENSE?

45

57

50

47

DIFFICULTY RATING: TWO FUCKING STARS

51

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58

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32

42 46

53

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9.

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Puzzle by Jeff Stillman ACROSS 1 Stern’s opposite 5 Varieties 9 Exercise unit 14 One of the Smurfs 15 Father of Ham 16 Monastery wear 17 ___ rock 18 Fit ___ king 19 Archaeological site 20 Celebration dance after a goal? 23 Sr.’s challenge 24 “Stop!” 25 Oodles 27 Combat engineer 30 Separated, as a couple 33 Degree in math? 34 Get through to 37 Part of a drum kit 38 Many millennia

40 Sag 42 They’re tapped 43 Like many traffic violators in court 45 E.M.T.’s cry before using a defibrillator 47 Network that airs the Soul Train Music Awards 48 Find, as at an archaeological site 50 Hardships 52 Stuff in a muffin 53 Goddess of the hunt 55 Letter before omega 57 Punched out a Disney elephant? 62 Ration out 64 Slender reed 65 It may be checked, in more ways than one

SUDOKU

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WHAT IS THIS

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SUDOKU WHAT IS THIS

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HERALD COMICS

HERALD COMICS

18

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cluehouse@badgerherald.com

DIFFICULTY RATING: ONE FUCKING STAR

15

17

DAVID ANDERSON

SUDOKU

PRESENTS

4

CLUEHOUSE

comics@badgerherald.com

PRESENTS

CROSSWORD 1

ANGST SEAN KIRKBY

66 “Fiddler on the Roof” character 67 Rural route 68 Politico Gary 69 Impassive 70 It’s just one thing after another 71 Not duped by DOWN 1 Relaxing spots 2 Crunchy sandwich 3 Vast 4 Like the Marx Brothers 5 Like some vision 6 Tapestrymaking aids 7 Gold standard 8 Its appearance is deceiving 9 Torahs, for example 10 Marker letters

11 Aerobics done to Chubby Checker music? 12 Forearm bone 13 Head-turner 21 Eternally 22 Like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, religiously: Abbr. 26 Farm sound 27 Real mix-up 28 Didn’t go anywhere for dinner 29 Give a hobbit a ring? 30 It’s about a foot 31 Prompter 32 Raid targets 35 Eyebrow shape 36 Rank above maj. 39 In the vicinity 41 One known for talking back?

44 Extreme, as measures 46 Orange exterior 49 Channel with the catchword “Drama” 51 South American cowboy 53 Home of the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building 54 Desktop pictures 55 Fours on a course, often 56 Thin strip 58 Cinnabon purchase 59 Haunted house sound 60 Former baseball commissioner Giamatti 61 Comics canine 63 Kimono sash

#children


8

The Badger Herald | Sports |Monday, February 17, 2014

Big 10 Men’s Basketball Scoreboard

Nebraska shocks No. 9 Michigan State STANDINGS Big Ten

All

Michigan State

10-3 21-5

Michigan

10-3 18-7

Iowa

8-4

19-6

Wisconsin

8-5

21-5

Ohio State

7-6

20-6

Nebraska

6-6

14-10

Minnesota

6-7

17-9

Purdue

5-7

15-10

Northwestern

5-8

12-14

Indiana

4-8

14-11

Penn State

4-9

13-13

Illinois

3-10 14-12

Nebraska 60, No. 9 Michigan State 51

Minnesota 54, Northwestern 48

No. 16 Iowa 82, Penn State 70

Terran Petteway scored 23 points, while Walter Pitchford chipped in 18 of his own to help Nebraska secure its first road win over top-10 team since February 22, 1997. With the win the Cornhuskers also improved to .500 in the Big Ten for the first time since joining the conference for the 2011-2012 season. Gary Harris led the Spartans with 18 points.

Despite leading by as much as seven in the first half, host Northwestern suffered through a scoring drought in the second half and shot only 30.2 percent from the field in the game in falling to Minnesota. The Gophers held the Wildcats’ leading scorer Drew Crawford to just two points on 1-of-15 shooting.

After four ties in the early going of the second half, the Hawkeyes finally pulled away from the host Nittany Lions in the late going with a 14-4 run to win their third straight conference road game for the first time since 1998. D.J. Newbill had 22 points for the Nittany Lions in the loss.

No. 22 Ohio State 48, Illinois 39

Purdue 82, Indiana 64

Aaron Craft scored 14 points and the Buckeyes held the host and last place Illini to 28.3 percent shooting to pull away in the second half for the road win. Illinois has now lost 10 of its last 11 games.

The host Boilermakers used a 19-1 run over the last 36 seconds of the first half extending to the first five minutes of the second half to pull away in the rout of the Hoosiers. Yogi Ferrell had 27 points for Indiana .

COLUMN

USA-Canada rivalry worth more than gold Dan Corcoran Corcoran’s Clubhouse The players on the two sides have compared it to their version of the Stanley Cup, the best of seven series in the National Hockey League that crowns the league champion. But to fit the comparison means that the excitement, controversy

and the eventual sheer joy on one side and the bitter throes of defeat on the other of the seven-game Stanley Cup would have to be smashed into one 60-minute game. Despite that tall task, the United States-Canada matchup in the women’s hockey gold medal game in the Olympics to the Stanley Cup has lived up to its billing in the past. Don’t expect anything different this time around. Barring a huge upset in the semifinals by either Sweden or Switzerland, who are matched with the Americans

and Canadians, respectively, the border rivals will meet once again in the gold medal game Thursday morning at 11 a.m. central time. Back in 2006, the United States was shocked by Sweden in the semifinals, marking the first time the United States had lost to someone other than Canada since women’s ice hockey was approved as an Olympic sport for the 1998 Nagano Games. Although you can never predict what will happen in the world of sports, that near gravity-defying upset by the Swedes in 2006 will most

likely not be replicated, at least not this time around. On the other side of things, the Canadians are basically shoo-ins for the gold medal game, considering they already dispatched Switzerland, their opponents for the semifinal, 5-0 earlier in the tournament. The fact is the United States and Canada are simply head and shoulders above any other team in international competition. Between the two, they’ve won every single gold medal and all but one silver since women’s Olympic play began in 1998. In a way, the intense rivalry and dominance at the international level in women’s hockey by the U.S. and Canada resembles the rivalry between Wisconsin and Minnesota at the collegiate level in the women’s game. Between the two schools, they’ve won eight of the 13 National Championships since the NCAA began sponsoring a championship for the sport. MinnesotaDuluth has won five championships of its own, but since 2004 Minnesota and Wisconsin have combined to win eight of the last 10 championships. To put it in a direct comparison, Minnesota plays the likeness of hockey Goliath Canada, as it is the state of hockey, while Wisconsin falls into a role similar to the United States, trying to best their neighbors to the north (and west in Wisconsin’s case). Lately though, Minnesota has had Wisconsin’s number, and with their sweep of the Badgers this past weekend,

the Gophers have now won 10 straight games dating back to 2011. Minnesota has also won the last two National Championships, including one over the Badgers in 2012, and look well on their way to another this year. Admittedly, as someone who grew up in the Madison area and watched these two teams compete many times, it’s difficult to watch the Gophers win. I stood idly by this weekend and watched Wisconsin get swept, while the Gophers basked in their 4-0 thrashing of the Badgers in front of the largest crowd in college women’s hockey history. It was tough to stomach, to the point where going home Saturday night I felt utterably disheartened that Minnesota had come into the Kohl Center and dismantled Wisconsin. After the game, Wisconsin goaltender Alex Rigsby said what was probably on most people’s minds, at least those associated with the Wisconsin women’s hockey program. She was sick of seeing the Gophers win. Just as Rigsby and the Badgers tired of having the Gophers come out victorious, I would have to imagine that many of the players on the Team USA echo the sentiments of Rigsby just on another level. They’re sick of seeing the Canadians win. The United States hasn’t won a gold medal in women’s hockey since the inaugural gold in Nagano. Canada has gone on to secure the last four gold medals, and has a three-game Olympic winning streak against the Americans, which includes a 3-2 triumph last

Wednesday during pool play. The good news for Team USA is that the new Olympic format pits the top four teams in the world against one another in the same pool, allowing the United States and Canada to potentially play twice in the same tournament. Although one loss to Canada in the past would have cost the U.S. a gold medal, this time the Americans will have a chance at revenge in the same tournament. But for that to happen, the rivals of Wisconsin and Minnesota that once despised each other on the ice will have to work together to dethrone the greater evil, Team Canada. Of the 21 players on the United States roster, nine are either former or current stars of the Badgers or Gophers. One of those players includes Amanda Kessel, the reigning Patty Kazmaier award winner — the women’s hockey equivalent of the Heisman — who is from Wisconsin but chose to attend Minnesota instead. She may represent the all too real face of betrayal when she returns to the Gophers next season, but her colors of maroon and gold pale in comparison to the red and white, and of course blue. Whether or not the United States can finally quench the 16-years of gold drought remains to be seen. But even if Canada comes out on top again, just like when Minnesota triumphs over Wisconsin, you can still appreciate the fact that these are two of the best teams going headto-head and the time when hockey is at its absolute pinnacle.

SWEEP, page 10

side of the ice, and, on approaching the Gophers’ goaltender Leveille, split two Minnesota defenders and tossed the puck over Leveille’s shoulder, into the back of the net, bringing all of LaBahn Arena to its feet.

leaving a wide-open Dani Cameranesi in front of the net. Ramsey promptly fed Cameranesi, who onetimed the pass past Rigsby to give the Gophers the 3-2 lead and the lead for good with 10 minutes and 58 seconds left to play. Wisconsin pulled Rigsby (30 saves) with more than a minute left in the game, but despite several quality chances the Badgers could not reach the back of the net, falling in a heartbreaker on what was senior night for Rigsby and five others, including Jaminski, Natalie Berg, Madison Packer, Ilana Friedman and Stefanie McKeough. “It’s definitely disappointing,” Rigsby said. “I thought our team played really well, but obviously it didn’t end the way we wanted. It’s never fun to come home and lose in your own rink, but all that aside I thought we played really well tonight.”

shot into the back of the Minnesota net. “We just had good puck possession so I stayed out there and just found a presence in front of the net,” Ammerman said of her goal. “It was a good momentum-shift for us.” There was still plenty of time to play after Wisconsin’s initial goal and Minnesota was far from yielding to the Badgers. Answering back, the Gophers put up a goal of their own 5 minutes and 44 seconds into the second period, followed by a second one in the beginning of the third at the 3:37 mark to take the 2-1 lead over Wisconsin. But just a few minutes later, looking for an opening to break out of the defensive zone, Wisconsin defenseman Kelly Jaminski pushed the puck up to forward Blayre Turnbull. Turnbull flew down the left

“It’s a good response,” Johnson said of Turnbull’s breakaway goal. “[Minnesota] defends very well, so they get up 2-1 and you know you may not get another goal, but [Turnbull] took it upon herself and had a nice rush and created energy.” But Turnbull’s endto-end goal still wasn’t enough to discourage the Gophers. A little less than four minutes later Minnesota racked up what turned out to be the gamewinning goal on a broken play inside the Badgers’ defensive zone. Gopher defenseman Rachel Ramsey was surrounded by several Badger players upon entering the zone,


The Badger Herald | Sports | Monday, February 17, 2014

9

RECAP

Wisconsin claims first road win since November After dropping a 2-1 decision Friday night, UW comes back strong in finale Caroline Sage Men’s Hockey Writer In its series split with Ohio State, the No. 8 Wisconsin men’s hockey team earned its first road victory since late November with a 4-2 win Saturday night in Columbus, Ohio. “At this time of the year it almost seems like every game is the biggest game of the year. And literally this was for us,” Wisconsin head coach Mike Eaves said. “To build momentum to stay in the race … this was a pivotal game.” The Badgers (17-9-2, 8-5-1-0 Big Ten with 25 points) stormed the ice at Value City Arena Saturday looking to avenge a 2-1 loss Friday to the Buckeyes (15-10-3, 5-6-3-2 with 20 points). Despite struggling to find an offensive rhythm

in first shifts of play, UW earned itself an early 2-0 lead with back-to-back goals midway through the first period. Redshirt freshman winger Morgan Zulinick netted a power play goal, beating the Buckeyes’ freshman goaltender Christian Frey (24 saves) at the 9:44 mark. It was Zulinick’s third goal of the season and first power-play tally as a Badger. Then two minutes and six seconds later senior center Mark Zengerle made it a two-goal lead off a pass from freshman Grant Besse. “We got the two nothing lead and that was the difference in the game,” Eaves said. “This young goalie covers the lower part of the net really well and we got a couple of pucks elevated on him and were able to beat him there in the first period.” In a quick two-goal deficit, Ohio State battled back, trying to defend its five-game winning streak. With a goal from freshman forward Nick

Schilkey with more than seven minutes to play in the second period, the Buckeyes cut Wisconsin’s lead in half. However, Zengerle would not be outdone by the Buckeyes and put his second goal of the game away one minute and two seconds into the final period of play. Although Zengerle’s career at Wisconsin has seen him contribute more often from a playmaker role, as he has piled up 112 career assists, he stepped into a different scoring role Saturday night and tied his career-high for goals in a game with his two scores. “He’s been shooting the puck more and tonight he was rewarded. He hit the back of the net a few times,” Eaves said about Zengerle. “I think he has built confidence in his shot. I’m glad to see him get reward because that in and of itself will encourage him to keep shooting the puck.” But the game was far from over after Zengerle

put the Badgers up 3-1. Just 55 seconds later, junior forward and De Pere, Wis., native Max McCormick answered Zengerle’s goal off a threeon-two Buckeyes’ to make it a 3-2 game. A battle until the end, junior goaltender Joel Rumpel and the Badgers’ defense fought off attacks by the Buckeyes until sophomore forward Nic Kerdiles sealed in UW’s victory with an empty netter with two seconds remaining in the game. Rumpel recorded 28 saves on the night, five coming off the four power play opportunities for the Buckeyes. On the weekend the Badgers’ penalty kill excelled, shutting down the Buckeyes’ toprated power play in the Big Ten on all eight opportunities with the man-advantage during the series. When OSU came to the Kohl Center just three-weekends prior — resulting in another series split — they broke down the Badgers’ defense with

Kirby Wright The Badger Herald Senior center Mark Zengerle tied his career-high for goals in a game when he netted two goals at Ohio State Saturday night in the 4-2 win.

POSITIVES, page 10 the game. Even in the face of a tough defeat, the Badgers seem to already be refocusing as the playoffs lurk just two weeks away. “I think it is obviously a learning experience,” Nurse said. “We will come back this week and watch the video, look on things that we have to get better on. There is still season left so we are looking forward to the future.” Rigsby was a little more blunt with her words about the future for this season. The all-time winningest goaltender in Wisconsin women’s hockey history quite clearly has her

sights set on Minnesota, and a National Championship. “We are definitely going to face them again, no doubt,” Rigsby said. “Hopefully we are able to capitalize on our opportunities and refocus — make sure we do the little things right to succeed.” Hopes of beating the Gophers when it really counts have permeated the Badger locker room. “For our younger players it’s a good learning tool,” Wisconsin head coach Mark Johnson said. “It is a humbling experience to put on a party and have the score be the way it was, but it’s also a learning opportunity. As I told the team after the

game, the next three or four weeks we can make some special things happen.” Though the loss put a damper on the event, all in all it was a great success. The game was able to draw the largest crowd ever seen at an NCAA women’s hockey game, while raising 4,677 pounds of food for Second Harvest Foodbank in the process. Wisconsin travels to Minnesota-State Mankato next Friday and Saturday for a two-game series that will wrap up the regular season. The WCHA playoffs will begin with the firstround matchups Feb 28 with the WCHA Final Faceoff taking place the weekend of March 5-9.

two power play goals in game one. “We had trouble with [Ohio State] in the Kohl Center on their power play so we focused on that a lot during practice this week,” Rumpel said. “Our guys do such a good job of getting in lanes and blocking shots and letting me see the puck … It’s a team effort out there and we’re doing really well.” Friday night was again a tale of success from scoring first as Ohio State took control in the first period of play and sent UW to the locker room during the first intermission down two goals. Sophomore forward and Middleton, Wis. native Tyler Lundey snuck one past Rumpel (28 saves Friday) just two minutes and eight seconds into play, followed by a goal from junior forward Derek Angeli with less than six minutes to go in the opening period. The Buckeyes out shot UW 14-6 in the first period. “We knew what was coming, we knew what we

had to do, we prepared properly all week for it and we talked about the first 10 minutes there getting pucks in and out and we had a few turnovers that led to goals,” Zengerle said. “You’re down early 2-0 it’s hard to come back. We had some chances but we didn’t generate enough.” Wisconsin worked to manufacture a comeback, and made leeway with a goal from senior forward Michael Mersch to open the third period, but despite putting 13 shots on net in the final period, UW couldn’t again find a way past Frey, who totaled 29 saves Friday night. Moving forward Wisconsin sits in second place in the Big Ten with their 25 points, seven behind first place Minnesota. The Badgers will return home for their final regular season home series against Michigan State this coming weekend before hitting the road for their final two series of Big Ten play at Penn State and Michigan State.


SPORTS

Sports Editor Spencer Smith sports@badgerherald.com

10 | The Badger Herald | Sports |Monday, February 17, 2014

Chris Lotten The Badger Herald A record crowd of 13,573 fans packed into the Kohl Center Saturday night to watch the No. 2-ranked Wisconsin women’s hockey team take on No. 1 Minnesota. Wisconsin broke its own record from a 2012 game against Bemidji State.

RECAP

Gophers sweep Badgers, clinch title UW’s losing streak to border rival moves to 10-straight games with weekend losses Meghan Eustice Women’s Hockey Writer Amid thundering chants of “Let’s go red” from a sell-out crowd in the Kohl Center Saturday night, the Wisconsin women’s hockey team hit the ice to face top-ranked Minnesota in the second game of the weekend series. Despite the Badgers’ high energy and home-ice advantage, the Gophers proved why they are the No.1 team in the country, trouncing Wisconsin 4-0. The game was exciting from the moment it began, with the Badgers emerging from behind a layer of fog and stepping into an arena filled with flashing lights, blaring music, and a charged crowd of 13,573 fans. “It was a pretty big adrenaline rush for our team,” goaltender Alex Rigsby said of the atmosphere. “We’ve never

had the fog machine before, and it was exciting to come out [and] have the huge attendance already. It was loud in there, and we were really lucky to have the support that we do.” From the second the puck was dropped both teams were off, setting a high pace that seemed to pressure the other to not ease up. The two looked evenly matched throughout the first period, Minnesota getting six shots off and Wisconsin taking seven, with quality scoring chances on each side of the ice. “It’s one of those games where the team that scores first probably has a good chance of winning,” Wisconsin head coach Mark Johnson said. And he was right, as halfway through the second period, Minnesota forward Kelly Terry snuck past a Wisconsin defender and, just to the right of Rigsby, hit the top shelf on a laser of a wrist shot, earning Minnesota the crucial first goal of the game and what proved to be the only goal that mattered. From that point on, the Gophers’ momentum

started building and, though Wisconsin put up a fight, Minnesota’s bid for the sweep could not be thwarted. The second goal came with just more than two minutes left in the same period, when a Minnesota defender took a shot from the top of the circle. Rigsby blocked this initial shot, but when she allowed a rebound, the Gophers’ leading scorers pounced. Minnesota’s Rachael Bona found the loose puck along the right endline and slipped a pass behind Rigsby through the crease to a wide open Hannah Brandt, both of whom lead the Gophers with 50 points apiece. Brandt had a wide open net to shoot at with Rigsby out of position and tucked the puck inside the left post for a two-goal lead. The last two goals came at the beginning and middle of the third period, both consisting of a Gopher taking the puck behind the Wisconsin net, only to throw a pass behind them to a teammate waiting out in front. Despite a lopsided score, the WCHA’s top two teams

looked evenly matched throughout the majority of the game. Minnesota totaled 27 shots and Wisconsin racked up 24, both teams kept penalties to a minimum and there was just as much playing time in one end as there was in the other. With the loss, the Badgers now haven’t seen a win against Minnesota since the 2011-2012 season, marking 10 straight losses, the longest losing streak for Wisconsin against their border rival in the all-time series. Rigsby explained that at this point UW is just trying to keep looking forward. “I’m tired of losing to this team,” Rigsby said. “We’re definitely going to face them again, no doubt, so hopefully we’ll be able to capitalize on our opportunities, refocus and make sure we do the little things right to succeed.” Badgers fall Friday

short

The top two teams in the nation came together Friday night at LaBahn Arena in what was one of

the fastest-paced games of the season. The Wisconsin women’s hockey team hosted Minnesota in the first of the two-game series, fighting tooth and nail until the very last minute against the No. 1 ranked Golden Gophers, but eventually walking away with a tough 3-2 loss. The two rivals showed their love for one another by starting off the Valentine’s Day game with four penalties in the first period. Wisconsin ran a successful penalty kill early on while senior defense Natalie Berg served two minutes in the box for hooking, though it was far from easy. Minnesota swarmed the net, consistently putting the pressure on senior goalie Alex Rigsby, who blocked all five shots directed her way while play was five-onfour. Wisconsin head coach Mark Johnson had prepared his Badgers for this situation and anticipated a high pace being set early on by opposing head coach Brad Frost and his Gopher players. “[The Gophers] play at

a really high pace, and if you’re going to compete with them you have to play fast and you have to take care of the puck and certainly try not to take too many penalties,” Johnson said. “They’ve got some high-powered forwards that create scoring opportunities and if you don’t defend well you’re going to be left looking a little silly.” Later on in the first period, Minnesota received two penalties back-toback, giving UW a fiveon-three advantage. Right as the first penalty expired, still leaving Wisconsin with a one man advantage, forward Brittany Ammerman put Wisconsin on the scoreboard. Defenseman Courtney Burke started the play, moving the puck over to the top of the right circle to forward Katy Josephs, who fired a shot into a crowd of players in front of Minnesota goaltender Amanda Leveille (21 saves). Ammerman was among those in the heavy traffic and redirected Josephs’

SWEEP, page 8

SIDEBAR

Fill the Bowl full of positives despite defeat Attendance of 13,573 at women’s hockey game sets new NCAA record Christian Karcher Women’s Hockey Writer A banner with trademark phrase “It’s a great day for hockey” hung in the rafter in the Kohl Center Saturday night next to the four women’s hockey national championship banners. The intensity of Wisconsin women’s hockey’s former home slowly increased as the NCAA record crowd of 13,573 screaming fans piled into their seats for the Fill the Bowl event.

The excitement reached a crescendo when the Badgers skated onto the ice with music blasting, fog machines, laser lights and all the works. As the night progressed, the No. 1 Minnesota quieted the home crowd with a 4-0 win over their secondranked rivals. However, Fill the Bowl was still a success and a learning experience for the Badgers in and of itself as they look forward to the remainder of their season. Despite the loss, the Badgers (23-5-2 overall, 19-5-2-1 WCHA with 60 points) were appreciative of the turnout at the game. The record setting crowd could very well be the largest crowd any

of the players will see in their careers, and those fans showed their support of the Wisconsin women’s hockey team in full force at the Kohl Center Saturday. “I think it was a pretty big adrenaline rush for the team,” senior goaltender Alex Rigsby said. “We never had the fog machine before. It was pretty exciting to come out and have a huge attendance already. It was loud out there today and we were really lucky to have the support that we do with the Badger community.” The crowd was electric in the first period as both teams shook off their nerves. The noise climbed

to a near deafening level multiple times throughout the first period as both teams continued to fire away at the oppositions’ net. But Rigsby and Minnesota goaltender Amanda Leveille turned back opportunity after opportunity, as both kept their opponent off the scoreboard for the first period. After remaining scoreless for more than half the game, the intensity of the crowd dampened as the Gophers (30-1-1, 24-1-1-0) began to pull away after a goal midway through the second period. With goals almost evenly spaced apart throughout the rest of the

game, Minnesota dashed any hopes of a Wisconsin comeback, eventually sending much of the crowd to the exits before the final horn sounded. In the end the Badgers lost to the Gophers for the 10th straight game, this time in a convincing manner. The 4-0 loss was a stinger for the Badgers, being unable to beat their top ranked border rivals once again. The game was a real eye-opener for Wisconsin as the team continues their quest for their first NCAA National Championship since 2011. “To be honest, I’m tired of losing to this team, but it is going to bring a determination to us,” Rigsby said in a postgame

interview. “I think we can recover from this; we can refocus and come back from the season strong and into the playoffs.” The loss was hard on Rigsby who allowed more than two goals for the first time this season and for the first time since a 5-1 loss to the Gophers late last year. Although Rigsby came up with multiple big saves throughout the evening, Minnesota’s high-powered attack proved too much to be held scoreless. Freshman Sarah Nurse also seemed to take the loss hard after missing a handful of good opportunities throughout

POSITIVES, page 9

NEED MORE SPORTS? Check out @bheraldsports and these frequently-tweeting Badger Herald Sports Editors: Spencer Smith @sj_smith23 Dan Corcoran @dancoco7


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