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THE UNIVERSITY SITY YO OF F WISC WISCONSIN’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER SINCE 1969 Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Volume XLIII, Issue 2

SPORTS | FOOTBALL

NEWS | CAMPUS

ARTS | FEATURE

The return to Pasadena

Proposed changes to the Memorial Union Terrace have some concerned sunset views will be compromised | A2

Come in and stay awhile

Wisconsin’s shot at another Rose Bowl appearance will not come easy | C1

The much-anticipated, modern minimalist HotelRED is open for business, just behind the gates of Camp Randall. | D1

MPD, Soglin: Mifflin must end City officials argue historic block party too costly, reckless to continue in 2012 Sasha Hayman City Editor If the Madison Police Department and Mayor Paul Soglin get their way, the Mifflin Street Block Party will be no more. A report released recently outlined the safety concerns surrounding the 2011 event, including what MPD spokesperson Howard Payne labeled as a number of “concerning issues.” The 2011 Block Party cost MPD $130,000, a $42,000 increase from 2010. There were two stabbings, several sexual assaults and incidents of battery, all related to the over-consumption of alcohol, Payne said. “When you balance those elements of cost and public jeopardy with the way the previous years of the event played out, the department does not see the event as having a positive benefit for the community,” Payne said. Soglin said he thinks everyone would be better served if the Block Party

came to an end. “In a very critical time, the tens of millions of dollars being spent on setup and cleanup and police enforcement for the event would be better spent on community services,” Soglin said. As a participant in the first Mifflin Street Block Party in 1969, Soglin said the focus of the event has shifted drastically from its politically-based origin and the per capita consumption of alcohol has increased significantly, creating serious problems for public health and safety. Ald. Scott Resnick, District 8, said he does not feel an event of this size and caliber can be ended. “Students celebrate prior to finals in many different ways,” Resnick said. “The police and the city can take steps to curb the amount of consumption, but in the past those attempts have not worked.” Payne said MPD looked at Mifflin’s trends beginning in 2008 in terms of cost and different vendors and promoters in an attempt to change the branding of the event and divert attention away

MIFFLIN, page A4

Zhao Lim The Badger Herald

Qualified partygoers at last year’s Mifflin Street Block Party were allowed to have open containers in designated streets for the first time, but the party cost the Madison Police Department $42,000 more to control than in 2010. Two stabbings and multiple battery incidents occurred during the event.

Search for new UW leadership starts with committee Administrators seek stakeholders’ advice in process to replace Martin, relieve Ward Selby Rodriguez Campus Editor The hunt for nominees to fill a search and screen committee responsible for working to find a new permanent chancellor for the University of Wisconsin is advancing. UW System President Kevin Reilly began the

search in August, sending letters to the University Committee, Academic Staff Executive Committee, Associated Students of Madison and Interim Chancellor David Ward requesting nominations for a committee consisting of 23 hand-picked individuals. Ward was appointed interim chancellor after Biddy Martin resigned earlier this summer to lead Amherst College in Massachusetts. The committee will consist of 12 faculty

members, two academic staff members, one classified staff member, one administrator from the Madison campus, another administrator from UW System Administration, one undergraduate UW student, one graduate UW student and four community members, according to a statement from the UW System. “We’re searching for a combination of people who will not only be strong advocates for the groups they represent but are also able to see the whole

institution, everything it does and what qualities a person who can do the job might have,” said UW System spokesperson David Giroux. The committee’s job will be to find five qualified finalists to pass on to a small group of regents appointed by Regent President Michael Spector, Giroux said. Once the committee and Reilly confirm the selected finalists are adequate, the search will become public with candidates visiting campus and

participating in forums to gain community support. Using this feedback, Reilly and the committee will then make their recommendation to the full Board of Regents for confirmation. Reilly stressed the entire process was one of shared governance. “The search and screen committee’s work is to come up with a list of five great finalists,” Reilly said. “We take it from there, utilizing input from the community to ultimately decide which person we

want to go after.” Nominations for the committee are due Sept. 30, and Reilly said he hopes to have a board in place no later than mid-October. Once appointed, the committee will have to first make a position description involving a strong focus on what qualities a new chancellor must possess. They will then engage a national search firm to help them narrow down possible candidates, after which

CHANCELLOR, page A4

System offers more flexibility

TEXTBOOK PRICES

UW administrators form plan to give campuses autonomy provided in budget Adelaide Blanchard News Editor

Students seek cost-cutting text options Growth of electronic media poses threat to local bookstores as prices climb Katherine Krueger Deputy News Editor Being prepared for class is painful. As students head back to lecture halls across the nation this fall, many will spend hundreds of dollars purchasing textbooks. The University of Wisconsin Office of Student Financial Aid website estimates that undergraduate students will spend $1,140 on books for the 2011-2012 academic year, a figure which continues to draw scrutiny to the business model of the bookstore. But even as prices continue to rise in each successive academic year, students and educators are beginning to embrace new electronic forms of text and other emerging media, which are often available for around half the price of a traditional textbook.

PRICES HAVE ‘ALMOST ALWAYS’

GONE UP

Although most of the feedback students provide local textbook retailers may take the form of groans at the checkout, Steve Scheibel, manager of the textbook department at University Book Store, said prices are largely determined by the publisher and chosen by instructors who are aware of the price of the required materials. Scheibel, who has worked in the textbook business for decades, credited steadily increasing book prices as a result of inflationary and other market pressures rather than the margins charged by the individual booksellers. “The prices of textbooks has almost always gone up,” he said. “As long as I’ve been in the business, students have complained about the price of textbooks. It’s the first thing you have to buy that you don’t want to.” While consumers running on a

student’s budget and increasing faculty awareness of the issue have increased the demand for three-hole punch “loose leaf” editions, which retail for around two-thirds the price of a traditional book, Scheibel said students still seem to prefer the physical textbooks. He said there remains no widely available electronic version of textbooks that are the “be all, end all” to make bookstores obsolete.

A WAR AGAINST USED BOOKS

For students hunting storefronts downtown for their required titles, Underground Textbook Exchange has carved out a different kind of niche — it will beat any local competitors’ price. Curtis Macek, manager of the State Street location, said a business model focused on cheap textbooks instead of gimmicks and a link to a

TEXTBOOKS, page A8 © 2011 BADGER HERALD

Under a proposed plan from the University of Wisconsin System president, chancellors and administrators from individual campuses across the state would have more influence in financial and operating decisions for their respective institutions. The plan is a product of a committee assembled by UW System President Kevin Reilly with the purpose of reevaluating the roles of the UW System and the institutions within it. Chancellors would have a greater leadership role within the System, the responsibility of maintaining degree programs would shift and the type of audits the system conducts would narrow, according to a statement from UW System. The plan looks to speed up the rate at which new degree programs are approved, the statement said. Under it, the System would make sure the variety of degrees is preserved, and maintaining academic standards would fall to the leaders at the

campus. The System would also scale back what kinds of audits it performs, UW System spokesperson David Giroux said. Currently, audits are conducted to make sure the System is spending its resources and money in accordance with the state and federal government, Giroux said. A second type of audit ensures institutions are following the best academic and administrative practices. Giroux said this more objective audit will now be conducted by each campus. The plan will go before the Board of Regents during their Sept. 8 meeting. The UW System received more flexibility from the state when the 2011-13 biennial budget was passed in areas including budgeting, financial management and tuition, according to a statement from the UW System. Throughout the next two years, the System will have to work with a $250 million budget cut from the state. One immediate cut laid

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The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Events today 9:30 a.m. UW Choral Auditions Humanities Building

11 a.m. Job Search 101 for Economics Majors

TODAY

TOMORROW

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

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76 54

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sunny

sunny

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mostly sunny

mostly sunny

Soglin pushes ‘nuisance’ party ordinance Proposal would give police more authority in ending large house gatherings, hold landlords to higher standards

Social Sciences Building

Sasha Hayman

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Herald editorial Editor-in-Chief Signe Brewster Managing Editor Carolyn Briggs Editor-at-Large Jake Begun News Adelaide Blanchard News Content Pam Selman Deputy News Katherine Krueger Multimedia Ryan Rainey Assoc. Multimedia Emily Campbell Campus Selby Rodriguez City Sasha Haymen State Matt Huppert Editorial Page Allegra Dimperio Ed. Board Chairman Alex Brousseau Sports Mike Fiammetta Sports Content Elliot Hughes Associate Sports Kelly Erickson Statistics ArtsEtc. ArtsEtc. Content Comics Copy Chief Assoc. Copy Chief Copy Editors

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City Editor A new proposal spearheaded by Madison Mayor Paul Soglin is looking to crack down on “dangerous” house parties and underage drinking, but a critic of the ordinance said he fears almost any house party could fall under the ordinance’s ambiguous language. Madison’s Alcohol Policy Coordinator Mark Woulf said the ordinance — co-sponsored in July by Soglin and Ald. Paul Skidmore, District 9 — is something Soglin has been working to implement in an attempt to decrease the large and often dangerous alcohol-driven house parties that are notorious throughout the city. “What we’re talking about are parties with 60 to 100 people hanging off

balconies, a significant number of which are underage folks,” Soglin said. The ordinance as drafted would allow police to declare a party a nuisance if the attendees violate one of 17 existing laws, ranging from allowing underage drinking to violating fire codes due to overcrowding. Kegs visible from a public sidewalk, street or neighboring property can be cited as an additional reason to label a party a nuisance. If a subsequent nuisance party takes place within the next year, both the landlord and the tenant can be fined from $100 to $5,000 for each violation. A landlord can be exempted from the fine if they can prove the nuisance party hosters have been evicted or attempts were made to evict them. According to Ald. Scott

Resnick, District 8, the ordinance was drafted two years ago, but not picked up until Soglin took office and was looking to introduce similar legislation. “Underage drinking and house parties can be a dangerous environment, disruptive to neighbors and add additional costs for police, and this is a response to that,” Resnick said. “However, one major criticism from the two committees that have seen the ordinance so far is that the language is too ambiguous.” Resnick said while the ordinance may not have been drafted with students in mind it could have a serious impact on the way students enjoy their free time. “This has a drastic effect on student life,” Resnick said. “Outdoor

game day parties now give police reason to enter the premises creating a very detrimental impact to students and unfairly targeting them.” Woulf said the ordinance would not change the way police break up student parties. Instead, it holds the landlords slightly more accountable so they will begin to get more proactive about driving down the numbers of nuisance house parties. Resnick said one major fear is that the landlord would be penalized, so they may begin adding extensive provisions to their leases, making it even more difficult for students to find housing. Soglin said the major benefit of the ordinance would be public health and safety. He said it would reduce incidents like that of the stabbings at the 2011

Mifflin Block Party, where there were 20 or more witnesses, none of whom were sober. “It would certainly reduce the number of conveyances to detox and emergency rooms and make neighborhoods more tolerable,” Soglin said. “This ordinance provides more flexibility to law enforcement in terms of dealing with excessive and often times illegal alcohol consumption.” Woulf said Soglin and Skidmore are working to meet with alders to get to a point where everyone is comfortable with the language. Resnick said the ordinance will be a process spread over several months. It is currently referred to the Housing Committee, which is scheduled to meet in September.

Documents show justice squabble Prosser will not face charges after allegedly assaulting fellow high court judge over case Matt Huppert State Editor Documents containing police interviews with the members of the state’s highest court addressing the details of a physical altercation between two justices in June provided conflicting accounts of the incident. The documents, released by Dane County Sheriff’s Prosser Office and obtained by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, reveal varying accounts of the encounter in which Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice David Prosser put his hands on Justice Ann Walsh Bradley’s neck in Bradley���s office on June 13. A special prosecutor in the case finished her evaluation of the June 13 incident without filing criminal charges against those involved, according to a statement by the Wisconsin Judicial Review. In the documents, Prosser said he went looking for Chief Justice Shirley Abrahamson to address his concern that the court had not yet published a statement regarding the status of their ruling in favor of Gov. Scott Walker ’s collective bargaining measure. Abrahamson said in the documents she and Bradley were in Bradley’s office discussing the dissent position on the collective bargaining case before the altercation with Prosser occurred. Prosser and three other justices from the concurring opinion entered Bradley’s office and found her with the chief justice, Prosser reported. Prosser said he was in the midst of telling Abrahamson he had lost confidence in her ability

to control the court when Bradley charged at him with her right fist raised, the documents said. Bradley said she did not charge at Prosser but was instead walking toward the door behind him and was pointing at the door, telling him to leave her office, the documents said. In the documented account, Prosser said he had been talking with his hands when Bradley walked towards him and as he leaned backward his hands came up slightly. “Did my hands touch her neck? Yes. I admit that,” Prosser said in the documents. “Did I try to touch her neck? No. Absolutely not. It was a simple reflex.” Bradley’s account claims Prosser brought his hands up and forced her into a “choke hold,” long enough for her to tell him to stop. While she said Prosser ’s hands had been fully around her neck, she did not feel any pain or bruising from the incident. Abrahamson said in the documents she witnessed Prosser become progressively agitated throughout the meeting in her office on June 13. She said Prosser brought his hands up around Bradley’s neck but did not believe he applied any pressure to the area. Bradley did not make contact with Prosser before or after the encounter, Abrahamson said in her account. “She never touched him,” Abrahamson said. “I’m certain of that.” The altercation was the first time Abrahamson said she had seen a physical confrontation between Prosser and another member of the judicial body. The evaluation of the incident will be under judicial review by Wisconsin Judicial Commission to determine any possible judicial misconduct in the case, a WJC statement said.

Rendering courtesy of the Wisconsin Union

Community members have had mixed responses to the approved plan to add on a 3,200 square foot glass addition to the Memorial Union Theater. The plan would replace a large portion of the current terrace and provide a year-round lounge space for students.

Proposed Union remodel sparks campus controversy Opponents charge project would ruin iconic terrace view Selby Rodriguez Campus Editor The initial phase of the Memorial Union Reinvestment Project continues to draw harsh opposition from members of the campus community claiming the plans will drastically alter a beloved campus landscape. A glass addition north of the Wisconsin Union Theater was adopted by a 10-2 vote for further study in a Feb. 7 Design Committee meeting. The addition would extend north from the theater lobby by 3,200 square feet, replace most of the existing upper Terrace and create a new terrace east of the theater, according to the meeting’s minutes. Proponents of the plan, such as the committee’s Student Project Manager Colin Plunkett, said the addition fulfills the initial 2006 Union Initiative requirement for more student lounge space while providing an area for the theater to use before, during and after productions. Many also view the glass structure as a positive addition to the Union, as its indoor space can be used regardless of season. “The important thing is this will create a yearround space in an area that for six months out of the year is neglected because of the weather,” said Wisconsin Union

spokesperson Marc Kennedy. John Sharpless, a University of Wisconsin history professor on the Design Committee and adviser to The Badger Herald Board of Directors, said he views the addition as motivated by money rather than students and is against the design. “Throughout much of the discussion down to the passage of the motion, this addition has been … all about Union Theater revenues and only incidentally student use,” Sharpless said. Sharpless said the addition not only consumes the majority of the upper deck of the Terrace and negatively imposes on the remaining seating, but also violates the Memorial Union’s historic preservation. He added Peet’s Coffee Shop and its surrounding area could arguably meet the student lounge space called for in the initiative. Other opposers argue the theater addition will block sunlight from reaching the terrace, plus views of sunset over Lake Mendota. The Memorial Union Reinvestment Project is phase one of the previously approved 2006 Student Union Initiative. The Design Committee is planning changes to the west wing and fifth floor of Memorial Union, which have not been restored since its construction in 1928. Citing electrical wiring, plumbing, heating systems and a strong

need to meet Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility standards within the building — which contains 27 different level changes — as areas needing improvement, Plunkett said the Reinvestment Project is essential. The committee is the first step in the project, with anything approved moving on to an executive team. This team then lobbies for these decisions to the Union Council, which ultimately makes the final approval. Plunkett maintains this process will remain run by students. “The Union really values student opinion. An important thing to note is the Design Committee, Executive Team and Union Council are all student majorities,” Plunkett said. Plunkett added student input is welcomed during workshops and open forums. He also said the committee’s relies on input from student interest groups. The Memorial Union Reinvestment Project marks the second phase of the Union Building Project — the first of which is the recently completed Union South, according to the project’s website. Design Committee records state the project currently has a budget of $52 million, 58 percent of which stems from student segregated fees. Construction is scheduled to begin summer 2012.


The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

City officials ID areas of concern in bar scene Downtown night life survey yields darker areas, overcrowding as issues to address Pam Selman News Content Editor Overcrowding and poor lighting are two of city officials’ main concerns with some of Madison’s heavily populated nightlife hot spots following an Aug. 25 downtown walkthrough. Making their way down State Street and looping back up University Avenue, Madison Mayor Paul Soglin, a group of downtown alders, representatives from several different city commissions and a number of Madison Police Department officials scoped out the downtown area for points that were dangerously overpopulated or dark. Soglin said this tour would probably serve as the first in a series of downtown evaluations. At the end of the tour, Soglin said some of the

main concerns included some dark crevices that could be lit up and some “pinch points,” where sidewalks get overcrowded. Officials are particularly concerned with the “S” formed along the path from University Avenue at Lake Street to Frances Street at State Street and then continuing to wrap around the 500 block of State by Whiskey Jack’s Saloon. “We already knew about this pinch point, but we wanted to revisit this and others to find ways for better lighting and avoid overcrowding,” Alcohol Policy Coordinator Mark Woulf said. “We need to observe the physical space available when there are not large crowds, but we found the area could also use more lighting between Frances and State.” At various points throughout the “S,” city officials saw bar-goers and passersby flowing off the sidewalk and into University Avenue, causing a safety concern, Woulf said. He said areas such

as outside Johnny O’s and Segredo where bar-goers are subjected to an overpopulated environment mean there could be a higher possibility for fights breaking out. The group evaluated the idea of bringing back guardrails between the sidewalk and roadway on University. In the next few weeks, officials will meet to review the problems they saw and the practicality of the potential solutions brought up during the tour. “This is all part of a continued open conversation with State Street bars,” Woulf said. “We will be meeting with the bars in the coming weeks to get the safety message out in order to further an open dialogue.” Soglin said although the area surveyed has been the recent site of numerous physical altercations and a recent sexual assault, no single incident triggered the downtown walk through. “When I came back into office in 1989, I did the

Megan McCormick The Badger Herald

During a nighttime walkthrough of the downtown Madison bar life, city officials found bar-goers outside of Johnny O’s overflowed from the sidewalk into University Avenue. Soglin said this survey would serve as the first in a series of similar events in the coming weeks to address concerns in the area. same thing,” Soglin said. “Still, we are concerned about some violence we’ve had in terms of fights and sexual assaults — the tolerance level is certainly zero.” Soglin said he intends to organize a number of other walks in the coming weeks so that city personnel can get a better idea of the downtown venues in different environments. Walks will take place both during the day and the night, particularly between the hours of

midnight and 2 a.m. on the weekends, and Soglin said he was considering the prospect of heading up a State Street bar crawl to allow for further evaluation. Still, Ald. Scott Resnick, District 8, said city officials only looked at one of two important issues in the downtown area during their most recent survey. He said while he believes safety is the more important issue, officials should also be looking into the underage drinking problem.

Adding more scanners into the downtown bars in an effort to combat illegal consumption is a separate but relevant issue in relation to the concerns raised during the survey, Resnick said. “Tonight was really about how to prevent fights and dangerous situations — we were literally shining lights into dark allies,” Resnick said. “But we’re really looking to create a safer environment, which requires us to focus on these two separate issues.”

TAA votes not to pursue state certification renewal Teachers’ union says approval would have diverted resources from current mission Matt Huppert State Editor Even before an independent agency created guidelines for state and municipal unions that want to continue to collectively bargain over wages, a prominent University of Wisconsinbased instructors’ union rejected recertifying with the state. At its general membership meeting Aug. 18, the Teaching Assistants’ Association voted against seeking certification, citing high costs associated with certification votes and the ability to accomplish

more as an unofficial union. In opting not to certify, the TAA lacks official recognition by the UW administration and all officially binding contracts. Though decertification would limit the organization’s ability to bargain for better wages with the state, Pagac said winning higher salaries is merely one tool TAA has used to represent the rights of teaching assistants. “Our union, like other unions, does more than just get our members a better paycheck,” Pagac said. “It fights to ensure democracy and dignity in the workplace, to advocate for graduate student worker concerns and interests at the [University of Wisconsin] and in our communities and to support working people in general.”

Under new rules recently laid out by the Wisconsin Employment Relations Commission, several election deadlines must be met by bargaining groups in order to be recertified by the state, according to a WEAC statement. The groups of state and municipal employees must hold elections by Oct. 31 to be recertified, a rule that excludes state public safety employees and local law enforcement, fire and transit employees. According to the statement, the state will recertify the union if 51 percent of the union’s bargaining unit approves. The new rules significantly weaken the ability to collectively bargain in a number of ways, TAA co-president Adrienne Pagac said in an email to The Badger Herald. For example,

the pool of eligible voters in recertification elections has been expanded to include all of the individuals of a bargaining unit, rather than merely the members of the union who vote. The TAA’s decision not to recertify is a part of a growing trend among unions in the state, said University of Wisconsin political science professor Charles Franklin. A certification election every 12 months could be viewed as an inefficient use of union resources, Franklin said, especially considering unions can’t bargain over anything but wages, and even then bargaining can only be made in regard to keeping up with inflation. Franklin said the the strict union recertification process established by WERC is a continuation of the anti-union policies

of Gov. Scott Walker ’s which are meant to give school boards and state institutions greater financial flexibility. Prior to the election deadlines, the bargaining groups must file election petitions, the statement said. If a bargaining unit fails to send a petition in by the required date, the body will no longer be certified by the state. The petition and subsequent election deadlines will differ based on what type of employees the bargaining units represent. The bargaining groups must also pay an election fee ranging from $200 for units with 100 members to $2,000 for groups with 3,000 or more members. Pagac said partaking in the process of getting recertified would have unnecessarily diverted physical and emotional

CHANCELLOR, from 1 point they will need to convince each nominee to consider the position. “A lot of people you want to get for a chancellor position are happy with their current jobs and will have to be persuaded to consider jumping into the pool,” Reilly said.

MIFFLIN, from 1 from alcohol, but none of those attempts seemed successful. In 2011, party-goers were allowed to drink on the street provided they were of-age and approved for a wristband. “This is not a knee jerk reaction to 2011,” Payne said. “The report combines previous years and the results are still the same. It’s the

energy, as well as financial resources, away from the current responsibilities of the organization. This is not the first time the union will not be certified by the state; the TAA lacked official recognition in the late 1960s as well as the mid1980s, Pagac said. She said the enactment of Act 10 and subsequent bargaining rule changes correlates with a mission that originated at the Capitol with the aim of weakening the bargaining rights of workers across the state. “A union is a union because workers decide to be a union. Union members recognize that they are stronger when they stand together — that management cannot manipulate and/or exploit its workforce when those workers support one another,” Pagac said.

Associated Students of Madison is currently seeking qualified candidates for the search and screen committee, ASM Chair Allie Gardner said. Student Council is still deliberating to set a process for selecting nominees and will make the final vote during their Sept. 7 meeting. Applications are due the

same day. “It’s a great educational experience for students,” Gardner said. “It’s an opportunity to see different perspectives from people doing different things on campus, as well as give the student’s perspective. It’s definitely our role to make sure this input is given.”

exorbitant costs of the event this past year that put it over the edge.” Resnick said he thinks the city needs to look at other options to solve the problem. The way Mifflin is promoted needs to be changed by staying more local, Resnick said. The 2011 Block Party took place on the same day as the Crazylegs Classic, which Resnick cited as a possible cause

for bringing in even more out-of-towners and dividing police forces. “If advertising focuses on UW-Madison instead of outsiders, I think it would put a positive spin back on the event,” Resnick said. Soglin said if students choose to participate in the 2012 Block Party, it would include significant and firm measures to deal with public and underage intoxication.


The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

FLEXIBILITY, from 1 out in the plan shaves down administrators who work directly within the System. According to the plan, 51 administrative positions will be cut. As those positions are eliminated, the plan creates a space for chancellors from System institutions to take a more hands-on role in administration, including serving on the UW System president’s cabinet and making policy presentations for regent meetings. Giroux said the plan marks more of a cultural shift in the System’s structure than any real policy change. The policy changes were granted when the budget was passed this summer and Gov. Scott Walker approved greater flexibility for the system. The plan, Giroux

said, is more of a way to acclimate leaders both in the System administration and on each campus with the new flexibilities. Earlier this year, discussions on greater flexibility for UW and the System came to a boil. With budget cuts on the horizon, former Chancellor Biddy Martin pushed for the New Badger Partnership, which would have spun the flagship campus off from the rest of the system. Leaders in the System proposed a rivaling plan: the Wisconsin Idea Partnership. While the plan contained some similar flexibility, it ultimately kept the Madison campus within the system. The clashing agendas were a point of contention, and the New Badger Partnership ultimately failed in the Legislature.

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Merry Christmas, hippies A Badger Buddy makes her way through the rubble and chaos that is move-in day at the University of Wisconsin residence halls. Tom Zionkowski The Badger Herald


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The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

New ticket rule limits reselling

This is your body on dubstep Two dancers get cozy at ‘The Rave on the Lake,’ part of an end-of-the-summer hooray and Welcome Week festivities hosted by the Memorial Union. DJs played house and electronic music for a crowd on the Terrace. Zhao Lim The Badger Herald

Once ejected from Badger football game, vouchers cannot be used by anyone else Selby Rodriguez Campus Editor A policy change for Badger football games will restrict season ticket holders from selling their ticket vouchers if they are ejected from games for alcohol-related reasons. Previously dubbed the “show and blow” policy, the Badger Alcohol Check program requires students ejected or cited at University of Wisconsin football games to come to all subsequent games completely sober if underage and under the legal limit if above 21. For the fall 2011 season, only the original ticket holder can use his or her vouchers to attend games if he or she receives a citation. This differs from past policy, when students could still sell their vouchers to other students who would then have to participate in the program, according to a campus-wide email sent to season ticket holders. Ervin Cox, student assistance and judicial affairs office director, said BAC is another way to try to address the alcohol culture during football games. “We’re tired of talking to parents after students die. We’re trying to encourage more responsible behavior,” Cox said. The change is an attempt to prevent students from

circumventing a breathalyzer test, ultimately improving the atmosphere at Camp Randall on game day and alleviating serious alcohol problems throughout campus, he added. According to UW Police Department spokesperson Aaron Chapin, the police have worked in cooperation with both the dean of students and the Athletic Department to change the drinking culture which results in negative behaviors. “We would like to see a reduction in the number of citations,” Chapin said. Cox said UW has faced criticism from alumni, donors and football players for student behavior during football games. These complaints included late arrivals and obscene chants, both of which could stem from possible alcohol use. While Chapin said UWPD provides the instruments and space for the dean of students office to operate BAC, the police will continue a prior policy of behaviorbased enforcement. Their focus will continue to be on negative behavior and safety concerns. “We would like to see students drinking more responsibly, and I think with the different groups we have been working with, [it’s becoming both] a reality and a possibility,” Chapin said.

Center reveals possible exposure Madison-based Dean Clinic to notify more than 2,000 after incorrect injection use Matt Huppert State Editor A Madison-based health clinic is investigating whether several thousand former patients were exposed to blood borne diseases after a former nurse used injection devices incorrectly for years. Following an internal review, Dean Clinic found the nurse had improperly used insulin demonstration pens and finger stick devices, both used for diabetes treatment, on patients between 2006 and 2011, according to a statement from the clinic. The misuse could have exposed thousands of patients from various clinic locations to Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV. A list of 2,345 former patients will receive phone calls and letters addressing their potential

exposure to the diseases and to determine if testing is needed, the statement said. The clinic said one of its top priorities will be working with the patients to determine the proper next steps and to answer any questions. Dean Clinic spokesperson Melissa Wollering said the insulin demonstration pens are used to instruct diabetic patients on how to administer insulin and are not meant to be used on patients, but instead intended to pierce something penetrable like a pillow or an orange. Wollering said a fellow employee originally notified the clinic that the former employee was using the pens on the patients, which sparked the investigation. The former employee also misused finger stick devices, which are another diabetic instrument, she

said. Although the finger stick devices can be used on patients, the cartridge encompassing the device needs to be removed after each patient. While the former employee did remove the needle at the end of the device, Wollering said the former employee failed to remove the cartridge itself. Through their investigation, Dean Clinic concluded the risk of exposure is isolated to just the 2,345 patients on the list, the statement said. Patient care staff will be reeducated on the correct use of these and similar devices to prevent similar incidents in the future. Wollering said it is still uncertain whether any of the at-risk patients have been infected with a blood borne disease because of the mistake, but said the investigation into patient care has only just begun.

“We just started the process of contacting patients,” she said, “It will take some time for us to get the test results back.” University of Wisconsin Health spokesperson Lisa Brunette said the chance of an exposure when blood drawing devices are applied to multiple patients is often close to zero percent. Every clinic and health organization has some policy of continuous quality improvement to ensure that their techniques and equipment are up to date and safe, she said. In an incident where an organization discovers a medical equipment or procedure being inappropriately used, Brunette said, a clinic generally takes it upon itself to re-educate the staff and provide any treatment to the patients who could have been involved.


The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Wis., UW get ready for concealed carry this fall Signs must be posted to keep weapons out of private, public buildings; permits available Nov. 1 Adelaide Blanchard News Editor Earlier this summer, Gov. Scott Walker signed concealed carry into law for Wisconsin, allowing citizens to apply for a permit to carry a concealed weapon in many public and private places. Yet politicians remain divided on whether concealed carry will make Wisconsin safer.

OPEN CARRY, CONCEALED CARRY AND CONSTITUTIONAL CARRY

Until Nov. 1, the only form of carry legal in Wisconsin is open carry. In 2009, Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen ruled Wisconsin residents can openly carry a handgun on their person without being charged with disorderly conduct, but there has been an instance where law enforcement confused the line between open carry and criminal behavior. Permits, background checks and training are all stipulations in the new concealed carry law, aspects that separate concealed carry from yet another form known as constitutional carry. Constitutional carry means the only gun laws necessary are the ones afforded in the Second Amendment, said Auric Gold, gun enthusiast and National Rifle Association-certified gun safety instructor. This means an individual would not need a permit and could make a choice as to whether they required training, he added. Wisconsin moved from open carry to concealed carry, and constitutional carry is the eventual hope for some gun law advocates, Gold said. Sen. Mary Lazich, R-Waukesha, one of the bill’s co-sponsors, said concealed carry was a compromise

for this Legislature, and constitutional carry was a contentious point and wouldn’t have garnered enough votes to pass. “At the end of the day, there was a compromise. [But] many other states approved concealed carry [and permits] before constitutional carry,” Lazich said. How Wisconsin adjusts to concealed carry could be an indicator of the feasibility of constitutional carry, she said. While concealed carry may be a compromise for some, it is ultimately a victory for legislators who have been working on passing the law for years, Sen. Pam Galloway, R-Wausau, said in a statement released when the bill was signed into law. “It has been passed and vetoed a number of times by Gov. Jim Doyle, and there were veto overrides that failed by votes … over the course of a few sessions,” said Jen Esser, spokesperson for Galloway.

CONCEALED CARRY AND SECURITY

Galloway said in a statement that the law is not a partisan issue, but rather it is about the general security of Wisconsin residents. Illinois is now the only state that does not have some form of concealed carry, and Illinois Carry spokesperson Valinda Rowe said there are currently two lawsuits filed against the state. One suit involves an elderly woman who had completed gun safety training and had been approved for concealed carry permits, but could not carry in Illinois. She was attacked and beaten, Rowe said, and is now suing Illinois for taking away her Second Amendment right to protect herself. However, Rep. Kelda

Helen-Roys, D-Madison, said she is skeptical about how much more security concealed carry will actually be afforded to state residents. “People make those claims, but proponents of the bill do not provide evidence for that, and I don’t think there has been convincing evidence that concealed carry will somehow make us safer. In some sense, it is unnecessary. Clearer, this is a priority for a Republican special interest group: the NRA,” Helen-Roys said. Gold said real security does not truly lie in the possession of a weapon but in an individual’s awareness of their surroundings. “If you have a good security awareness, then your need for ever using a gun is greatly reduced. Knowing how to be aware of your surroundings is more important than using a firearm,” Gold said.

WHERE CAN CONCEALED WEAPONS BE TAKEN?

There are safeguards to give private business owners the right to keep weapons off their premises, but it relies heavily on the building owner to make it clear concealed weapons are not allowed. If a private business owner does not want someone bringing a concealed weapon on their premises, they must post a 5” x 7” sign on all major entrances, Lazich said. Some states require signs to have specific statutes, but Wisconsin signs won’t need any special insignia or logos in order to be considered legitimate. Lazich said any private business owner who allows concealed weapons on their premises won’t be liable if there is an altercation or injury on their property due to a misuse of a concealed weapon.

Certain public spaces, including state and local government buildings, attach a condition to concealed carry: Unless it is explicitly stated concealed weapons are not allowed, a permit holder can bring them onto the premise. According to a Department of Justice statement, this applies to university buildings as well. While the decision is ultimately up to local campus leadership, University of Wisconsin System spokesperson David Giroux said he has not heard of any leaders who are willing to allow concealed carry. Currently, there is no uniform policy for how the UW System will handle concealed carry, but most campuses are looking to restrict concealed weapons from campus buildings, Giroux said. To provide each prominent entrance to each campus building in the entire UW System, 12,000 to 15,000 signs would be needed, he added. “It’s a big logistical challenge,” he said. While public buildings may place sanctions on concealed weapons, the government cannot limit open outdoor public spaces, according to the DOJ statement. It will be legal to carry a concealed weapon in parks and other outdoor spaces.

LOGISTICAL ISSUES: PERMITS AND TRAINING

After the bill was signed into law, the DOJ went to work smoothing out the specifics on permits, training, and limits as to where concealed weapons can be taken. Starting Nov. 1 of this year, Wisconsin residents over 21 who can legally possess a firearm can apply to get a license through the DOJ, a statement from the

department said. When Wisconsin residents can apply for permits, an application will be available through the DOJ website, according to the statement. The fee for the permit won’t exceed $50, and proof of training will be required. Those applying will be subject to a background check. After an application is submitted, candidates for permits can expect to wait up to 45 days if they apply during the first month the applications are available, according to the statement. Applications submitted after Dec. 1 should be evaluated within 21 days. Wisconsin became the 49th state to pass a concealed carry law, but each state has tailored different aspects of the law, including training. In Minnesota, residents can only be approved through one type of concealed carry instruction, Gold said. In Wisconsin, those who have taken hunter safety, have prior military experience or take one of a variety of different safety courses can be qualified. The concealed carry law only covers certain weapons. While it will be legal for a permit holder to conceal a handgun, it won’t be legal to conceal a shotgun or other larger gun, Gold said. Other changes to the law include the legality of electric weapons. According to the DOJ statement, before the law was passed, only law enforcement and military personnel could possess and carry electric weapons, such as Tasers. “It’ll be legal to have those, and if you have a license, you can take them wherever you can take a weapon. If you don’t have a license, you can take them on your own property or business,” Gold said.

East coast feels heavy effects of Hurricane Irene New York sees small hit as death toll rises in neighboring states Jennifer Peltz Associated Press

Wilson Ring Associated Press MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The full measure of Hurricane Irene’s fury came into focus Monday as the death toll jumped to 40, New England towns battled epic floods and millions faced the dispiriting prospect of several days without electricity. From North Carolina to Maine, communities cleaned up and took stock

of the uneven and hardto-predict costs of a storm that spared the nation’s biggest city a nightmare scenario, only to deliver a historic wallop to towns well inland. In New York City, where people had braced for a disaster-movie scene of water swirling around skyscrapers, the subways and buses were up and running again in time for the Monday morning commute. And to the surprise of many New Yorkers, things went pretty smoothly. But in New England, landlocked Vermont contended with what its governor called the worst flooding in a century. Streams also raged out of

control in upstate New York. In many cases, the moment of maximum danger arrived well after the storm had passed, as rainwater made its way into rivers and streams and turned them into torrents. Irene dumped up to 11 inches of rain on Vermont and more than 13 in parts of New York. “We were expecting heavy rains,” said BobbiJean Jeun of Clarksville, a hamlet near Albany, N.Y. “We were expecting flooding. We weren’t expecting devastation. It looks like somebody set a bomb off.” Meanwhile, the 11-state death toll, which had stood at 21 as of Sunday

night, rose sharply as bodies were pulled from floodwaters and people were electrocuted by downed power lines. The tally of Irene’s destruction mounted, too. An apparently vacant home exploded in an evacuated, flooded area in Pompton Lakes, N.J., early Monday, and firefighters had to battle the flames from a boat. In the Albany, N.Y., suburb of Guilderland, police rescued two people Monday after their car was swept away. Rescuers found them three hours later, clinging to trees along the swollen creek. “It’s going to take time to recover from a storm of this magnitude,”

President Barack Obama warned as he promised the government would do everything in its power to help people get back on their feet. For many people, the aftermath could prove more painful than the storm itself. In North Carolina, where Irene blew ashore along the Outer Banks on Saturday before heading for New York and New England, 1,000 people were still in emergency shelters, awaiting word on their homes. At the same time, nearly 5 million homes and businesses in a dozen states were still without electricity, and utilities warned it might be a

week or more before some people got their power back. “Once the refrigerator gets warm, my insulin goes bad. I could go into diabetic shock. It’s kind of scary because we don’t know how long it’s going to be out for,” said Patricia Dillon, a partially paralyzed resident of a home for the disabled in Milford, Conn., where the electricity was out and a generator failed. Her voice cracking, she added: “I’m very tired, stressed out, aggravated, scared.” Russ Furlong of Barrington, R.I., ruefully remembered the two weeks he went without power after Hurricane Bob 20 years ago.


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The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

A slice of the market: How textbooks compare For the cash-strapped student, sizing up the prices of their textbooks from a variety of vendors can prove crucial. Here’s a look at the prices for books in some of the most popular classes for a University of Wisconsin undergraduate freshman. Prices represented are as of Sept. 4 and are an estimation of the total cost for any texts listed as required. Figures gathered from online sources do not include standard shipping rates.

TEXTBOOK PRICES BOOKSTORES

ENG 169

ECON 101

HIST 103

BIO 101

CHEM 103

NEW

USED

NEW

USED

NEW

USED

NEW

USED

NEW

USED

Underground Textbook Exchange

$96.55

$72.41

$43.75

$32.81

$145.38

$109.28

$190.00

$142.50

$151.00

$113.25

University Bookstore

$94.85

$71.25

$59.00

$44.25

$144.40

$108.35

$190.00

$142.50

$156.25

$117.20

A Room of One’s Own

$96.89

N/A

$146.25

N/A

$152.05

N/A

$202.67

N/A

$225.95

N/A

Amazon

$48.91

$22.77

$120.52

$43.38

$119.01

$98.26

$85.00

$35.00

$100.00

$24.70

Barnes & Noble

$68.36

$31.47

$125.52

$50.54

$124.70

$102.41

$186.22

$36.94

$228.69

$31.10

SOURCE: The Badger Herald

TEXTBOOKS, from 1 Nebraska used book wholesaler gives the business an edge when it comes to buy back prices and stock. He said while it is no secret that the online market, particularly sellers such as Amazon.com, have captured a sector of the market originally secured by storefront window bookstores, publishers are waging a war on the reselling of used books. “Publishers are kind of at odds with the used textbook industry,” Macek said. “They want to sell a new copy every year.” Macek added a tough economy has led to the erosion of brand loyalty with individual bookstores, instead encouraging a fight to undercut other retailers. He said this market conflict has lead to the rise of new editions available every year, the inclusion of CD-ROMs with textbooks and online codes to access homework and other material. Some of the largest course sections for University of Wisconsin freshmen, Chemistry 103 and Zoology 151, also require editions custom made for the university — which Macek said makes students hesitant to purchase these “disposable” and nearly identical texts.

A NATIONAL SPOTLIGHT AND LEGISLATION

A July 2005 report from the non-partisan federal Government Accounting Office, commissioned by multiple Congressional committees, raised concerns about how these tactics employed by publishers have affected affordability for students. The report cited packaging strategies ranging from the bundling of textbooks to frequent revisions as factors that “may limit the ability students have to decrease their costs.” Although GAO spokesperson Laura Kopelson acknowledged the market has shifted significantly since 2005, no other study of the same scope has since been requested of the organization. On the UW campus, the Registrar’s office works to make textbook information, such as the ISBN number, accessible to students as they make course choices — a product of the Bush

administration’s 2008 Higher Education Act. Registrar Scott Owczarek said 2008 brought on initiatives for a common entry system for instructors to easily enter textbook information and get the institutions’ information to bookstores. “It’s our way of giving students the information in an easy and accessible way so they can make informed decisions in selecting classes and planning for the cost of education,” he said.

NEW WAYS TO LEARN

The future of textbooks, which some believe is poised to usher in a new model of learning for students, is already here. One emerging frontrunner in the race to incorporate different forms of media with text is Kno, a California-based educational software company that now offers more than 100,000 textbooks for iPad, web and Facebook interfaces. Kno spokesperson Jennifer Acree said the titles are available for 30 to 50 percent of the price of conventional textbooks and feature technology such as 3D chemistry models, the ability to link to any third party content and video embedded in text. “We’ve been getting a lot of traction from all across the country,” she said. “Technology has caught up in every other area of students’ lives.” Since launching in 2009, the company has expanded to include 2,000 U.S. campuses and is now the No. 1-ranked education app for iPad. In an effort to combat textbook prices for students on the UW campus, Brower is set to debut three pilot projects featuring interactive web-based materials for students. The projects, which are the result of a cross-campus collaboration between several colleges, the Division of Information Technology and the libraries, could be a step toward offsetting textbook costs for students in the future if the pilots prove successful. Brower characterized the pilots — which drew around $50,000 from a number of campus sources — as media-rich websites with interactive demonstrations that

will be available to a small number of students for download like an application. “The purpose is to help package information in a way that makes it easy to communicate a range of material in an understandable way,” he said. The pilots could play a role in addressing costs for students, but Brower maintains the main goal is to enhance the educational experience for students at a fraction of the price of traditional textbooks.credited steadily increasing book prices as a result of inflationary and other market pressures rather than the margins charged by the individual booksellers. “The prices of textbooks has almost always gone up,” he said. “As long as I’ve been in the business, students have complained about the price of textbooks. It’s the first thing you have to buy that you don’t want to.” While consumers running on a student’s budget and increasing faculty awareness of the issue have increased the demand for threehole punch “loose leaf” editions, which retail for around two-thirds the price of a traditional book, Scheibel said students still seem to prefer the physical textbooks. He said there remains no widely available electronic version of textbooks that are the “be all, end all” to make bookstores obsolete.

A WAR AGAINST USED BOOKS

For students hunting storefronts downtown for their required titles, Underground Textbook Exchange has carved out a different kind of niche — it will beat any local competitors’ price. Curtis Macek, manager of the State Street location, said a business model focused on cheap textbooks instead of gimmicks and a link to a Nebraska used book wholesaler gives the business an edge when it comes to buy back prices and stock. He said while it is no secret that the online market, particularly sellers such as Amazon.com, have captured a sector of the market originally secured by storefront window bookstores, publishers are waging a war on the reselling of used books. “Publishers are kind of at odds with the used textbook industry,”

Macek said. “They want to sell a new copy every year.” Macek added a tough economy has led to the erosion of brand loyalty with individual bookstores, instead encouraging a fight to undercut other retailers. He said this market conflict has lead to the rise of new editions available every year, the inclusion of CD-ROMs with textbooks and online codes to access homework and other material. Some of the largest course sections for University of Wisconsin freshmen, Chemistry 103 and Zoology 151, also require editions custom made for the university — which Macek said makes students hesitant to purchase these “disposable” and nearly identical texts.

A NATIONAL SPOTLIGHT AND LEGISLATION

A July 2005 report from the non-partisan federal Government Accounting Office, commissioned by multiple Congressional committees, raised concerns about how these tactics employed by publishers have affected affordability for students. The report cited packaging strategies ranging from the bundling of textbooks to frequent revisions as factors that “may limit the ability students have to decrease their costs.” Although GAO spokesperson Laura Kopelson acknowledged the market has shifted significantly since 2005, no other study of the same scope has since been requested of the organization. On the UW campus, the Registrar’s office works to make textbook information, such as the ISBN number, accessible to students as they make course choices — a product of the Bush administration’s 2008 Higher Education Act. Registrar Scott Owczarek said 2008 brought on initiatives for a common entry system for instructors to easily enter textbook information and get the institutions’ information to bookstores. “It’s our way of giving students the information in an easy and accessible way so they can make informed decisions in selecting classes and planning for

the cost of education,” he said.

NEW WAYS TO LEARN

The future of textbooks, which some believe is poised to usher in a new model of learning for students, is already here. One emerging frontrunner in the race to incorporate different forms of media with text is Kno, a California-based educational software company that now offers more than 100,000 textbooks for iPad, web and Facebook interfaces. Kno spokesperson Jennifer Acree said the titles are available for 30 to 50 percent of the price of conventional textbooks and feature technology such as 3D chemistry models, the ability to link to any third party content and video embedded in text. “We’ve been getting a lot of traction from all across the country,” she said. “Technology has caught up in every other area of students’ lives.” Since launching in 2009, the company has expanded to include 2,000 U.S. campuses and is now the No. 1-ranked education app for iPad. In an effort to combat textbook prices for students on the UW campus, Brower is set to debut three pilot projects featuring interactive web-based materials for students. The projects, which are the result of a cross-campus collaboration between several colleges, the Division of Information Technology and the libraries, could be a step toward offsetting textbook costs for students in the future if the pilots prove successful. Brower characterized the pilots — which drew around $50,000 from a number of campus sources — as media-rich websites with interactive demonstrations that will be available to a small number of students for download like an application. “The purpose is to help package information in a way that makes it easy to communicate a range of material in an understandable way,” he said. The pilots could play a role in addressing costs for students, but Brower maintains the main goal is to enhance the educational experience for students at a fraction of the price of traditional textbooks.


The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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CRIME in Brief UW ARBORETUM Sexual Assault University of Wisconsin police have a suspect in custody in connection to a sexual assault that took place at 2:30 a.m. Sept. 1 at the UW Arboretum, according to a UWPD statement. Sgt. Aaron Chapin stressed that while the assault took place on campus property, neither the victim nor the suspect were affiliated with the university. The investigation is ongoing.

LANGDON STREET Arrest in Battery Case After an alleged battery on two University of Wisconsin students Sept. 1 in front of the Red Gym on Langdon Street, the UW Police Department confirmed they have a suspect in custody. One of the victims was hit by a brick and had to be treated for lacerations, according to a UWPD statement. Chapin confirmed in a message to The Badger Herald an arrest was made in connection to the battery. More information will be released later this week as the investigation unfolds, he said.

WILSON STREET Weapons Violation The Madison Police Department is currently investigating an incident involving a 24-year-old Madison woman who was allegedly shot in the leg by her tenant, a 57-year-old Madison man.

According to an MPD incident report, the two had been partying the night before the incident and the woman returned the next day, Aug. 29. She allegedly broke out a window, claiming that she had come back to retrieve her purse. The man believed he was being burglarized, grabbed his .22-caliber rifle and held the woman at gunpoint as he called the police. When police arrived on scene, the man said he believed it was an intruder and shot the victim in her leg. MPD spokesperson Joel DeSpain said detectives are investigating the incident.

WHEELER ROAD Arrested Person On Aug. 27 at 11:30 a.m., police arrested 29-year-old Joseph Cochran of Madison for resisting or obstructing a police officer. According to an MPD report, police received complaints that Cochran walked into the middle of the road when vehicles would drive near. When an officer confronted Cochran, he said he was dehydrated and disoriented which caused him to misjudge where the roadway was. Officers offered Cochran medical assistance, but he refused and then fled the scene. He was found underneath the deck of a nearby residence, where he was arrested.

JOHN NOLEN DRIVE Intoxicated Driver Two Wisconsin Dells residents were involved in a life-threatening car crash after attempting to return home from a trip to Madison while under the influence of heroin last week. Twenty-year-old Elizabeth Elledge and 23-year-old Thor Crapp were arrested for driving while intoxicated and possession of heroin after recklessly driving inbound on John Nolen and crashing into a tree the evening of Aug. 24. An MPD report said when police arrived on the scene, the two detainees were found unresponsive in the vehicle with “blue faces and extremely pale skin.” After being resuscitated, Elledge was cooperative and said the two had consumed heroin before she had operated the vehicle. DeSpain said MPD has had numerous news conferences about the heroin epidemic in the past two years. He said the increase in heroin use has also been witnessed across the country.

EAST TOWNE MALL Fraud A 19-year-old Madison man, Maurice Porter, and a 32-year-old Madison woman, Sharee Koker, were arrested in connection with a fraud investigation the afternoon of Aug. 24. An MPD report said an officer noticed something rectangular protruding in

Athletic Board preps for leadership change Former head Dickey to assume new role serving under Alvarez Selby Rodriguez Campus Editor The University of Wisconsin Athletic Board will see a major personnel change as student-athletes begin heading into the fall semester. Walter Dickey, UW law school professor and Athletic Board chair, stepped down from the board to begin working with Athletic Director Barry Alvarez as senior associate athletic director. UW veterinary medicine professor Dale Bjorling will replace Dickey as chair of the Athletic Board. Having served on the board for the past eight years, Dickey has been chair for the past six. He has also served as a faculty representative to the Big Ten and NCAA and worked on the Big Ten’s executive, compliance and finance committees. Dickey retired from

teaching prior to receiving Alvarez’s offer. He expects to continue teaching part-time while on the senior staff. “I had just retired from the faculty when Barry Alvarez asked if I would join the senior staff. It took a lot of discussion and thought, but I agreed,” said Dickey. Dickey’s legal background will be helpful to the staff following the exit of two senior staff members. Bjorling said Dickey’s move will allow him to lend his expertise in legal matters to the staff. “[Dickey] has a great deal of experience with compliance issues and will be able to provide the department a lot of assistance in that area, especially now with these absences,” Bjorling said. During his tenure on Athletic Board since 2005, Bjorling also served on several committees within Athletics, cochairing the academic compliance committee for the past four years. Dickey led the Athletic Board when it came under the scrutiny of an ad hoc committee

between 2008-09 after allegations members were being intimidated and university procedure was not being followed. The committee’s report did not find any evidence to back those claims. Dickey said Bjorling is a good replacement as his experience with the board will be beneficial in handling the chair position. “[Bjorling’s] experience and strong character are requirements of the job, as you tend to receive a lot of criticism,” Dickey said. Bjorling said it is important the board continue working with the Athletic Department to ensure student athletes are getting the best possible academic experience. He has no major plans for change at the moment. “At this time, I don’t think any largescale changes are needed,” Bjorling said. “We just need to provide the Athletic Department with insight and assistance into the academic side of the student-athlete experience.”

the center region of Koker’s buttocks and she would not cooperate when asked to remove the item. The officer retrieved the item, which turned out to be a number of gift cards from Sears and Best Buy. DeSpain said this fraud investigation had been ongoing. The two were responsible for a combined total of more than $2,200 in stolen merchandise.

HUMMINGBIRD LANE Exposure A 51-year-old Madison man was arrested on the charge of disorderly conduct after exposing himself to a number of people residing in the area mid day Aug. 28. The arrested man, Paul Olson, was standing in the window of his home when he pulled down his pants and exposed his buttocks, placed them on the glass window and “gyrated” for approximately four minutes, an MPD report said. When police arrived, Olson told the officers he had just finished having sex with his wife and was not “taunting” the complainants as they had reported.

JOHN NOLEN DRIVE Arrested Person After threatening and tormenting a Madison taxi driver, 22-year-old Aaron Gaustad of Monona was arrested on two charges of disorderly conduct Aug. 25. A Madison taxi picked Gaustad up on State Street,

and he allegedly told the driver to take him to the Taco Bell in Monona. The driver began taking John Nolen Drive toward Monona, which allegedly infuriated Gaustad and prompted him to begin screaming at her and punching the back of her seat, according to the report. The driver pulled over and called the police while watching Gaustad. He then began swinging at the driver and ran away when a second male taxi driver came to the scene. An officer found Gaustad standing on a railroad track, urinating, and he was immediately taken into custody.

BROOKS STREET Arrested Person A 44-year-old Madison man, Eric Pittman, was arrested for burglary and probation violation when he broke into a student residence the evening of Aug. 28. An MPD report said two 19-year-old Madison men left their home briefly to get food, and when they returned, they saw Pittman standing inside their apartment. Pittman slammed the door on the legal residents and then allegedly kicked out a screen to escape. The residents chased Pittman on foot for several blocks until he fell on the pavement and the two victims pinned him down until police arrived.


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The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Mayor: Budget includes significant cuts to curb debt Soglin says Madison will fund only core, essential programs Sasha Hayman City Editor While the specifics of Madison’s 2012 budget are yet to be revealed, city officials say one thing is certain: Big cuts are coming. Madison Mayor Paul Soglin said discussion regarding the capital budget is almost complete, with close to $60 million in spending cuts, and city officials have just begun work on the operating budget. Ald. Lauren Cnare, District 3, said the capital budget involves investments in land, buildings and equipment,

while the operating budget provides money for city departments and services to fund salaries, staffing and supplies. “We’ve basically divided budget requests into wants and needs,” Soglin said. “The situation is such that we can only fund the city’s needs, and I’m not even sure we can fund all of those.” A statement from Soglin’s office said after taking steps in 2011 to reduce debt — including adopting more current numbers for energy consumption, cutting employee benefits and freezing or eliminating vacant positions or new positions — there is still a need for an additional $11 million in cuts in the 2012 operating budget. Soglin has released

neither the proposed capital budget nor the operating budget, but in the coming weeks each proposed plan will go before the Board of Estimates and City Council. Soglin will present the capital budget to City Council Sept. 6, and the Board of Estimates will evaluate it Sept. 12 and Sept. 13, according to a statement from the mayor’s office. It will then go back to the council. The operating budget follows a similar schedule behind the capital budget, and is slated to be introduced to council on Oct. 4 and the board Oct. 10 and Oct. 11. One cut that is expected to be included in Soglin’s proposed capital budget is to the TIF loan for the renovation and expansion of the Edgewater Hotel.

A TIF loan is money the city invests in tax incremental finance districts, which increases the property value of the project. The money generated by the increased property taxes is then paid back into the district over time. Cnare, who also acts as City Council president, said the exact amount being cut is unknown, but the Edgewater will not receive the $16 million as was originally proposed. She said she heard the cuts could put the loan in the $4 or $5 million realm. “The City Council will react by trying to figure out what that means for the project,” Cnare said. “I’m sure many members will try to find ways to increase that funding. There are

a lot of good reasons the city council voted to fund the construction and will continue to vote for it.” Soglin said there will undoubtedly be less money for snow removal and reduced staffing levels in parks and streets. He said he believes if these cuts are short-term, two years or less, the city will be alright. However, he said if there is no changes made in returning state shared funds to Madison by 2013, there will be very serious long-term problems. “Soglin has to find a balance and decide which cuts are supportable and what the community really needs,” Cnare said. “They change everyday according to things that come in.” Cnare said the greatest

cuts will come in the area of capital expenditures. Officials are looking closely at personnel cuts and want to avoid layoffs, but options such as limiting days off are still in the cards. In the past month, there have been a number of city budget conversations, each meeting revolving around a different group of the city’s services, Cnare said. They have been divided into community development, administration, infrastructure, large community facilities and parks, and public safety. At the meetings, community members have been encouraged to work with city staff and committee members to discover what Madison’s residents’ most important priorities are.

State rolls out approved changes to reciprocity Wisconsin students to pay Minnesota in-state tuition rate after 2012-13 term Matt Huppert State Editor Wisconsinites enrolling at colleges and universities in Minnesota next year will no longer have the advantage of paying lower prices than Minnesotans for comparable education due to a new reciprocity agreement between the neighboring states. The State of Wisconsin Higher Educational Aids Board and the Minnesota Office of Higher Education agreed to a change in the MinnesotaWisconsin Interstate Tuition Reciprocity Program, HEAB Administrative Policy Advisor Sherri Nelson said. Cullen Werwie,

spokesperson for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, said the new agreement allows Wisconsinites to attend an undergraduate or graduate program in their neighboring state for the price a native Minnesotan would pay. The memorandum phases out the supplement agreement established by HEAB and MOHE during the 2008-09 school year in which the state of Wisconsin covered the financial difference of a Wisconsin resident paying in-state tuition at a Minnesota university with higher in-state tuition prices, Nelson said. For the past three years, Nelson said Wisconsin universities have had lower in-state tuition than comparable Minnesota universities. Therefore, under the supplement agreement, Wisconsin students paid less to go to Minnesota universities than Minnesota students. The financial difference

created by this policy was paid for by the state of Wisconsin to the state of Minnesota, Nelson said. The supplement agreement was originally created by former Gov. Jim Doyle to prevent Wisconsin students from paying the difference. A Minnesota student attending a university in Wisconsin will continue to pay the in-state tuition price of a comparable Minnesota university, Nelson said. In creating the reciprocity agreement, Werwie said both states had to pass concurring legislation and sign a memorandum of understanding. Additions to the memorandum had to be made after Wisconsin policymakers and constituents voiced concern that the new reciprocity agreement should not be set in place until the 2012-13 school year, Nelson said. Despite the higher costs


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Band of drummers Geared up for the game, members of the University of Wisconsin marching band stroll past Camp Randall on their way to the home opener against the University of Nevada-Las Vegas.

Megan McCormick The Badger Herald

Man sentenced in ‘09 Chicago mob beating Member of group that killed teen will join other cohorts in prison for 32 years Don Babwin Associated Press CHICAGO (AP) — The last suspect convicted in the 2009 videotaped beating death of a Chicago honors student was sentenced Monday to 32 years in prison, ending a tragic case that symbolized the brutality of youth violence and sparked outrage around the country. Lapoleon Colbert, 20, was convicted of firstdegree murder in June for participating in the

mob attack on 16-year-old Derrion Albert. In addition to watching the beating, which was captured on a cellphone camera, a jury heard a recording of a police interrogation in which he admitted to kicking Albert in the head and stomping on him while he lay defenseless on the ground. Before his sentencing, Colbert apologized to Albert’s family and pleaded with the judge. “This is my first offense, have mercy on me,” Lapoleon said, standing to face Albert’s family before sitting silently with his hands folded in front of him. But Judge Nicholas Ford was not swayed. He previously had handed down prison sentences of 32 years to two other

defendants convicted during separate trials and 26 years to a fourth who pleaded guilty. A fifth suspect tried as a juvenile was ordered to remain imprisoned until he turns 21. “There is a growing tolerance of conduct that history would view as unconscionable,” Ford said. The September 2009 fight erupted near Fenger High School on the city’s South Side where Albert and Colbert attended classes. In the video, Derrion’s attackers are seen punching and kicking him, slamming him over the head with large boards and finally, stomping on his head. The sight of Albert trying to defend himself against waves of attackers, staggering to his feet and

then crashing to the street again as he was unable to cover his body from all the kicks and punches, prompted the Chicago police and school officials to promise dramatic improvements in security around schools. From Washington, President Barack Obama dispatched two top Cabinet officials to the city to discuss ways to quell the violence. Albert’s family has reacted calmly to the verdicts. To them, the tragedy is about six young men thrown together on a sunny afternoon, just days into the beginning of the school year, and how all their lives were destroyed in a matter of minutes. Chicago officials said they implemented various programs to help

students get safely past neighborhoods where just walking by posed a danger — as well as initiatives such as conflict resolution programs inside the schools. Among the security measures was a pilot program installing cameras allowing Chicago police to monitor events around Fenger and two other schools. Officials recently said that the number of crimes, arrests and cases of misconduct dropped dramatically at Fenger as a result, and that they would spend $7 million to introduce the cameras at a dozen other troubled schools. “Despite the tough economic times facing our district, we’re taking additional steps to reduce crime and create school

environments that are safe for students and staff,” Chicago Public Schools CEO Jean-Claude Brizard said in a statement when unveiling the program. After the Albert killing, the city deployed more police officers to the area and created a database and intelligence hub to track daily incidents of violence around schools, officials said. Federal stimulus money was used to boost “safe passage” programs to help youths get safely to school, and a $500,000 emergency federal grant was spent on crisis intervention and other student programs. ___ Associated Press reporters Sophia Tareen and Deanna Bellandi contributed to this report.

Voter ID challenged in court Women’s activist group looking to file suit after sufficient funds are gathered Sean Kirkby State Reporter A recently passed state law requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls will face a court challenge on allegations it violates the Wisconsin Constitution. On Aug. 18, the League of Women’s Voters of Wisconsin announced it would challenge the voter ID law in Dane County Circuit Court within the coming weeks. “We’re just trying to uphold the state constitution,” LWVWI spokesperson Andrea Kaminski said. The bill requires voters to show photo identification, such as a Wisconsin driver’s license, a passport or a valid student ID card, before casting a ballot, Kaminski said. University of Wisconsin System’s current IDs do not meet the qualifications for a voter ID as there is no address

listed on the card. Because the state constitution only bans felons and those considered incapacitated from voting, Kaminski said the law violates the constitution by creating a third class of people who cannot vote — those who do not have proper identification. Although the state constitution allows the Legislature to make laws regulating voter registration, Kaminski said the recently passed law goes beyond regulation and could stop those who meet citizenship, residency and age requirements from voting. Republican legislators maintain the law does not violate the state constitution, said Mike Pyritz, spokesperson for bill’s co-author Rep. Jeff Stone, R-Greendale. “We are confident that the suit will be found frivolous,” Pyritz said. While the Legislature

passed the bill last May, voters will not have to show photo identification until next year, Kaminski said. The bill also included other changes to voting registration laws, such as increasing in-state residency requirements from 10 to 28 days. The LWVWI will file the suit after they have collected the funds necessary to do so, Kaminski said, which should be in the coming weeks. After the circuit court hears arguments, it will either decide on a verdict or declare that the challenge decision is of statewide importance and pass it on to the state Supreme Court. A challenge against the law could remain in court for years, though the LWVWI hopes it will move through the system quickly, Kaminski said. In an email to The Badger Herald, University of Wisconsin political science professor

Barry Burden said an unconstitutionality ruling seems unlikely. “It is a challenging argument to make because the burden is on the League to demonstrate that the law is unconstitutional,” Burden said. “The ideological composition of the court is certainly tilted against them.” The courts could uphold the law and argue voter ID might be a way of helping election officials determine if someone is a felon, Burden said. The judges may also decide to follow a strict interpretation of the constitution and overturn the law since the constitution does not explicitly say voters must show ID to vote. With a Republican governor and a Republican majority in the Legislature, the court system is the only chance the LWVWI has of overturning the law, Burden added.


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Zhao Lim The Badger Herald

Students had to work around construction on many streets, including Lake Street, while moving into the residence halls and housing near the UW campus.

Construction speckles city Officials try to smoothly orchestrate tearing up roads with student move-in Caroline Wittenburg City Reporter With the month of August comes a scramble of students, parents and teachers alike preparing for the upcoming school year. This August, Madison’s bustling atmosphere feels no different despite the construction that has been in the works all summer and that continued to rage during the University of Wisconsin’s designated move-in days. For Madison residents, the sounds of cranes and power tools were often heard throughout the lengthy construction process that has been going on around campus and the downtown area throughout the past several weeks. However, Ald. Scott Resnick, District 8, said the construction has not greatly impacted the transition of new freshmen moving into their housing. Resnick said the city had taken the construction projects into consideration ahead of time and planned accordingly. “From the city perspective, we’ve really hit our mark on getting timing right, and I’m glad to say many of the major city projects are ahead of schedule or right on schedule,” Resnick said. Through cooperation between the city and UW, many students’ transition to campus was designed so most of the city’s construction would be suspended before the students move in and out of dorms or nearby apartments to avoid any further congestion or conflict. Ald. Mike Verveer, District 4, said the city set an example of trying to minimize move-in disruption by completing the Frances Street renovations by the Nitty Gritty with enough time to avoid congestion around Witte Hall. “The city is very cognizant of the tremendous amounts of

traffic that are carried by students moving both in campus and off campus, and we do try to plan our construction around those key dates,” Verveer said. City officials met a number of times during the summer to assign different days when freshmen could move in and account for construction conflicts. The team decided to have the southeast residence halls move in on the weekend instead of during the week so as not to exacerbate traffic issues. Still, students can expect the city’s projects to pick back up in the near future as officials revamp their plans for various areas surrounding campus. Gary Brown, UW director of planning and landscape architecture, said the nearly two-year process to redesign Picnic Point is finally under way, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 1. The project, overseen by the Lakeshore Nature Preserve Committee, aims to open up the view that can be seen from Picnic Point to include downtown Madison and the UW campus by removing invasive species and replanting native species, clearing erosion and dealing with storm water. Prior to redesign plans to open up the view, students were climbing down the slopes, which were very unstable, in an attempt to get a glimpse of downtown Madison and campus. So, Brown said, the project not only provides a safety net but brightens up Picnic Point as well. The project also involves upgrading the current fire circle pit with a stone seated wall to allow large groups of people to gather there without impacting the soil. “Our continued hope is to accommodate the large groups of students that gather out there and use that place,” Brown said.

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ASM to finalize student role in chancellor search Reps endorse rally for workers’ rights following debate on relevance of event Katherine Krueger Campus Editor

The Associated Students of Madison evaluated the proposed plan to select nominees for the committee to find the next chancellor for the University of Wisconsin Sept. 31. While the vote on ASM’s methods to select two students for the committee will be conducted during their next meeting, Shared Governance Chair Nicholas BrighamSchmuhl laid out the current plan during last Wednesday’s Student Council meeting. As it stands, the Shared Governance committee will interview candidates after an initial application process. Finalists will then be forwarded to Student Council for the final vote. Brigham-Schmuhl said the Shared Governance

Committee wanted to give Student Council one last level of oversight while also making sure candidates would be able to handle the demands of being on such a committee. “This puts those students in the position to be asked questions and have to assert themselves in front of others, which is exactly what they will have to do while on the search and screen committee,” BrighamSchmuhl said. The nomination process started when UW System President Kevin Reilly notified ASM of the call for search and screen committee members, seeking the council’s help in selecting two student candidates. One of the members will be an undergraduate, the other a graduate student. A resolution introduced to endorse a rally supporting campus workers also proved a topic of dissent at the council’s Wednesday meeting. The rally — scheduled to take place on Bascom Hill Sept. 6 —

will call for the university to increase employee protections while educating students on the impacts of state budget cuts. Citing ASM’s obligation to act as a liaison and protect campus workers, Rep. Michael Billeaux said the endorsement would help bring attention to the rally’s message as well as show support for teaching assistants and other graduate workers on campus. Other members disagreed. Rep. Tom Templeton expressed concern over the lack of literature concerning the event and asked for more information before approving an endorsement. Other concerns included whether or not the event would be relevant to a large portion of the student body. Rep. Karen Scott said the endorsement would help show support for a group of staff and teaching assistants who often feel neglected by ASM. She also said the event was pertinent to not just

Megan McCormick The Badger Herald

Rep. Michael Billeaux speaks during Wednesday’s ASM Student Council meeting. Billeaux was a supporter of endorsing the workers’ rights rally, slated to take place on Bascom Hill on September 6. He said supporting the rally would in turn support workers that work closely with students. students but Wisconsin in general. “This affects every person in the state of Wisconsin,” Scott said. “It affects every single public employee, not just those working for the university. Money will continue being sucked out of the economy through these cuts.”

The council voted to approve an ASM endorsement of the event. Other approved measures included renaming the Bus Pass Advisory Board the Student Transportation Board. This board will continue to make decisions relating to all aspects of

student transportation and not solely the bus system. The measure passed with unanimous consent. The governing body also granted final approval to the selection of Sami Ghani as Press Office Assistant Director and Samir Jaber as SSFC Legal Counsel.

Recall elections narrow Senate Republican majority GOP retains control in Senate while two incumbents fall to Dem. challengers Matt Huppert State Editor

The recall elections held in nine districts across the state this summer failed to shift the majority power at the Capitol, but have left many curious as to how the more even balance of control will affect policymaking. Six Republican incumbents were taken back to the ballots Aug. 9 after the Democratic Party of Wisconsin, along

with independent recall campaigns, gathered enough signatures to attempt to take back the majority control, University of Wisconsin political science professor Charles Franklin said. While four incumbent Republican senators maintained their seats in the Aug. 9 elections, Republican incumbents Randy Hopper of Fond Du Lac and Dan Kapanke of La Crosse lost their seats to Democrat challengers Jessica King and Jennifer Shilling, respectively. The second set of recalls, held July 19 and Aug. 16, served as an an attempt by state Republicans to oust three

Democratic senators who left the state last spring during the budget repair bill proceedings, Franklin said. All three Democratic incumbents managed to hold on to their seats. In contrast to the previous session, which consisted of 19 Republicans and 14 Democrats, the new session will host 17 Republicans and 16 Democrats. Franklin added most of the recall elections were held in districts that voted favorably for Republican Gov. Scott Walker during the gubernatorial election in the fall of 2010. Democrats fell short of the overall goal of the

Just hangin’ with the young folks Peter Bjorn and John perform in a free concert on King Street in front of The Majestic on August 26. Students and Madisonians alike jammed out to the Swedes’ rock hits, with local DJ Nick Nice spinning from atop the theater’s marquee. Lead singer Peter Moren entertained an energetic crowd with fan favorites and reappeared to play encores. Eric Wiegmann The Badger Herald

recall elections, as the Republican majority in the Senate remained intact. Graeme Zielinski, spokesperson for the Democratic Party of Wisconsin, said having only a single member majority will make it difficult for Senate Republicans to pass high profile legislation without bipartisan support. “There’s no way that Scott Walker could have gotten the legislation approved in the last session passed in this Senate,” Zielinski said. “There was no compromise from him before, but in the 17-16 Senate he won’t be able to act that way.” Zielinski alleged

Walker has a history of active partisanship — something Zielinski said he does not anticipate will change during the coming session, but the single member majority could conceivably make it harder for more staunchly-partisan legislation to be passed into law. Still, Franklin said it is just as likely moderate legislation would have difficulty passing if a conservative senator chose to block such a bill on grounds it did not go far enough to the right. Andrew Welhouse, spokesperson for the Committee to Elect a Republican Senate, said state Democrats

made a commitment to partisanship when they left the state to halt a vote on the budget repair bill last spring. Welhouse said the Legislature is weakened with the loss of Hopper and Kapanke. He added preserving a majority in the Senate allows Republicans to keep passing legislation they promised during the 2010 election campaign, such as balancing the state’s budget. “We ran on a lot of promises in 2010,” Welhouse said. “The protests and the recalls have thrown us off a bit, but now we can get back to pursuing those promises.”

Israeli forces prepare for standoff on West Bank While officials hope to prevent conflict, Palestinian rallies set up tense stage Daniella Cheslow Associated Press ELAZAR, West Bank (AP) — Israeli forces are seeking to prevent bloodshed when Palestinians march in support of a statehood drive this month, but they are preparing for worst-case scenarios, even authorizing West Bank settlers to shoot at Palestinians who approach their communities. Palestinians say the rallies will be peaceful — a view shared by Israel’s own security assessments — and will steer clear of any settlements. Yet, the combustible atmosphere and the long and deadly history of IsraeliPalestinian violence are raising the specter that events might spin out of control. For the Palestinians, the mass marches are intended to boost their campaign to get the U.N. to recognize an independent state, a strategy they are trying because negotiations aimed at bringing about a state through a peace deal with Israel have been stalled for two years. Settlers living on land the Palestinians want for their future state have long been targets for militant attacks; likewise, some settlers have attacked Palestinian civilians. The fear among settlers now is that even unarmed

crowds — if large enough — could overrun their communities. Ilan Paz, a retired Israeli general who served in the West Bank for a decade, said a scenario with hundreds of casualties was not unthinkable. “You can’t know how this sort of protest will end,” Paz said. “All sorts of local incidents can lead to injuries, and this can cause a deterioration in the situation.” Israel’s army is training soldiers used to battling gunmen in non-lethal riot control tactics and inviting settlers to watch the drills at a military camp in a rural part of central Israel. The mass demonstrations are set for around the time of the Sept. 13-22 United Nations General Assembly session, where the Palestinians hope to be granted official endorsement as a state. Some doubt the rallies will take place at all, however, and several Palestinian activist groups say they will not take part, believing the effort would achieve little. Preparations undertaken by police are expected to cost Israel about $20 million, according to a senior police officer. Purchases include 16 long-range tear gas launchers, 15 trained Belgian horses to bolster the police’s mounted forces, and a weeklong riot training course for a quarter of the nation’s 28,000 police officers, he said. Police expect Israelicontrolled east Jerusalem, home to 250,000 Palestinians, to be a flash point, he added. He

spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the precautions. Security forces are stockpiling tear gas, stun grenades, water cannons and other nonlethal weapons. At a military camp about an hour’s drive from Israel’s metropolitan center in Tel Aviv, troops are practicing civilian crowd control. But in the West Bank, some settlers say they do not fully trust the army to handle any unrest. The army “doesn’t always know how to deal with this sort of event,” said Avraham Binyamin, a spokesman for Yitzhar, a settlement considered extreme even by many settlers. Palestinians marching toward settlements are a threat even if they are not carrying firearms, he said: “You can kill with a rock or a knife, and you can burn with a match.” There are 300,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank, living among around 2.5 million Palestinians. Settlements are typically guarded by soldiers and by teams of local residents armed by the military. In addition, many settlers carry private firearms, and clashes between settlers and Palestinians are common. The Palestinian Authority, the Westernbacked government that has partial authority in the West Bank, has released a schedule of planned September protests slated to be held in city centers and villages. Saeb Erekat, the chief Palestinian negotiator, said fears of Palestinian violence were “absolutely unfounded.”


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Challengers test field as early campaigning begins Texas Gov. Rick Perry among GOP slated against Obama Matt Huppert State Editor Following months of polarizing political turmoil, Republicans and Democrats are gearing up for what both parties see as a chance to regain the nation’s attention for the 2012 presidential elections. While President Barack Obama can rely heavily on his campaigning skills, University of Wisconsin political science professor Donald Downs said his low approval ratings do not bode well for the possibility of reelection. Obama’s low approval ratings are directly correlated to the poor condition of the economy, said Downs, who is an adviser to The Badger Herald. Obama is scheduled to give a speech Sept. 8 where he is expected to unveil his plan for job improvement and growth. Whether or not the economy drastically changes for the better before the election on Nov. 6, 2012 may greatly contribute to Obama staying in office, he said. “It’s a dangerous time for President Obama,” Downs said. “Historically, presidents with his current approval rating have not done particularly well in the election.” Chairman of UW College Republicans Johnny Koremenos said undecided voters, especially students who will be entering the job market in the next few years, should question whether their ability to find and keep a job has increased during Obama’s first term.

Koremenos said both parties are to blame for the high unemployment and large federal debt of the last three years based on their reluctance to cut spending and entitlement programs. “There’s a lot of optimism for the 2012 election,” Koremenos said. “[Republicans] are becoming more and more confident what happened at the state and federal level last fall was not a coincidence.” Erin Goulding, spokesperson for UW College Democrats, said the cause of the weakened state of the economy is more complex than spending. She said the continuation of former President George W. Bush’s tax cuts and corporate irresponsibility are just some of the many factors which contributed to the stagnant financial situation. The financial burden caused by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have also caused much of the country’s debt accumulation over the past decade, Goulding said. Obama should be given more time to solve the problems he inherited, she added. Goulding said she is hoping for a growth in jobs and broad economic improvement to help the president’s chances of reelection. On the opposing side, the Republican nomination appears to have three front runners, Downs said, but recently one appears to be edging ahead of his opponents. Texas Gov. Rick Perry seems to have taken a considerable lead over former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann, he said. Perry’s popularity among evangelical

Courtesy of the Associated Press

Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks at a “Welcome Home Rally” in August. Perry joins former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney as the early frontrunners vying for the Republican nomination. Christians and other groups who generally vote for strictly fiscal and social conservative candidates was expected, Downs said. However, the substantial lead Perry has gained from more moderate Republicans is surprising. Downs said nothing is

certain this early in the campaign, and Perry’s current popularity could fade during the primary race. However, Downs said Perry’s broad appeal among conservatives considerably helps his chances of winning the nomination. Some of the GOP front

runners have come out swinging with their own job improvement plans — former Utah governor Jon Huntsman released his job improvement plan which would include changes to corporate tax rates, and Romney is expected to release his plan in the near future.

Former Alaska governor and 2008 vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin is expected to make an announcement regarding her decision to run for the presidency soon. — The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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Neumann announces U.S. Senate candidacy Former GOP congressman first candidate to throw hat in ring for Kohl’s vacated seat in 2012 race Scott Bauer Associated Press

First Lastname The Badger Herald File Photo

Ald. Mike Verveer, District 4, answers questions from constituents in a Madison City Council meeting. Verveer has served on the council for 16 years, with two terms as president. He also addresses city alcohol policy as a member of the Alcohol License Review Committee and holds neighborhood meetings for students before the annual Mifflin Street Block Party.

A city in flux: an oral history of the isthmus from a councilman’s eyes Ald. Mike Verveer reflects on the evolution of his district and Madison’s growing pains Katherine Krueger Deputy News Editor In a political landscape dominated by strong characters, Ald. Mike Verveer, District 4, has become one of the reigning personalities adding color to Madison’s City Council. The alder, who served as council president from 2003-2004 and 20072008, has been the face of one of the city’s student-heavy districts for more than a decade and has yet to face serious opposition at the polls. The following is an edited version of a sit-down interview between Verveer and The Badger Herald. Verveer reflects on running a district in flux, the issues that matter to students and the Mifflin that could have ended it all. The Badger Herald: How has the political scene in the city of Madison evolved during your tenure on City Council? Mike Veveer: I’ve served for 16 years and was first elected in 1995. I started when then-Mayor [Paul] Soglin was in office, so I like to say it feels a bit like déjà vu with Soglin all over again. It’s interesting and kind of fun that I remember many of his personality traits of the 1990s, which have all come back to the office this year. I’m now the second most senior member of the City Council, so I’ve witnessed that a lot has stayed the same, but a lot has changed as well. I’ve enjoyed watching the downtown area grow and develop with major investments of hundreds of millions of dollars made during my tenure. Everything from big public investments like the Kohl Center, the Overture Center and the Monona Terrace were projects I worked on during my tenure. There was also no student high-rise housing when I was

first elected. BH: Has the composition of your district, by demographics or other markers, changed during the course of your service? MV: It’s been really fascinating. The way it’s gone, I’ve gotten older as the district has gotten older. Downtown living has become more attractive to people, and downtown Madison has enjoyed a kind of renaissance in recent years. My district also used to be predominantly students with fewer long-term downtown residents. As a result, I tend to hear from nonstudents the most. BH: Has the shifting composition of your district changed the way you address constituent relations? MV: I have tried to never turn my back on students during my time on council. While I served on City Council as a student, I like to think I can bring a student’s perspective whether I’m enrolled or not. I also host a neighborhood meeting every year for Mifflin residents, which had a higher turn out than any other meeting this past year. It’s for an immediate interest for students in the district. BH: Do you think the major concerns to students when you were first elected were more tied to a particular time and place or have these issues remained fairly constant? MV: These kinds of concerns have remained fairly constant. They most often fall into two categories. First are alcohol issues and running into trouble with the law, particularly with house parties and similar issues. Students also raise landlord-tenant concerns such as building inspections. Finally, students are concerned with the lack of affordable parking downtown — though most of these issues apply to non-students as well. BH: In what ways has the overall political climate of the city shifted during your time as a politician? MV: Compared to the historic times of the late ‘60s and ‘70s, Madison seems to be more moderate than

then. The recent protests and political activism surrounding events at the Capitol have certainly encouraged more and more activism locally and statewide. Many have charged that students are becoming increasingly apolitical. I haven’t seen a huge change over the years because the average student doesn’t really have an interest in local government — which I don’t blame them for — unless an issue directly affects them. BH: Running unopposed for the majority of your term seems to be a fairly atypical experience for a politician. To what do you credit a lack of challengers? MV: It’s been gratifying that hopefully people think I’m doing a decent job. I have been fortunate to run unopposed for the past 10 years. I haven’t really had to campaign for myself but have on the behalf of other candidates and pride myself on staying in touch with my constituents. I’m certainly ready and willing should a challenger choose to run. BH: What have been the most trying times, either personally or professionally, during your time as an alder? MV: There have been several instances that were particularly emotional for me. In 1996, there was rioting at the Mifflin Street Block Party. It was during my first term in office and only the second Block Party of my tenure. The situation developed into students throwing debris at police and firefights and setting a car on fire. I blamed myself for the awful inhumanity. I took it personally, getting teary-eyed and emotional in interviews with the media. I was raised a Roman Catholic, so we joke about Catholic guilt, but I really beat myself up over it. Some of the horrible tragedies that have occurred were also trying. There was a student death in a fire on North Bedford Street in 2007. I met with Pete Talen’s family and went to UW hospital but wondered: What do you say to these parents who just lost their son?

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Former two-term Republican congressman Mark Neumann announced Monday that he will run for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by retiring Wisconsin Democrat Herb Kohl. Neumann is the first to officially announce his candidacy in the 2012 race, but several other prominent Republicans and Democrats are expected to announce soon. One of them, former Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson, released a statement welcoming Neumann into the race and urging him to focus his campaign on the policies of President Barack Obama and Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. “Republican voters deserve a primary campaign based on the issues,” Thompson consultant Darrin Schmitz said in the statement. Neumann, who announced his decision on WTMJ radio in Milwaukee, refrained from criticizing Thompson even though the former governor has been the target of attack ads being run statewide by the national conservative Republican group Club for Growth. The 30-second spot includes an edited clip of Obama saying Thompson supported health care reform and criticizing Thompson’s fiscal record in Wisconsin. Neumann said he would work to overturn Obama’s health care reforms. Neumann said he has no ties with Club for Growth, which backs conservative candidates, but that he hopes to secure the group’s support. He also said he respects Thompson but that he views his opponent to be Democratic U.S. Rep. Tammy Baldwin, who hasn’t formally announced her decision to run. A spokesman for Baldwin said she had no comment Monday. Neumann, 57, said the race is about tackling unemployment and crippling national debt. “The day of reckoning isn’t in 50 years, it’s coming now,” Neumann said in the statement. Neumann said in an interview that to win he must clearly articulate a plan for solving the nation’s debt problem because no other issue looms as large with voters. “The winning path for us is to stay focused on a plan for balancing the federal budget,” he said. Wisconsin Democratic Party Chairman Mike Tate branded Neumann an extremist whose only support comes from “tea party zealots who seek tax breaks for billionaires financed by the end of Medicare and Social Security.” Thompson has been busy working behind the scenes to shore up support among prominent Republicans, even though he has yet to officially announce his candidacy. Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen, along with the adviser who helped run his four gubernatorial races, are on board cochairing a Thompson advisory committee. Thompson hasn’t been on the ballot in Wisconsin since 1998. In addition to his failed run for governor last year, Neumann also ran for the U.S. Senate in 1998 when he lost to Russ Feingold. He served four years in Congress before that. In the governor’s race GOP primary, Neumann got 39 percent of the vote in his loss to Scott Walker. Neumann said that race taught him the importance of starting the campaign early, which is why he announced his candidacy for the Senate race Monday, more than a year before the primary.

UW student shares experience during Norway attack Senior studying abroad heard blast, saw nation attempt to heal, rebuild Adelaide Blanchard News Editor

“I never thought it would happen in Norway,” said University of Wisconsin senior Max Fries. This summer, eight people were killed in a bombing near the government headquarters in Oslo. Anders Behring Breivik has been arrested in connection with the attack — which has since been deemed a massacre — and has confessed to the bombing as well as the shooting spree that killed 69 people. To many Americans, the attack, while frightening, was a distant event. But Fries was studying contemporary Norwegian society in the city during the time of the bombing. Fries sat down with The Badger Herald to share his proximity to the attack and his

experiences briefly living in a country trying to heal. The following is an edited interview. The Badger Herald: I understand you were very close when the attack happened. Max Fries: I heard something. I didn’t know what it was. I was in the National Gallery in Oslo, and that’s just off the main street. I felt something that sounded like thunder. We left, went back outside, didn’t think anything of it. No one looked panicked. We went to the Metro station and took the Metro back to our dorm. [I checked my computer and] I see “Blast goes off in Oslo,” and I thought: I’m in Oslo. It was all very shocking because you never think something like that is going to happen to you until you’re in the middle of the action. It actually happened in [the Government Quarter]. People all the way back to our dormitory could hear it, which is a little over a 10-minute Metro ride from where it happened. It could be heard

from far away. The director of the summer school we were at called us into a meeting to explain the events and what went on. It was a very surreal feeling. BH: Nothing was closed down? Fries: The Government Quarter was closed down, and what I also heard was there were army officers all over the place, which almost seems completely unbelievable. We were going to Norway, and I had a travel partner who also goes to UW. It was funny because he said one girl said to him, “OK, be safe in Oslo! What am I talking about? You’re going to Oslo.” You had this sense of security, which was then put in jeopardy. BH: Do you think there was a difference between how Norway responded to the attack versus how Americans have responded to attacks? Fries: Yes, I do. If there’s anything that I really want to [convey], it is this: What was really disappointing was

how the American media handled it. How everyone in the states, and by everyone I mean the American media — conservative, liberal, doesn’t matter — how they thought it was a Muslim extremist attack at first. Norway is a very transparent country. We were told at least by our instructor that you could email a [politician] and get a response. Granted, it’s 4 million people, but that transparency is very present in their media and in their speech. It’s like the [Norwegian Prime Minister] Jens Stoltenberg said: We’re going to fight this kind of attack with more democracy. BH: Was there an element of revenge in many Norwegians’ responses after the attack? Fries: With every Norwegian I talked to, it was never about revenge. It was, ‘What can we do to make sure this kind of hate never happens again. How do we eliminate this sort of hate?’ This is the greatest attack on their country since World

War Two, so it was a shock. There was all this time for self-reflection. [Norwegians thought:] We thought we were a very safe, well-grounded society. How do we deal with this in the future and how do we meet this sort of security issue? BH: Did the attack come up in any of your classes? Fries: Definitely. It happened on a Friday afternoon, so I had the weekend, and the first thing we talked about in my classes was the attack. One of our instructors had us write a reflection and he posted them anonymously on the internet. We did have some Norwegians [in our class]. They talked about their own sorrow, their own hopes. I talked about my proximity to it and how I never thought my security would be compromised in a place like Norway [...] I never thought it would happen in Norway. — The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue


The Badger Herald | News | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Lakeshore dorm kicks off year with fresh name Re-dubbed Phillips Hall honors former Wis. state official, civil rights leader Katherine Krueger Deputy News Editor

Megan McCormick The Badger Herald

Copies of ‘Enrique’s Journey’ are offered for free to freshman attending the Chancellor’s Convocation. The novel tells the story of a young boy immigrating from his native Honduras to find opportunity in the U.S. The author is slated to visit campus on Oct. 27 for a talk at Union South.

Go Big Read novel to bring immigration issues to light The program’s latest offering, ‘Enrique’s Journey,’ will foster campus-wide talks Selby Rodriguez Campus Editor Slated as this year’s Go Big Read common book program selection, Sonia Nazario’s non-fiction novel “Enrique’s Journey” touches on more than just pressing immigration issues. Nazario’s non-fiction piece is originally based off a Los Angeles Times newspaper series, keeping in line with the journalist’s background. The novel covers the story of a young Honduran boy, Enrique, who begins the difficult journey of immigrating to the U.S. by traveling through Mexico aboard freight trains, according to the book’s website. The University of Wisconsin selection committee, however, chose “Enrique’s Journey” for more than just its discussion on immigration, according to Charles Snowdon, a UW psychology professor and co-chair of the selection committee. The book also touches on the repercussions immigration can have on families,

especially in regard to the absence of a parental figure. “We tried to find something [with] issues that could be engaged on multiple levels,” Snowdon said. “One [such] issue raised by the book is parenting behavior.” UW journalism professor Deborah Blum said she believes parenting behavior to be a neglected but crucial aspect of immigration. “I think one of the things that gets lost is the point of the human issue. The human issue of immigration is one of the founding points of this country,” Blum said. “Enrique’s Journey” transcends the bounds of the literary world by moving readers to help those facing similar conflicts. On the book’s website, Nazario describes ways in which readers can get involved by creating jobs, opening schools or sending supplies to individuals aiding others in their struggle north. “All of these books are about who we are today [but] told by journalist nonfiction writers at the top of their class,” Blum said in respect to the Go Big Read program. “The message in terms of the importance of what these writers are doing is wonderful.” In addition to drawing

attention to the intricate dilemmas occurring in immigration families, “Enrique’s Journey” provides insight to what the future may hold for the U.S. According to Karma Chavez, a UW communications professor and expert on immigration studies, the current weakness of the economy makes immigration important on a state and national level. Citing past historical trends for immigration and antiimmigration sentiments, Chavez believes this year’s selection benefits students in its direct ties to current affairs. “The fact we are reading a book that highlights a lot of the complexities of immigration is going to be an eye-opening experience,” Chavez said. Nazario plans to visit campus Oct. 27, according to the Go Big Read website. During that time, she will hold a talk at Union South along with a book signing. Students may submit questions they would like answered at the event on the program website, according to Go Big Read project manager Sarah McDaniel. Students looking for a copy of the book can request a copy through Go Big Read’s website.

A group of incoming Lakeshore residents will be the first to call Phillips Hall their home, although the building has been open for nearly four decades. The newly rechristened building, formerly known as Friedrick Hall, was dedicated in a ceremony Aug. 21 and is intended to reflect the history of women influential for the university, the state and the nation. The building’s namesake, Vel Phillips, was the first black woman to graduate from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1951 and in 1978 became the state’s first black person and woman to be elected secretary of state. The houses and

Bucky Badger welcomes students at a Welcome Week event at the Computer Science building during the last day before classes officially started for the fall. Tom Zionkowski The Badger Herald

Following financial debate, safety concerns, B-Cycle finally takes root in Madison City Editor As students return to campus, many may be taking note of new landmarks on campus: several new stations popped up throughout the summer, with red bikes and empty racks where community members could rent bicycles as part of B-Cycle, the city’s newest environmental effort. Despite slight controversy that looked to delay the program’s implementation, B-Cycle made a $2 million investment to donate the system to Madison last spring. City of Madison Planning Division Staff Member Rebecca Cnare worked in conjunction with Trek Bicycle, several different city departments and other local groups to find appropriate locations to place the kiosks, called B-Stations, in downtown Madison. “We took in a number

of considerations and met with B-Cycle representatives to present a list of 60 or 70 sites, and they chose 35,” Cnare said. “There are only 25 installed at the moment.” Cnare said this is the first phase of the program, and as people get used to using it, some kiosks may be added, some may be eliminated and some may be relocated. In an email to The Badger Herald, Eric Bjorling, Trek Bicycle spokesperson, said the new stations seem to fit well into the city’s landscape. Cnare said she thinks the sites look great, adding to the urban features of Madison. “We’re continuously improving and refining our processes for how to make B-Cycle accessible to more people, and Madison residents have come to us with some great suggestions,” Bjorling said. When the Urban Design Commission passed the bike sharing program in

March, there were some concerns about allowing residents to rent bikes with no required safety course. However, Bjorling said signage has been added to many of the stations and bikes with suggestions for safe and proper handling of the B-cycle, including encouragement of helmet use. “B-Cyclers have been great about safe riding and using Madison’s amazing bike lanes and paths,” Bjorling said. “We hope that will continue as time goes on.” As a Madison native, Bjorling said he wished the program had been in place when he attended the University of Wisconsin. “It’s been great to watch the program and membership grow,” Bjorling said. “To have a public transit option that is not only environmentally friendly but it improving the health of the population is fantastic.” Cnare and Bjorling both agreed that the benefits of

October to share her personal history and give residents the opportunity for an open dialogue. The name change, which was granted final approval by the UW System Board of Regents, was the result of a collaborative process with individuals from across campus, including representatives from the gender and women’s studies and history departments. “It used to be the case that Lakeshore was housing for men, so all houses and floors were named after men,” Scott Seyforth, a Residence Life administrator, said. “A lot of these stories are not often told.” He said assembling a list of possible names included interviewing family members, gathering original documents for fact checking and compiling personal biographies. He added it was not long before a short list became apparent. Seyforth said Phillips was “deeply honored” by the final decision.

Oh hai, Bucky

City launches bike sharing program Sasha Hayman

floors of the hall will also be renamed after influential women for the university, including Nellie McKay, a distinguished scholar, Gerda Lerner, one of the creators of Women’s History Month and Kay Clarenbach, founder of the National Organization for Women. University Housing administrator Jeff Hinz said the division had the opportunity to rename the hall after the building, which was previously run by UWExtension, was converted for use as a residence hall in 2008. The Friedrick name will continue to be used elsewhere on campus in a facility operated by Extension. “It’s a way to keep history alive,” he said. “It gives students the opportunity to learn about them and to hear stories about the struggles that took place.” He also said Phillips agreed to meet with students living in the hall in September or

this program are numerous, including replacing cars, freeing parking, exploring more of the city and purely the amount of fun people have getting around on the bikes. Bjorling said Trek hopes to see the program continue to grow and for more and more Madison residents and students to adopt B-Cycle for daily usage. “Cities around the world are changing and face a lot of unique challenges that traditional transportation will not meet,” Bjorling said. “Bike share holds massive benefits for those cities to fight congestion as well as space and health issues.” Bjorling said he tries to get on one of the B-Cycle bikes every chance he gets. “Sharing the same experience as the user is imperative to understanding the potential benefits and how we can make the system better and more accessible for all,” Bjorling said.


Section B The Badger Herald | Opinion | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Editorial Page Editors Allegra Dimperio & Sam Stevenson oped@badgerherald.com

pinion From the desk of the editor: Welcome to the Herald Signe Brewster Editor in Chief I sometimes marvel that our founders sat down and started The Badger Herald from

nothing. Something big happens in this office every day, and the fall 2011 staff is lucky to know the lessons learned during the first 41 years of production. There is room for more lessons yet. This fall will see the transformation of our website, social media use and multimedia presence, plus further tinkering with the design and content of our

paper. As we continue experimenting with what it means to be a student newspaper, we will stumble at times. But there will also be instances of innovation. This will not change that, at our heart, we are here to inform students and train future journalists. We remain the premiere source for coverage relevant to the University of Wisconsin.

This will be especially important this fall as we provide context for battles playing out at Bascom Hall, the Board of Regents and the Capitol. With budget cuts, a new chancellor, turmoil in the Legislature and state and national elections on the horizon, the time for the media to flourish is now. The Herald is ready, but can do even better. We need bright new

also look for our table at the student org fair September 14 or shoot me a personal email. Thanks for reading. On Wisconsin.

staff members to write for our news, opinion, sports and arts pages, plus videographers, photographers, bloggers and web editors. If you are interested in getting involved, attend one of our open house meetings on Sept. 11 at 3:30 p.m. or Sept. 13 at 5:30 p.m. Our office is located at 326 W. Gorham St. above Silver Mine Subs and Madhatters. You can

Signe Brewster

Have an opinion? We want to hear it Allegra Dimperio Opinion Editor Fall Semester 2011. It could be good, it could be bad and at times, it will most certainly be ugly. That’s where we come in. Welcome, or welcome back, to the Opinion page — the place where we put all of the above in perspective. Protests the likes of which hadn’t been seen since the ‘60s? We had a few opinions about it. Our chancellor quitting at a time that she herself said would be bad? Yeah, we had something to say. The ushering in of a new political era in Wisconsin? We argued about that, too. And that was just spring 2011. It’s impossible to predict the future, but one thing that’s certain is that people will always have opinions. We just happen to be the place to voice them. In our columns, in our Editorial Board statements, in our Letters to the Editor and even in our online comments board, college students just like you have found an outlet to say what they think. Or maybe you’ve found they aren’t just like you. Perhaps your voice is completely unrepresented on our page; be the one to change that. As an Opinion page with volunteer writers, we can only publish what they write. If you think we’re biased one way or another, we wholeheartedly encourage you to balance our content. Whether you want to submit a guest column challenging a column, a Letter to the Editor disagreeing with an Ed

Board or if you want to do students like you a favor and become a columnist, feel free to email opinion@ badgerherald.com. We’ll let you know how to get involved. This semester we are also trying to take the issue of balance into our own hands. We are inviting members of all student organizations to get involved in the page. We want readers to know how the opinion of someone in College Republicans compares with someone in Environmental Club, how someone in Sex Out Loud differs from someone in Badger Catholic, or if someone in Wisconsin Alumni Student Board agrees with someone in the Associated Students of Madison. There are dozens of student orgs on campus representing nearly all of the student body. We want to give all of them a chance to have their opinions heard by their peers. This is just one of the changes we will be attempting to make this semester to create a page that students can rely on for the news — digested. It is our goal to be a truly valuable resource on campus, but we will need your help to do so. We welcome any suggestions you may have to improve the page, as it is you we want to serve. So keep reading our page, check us out at www.badgerherald.com/ opinion, and shoot us an email if you want to get involved or make a suggestion. It’s going to be an interesting semester. We hope you’ll come along for the ride. Allegra Dimperio, Opinion Editor Allegra Dimperio (adimperio@badgerherald. com) is a junior majoring in journalism.

Courtesy of Uihlein Wilson and Moody Nolan

The proposed Memorial Union Theater addition will add a year round lake-view as well as a better outdoor vantage point during nice weather.

Herald Editorial Total eclipse of the Union? The Memorial Union Terrace is one of Madison’s most symbolic and popular public spaces. It’s the perfect mixture of our city’s stunning natural beauty and urban character. And three years from now, the Union will have completed a large renovation of its west wing that will change the view from the Terrace forever. The Memorial Union’s west wing is currently home to the Play Circle and Wisconsin Union Theaters — cramped facilities that haven’t been fully renovated since the building’s 1928 opening. The Hoofers shop beneath the Terrace is embarrassingly inadequate and does not meet many building codes. Most disappointingly, the entire west

wing is chronically underused by students, who only go to the section of the building perhaps once every year for a musical performance or high-traffic lecture. After a referendum in 2006, the Union set the gears in motion to expand the west wing. The plans included the addition of a “glass box” that would extend out into the upper deck of the Terrace adjacent to the Wisconsin Union Theater and act as a year-round lounge with a view of Lake Mendota. After more definitive plans were released, controversy developed around the addition. Despite claims the new box will disrupt views of the sunset from the main section of the

Terrace, the addition will act as a welcome expansion to both indoor and outdoor recreation areas at the Memorial Union. During the summer, the addition’s upper deck most likely will be outfitted with Terrace furniture, while the indoor area will serve as a much-needed concession area for the Union Theater. Even more promising, the indoor lounge space will provide a welcome alternative to Lakefront on Langdon, which does not provide as stunning a view of Lake Mendota. We’re all about keeping the Terrace’s traditions intact, but this board simply does not believe the new additions to the Memorial Union will harm the best spot in Madison. In fact, it’s an improvement.

Alex Brousseau

Signe Brewster

Carolyn Briggs

Editorial Board Chairman

Editor in Chief

Managing Editor

Jake Begun

Allegra Dimpirio

Ryan Rainey

Editor-at-Large

Editorial Page Editor

Editorial Board Member

Editorial Board opinions are crafted independently of news coverage.

Your Opinion · Send your letters to the editor and guest columns to oped@badgerherald.com oped@badgerherald.com.. Publication is based on space and takes into account relevance and quality. Letters should be sent exclusively to the Herald. Unsigned letters will not be published. All submissions may be edited by the Herald for length and style. Reader feedback on all articles and columns can be posted at badgerherald.com, badgerherald.com, where all print content is archived.


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The Badger Herald | Opinion | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

MEET THE ED BOARD The Badger Herald editorial board is the voice of the students on campus. We are a six-member board consisting of University of Wisconsin students from all different majors, backgrounds and political affiliations. We tackle only the most important issues in state, city and campus life and give the student’s perspective. Hard work and deliberation goes into every piece we write. We look into every issue by doing extensive research, meeting with community leaders and asking the difficult questions. We then debate and craft each editorial board piece into one cohesive argument with one cohesive voice — the students’ voice.

Returning to The Badger Herald has been a dream come true. I am a second year UW law student concentrating in criminal law. As an undergrad at UW, I majored in political science and French. However, a passion of mine has always been journalism. I devoted my life to The Badger Herald starting as a freshman and worked my way up to news editor, where I was head of the news department during the 2009-10 school year. I know my way around campus, city and state politics, and I am excited at the chance to express my opinions as chair of the editorial board. I bring to the board a

In my time at The Badger Herald, I’ve had the opportunity to interact with a wide variety of public officials, students and young journalists all seeking, in some form or another, truth and a sense of what is correct. And while I certainly disagree with some, I understand my role on this board to be first and foremost that of a concerned and informed student. I got my start working as a reporter and subsequently city editor in the news department before moving on as editorial page editor. My

We as an editorial board have done a lot to help promote the voice and rights of students. In the coming year, we hope to continue the type of activism this board displayed when we helped get a student voting member on the city’s Alcohol Licensing Review Committee with our “Boycott the Nitty” campaign. Our goal is to make local leaders and politicians aware of how one of the largest and most important demographic in Madison thinks of their actions.

Here is this year’s editorial board.

Alex Brousseau

Signe Brewster

Carolyn Briggs

Ed Board Chairman

Editor-in-Chief

Managing Editor

conservative voice that is not often heard nowadays in Madison. I describe myself as a conservative with a heart (my friends often say a conservative with a brain). I am liberal on most social issues but conservative on the rest. I rely more on rational thinking than what any party dictates I should do. I also bring my background in the legal world and the unique mindset which comes with being a lawyer. I look forward to collaborating with my fellow board members on campus and most city issues, but also getting into heated debates over state issues. This city needs to know how all its students think, not just those who think alike.

While I am leftleaning, this is not the place for a cut and dry description of my political leanings. This board advocates for students, and that often means setting aside personal beliefs or venturing into territory that has nothing to do with Republicans or independents. Last spring, the Herald’s editorial board grappled with the events at the Capitol and Bascom, plus the dozens of other topics that cropped up day to day. Despite the staunch liberals and libertarians among our ranks, we came to agreements and united our names behind each written opinion. I will continue to think

first as a student and member of the Madison community and represent that with my voice on the board. Outside of board meetings, I am the editor-in-chief at the Herald. I started as a campus reporter at the Herald in the fall of 2008 before moving on to become campus editor, deputy news editor, news content editor and editor-atlarge. I have interned at SUN Newspapers in Minnesota, the Wisconsin State Journal and offManhattan and The Onion in New York. I am a life sciences communication major with goals of someday being a professional journalist.

As a native Madisonian, liberal political activism has been a part of my life as long as I can remember. While my youthful blind liberalism has given way to more rational thoughts with a leftward lean, local issues and city politics are still a heavy feature in my daily life. In addition to my loudmouth rants you’ll be able to read in the opinion section, you can look back in The Badger Herald archives and read two years worth of news stories. This time in news taught me to carefully assess all sides of an issue and that gut reactions can often be wrong. That being said, I’ve never had a problem forming strong opinions, and that will certainly be reflected on

these pages and in the editorial boardroom. Several members of the board have already referred to me as a wildcard. I’m not sure how they meant it, but I think it describes two key traits that I will bring to this board and this page. Firstly, while I describe myself as liberal, few of my opinions form perfectly to the classic liberal view, and some can be downright surprising. Secondly, I’ll yell, rant and say some shocking things to make my points. You can expect some quotable moments — both good and bad — in my columns. I hope you enjoy reading (sub: loving/ hating) them as much as I enjoy writing. Carolyn Briggs: Madisonian, newsie, wildcard.

Jake Begun

Allegra Dimperio

Ryan Rainey

Editor-at-Large

Editorial Page Editor

Ed Board Member

current role as editorat-large brings me into contact with our news department once again, but it is my place on the editorial board to represent the interests of students to the best of my ability. I’m a senior majoring in history and journalism, intending to go on to bigger and better-paying things. Politically, I lean left, but seek to remain as impartial as possible in recognizing the opinions and needs of University of Wisconsin students. It’s my hope I can continue to do so in the coming semester.

My name is Allegra Dimperio, and I’m a journalism major that has never been afraid to tell people what I think. I joined the opinion page my first semester freshman year and have worked my way up to editorial page editor, a position I intend to keep until I graduate. I truly love my job: Not only do I get to pick pieces apart to stitch them, improved, back together, but I get to work with people who aren’t afraid to say what they think. I hope to be an editor in the future, and I interned at

TeenVogue to experience working at a magazine. Politically, I’m a liberal pacifist that stares at Exceptionalists in disbelief but secretly sees the logic in Ayn Rand. I do not profess to have the same core values as other Democrats, and I am unconvinced by American politics. My beliefs may be unconventional, but I believe that seeing the cracks helps inform the whole. This year, I hope to see the Editorial page become more relevant to campus, representing the entire student voice.

In my role as The Badger Herald’s multimedia editor, it might be easiest to describe the political beliefs I bring to the editorial board in a Facebook-esque way. But as my colleagues here know, I’m a little bit too long-winded to sum up my views in a one word description. I began working for the Herald almost as soon as I came to Madison. I quickly fell in love with journalism, and my once-unabashedly liberal beliefs gave way to strictly following the Gospel of Journalism. I wrote news for two years, covering major stories like municipal elections

and the union protests before heading home to Philadelphia for a web internship at WHYY, the area’s public radio and television station. Since leaving news I’ve become a skeptic of both the right and the left, even though I still hold some moderately liberal views. In spite of this liberalism, I often laugh at the ridiculousness of both the left and right wing extremists that dominate our political conversation, and as a member of the editorial board and in the future as a journalist I hope to see a return to a more moderate and deliberative political conversation.

Right to counsel for all defendants Matt Jeffers Staff Writer The Sixth Amendment to the Constitution guarantees every citizen, regardless of race, wealth, gender or age, the right to have a lawyer represent them in court. However, there is a distinction in law concerning criminal and civil trials. Thus this constitutional right does not protect the right to counsel in civil cases. The issue of the right to counsel in civil cases is determined by each individual state. On Sept. 30, 2010, a petition was filed with the Wisconsin State Supreme Court in order to establish the right to counsel in civil cases. The public hearing for this issue is at 9:30 a.m. on Oct. 4 in the Supreme Court Room. The moral and legal question we must answer as a society runs like this: “Do impoverished individuals have the right to free legal counsel in civil cases?” As with all questions of rights, this is one of moral desert; that is, do they deserve to have their attorney fees paid for by the state? One side to this argument is to say that these individuals do not

have any right to legal counsel based solely on the fact of their inability to pay. Furthermore, this side would argue that these persons’ “irresponsibility and lack of being a productive member of society” leads to their impoverishment, and thus the productive individuals in society should not have to pay for the legal fees of others. This position, however, is quite handily presumptive, as it accuses all poor people of being lazy and irresponsible. An individual may be poor because they are lazy and irresponsible, but this is not the only reason and maybe not even the primary reason why people are poor. However, let us ignore this contention of the “ability to pay” for the moment and instead move on to a more fundamental question: Do all individuals have the right to a fair trial? If it can be agreed that this is indeed a universal right, then it should not matter if somebody is poor and cannot afford an attorney. They are still owed the same right that is granted to all other citizens. The legal process is not only confusing, but also time consuming and frustrating. Expecting poor individuals — or anyone for that matter — to be able to maneuver through the court systems and legal processes without attorney aid is effectively damning them to lose their

cases. By not providing impoverished people with legal counsel, the state is fundamentally denying them the right to a fair trial. Since the state is usually the prosecutor, that same state should have the responsibility of providing that person with legal assistance so that they can adequately defend themselves in court, which is a fundamental prerequisite for the right to a fair trial. For those who disagree, imagine you’re in this situation: You were born and raised in a lower class family that could barely make ends meet. You did well enough in school to go to college, but because your family couldn’t support you, you had to take out student loans. You graduated, but the recession hit immediately after you finished school, and you were unable to get a career in your field. You now work a minimum wage job and can barely make enough money to pay for groceries, utilities, student loans and rent. You live in government subsidized housing and you pay all your bills, but you were late in paying your last two months of rent. The government now wants to evict you from your apartment, putting you out on the street. You’re already in debt and can’t afford an attorney. What do you do? This story is meant

to simply illustrate that sometimes we get dealt a bad hand in life, and in some cases, individuals are treated unfairly by the system. The right to counsel in civil cases would protect the rights of those individuals; for if fairness is to exist somewhere, it should certainly exist in the courtroom. To deny the right to counsel for defendants would deny them their right to a fair trial and represents class discrimination. An individual’s wealth should not be what limits their right to a fair trial. Some may contend that society should not have to pay for others’ problems. But if we as a nation acknowledge the right to counsel in criminal cases, why should civil cases that often result in people being evicted from their own homes be any less important? What makes a civilized society truly civilized is that they strive at great lengths to ensure that those on the bottom do not fall through the cracks. The mark of a great state is legislation that seeks to ensure there is no unequal treatment, even to those with the smallest voice. Let us make another step toward progress by granting poor defendants the right to counsel, thereby further protecting the rights of all citizens to a fair trial. Matt Jeffers (mjeffers@ wisc.edu) is a senior majoring in philosophy and economics.


The Badger Herald | Opinion | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Walker picks on FoodShare Taylor Nye Staff Writer On my way to the library to work on this column, I passed two men and a woman sitting outside by the dumpsters in the rain. Their clothes were ragged and dirty and they were sitting on a concrete parking divider to avoid the puddles. “What did we get this time?” one man asked the group, pulling items out of a grocery bag. “Looks like more canned fruit,” said the lady, inspecting a can of mandarin oranges. On my walk, I continued to think about them, and as I checked the Cap Times, I found that FoodShare, the program that likely provided them with groceries, has been caught in the Walker administration’s crosshairs. To try and save a buck, the governor first tried to cut these public workers’ jobs and privatize them. Now, with the United States Department of Agriculture looking to intervene on this technically illegal move, Gov. Scott Walker will have to eliminate the private workers’ jobs and transfer their workload to the strained public employees that remain. As we have previously seen from this administration, slash-andburn budget cuts have lead to lost jobs in an already floundering economy. Once again, Walker attempted to throw the baby out with the bathwater, attacking a program that benefits Wisconsin’s workers and poor. It all started in 2009 under former Gov. Jim Doyle. FoodShare, a countyspecific government-funded food assistance program and its Enrollment Services Center were a part of the BadgerCare Plus Core Program. The program was created to provide affordable health insurance to childless adults earning less than $21,000 annually. Due to the high demand for services, Doyle expanded FoodShare into the private sector to help accommodate those in need. However, federal guidelines “prohibit private, or vendor, staff from deciding an applicant’s eligibility for food assistance,” so these private jobs were nondiscretionary ones such as scanning documents. Overall, 270 public workers and 425 private workers were employed to handle 99,000 food assistance cases and manage $42 million in aid from the USDA in 2010. However, pennypinching Walker and his budget busting cronies looked to eliminate spending wherever possible, and in this case, in feeding the poor. At first the best way to cut corners seemed to be complete privatization of the system, which would have cost about 270 public employees their jobs.

Not only does this further demonstrate Walker’s vendetta against the public sector, but it also seems dangerous to have just any private employee with a grudge or a chip on their shoulder deciding whether or not you get to eat that night. However, the USDA put the brakes on this plan. If Walker continues on his route, he is in danger of losing the millions in federal aid the government provides in addition to the approximately $1 billion they already give in food assistance to Wisconsin residents. “The state right now is not in compliance [with federal law],” said Alan Shannon, a spokesperson with the USDA’s regional office in Chicago in a Cap Times interview. “It’s that simple.” So now, instead of 270 public employees being out of work, 319 private employees could be jobless by March. That leaves about 376 people to do the work that 695 people did under Doyle. According to the Cap Times, “Dane County employees now will be in charge of an additional 9,000 to 10,000 cases.” Maybe it’s sometimes the case that a few people could more efficiently do the work of many, but at 10,000 cases more per year, efficiency isn’t likely Walker’s main consideration. Not only are the cuts devastating to the families of the 319 workers laid off, they are also damaging to those receiving assistance from the program. These cuts mean fewer jobs, but they also mean fewer distribution centers, which will go from in-county to a few scattered centers across the state. Important players in the program have agreed: Dane County Executive Joe Parisi, officials with the Hunger Task Force of Milwaukee, the Wisconsin Council on Children and Families and Disability Rights Wisconsin have criticized the move. Maureen Fitzgerald, the FoodShare project director for the Hunger Task Force of Milwaukee, criticized the privatization of the program by sharing a customer service horror story with the Cap Times: A recipient “came to [FoodShare] after receiving a letter with a number to dial for assistance [but], rather than connecting the person to the Enrollment Services Center … [it] connected them to DirecTV, a satellite cable service.” With his one-track mind on the budget, Walker has not only decreased quality of service for Wisconsin’s poor, he has also endangered the jobs of the working class — the opposite of what he promised in his campaign. Balancing a functioning assistance program is a delicate, surgical task. Yet if a surgeon makes a mistake, he or she doesn’t keep cutting to fix it. For the sake of food and jobs, why would we accept the same from our governor? Taylor Nye (tenye@wisc. edu) is a junior majoring in biological anthropology and Latin American studies.

Associated Press

Stock traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange examine unstable world markets. The credit rating downgrade sent markets spinning as investors, fearing a crash, sold off their stocks. When the market settled, countries around the world suffered huge losses as a result of investor panic.

Investors caused downgrade damage wildly, leaving analysts and investors alike confused about just what the state of the American stock market is. Currency markets have also been adversely affected. I’ll comment Shawn Rajanayagam on the Australian to U.S. Staff Writer dollar exchange rate, as that’s where I’m from and that’s how I was When Standard & burned. Poor’s downgraded the Prior to the S&P United States’ credit downgrade, one rating to AA+, the Australian dollar was effect should have been buying around 1.06 a sobering one. What U.S. dollars — as I S&P argued, and what was preparing to come political commentators over to UW, this was have been bemoaning for great news. In the months, is that deadlock following two weeks, has overtaken Congress the Australian dollar throughout President dropped about 10 percent Barack Obama’s time in in value as investors office. worldwide fled from the In literal terms, stock market and sought however, the downgrade safer investments in the was an infinitesimal bond and cash markets. one; yes, it meant that Over a two week period, American investments I lost about $1500 that could no longer be I had planned to use to considered absolutely fund my semester on failsafe, but they were exchange here at UW. still extremely stable. As Thus, my frustration of March 2011, America’s is twofold. First, I Country Risk rating am frustrated at the was 82.07, good for American government 15th in the world. Why, for not being able then, has the effect of to reach a suitable the downgrade been so compromise on the debt catastrophic? ceiling until the 11th In a nutshell, it boils hour, and second, I am down to investor panic. frustrated at investors for Across the world, panicking and dumping there was a fire sale their stocks en masse of American assets as when the actual effect investors feared the of the credit downgrade worst and dumped their should have been mild. investments to insure But what does this mean themselves against a for the future? stock crash. This proved The government needs a self-fulfilling prophecy, to figure out what it’s as the wholesale doing. Both sides need to dumping of assets then recognize that the needs actually caused a crash. Over the last three weeks, of the American people (and the entire global the Dow Jones has been economy) come before ping-ponging around

the petty brinkmanship that characterized the debt ceiling debacle. Time and again news reports emerged of either Obama or Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, walking out of negotiations in a huff. The aggrieved party would hold a press conference decrying the other side, and moments later we’d see his opponent shrugging his shoulders in confusion, asking the public what he’d done wrong. When the Gang of Six plan emerged, it appeared that finally we’d see an end to the intractable negotiations. Even this proved a false dawn as both Obama and Boehner quickly squashed the plan for different reasons. When an agreement was finally reached, the American public had seen that politicians on both sides were no longer protecting their citizens. They were fighting like children in a sandbox, and no one was impressed. The credit downgrade should be a shock to politicians on both sides. They need to realize that if they continue to squabble, there will be even more severe consequences for America and the world economy. On the other side of the equation we have investors. As the debt ceiling negotiations stretched to breaking point, investors were pulling their hair out, and rightly so. If the unthinkable happened and America defaulted on its debt, trillions of dollars would be lost in

stock value. As an agreement was finally reached and crisis was averted, things should slowly have returned to normal. Investor sentiment would be characterized by a modicum of caution, but the stock market would grow incrementally and eventually the whole issue would be forgotten. But when S&P issued its statement on Aug. 5, mayhem broke loose — first on Wall Street, and then across the globe. The overreaction was on an unfeasible scale. In the two-week period of havoc I mentioned earlier, Australian stocks lost $55 billion. The commensurate loss on the New York Stock Exchange was closer to $1 trillion, fueled entirely by investor panic. Time will tell as to how long it takes investors to return to normal. It may be months or even years before we see the rapacious melee of buying and selling that characterized Wall Street during the Bush era boom. God forbid, we may even see some restraint and moderation in the stock market, but probably not. The lessons are clear: Investors need to calm down and Congress needs to pick up its game, or the consequences of the credit downgrade will be a mere shadow of what is still to come. Shawn Rajanayagam (rajanayagam@wisc. edu) is a senior majoring in political science and American studies.

Need $ for textbooks, beer?

$3

Name Address Student ID #

(as proof of enrollment)

Mail to: Katie Baeten United Council of UW Students 14 W Mifflin St # 212 Madison, WI 53703-4309

per semester!!! $3 of your segregated fees goes to the United Council of Wisconsin Students each semester under the guise of lobbying on the state level. Neato, right? Hell no! UC’s mission is far too broad for the specific needs of UW, and ASM’s Legislative Affairs already devotes time toward lobbying on our behalf. At the very least, $60,000 each semester could go toward a professional lobbyist dedicated strictly to UW students. But there’s good news! You can get your fucking money back! Just fill out this form with proof you paid your tuition (available through MyUW) and stick it in an envelope addressed to UC’s office within the first 45 days of the semester, making sure to include proper postage. Stop paying for inadequate representation and ineffective campaigning!


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The Badger Herald | Opinion | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

End of subsidies for reciprocity Charles Godfrey Staff Writer There is a recent development in higher education that will affect many of our fine students. And their younger siblings. And prospective students in high schools across the state. And hell, maybe even our children and our children’s children. As many of you esteemed readers know, the great states of Minnesota and Wisconsin have long joined forces in a pact of mutual reciprocity to further their goals of continuing enlightenment of the populace. What this means is that Minnesota students such as yours truly are free to attend Wisconsin’s public universities at in-state, Wisconsin prices, and vice versa. All of which is very generous, and in keeping with a sentiment of brotherhood and sisterhood that I appreciate greatly. The complicated part of this agreement was that across the board, Minnesota schools have for some time been slightly more expensive than their Wisconsin equivalents. In order to maintain the reciprocity program, the great state of Wisconsin subsidized tuition for its students to make up the difference; a noble gesture. Wisconsin will contribute $1,396 this year for each of its students at the University of MinnesotaTwin Cities and $2,213 for every young scholar at the University of Minnesota-Duluth. After the upcoming academic year, these subsidies will end.

The opportunity cost of college is 10,000 Big Macs, 100 Fender Stratocasters or a BMW. This shows that post-secondary education is not accessible and is straining the bonds of affordability. In a textbook example of the grandfather rule, the entering first-year class will be eligible for reciprocity subsidies for the next five years, but the 2012 freshman class won’t see a dime. For many Wisconsin families, this is cause for concern and will strongly affect the college choices of today’s high school seniors. However, ending reciprocity subsidies will benefit the state of Wisconsin. More than 10,000 Wisconsin students participate in the reciprocity program, and when you multiply thousands of students by thousands of dollars, you end up spending millions. In the next two years the state expects to save $21 million. This is big money that can be used to improve local public universities, rather than funding education in Minnesota. Additionally, prospective college students in Wisconsin will have an added incentive to attend universities in their home state and further enrich those institutions. I can understand why

the state government decided to stop sending bright students and millions of dollars to Minnesota colleges when it could keep both and focus on its own schools. In the long run, ending subsidies for reciprocity will create a more competitive market for higher education and will limit costs for future students. In-state reciprocity will continue to allow Minnesota and Wisconsin students to attend schools in their neighbor states for relatively affordable resident rates. For all of the negative publicity it is receiving, cutting these subsidies from the state budget makes everybody better off. Now let’s step back for a moment. I’ve just been discussing thousands and millions of dollars and university education as if it were an ordinary, logical and commonsense issue. Because expensive tuition is the only tuition anyone remembers, and because we are constantly reminded of its cold hard reality and because we have no better options, it is a difficult concept to question. But here goes. Today, even public universities like our own University of Wisconsin cost around $10,000 per year. The opportunity cost of college is 10,000 Big Macs, or 100 Fender Stratocasters or a BMW. What this means to me is that postsecondary education is not accessible and is straining the bounds of affordability at a time when universal and excellent education is supposedly a national priority. As a result of outrageous tuition, the debt graduates take on limits their opportunities to pursue their dreams and aspirations. Furthermore, student loans represent banks and other financial institutions betting on college graduates’ ability to pay off their tuition bills in a slowly recovering business world, and this hazardous investment may prove to be the next bursting bubble sending ripples through our economy. A British university student once asked me if I ever though it was crazy that I lived in the wealthiest country in the world and paid a fortune for college. At the time it had never seemed abnormal to me, but now I find it absurd. I was reminded of this conversation a couple of weeks ago when tuition increases in the UK set off riots in the streets of London. Now, the last thing I want to see is an angry mob smashing store windows on State Street, and I firmly believe that we the students can find more peaceful and constructive ways of dealing with oppressive tuition bills. Personally, I think the first step toward affordable education is realizing that knowledge and information are either inexpensive or free. Unnecessary costs, including but not limited to the constant cycle of tearing down and rebuilding our campuses in the effort to make college a state of the art and aesthetically pleasant experience, make education a major investment. By eliminating such excessive spending, it will be possible to reduce tuition to the point where students pay for education alone and graduate with the ability to pursue their own futures. Charles Godfrey (cwgodfrey@wisc.edu) is a sophomore majoring in math and physics.

Herald Editorial Decertification delegitimizes TAA With the passage of the budget repair bill in the spring, public unions have been thrust into an increasingly difficult situation with respect to their organizing and bargaining capabilities. Collective bargaining has been limited to base wages, members’ dues can no longer be deducted from paychecks and unions are now required to recertify annually with a vote from 51 percent of their bargaining unit, not merely voters on the measure. It is in this hostile landscape that the University of Wisconsin’s own Teaching Assistants’ Association, representing some 3,000 members across campus, has voted to forgo what they

believe to be an “illegitimate” recertification process and carry on with no official recognition from the state. Having placed itself at the forefront of the union debate since its inception in February, the TAA has made a name for itself with a variety of protest actions and pronouncements against Gov. Scott Walker and the Republican-controlled Legislature. While TAs may be the most visible face of the university for a large number of students, this latest move — delegitimizing in response to perceived illegitimacy — is short-sighted. The TAA is a strong, cohesive union. Any claims that the recertification process would

take inordinate resources and time away from the union are unfounded. Plus, severing all officially recognized channels to administration — though heavy on the whole solidarity thing — may be a less than wise choice during the search for a new chancellor. The TAA has existed before as an uncertified union, and they will continue to be an important force fighting for the rights of graduate students. But to forfeit all binding contracts with UW and opting for what may be a political statement rather than formal recognition does not bode well with the current flux in administration and the unpredictable state governance.

Soglin’s party foul Recently, the Madison Police Department released a detailed report on crime and arrests at 2011’s Mifflin Street Block Party. Their recommendation for the future echoed a line Mayor Paul Soglin has been spouting for months: Shut it down. Completely shutting down any and all parties on Mifflin Street would be impossible. Residents of the street will still host keg parties in their backyards no matter what measures MPD takes. Instead of shutting it down, the city should work with Mifflin Street residents to make a safer event for everyone involved. There are a few easy ways to accomplish this. The city needs to recognize and accept what the party has become. It is now an event centered around alcohol. The MPD knows this, having noted it several times in their report. If police accept that students will drink heavily, they can focus on keeping students safe, as opposed to spending time issuing tickets

to students who accidentally step onto the sidewalk with a cup of beer, as has been done in past years.

If police accept that students will drink heavily, they can focus on keeping students safe, as opposed to spending time issuing tickets to students who accidentally step onto the sidewalk with a cup of beer. The city also must do away with the street use permit. Allowing open containers in the street and statewide advertising via the event’s sponsorship

invited people with no connection to the University of Wisconsin or Madison to come to the event. Of the 162 total arrests this year, only 37 were UW students. Clearly, it is not the students who care about our community causing the problems. The city should also get the university involved. UW does its part to help on Halloween by not allowing guests in dorms. If they took this measure on the weekend of Mifflin, it would surely help to curb some of the problems. With students and the city working together, we can make an event that is fun and safe for everyone. What will not work is shutting students out of the discussion, because frankly, we will show up and party anyway. What especially will not work is taking measures to ensure that people who have no connection to or love for our community feel welcome. It’s our event. Give it back to us, and let us show the city we can do it right.

Alex Brousseau

Signe Brewster

Carolyn Briggs

Editorial Board Chairman

Editor-in-Chief

Managing Editor

Jake Begun

Allegra Dimpirio

Ryan Rainey

Editor-at-Large

Editorial Page Editor

Editorial Board Member

Editorial Board opinions are crafted independently of news coverage.

Recalls not best way to settle a grudge Carolyn Briggs Managing Editor To steal an old phrase from moms: If ifs and buts were candy and nuts … at least we’d have some fucking candy. But all the ifs and buts in the world can’t justify the current Wisconsin recall elections. Throughout the past few months, I’ve heard every justification imaginable for recalling Gov. Scott Walker. Some say he didn’t reveal his true intentions toward unions in his campaign. Others claim his actions toward workers are morally reprehensible enough to warrant a recall. I say they’re wrong. Before I start on my opinion, I feel obligated to prove facts. Walker did say in his campaign he would go after government workforce spending. You didn’t have to look toward obscure hometown newspaper articles to see it either. All you had to do was turn on your television. In one ad, Walker bragged about cutting the Milwaukee County government work force spending by 20 percent.

In another, he discussed his desire to make all public employees pay toward their retirement and pension. We knew he wanted to cut government work force spending; if you didn’t, you just weren’t paying attention. So now the big question: What about the collective bargaining provision we’ve all been protesting since February? While it is true the governor did not outright say he would be eliminating collective bargaining until after the election, he did hint he did not see collective bargaining as an important part of the budget process. In an edited transcript of an interview with the Appleton Post Crescent that appeared on Walker’s campaign website, he noted budget debates can be settled through statutes without using collective bargaining. To me, this transcript paints a picture of a man who has no respect for the collective bargaining process, and I was certainly not surprised he did away with it. While I liked that unions were able to bargain for their wages, benefits and working conditions, I do not believe that is a constitutionally given right. Not every state gives its employees the right

to collectively bargain, and as long as states are not discriminating against employees who choose to unionize, they are not doing anything illegal. While many may disagree with Walker’s choice to take away these privileges, it is certainly not against the law for him to do so. This recall campaign against Walker is not about fraudulent promises, and it is certainly not about illegal policies. It comes down to the fact that people don’t like the laws he passed. Laws, he said, or at least hinted, that he would be going after. If a public official lives up to their campaign promises and does not break the law, there is no basis for recall. So what happens the next time a governor, Republican or Democrat, offends a large portion of his or her constituency with a law he or she chooses to push? Do we just constantly scream recall? How will Wisconsin’s leaders ever be able to govern with the constant threat of a recall hanging over their heads? If recall elections continue to be used in this way, if Wisconsin is constantly stuck in campaign mode, there can be no governing. There can be no government. The very nature of our democracy will be

changed, likely for the worse. In the act of a recall, we have a beautiful tool to remove legislators who have committed truly awful acts from power. If we do not use it responsibly, the best-case scenario is we lose the right to recall. The worst case? Recall elections become the norm, and Wisconsin’s elections become an anything goes, no-rules, free-for-all where we are recalling legislators left and right because we don’t like the look of them. In golf, there is this useful little thing called a mulligan. When I played mini-golf as a child, my dad let me take as many as I needed. When I started playing real 18hole courses, that ended. My dad said if I were old enough to play a real course, I was old enough to play the ball I hit. If you’re old enough to cast a vote, you’re old enough to live with the consequences. If you did not research the candidate enough before voting for him, that’s not a reason for recall. If you did not vote, that’s your problem. The only thing you can do is learn from this, and take that lesson to the polls next time around. Carolyn Briggs (cbriggs@ badgerherald.com) is a senior majoring in English.


The Badger Herald | Opinion | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Recalls expose politicians to unwarranted punishment Alex Brousseau Editorial Board Chairman

Norweigian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, via Flickr

Mourners in Norway promote a message of peace, a concept local and national politicians in the U.S. can’t grasp.

Compromise the lesson to take from Norway tragedy Reggie Young Staff Writer On July 22, Anders Breivik killed eight people using homemade explosives in Oslo, Norway, before going on to personally shoot 69 youths on the island of Utoya. Yet Oslo’s mayor, Fabian Stang, informed the world that while Breivik will be prosecuted, he will be punished “with love and democracy.” Stang is the kind of politician the world needs. More specifically, this is the kind of upstanding political integrity Wisconsin needs. Stang teaches an important lesson with his words — while we may not agree with someone, we must not stoop to their level of ignorant malice. Instead, we ought to tolerate and work with them, not shut them out. In the political process, this is something known as compromise, something our current governor can’t seem to grasp, despite it being the most basic, fundamental building block of our system. Wisconsin is replete with examples of this lack of political integrity. Just look to Rep. Peter Barca’s, D-Kenosha, attempt to simply read part of the Wisconsin constitution in a Senate hearing regarding Walker’s infamous bill: Barca was blatantly ignored, disrespected and shut out by Republicans. Why are so many

naïve, idealistic politician anymore, so today’s politicians fight to keep their seats. Job security is the name of the game now. More checks on power. Less isolated politicians. More political parties represented. We need these as barriers against power mongers. Our state constitution has been around for 163 years — plenty of time for loopholes to be found. We need a constitution based on the ideas Oslo’s mayor posited. We need love and democracy, not hostility and unilateralism. I’m going to be honest: I miss having Feingold to look up to. He was a politician who knew how to work with the other side and upheld all those idealistic notions that every freshman majoring in political science still believes in. It’s not about winning for your side; it’s about winning for the people. It’s not about taking care of a business; it’s about taking care of the people. Wisconsin’s politics should function for the people, but somewhere along the way it began to function only for the two respective parties. So how could we tweak the system? We need politicians in power that are able to instigate the needed change, but we need the change before those politicians are able to claim their seats. It’s yet another catch-22 in the political world, leaving Wisconsinites under-, if not completely un-, represented.

campaigns run on attacking an opponent? Are today’s politicians just not able to defend their positions well enough to the public that they need to move the spotlight to the other candidate? We’ve lost upstanding trendsetters like former U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold and replaced them with people who don’t acknowledge the existence of the other side. Don’t get me wrong — lack of integrity can be found in politicians on both sides. The previous examples show only Republicans as the culprits who lack political integrity, but Democrats definitely do as well. Have the people in our state simply become intolerant? That’s hard to believe, considering the Midwest is known to be an “oh-ja-don’tchya-knoweverybody-gets-along” place. Does this Midwest trait simply disappear when someone assumes a political office? Our state’s system, and perhaps our country’s system, needs revamping. And I’m not talking “recall Walker!” I’m talking about a revision of the structure established in our state constitution. The basic tenets of our state government’s structure were established during a much different time, but even then politicians understood the need for checks and balances. James Madison understood their necessity by noting that “all men having power ought to be distrusted.” This notion is still very true today, but the risk of a politician losing his or her integrity is now much higher. The world isn’t friendly to the

Reggie Young (rcyoung3@ wisc.edu) is a junior majoring in legal studies and Scandinavian studies.

The recent recall elections in our state have made it clear the recall process in Wisconsin needs to be reformed to protect against more costly and unfounded recall efforts. Our state constitution allows the recall of any incumbent elective officer of any congressional, judicial or legislative district (Wis. Const., article XIII, section 12). Wisconsin is only one of 19 states to allow such legislative recalls. Since the recall provision was added to the state constitution in 1926, only two state senators had successfully been recalled. Sen. Otto Mueller, R-Wausau, was the first state legislator in history to face a recall in 1932, but survived. Sens. George Petak, R-Racine, and Gary George, D-Milwaukee, were both recalled in 1996 and 2003 respectively. In 2011, nine Wisconsin state senators faced recall elections — an unprecedented amount not only in Wisconsin history, but the history of the United States. Six Republicans were targeted for voting for Gov. Walker’s collective bargaining bill, whereas three Democrats were targeted for fleeing the state for three weeks to prevent the budget repair bill vote from taking place. When both sides started their recall efforts, they went down the warpath for the sole

purpose of punishing the state senators based on a single issue. The Republican senators were being punished for voting how they promised they would and what they were voted into office to do. The Democrats, on the other hand, were being punished for blocking the vote and leaving the state. While their actions were childish and an abdication of their duty, it did not justify a recall. Wisconsin has seen this type of “recall as punishment” effort before. In 1996, Petak was recalled for casting the deciding vote in favor of public financing to build Miller Park. While his constituents in Racine were upset about the increase in costs to them, Petak helped to save Major League Baseball for Milwaukee. By overreacting to a single issue, the people of Racine lost a good politician who was ultimately looking out for his constituents. The state constitution has no language in the recall provision which dictates why an elected officer can be recalled. Instead, state politicians can face a recall for any reason, whether it be they stole money from the government or they are Vikings fans. As we’ve seen, this can create political instability since an official can be recalled at the spur of the moment for a single decision he or she made. Rep. Robin Vos, R-Burlington, has proposed an amendment to the state constitution which would place limits on the recalls of state elected officials. His proposal would limit the reasons why a state official can be recalled to egregious criminal and ethical violations. This amendment, which is set to be

presented to the Legislature in the fall, is essential to preventing any more frivolous recalls such as those which took place in 2011. Enormous amounts of money can be spent just because of a fit thrown by dissenting citizens who were too lazy or uninformed during the last election to vote for a different legislator. Also, special interest groups could push voters into recalling their legislator because of a single issue. Both of these scenarios create enormous political instability and could lead to the collapse of the state legislative process. The constitutional amendment would also end an inconsistency found between the local and state level. Wisconsin statute dictates that in order to recall a local elected official, the recall petition must contain a statement of reason that is related to the official responsibilities of the person being recalled. Wis. Stat. § 9.10(2). Imposing similar requirements on the recalls of state legislators would make perfect sense. If Wisconsin wants to be one of only 19 states to allow recalls, it should be consistent with the requirements and protect against frivolous petitions. Neither the Republicans nor the Democrats who faced recalls in 2011 deserved the spiteful lick of the recall whip. No egregious criminal or ethical acts were committed. All they did was take a stand for what they believed in. If that is deserving of a recall, then what isn’t? Alex Brousseau (abrousseau@ badgerherald.com) is a second year law student.

NEW WRITERS MEETINGS Sunday, September 11 @ 3:30 pm Tuesday, September 13 @ 5:30 pm Located at The Badger Herald office 326 W. Gorham St. (above Silver Mine Subs)

Herald Editorial Kegs and loud music and underagers, oh nuisance! Mayor Paul Soglin and other city officials are proposing a new ordinance that goes too far in controlling student activity. The proposed ordinance aims to curb underage drinking and house parties by holding not only tenants, but their landlords responsible if a tenant is hosting a party which is deemed to be a nuisance. While the idea behind this new law — to hold landlords accountable — is valid, the ordinance itself is fraught with errors and is horribly drafted. First, the law is nothing but another way to punish students. The police may already break up a party and fine students for any of the 17 offenses listed in the

ordinance. Also, buying a keg and drinking beer is not illegal for those 21 years of age or older. In an effort to hold landlords responsible, the ordinance merely gives police another tool to enter a student’s home, give the party the label of a “nuisance” and slap another fine on top of everything else. In addition, anything that the city does to the landlords will simply be passed on to the tenants in the form of higher penalties, fines and rents. Punishing the landlord would ultimately punish the students. Second, the new ordinance also puts the students at the mercy of the police officer’s discretion. While the central police have said they would

not use the ordinance more than eight to 12 times a year, nothing could stop them from abusing the ordinance to punish any gathering on campus. Police from other parts of Madison with different goals may be able to use the ordinance to target racial minorities or groups of students within their district who they no longer want around. All in all, the opportunity for abuse is high with no safeguards in the ordinance to protect the public. Third, the eviction clause is borderline illegal. In order to avoid the fines, the landlord only needs to prove he has or is trying to evict the nuisance tenant. However, the laws in Madison only allow eviction

in egregious circumstances, and holding a nuisance party is not one of them. If a landlord ever brought such an eviction notice before a judge, he would laugh. The possibility that a landlord could utilize this affirmative

The new ordinance puts the students at the mercy of the police officer’s discretion. There is nothing to stop them from abusing the ordinance to punish any gathering on campus. defense is zero, and they know that. A proposed amendment

Alex Brousseau

Signe Brewster

Carolyn Briggs

Editorial Board Chairman

Editor-in-Chief

Managing Editor

Jake Begun

Allegra Dimpirio

Ryan Rainey

Editor-at-Large

Editorial Page Editor

Editorial Board Member

Editorial Board opinions are crafted independently of news coverage.

would eliminate the landlord clause. As stated before, the only new provision in the ordinance is holding landlords accountable for their residents’ actions. If the City Council were to eliminate the landlord’s responsibility from the provision, what would be the point of the ordinance? This ordinance is fraught with bad language, poor planning and lack of foresight. The mayor, instead of dredging up old legislation, should draft an ordinance whose language reflects its good intentions. This board is not against the idea of holding landlords accountable, but doing so with this legislation is unacceptable. Go back to the drawing board, Mr. Soglin, and try again.


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The Badger Herald | Opinion | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Slim pickings to replace Kohl Jake Begun Editor-at-Large

Courtesy of the University of Wisconsin

Interim Chancellor David Ward must keep UW-Madison afloat while tackling large budget cuts and a stiff political climate, a daunting task.

Herald Editorial Words for Ward A lot can happen in a year. At this time last September, former Chancellor Biddy Martin’s presence at the University of Wisconsin was not enough of a news item to warrant words on The Badger Herald’s opinion page. Just as when she first entered office, Martin was comfortable. There was time to plan for the coming troubles. This time around, Interim Chancellor David Ward might as well be taking over a different university. He certainly has his work cut out for him, a priority being managing the planned $94 million in budget cuts over the next two years. He told the Herald earlier this summer that there needs to be discussion of the appropriate split between state and student investment in education, but the last decade has made it obvious that for the time being the state is in control. Administrative Excellence will reduce annual costs for the university by millions of dollars, but Ward will also have to make some hard cuts. We ask that he tackle this head on and make smart budget reductions instead of the easy ones. Cutting administrative costs via Administrative Excellence has

set a fine example of that. In an email to campus last week, Ward noted another important goal: reshaping UW with the administrative flexibilities that were retained in the 2011-13 state budget. “We must demonstrate that these flexibilities are as important as we claim them to be,” he said in the email. “That will require great effort on our part. It will be incumbent upon the faculty, staff and students of UWMadison to find a way to make these important opportunities really work, and if they don’t, to show what other flexibilities are needed.” We applaud these words, but know to make them work he must also rebuild relationships at the state level. The lessons he learned as chancellor under former Gov. Tommy Thompson in the ‘90s should be paired with Martin’s brand of building allies within the Legislature from her first two years at UW. By being appointed to serve at the pleasure of the Board of Regents and UW System President Kevin Reilly, he is already definitively connected to them in a way that will immediately strengthen working

ties. But as someone charged with easing the transition between permanent chancellors, that cannot mean lying down as the UW System’s mouthpiece. Ward must strike a firm tone with an eye for collaboration that will prepare regents to work with his successor. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, Ward must maintain the existing goals of the university. This is a year to lay the groundwork for the future, but also a time to ensure the heart of UW is not lost. This means respecting shared governance as we tackle issues like diversity, student services and textbook costs. It also means preserving programs such as international partnerships and Go Big Read. This will define UW as a place worth fighting for. It is crucial that we attract the best and brightest chancellor candidates to take on our problems, and that will come more easily if our most central goals are apparent. It falls to Ward to hold us to those while looking toward a shifting future. In his own words in last week’s email: “Although my title is interim chancellor, this is not a moment for UW-Madison to stand still.”

Alex Brousseau

Signe Brewster

Carolyn Briggs

Editorial Board Chairman

Editor-in-Chief

Managing Editor

Jake Begun

Allegra Dimpirio

Ryan Rainey

Editor-at-Large

Editorial Page Editor

Editorial Board Member

Editorial Board opinions are crafted independently of news coverage.

Wisconsin Left loses its protest steam Ryan Rainey Staff Writer In all political movements or campaigns, rule number one is not to lose a message. Barack Obama’s 2008 message, “Change we can believe in,” trumped John McCain’s infighting with Sarah Palin. John Kerry’s scattershot 2004 campaign covering multiple issues wasn’t enough to beat George W. Bush’s national security message. I worry we can now add another recent example to the list: the left wing’s resurgence in Wisconsin. This winter, the Wisconsin Left had more positive energy and momentum than any conservative counterpart. No rally in the short history of the Tea Party could outdo the diversity and attitude of the Capitol’s occupation. Democrats and leftists were united again around a common cause: the rights of the worker.

But similar to the Tea Party’s recent devolution into embarrassing economic extremism, Wisconsin’s leftist movement has devolved into a radical conversation assailing anyone who affiliates with the Republican Party. Today, independents aren’t agents of compromise, they’re agents of stagnancy. To today’s liberals, Bill O’Reilly and Glenn Beck are not counterproductive because they harm civility in our national political conversation, but because they hold rightwing views. The same progressives who decry Fox News just as easily cheer an equally divisive figure like Ed Schultz, who has become a regular visitor to Madison and has created a more alienating climate to independents who hate Gov. Scott Walker’s recent assault on unions. And even worse, the protesters who regularly set up shop in Madison have taken control of the conversation away from elected representatives who in any other time would be widely lauded for their progressive credentials. The political

heroes of this winter’s uprising, folks like Assembly Minority Leader Peter Barca, D-Kenosha, and Senators Lena Taylor, D-Milwaukee and Jon Erpenbach, D-Middleton, have gradually lost their clout as union supporters because of their affiliation with the Democratic Party, despite their backbreaking work for unions in February and March. The true grassroots beginnings of the uprising largely centered on public employees pleading with benevolent Democrats to do anything to stop the budget repair bill. The Democrats delivered. But because of missteps in Washington and a president who is, compared to most Democrats, anti-labor, any Wisconsin politician with a ‘D’ after their name is seen as an inhibitor of progress — just as bad as Walker or the brothers Fitzgerald. Because of this, the movement’s message has spiraled downward from an intelligent conversation led by public figures like Barca and Taylor to a confused mess of protest songs and fulfillment of Walker’s claim that out-ofstate interests have been

flooding into Madison. Progressives here are forced to trust people like Schultz and Michael Moore as the leaders of a movement they didn’t even start. And if you don’t? You’re not a true progressive. And so the left in Wisconsin has become what progressives often ridicule about Tea Party conservatives: divisive, plagued by in-fighting and unattractive to “normal,” independent Wisconsinites. Considering the unity of the left six months ago, this indicates a huge failure in message that could lead to even more failure next year if no action is taken. Do I want to see Scott Walker recalled? Of course. Does Wisconsin face an unapologetically radical conservative agenda that needs to be stopped? Sure. But for now, progressives should go back to what was most successful six months ago: leaving the conversation to the grown-ups. That will make stopping Walker much easier. Ryan Rainey (rrainey@ badgerherald.com) is a junior majoring in journalism and Latin American studies.

When first made aware of Sen. Herb Kohl’s coming retirement, I, no doubt along with many Wisconsin residents, expressed a common sentiment: Oh yeah, that’s right, Wisconsin has another senator beside the doofus that beat former Sen. Russ Feingold. Kohl, the state’s senior senator, is wrapping up his tenure after 20 years in the business. But with nearly a quarter century of service in the Senate under his belt, one would expect he’d have done more than serving as a run-of-the-mill liberal Democrat and spending his time as chairman of the Special Committee on Aging … well, aging. But out with the (very) old, in with the new, right? First in the running is former two-term Republican congressman and gubernatorialwannabe Mark Neumann. Although he had a poor showing against Gov. Scott Walker in the 2010 Republican primary, Neumann’s conservative cred is boosted by his track record in Congress. He echoed Newt Gingrich on opposition to tax increases in the mid-’90s, he’s outspoken in his anti-LGBT, antiabortion beliefs and has jumped on the balanced budget bandwagon with all the gusto of a seasoned Tea Party patriot. Combine all that with a self-made, small businessman backstory, and he’s the complete package. Neumann’s also received the backing of Club for Growth, the small government, antitax advocacy group. Club for Growth has been attacking another likely candidate for Kohl’s Senate seat, former-Gov. Tommy Thompson, for his tax policies and relatively moderate stances. Oh, and one of Neumann’s former staffers is the executive vice president for the national Club for Growth. But Tommy, despite what the club would have you believe, has spent time selling himself as a Tea-soaked man of the people. Thompson toyed with a run against Feingold in 2010, trying to distance himself from the “Obamacare” initiatives he previously supported. Wisconsin’s political scene has changed

drastically since then, but I remember vividly the warm reception Thompson received at the Tax Day rally that same year, his jowls flapping like a Gadsden flag as he announced he wouldn’t be seeking Feingold’s seat. Whether any of that fervor has continued on remains to be seen. Thompson’s dual center-right/far-right personalities will conflict, and he’ll be forced to come down on one side. But where Thompson may have to rely on moderate nostalgia and whatever conservative elements he can muster to stay afloat, a rising star may be able to draw on the current political atmosphere. Assembly Speaker Jeff Fitzgerald, R-Horicon, though not officially in the running as of yet, has great potential to garner the support of Wisconsin conservatives of all stripes. And although he may not have the star power of his brother in the state Senate, Scott (think of Jeff as the Emilio Estevez to Scott’s Charlie Sheen), his steadfast support of Gov. Scott Walker’s conservative agenda will no doubt serve him well. Then, of course, there are the Democrats. After serving half a year as a punching bag on the state level and losing Feingold in 2010, Democrats could stand to get a win. But with Feingold announcing he will not enter the fray to reclaim Wisconsin in the name of all that is good and decent, a serious blow was dealt to Democrats’ collective dreams. The prospective frontrunner is Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin. Her name recognition and track record will help her among liberal voters, but the state’s 2nd Congressional District, including the perpetually blue Dane County, is an entirely different animal than the state as a whole. Also said to be eyeing the position are U.S. Rep. Ron Kind of La Crosse and former Rep. Steve Kagen of Appleton. I’ll leave it at that, because that’s all they’ve managed to do. A lot of the anger across the state concerning Walker and Republicans could translate to a Democratic win. But until Democrats can bring forth some more substantial candidates, particularly one that can appeal to a more moderate set of voters, Republicans appear to be at an advantage. Jake Begun (jbegun@ badgerherald.com) is a senior majoring in history and journalism.

Malory Goldin The Badger Herald

Sen. Herb Kohl will be retiring fom 20 years of politics next year, but the crop of candidates on both sides seeking his seat leaves much to be desired.


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Sports Editor Mike Fiammetta sports@badgerherald.com

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SPORTS

THE MARCH BEGINS Nine months later, Wisconsin begins its quest for a return trip to Pasadena, site of the Badgers’ heartbreakingly close loss to Texas Christian in the Rose Bowl. With a new quarterback at the helm, the journey is off to a resounding start after Thursday’s 51-17 drubbing of Nevada-Las Vegas in the season opener. Many obstacles remain, including a brutal late-October stretch of games at Michigan State and Ohio State, but Wisconsin longs for nothing more than another shot at seizing a fistful of roses.

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Veteran Thiermann hoping to boost UW’s offense After transfer from Notre Dame, senior looks to make major impact in Madison Ian McCue Associate Sports Editor From his decision to transfer to Wisconsin from a top-tier program to his offensive firepower and ability to elude defenders, everything about Josh Thiermann exudes confidence. A fifth-year senior forward/midfielder who joins the Badgers after suiting up for Notre Dame for three years, Thiermann is expected to be a standout player on Wisconsin’s offense. The Stoughton, Wis., native sat out all of last season due to injury, but the coaches are relying on Thiermann to make an immediate impact for the Badgers this year. “Good soccer teams have a protagonist — he’s our protagonist,” head coach John Trask said. “He’s relentless, his pace unsettles the other team, he unbalances them … and he just has the desire to go to goal which we hope amounts to a lot of goals.” Although it will be his first year on the field for Wisconsin, Thiermann has more experience than most of the players on what is a very young team. Playing in more than 10 games in each of his three years with the Fighting Irish, he has both the technical ability and leadership skills to take on a prominent role in his final year of collegiate soccer. Despite never appearing in a game for Wisconsin, Thiermann was named one of three senior captains earlier this year. Though he was surprised by the selection, his coaches and teammates see it as a sign of his natural leadership ability and how well he meshes with the rest of the Badgers’ roster. “He didn’t really let the fact that he was the new guy get to him, and instantly when he got on the field, players started to

respect him,” fellow senior captain Colin Mani said. “He’s just a really good leader, and he’s got a great personality for this team and contributes a lot.” To the surprise of many, Thiermann left Notre Dame, a national soccer powerhouse where he saw significant playing time, after his junior year. While he points to the fact that he never felt comfortable in the Fighting Irish’s system, the senior captain admits that playing for the team he grew up rooting for was a major part of the decision. With several former childhood teammates already playing for Wisconsin, the senior forward believed playing his final year for the Badgers was the perfect way to end his career. “I’m very, very close to my family, so being closer to home, being back with these guys who I played club with, it all just seemed like a great fit, a good way to go out,” Thiermann said. While it’s still early in the year, the standout senior already made his presence felt in his first game as a Badger with a team-high five shots against Western Illinois. A relentless worker who is always working to improve his game, the fifth-year senior has impressed coaches and teammates alike. Described by those around him as an incredibly driven individual, Thiermann sets a strong example for a team full of younger players. “I’ve been coaching [over] 20 years now; I could only name one or two players that I ever worked with or played with that are putting in the amount of effort on and off the field to take care of himself, to be successful,” Trask said. “So he’s a great leader by example.” Thiermann is hoping that his work ethic will allow him to take his game to the next level, as he aspires to play soccer professionally. Thiermann felt that transferring to Wisconsin gave him the best opportunity to finish off his career with the type

Photo courtesy of UW Athletics

A native of nearby Stoughton, Josh Thiermann admits that playing for the team he grew up rooting for factored into his decision to transfer to UW. In just his second game with the Badgers, the fifth-year senior transfer scored the winning goal in Friday night’s overtime victory against Virginia Tech. of standout season that could land him a spot on a pro team. In addition to the extra playing time Thiermann will see at Wisconsin, he believes the UW coaching staff will help him with the difficult transition to the next level. “It’s been a goal of

mine ever since I can remember,” Thiermann said. “Every single day just with the ball, trying to get better and better.” “Absolutely, I think [the coaches] have prepared me [for the next level]. They’ve definitely turned me onto a different mindset toward the game, paying attention

to the finer details.” While Thiermann is new to the UW men’s soccer team, his quick adjustment to a new program and the instant respect he has gained from teammates make him fit the mold of a veteran Badger. Finally ready to suit up for his hometown team, there’s no

doubt that the senior will add a major threat to the Wisconsin offense. “I’m excited to be healthy personally, because it’s been a while, but I definitely think I can bring that experience, bring a little bit of a bite to our offense, and hopefully we have a great season.”


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Improving Badgers aiming for Big Ten championship Brett Sommers Statistics Editor The 2011 Wisconsin women’s soccer season is underway, and it has featured a tough schedule with positive results. Entering a four-game road trip that began Friday, the Badgers have already taken on three Top-25 teams: Marquette in an exhibition match, at defending national champion and No. 1 Notre Dame and No. 23 Washington at home in the McClimon Complex. Wisconsin sits at 2-1 with victories over Washington and UW-Green Bay, with the loss coming at Notre Dame, 2-0. “We schedule it that way so we can figure out what we need to fix,” head coach Paula Wilkins said. “Anytime you are playing the defending nation champions at their home field, you’re going to be put under some pressure and I think it was important to get young players acclimated.” Fifth-year senior goalkeeper Michele Dalton knows the Badgers need to push themselves like a top team all season. “Everyone is engaged in the full 90 minutes against great opponents,” Dalton said. “Just the intensity is a completely different level against a Top-10 team, and as a team we need to bring that to every game not just against Top-10 opponents; to be successful we need to do it against every single

opponent that we face.” Wisconsin is picked to finish third again in the preseason media polls, and Wisconsin senior defender Meghan Flannery is looking forward to playing spoiler. “We haven’t gotten the time of day in terms of ranking, so that puts no pressure on us and we’re just kind of out to beat everyone because evidently nobody thinks that we’re a big team to beat, and we want to show them what we got,” Flannery said. UW’s competitive spirit starts in practice, and the team recognizes that no starting position is safe. “We are a lot deeper, so there is more competition in practice and it raises our level of what we are trying to do,” Wilkins said. “I think that is going to push people to be better.” Assembling a team that has the ability to be competitive in practice has been in the works for five years since Wilkins arrived from Penn State, and Flannery has seen the growth of the program year after year. “The improvements that we have made, starting from my freshman year, not having the best season and then progressively getting better and better and winning bigger and bigger games. I am excited about this year to see what we can build on that,” Flannery said. Wisconsin boasts seven seniors and 10 juniors who

will lead the team and help develop several freshmen who have already begun starting games, including forward Cara Walls, who recently was awarded Big Ten Freshman of the Week honors. Senior forward Laurie Nosbusch recognizes it is partly her responsibility to make sure everyone is focused and together. “(The seniors) need to make everyone understand that this is our last year, this is our last chance to make a difference for the program,” Nosbusch said. “We have all accepted that and taken that on as a challenge to just get everyone else on the same page with us and make them as desperate as we are to fight for every last game that we can.” “The fact that we have people competing for spots every day now. It makes everybody a little bit better, a little bit more on edge and sharper in practices and games.” One early season indicator for whether Wisconsin will succeed in accomplishing its goals for this season is all about converting its in-game chances. “We have created more opportunities now that we did a year ago at this time,” Wilkins said. “(But) though we have created a lot of opportunities, I think we need to finish a lot more of them and our ability to Zhao Lim The Badger Herald maintain and be consistent needs to be better The Wisconsin women’s soccer team was picked to finish No. 3 in the Big Ten preseason media throughout the game.” poll, but senior defender Meghan Flannery believes the Badgers have the potential to finish No. 1.

Men’s soccer looking to build on strong start to 2011 season Wisconsin counting on senior leadership, expecting improved performance in fall Ian McCue Associate Sports Editor Adjusting to a new coach and a roster full of young players last year, the Wisconsin men’s soccer team’s 2010 campaign left the team hungry for a more successful season this year. Finishing the year with four wins last year, the Badgers will have a much higher bar for success as their season gets underway. The UW men’s soccer squad is already off to a strong start, kicking off the season with two wins over Western Illinois and Virginia Tech. Now off to their best start since 2008, the Badgers seem poised to make Wisconsin a serious competitor in the Big

Ten. “Being able to get that win, it makes the season feel really attainable and like we really have it at our fingertips,” senior defenseman Colin Mani said. “But, also, we don’t want to look onto it as being like everything’s answered from here.” While the Badgers’ roster is dominated by first and second year players, the three senior captains will all be critical to the Badgers’ success. On the offensive side, Wisconsin will look to Josh Thiermann, a fifth-year senior transfer from Notre Dame, to provide much of their scoring. After sitting out much of last season due to injury, Thiermann should provide a major boost to a Badgers’ offense that often lacked firepower last season. In just his second game with the Badgers, Thiermann netted the overtime winner in an impressive 1-0 victory over Virginia Tech.

On the other side of the field, two senior captains in Mani and Arnel Zahirovic will lead the UW defense. Seeing plenty of playing time last year, the senior duo should allow for a much more intimidating Wisconsin defense in 2011. Although the season just started, the coaching staff is already seeing noticeable improvement over last year’s squad. The coaches are attempting to take full advantage of the preseason, preparing the team for regular season play before the players have to carefully manage their time between academics and athletics. “I know we’re further along than we were a year ago,” head coach John Trask said. “It’s not just that they’re a year older—we as a coaching staff have just done a better job of preparing them before the grind of being a student-athlete really kicks in.” Dropping 12 games

by a single goal last year, the Badgers often found themselves on the brink of victory last year. Despite their 4-13-3 record in 2010, UW still saw some success in the team’s growth and improvement over the course of the season. With higher expectations in 2011, one challenge Wisconsin will face is simply managing a lead. In a season where they often found themselves trailing their opponent, greater success on the field means that defense that will play an especially important role this year in allowing the Badgers to hang on for close wins. “We didn’t have a lead very often, we we’re usually chasing the game. If and when we do get up a goal, like we did against Western Illinois, how the demands of the games change [is a challenge],” Trask said. “We feel like even though we’ve only played three competitions, a lot of little

lessons that a team learns in the process of becoming a good team have kind of been thrown at these guys.” With an extra year of experience and a focus on collective play rather than working primarily on individual skills, Wisconsin is confident that this year’s squad is groomed for success. In particular, the Badgers have been trying to improve their team defense in the off-season. Surrendering as many as four goals in a single contest last season, defense looks to be a major factor in the team’s success this year. “Defensive organization is a very, very big [area of focus],” Thiermann said. “We’re much better technically this year than we were last year, fitness is better, but defense is really what’s going to win us games.” As the team gets deeper into the season and

prepares for conference play in October, there’s little doubt that the team has the talent and drive for a more successful season this year. Wisconsin seems confident that its combination of experience, talent and optimism will lead to a much improved performance this year. While the team aspires to such goals as winning the Big Ten or qualifying for the NCAA Tournament, the Badgers are keeping one major goal in mind—to win. Still a young team in a transitional period, UW welcomes lofty expectations but is trying to keep their success in perspective. “Just to put it simply, we want to win,” Thiermann said. “Last year we won four games—that’s not acceptable to any of us here. We want to be much better than just a .500 team. Yeah, we want to get into the [NCAA] Tournament, but to get there you have got to win.”


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Young Badgers look to surprise With just 7 upperclassmen, volleyball team hopes to bounce back from 2010 season Nick Korger Extra Points Editor 2010 was a season of mixed results for the Wisconsin volleyball team. The Badgers jumped out to a promising 11-0 start, tying for the best start in school history. But the team couldn’t continue the trend, as it posted a 16-15 overall record to finish the season. The Badgers wrapped up their first winning season since 2008, but failed to reach the NCAA tournament and went 5-15 in conference play. Many of the struggles in the Big Ten came from the Badgers’ lack of consistency in close sets, as the team went 6-12 in sets decided by two points. In 2011, the Badgers will look to polish their consistency in close contests. “We lost quite a few sets by two points last season, and our goal is to turn that into wins,” head coach Pete Waite said. “Mental toughness is key to finishing off the long sets, especially late in the season.” Lack of consistent results stemmed from an inconsistent starting lineup, as the Badgers used 12 different combinations throughout the season to adjust to injuries and inconsistent play.

“We’ve gone through injuries that made it hard to go through our business like we were used to,” Waite said. “Sometimes multiple injuries and youth make a big difference over the course of a long season.” Waite’s squad was also one of the youngest in the conference. Carrying just seven upperclassmen on a team of 17, the Badgers will be in more or less of a similar situation, as only five upperclassmen fill the ranks of the current squad. With six new incoming freshmen, the team will be ripe with new faces and talent. However, don’t be surprised if those new young faces make a big difference right away. “The way volleyball is now at the high school and club level, it’s getting so much higher and closer to the college game,” junior Alexis Mitchell said. “We have a lot of freshmen that have played at the international level and a high level at club so they know the game extremely well. The only big adjustment for the freshman is a little faster game tempo and new teammates. The freshmen we have are definitely one of the top 10 recruiting classes in the nation.” Chemistry will be one of the Badgers’ biggest issues in the early part

of the season. While the team returns five key players, including senior captain Janelle Gabrielsen and Mitchell, the returning members will need to learn how to mesh with the younger players and their playing styles in the early weeks of the season. “Chemistry is so important in volleyball because it’s not a sport you can do by yourself,” Mitchell said. “Not one person can get the job done; all six people on the court need to be flowing and working together at all times. You can get beat by any team that has great chemistry; if you don’t have it you can get beat any day. Those words ring especially true in the Big Ten, where the competition is perhaps the stiffest in the nation. Entering the final week of August, seven of the 12 teams in the conference were ranked, including Penn State at No. 2 overall and newcomer Nebraska at No. 5. “You have to be prepared for every team in the conference,” Gabrielsen said. “You always have to scout and prepare for every team. You can’t be unprepared for any team in the Big Ten the way it is with the level of talent and competition.” With less than a month to prepare for

the opening conference match against Northwestern Sept. 23, Wisconsin hopes to use its early non-conference matches to find its identity. By that time, the Badgers hope to have a solidified rotation and starting lineup to give them the consistency they lacked last year. “Once we get into the Big Ten schedule, we want to have the same lineup so there’s a familiarity with each other ’s play,” Mitchell said. “People on our team have really been fighting in these early games to show what they’re made of to earn a spot. It’s a time to prove yourself during nonconference play.” “We know that coming into Wisconsin and every preseason, we are in the toughest volleyball conference in the country,” Mitchell added. “There is some stress there because we want to finish at the top and get back to the tournament, but we use it as motivation. Knowing we’re going up against great competition will only make us better, and we just have to have high confidence. With the top teams and Nebraska coming in, they may look at us as the team we were last season and think they can walk all over us, but they’re in for a surprise.”

Top 5 games to see away from Madison Mike Fiammetta Mike’d Up Just as students across campus are breaking out their planners and organizers as the semester begins, Wisconsin athletic teams are circling their calendars with the biggest games of the fall. With as many successful programs as UW boasts, there are quite a large number of matchups that fans won’t want to miss. Naturally, many will come on the road, away from the friendly confines of Madison. The ability to succeed away from home is always one of the principal trademarks of a strong athletic team, and coupled with the reputation Badger fans have of being one of the best traveling fanbases in the country, fall 2011 could be a special season for several UW programs. Here are the top five away games of this season that we say you’ll definitely want to catch: 1. Football vs. Michigan State; East Lansing, Mich., Oct. 22, 2011 By this point in the season, the Badgers could very well be undefeated. The nonconference schedule won’t be a cakewalk by any stretch of the imagination, though it is entirely manageable. After the Big Ten opener under the lights against Nebraska — arguably the game of the year — Wisconsin hosts Indiana the week before traveling to East Lansing. On the second day of last October, the Badgers made that same trip and left with what would remain even at the end of the season arguably the team’s worst showing of 2010. Despite forcing MSU to turn the ball over three times, UW failed to take

advantage. The offense managed only 292 yards, while the defense allowed Michigan State to convert 2-of-3 fourth down conversations and hold the ball for 36:24, nearly 13 minutes longer than Wisconsin did. At the time, the loss had the effect of knocking the wind out of most of the BCS hopes the Badgers held at the time. Obviously, Wisconsin recovered to make the Rose Bowl. 2. Football vs. Ohio State; Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 29, 2011 This season, the MSU game makes up the first of a brutal two-game stretch that is very likely to make or break UW’s season. One week later, Wisconsin travels to Columbus, Ohio, to take on Ohio State — also at night — and you can bet the Buckeyes will have revenge on their minds. One loss in Big Ten play shouldn’t doom Wisconsin this year, though two very well could derail the Badgers’ BCS hopes and present an obstacle too taxing to overcome. Ohio State has undeniably tarnished itself and set up significant obstacles to overcome this season, but its still entirely possible for the Buckeyes to remain at the top of the conference. Fans throughout Madison — and beyond — have pegged the Badgers as definite contenders in the inaugural Big Ten Championship Game, but remember — Bucky will have to finish ahead of Brutus in order to top the Leaders Division. 3. Men’s basketball vs. North Carolina; Chapel Hill, N.C., Nov. 30, 2011 While the football team will see significant time in the national spotlight this fall (Bret Bielema’s Badgers are pegged to play in four of the Big Ten’s seven primetime games to be aired on ESPN), Bo Ryan’s men’s basketball squad won’t exactly be forgotten. After making its first Sweet

16 since 2008, the men’s basketball team will be featured prominently come the annual Big Ten/ACC Challenge in late November when the Badgers travel to Chapel Hill to face what very well could be the nation’s top team in the North Carolina Tar Heels. The remainder of the men’s basketball schedule hasn’t yet been released, though it’s a safe bet that the UNC game — which is the headliner of the Challenge — will be the most widely anticipated.

One loss in Big Ten play shouldn’t doom Wisconsin this year, though two very well could derail the Badgers’ BCS hopes and present an obstacle too taxing to overcome.

4. Men’s hockey vs. North Dakota; Grand Forks, N.D., Jan. 27-Jan. 28, 2012 Yes, this series technically falls at the beginning of the spring semester, but as a huge pair of games for a team that begins the season in the fall, we’ll count it. The Badgers will face their WCHA brethren twice this season, once in late October and again in late January. North Dakota finished atop the conference last season with a 216-1 WCHA record and 32-9-3 overall record that had them playing deep into the Frozen Four. The Fighting Sioux ultimately fell to Michigan, 2-0, in the semifinals, despite being considered a favorite by many to win it all. North Dakota has lost six of its top seven scorers from last season, but the Sioux still return a ridiculous

amount of talent. For a Wisconsin team looking to pick itself up after finishing seventh in the WCHA and losing many of its key players (forward Craig Smith and goaltenders Scott Gudmandson and Brett Bennett, to name a few), this early season test will be a huge proving ground. Much can, and likely will, have changed since the time the Badgers and the Sioux first meet in Madison, Oct. 21-22, but a solid outing in the second matchup against UND will give UW a huge positive result late in the season. 5. Women’s soccer vs. Illinois; Champaign, Ill., Oct. 16, 2011 After a third-place finish in the Big Ten last season, the Badgers are primed for a breakout season. The Fighting Illini finished right behind them with a 6-3-1 record for fourth place (the Badgers were 7-1-2), and in 2011, the two teams begin the season ranked the same in the Big Ten preseason coaches poll. Wisconsin gets both No. 1 Penn State (Sept. 17) and No. 2 Ohio State (Oct. 2) at home, meaning it will have to be sure to take advantage of a matchup that should favor UW. Adding to the magnitude of the game is that after traveling to Champaign, the Badgers will have only three more games remaining in the regular season. The Badgers reached the NCAA tournament and managed to crawl by Milwaukee, 2-1, in the first round before falling to Marquette on penalty kicks after a 2-2 tie. For a team that is undoubtedly looking for an even stronger finish, this last road game of the season will be vital for the Badgers. Mike is a senior majoring in journalism. Which games are you planning on making the trip for? Let him know on Twitter @mikefiammetta and be sure to follow @ bheraldsports for all the latest Badgers news.

Zhao Lim The Badger Herald

The winningest coach in Wisconsin volleyball history, Pete Waite is aiming to lead the Badgers back to the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2007.

Waite leads UW to continued success Easygoing head coach enters 13th season at helm of Wisconsin volleyball program Nick Korger Extra Points Editor For a team to be successful in any sport, there must be solid leadership. At the highest position on the team, a head coach must be a winner and a solid verbal communicator with their players. The Wisconsin volleyball program has that in head coach Pete Waite and has had it for a long time. Waite is entering his 13th year at the helm of the Badgers and his 24th overall coaching at the Division I level. During his time at Wisconsin, Waite has become the winningest coach in Badgers history, both in number of wins and percentage, posting a 157-83 record in 12 years (.654) as well as boosting his career record to 538217. The fact that Waite is such a proven winner makes his coaching gospel to his players. “We all know he’s a proven winner and has had many wins at Wisconsin and really loves the program,” senior Janelle Gabrielsen said. “We all respect and listen to his coaching and take it in stride. He knows what happens inside and outside of volleyball, so his advice is always easy to take whether it’s on or off the court.” Players also thrive under the coaching style of Waite. It’s an approach that has earned Waite nine Coach of the Year honors in his career. “Coach is one of the calmest coaches I’ve ever had,” junior Alexis Mitchell said. “He tries to teach you to how to think for yourself and be smart on the court. He doesn’t want to hold your hand through everything, which made me mature faster as a player. He wants you to be adaptable to all the different situations of a game on your own. He does put pressure on the veterans to step up and lead the younger players.” “He always talks to you like you’re a human being,” Gabrielsen said. “He likes to set up individual meetings with players to let them know what’s going on and how they can help the team and how he can help us get better and improve. He spends a lot of time with us making sure that we’re happy. Waite acknowledges that with every situation and player a coach must constantly adapt his coaching for each individual. “I think you have to adjust to the personnel you have,” Waite said. “You have certain styles you like to keep as a coach, but with every player there are different skills and backgrounds, so your approach can never be the same.

It’s a player-friendly approach that Waite has kept throughout his time coaching. What has also made Waite successful is his push for his players to be generals on the floor themselves. “He looks at us (upperclassmen) to lead by example, as well as with words,” Gabrielsen said. “We try to be more vocal on the court and push our teammates more. He really wants us to create the atmosphere on the court we want at Wisconsin. After we do that, the younger players catch on and can lead with us.” “The upperclassmen have to lead the way with the challenges of training and practice,” Waite said. “The difficulties of the season and the Big Ten will be high. I think a year ago we lacked consistency of play, physical size and ball control. We took care of the size with some of incoming freshman class, but I’d say Gabrielsen and Mitchell are especially important for us this year. They posted the most court time last year, and they are both great athletes and competitors.” The dedication and leadership Waite expects from his team and his veterans is only outshined by what he expects from himself, as his commitment and dedication to his job is admired and joked about by his team. “We joke around a lot wondering if he’s ever at his house,” Mitchell said. “He might sleep at the Field House; otherwise, he wakes up at the crack of dawn to get there so early. He’s always available if we need to meet with him or watch film. He and our coaching staff are awesome, they always have everything set up for us and we can get in the gym early and work with them. They always have everything ready and prepared to help us succeed.” Waite and his Badgers will look to return to prominence this season, as the team has now gone three years without an NCAA tournament appearance. With a talented freshman class and a solid group of returnees, Waite knows that one of the biggest challenges for the success of the squad will be maintaining consistency. “With volleyball, you need to understand that this is a marathon; you have to sustain that level of high performance throughout a 30-plusgame season,” Waite said. “We start from the first couple days of preseason to start comparing players. Once you start the real competition, you find out who can play in the games rather than practice and what the roles of players will be. At the end, you have to put that puzzle together and hope there aren’t any pieces missing.”


The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Thankfully, Bucky starts strong against Rebels Elliot Hughes Hughe’s Your Daddy? Between the third and fourth quarters of Thursday night’s 51-17 butchery by Wisconsin unto Nevada-Las Vegas, when the obedient student section jumped around, turning the press box into a swing set, I sat there, enjoying the closest I’d ever come to an earthquake, thinking: “Tonight couldn’t get much better for the Badgers.” Total satisfaction is not something that always accompanies Wisconsin when playing humble nonconference teams. Sure, head coach Bret Bielema has never lost to a nonconference foe before, now 21-0, but many’s-a-time over the last few years the Badgers came away from

wins against lowly foreign opponents with some pretty big if’s and’s and but’s. Not totally true for this game. It all went according to plan. Here are some things that should happen when a team that ranks No. 10/11 meets one that CBSSports. com says is the 112th best in the country. 1) You score seven touchdowns on your first eight possessions and the only reason you don’t score eight is because you ran out of time at the end of the half and kicked a field goal anyway (Check). 2) The punter does not see the field until sometime after the secondstring quarterback and other reserves do (Check). 3) As you zip by defenders to accumulate six plays that go 20 yards or more, give the impression that the opposing defense is slow and stiff (Check). 4) Miscellaneous: keep the opposition out of the endzone until the second half (Check), commit zero

turnovers (Check), sack the opposing quarterback at least three times (Check), never allow your quarterback to be touched (Check), allow no more than one play of 20 yards or more (Check), do not allow the opponent to convert 25 percent of third downs (Check). Not to get too carried away, though, the game wasn’t a masterpiece. Penalties crept up (six), fourth down conversions were conceded (2-2), zero turnovers were forced and Bielema himself thought the tackling could’ve been better. But this game still went according to plan. UNLV never looked as if it were up to the task. And that was the opposite of a year ago, when things failed to go according to plan and Wisconsin didn’t look the part for a good amount of the non-conference season. In Las Vegas for the 2010 season opener, the Badgers (then ranked No. 12) pummeled the Rebels 4121 but lead by just 17-14 at half. In that game, UNLV

returned an interception for a touchdown and recovered a fumble inside its own 5-yard line to run it back 82 yards and set up another score. UW cleaned itself up in the second half, but overall, it was labeled as a sloppy beginning and the games that followed weren’t much better. Against unranked San Jose State, fumbles abounded and horrendous tackling reserved UW to a modest 27-14 win. That preceded a game versus Arizona State that was won by the thinnest of margins – a blocked PAT and a tackle at the 1-yard line. The Badgers put it together in a recordbreaking 70-3 win the next week, but that was against Austin Peay, a school with an enrollment one-fourth the size of Wisconsin’s. So kudos for that. But then came the Big Ten opener, where a strong and inspired Michigan State team dispatched Wisconsin “convincingly” – as head coach Mark

Dantonio will remind you – by a score of 34-24. You see, the point I’m trying to make is that it took a while for Wisconsin to reach its full potential last year. The Badgers beat the bad teams (despite sometimes playing down to their level), and when their first test arrived, they failed it and jeopardized a trip to Pasadena. Fortunately, the loss had its silver lining. The Badgers cut out the nonsense and played to their true potential after that game. Things went according to plan after that – except, of course, for the fact that UW lost in the Rose Bowl. Still, the point remains. Wisconsin played so well Thursday night it almost caught center Peter Konz by surprise, simply because it was the first game of the season. Montee Ball called the win “a lot” more satisfying than the 2010 season opener. Against these lessertalented teams, it’s obviously much more

about how the Badgers win rather than if they win. Last season, it took the Badgers a few weeks to patch up deficiencies, but on Thursday night, there were no red-alert complications. The Badgers simply looked better prepared and more focused than they did at the outset a year ago, which is all the more important. Wisconsin needs to be on a roll by the time Nebraska visits Madison. UW cannot be sitting like a lame duck after barely skirting by hapless opponents. The most important thing about Thursday: it went according to plan. And if Wisconsin continues to produce that, the results will get bigger each time. But hey, that is some quarterback they got, too, huh? Elliot is a junior majoring in journalism. Were you surprised at how well UW played Thursday? Tell him about it at ehughes@ badgerherald.com.

Early preseason thoughts on Badger men’s hockey third season with the Badgers, Thompson has yet to see any game action, sitting behind Gudmandson and Brett Bennett both seasons. Before walking on to Wisconsin, Thompson Kelly Erickson played in the Northern Erickson the Red Pacific Hockey League with the Bozeman Icedogs. In the 2008-09 It’s never too early to season, Thompson went talk hockey. 20-7 with a .906 save After spending about percentage and a 2.93 a month-and-a-half in goals-against average. Canada this summer, I There’s no doubt that have never been more Eaves is taking a risk excited for the hockey heading into the season season to start. with a class of untested From my personal goaltenders. Rumpel observations, it is no must overcome any first exaggeration to say year jitters and, like any Canadians are obsessed smart goalie, realize he’s with hockey. During my there to stop the puck. visit, their equivalent of ESPN always had at least one hockey-related story, and more often than not, Of Wisconsin’s top multiple stories. Being five goal scorers inundated with hockey for six weeks only made from last sesaon, me long for Oct. 7. So while Wisconsin’s only one of them season opener is still over is returning a month away, here is an early look at what to — and he’s a expect this season.

defenseman.

Inexperience in goal There are three goaltenders listed on the Badgers roster, and not a single one of them has seen time in a collegiate level game. Of the three, two — Joel Rumpel and Landon Peterson — are freshmen, while junior Mitch Thompson completes the trio. In an interview last November with Madison. com’s Andy Baggot, head coach Mike Eaves said he expects Rumpel to take the vacant No. 1 spot with Thompson at No. 2. That statement has not changed or been updated further in the last year. Last season, Rumpel minded net with the Pentiction Vees (BCHL) and finished the season with a .911 save percentage and a 2.53 goals-against average with an overall 27-12-3 record. The 6-foot3,190-pound freshman will have to catch on quick to fill in for Scott Gudmandson, who finished last season as one of the nation’s top 15 goalies with a .921 save percentage. Despite being in his

In light of the uncertainty that currently surrounds the goaltenders, Eaves told UWBadgers.com when Rumpel was signed that he is “going to jump right into the pipes and play immediately for us.” Let’s just hope Rumpel gains some confidence quickly. Offense needs new leaders Of Wisconsin’s top five goal scorers from last season, only one of them is returning — and he’s a defenseman. At the end of last season, both defensemen Justin Schultz and forward Craig Smith said they would be returning for their junior seasons. But in mid-July, Smith decided the time was right to move on to the National Hockey League with the Nashville Predators, leaving Schultz as the only Badger from last season to have scored doubledigit goals.

Although Schultz is one of the nation’s top defensemen, in a general sense, the forwards should be the ones carrying the offense. With Smith gone, there isn’t a clear leader among them. Unless the forwards improve drastically from last year or the freshmen step up, UW will have some issues. Of the top five returning forwards, only sophomore Mark Zengerle has more than 20 points with 36, but with only five goals. Sophomore Michael Mersch had the most goals of the returners from last season with eight goals and a total of 19 points. Last season, the 11 returning forwards combined for a total of 33 goals. The top five scorers scored a total of 78 goals, 18 of which came from Schultz. The stats are undoubtedly lopsided. Sure, turnover happens at a much faster rate in college hockey, where it’s rare for players to stay for all four years. Regardless, the forwards have no choice but to step up and produce many more points this season if they hope to stay competitive in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association. Schultz will make headlines, again Two seasons ago, the Badgers finished their season playing for a national title. While they were only runners-up that year, Wisconsin received something just as special: Blake Geoffrion brought home UW’s first Hobey Baker Award. Last year Wisconsin had another chance at the Hobey Baker as Schultz was named one of the 10 finalists. With his aforementioned 18 goals, Schultz scored the most goals by a defensemen in the league in eight seasons and was the only blueliner to be among the nation’s top 40 goal scorers. And he was only a sophomore at the time.

Returning for his junior year, Schultz will assist fellow defenseman John Ramage in captaining the team and add to his recordbreaking collegiate career. As the strongest returning player, all eyes are already on Schultz. With a Hobey Baker nomination last season and a teamleading 47 points, Schultz should pick up right where he left off. If he plays better than he did last season, there’s a solid chance he’ll be a finalist again. But don’t get expect him to bring home UW’s second Hobey Baker. The award traditionally falls in the hands of a forward. For Schultz to have the best chance possible at winning

it, the Badgers would also have to perform better as a team this year. Hockey season may still be several weeks away, but at least that’s enough time for the young Badger team to gain some confidence and hopefully turn this not-so-positive

outlook around. Kelly is a junior majoring in journalism. What are your fears or expectations for this hockey season? Let her know at kerickson@badgerherald. com or follow her on Twitter @ kellyerickson4.


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The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue


The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Time to stop overlooking Badgers cross country Ian McCue McCue’s View For a team that has won 12 (yes, you read that correctly) straight Big Ten titles, you would think that the Wisconsin men’s cross country team would carry a bigger name on campus. Football, basketball and hockey will undoubtedly remain the three staples of Wisconsin athletics, but it’s time to give some love to the cross country team. While Bret Bielema may be building a football powerhouse at Camp Randall and Bo Ryan’s swing offense will keep the basketball team amazingly consistent, it’s hard to find a more successful team on campus over the last decade than Mick Byrne’s

cross country squad. Last season, the Badgers finished in the top three at all six of their races and won half of them. And it’s not like this success is something new to the Wisconsin cross country program. The program holds 44 Big Ten titles (a conference record) and owns 29 of the last 34 Big Ten championships. For comparison, the beloved Badgers football team lays claim to 12 Big Ten titles ... in the last century. The cross country team’s high level of success is simply unheard of in sports. The closest competitor for all-time cross country titles in the Big Ten is Michigan State, with a respectable 14 championship titles — still 30 behind the leader. Not only is the UW cross country team collecting Big Ten titles, but they’re often blowing away the competition. In 2010, they won the Big Ten championship by an impressive 47

points. With four runners finishing in the top six of the race, it was yet another dominant performance by this unstoppable squad. At this point, it’s no longer fair to call the UW cross country team a “powerhouse” or a “premier program” — they are an outright dynasty. Despite coaching changes and revamped rosters, the cross country program has become a model of consistency. There’s no such thing as a “rebuilding year” or “transition year” with this team; they only have “let’s just do what we did last year” seasons. Just as Miami and Notre Dame dominated the college football landscape in the ‘80s, the Badgers have been one of the most dominant cross country teams of this decade. While their Big Ten performance is outstanding, Wisconsin’s success on the course is not confined to conference opponents.

Since 1999, the Badgers have finished in the top five at the NCAA Championships 11 times, including five second place finishes and a national title in 2005. The names of standout runners such as Elliot Krause, Landon Peacock and Maverick Darling may not be as well known as James White or Jordan Taylor, but they deserve the same level of respect. Running, especially during preseason workouts, is often seen as the most unappealing aspect of major sports, but this is what these guys live for. Instead of running to get in shape, they run for a sport. Sure, the Wisconsin football season picked up two Big Ten Player of the Year awards in a Rose Bowl year, but the men’s cross country team swept the awards last season. As in, they won all of them — Athlete of the Year, Coach of the Year and Freshman of the Year. It’s nearly impossible to find

another Badgers team that simply dominates their conference at both the individual and collective level in a similar manner. So what exactly is the point of me tossing around all these impressive numbers? To point out the lack of attention paid to some of the most successful student-athletes on campus. Jumping Around at Camp Randall and yelling ferociously at the Kohl Center is always fun, but students should also consider keeping tabs on the cross country team. Sure, chasing runners through a course might be less appealing than a game in the student section at Camp Randall, but it’s not fair to simply deny the cross country team’s unprecedented achievements. While Bucky’s Locker Room was loaded up with Rose Bowl gear and shirts proclaiming the Badgers’ Big Ten title last

winter, shirts advertising the cross country team’s Big Ten win were surprisingly absent. Such notice needs to be taken for a team that has performed at such a high level for such a long time. Currently ranked No. 3 nationally, you can expect UW’s squad to put in (another) great season in 2011. While it’s hard to top last year’s No. 3 finish at the NCAA Championships, Byrne’s team will no doubt put in another dominating season. The Badgers kick off their season at home on their Zimmer Championship Course this Friday, and it’s the perfect opportunity to watch history in the making. Come on, these guys deserve it. Ian is a junior majoring in journalism. Are you a fan of the men’s cross country team? Let him know at imccue@badgerherald. com and follow him on Twitter @imccue.

Rose Bowl memories never faded for determined UW Mike Fiammetta Sports Editor

As painful a memory as it remains, the Wisconsin Badgers’ two-point loss in the Rose Bowl has given them everything they have entering the 2011 season. New quarterback Russell Wilson chose Wisconsin over Auburn and his professional baseball career because, above all else, his best chance for winning football games is in Madison. The Badgers’ primetime schedule — UW will play in four of the Big Ten’s seven primetime matchups on ESPN this year — was made possible by the explosiveness of last year’s squad that won games by margins as large as 67, 63 and 47 points. Any national title aspirations — and depending on who you talk to, there are plenty — stem from the fact that despite losing the likes of J.J. Watt, Gabe Carimi, John Moffitt and John Clay to the National Football League, Wisconsin’s offense remains one of the nation’s most potent, and the defense returns six starters from last year’s No. 20 unit in total defense. Simply put, last year’s 21-19 loss to Texas Christian University in Pasadena won’t just be washed away by the waves of a new season — not by the team, not by the media and certainly not by Badger fans. For as steady and pragmatic a program as UW is, led by head coach Bret Bielema’s “1-0” philosophy, any destination that isn’t Pasadena or New Orleans (the site of this year’s BCS National Championship Game) will be viewed as a disappointment. “It’s definitely a reminder day in and day out,” safety Aaron Henry said of last year’s Rose Bowl loss. “But I just think with the guys that

we have, they didn’t lose sight of what happened last year. They’re focused on even bigger things now this year. It was definitely unfortunate what happened last year, but guys have been working nonstop to ensure that doesn’t happen again.” New quarterback leads the charge When Wilson officially became a Badger in what seemed more like a free agent transaction than collegiate transfer (He’s eligible to play immediately since he already earned his degree at North Carolina State), the buzz around UW immediately surged from Big Ten title favorite to potential national title contender. Wilson, listed at 5-foot11, 210 pounds, is a dualthreat quarterback with the kind of mobility that simply hasn’t been present in recent Badger quarterbacks. In three years as the starting Wolfpack quarterback, Wilson compiled 1,089 rushing yards (an average of 363 per season) and 17 touchdowns. For comparison, last year’s starting UW quarterback, Scott Tolzien, has -9 career rushing yards to his name. Of course, Wilson also excelled with his arm, throwing for 1,180 yards, 76 touchdowns and 26 interceptions at N.C. State. Wilson completed 57.8 percent of his passes and averaged just fewer than three touchdowns for every interception thrown. Clearly, Wilson was a player too enticing for the Badgers to pass over. Acquiring your starting quarterback the summer before he’s set to start is a rarity in college football, and for Wisconsin it’s nothing short of shocking. So far in fall camp, Wilson has been everything that’s been advertised, and he’s seamlessly made the transition into UW’s locker room. Along with

fellow seniors fullback Bradie Ewing, defensive tackle Patrick Butrym and Henry, Wilson was voted a captain by his teammates. Quarterbacks are typically synonymous with leadership and the responsibilities that come with the “captain” title, but naming someone who hasn’t played a single down for the team is still eye opening. “I’m blessed, more than anything,” Wilson said. “I’m excited to be a part of this, just to be a part of this team in general, whether I was a captain or not. I’m still going to lead, even if I wasn’t captain. I’m excited to be a part of that and something special.” For Bielema, Wilson’s acclimation into the locker room was the main obstacle. Since his addition in late June, there haven’t been many issues to worry about. “The maturity level that that young man has and the way he can process everything going on around him — whether it be schematically x’s and o’s, whether it be locker room chemistry, whether it be media chemistry — he’s got a pretty good handle on things,” Bielema said. Leadership still veteran, but changed Last year, Watt, Carimi and Moffitt, plus quarterback Scott Tolzien and safety Jay Valai, were UW’s undisputed leaders. Tolzien was calm, steady and led by example, while Valai could trash talk and lay the wood with the best of them. Carimi and Moffitt were unrivaled in their physical presence and natural ability along the offensive line, and Watt set the tone in regard to on-field production. This year, they’re all gone. So are middle linebacker Culmer St. Jean and tight end Lance Kendricks, two other players who aptly led their respective positions.

In naming four seniors captains this year, the Badgers clearly plan to follow whatever veteran experience they have. Henry might be the most talkative of the bunch, and his lingering memories of Pasadena alone seem sufficient to fuel UW this season. “It motivated us a ton [this fall], man,” Henry said of last year’s Rose Bowl loss. “You do everything you have to do during the season so that you will be placed in a huge game on a national level like that, but you come up a little bit short — it definitely leaves a sour taste in your mouth.” Ewing and Butrym, meanwhile, seems bound to carry the roles vacated by

Watt and Tolzien — quiet, but efficient and supremely productive. The 6-foot, 245-pound Ewing had arguably his finest season as a blocker in 2010, and he caught eight passes (the first of his career) for 82 yards and two touchdowns out of the backfield. Butrym started all 13 games and recorded 28 tackles (three for loss) and 2.5 sacks. Chances are the Badgers will find key contributions from some surprise candidate, a là Watt in 2010. But before that can become a priority, the Badgers’ four captains and the rest of their veteran leaders must lead the way. With Ohio State facing tremendous uncertainty

and Nebraska still awaiting its introduction to the conference, the Big Ten is up for grabs — right when there have never been more eager eyes watching to see how its 12 teams perform. For a program that seemingly grows closer every Saturday to turning the corner toward becoming a national power, nothing is more pressing than a return trip to Pasadena — or beyond. “Guys are just itching to get back to the promised land, wherever that may be.,” Henry said. “Hopefully it’s a huge, huge bowl game, but guys just want to get better each and every week. I think if we can do that, the sky’s definitely the limit.”


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The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

SCHEDULE

2011

9/1 vs. UNLV

9/24 vs. South Dakota

10/22 at Michigan State

11/12 at Minnesota

9/10 vs. Oregon State

10/1 vs. Nebraska

10/29 at Ohio State

11/19 at Illinois

9/17 vs. Northern Illinois

10/15 vs. Indiana

11/5 vs. Purdue

11/26 vs. Penn State

(Soldier Field)

WISCONSIN FOOTBALL

C11

(Homecoming)

DEPTH CHART Shelton Johnson

SS

FS Kevin Claxton

Chris Borland

Mike Taylor

OLB

MLB

OLB

KEY RESERVES

Aaron Henry

Devin Smith

Louis Nzegwu

Patrick Butrym

Ethan Hemer

David Gilbert

Antonio Fenelus

CB

DE

DT

DT

DE

CB

WR

LT

LG

C

RG

RT

WR

Nick Toon

Ricky Wagner

Travis Frederick

Peter Konz

Kevin Zeitler

Josh Oglesby

Jared Abbrederis

HB

Montee Ball James White

Kyle French

P

Brad Nortman

DT Jordan Kohout LB Ethan Armstrong S Dezmen Southward CB Marcus Cromartie

Jacob Pedersen

QB Russell Wilson

TE

K

RB Melvin Gordon WR Manasseh Garner OL Ryan Groy TE Jake Byrne

FB Bradie Ewing

PREVIEW

Despite losing several leaders and valuable contributors on both sides of the ball, the Badgers are primed for another strong year atop the new-look Big Ten.

Megan McCormick The Badger Herald photo

Alex Laedtke The Badger Herald Design

For Ball, White, rivalry still friendly Kelly Erickson Associate Sports Editor Wisconsin football is mainly known for three things: offensive linemen, tight ends and running backs. Between one 1,000-yard rusher and one four-yards-shy-of-being-a-1,000-yard rusher, James White and Montee Ball are ready to pick up where they left off last season. Entering the much anticipated 2011 season, White and Ball present a dual threat in the backfield that only helps to fuel the expectations surrounding the talented Badger squad. As a true freshman last season, White finished as Wisconsin’s leading rusher with 1,052 yards on 156 carries. Ball didn’t really emerge until after John Clay was sidelined due to injury. With considerably more carries through the second half of the season, Ball finished with 163 carries for 996 yards — disappointingly yard mark. four yards shortt of the 1,000 1,000thing clear If they’ve made one that they’re this offseason, itt is the fact out last forgetting about season. “I want to actually break d mark instead that 1,000-yard rds shy,” Ball of being four yards said. “Basically we’re just forgetting n because you about last season g is know nothing this guaranteed season, so we need to makee o sure we come to each practice and work hard, harder than we did last year because we know it’s going to ong pay off in the long run.” ll and One way Ball ng the White are helping

team work hard and make the running backs even better is by creating some friendly competition between the two of them. Rivalries always make for great games, but a friendly rivalry within the team pushes both Ball and White to be better, to fight for more carries and to ultimately move the ball down the field farther. “We’ve been saying the healthy competition that we have, that [running backs coach Thomas] Hammock keeps trusting us to have, basically that means that if [White] starts a series off and has a long break, I’m going to congratulate him, but you know I want to do even better than that when I go in, and vice versa,” Ball said. “If I have a long break, he’s going to want to have a longer one, a better one, a better move and all that stuff. It’s only going to better the team.” “I think they’re pretty good friends, but at the same time I can definitely see how important it is to them to be out there carrying the ball or catching the ball, or out there in key situations during the season that are going to come up,” Hammock said. “They have a good friendly rivalry.” In a season op opener that let UW’s overall talent shine, Ball and White White’s rivalry helped them show the nation why they’re one o of the top running back duos in the nation. With 11 carries ca for 64 yards, White scored one touchdown. Ball, with one less carry, also had one wit a net gain of 63 yards on the night. less yard with With three rushing ru touchdowns and one through the air, Ball gave one of the many outstanding performan performances in the UNLV win. While Ball had the initial start, the two switched off throug throughout the game, pushing each other to do be better with each carry. In Individually, both Ball and White have tak taken strides this summer to better their g games. By becoming stronger and more competitive in a personal sense, they’ve created a greater rivalry, as well. Once spring camp opened, news of Ball shedding some weight to help better his game was all over town. Ball believes he’s not only speedier at 210 pou pounds (down from 225), but also that he

will remain the power running back that he was through his first two years. “No matter how much you weigh, you’re going to still try to play physical, you’re still going to try to play hard, you’re still going to try to play the game the right way,” Hammock said. “I think if you look at [Ball] and the way he’s practiced, he’s practicing a little more explosive, a little more powerful.” Ball also noted the small change in his play, with crisper cuts and a faster pace. “I know with losing weight, my cuts will be a lot better and I’ll have more speed and I can have a lot more carries,” Ball said. “I know that will better the team.” While Ball’s weight loss was making news, White was also revising his game. White exploded onto the scene last year as a breath of fresh air in a running back corps traditionally renowned for its power. He brought speed and a new dynamic to the Badger running game, despite the fact that he was significantly smaller than his predecessors at Wisconsin. “For me, it was strengthening my legs,” White said of his key offseason changes. “Last year, I probably didn’t run between the tackles as hard as I probably wanted to. For me, it’s getting in the squat rack and getting my legs even stronger than before to help my running game, pass blocking and my cuts.” With their personal changes in tow, the duo are mainly attempting to better the team, while simultaneously fighting for that No. 1 spot on the depth chart — which they currently share. While the season is barely under way, Hammock is confident the strides the two have taken throughout the offseason, as well as the rivalry they’ve fostered, will only help them take their competition to a higher level. “I think they’re doing it,” Hammock said. “It’s important to them. They want to be successful. I think it’s on them. Those are the guys that are out here working every day. I think they’re really taking the right approach and the right mindset to go about helping this team win.” While they’ll tell you nothing is guaranteed and they’re only taking the season at a one-day-at-a-time pass, there’s no doubt Ball and White are aiming for the top of college football. “Last year we didn’t get that victory. This year we’re going to try and get that victory, maybe even go to an even bigger bowl,” White said. “We’re just out here trying to get ‘W’s each and every week.”

Top 2 linebackers finally share field Elliot Hughes Sports Content Editor You would almost start to think that certain stars have to align in order for Wisconsin linebackers Chris Borland and Mike Taylor to see the field together. Taylor, a redshirt junior, and Borland, a sophomore who received a medical redshirt in 2010, have been standout defenders for the Badgers for the past two seasons, yet before last Thursday’s game versus UNLV, their mutual health had never lasted more than six plays as starting linebackers. The luckless medical history of Borland and Taylor is such an anomaly that when asked before the 2011 season opener how eager he is for the two defensemen to enjoy playing a full season together, head coach Bret Bielema responded with a more modest aspiration. “Well I’d love for a full game first,” he said. “Full practice and then a full game.” Their playing time has always been defined by injuries, starting from the beginning in 2009, when both made considerable impressions as rookies. Then a redshirt freshman, Taylor started ahead of Borland, then a true frosh himself, for the first seven games at outside linebacker before tearing the anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee in the seventh game of the season. By that time, Taylor had already established himself as a preeminent member of the Wisconsin defense. He led the Badgers with 46 tackles and had accumulated 6.5 tackles for loss, an interception and a forced fumble by the time of his injury. But the void left by Taylor was quickly filled by Borland, who, in just six games as a starter, flashed numbers bright enough to earn him recognition as the Big Ten Freshman of the Year. He finished the season with 36 tackles, 10.5 for loss, five sacks, five forced fumbles and three fumble recoveries. With Taylor expected to make a steady recovery in time for the following 2010 season, Wisconsin appeared to have a well-fortified linebacking corps for a few years to come. But again, injuries had the two playing tag-team.

Borland started the season opener — registering five tackles and a sack — while Taylor looked on from the sidelines, his right knee nearly healed. But Borland also injured his left shoulder in the opener, so a week later the two flipped positions; Taylor finally made his return from a season-ending knee injury while Borland nursed his shoulder. The third week of the season saw Borland and Taylor pair up as starting linebackers for the first time, but it lasted just six defensive snaps. Borland aggravated the left-shoulder injury, inflicting more damage, and was subsequently shut down for the year with a medical redshirt. Still slowed by his serious knee injury the year before, Taylor did manage to play out the 2010 season, absorbing a smaller injury to his left knee along the way. He finished second on the team in tackles for loss on his way to earning consensus honorable mention All-Big Ten accolades. And now in a young 2011 season, Borland and Taylor again swapped places from where they were a year ago. It is Borland coming off the season-ending injury, and it is Taylor who is coming off a season met with recognition. With Borland’s move to middle linebacker and his rehabilitation in the offseason, the two linebackers can now go back to looking forward to wrapping up running backs together. “[I’m] really eager,” Taylor said, with a grinning Borland peering around from behind his teammate to listen. “It’s something I’ve been looking forward to the past few years; it got cut short last year. When we’re both on the field we just have a tremendous amount of trust. We love playing with each other.” Against UNLV, the two linebackers led the way for defense. Borland had a team-best seven tackles while Taylor tied for second with six. But as much as the Wisconsin coaching staff is looking forward to naming the oft-injured linebackers to the starting lineup week in and week out, caution still reigns over all else. Over the course of the offseason, it was still a rare day when the two played with each other during team drills. Borland was inactive in the spring and has been in and out of team scrimmages this fall. As a precaution, all players with past ACL injuries are

exempt from scrimmages during the second practice of two-a-days, and that included Taylor, who is about a yearand-a-half removed from his own. He also missed three consecutive practices at one point when soreness in his knee arose. Despite that, however, in an interview before the UNLV opener, Taylor said he’s the healthiest he’s been in quite a while, estimating his full health at 90-95 percent after spending last season between 80-85 on average. Throughout August, Bielema detailed the cautious approach to reinstating Borland to full contact, even likening the process to those reserved for serious knee injuries. That approach also included lessons on avoiding reckless tackling. The slow return to the game has tested the patience of Borland, but he knows it’s paid off. “It’s been frustrating, but I think it’s a smart play,” Borland said. “I mean, it’s worked out, I’m feeling good. But at the same time I’ve gotten enough reps to get back into the swing of things from the football aspect, so all is well right now.” Borland’s return isn’t notable for just his skill and past success at the position alone, but also because of the ripple effect it’s had on the rest of UW’s defense. After the 10th day of practice at fall camp, Bielema said that, upon watching tape of a full contact scrimmage, he noticed the defense played better with Borland on the field and even singled out Taylor as someone who “played faster.” Fifth-year senior and co-captain Aaron Henry, who plays just a few yards behind Borland and Taylor at free safety, agreed with his head coach’s assessment. “Guys are just crisper,” Henry said. “It’s just faster, we get the adjustments faster. Guys are just going out there, flying to ball faster — it’s kind of like a race to the football when he’s out there.” Collectively, and for the second year in a row, it’s back to square one for Borland and Taylor: maintaining health. Should they accomplish that, the rest will take care of itself. The sky is the limit but it’s going to take a lot of work,” Borland said. “We’re not nearly there yet … and we got a lot of work to do but, same old. We continue to improve every day, ready to do something special.”


C10

The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

SCHEDULE

2011

9/1 vs. UNLV

9/24 vs. South Dakota

10/22 at Michigan State

11/12 at Minnesota

9/10 vs. Oregon State

10/1 vs. Nebraska

10/29 at Ohio State

11/19 at Illinois

9/17 vs. Northern Illinois

10/15 vs. Indiana

11/5 vs. Purdue

11/26 vs. Penn State

(Soldier Field)

WISCONSIN FOOTBALL

C11

(Homecoming)

DEPTH CHART Shelton Johnson

SS

FS Kevin Claxton

Chris Borland

Mike Taylor

OLB

MLB

OLB

KEY RESERVES

Aaron Henry

Devin Smith

Louis Nzegwu

Patrick Butrym

Ethan Hemer

David Gilbert

Antonio Fenelus

CB

DE

DT

DT

DE

CB

WR

LT

LG

C

RG

RT

WR

Nick Toon

Ricky Wagner

Travis Frederick

Peter Konz

Kevin Zeitler

Josh Oglesby

Jared Abbrederis

HB

Montee Ball James White

Kyle French

P

Brad Nortman

DT Jordan Kohout LB Ethan Armstrong S Dezmen Southward CB Marcus Cromartie

Jacob Pedersen

QB Russell Wilson

TE

K

RB Melvin Gordon WR Manasseh Garner OL Ryan Groy TE Jake Byrne

FB Bradie Ewing

PREVIEW

Despite losing several leaders and valuable contributors on both sides of the ball, the Badgers are primed for another strong year atop the new-look Big Ten.

Megan McCormick The Badger Herald photo

Alex Laedtke The Badger Herald Design

For Ball, White, rivalry still friendly Kelly Erickson Associate Sports Editor Wisconsin football is mainly known for three things: offensive linemen, tight ends and running backs. Between one 1,000-yard rusher and one four-yards-shy-of-being-a-1,000-yard rusher, James White and Montee Ball are ready to pick up where they left off last season. Entering the much anticipated 2011 season, White and Ball present a dual threat in the backfield that only helps to fuel the expectations surrounding the talented Badger squad. As a true freshman last season, White finished as Wisconsin’s leading rusher with 1,052 yards on 156 carries. Ball didn’t really emerge until after John Clay was sidelined due to injury. With considerably more carries through the second half of the season, Ball finished with 163 carries for 996 yards — disappointingly yard mark. four yards shortt of the 1,000 1,000thing clear If they’ve made one that they’re this offseason, itt is the fact out last forgetting about season. “I want to actually break d mark that 1,000-yard instead rds shy,” of being four yards Ball said. “Basically we’re just forgetting n because about last season you g is know nothing guaranteed this season, so we need to makee o sure we come to each practice and work hard, harder than we did last year because we know it’s going to ong pay off in the long run.” ll and One way Ball ng the White are helping

team work hard and make the running backs even better is by creating some friendly competition between the two of them. Rivalries always make for great games, but a friendly rivalry within the team pushes both Ball and White to be better, to fight for more carries and to ultimately move the ball down the field farther. “We’ve been saying the healthy competition that we have, that [running backs coach Thomas] Hammock keeps trusting us to have, basically that means that if [White] starts a series off and has a long break, I’m going to congratulate him, but you know I want to do even better than that when I go in, and vice versa,” Ball said. “If I have a long break, he’s going to want to have a longer one, a better one, a better move and all that stuff. It’s only going to better the team.” “I think they’re pretty good friends, but at the same time I can definitely see how important it is to them to be out there carrying the ball or catching the ball, or out there in key situations during the season that are going to come up,” Hammock said. “They have a good friendly rivalry.” In a season op opener that let UW’s overall talent shine, Ball and White White’s rivalry helped them show the nation why they’re one o of the top running back duos in the nation. With 11 carries ca for 64 yards, White scored one touchdown. Ball, with one less carry, also had one less yard wit with a net gain of 63 yards on the night. With three rushing ru touchdowns and one through the air, Ball gave one of the many outstanding performan performances in the UNLV win. While Ball had the initial start, the two switched off throug throughout the game, pushing each other to do be better with each carry. In Individually, both Ball and White have tak taken strides this summer to better their g games. By becoming stronger and more competitive in a personal sense, they’ve created a greater rivalry, as well. Once spring camp opened, news of Ball shedding some weight to help better his game was all over town. Ball believes he’s not only speedier at 210 pou pounds (down from 225), but also that he

will remain the power running back that he was through his first two years. “No matter how much you weigh, you’re going to still try to play physical, you’re still going to try to play hard, you’re still going to try to play the game the right way,” Hammock said. “I think if you look at [Ball] and the way he’s practiced, he’s practicing a little more explosive, a little more powerful.” Ball also noted the small change in his play, with crisper cuts and a faster pace. “I know with losing weight, my cuts will be a lot better and I’ll have more speed and I can have a lot more carries,” Ball said. “I know that will better the team.” While Ball’s weight loss was making news, White was also revising his game. White exploded onto the scene last year as a breath of fresh air in a running back corps traditionally renowned for its power. He brought speed and a new dynamic to the Badger running game, despite the fact that he was significantly smaller than his predecessors at Wisconsin. “For me, it was strengthening my legs,” White said of his key offseason changes. “Last year, I probably didn’t run between the tackles as hard as I probably wanted to. For me, it’s getting in the squat rack and getting my legs even stronger than before to help my running game, pass blocking and my cuts.” With their personal changes in tow, the duo are mainly attempting to better the team, while simultaneously fighting for that No. 1 spot on the depth chart — which they currently share. While the season is barely under way, Hammock is confident the strides the two have taken throughout the offseason, as well as the rivalry they’ve fostered, will only help them take their competition to a higher level. “I think they’re doing it,” Hammock said. “It’s important to them. They want to be successful. I think it’s on them. Those are the guys that are out here working every day. I think they’re really taking the right approach and the right mindset to go about helping this team win.” While they’ll tell you nothing is guaranteed and they’re only taking the season at a one-day-at-a-time pass, there’s no doubt Ball and White are aiming for the top of college football. “Last year we didn’t get that victory. This year we’re going to try and get that victory, maybe even go to an even bigger bowl,” White said. “We’re just out here trying to get ‘W’s each and every week.”

Top 2 linebackers finally share field Elliot Hughes Sports Content Editor You would almost start to think that certain stars have to align in order for Wisconsin linebackers Chris Borland and Mike Taylor to see the field together. Taylor, a redshirt junior, and Borland, a sophomore who received a medical redshirt in 2010, have been standout defenders for the Badgers for the past two seasons, yet before last Thursday’s game versus UNLV, their mutual health had never lasted more than six plays as starting linebackers. The luckless medical history of Borland and Taylor is such an anomaly that when asked before the 2011 season opener how eager he is for the two defensemen to enjoy playing a full season together, head coach Bret Bielema responded with a more modest aspiration. “Well I’d love for a full game first,” he said. “Full practice and then a full game.” Their playing time has always been defined by injuries, starting from the beginning in 2009, when both made considerable impressions as rookies. Then a redshirt freshman, Taylor started ahead of Borland, then a true frosh himself, for the first seven games at outside linebacker before tearing the anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee in the seventh game of the season. By that time, Taylor had already established himself as a preeminent member of the Wisconsin defense. He led the Badgers with 46 tackles and had accumulated 6.5 tackles for loss, an interception and a forced fumble by the time of his injury. But the void left by Taylor was quickly filled by Borland, who, in just six games as a starter, flashed numbers bright enough to earn him recognition as the Big Ten Freshman of the Year. He finished the season with 36 tackles, 10.5 for loss, five sacks, five forced fumbles and three fumble recoveries. With Taylor expected to make a steady recovery in time for the following 2010 season, Wisconsin appeared to have a well-fortified linebacking corps for a few years to come. But again, injuries had the two playing tag-team.

Borland started the season opener — registering five tackles and a sack — while Taylor looked on from the sidelines, his right knee nearly healed. But Borland also injured his left shoulder in the opener, so a week later the two flipped positions; Taylor finally made his return from a season-ending knee injury while Borland nursed his shoulder. The third week of the season saw Borland and Taylor pair up as starting linebackers for the first time, but it lasted just six defensive snaps. Borland aggravated the left-shoulder injury, inflicting more damage, and was subsequently shut down for the year with a medical redshirt. Still slowed by his serious knee injury the year before, Taylor did manage to play out the 2010 season, absorbing a smaller injury to his left knee along the way. He finished second on the team in tackles for loss on his way to earning consensus honorable mention All-Big Ten accolades. And now in a young 2011 season, Borland and Taylor again swapped places from where they were a year ago. It is Borland coming off the season-ending injury, and it is Taylor who is coming off a season met with recognition. With Borland’s move to middle linebacker and his rehabilitation in the offseason, the two linebackers can now go back to looking forward to wrapping up running backs together. “[I’m] really eager,” Taylor said, with a grinning Borland peering around from behind his teammate to listen. “It’s something I’ve been looking forward to the past few years; it got cut short last year. When we’re both on the field we just have a tremendous amount of trust. We love playing with each other.” Against UNLV, the two linebackers led the way for defense. Borland had a team-best seven tackles while Taylor tied for second with six. But as much as the Wisconsin coaching staff is looking forward to naming the oft-injured linebackers to the starting lineup week in and week out, caution still reigns over all else. Over the course of the offseason, it was still a rare day when the two played with each other during team drills. Borland was inactive in the spring and has been in and out of team scrimmages this fall. As a precaution, all players with past ACL injuries are

exempt from scrimmages during the second practice of two-a-days, and that included Taylor, who is about a yearand-a-half removed from his own. He also missed three consecutive practices at one point when soreness in his knee arose. Despite that, however, in an interview before the UNLV opener, Taylor said he’s the healthiest he’s been in quite a while, estimating his full health at 90-95 percent after spending last season between 80-85 on average. Throughout August, Bielema detailed the cautious approach to reinstating Borland to full contact, even likening the process to those reserved for serious knee injuries. That approach also included lessons on avoiding reckless tackling. The slow return to the game has tested the patience of Borland, but he knows it’s paid off. “It’s been frustrating, but I think it’s a smart play,” Borland said. “I mean, it’s worked out, I’m feeling good. But at the same time I’ve gotten enough reps to get back into the swing of things from the football aspect, so all is well right now.” Borland’s return isn’t notable for just his skill and past success at the position alone, but also because of the ripple effect it’s had on the rest of UW’s defense. After the 10th day of practice at fall camp, Bielema said that, upon watching tape of a full contact scrimmage, he noticed the defense played better with Borland on the field and even singled out Taylor as someone who “played faster.” Fifth-year senior and co-captain Aaron Henry, who plays just a few yards behind Borland and Taylor at free safety, agreed with his head coach’s assessment. “Guys are just crisper,” Henry said. “It’s just faster, we get the adjustments faster. Guys are just going out there, flying to ball faster — it’s kind of like a race to the football when he’s out there.” Collectively, and for the second year in a row, it’s back to square one for Borland and Taylor: maintaining health. Should they accomplish that, the rest will take care of itself. The sky is the limit but it’s going to take a lot of work,” Borland said. “We’re not nearly there yet … and we got a lot of work to do but, same old. We continue to improve every day, ready to do something special.”


Gridiron Nation Editor: Brett Sommers | sports@badgerherald.com

C12

The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

THIS WEEK'S TOP GAMES No. 12 S. Carolina at No. 19 Georgia

No. 2 Alabama at Penn State

Sat., Sept. 10 • 3:30 p.m.

Sat., Sept. 10 • 2:30 p.m. A rematch of last season’s week two encounter. The biggest difference is location, with this contest being played in Happy Valley. Perhaps Penn State can solidify itself in the rankings with an early season upset.

A very intriguing SEC matchup and a perfect opportunity to watch SC sophmore running back, Marcus Lattimore. Lattimore had a monster game with 182 yards on the ground last year against the Bulldogs.

No. 16 Notre Dame at Michigan Sat., Sept. 10 • 7 p.m. A rivalry game between Notre Dame and the Wolverines at the Big House! Michigan won on the road last year in South Bend. With what looks to be a reemerging program, maybe Notre Dame can return the favor.

NUMBER OF THE WEEK

14 The number of NCAA Division 1-A football prgrams currently under investigation by the NCAA for either player recruitment or improper benefit violations. Ten of the 14 teams were in the preseason top-25 polls.

NATIONAL RANKINGS Associated Press Top 25 1. Oklahoma 2. Alabama 3. Oregon 4. LSU 5. Boise State 6. Florida State 7. Stanford 8. Texas A&M 9. Oklahoma St. 10. Nebraska 11. Wisconsin 12. S. Carolina 13. Va. Tech

14. TCU 15. Arkansas 16. Notre Dame 17. Michigan St. 18. Ohio State 19. Georgia 20. Miss. State 21. Missouri 22. Florida 23. Auburn 24. W. Virgina 25. USC

PLAYERS TO WATCH

USA Today Top 25 1. Oklahoma 2. Alabama 3. Oregon 4. LSU 5. Florida State 6. Stanford 7. Boise State 8. Oklahoma St. 9. Texas A&M 10. Wisconsin 11. Nebraska 12. S. Carolina 13. Va. Tech

STANDINGS ACC

Atlantic

Montee Ball and James White Running Backs, Wisconsin Ball and White are both on various Heisman Watch lists. With the departure of John Clay, can both Ball and White get enough carries to top 1,500 yards this season? If they can , another trip to Pasadena could be in the cards.

Team Clemson BC FSU WF N.C. St. Maryland

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Team Ga. Tech Va. Tech Miami UNC Duke Virginia

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Team Cinc. Pitt WVU Rutgers UConn S. Florida Louisville Syracuse

The Gators underachieved in Urban Meyer’s final season. Muschamp will bring new energy to the program, as Florida attempts to make the uphill climb back to the top of the SEC.

KEY RETURNEE Andrew Luck, QB Stanford Luck already would have been the No. 1 pick in the 2010 NFL Draft had he not elected to forgo the draft. Now he has a shot to run away with the Heisman, and he is still only a redshirt junior!

HEISMAN HOPEFULS 1. Andrew Luck, QB, Stanford ‘10: 3,338 yards, 32 TDs 2. Marcus Lattimore, RB, S.C. ‘10: 1,197 yards, 17 TDs 3. Justin Blackmon, WR, Ok St ‘10: 111 rec., 1,782 yards, 20 TDs 4. LaMichael James, RB, Ore. ‘10: 1,731 yards, 21 TDs 5. Kellen Moore, QB, Boise St. ‘10: 3,385 yards, 35 TDs

CONFERENCE POWER RANKINGS

1.

SEC — Eight SEC teams were in the preseason Top25 polls. If the SEC is that talented, losses all around may be what keeps the SEC from winning its sixth straight national title.

2.

Big XII — The newlook Big XII lost one of its perennial powerhouses in Nebraska, but still boasts national championship potential with No. 1 Oklahoma and two other Top-10 teams, OK State and Texas A&M.

3.

Big Ten — Any argument that the Big Ten is on par with the SEC ended last year when the Big Ten went 3-5 in bowl games. The addition of Nebraska will help strengthen the conference, and so would a title.

4.

Pac 12 — The Pacific Conference got a facelift with two new members, but didn’t improve much as a whole. Despite very good Oregon and Stanford teams, the rest of the Pac-12 is quite average.

5.

ACC — Florida State is definitely the crown jewel of the ACC and could bring some respectability back to the conference if the Seminoles can live up to expectations.

LSU starting quarterback Jordan Jefferson and reserve linebacker Joshua Johns released on bail from East Baton Rouge Parish Prison.

Storylines abound on, off field for college football Despite scandal-filled offseason, Florida State, Luck, Lattimore make season worth watching Brett Sommers Statistics Editor The college football season, just under way, is probably a breath of fresh air to student athletes, coaches and fans all across the country. And it’s not just your everyday run-of-the-mill oxygen; it has the healing powers of the grade-A stuff found in hyperbaric chambers. The season will hopefully numb the pain that so many top-flight programs across the country have been feeling for quite some time, even if it’s just a temporary fix. The headlines have ranged from the typical improper benefit allegations — which seem all too common in college football these days — to recruiting violations of past and current players and the severe, violent acts committed by players who forgot they were jeopardizing everything they have because of their actions. No one saw the fall of Ohio State and one of the best coaches in college football, Jim Tressel, coming. Many thought that ship had sailed with the Buckeyes victory over Arkansas in the Allstate Sugar Bowl. Butch Davis had an intensely talented squad as North Carolina headed into last year that was heaped with expectations. But after all the turmoil of an NCAA investigation, the program fell flat on its face and Davis was out of a job. Auburn is probably chewing its fingernails in nervous anticipation, constantly wondering how long it will be before they are asked to rescind their national championship trophy that has yet to gather any dust. In July, a New York Times report confirmed that the NCAA is still investigating the recruitment of Heisman winner and new Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton. It seems hard to find a program with a wealth of success that doesn’t have investigators hounding every little crevice for evidence of wrongdoing. Yet

the recent developments at LSU are just plain stupid. You have a team’s starting quarterback, Jordan Jefferson, allegedly kicking a fallen individual in the head after a bar fight. He has been suspended, but head coach Les Miles talks as if this is no big deal and Jefferson’s suspension is a meditation exercise and can’t wait to have him back. Of those detrimental stories that dotted the landscape of college football throughout the offseason, none were quite as bizarre as what happened at Toomer’s Corner, the site of Auburn celebrations where fans decorate the landmark oak trees with toilet paper. Harvey Updyke — or Al from Dadeville, whichever you prefer — justified his decision to poison the legendary trees with his love for Alabama and hate of Auburn. While everyone has their favorite teams, that may be where Updyke got it wrong. He forgot that he and many others love college football, and without rival teams, the sport’s excitement would be greatly diminished. So to get over all the negativity in the air, actual football is what everyone has to focus on. The offseason is over, the games have begun and the ultimate quest for an NCAA football championship is finally underway. The NCAA can impose all the sanctions it wants, players can be suspended, coaches can be fired and teams like USC can be banned from post-season play even though the team is ranked in the Top-25. But football will still be played on Saturdays and it’s up to the players and coaches who take the field to make all the problems go away — at least for a little while. Saturdays will be the BandAids for everyone who loves college football, and despite all the problems in college football today, there is a lot to look forward to this season. Here are several of the can’t-miss moments to come. Saturday, Oct. 1 is going to be crazy. The Cornhuskers of Nebraska will invade Camp Randall Stadium to take on the Badgers, forming the first matchup of these two programs since 1974. It is the Big Ten conference opener for both teams, and it will be under the lights. The contest is a possible preview of the first-ever

Big Ten conference championship game and the outcome will play a huge role in both teams’ quests for a parade of roses, or maybe even more. Andrew Luck has NFL teams drooling over the prospect of drafting him No. 1 in next year’s draft. Now it’s doubtful that a team would actually tank to get Luck, but it’s even less likely considering he is a redshirt junior and could abstain from the draft again, if he so chooses. It is quite exciting to think that arguably the best player in college football could play in 2012 as well. Luck is definitely worth watching every chance you get. Florida State is an intriguing team. Jimbo Fisher did a phenomenal job in his first year after replacing coaching legend Bobby Bowden. The Seminoles began the season ranked No. 6 in the AP poll and have a real shot to do something special and deliver themselves from obscurity for the better part of the decade. Look for Marcus Lattimore to be headed to New York City for the Heisman Trophy presentation at the end of the season. Coming off a unanimous selection as national Freshman of the Year, Lattimore has everything it takes to be the most outstanding player in college football. An extremely powerful 232-pound back, Lattimore should continue to punish SEC defenders all season. Finally, as college football fans, please hope for the best for Toomer’s Corner. Madison may seem far-removed from the Auburn campus, but to intentionally kill a living landmark out of hate for another team is beyond extreme. Sticking to the traditional taunts and derogatory chants would hopefully be enough to enjoy ridiculing a rival school. While recovery chances for the trees remains small, if the oaks can turn the corner so might the problems of college football. While the preceding highlight reel is brief, it is composed of great story lines for this season that should instill joy and excitement back into college football and finally put a rather dismal offseason to rest. And if you aren’t feeling better yet, then you might be as deranged as Al from Dadeville.

QUICK HITS Big XII With Less Than 10?

1 2

The Big XII Conference is shifting once again, and so might the rest of college football. Texas A&M officially declared its desire to leave the Big XII by July 2012 and join the SEC or another league that would accept it. A&M may be the first piece of a major puzzle about to change one more time. The Big XII said it will pursue a replacement for Texas A&M.

More Behind Bars...? The arrests of LSU starting quarterback Jordan Jefferson and reserve linebacker Joshua Johns may just be the tip of one nasty iceberg for Louisiana State University. The lawyer of the four men injured in the brawl outside Shady’s Bar says he expects more players to be arrested in the case.

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Overall 1-0 1-0 0-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0

BIG TEN

Photo courtesy of Associated Press

As the No, 1 overall recruit coming out of high school, Clowney will be watched closely across the country. A menace to quarterbacks, Clowney recorded 29.5 sacks his senior year of high school.

Overall 1-0 1-0 0-0 1-0 0-1 1-0

BIG EAST

Will Muschamp Head Coach, Florida

Jadeveon Clowney, DE South Carolina

Overall 1-0 0-1 1-0 0-1 1-0 0-0

Coastal

NEW FACES

FRESHMAN FOCUS

14. Arkansas 15. TCU 16. Ohio State 17. Michigan St. 18. Notre Dame 19. Auburn 20. Miss. State 21. Missouri 22. Georgia 23. Florida 24. Texas 25. Penn State

Leaders Team Illinois Indiana Ohio St. Penn St. Purdue Wisconsin

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Overall 1-0 0-1 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0

Legends Team Iowa Michigan Mich. St. Minn. Nebraska NU

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Overall 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-1 1-0 1-0

PAC-12 North Team California Oregon Oregon St Stanford Wash. Wash. St.

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Team Arizona AZ St. Colorado UCLA USC Utah

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Overall 1-0 0-1 0-1 1-0 1-0 1-0

South Overall 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 1-0 1-0

BIG XII Team Baylor Iowa St. Kansas Kansas St. Missouri OU OK St. Texas A&M TTU

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Overall 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-0 1-0

SEC East Team Florida Georgia Tenn. Kentucky S Carolina Vandy

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Team Alabama LSU Ole Miss Arkansas Auburn Miss St.

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Overall 1-0 0-1 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0

West Overall 1-0 0-1 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0

*Standings are as of press time 5 p.m. Sunday.

RETURNING 2010 STAT LEADERS Quarterback Rating 1. Kellen Moore, Boise State 2. Andrew Luck, Stanford 3. Bryant Moniz, Hawaii 4. Dan Persa, Northwestern 5. Chandler Harnish, NIU

182.6 170.2 159.1 159.0 157.8

Rushing Yards 1. LaMichael James, Oregon 2. Denard Robinson, Mich. 3. Bobby Rainey, WKU 4. Lance Dunbar, UNT 5. Ronnie Hillman, SDSU

1,731 1,702 1,649 1,553 1,532

Receiving Yards 1. Justin Blackmon, OK St. 2. Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma 3. Alshon Jeffrey, S.C. 4. Jordan White, WMU 5. Juron Criner, Arizona

1,782 1,622 1,517 1,378 1,233

Sacks 1. Bruce Irvin, West Virginia 2. Brandon Jenkins, FSU 3. Jonathan Massaquoi, Troy 4. Vinny Curry, Marshall 5. Logan Harrell, Fresno St.

14.0 13.5 13.5 12.0 10.5


The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Purdue escapes with blocked kick WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP)-- Just a few inches prevented Middle Tennessee from grasping the big-time win it has coveted. The Blue Raiders trailed Purdue 27-24 in the final seconds Saturday when Logan Kilgore launched a deep pass to Malcolm Beyah in the back of the end zone. Beyah touched the ball as he reached the end line, but he couldn’t haul it in with five seconds remaining. “Malcolm got by (his defender) a little bit and had a chance,” MTSU coach Rick Stockstill said. “I don’t know if it would have been out of bounds or in bounds.” On the next play, Middle Tennessee went for the tie, but Purdue’s Ricardo Allen blocked a 47-yard fieldgoal attempt by Alan Gendreau to end the game. Kilgore passed for 330 yards and two touchdowns, Beyah caught four passes for 89 yards and a touchdown and Benny Cunningham had 105 yards from scrimmage for MTSU. Even with 460 yards of offense, the Blue Raiders couldn’t quite pull the upset. “It kicks you in the gut right now, you’re sick to your stomach that you lost the game, and it’s hard to find a positive right now because of that,” Stockstill said. Eventually, the team was able to put it in perspective. “It’s not disappointing at all,” Kilgore said. “I think it’s extremely encouraging. We see great things in our future. I couldn’t be more proud of our offense, of our o-line, of our defense, our special teams. I’m extremely excited. There’s nothing disappointing about this game.” Purdue, trailing 2420, got a late defensive stop to earn a shot at the win, and Caleb TerBush led the Boilermakers 85 yards in 11 plays. His 35-yard touchdown pass to Antavian Edison came with 49 seconds left. That set up the frantic ending that nearly gave the Blue Raiders their first win against a Big Ten team. The Sun Belt Conference member fell to 0-4 all-time against the Big Ten, including a 24-17 loss to Minnesota in last season’s opener. Purdue trailed 1710 when running back

Akeem Shavers went 30 yards up the middle for a touchdown to tie the score with 11:44 to play. Middle Tennessee came right back with a 60-yard touchdown drive. Tavarres Jefferson made backto-back outstanding catches for first downs, then two plays later, Cunningham finished the drive with a 2-yard scoring run to give Middle Tennessee a 2417 lead with 9:26 to go. Purdue had a thirdand-1 at the MTSU 21 before getting called for a false start. TerBush was sacked on the next play, so Purdue settled for a 47-yard field goal by Carson Wiggs that trimmed MTSU’s lead to 24-20 with 5:57 remaining. The first break for either team came when Allen fumbled and Middle Tennessee recovered at the Purdue 22. On thirdand-14, Kilgore found Beyah for a 26-yard touchdown pass to put the Blue Raiders up 7-0. Wiggs made a 50yard field goal later in the quarter, his fifth of at least 50 yards during his career, to cut MTSU’s lead to 7-3. Eric Russell intercepted a pass by TerBush early in the second quarter and returned it 34 yards to the Purdue 45, but the Blue Raiders couldn’t take advantage. The Boilermakers responded with a 12play, 98-yard drive. TerBush rolled right and found running back Jared Crank in the end zone for a 2-yard touchdown pass to give Purdue a 10-7 lead with 7:32 left in the second quarter. Middle Tennessee came back later in the quarter with a 95yard drive. This time, Kilgore found Sancho McDonald for a 21-yard score to give MTSU a 14-10 lead with 2:10 left in the first half. Purdue caught a break when Gendreau missed a 39-yard field goal late in the third quarter. He made a 42yard field goal early in the fourth quarter, extending MTSU’s lead to 17-10. Purdue scored 17 points and gained 192 yards in the fourth quarter. “They did a good job towards the end,” Stockstill said of Purdue. “Their size and strength kind of overpowered us a little bit down there. They wore us down a little bit.”

Associated Press

Purdue’s Ricardo Allen (21) blocked Middle Tennessee State’s 47-yard field goal attempt to preserve a 27-24 win over the Blue Raiders.


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The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Wisconsin offense runs over Rebels Ball scores 4 touchdowns as Badgers score on first 8 possessions in 2011 season opener Elliot Hughes Sports Content Editor No need to worry, the juggernaut offense of last season’s Wisconsin football team is back for another round. In rumbling off 499 yards of total offense, the No. 10/11 Badgers (1-0) opened the 2011 season with a 5117 victory over NevadaLas Vegas (0-1) under the lamps of Camp Randall Stadium Thursday night. On 10 carries and two receptions, running back Montee Ball ramped up 131 total yards of offense and scored four touchdowns while super-sub James White accumulated 104 total yards and a trip to the endzone himself. In his debut for Wisconsin, quarterback Russell Wilson did not disappoint Badger fans after his highly anticipated transfer from North Carolina State. The fifthyear senior completed 10 of 13 passes for 255 yards and two touchdowns but also wowed the stadium with two rushing attempts that totaled 62 yards and another score. In averaging 9.4 yards per play and committing zero turnovers in the first game of the season, the play of the offense impressed center Peter Konz. “I mean, I expected to struggle a little bit sometimes just because it was the first game of the season,” Konz said. “I don’t really expect to be firing out all the time, but we just kept it going. Russell played great, the backs played great, receivers were making a lot of plays too. I love to see that.” Five of Wisconsin’s six drives in the first half resulted in touchdowns, while its last concluded with a field goal. Wisconsin built a 27-0 lead after Ball scored on a 4-yard reception and runs from 1 and 22-yards out – with kicker Kyle French missing a PAT in the process. White also added 1-yard plunge as well.

After missing two previous attempts, Nolan Kohorst put UNLV on the board on a 37-yard field goal with 1:45 remaining in the first quarter. But Wisconsin didn’t give that much thought. On his first rushing attempt of the game, Wilson snaked his way downfield, untouched, for a 46-yard touchdown with 1:14 left in the second quarter, sending the home crowd into a frenzy. “If he sees a little hole, he gets through it in a quick amount of time and, obviously, that one run before the half was special,” UW head coach Bret Bielema said of Wilson. Wisconsin added a field goal before the break and then proceeded to score touchdowns on its first two drives in the second half. Wilson found a wideopen Jacob Pederson in the endzone on an 8-yard strike and Ball rolled in on another 1-yard rush to top off the night at 51 points before reserves started taking the field. “It’s a special group (the offense), and you know what? I think it’s a group that stays hungry, so it’s going to be fun to watch them grow,” Bielema said. UNLV was held to held to 292 yards of total offense and was unable to find the endzone against Wisconsin’s defense until late in the third quarter, when the Badgers had already begun playing some of its reserve players. The Badgers’ offense zwasn’t the only unit that enjoyed a solid night, with strong play coming from the defensive side as well. Linebacker Chris Borland led the Badgers with seven tackles while Louis Nzegwu registered two sacks, with another coming from David Gilbert. Wisconsin stopped UNLV 10 times in 12 thirddown situations, but also conceded two fourth-down conversions in as many attempts. UNLV quarterback Caleb Herring, in his first

Stephanie Moebius The Badger Herald

Running back Montee Ball had a stellar season opener Thursday night, gaining 131 total yards and four touchdowns against UNLV. start, led the way for the Rebel offense with 18 completions on 27 attempts for 146 yards and two touchdowns. He mixed that in with nine rushes for 53 yards. He tossed a 6-yard pass to wide receiver Philip Payne with 2:53 left in the

third and a 9-yard toss to fullback William Vea early in the fourth quarter. Six penalties tripped up Wisconsin on a few occasions, most notably near the end of the first half when a false start forced the Badgers to call a timeout and avoid a time

deduction. In all, UW lost 50 yards on flags. Nevertheless, all hiccups aside, Wisconsin players were all smiles following the 2011 opener, especially the team’s newest player. “I think it was a great start for us,” Wilson said. “We did a really good

job, we played hard and executed the offense really well. There are obviously little things we can get better at each and every play, but that’s just being critical.” “I think we did a good job offensively, defensively and on special teams.”

Kelly Erickson

Elliot Hughes

Associate Sports Editor

Sports Content Editor

Fantasy football: Rodgers or Vick? Rodgers’ offensive weapons will lead to big year

Vick’s big-play ability makes up for health concerns

I will admit I’ve only recently joined the fantasy football lifestyle. Last year, in my rookie season, I was a failure. I drafted well, but with a slew of injuries throughout the season and a general loss of interest after a few weeks, my team was incredibly unimpressive. This year, I intend to redeem myself. Of course in order to do this, I must pick a great quarterback to build my team around. With the likes of Michael Vick, Tom Brady, Cam Newton (LOLZ) and Philip Rivers leading their respective teams this year, I would hands-down pick Aaron Rodgers as my main playmaker. Forget his impressive 2010 resume (Super Bowl XVL MVP anyone?) for a moment. Rodgers has a multitude of targets surrounding him — if they stay healthy — that he will easily earn a multitude of points week in and week out. Between Greg Jennings, Donald Driver, Jermichael Finley, Jordy Nelson, Ryan Grant and James Starks in the short field all coupled with his mobility, Rodgers will be tough to slow down. Last season alone Rodgers threw 28 touchdowns and ran for four, which ties for the most rushing touchdowns on the team. I mean the guy is no Russell Wilson in the speed category, but he’s still gets the ball in the endzone by any means possible. Sure there are other quarterbacks out there heralded as more athletic, more mobile, more accurate and overall just better than Rodgers, but rest assured, he won’t disappoint.

All things considered, Aaron Rodgers and Michael Vick have a quite a bit in common, actually. Both are hardworking professionals, elite passers and ringleaders of offenses with as much talent as a traveling circus. Really, the only differences between the two — and boy, this will be a shocker — is health concerns (favoring Rodgers) and mobility (favoring Vick). Still, Vick absorbs the threat of injuries and comes out the clear favorite. Here’s how much Vick’s mobility and improved passing compensates for time spent on the sidelines. Vick missed essentially five games in 2010 — compared to Rodgers, who missed essentially two — and still scored eight more points than Rodgers in season totals. His 300 points put Vick at No. 3 in total points scored on ESPN.com. To put it in a different perspective, Vick scored 27.3 points per game, while Rodgers notched 20.9. In a deep league, that will make a big difference. Plus, why get too caught up in what if’s? Vick could certainly make it through the season unharmed. Let’s stick with what we know right now: Vick is a firecracker of a football player and he’s surrounded by an arsenal of weapons. He makes defenses look like they’re still in high school. Pick Vick.

Log on to www.badgerherald.com/sports to vote for this Point/Counterpoint.


The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Trojans spoil coaching debut for Kill, beat Gophers 19-17 Barkley, Woods set school records for USC; Gray totals 142 total yards for UMN LOS ANGELES (AP)-Even after Robert Woods and Matt Barkley set two Southern California records with one sharp connection after another, the star receiver and his prolific quarterback still had to sweat out the final minutes against Minnesota on the Coliseum sideline. That’s when the USC defense finally interrupted its own recent history by preserving a late lead for the Trojans. Woods caught a school-record 17 passes for 177 yards and three touchdowns, and 25thranked USC hung on to spoil Jerry Kill’s coaching debut for Minnesota in a 19-17 victory Saturday. Barkley completed a school-record 34 passes for 304 yards for the Trojans, who still couldn’t score in the second half of their 14th consecutive seasonopening victory. Minnesota freshman quarterback Max Shortell nearly led the Golden Gophers all the way back from a 16-point halftime deficit, but Torin Harris intercepted his final pass near midfield with 53 seconds left. “I obviously had flashbacks to last year, but this is a new year and a new defense,” Barkley said of the Trojans, who blew several fourth-quarter leads and lost two games on field goals at the gun last season. Until USC’s offense sputtered and collapsed in the second half, the Trojans opened their second season under coach Lane Kiffin with a display of dazzling aerial chemistry between Barkley and Woods. The sophomore receiver has sticky hands and burning speed -- and now a place in the record books among Lynn Swann, Keyshawn Johnson, Dwayne Jarrett and the other great receivers. Woods’ coaches saw this performance coming, telling Woods about Johnnie Morton’s school record of 15 catches during their preparations for the Gophers. “We said, ‘It’s time to break it,’” Kiffin said. After catching 11 passes for 115 yards in the first half, Woods tied Morton’s 1993 record with his 15th catch late in the third quarter. He surpassed

Morton’s mark early in the fourth, but the rest of USC’s offense sputtered, with an inexperienced offensive line struggling to establish a running game. “Not scoring a point (in the second half) is hard to imagine,” said Kiffin, who told his postgame television interviewer that the Trojans have “got two good players on our offense.” Barkley went 34 for 45 with eight drops, according to Kiffin. The junior completed 16 straight passes during one stretch and surpassed Todd Marinovich’s 1989 record for completions in the fourth quarter, but Barkley watched the Gophers’ final drive with dread alongside Woods. “We had a lot more penalties in the second half, and they just took over,” Woods said. “We couldn’t get anything done.” Shortell came off the Gophers’ bench in the fourth quarter when starter MarQueis Gray went down with leg cramps, throwing a 12-yard TD pass to Brandon Green with 8:03 to play. The Trojans then converted two longyardage first downs on their ensuing drive before a punt left Minnesota at its own 9 with 2:04 to play. “We could have come out in the second half and just laid an egg and got blown out, but the way we played in the second half showed that some of our kids have bought in,” said Kill, who gathered his team around him in a huddle before heading to the locker room at halftime. Minnesota came out stronger in the second half, stopping USC’s opening drive with a 32-yard loss when a fourth-down snap sailed over Barkley’s head, followed by a quick drive ending with Bennett’s 9-yard TD run. Gray passed for 94 yards and rushed for 48 more in his first collegiate start at quarterback for the Gophers. Kill, who left Northern Illinois to take over a program with just one winning season in its last five, likely was more impressed by Shortell, who backed up his impressive camp with a 7-for-13 performance for 98 yards in the fourth quarter. “I got a little nervous walking into the Coliseum, but once I got in there, it was time to play ball,” Shortell said. Duane Bennett rushed for 53 yards and a score

Associated Press

Minnesota cornerback Troy Stoudemire Jr. (right) breaks up a pass in Southern California’s season-opening 19-17 win Saturday. for Minnesota, which hadn’t visited the Coliseum since 1979 and hasn’t won a game in California since 1964. After catching passes for most of his first two seasons at Minnesota, Gray took over the Gophers’ offense this year, starting his first game at quarterback since 2007 at his Indianapolis high school. “I waited three years to be a quarterback, and to get cramps late in the third quarter and sit out most of the fourth quarter, this is going to be a hard pill for me to swallow,” Gray said. Woods achieved his goal

of seeing himself score on the Coliseum’s new 6,000-square-foot video board during USC’s opening drive. He made a 43-yard TD catch in the second quarter with a Minnesota defensive

back draped all over him. The Trojans failed on 2-point conversion attempts after both of their first two scores, with Kiffin explaining he saw defensive matchups he thought he could exploit.

Instead, Rhett Ellison was tackled inside the 1, and Barkley made one of his only poor throws of the day. USC kicked an extra point after Woods’ 2-yard grab 49 seconds before halftime.


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The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue


The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Dalton enters final season with mixed emotions Senior goalkeeper planning to make most of last year on field as Badger Brett Sommers Statistics Editor Many would say five years is a long time, but to Michele Dalton, it barely seems like a blink of an eye. Dalton, a fifth-year senior and the Wisconsin women’s soccer team’s starting keeper, wants her last season to be her team’s finest.

I remember vividly my very first practice up at North Field. I thought the coolest thing on Earth was that we were practicing underneath where it says ‘Home of the Wisconsin Badgers,’ and that, to me, was just like, ‘I am home.’ Michele Dalton Goalkeeper

“I would like to win a Big Ten championship,” Dalton said. “Going forward, that is something I have dreamed about. I felt like last season we were so close yet so far, just one point off. It kills me; one save or one goal would have done it for us. I would like to be a top-10 team as well.” Her goals are specific, and her focus comes from a seemingly nondescript source: a scoreboard. Not the scoreboard at the McClimon Complex, though. Rather, Dalton remembers the one at

North Field, between Camp Randall Stadium and the Engineering Centers building, where the women’s soccer team regularly holds practice. “I remember vividly my very first practice up at North Field,” Dalton said. “I thought the coolest thing on Earth was that we were practicing underneath the scoreboard where it says ‘Home of the Wisconsin Badgers,’ and that to me was just like, ‘I am home.’” Wisconsin has become a welcoming home for Dalton, but she looks in the rearview mirror and can’t believe how fast time has passed her by. “I am not taking things for granted as much anymore because I know the amount of times that I get to walk out and play under that scoreboard are numbered.” As the countdown continues, Dalton has been prompted to reflect after seeing this year ’s freshman class. “They are asking me freshman-type questions and I just smile,” Dalton said. “It’s funny, it’s surreal, it’s heartwarming; it’s sad to think that this is my last chance to represent the University of Wisconsin as an athlete. It’s humbling and I am going to enjoy every second of it.” The enjoyment she will have throughout the season stems from how close this team has become. Dalton calls it a family, and she’s been cast as the matriarchal figure. “She is a leader, she is tough on us and she expects the best from us on the field. She is a great teammate and is always going to be there for you,” fellow senior Laurie Nosbusch said. Dalton’s coaches have seen her push her teammates to become better, but they have also recognized her personal maturation during the past five years. “She has become mature about the game, tactically, seeing stuff, and I think she has been able to push herself a little bit more physically,” head coach Paula Wilkins said. “But most of it has been the psychological side of it, not letting goals get to her and wanting to be the reason the team is

Zhao Lim The Badger Herald

Senior goalkeeper Michele Dalton is entering her final year for the Wisconsin women’s soccer team. In three seasons, Dalton has a .836 save percentage. successful.” Those improvements have rewarded Dalton with a special ability that few athletes in any sport have. “She can make [the team] believe with one big save,” Wilkins said. Dalton makes her teammates believe, but who makes Dalton believe? Wilkins has a big hand in that, and rightly so, because not

coincidentally, Wilkins is also in the fifth year of her career at UW. According to Dalton, she was Wilkins’ first recruit at Wisconsin and playfully jokes that it was the greatest day of Wilkins’ life. While that may be an exaggeration, Wilkins certainly sees how important Dalton has been to the women’s soccer program.

“Michele has always had a great mentality and a great attitude in terms of a winning attitude,” Wilkins said. “She has always wanted the program to be successful. The first two years she didn’t play, but she didn’t give up.” While every athlete loves to win, Dalton’s drive for excellence may be more tied to wanting the university to do well,

as evidenced by the feelings she experiences just by walking around campus. “When I walk down State Street and I am wearing Wisconsin soccer gear, I am so, so proud,” Dalton says. “You wear that ‘W’ and you wear the red and you are representing something far greater than yourself, and it’s a really cool experience.”

Ohio State cruises to 42-0 win over in-state rival Akron Under Fickell, OSU QBs Bauserman, Miller combine for 293 passing yards COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Even missing eight players suspended for breaking NCAA rules, No. 18 Ohio State had more than enough talent left behind. Joe Bauserman, a quarterback starting his first game in eight years, ran for a touchdown and threw for three to tight end Jake Stoneburner to lead No. 18 Ohio State to a 42-0 win over Akron on Saturday in a sweltering season opener. “We’re going to focus on the guys we have here,” Luke Fickell said after his first game as head coach since taking over for the scandal-ridden Jim Tressel. “That’s the most important thing. If it changes week to week, we’re going to continue to have guys step up.”

Against overmatched Akron, the no-name Buckeyes had a bevy of stars. Bauserman, who last started when he was a senior in high school, ran for a 15-yard score and threw TD passes of 28, 11 and 2 yards to Stoneburner — who became the first Ohio State tight end to catch three scoring passes in a game. And the defense, led by linebacker Andrew Sweat — who had an interception — completely throttled the Zips. Already missing five players because of the cashfor-memorablia scandal that cost Tressel his job, three other Buckeyes — two starters and a backup — were suspended indefinitely this week for accepting under $300 from a charity. Instead of being stunned by yet another body blow, the rest of the players picked up the slack. “That’s the thing that I might be most excited about and this team might be most excited about, is that

they didn’t whine about it, they didn’t bat their eyes about it,” Fickell said. “They just said, ‘Next man up.’ That’s the amazing thing.” First-year players also had a big day for the Buckeyes. Heralded freshman quarterback Braxton Miller tossed a TD pass to another true freshman, Devin Smith, and classmate Rod Smith ran for a score. Bauserman, who spent the last two years on the sidelines watching Terrelle Pryor play, completed 12 of 16 passes for 163 yards and the three scores with no interceptions. “Just waiting around all morning. Just waiting. That was the only thing,” said Bauserman, when asked the hardest part of his day. “I just wanted to get on the field.” Akron’s offense managed just 90 total yards. The Zips, 1-11 a year ago, came closest to scoring when a 41-yard field goal just before the half went wide.

“I just know that their line of scrimmage controlled our line of scrimmage today,” Zips coach Rob Ianello said. In addition to the final score, every stat was lopsided in Ohio State’s favor, including first downs (27-5), rushing yards (22435) and sacks (5-0). “Although we don’t have some big names like in the past, we have a lot of young guys who are fully capable of getting the job done,” said Sweat, who also had two tackles for minus yardage and forced a fumble. “We had a competitive camp at each position and we were ready to play today.” The nearby Ohio State Medical Center reported around 20 people were treated for heat-related illnesses. Almost half the crowd was gone by halftime as the temperature soared to the high 90s with high humidity. A referee had to leave the game due to dehydration. One Red Cross

volunteer said his station had run out of baggies to put ice in and that all of the medical personnel were “swamped.” “It was smoking,” said Akron quarterback Clayton Moore, who completed just 6 of 16 passes for 54 yards with the one interception. “I went in at halftime and I couldn’t feel my legs. They were just dead.” The Buckeyes took control early. Bauserman, a 25-yearold former Pittsburgh Pirates prospect as a pitcher, completed passes for 9 and 28 yards on the opening drive, capped by an Akron misplay. On a blown play, Bauserman turned to hand off the ball to a back but there was no one there. He sidestepped a defender and zigzagged through several more potential tacklers on a lumbering 15-yard touchdown — his first in college. “That was a little miscommunication,” he said. “I just decided I was going to turn and get back

NEW WRITERS MEETINGS Sunday, September 11 3:30pm Tuesday, September 13 5:30pm At the Badger Herald office - 326 W. Gorham St.

up to the line of scrimmage and I made a guy miss and it opened up.” The Buckeyes led 21-0 at the half after Bauserman hit a wide-open Stoneburner twice on scoring passes, the second after Sweat picked off a pass that was tipped by teammate Dominic Clarke. Ohio State went with one of its youngest starting lineups ever with just six seniors starting. Another reason for all the youth is the legion of NCAA problems surrounding the program. Leading returning receiver DeVier Posey, top 2010 rusher Dan Herron, starting offensive tackle Mike Adams and backup defensive lineman Solomon Thomas, are all suspended for the first five games for receiving cash and tattoos from the subject of a federal drug-trafficking probe. They were also without linebacker Jordan Whiting, who had to sit out just the first game for the same NCAA violation.


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The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Wilson silences critics with 3 touchdowns, 317 total yards Transfer quarterback puts on show for fans, leads UW to easy win over UNLV at home Kelly Erickson Associate Sports Editor The Wisconsin football team could not have asked for a better season opener. Not only did it play under the lights on national television, it showcased its talent in almost every way possible, thrashing the Nevada-Las Vegas Rebels, 51-17. Only to add to all the perks, quarterback Russell Wilson single-handedly silenced any skeptics, going 10-for-13 with 255 yards and two touchdowns, while also rushing twice for a total of 62 yards. To put his stats in perspective, running backs Montee Ball and James

White each ran for 63 and 64 yards with 10 and 11 carries, respectively. “Hats off to our offense, they did a tremendous job,” safety Aaron Henry said. “I mean, two words: Russell Wilson. The guy put on a show.” Ever since his June 27 commitment to Wisconsin, the season opener remained a widely anticipated opportunity to see if Wilson really is as great as everyone expected. With the performance he gave, there probably aren’t too many doubters left. “I’ve been in this profession now awhile and you can see guys that have a little bit of something to them, some moxie, some savvy, some god-given ability that he loves every minute of the day,” Bielema said in a post game interview. “Russell has been a guy who’s been very impressive in how he

handles everything. You’ve head me say it many times, but I think as people see that, for instance when NFL scouts come in, when visitors are at practiced, they’re just amazed at the way he works. Today, you saw why.” While Wilson was a threeyear starter at N.C. State, there is arguably no greater game day atmosphere than Camp Randall. With that electricity and all the expectations surrounding him, Wilson had every right to be nervous. “To be honest with you, not at all,” Wilson said. “I’m truly blessed to be here, I believe in the Lord to lead me in the right direction and I think he did, make sure I’m doing the right thing at the right time. When you prepare, I don’t think you get nervous at all, I think you play with confidence.” With a confidence that was evident from his first

snap under center, Wilson led Wisconsin down the field and eventually helped the offense score in each of the seven drives he competed in. In the run-oriented offense that UW is renowned for, Wilson threw a four-yard touchdown pass to Ball in the first quarter to put the Badgers up 7-0. Through both his passing and ability in the running game, Wilson has already become a vital asset in the backfield for the running backs. “It’s a great addition to have him there in the backfield,” White said. “He’s a great quarterback, he can run fast, he can do it all. He really helps with us running backs because he opens more holes for us. He can

hold defenders because they’ll be checking to see if he’s running. It really helps me and Montee a lot.” While Wilson efficiently controlled things within the pocket, everyone still got the chance to see his mobility and put to rest any remaining questions they may have had. Running the ball only twice, Wilson got the offense downfield, scoring once and almost a second time. In the second quarter with 1:37 left, Wilson, with what could only be described as hours in the pocket, kept the ball himself and took it 46-yards for a touchdown. He later had a similar situation in the thrid, but only ran for a 16-yard first down, which led to an eventual eight-yard touchdown

pass to tight end Jacob Pedersen. “[He’s] a quarterback who’s gifted enough to be a drop-back passer, but yet when the answers aren’t there on the field, can take off and hurt you in the running game, which is exactly what happened tonight,” Bielema said. “That’s a great balance for us, it’s very difficult to defend.” It’s difficult to take away many negatives from a 51-17 win, which has already set the season on the right track. Wilson simply feels blessed to be a part of it. “It was definitely a positive game for our football team,” Wilson said. “Getting out there the first time — I’m truly blessed to be here, truly blessed to be a Badger. It was an exciting game.”


Comics

Oh. You Again. Noah Yuenkel comics@badgerherald.com

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The Badger Herald | Comics | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

WHAT IS THIS

SUDOKU

HERALD COMICS

PRESENTS

S

U

D

O

K

U WHITE BREAD & TOAST

toast@badgerherald.com

MIKE BERG

NONSENSE? Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. What? You still don’t get it? Come, on, really? It’s not calculus or anything. Honestly, if you don’t know how to do a sudoku by now, you’ve probably got more issues than this newspaper.

TWENTY POUND BABY

DIFFICULTY RATING: First week skips? No prob, Bob!

HERALD COMICS

PRESENTS

K

A

K

U

R

O

baby@badgerherald.com

STEPHEN TYLER CONRAD

YOURMOMETER

LAURA “HOBBES” LEGAULT

C’EST LA MORT

PARAGON

yourmom@badgerherald.com

HOW DO I

KAKURO?

I know, I know. Kakuro. Looks crazy, right? This ain’t no time to panic, friend, so keep it cool and I’ll walk you through. Here’s the low down: each clue tells you what the sum of the numbers to the right or down must add up to. Repeating numbers? Not in this part of town. And that’s that, slick.

paragon@badgerherald.com

The Kakuro Unique Sum Chart Cells Clue 2 3 2 4 2 16 2 17

DIFFICULTY RATING: 2nd through 14th week skips? DO IT, KID

MOUSELY & FLOYD

Possibilities { 1, 2 } { 1, 3 } { 7, 9 } { 8, 9 }

3 3 3 3

6 7 23 24

{ 1, 2, 3 } { 1, 2, 4 } { 6, 8, 9 } { 7, 8, 9 }

4 4 4 4

10 11 29 30

{ 1, 2, 3, 4 } { 1, 2, 3, 5 } { 5, 7, 8, 9 } { 6, 7, 8, 9 }

5 5 5 5

15 16 34 35

{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 } { 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 } { 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 } { 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 }

6 6 6 6

21 22 38 39

{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 } { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 } { 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 } { 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 }

7 7 7 7

28 29 41 42

{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 } { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 } { 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 } { 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 }

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 } { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9 } { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 } { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 } { 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 } { 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 } { 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 } { 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 } { 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 }

comics@badgerherald.com

MADCAPS

HERALD COMICS 1

2

3

4

pascle@badgerherald.com

RYAN PAGELOW

PRESENTS

5

6

7

8

16

17

18

19

20

21

24

25

33

34

22

23

26

28

29

35

36

43

37

46

47

48

50 56

random@badgerherald.com

40

41

42

59

60

61

44

45

ERICA LOPPNOW

10

15

39

RANDOM DOODLES

9

14

27

BUNI

madcaps@badgerherald.com

MOLLY MALONEY

57

49 51

52

58

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

71

Puzzle by Peter A. Collins

PRIMAL URGES

primal@badgerherald.com

ANDREW MEGOW

MODERN CONSERVATIVE MOVEMENT

THE SKY PIRATES

COLLIN LA FLEUR

DENIS HART

mcm@badgerherald.com

skypirate@badgerherald.com

When this puzzle is done, you will find that the ends of the answers to the five starred clues, when in the 15-/67-Across, comprise a 1-/71-Across. Across 1 [See blurb] 6 Grows old 10 “Easy to Be Hard” musical 14 Boxing locale 15 [See blurb] 16 First word of the “Aeneid” 17 Requested gift in “A Christmas Story” 18 From a distance 19 Shepherd who co-wrote “A Christmas Story” 20 *Midwest conference 22 *Pancake 24 “___ not my fault!” 25 Long Island university 27 Wait 29 Show disdain

for, in a way 33 Creatures 38 A star may have a big one 39 *1951 Bogart/ Hepburn film 43 Suffix with front 44 Weaver of tales on the big screen 45 Warfare 49 Limerick’s land 50 One-named female singer with the 2002 #1 hit “Foolish” 53 French dance 56 *Billy Crystal’s “Memories of Me” co-star 59 *Shooting star? 62 Kind of mail 63 Wander 65 Medicinal shrub 66 When the nude scene occurs in 10-Across 67 [See blurb] 68 Hall’s partner

in pop music 69 Dancer’s strap? 70 Ring results, briefly 71 [See blurb] Down 1 One of three people walking into a bar, in jokes 2 Go around 3 Safecrackers 4 “… some kind of ___?” 5 Lovers’ ___ 6 Simile’s center 7 Faux pas 8 “Kill ___” (Metallica’s tripleplatinum debut album) 9 One of the highest order of angels 10 Pilgrims to Mecca 11 Domain 12 Computer that once came in Bondi Blue 13 Captain, for one 21 Low point

Get today’s puzzle solutions at badgerherald.com

11

12

13

CROSSWORD

33 Ear-related 34 Prefix with -stat 35 It might make you sick 36 Former 30 31 32 telecom giant 37 Bob of 38 “Full House” 40 Waterwheel 41 “___ transtulit sustinet” (motto of 53 54 55 Connecticut) 42 Coffee container 46 Shoot off the backboard successfully 47 Pop a question 48 Strong desire 51 Actress Aimée 23 Greek symbol of “La Dolce for the golden Vita” ratio 52 Mystery 26 Lucy’s writer Marsh husband 53 Zulu, e.g. and son 54 Derma27 Sheep’s sound tologists’ 28 Like concerns Beethoven’s 55 Dog restraint Symphony 56 Cracked No. 8 57 Time founder 30 Spotted Henry 31 James who co-wrote the 58 Opposed to 60 “It ___ no script for concern” 39-Across 61 “Keep it ___” 32 Playwright’s 64 Peaks: Abbr. prize

Rocky the Herald Comics Raccoon™

You’re baaaaaaaaack.


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The Badger Herald | Sports | Fall 2011 Registration Issue


ArtsEtc. Editor Sarah Witman arts@badgerherald.com Section D The Badger Herald | Arts | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Morello returns with rage against corporate media Voices united, ideas spread at rock show Sarah Witman ArtsEtc. Editor The Nightwatchman came running earlier this year when he felt Wisconsin union protesters needed his legendary songs of justice to inject musical life into their movement. Six months later, and two senate seats stronger, the wound that originally brought the frontman of Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave to the Capitol steps remains unhealed. Last night at Madison’s Barrymore Theater, Tom Morello took up where he left off, in an appropriately-timed “labor” day performance. “I was very inspired by the time I spent in Madison in February,” Morello said. “While I’ve played hundreds of protests and demonstrations, I never saw anything like what I saw on the streets of Madison and in the Capitol building — where you had unionist police officers and anarchist students high fiving each other in the hallways and standing shoulder to shoulder fighting for justice in union struggles

across the Midwest. … They were using all of their intelligence and creativity and power to let the whole world know what was going on in Wisconsin was wrong.” With him were Wayne Kramer of MC5 and Tim McIlrath of Rise Against, who performed with Morello Feb. 22 at Monona Terrace; an impromptu concert that took place within the very first days of protest. The intention of their return to Madison, which kicked off the three-part “Justice Tour,” was, as Morello put it, “to continue to stir up trouble in your fine city.” The tour will also stop in Michigan and Ohio, two more states which Morello considers to be “under siege” as far as workers’ right to organize. In conjunction with standing up for this issue, Morello hopes to promote the idea of independent media. Non-corporate news outlets have been invited to report on the shows, and the proceeds will go toward the creation of a wider pool of ideas. “One of the things I noticed after I returned home from Madison in February was most of the prejudiced reporting of things that I had seen there,” he said. “All the

money from these shows benefits the Nation Institute, which promotes independent media. That is, media that is of the people, by the people and for the people, one that is willing to tell the truth and is unburdened by corporate sponsorship, which will inevitably lean on them to give a slanted view of the facts.” The Nightwatchman released two albums this year: an EP called Union Town and a full-length record called World Wide Rebel Songs. Both contain more electric guitar than any of his previous solo works, which have been primarily acoustic. “Only one song on that EP is live; it is the song ‘Union Song’ that I performed live on the steps of the Capitol before my fingers got frostbitten,” he said. “I thought that the recording of that particular song captured the feeling of power in the streets and the anticipation that the citizens of Madison and the working class people of Wisconsin had. They were able to … have some say over what their lives and their families’ lives would be like and stand up to an awful governor trying to strip them of their most fundamental rights.”

ArtsEtc.

Megan McCormick The Badger Herald

Tom Morello, guitarist for bands Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave, is pictured above performing at Monona Terrace during February protests. He is rejoined by Wayne Kramer of MC5 and Tim McIlrath of Rise Against this month for their three-stop Justice Tour. Many well-known figures in history have discussed and fought social injustice; Morello spent a lifetime addressing these same issues and reaching people through the context of song. “One thing about music is it can be completely uncompromising. It has been a part of every social justice struggle in the country,” he said. “Music is very important to help steel the backbone of people under siege … when you’re standing

amid a hundred thousand people singing a song it speaks to something in the reptilian brain that can be very energizing, and when it’s done right can feel like the truth.” Morello took time to reflect on a benefit show he was booked to play in 2010 for several guitar manufacturers in Seoul, South Korea, who had lost their jobs after trying to unionize. However, the day before the benefit, the devastating earthquake in Haiti took place. Instead

of going ahead as planned, the Koreans voted to donate 100 percent of the proceeds from their benefit to Haiti. “I thought it was such a selfless act and really a glimpse into the kind of world I’d like to see and the kind of world I’m fighting for,” he said. “It’s the same kind of world I felt on the streets of Madison and that I know is in the hearts and minds of working class Wisconsin who have had enough.”

No longer vacant, modern HotelRED here to stay Monroe St. building gets chic makeover Lin Weeks ArtsEtc. Content Editor Around any corner in the brand new HotelRED, there lies an equal chance of seeing traditional painted drywall as there is rough, gray concrete, complete with indentations where structural beams

run through. In another context, exposed concrete walls might make an interior look hastily put together, under-planned or unfinished. HotelRED is none of those things — especially not hastily put together. In fact, approval and construction of the hotel was a wrought and drawnout process. “When someone has a new idea — often even if

Malory Goldin The Badger Herald

After a long history of opposition, HotelRED has much to prove to community members.

it’s a good idea — people react badly to it just because [they think], ‘This is my identity here. My world. And somebody is going to just do something different with it.’ So I think there was some of that here,” said Ald. Sue Ellingson, District 13, the district where HotelRED stands. The recent history of the lot at 1501 Monroe St. is complicated, and, for some, emotionally charged. But presented here are the basics, as told by Brad Ricker, past president of the Vilas Neighborhood Association and resident of that area since 1979. Local architect Bob Sieger bought the property back in 1994. He operated several businesses there including a bar called the Copper Grid. Over time, Ricker said Sieger acquired a reputation for “always pushing the boundaries of what was allowed, of how many people he could have in there” and for other things, like constructing a house that appeared to be a student residence where neighborhood ordinance called for long-term family homes. Sieger did not respond to phone or email messages regarding this story. In 2006, Sieger proposed tearing down the

businesses along that strip and developing condos, which Ricker remembered as “eight or nine stories tall — way too tall for the neighborhood.” A Wisconsin State Journal article from that year describes a sevenstory building, and later articles refer to a six-story project. That sentiment was echoed throughout the neighborhood and the project was reborn in late 2007 as a 48-room hotel. The headlines from articles about the hotel in 2008 tell the story. In a month-and-a-half-long period that summer, they go from “Monroe-Regent project gets go ahead” to “Hotel plan hits another snag” back to “Monroe St. Hotel Plans OK’d.” Three full years and a change in ownership would lie between that optimistic headline and HotelRED’s soft open a few weeks ago. But someone must have been doing some work during that time, shown simply by the hotel’s unique detail and intricate furnishings. Although the connection wasn’t made explicit by general manager Jason Ilstrup on his guided tour, those exposed concrete walls and polished cement floors immediately bring to mind the famous hulking, utilitarian, concrete structure just across the

way. In fact, HotelRED’s proximity to Camp Randall and the University of Wisconsin informs much of its design. For instance, rather than the typical paint-bynumber landscapes and weirdly-realistic pictures of running horses found in hotels, the wall space above the beds is decorated with pieces from a company called Bespoken Art. Owner Mike Erikson recorded audio clips of phrases like “Red Dreams.” The wavelengths and frequencies of those clips were then printed in bold red and white and shipped to the hotel for display. Ilstrup and Erikson also stressed the hotel’s connection to Madison at large. “Travelers these days want to go to a city and immerse themselves in that city, so we’re trying to offer that to guests that come out here,” said Erikson. Ilstrup listed the details: coffee from Barriques, a custom flavor of chocolate from Maurie’s, New Glarus beer, and conference rooms named Regent and Monroe. In all, it’s a triumph — the rare place that manages to pull off in practice the high-concept buzzwords all hotels use in promotion. So, when

Ilstrup and Erikson called HotelRED “a luxury boutique hotel” multiple times within a matter of minutes, it came off as a mission statement rather than empty posturing. HotelRED is indeed unique, down to the red ceramic bowl sinks and the balconies with views of the stadium and Capitol. Of course, to some extent, the character of a hotel is determined by its guests. In the eyes of its surrounding neighbors, HotelRED’s big test will be game day weekends. While they were generally positive on the hotel, Ricker and Ellingson expressed concern it could turn into, as Ellingson put it, “four floors of drunk people hanging off the balconies.” For now, though, those worries must be forgotten, because the current Vilas Neighborhood Association president, Jon Standridge, and a few others were spotted enjoying a beer and looking over documents down in the lobby lounge late in the afternoon a few weeks ago. His presence there would have been surprising had I not just taken the tour; in fact, it seemed rather natural. After all, the HotelRED stood vacant and unused for two long years. It’s now nothing if not complete.

Powerful, persuasive images at Chazen’s printmaking exhibit ‘The Loaded Image’ explores how art influences opinion Emily Genco ArtsEtc. Staff Writer “History is written by the victors,” according to Winston Churchill. Churchill’s quote underscores the human element of bias woven into the retelling of history through text or its representation through art. The Loaded Image: Printmaking as Persuasion exhibition curated in the Oscar F. and Louise Greiner Mayer Gallery at the Chazen explores how artists’ beliefs and

perceptions impact their depiction of history. The gallery flows roughly chronologically and features prints in a range of sizes. The largest print, “Hydrogen Man” by Leonard Baskin, will immediately draw viewers’ attention. It looms life-size and features an adult male’s veins overlain on a brown background. Its raw representation and its anatomical distortion of human biology may jar and unsettle the viewer, as Baskin intended. According to the placard alongside the print, the piece symbolizes the fear of nuclear war pervasive during the 1950s.

The exhibition expertly portrays social discontent as well as popular fear. Unlike much art created during the Renaissance at the behest of wealthy families, the comparatively less expensive art of printmaking allowed artists to appeal to popular sentiment. Honoré Daumier captures social turmoil and class stratification simply and beautifully in black and white with his “Repos de la France.” In the print, a member of the upper class sprawls on a throne in the foreground while a woman of the lower class sulks in the background, indicative of her social status.

The most evocative prints in the show depict historical events and sentiment simply. Few prints make use of color, allowing viewers to focus on the content. William Weege’s “Hell No I Won’t Go” features just two components: a child and a machine gun. The child’s innocence juxtaposed with an instrument of violence heightens the show’s emotional impact. Repetition of common themes may also intrigue viewers. Differing depictions of the biblical character the prodigal son demonstrate the use of artistic license to represent history. One print depicts the story traditionally. By

comparison, Thomas Hart Benton’s interpretation shows the son returning to a crumbling shack during the Dust Bowl, allowing him to implicitly comment on the economic climate of the United States through the lens of a familiar story. The exhibition lacks a homogeneous viewpoint, enabling visitors of different political leanings to connect with the art. Louis Lozowick’s “Crane” and Harry Sternber ’s “Enough” differ drastically in their representations of industrialization. The backlight in “Crane” creates contrast with the machine affording it a grand air. Comparatively in

“Enough,” a man struggles to break his rope bonds, presumably symbolizing industrialization, while a factory burns in the background. Printmaking never seemed so crucial to historical understanding as it does in The Loaded Image. The show allows visitors to visually explore a range of topics from war to poverty, providing a provocative gateway into the academic year. The Loaded Image: Printmaking as Persuasion is available to view from June 18-Oct. 30 in the Oscar F. and Louise Greiner Mayer Gallery at the Chazen Museum of Art. Admission is free.


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The Badger Herald | Arts | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Despite dim plot, Saldana shines in revenge flick Surplus of thrills but shortage of subtlety in ‘Colombiana��� film

Jennifer Slattery ArtsEtc. Writer An obvious creation of the French screenwriter and producer Luc Besson (“The Fifth Element”) and selfdubbed director Olivier Megaton (“Transporter 3”), “Colombiana” is an action packed, revengecentric B-movie starring the gorgeous Zoe Saldana (“Takers”). The film begins in Bogotá with young schoolgirl Cataleya (Amandla Stenberg in her debut feature film) witnessing her parents being brutally gunned down by local thugs sent by drug lord Don Luis (Beto Benites, “Hermano”). This moment sets up the film’s plot and reason for revenge, but also allows for an incredible chase scene showing off Cataleya’s almost infeasible yet beautiful parkour. The young girl makes a narrow escape by slipping through alleyways, bounding off rooftops and sliding into the sewer. After expelling a swallowed microchip passport and what seems to be a rather large breakfast onto an Embassy official’s desk, she finds herself on her way to safety, reuniting with her Uncle Emilio (Cliff Curtis, “The Last Airbender”) in America. Young Cataleya’s strong will and determination to take revenge on Don Luis and his band of murderers present themselves as she bluntly tells her uncle at breakfast “I want to be a killer” and proceeds to ask him to teach her how. He, just as blasé, replies “Sure.” The movie then cuts to Cataleya’s first day of school when

her uncle explains to her that in order to be a killer she must receive an education first. He makes his point by pulling out a gun and shooting a car driving by multiple times. Considering the writer and director of the film, subtlety really isn’t to be expected. The scene then cuts and transports the audience 15 years forward in time. Unfortunately, none of Cataleya’s childhood training is ever shown, but she must have done a pretty excellent job because the next time we see her played by Zoe Saldana, she’s a hired killer working for her uncle and performing ridiculously intelligent assassinations as well as slipping gracefully into the tightest places in scandalous body suits and skimpy outfits, which is all very Catwoman-meetsLaura Croft. Remember, no point in expecting subtlety. As the film continues and bodies pile up it is clear Cataleya’s assassinations all connect to the murder of her parents, and each victim gets tagged with her signature, an orchid properly named Cataleya. This tag helps bring the plot together and attracts the attention of Don Luis and his sidekick Marco (Jordi Mollà), which was Cataleya’s brilliant plan all along. Saldana’s seemingly flawless performance as a stone-cold killer showcases the actresses’ extraordinary ability to play an emotionless character who knows how to get the job done. Nevertheless, Saldana’s character does eventually break down, but, hey, she’s human, right? These few moments in the movie are very well done by Saldana and offer a break from the intense and cold Cataleya while allowing the

Photo courtesy of Stage 6 Films

Zoe Saldana, playing the role of Cataleya, shows off the poise, weaponry and outfit natural to any revenge-motivated, cold-blooded killer in Olivier Megaton’s latest release ‘Colombiana.’ audience to connect with her on an emotional level. While the plot mostly consists of chase scenes, dead bodies and strategically placed bullets, love is also incorporated, as it is in most — if not all — action movies. Saldana’s on-screen lover boy, Danny, played by the real

life hunk and ever-sodelicious Michael Vartan (of TV’s “Hawthorne”), gives Cataleya a reason to show her vulnerability while remaining in control. It also gives her a reason to strip down, pushing the movies’ PG13 rating as far as it can go. These scenes are few and far between, but the

actress’s enjoyment of lollipops, dancing in short shorts in her apartment and escapades wearing next to nothing fill in the gaps. The revenge plot is rather over-used, and the action a bit unrealistic (scaling of walls and increasingly absurdly complex break-ins like

swimming under a glass pool with sharks unharmed). Still, minus some small bits of bad acting, “Colombiana” is well done and amped up by Saldana’s great performance.

‘COLOMBIANA’ OLIVIER MEGATON


The Badger Herald | Arts | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Best of the best: Sifting through nearly 700 area eateries Allegra Dimperio Chew On This Columnist For most college students, food is something that should be fast, hot and easy. Going to sit-down restaurants is not a priority, and venturing outside of walking distance to nosh is a rare occurrence. In Madison, this is a damn shame. Yelp lists 655 restaurants in Madison, not including food carts or farmers’ market stands where other delicious food can be bought. There’s so much more to the Madison food scene than Pizza Di’s and Buffalo Wild Wings; all it takes is a little searching to discover it. I realize that for those not familiar with eateries beyond State Street,

taking the first step in exploring Madison’s culinary offerings can be daunting. That is why I, a lifelong Madison area resident and food snob, am presenting you with a Madison food bucket list. In it you will find items from Madison restaurants many college students would never otherwise stumble into. So sit back, relax and prepare to get hungry. The first on my bucket list is a morning bun from La Brioche at 2862 University Ave. This pastry is filled with cinnamon and sugar and is easily a breakfast in itself. Best served warm, this is the most popular item at the bakery and often sells out, so be sure to get it early. While there, check out the 100 percent feng shui set up of La Brioche’s restaurant, True Food. While still in the breakfast theme, Sophia’s Bakery and Café at 831 E. Johnson St. has truly amazing pancakes. While only open on the

weekends, the café is well worth the wait. A cozy (read, tiny) spot, dining here is an experience not soon forgotten. The food is homemade and the atmosphere about as east side as the east side gets. You may have to share a table with strangers, but you’ll be doing it while enjoying the best breakfast you’ve had in a long while. Skipping across to the west side, Shish Cafe at 5510 University Ave has the best falafel in town — and, trust me, I know falafel. Wisconsin is not exactly known for its authentic ethnic food (emphasis on authentic), but Shish Cafe serves up some pretty spot-on Mediterranean cuisine, better than Med Café and with a more extensive menu. Remember to get the hummus, and don’t be afraid to forget what country you’re in. The next item is almost as American as French fries — however, it’s actually as Belgian as pommes frites. Brasserie V

at 1923 Monroe St. serves up a mouthwatering version of this salty snack and serves it with two to-die-for aolis. While fried, fattening foods are delicious by nature, these frites put even Parthenon’s fries to

There’s so much more to the Madison food scene than Pizza Di’s and Buffalo Wild Wings; all it takes is a little searching to discover it. shame. Easily shared and even more easily inhaled, this is something you’ll want to have again and again. Now everyone knows that fries go with ice cream (If you don’t, I highly recommend dipping the former in the latter), and this is the place to get it. Ella’s Deli and Ice Cream Parlor at 2902 E. Washington Ave.

is impossible to miss from the street: It’s the one with the carousel in front. Get an ice cream sundae (Try the Sparkled Kazoo if you’re feeling daring) and step into the carnivalesque décor. Motorized toys line the ceiling, and the tables are filled with pinball machines and trinkets. At Ella’s, you truly have to see it to believe it. With this next item, it is the food, not the surroundings, that make it a must. Fraboni’s at 822 Regent St. is an Italian grocery and deli, selling all kinds of goodies from the boot across the Atlantic. However, we’re coming here for their sub sandwiches. For meat lovers, the Otto sandwich is a dream come true. Filled with ham, pastrami, pepperoni, hard salami, provolone and a smattering of vegetables, the sandwich has all that is good about Italian meat (they also serve non-arteryblocking fare for the less carnivorous). Not a sit

down joint, but one of the best choices for take out. The last item on the list, but certainly not the last of my Madison favorites, doesn’t come from a restaurant. Honey sticks from the Dane County Farmers’ Market: There is something about eating honey like a Popsicle that makes it taste better. Several vendors sell the treat, made from bees they themselves care for. While spicy cheese bread is well and good and flowers are pretty, do yourself a favor and try something sweet, new and locally sourced from the market before it closes for the season. These items are just a sampling of the unique tastes of Madison. Enjoy these, then go out and find your own favorites. You have 655 opportunities and counting to find something you love. Allegra Dimperio (adimperio@badgerherald. com) is a junior majoring in journalism.

Pre-used market poaches big game industry’s profits Regen McCracken Herald Arcade Columnist

Photo courtesy of Warner Bros.

After a five-year hiatus, California rockers Red Hot Chili Peppers are back with its much-anticipated follow up to ‘Stadium Arcadium.’

Chili Peppers release lacks same spice as past albums Same old tricks for new RHCP tracks on ‘I’m With You’ Bess Donoghue ArtsEtc. Staff Writer It has been some time since the American rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers has seen the spotlight. Its last album, Stadium Arcadium, was released in 2006, and after its world tour for the album concluded in 2007, the group decided to take a break. Anthony Kiedis, along with co-founding bass player Michael “Flea” Balzary, longtime drummer Chad Smith and the most recent addition to the group, guitarist Josh Klinghoffer, all came together in September 2010 to begin recording for their 10th studio album, I’m With You. Although the group had compiled enough music for a double album, it narrowed its song selection down to 14. The first single from that selection, “The Adventures of Rain Dance Maggie,” has been popular on iTunes, cracking the top 50 this summer. “Monarch of Roses” has been popular on iTunes as well. The initial drumming in the song stirs excitement and interest. The lyrics use “rose” to symbolize love and how people find themselves entangled in the emotion, specifically love at mental and physical levels. While compiling the album, the group’s

longtime supporter Brendan Mullen passed away. It was this tragic event for the band that inspired “Brendan’s Death Song.” Unlike some of the album’s other songs, it is serene, with the vocals more prominent than the instruments. The song questions one of life’s many themes — fate — and how nice it would be if there were signs to prepare us for events like death. Fate is also discussed in “Even You Brutus?” which is sung like a proclamation. Statements are made over the course of the song such as “You never know how it might unfold … Time will tell but it never gets old.” The lyrics of the more upbeat songs “Dance, Dance, Dance” and “Look Around” are repetitive but for the sake of emphasis and persuasion. In “Dance, Dance, Dance,” the vocals get progressively more high-pitched as the singer wants to spend the night living in the moment, dancing. Drums and guitar are well-blended on the upbeat “Look Around” and it is repetitive, specifically in the chorus, with constant iteration of the song’s title. While this makes an argument, to “Look Around,” it poses a question: look around for what? The song could be suggesting to look around for a number of items such as love, safety or security, as well as opportunities. During their hiatus, the band members pursued different projects. One member, Flea, studied music theory at the

University of Southern California, where he learned to play the piano along with other music composing techniques. These new techniques are on display in a few songs throughout the album. In “Happiness Loves Company,” the song begins with a beautifully composed piano introduction that sets a completely different tone for the song. But when put together with the drums, the melody still remains faithful to the group’s traditional form of music. That shift in focus is also present in “Meet Me at the Corner,” which has a much slower tempo. Although it seems as though the song picks up at the chorus, it actually remains relaxed. The drumming is more calm, and there’s a flavor of jazz when it’s combined with the soft guitar. While the Red Hot Chili Peppers has successfully created more music that is faithful to its style with I’m With You, it adds a few welcome elements of musical fusion throughout the album. It would be served well to continue experimenting as its members’ respective careers go on.

½

‘I’M WITH YOU’ RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS

In today’s economy, nearly all markets are suffering because people cannot afford to stimulate them. Naturally, people are always looking for ways to retain their old spending habits but at cheaper cost; thus, wallet-friendly options are born: cheaper restaurants, wholesale stores, eBay and so on. The video game world has always been a bit pricey, so it too has created a cost-efficient option: used games. Like other industries, this cheaper option makes waves because of the competitive, capitalist society that exists. Used games are especially negative for the gaming industry due to the fact that they cause game developers and publishers to see very little, if any, profit from their sales. This is a very underhanded tactic to turn a profit, as it is akin to illegally downloading music in how it affects those who create the product for consumption. Strangely enough, buying used games is still legal, and there is no sign of anything changing in the near future. Of course, those who have been following the gaming industry over the past few years already knew this, as it is by no means a new issue. Yet, it still persists in the struggling economy of today. This problem will remain an issue as long as games remain as expensive as they are today because the attempts the industry has made to make up for the losses they incur due to used games (digital distribution for a lower price and downloadable content) have not been enough. Digital distribution services such as Steam and OnLive (a streaming, rather than distribution service) have popped up to offer games at a lower price, yet a large portion of the profit goes to the developers. The problem with these services is that they are currently only in place to supply PC games. Console games are only digitally distributed long after they come out on physical media, or they are “arcade” titles.

Perhaps once digital distribution takes off for console play, the used game market will plummet enough so it isn’t a viable option anymore, but for now the gaming world isn’t ready for it. The Sony PSPGo, a handheld that was released in 2009, was based entirely on the concept of digital distribution. It was discontinued in 2011, which speaks volumes about the acceptability of a complete lack of physical media. Gamestop is the main distributor of used games, but eBay, Amazon and all of Amazon’s affiliates are also culprits. Certainly, the solution will not (and should not) be putting these retailers out of business, but rather they should go into a different kind of business: a business that doesn’t sell used games.

Used games aren’t all bad. ... The buyers may want more bang for their ill-spent buck and use that money they saved buying used to purchase downloadable content. Still, these sales just aren’t enough to make up for what’s lost in used game sales, and downloadable content has a dark side.

People are always going to sell their games to one another, but if it were on a smaller, person-to-person scale, the industry wouldn’t be in its current position. Gamestop (and all sellers of used games) would remain in business; they would just have to shift their focus to carrying specialty import or rare games. This would be beneficial for gamers as well as game companies and could even create a whole new market for such games in the United States. Used games aren’t all bad. They do give

publicity to the games and possibly encourage those close to the buyers to purchase the game themselves. In addition, the buyers may want more bang for their ill-spent buck and use that money they saved buying used to purchase downloadable content. Still, these sales just aren’t enough to make up for what’s lost in used game sales, and downloadable content has a dark side. Downloadable content’s profits go almost completely to the developer, making it a viable alternative for revenue in a world filled with used games. The problem is, downloadable content only goes so far because in most cases it is much less costly than your average retail game. It costs even more money for the developer to make, thus making it harder still for them to turn a profit and continue making games. The obvious solution to some game companies was to release downloadable content immediately after the release of the game. This content clearly could have (and would have in a different time) come packaged in the game, but because of the desire to turn a profit via downloadable content, developers decided to force consumers to pay more. Used games may be beneficial for the buyer short-term (and, for the casual gamer, the short- and long-term), but the hardcore gamer will spend more money and get less content in the long run due to effects directly related to the sale of used games. The only significant beneficiary of selling used games is Gamestop and its ilk — they get to keep almost all of that profit for themselves. By purchasing used games, consumers may think they are saving money, but they are actually only hurting themselves. All people that provide a service are paid for their work: wait staff at a restaurant, lawyers that win cases and professors that teach students. Why should those who entertain us by creating magnifi cent video games be any different? Regen McCracken is a junior planning to major in journalism. Any questions or comments on this article, past articles, or any entertainment medium may be directed to rmccracken777@gmail.


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The Badger Herald | Arts | Fall 2011 Registration Issue


The Badger Herald | Arts | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Lil Wayne’s ‘IV’th time tha charm Four-time Grammy award winning rapper remains consistently great with latest release Meredith Lee ArtsEtc. Writer Rap fans need not wait any longer; Tha Carter IV is here. Lil Wayne’s newly released album has been a long time coming. After the success of his previous album Tha Carter III, which featured such hits as “A Milli” and “Lollipop,” Lil Wayne began work on Tha Carter IV. Lil Wayne released two albums, the rock-themed Rebirth and I Am Not a Human Being, between the two Carter albums to allow time for the slow and steady production of what is now Tha Carter IV.

Controversy aside, Lil Wayne definitely brings his A-game. The album showcases Lil Wayne’s preferred themes of sex, drugs and violence; however, the album also features a new side of Lil Wayne’s music. The album is a breakthrough for Lil Wayne as he explores outside his usual music style. ... Lil Wayne not only explores a new style of music but also delves deeper emotionally than he has before.

Fans have long awaited the release of Lil Wayne’s newest album, but in the end they didn’t have to wait quite as long as anticipated. After being rescheduled several times, the album was set to release Aug. 29. Unfortunately, the album was massively leaked on the web Aug. 24. Tha Carter IV is Lil Wayne’s ninth studio album and features an

array of supporting talent including appearances by Cory Gunz, Drake, T-Pain, Tech N9ne, Andre 3000, Rick Ross, John Legend, Jadakiss, Bun B, Nas, Shyne and Busta Rhymes. Shortly after the early leak of the album, the song “It’s Good” featuring Jadakiss and Drake received the most attention. Twitter blew up with comments on the song, and questions arose about a possible diss to Jay-Z. Controversy aside, Lil Wayne definitely brings his A-game. The album showcases Lil Wayne’s preferred themes of sex, drugs and violence; however, the album also features a new side of Lil Wayne’s music. The album is a breakthrough for Lil Wayne as he explores outside his usual music style. With the hit single “How to Love,” Lil Wayne not only explores a new style of music but also delves deeper emotionally than he has before. It’s a rare slow love song from the rapper, and instead of his usual aggressive rap style, Lil Wayne sings the song and does it without auto-tune or mix help. Hearing his unmixed voice makes the song very personal. Lil Wayne fans shouldn’t worry: He stays true to his rough, Weezy roots in the song “Intro.” It is the perfect song to start the album as Lil Wayne spits three solid minutes of hashtag rap flows. The highest points of the album are definitely “Outro,” featuring Bun B, Nas, Shyne and Busta Rhymes, and “She Will,” featuring Drake. Both songs are intense with awesome beats and are good clean party music. There are a few songs on the album that aren’t as strong as Lil Wayne’s usual pieces, like “Blunt Blowin,” but Tha Carter IV is an overall great album that Weezy fans everywhere should enjoy. Although it doesn’t outshine the outstanding Tha Carter III album, Tha Carter IV is great party music.

‘THA CARTER IV’ Lil Wayne

Photo courtesy of Jim Healy

The Cinematheque film series has been ongoing at the University of Wisconsin for 12 years, and the program’s first-ever director Jim Healy provides unique insight as to which films will shine this season.

Ray’s centennial tops fall film season International cinema, American classics comprise Cinematheque’s expanded lineup Sarah Witman ArtsEtc. Editor Not everything is just as good 12 years later, but due to some twists and revamps over the years, the Cinematheque film series at the University of Wisconsin has proven to do just that. Of course, it doesn’t hurt that so many people love films — each is a piece of entertainment designed for the masses, after all. This fall’s Cinematheque calendar, complete with a colorful redesign, will feature an increase in the number of films. These will range across a broad spectrum of nationalities, and from the American silent era to the ‘80s. Jim Healy, Cinematheque’s first-ever director of programming, started in the position last October and said he has seen a 70 percent increase in attendance since last summer. He is ready to finish up his first full year with a lineup of some spectacular cinema, as well as some notable guest presenters. “We do have three inperson guests confirmed. … The Nicholas Ray [centennial] series is ending with the last feature film he made in 1976, and his widow

will be there to present it. It’s just been recently restored,” Healy said, speaking of the famed ‘50s-era director who tackled gritty issues in “Rebel Without a Cause.” “Joe Dante who made ‘Gremlins’ and is also a great film historian is coming to the show. ‘Gremlins’ at the Marquee [will] introduce a kind of a collage film he made in the ’80s called ‘The Movie Orgy.’ It runs nearly five hours of footage pulled from his 16 mm. It’s really something to see.” Something new starting this semester is that in addition to Cinematheque’s Friday and Saturday showings of selected films, they will have “Marquee Mondays” once a month at the Marquee Theater inside Union South. Starting November there will also be a film shown Sunday afternoons in the Chazen. Healy also commented that the Cinemateque takes part in what he calls “classic exploitation cinema” — that is, trying to slot films in accordance with the season in order to attract more interest. “You’ll notice that the three Christmas movies we’re showing this year are very dark;

that might be only slightly coincidental. … We thought, ‘Let’s do something fun,’ and these films somehow presented themselves to us,” he said. “I think seeing ‘Silent Night, Deadly Night’ with the audience at the Marquee is going to be great. Santa Claus with an ax, how bad could it be?” Healy has a unique perspective, if not the best, on which films students should be trekking to see this season. He said a lot of programmers get into their jobs because they want to see movies on the big screen themselves, whether a favorite film or one they’ve never experienced before. “I’ve only seen two of the Kaneto Shindo films and they were both magnificent, and I’ve heard only great things about the other two. … He’s 99 years old, and he just made a new film called ‘Postcard,’” he said. Another Shindo film in the series, ‘Naked Island,’ is a favorite of director Benicio Del Toro, who sponsored the creation of the print that will be used for Cinematheque’s presentation of the film. “Out of the Robert Siodmak films I’ve only

seen one, so I want to see them; I’ve wanted to see ‘The Suspect’ and ‘Christmas Holiday’ for years.” Cinematheque attracts a variety of different age niches, depending on the film being shown. Healy said it’s the program’s mission to communicate to a wide breadth of viewers why the films being shown are still relevant, perhaps more so than what’s being shown in commercial theaters. “They all inform the contemporary world; whether it’s the subject matter or the way it was made, what happened historically or what happened afterward,” he said. “For anybody who might not be versed in these films … [we] can’t show them how good they are until you get them in the door. Cinematheque is fun! We might be part of the university, but it’s not just good cinematic medicine for you; what we do is very much alive and a part of the fabric of our culture.” Check out a full listing of films, from ax-wielding Santas to 45-year-old Japanese films, to be presented by the Cinematheque this fall at www.cinema.wisc.edu.


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The Badger Herald | Arts | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Hit a wall? New artists to supplement your musical tastes If you dug...

You’ll dig... Most likely known best for its single “Pumped Up Kicks” pumping up radio charts this summer, the band Foster the People pays homage to all three of these different but equally great eat indie boy bands. The similar sound is achieved through falsetto male vocals, confi dent guitar and fident drum playing, as well as heavy synth use in songs like “Houdini” i” and “Helena Beat.”

MGMT, Vampire Weekend or Peter, Bjorn and John

Foster the People

Florence and the Machine

Zola Jesus

Mickey Avalon

Hoodie Allen

Although she is Russian, Zola Jesus was raised in Merrill, Wis., and trained as an opera singer. Like Florence, she leans heavily on strong vocal talents to guide her music. Born in Old Bethpage, NY, Hoodie Allen brings the same funny hooks and lively rhythms to the table that we all loved to hear in Mickey Avalon’s tracks like “Mr. Right” in the early 2000’s. The Jewish rapper’s name reflects his two most endearing qualities: He is as entertaining as Woody Allen, and his sound is as comfortable and familiar as a hooded sweatshirt.

It’s difficult to describe Best Coast any way but through comparison; just know that if you ever find yourself on a road trip to California, this band should be featured on the traveling playlist. If The Beach Boys were young enough to have Zooey Deschanel or Liz Phair sing lead for them, the best possible result would sound exactly like Best Coast.

Liz Phair, The Beach Boys or She and Him

Best Coast

Yeasayer

tUnE-YarDs

Kid Cudi

Skizzy Mars

You’re going to have to look tUnE-YarDs up in order to even begin to get the gist of what they are all about. But if Yeasayer is a square peg, then tUnE-YarDs must be a round d hole of similar dimensions because they go together as much as any two groups could while still being so o very different. If you think you might like psychadelic, rhythmic, and above all experimental music, then step out of the schoolyard and into the the tune-yard. It will literally take you three, maybe four, seconds to realize how much like Kid Cudi he sounds. When Cudi fans no longer feel like embracing the Martian, or tire of being the man on the moon, they can fortunately hop over a few planets to Skizzy Mars.

‘Idiot Brother’ unique concept, lacks laughs Rudd’s bumbling, endearing character fails to carry movie Katie Foran-McHale ArtsEtc. Writer Unfortunately, nice guys don’t always finish first. That’s the case for Ned (Paul Rudd) in “Our Idiot Brother,” whose unrelenting honesty and goodnatured attitude gets him into trouble. After being tricked by a uniformed police officer who wanted to buy pot from him (Ned tries to give it to him for free, but the officer insists on him paying, leading to his arrest), Ned spends months in prison, coming back to find his girlfriend with a new man. That doesn’t bother Ned; the only thing that destroys him throughout the entire film — though there are countless opportunities with familial frustrations and general letdowns — is his ex’s custody demand of his beloved dog, Willie Nelson. Ned bounces around his sisters’ (Zooey Deschanel, Elizabeth Banks and Emily Mortimer) houses, contributing to each of their downfalls as he commits enormous social faux pas by opening his mouth about various sexual infidelities, and ruins a high-profile story for Banks. Rudd (“How Do You Know”) packs on the pounds and far too much hippie facial hair for the role, but the starstudded cast still shines. Mortimer (“Leonie”) takes her usual role as the sweet yet mundane wife, Deschanel (“Drunk

History”) plays what The AV Club’s Nathan Rabin would call a manic pixie dream girl — an archetype she’s greatly contributed to in the last decade in films like “500 Days of Summer” — and Banks (“30 Rock”) functions well as the slightly bitchy control freak. A supporting role by Adam Scott (“Parks and Recreation”) as Banks’ neighbor showcases his classic deadpan humor, and as Deschanel’s lover, Rashida Jones (“Parks and Recreation”) takes the cake as cutest badass, complete with dreadfully oversized glasses and an intense pep talk to steal Rudd’s dog. The weakest performance lies within Steve Coogan (“The Trip”), Mortimer ’s cheating, frigid husband, but it doesn’t bring down the powerful cast. Take all these great performances and what do you get? At times, disorientation. Shots move by so quickly between scenes and between characters’ abodes and dramatic situations that while it’s not exactly hard to follow, at times the editing seems a bit too fast paced for a lighthearted comedy. And then there’s the comedy. It’s clear the actors are well-versed in improv and in general are talented comedians, but the number of laughout-loud moments are few and far between. Sporadic one-liners are more than welcome between the drawn out, awkward interactions and relatively mundane conversations. But one very refreshing thing about the film is a lack of a

romantic interest. Most writers cave into the rom com subgenre in these situations — especially considering the filmographies of the movie’s cast — but this movie relies solely on the relationship between a family and their dopey brother. Like

Although Rudd is heralded as “the idiot brother,” he’s easily the most likable and full-hearted character in the film. Ned’s personality, the “My Idiot Brother” is unclouded by lust and serious relationships and left to be innocent and naïve. And although Rudd is heralded as “the idiot brother,” he’s easily the most likable and fullhearted character in the film. He’s as lovable as his beloved golden retriever. By the end, it’s pretty clear that the decisions and behaviors by every other character in the film are far more idiotic than Ned’s contribution to the film’s title. Despite the film’s few flaws, it’s a cute story about a lovable schmuck, but if Rudd had let his hair grow any longer, he’d be looking less like an idiot and more like his puppy.

½

OUR IDIOT BROTHER Jesse Peretz


The Badger Herald | Arts | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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Despite lack of [title], show ready to perform UT’s meta-production evokes ‘The Producers’ Bess Donoghue ArtsEtc. Staff Writer For the past two years, Fox’s television show “Glee” has captured the hearts of viewers for one particular reason: Many find the characters relatable. After a round of shows in July, starting Sept. 9 University Theatre will offer this same experience with its production of [title of show]. After making its debut on Broadway in July 2008, this Tony-nominated musical is about two men struggling to write a performance under a tight deadline who end up channeling their dire situation into the storyline. In regard to the experience of a neverending ticking clock, cast members Haley KosupKennedy, Stuart Mott and Alli Rekow all agreed the storyline was very relatable. “Each person embodies a completely different personality. … Each character has a lot of individuality that they bring that people could latch on to,” KosupKennedy said. Production for [title of show] began in early summer when University of Wisconsin theater majors Kosup-Kennedy, Mott,

Rekow and UW alumnus Chris Tiernan were cast after hearing about the show through the theater department. After many weeks of intense rehearsal, the cast was ready to perform. “Going into the run, we felt really confident, and just hit our stride,” Mott said. While the cast has remained faithful to the original script, the actors have brought their own sense of interpretation into their performance of the show. “A lot of it is about humor and characters talking to each other in a natural way, and everyone has their own unique sense of humor … and their own way of speaking and communicating. For that factor, we’ve all brought something a little different to the table than what the original cast had,” Rekow said. In regard to their opinion of a well-performed play, each cast member had a different opinion, but all agreed that these many aspects were indeed present in [title of show]. “It depends on what style; [title of show] is a comedy, so the first thing I ask myself is does it make me laugh, and the [title of show] does. … The story develops in a way that makes you invested in

these characters, and by the end you get a meaning and significance out of it, and it actually goes from comedy to something kind of touching,” Mott said. Rekow argued that a play should aim to capture an audience’s attention. “What you really want is for people to walk out at the end and not only have them enjoy sitting through the performance … but maybe give them a little something to think about. … I think we do that,” Rekow said. A third aspect KosupKennedy discussed was the relationship between the castmates on stage. “When people, as a whole, have strong chemistry, I get sucked in because I become involved, because they’re involved and focused,” KosupKennedy said. Kosup-Kennedy, Mott and Rekow all unanimously agreed that the chemistry between themselves and Tiernan was excellent. “I think it’s very rare to see four people with as much chemistry as we have. … I think that shows in performance, that we do love each other and care about each other,” KosupKennedy said. Three of the castmates had also worked with each other in University Theatre’s production of “The Rocky Horror

Photo courtesy of Michele Traband

University Theater’s production of ‘[title of show]’ capitalizes on its concept of Shakespeare’s ‘play within a play’ to maximize the script’s tongue-in-cheek humor. Picture Show” this past winter. However, unlike “Rocky Horror” and other theatrical experiences they have had, they feel [title of show] is unique. “It’s such a different musical from any other musical: There’s no big dance number, just a solo keyboard on the stage. … It’s very simple,” KosupKennedy said. Having just made its debut in 2004 theater festivals, the play was also fairly modern, which shows through the writing. “It’s a modern show;

the writing is very conversational. It reminds me of the way I talk to my friends,” Rekow said. The cast members would agree that what makes the show most appealing is the overall message: Do something that you are passionate about and believe in. “We ... are afraid of people not understanding us, and it is a message for people to do what they believe in. Everyone else can do what everybody else thinks is funny, but only you get to say something

‘Hole’ filled with pathos, intensity Talented cast of Strollers Theater tumbles down ‘Rabbit Hole’ with tears, laughter Daniel Niepow ArtsEtc Staff Writer Admittedly, it is no small task for a local theater company to attempt to put on a Pulitzer Prize-winning drama. The expectations of both critics and casual theater-goers alike will be much higher than usual. Fortunately, Madison’s own Strollers Theatre has put on a production of David Lindsay-Abaire’s critically-acclaimed play “Rabbit Hole” which, aside from a few minor flaws, will be a delightful experience for all who attend. Rabbit Hole premiered in 2005 and received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2007. The plot focuses on the way in which the Corbett family deals with the death of their four year-old son Danny. Becca Corbett, played by Jessica Jane Witham, and her husband Howie, played by University of Wisconsin graduate Patrick O’Hara, are both deeply grieved by the loss of their son, but they seem to grieve in different ways. Witham and O’Hara seem deeply in-tune with the thoughts and feelings of their respective characters, and the strained chemistry between them is remarkable on stage. The tension is almost palpable at some points. For example, Howie’s failed attempt to rekindle intimacy with his wife is one of the most poignant moments in the play, and both actors do a superb job with the scene. O’Hara’s portrayal of Howie is well done overall, though it seems weakest at the most emotionally intense moments. One is left

with the sense that he is holding back just a bit, even when he should be reaching the depths of his character’s pathos. Izzy, played by Jessica Evans Grimm, is Becca’s childish, irresponsible sister who, in an ironic twist, finds herself pregnant. She provides welcome comic relief amid all the mourning and fighting, though she too participates in a fair share of the family arguments. Grimm’s portrayal of Izzy, though humorous and lighthearted, seems somewhat exaggerated and false at points; she seems more like a caricature than an actual human being. Again, it’s obvious that the playwright intended Izzy to be comic relief, but some of her lines reveal shades of depth and compassion that Grimm failed to actualize. Becca’s mother Nat is played by Marcy Weiland. She serves as an important supporting role for Becca. Her situation in life parallels Becca’s in an eerie way, as a son of hers died too. In spite of their similarities, the two still argue viciously at points throughout the play. Weiland does an excellent job of portraying the various shades of her character: At times she is jovial and drunk at the kitchen table, at others she is a compassionate mother and at still other times she is bitterly fighting with her daughter. Witham’s acting seems the most polished of all the cast. Becca’s personality throughout the play is full of complexities and nuances that Witham seems to hit on very well. Even more than Weiland, Witham is required to hit

Photo courtesy of Jonathan J. Miller

‘Rabbit Hole,’ the film adaptation of which was nominated for an Oscar, is currently playing at the Bartell Theater. Each cast member in the production attempts to portray the different ways in which each family member expresses their grief. a huge range of human emotion. The set of the play is a realistic, suburban family home. The designers made full use of the width of the Evjue Stage: stretching along the kitchen, Danny’s room and the family room from left to right. The back wall of the set is painted with an image of a rabbit hole which runs continuously through all three rooms of the house. Some of the paint strokes even stretch out onto the floor. It adds a surreal feeling to all the drama being enacted before it. It also serves as a

physical reminder of the family’s slow descent into the darkest depths of mourning. The designers also snuck in a few subtler hints about the play’s main themes. For example, the birthday cake at Izzy’s birthday is actually a carrot cake. The Strollers Theatre production of this play isn’t perfect, but it’s still skillfully executed and worthy of attention. The cast has definitely captured the emotional depths of the play. The crowd is sure to be filled with both glistening eyes as well as bursts of laughter, as the playwright would have

intended. Seeing such an intense, well-written play live is an opportunity that anyone interested in theater should not miss. “Rabbit Hole” will run at the Bartell Theatre on 113 E. Mifflin St from Aug. 26-Sept. 17. Tickets are $15 for general admission and $12 for students and seniors. For more specific times and dates call (608)-6619696 x2 or visit www. bartelltheatre.org.

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RABBIT HOLE Casey Grimm

you believe in and created,” Kosup-Kennedy said. Rekow could not agree more. “It’s a show about people going after their dreams … doing something that matters,” she said. “Everyone would like to think that they have the courage to go after their own personal ambitions.” For more information regarding the show ‘Rabbit Hole’ at the University Theater, and to purchase tickets, visit www. utmadison.com.


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The Badger Herald | Arts | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

Model behavior: Group turns back time by restyling classics Local retro-clothing venues collaborate to prepare High Noon Saloon for Vintage Madison’s second annual Fall Fashion Show

By Courtney Becks ArtsEtc. Writer It turns out it’s easy to spot a vintage clothing dealer in a crowd — or a café. Most likely, she will be the best dressed woman in the joint. On a summery Saturday morning, Jess Parvin, the creative force behind Wanderlost Vintage, is easy to pick out even if you don’t know what she looks like. She wears a full colorful print skirt with vintage wooden wedges that a fashion blogger would mistake for an Anthropologie purchase. “Ninety percent of my wardrobe is from thrift[ing],” Parvin said. “That’s just my passion.” Parvin is a former graphic designer with a degree in art history. She said she’s been shopping second-hand for years — at yard sales, resale shops and thrift stores. In the past two to three years, she’s been able to successfully make a go of doing what she loves by continuing to collect vintage and heading the local group, Wanderlost Clothing. “If I can’t find it second-hand, I probably don’t need it,” she said. These are truly humbling words since Parvin’s outfit is awesome in a way that seems completely effortless, and soon Madison residents will get the chance to learn from her experience. Vintage Madison’s second annual Fall Fashion Show will take place Sept. 7 at High Noon Saloon at 7 p.m. The event will hopefully make it a lot easier to step right into Parvin’s gift of reviving clothing from throughout the ages, turning back a page of history to glimpse a world of glamorous permanency and classic styles we still idolize today. The fashion show will feature eight to 10 looks from each Vintage Madison clothing dealer. er. The cover is $5 to attend, and thee local band

Alex Laedtke The Badger Herald Design

Surgeons in Heat will also play the event. “I love the High Noon,” she said. “We’re going to have a band and take advantage of their sound system. We’re trying to make it like a party. Hopefully people will hang around and dance and have a good time.” Vintage Madison is a collaboration of three local vintage clothing dealers. Parvin is the purveyor of Wanderlost Vintage; Rebecca Light is the

‘Ninety percent of my wardrobe is from thrift[ing]. That’s just my passion. If I can’t find it second-hand, I probably don’t need it.’ Jess Parvin

and accessories featured in the show will be for sale, plus tons more, at our Pop-Up Vintage Shop at the Project Lodge the following week.” Attendees can see the vintage originals that have inspired looks that are currently “on-trend.” And, best of all, these items can be bought for less. The fashion show’s ensembles and much more will be available at Vintage Madison’s “Pop-up Shop,” which will be set up in the Project Lodge, 817 E. Johnson St., from Sept. 11-18. Satisfying fashion cravings for the styles of old has never been easier. Vintage Madison’s previous events have included last spring’s Vintage Prom, summer sales at local vintage oasis Zip-Dang and other “Pop-up Shop” occasions. More information about Vintage Madison and the Fall Fashion Show can be found on Vintage Madison’s Facebook page or www.vintagemadison.com.

Wanderlost Vintage

vintage entrepreneur of Picturee Day Vintage and Claire Schilhabell works at Madison’s own vintagee wonderland, the Good Style Shop. “We’re excited to have a moree curated show this year with h individual sellers’ looks,” Lightt said. “[Schilhabel] showcases ‘80ss and ‘90s vintage, [Parvin] focusess on ‘70s bohemian and my collection, n, Picture Day Vintage, iss mid-heavily mid century. All of thee clothes

Photos courtesy of Jess Parvin


To place an ad in Classifieds: Roshni Nedungadi rnedungadi@badgerherald.com, 257.4712 ext. 311 Section E The Badger Herald | Classifieds | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

ATTENTION

FOR RENT

Classifieds

Make Fun Of Ohio State! Nov- Downtown/ campus, heated/ elty T-Shirt Funny. www.Ohio- underground parking $150/ month at the Embassy 505 UniSwap.com versity Ave. Parking also availStraight Teeth for Spring Break & able for $90/month at 431/435 Interview Season! Yes, you can W. Johnson and $50/month at have a new smile in 6 months. 541 W. Doty. Call 608-256-7368 MadSmiles.com $500 off full for more info or stop by the Emmouth invisible braces with this bassy office. ad. Act before October 31, 2011.

EMPLOYMENT

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Campus Parking. Kohl’s Center !Bartending! $300/day potential. or Camp Randall areas. Call or No experience neccesary. Train- text 608-695-3937. ing course available. 800-965Parking available in The Kohl 6520 ext. 120 Center and Camp Randall areas. Earn $100-$3200/ month to Prices starting at $49.00. Beat drive our cars with ads. www. the end of summer rush. GaFreeCarJobs.com rages available too!! Call Tallard EXTRA CASH: Clean-up after Apartments at 608-250-0202. UW Events. Immediate Open- See parking maps on our webings! (608)-242-7885 Hiring & site. www.tallardapartments.com

ASO to the kid with the open keystone who walked past me on Park tonight and goes “Youʼre a freshman right?” and his lady friend who proceeded to yell “Sophomore slums bitch!”. Iʼm a junior, and you guys are jokes.

Staff Services. SO to the Hoofers guy docking at the Union. Your red shorts fit you nicely. ASO for not inviting us to join, we love to float.

Great Full Time Career Opportunity with Nestle Direct Store Delivery. Utility Sales Associate wanted to service and stock Nestle products in Milwaukee, WI area grocery stores. Class B CDL required. For more info and/ or apply online www.nestleusa. com/careers. (search frontline jobs in Wisconsin) EOE/M/F/D/V

ASO to you, three guys on Park street. “Nice bowl cut, Father Christmas” is literally the stupidest insult that Iʼve ever heard. Especially considering I donʼt have a bowl cut and am not a magical, obscenely generous, or portly. Just relax.

STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM. Paid Survey. Takers Needed in Madison. 100% Free to Join. Click on Surveys.

SO to my boyfriend for being down with role playing as Quagmire. ASO to him being a long distance relationship: I need my Giggity Giggity Goo! SO to the guy working at the State Street Ianʼs last night around 1:30am, who successfully determined that I wanted a slice of BBQ steak and fries, despite the fact that I was unable to put my request into actual coherent words. Well done, sir.

ASO to bats. DASO to animal control. Do not tell me upon arriving at my house to catch said bat that youʼve been to this house before.

SO to Casey from Wandos! You are one sexy bartender. Keep on keepinʼ on.

SO to finding a way to make my co-worker stop talking all the freaking time: dum dum pops.

SO to all the Badger Herald Ad Reps for having so much swagger this year.

SO to unleashing the Kraken! A day of beer drinking on the beach, followed by a night of beer games and a handle of kraken. ASO to taking big pulls to help finish the handle and going into instant blackout and convincing my friends to go to the bar. Next thing I know Iʼm waking up on my rug and missing half my wallet..

SO to 90s tv shows, fresh prince of belair, boy meets world, family matters, full house, sabrina the teenage witch, friends, saved by the bell, most stuff on tv today has gone to shit, i miss the 90s, im sure im forgetting some great shows, life was better before reality tv became a reality and mtv stopped playing music ASO to not finding a Badger boy to father my future children so we can force them to come to UW. SO to buying more Wisconsin clothes to wear when I move to Boston so maybe I can find a cute alum to be my future baby daddy. SO to the girl who just “ran” past my apartment but was moving slower than the girl walking at a normal pace in front of her. A+ for effort. SO to the moped eye fuck. Flirting at moderate speeds never felt so good. ASO to tiny bathroom stalls with doors that open inward. If I have to stand in a toilet, it damn well better be taking me to the Ministry of Magic. SO to feeling a little bit better about life after facebook creepin on girls from high school who are now strippers. .................MORE >


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The Badger Herald | Classifieds | Fall 2011 Registration Issue


The Badger Herald | Classifieds | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

SO to waking up covered in glitter. ASO to walking around with some insanely sparkly cleavage the night before and feeling like a straight up Ke$ha wannabe. I donʼt have the confidence to pull that look off. Hell, Ke$ha can barely pull it off. HMFSO to J.P... “Well, at least weʼll be able to tell who motorboats you!” SO to Madison Cops always trying to catch me ridin dirty on my longboard around downtown. Itʼs a fun form of transportation. Maybe if you chilled a bit, youʼd remember weʼre all kids once and weʼre not all bad. SO to the guy wearing a king costume who, upon me complimenting his attire, replied “WINTER IS COMING!” Best thing everrrrr. SO to Criminal Minds marathons on tv. ASO to them being on right before I go to bed and making me terrified that thereʼs a serial killer hiding in my closet. Shout out to last weekend which was my last weekend ever in Madison. SO to getting wasted and going skinny dipping in lake Mendota! DSO to going out with a bang! ASO to being in love with a boy my family doesnʼt approve of. Iʼve tried to move on but always end up back in your arms and I love every second of it. DASO to not knowing what to do.

ASO to making $8 working as a cashier in a parking booth. SO to 50 cent taps at Chasers which enables my feeble hourly wage to support my summer drinking habits on Monday nights. Cheers SO to bacon night. Sorry I missed you last Tuesday. Tomorrow we shall be reunited, and it shall be glorious. Also, I will definitely see you next Tuesday. SO to my grandpa. As the only grandpa I had I loved you more than anything and I miss you every day. I chose madison as my school because of you, and it was the best decision Iʼve ever made. As a third-generation badger Iʼm proud to carry on my legacy. Save a spot up there for me in Badger heaven Grandpa. On Wisconsin. SO to the ginger attempting to do tricks with his skateboard in front of the memorial union. All power to ya but you almost bust your shit about 10 times. You fancy huh? ASO to guys in relationships who act like theyʼre single. You made your choice, jackass, and it wasnʼt me. GTFO. ASO to friends that still have to get their parents permission to go out on the weekend. Weʼre in college for fuckʼs sake. SO to my dad for suggesting a diaper as my

outfit for a 90ʼs themed party since, after all, it was when I was born. SO to tequila shots. Off of a shot-ski. With tall folk that had to bend down to my 5ʼ2” level. Never have I felt more in control of drunk people. HMFSO to just watching a Scooby Doo episode where they were in Wiscosin. They talked about Lake Michigan, cheese, and the Packers! Yeah. The Packers were mentioned on Scooby Doo as the thing that, in Fredʼs mind, makes Wisco awesome. WIN SO to tearing up a little bit at flash mob videos. What the fuck is wrong with me? HSO to cookie dough blizzards from Dairy Queen. ASO to the MINI having 300 calories and the small having 700+. ASO to the girl with feathers and tinsel in her hair AND fake eyelashes on at the Serf. Thatʼs not normal. ASO to feeling when you are looking around the room for that one person and you realize she/he already left SO to condoms. ASO to not having them at crucial moments. DSO to non-transferable ingenuity. SO to the grandma that came to the pool with curlers in her hair! DSO to her getting in the water and swimming with her grandchildren!

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ASO to the bald guy playing the maracas and rubbing his nipples on Bascom Hill today. Go away. ASO to the guy hunger striking on capital square. According to the laws of reality, if youʼve *really* been hunger striking for 72 days, youʼd be dead at least 5 or 6 times already. Please, go home. SO to all the laying out on finally have a get up before afternoon.

fine tail Bascom. I reason to 3 in the

ASO to humidity. SO to air conditioned buildings. SO to meeting a guy tonight who was mysteriously evasive about his job and joking that maybe he was a male escort...only for him to laugh guiltily and look away awkwardly. That was unexpected... ASO to not being able to make the icing on my toaster strudels look like it does in the commercials. SO to toaster strudels. SO to Nicki Minaj, she mack them dudes up, back coupes up, and chuck the deuce up. SO to Washington DC, DSO to running into people from Wisconsin everywhere and all of them wanting to talk about UW-Madison. Badgers are everywhere. ON WISCONSIN! ASO to sexting the wrong person. .................MORE >


E4

The Badger Herald | Classifieds | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

SO to the gorgeous blonde who bought my season football tickets on Wednesday afternoon. You said they were for your boyfriend, but after seeing you and then talking to you... you are way better than most girls Iʼve met here. Dump him and call me.

SO to anyone who can listen to Bohemian Rhapsody without singing along. SO to Lobby Nights at the Orpheum this summer. Yeah you were sketchy, full of 18 year olds, and downright dirty, but you

rocked all summer. DSO to dubstep in general. SO to the little campus messages that appear while waiting for Wiscmail to load. DSO to planning my weekend according to these messages: eating Babcock ice cream, listening to

music on the terrace, and practicing the Triple Lindy at the Nat. ASO to creepy participants hitting on you during an experiment. Next time Iʼll crank up the shocks to maximum volts... WWW.BadgerHerald.com

SO to the hottie guitar player I unintentionally see at potbellys all the time and then when I was working at uhs, I knew I shouldve slipped you my number ASO to guys who post how much they bench/ check in at gyms and

say “gettin swoll” on a daily basis. I seriously want to punch you in the throat ASO to cell phones. I miss the days when I could pretend I wasnʼt home to avoid a call. SO to the adorable old couple sitting next to me at the car dealership. you made my day after the little old lady leaned over and whispered “i love you” after they didnt say a word for 20 minutes. HSO (hopeful SO) to being just as in love at their age after i get married. SO to eating deep-fried butter at the state fair. Unbelievably delicious-Wisconsin knows whatʼs up. SO to the guy at brothers last night I overheard using the pickup line, “So... do you read the shout outs?” Hopefully you two “made it happen.”

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The Badger Herald | Classifieds | Fall 2011 Registration Issue

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The Badger Herald | Classifieds | Fall 2011 Registration Issue


2011.09.06