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CAREERS   NEWSLETTER    

2017-­‐18

 

ISSUE 14  –  Friday  11  May 2018   Please  note  all  previous  issues  of  our  2017-­‐18  Careers  Circulars  are  now  available  as  

a  ‘stack’  on  Bablake’s  Issuu  page.  We  hope  they  stand  out  as  well  as  our  EES  teams     did  last  week  at  their  Celebration  Day.  (Pictured  Above:  Arup  Team.)    

 

CAREERS IN  SPORT  –  CAREERS  FORUM  15  

“THE SPORTS  BUSINESS  IS  A  TRILLION-­‐DOLLAR  INDUSTRY.  ACROSS     THE  WHOLE  SPORTING  SPECTRUM,  THE  AMOUNT  OF  MONEY  THAT   IS  POURED  INTO  SPORT  NOW  IS  REMARKABLE.”    

Brian Barwick,  Chairman  of  The  National  League  a nd  former  Chief  Executive  of  The  FA.    

Jordan  Hearne  from  UCFB,  a  university  with  campuses  at  both  The  

Etihad  (Manchester)  and  Wembley  Stadium  (London),  delivered  an  

excellent presentation  about  the  very  unique  study  model  offered  

by  UCFB  to  students  looking     to  study  degrees  in  sport  and,  in  

particular, football.     Being  located  in  such  iconic  venues  for  sport  and  media,  it  is  no   surprise  that  the  networking  and  work  experience  opportunities  for   those  studying  broadcasting,  business,  coaching,  events   management,  finance,  journalism,  leadership,  marketing,  PE  or   psychology  are  very  clear.  UCFB  Students  are  in  regular  contact  with   inspirational  public  figures  from  sport  and  spoilt  for  choice  as   regards  exciting  placement  opportunities  both  in  the  UK  and  abroad.     Jordan  conveyed  the  excitement  and  professional  atmosphere  felt   by  UCFB  students  very  well,  making  a  solid  case  for  the  ever-­‐ increasing  variety  of  jobs  available  in  a  sector  that  contributes  vast   revenue  to  the  national  economy.  This  is  a  sector  that  will  only   continue  to  grow  and  UCFB  is  already  producing  talented  graduates   whose  love  of  sport  links  perfectly  with  their  future  career  path.       For  more  information,  see  www.ufcb.com.  We  are  also  delighted  that  UCFB  has   th agreed  to  return  next  term  to  talk  to  our  4  Year  PE  pupils.      

#18Before18 #SkillsForYourFuture  #RealisingYourPotential  

@BablakeCareers

SUMMER READING    

New publication  ‘The  Successful  Law   Student:  A n  Insider's  Guide  to   Studying  Law’  is  a  comprehensive   companion  for  prospective  law   students.  Full  of  insight,  advice  and   perspective  from  current  and  past  law   students,  it  offers  the  inside  track  on   how  to  m ake  the  most  of  your  law   degree  and  time  at  university.   Experienced  law  tutors  Imogen  Moore   and  Craig  Newbery-­‐Jones  focus  on   making  a  smooth  transition  to   university  level  study,  getting  the   most  out  of  lectures  &  feedback  from   tutors,  and  how  to  approach  law   exams.  

We  thank  Oxford  University  Press  for   sending  us  a  complimentary  copy.  


TALKING ABOUT  APPRENTICESHIPS/  SCHOOL  LEAVER  PROGRAMMES    

When discussing  options  beyond  Bablake,  we  always  urge  every  student  to  choose  the  option  that  suits   the  individual  best.  With  wise  guidance  and  awareness  of  all  options  available,  we  trust  the  majority  of   students  make  an  informed  choice.  Whether  that  route  involves  university  education  or  training  as  an   apprentice,  or  even  both  aspects  as  a  degree  apprentice,  this  is  possibly  the  hardest  choice  for  our   current  Sixth  Form  students.       With  the  rise  in  popularity  of  apprenticeships,  it  is  very  important  to  dispel  certain  myths,  so  here  is  our   list  of  positives:   • You  may  still  gain  a  degree-­‐level  qualification  by  doing  an  apprenticeship/  completing  the  levels.   • Apprenticeships  are  not  only  available  for  technical  or  blue-­‐collar  industries;  the  variety  of  options   is  now  vast  and  exciting.   • You  may  apply  for  both  university  courses  and  apprenticeship  programmes,  before  making  a  final   decision  on  your  preferred  route.   • As  an  apprentice,  you  have  many  of  the  rights  of  the  rest  of  the  workforce:  e.g.  a  wage,  holiday   entitlements  and  other  benefits.  Wages  vary,  but  the  best-­‐paid  schemes  will  be  approaching  £15-­‐ 20k  per  year.  This  is  a  wage  that  will  rise,  and  there  is  no  student  loan  to  repay.   • After  completing  an  apprenticeship,  the  majority  of  people  stay  with  the  same  employer.  This  is  a   wise  investment  for  all  parties  and  reassuring  for  those  wanting  a  job  guarantee  after  studying.   • Apprenticeships  are  most  definitely  not  just  for  people  who  cannot  get  into  university.   • Apprenticeships  are  not  an  inferior/  second  or  third  class  route  into  employment.   • Apprentices  are  capable  of  earning  as  much  as  graduates  and  start  earning  from  day  1  of  training.   • Apprenticeships  are  available  for  all  ages,  not  just  16  –  25  year  olds.   • Degree  apprenticeships  are  fee  free  –  hard  work,  but  with  excellent  rewards  and  challenges.   • Apprentices  still  experience  independence,  have  excellent  social  lives  and  make  new  friends.     The  most  common  concerns  in  finding  suitable  apprenticeships  are:   • Identifying  specific  areas  of  study,  providers,  suitable  locations,  application  deadlines  and  starting   dates.   • Official  listings  of  apprenticeship  opportunities  do  not  yet  match  the  efficiency  and  clarity  of  the   UCAS  system  that  exists  for  degree  courses.     • Unlike  UCAS,  where  you  apply  well  in  advance  for  a  degree  and  complete  a  relatively  simple   application  procedure,  there  is  greater  variety  for  apprenticeships.  Some  employers  will  only   advertise  when  positions  arise.   • Even  where  there  is  a  regular  annual  intake,  we  have  seen  a  massive  difference  in  the  scale  of   ‘work’  involved  in  applying  for  an  apprenticeship.  A  few  students  have  almost  interviewed  the   company  of  their  choice  or  been  offered  a  post  after  a  relatively  informal  interview,  while  others   have  undergone  procedures  as  tough  and  competitive  as  those  for  graduate  schemes.     If  uncertain  of  an  apprenticeship  path  and  not  targeting  a  large/  key  employer  or  sector,  it  may  be  wise  to   use  the  Upper  Sixth  year  to  attend  suitable  job  fairs  and  do  your  research,  while  completing  A  levels  and   gaining  the  best  grades  possible.  Students  can  then  apply  for  schemes,  using  what  would  be  a  gap  year   afterwards  to  think  carefully  and  test  the  ground  in  a  few  industries.  It  is  more  important  to  get  the   decision  right  than  rush  a  decision.     ONLINE  ASSISTANCE    

Amazing Apprenticeships,  Get  My  First  Job,  Milkround  School  Leavers,  National  Apprenticeship  Service  (www.gov.uk/apply-­‐ apprenticeship),  Not  Going  To  Uni,  Rate  My  Apprenticeship,  Target  Careers,  Which?Uni.  Please  note  UCAS  is  beginning  to  list   opportunities  and  do  not  be  shy  of  approaching  specific  employers:  e.g.  Accenture,  Civil  Service,  Deloitte,  Dyson,  EY,  IBM,   KPMG,  PwC  et  al.  

DISCUSSING OPTIONS  BEYOND  BABLAKE  


CLEARING THE  PATH  FOR  TOMORROW’S  FEMALE  ENGINEERS  

     

Helen Jackson,  senior  consultant  for  Ove  Arup  and  Partners  Limited  (one  of  our  Engineering  Education  Scheme  partners)  has   previously  documented  some  of  the  hurdles  she  has  faced  in  her  engineering  career,  and  what  can  be  done  to  remove  them   for  the  next  generation.      

Whenever  I  see  the  statistics  about  the  proportion  of  women  in  UK  engineering,  I  am  no  longer  astonished;  I  am  resigned  to  a  gender   imbalance  in  engineering,  even  in  these  modern  and  otherwise  diverse  times.  Only  8  per  cent  of  professional  UK  engineers  are  women,   and  the  figures  for  current  engineering  first-­‐degree  courses  show  that  the  proportion  of  women  is  only  around  14  per  cent.  In  2013/14,   nearly  9,000  young  women  opted  for  level  2  apprenticeships  at  post  16  in  hairdressing,  while  only  80  opted  for  an  engineering   apprenticeship  at  the  same  level.  It  seems  that  whatever  factors  limit  the  number  of  women  going  into  engineering  in  the  UK,  they  are   still  in  full  play.   Let’s  not  underestimate  the  issue  here.  These  numbers  are  disturbingly  low,  the  worst  in  Europe,  and  an  indictment  of  how  engineering   is  sold  to  the  younger  generation.  We  commonly  think  that  in  this  country  we  are  world  leaders  in  diversity,  but  somehow  every  other   European  nation  is  doing  better  than  the  UK  in  removing  the  hidden  obstacles  to  women  having  a  career  in  engineering.   It  is  hard  to  conceive  how  this  could  be  the  case  but,  when  I  start  considering  my  own  history,  I  realise  that  at  every  turn  I  have   had  to  fight  to  remain  on  course  for  an  engineering  career.  At  each  crucial  point  I  have  had  to  resist  the  pressures  and  alternative   attractions  that  led  my  peers  to  follow  different  paths.   My  starting  point  for  any  consideration  of  the  gender  split  in  engineering  is  that  there  is  absolutely  no  difference  in  the  innate   ability  of  men  or  women  to  be  excellent  engineers.  I  was  astonished  to  read  that  research  from  King’s  College  London  indicated  that   some  teachers  still  perpetuate  the  myth  that  physics,  a  subject  central  to  an  engineering  career,  is  somehow  a  subject  more  suited  to   ‘boy  brains’.  How  these  ideas  remain  credible  today  I  don’t  know,  but  I  hope  that  one  result  of  International  Women  in  Engineering  Day   is  to  show  young  women  that,  if  you  have  an  aptitude  for  physics  and  maths,  there  is  no  reason  why  you  will  find  it  any  more  difficult   than  a  boy.  Showing  that  there  are  plenty  of  women  like  me,  with  a  successful  engineering  career,  shouldn’t  be  necessary,  but   apparently  still  is.   I  went  to  an  all-­‐girls  independent  school  and,  to  be  honest,  I  had  little  support  from  the  school  when  I  decided  to  pursue   engineering.  In  year  8,  I  took  part  in  a  careers  planning  exercise  –  engineering  wasn’t  on  the  list  of  options  for  a  girl  –  but   because  of  my  obvious  technical  abilities  coupled  with  a  love  of  music,  I  was  told  that  being  a  piano  tuner  was  my  ideal  career!  This   lack  of  encouragement  at  school  continued  and  I  had  to  find  my  own  ways  of  gaining  work  experience,  spending  my  holidays  working  with   an  Indycar  team,  at  the  sportscar  manufacturer  TVR’s  Blackpool  site  and  at  my  local  car  garage.   The  only  support  from  school  to  my  engineering  aspirations  was  the  ability  to  take  part  in  the  Engineering  Education  Scheme  (EES),  run   by  the  charity  EDT,  in  Year  12.  This  was  supported  by  my  A-­‐Level  physics  teacher  who  accepted  that  whilst  we  were  all  being  taught   medical  physics  modules  to  become  doctors,  there  may  have  been  the  odd  girl  interested  in  engineering.  There  was  only  one  team  of  four   from  my  school  and  it  contained  the  only  two  girls  in  the  year  who,  out  of  a  group  of  78,  were  sufficiently  resilient  to  still   maintain  a  drive  to  pursue  engineering  at  higher  education  and  beyond.   EES  was  a  revelation.  Our  team  was  paired  with  a  company  in  Birmingham’s  Jewellery  Quarter  that  was  looking  to  improve  efficiency  in   the  heat  treatment  process  gold  to  save  money.  We  visited  the  factory,  spoke  to  the  workers  and  had  an  engaging  mentor  who  explained   the  mechanics  and  thermodynamics  of  the  problem.  We  felt  we  could  really  make  a  difference  for  this  firm,  despite  being  17  years  old,   despite  being  girls.   I  am  still  in  touch  with  my  school  as  it  is  one  of  a  number  of  schools  Arup  supports  in  EES,  which  I  co-­‐ordinate.  When  discussing  my   experiences,  teachers  now  acknowledge  that  not  enough  was  done  to  encourage  girls  with  engineering  capabilities  during  my  time.  They   are  now  changing  the  approach  and  the  culture  with  some  positive  results.   As  I  have  continued  my  career,  I  have  become  used  to  being  one  of  the  few  females  in  the  room.  Sadly,  whenever  I  have  undertaken  high-­‐ level  presentations,  it  continues  to  be  remarked  on  that  I  have  had  the  task  of  capturing  the  attention  of  male-­‐dominated  audiences.   My  own  view  is  that  encouraging  young  women  into  engineering  is  no  different  from  encouraging  anybody  into  engineering;  you  need  to   show  them,  at  an  early  an  age  as  possible,  what  engineering  involves.  Show  them  role  models  (male  or  female)  in  engineering  that  they   can  relate  to,  and  let  them  undertake  realistic  commercial  projects  that  give  them  an  understanding  of  what  engineers  can  achieve.  I   think  it  is  important  that  such  experiences  should  take  place  early  in  young  people’s  journey  towards  deciding  their  careers,  ideally   in  years  6  to  9,  so  that  they  get  the  insight  into  engineering  before  they  start  thinking  about  their  GCSE  and  ‘A’  level  subjects.   Programmes  like  EES  at  Year  12  are  excellent  for  confirming  an  engineering  aspiration,  but  may  be  too  late  to  inspire  those  who  have   already  closed  the  door  on  engineering  earlier  in  their  school  life,  without  any  real  insight.   I  am  also  in  sympathy  with  the  IMechE  report  that  emphasises  the  need  to  reposition  engineering  as  a  people-­‐focused,  problem-­‐solving,   socially-­‐beneficial  discipline,  to  appeal  to  a  broader  range  of  young  people.  We  tend  to  be  very  product  focused;  “become  an  engineer   and  design  the  next  generation  of  ultra-­‐supercritical  generator-­‐based  power  stations”  means  little  to  a  young  person.  “Become  an   engineer  and  design  the  solutions  which  will  help  roll  back  global  warming”  is  much  more  likely  to  inspire  them.  It  is  commonly   suggested  that  young  women  are  particularly  responsive,  perhaps  more  empathetic,  to  messages  that  emphasise  their  potential  role  in   enhancing  the  public  good  and  global  sustainability  through  engineering.   So,  what  can  engineers  and  engineering  companies  learn  from  my  experience?  I  would  give  two  main  pieces  of  advice.  Firstly,  engage   with  young  people  at  school,  both  boys  and  girls,  as  young  as  possible  through  schemes  like  EDT’s  Go4SET  or  any  Industrial  Cadet   accredited  programme  for  Years  6  to  9.  Give  them  the  engineering  work  experience  that  I  found  so  hard  to  get.  As  an  engineering   community,  we  must  recognise  that  to  get  more  young  people  into  engineering,  particularly  young  women,  we  need  to  inspire  and  mentor   them  before  they  have  started  thinking  about  possible  careers,  so  they  study  the  subjects  that  engineering  needs.   Secondly,  let’s  not  undersell  ourselves  by  talking  about  products  all  the  time.  OK,  the  technical  stuff  excites  us,  that’s  because   we’re  engineers,  but  to  communicate  with  young  people  we  need  to  communicate  why  the  technical  stuff  helps  build  a  better  world.   That’s  the  message  that  interests  them.  That’s  the  message  which  will  bring  them,  particularly  young  women,  to  consider  engineering  as   a  career.  

This  excellent  article  was  previously  published  on  www.theengineer.co.uk.  In  the  Sixth  Form,  Bablake  has  an  excellent   relationship  with  EES  via  our  Design  and  Technology  department,  but  younger  pupils  should  not  disregard  taster  courses   available  at  our  local  universities  and  vacation  opportunities  with  organisations  like  Smallpeice  Trust.    


TALKING POINTS    

 

#STEAM NOT  #STEM     We  have  acquired  an  excellent     resource  from  Creative  Skillset,   allowing  students  to  explore  options     in  screen-­‐based  creative  areas.      

       

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT   FOCUS  ON  OUR  U6TH  

SESSION 16   Friday  25th  May  (L6th  only)      

‘Beyond Bablake’    

Presentations on  CV  writing,   interview  technique,  gap  year   opportunities,  UCAS,  and  alternative   routes  post  18  will  be  delivered  by:   James  Catterall  (Gapforce),  Ruth   Forster  (Wagstaff  Recruitment),   Emma  Goodman,  Mrs  Tumber  (Head   of  6th)  and  Mr  Woodward  (Head  of   Careers).      

This promises  to  be  an  excellent,  crucial   day  for  our  L6th  students.  

 

   

CAREERS FORUM  

See  http://creativeskillset.org/  for  more  info  

#18BEFORE18 A  reminder  of  the  categories   pupils  using  our  planners  should   use  to  create  their  programme:    

CALLING  FOR  ASSISTANCE  

Thank you  to  the  parents  who  have     responded  to  our  appeal  for  help   supplementing  our  guidance.       If  you  are  still  keen  to  assist,     http://www.2morrow-­‐2day.com/help-­‐ we-­‐need-­‐somebody.html  has  more  info   on  what  we  are  looking  for.  

• • • • • •

Networking Qualifications   Help  with  Decisions   Challenging  Yourself   Beyond  the  Classroom   Bablake  Opportunity    

www.18before18.co.uk has  more  info.  

Well done  to  Riley  McGuire  who  will   begin  an  apprenticeship  with  Jaguar   Land  Rover,  after  completing  his  A   level  studies.       Krina  Mistry’s  outstanding   performance  at  interview  -­‐  all  of   which  differed  in  format  -­‐  has  led  to   her  receiving  4  offers  for  Optometry/   Orthoptics.     We  also  congratulate  Lewis  Coleman   and  Deepra  Sinha  on  receiving  offers   from  all  4  of  the  medical  schools  they   applied  to.  

CAREERS  FORUM  

Our final  2  sessions  for  2017-­‐18  will   take  place  after  half  term.     We  hope  to  offer  sessions  on:   • Finance  and  Accountancy   • Fashion/  Social  Enterprise.     We  are  already  planning  an  exciting  new   programme  of  talks  for  2018-­‐19  and   would  always  welcome  suggestions  for   areas  to  cover.  

 

A REMINDER!    

‘BEYOND BABLAKE’  WEEK  (L6th)  –  Monday  2  July  to  Friday  6  July   All  L6th  students  are  planning  a  schedule  for  the  week  and  many  of  the  year  group  have  exciting  plans  already  in  place.   Involvement  with  Sports  Day  (Senior/  Junior  School),  Bablake’s  T20  festival,  hosting  a  business  day  for  our  4th  years,   CREST  or  EPQ  research,  and  university  open  day/  taster  day  visits  are  all  suitable  options.   If  you  are  lacking  ‘inspiration’,  please  talk  to  your  form  tutor  or  see  MGAW  a.s.a.p.  to  discuss  further.    

THOUGHT FOR  THE  WEEK  

CONTACT BABLAKE  CAREERS  

 

Mr Mark  Woodward    

“Stay away  from  negative  people.  They  have  a  problem   for  every  solution.”   Albert  Einstein   ‘The  World  As  I  See  It’  

Email:  mgw@bablake.coventry.sch.uk    

Twitter: @bablakecareers     FB:  www.facebook.com/bablakecareers   Website:  www.2morrow-­‐2day.com   LinkedIn:  www.linkedin/markwoodward   Blog:  http://bablakecareers.tumblr.com/     Spotify:  http://www.spotify.com/18before18   Instagram:  @bablakecareers   Careers  Circulars:  http://issuu.com/bablake/stacks          

Bablake Careers Circular - Issue 14 (17-18)  

Fortnightly term-time newsletter from Bablake's Careers department.

Bablake Careers Circular - Issue 14 (17-18)  

Fortnightly term-time newsletter from Bablake's Careers department.