Page 1

2017

PRESENTING SPONSOR


S R P

SU PPL I ER

D I V ER S I T Y

WE DON’T BELIEVE IN BUSINESS AS USUAL.

We’re looking for partners who feel the same. For more than 100 years, SRP has kept diversity at the forefront of all aspects of our business. When our business partners reflect our diverse community, everyone benefits. To learn more about becoming an SRP partner, visit srpnet.com/about/procurement/supplierdiversity.aspx.


WELCOME TO DATOS 2017 "SRP is proud to support the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce's commitment to the economic vitality of our great state and its diverse communities. We congratulate the Chamber on the 21st anniversary release of DATOS: The State of Arizona's Hispanic Market. The impact of Latinos on our state's economy is real, growing and a vital component of our state's future prosperity." —MARK BONSALL, General Manager & CEO, Salt River Project

THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF ARIZONA LATINOS IS STILL GROWING If there is one constant when it comes to the impact of Arizona Latinos on our state's economy, it is that the magnitude and importance of that impact is growing every year. In 2007, Arizona was home to 52,000 Latino-owned businesses. Since then, that figure has jumped more than 100 percent. At the same time, the number of Hispanic women entrepreneurs tripled – making Latinas the fastest growing segment of business owners nationwide and the majority of Latino-owned companies in Arizona. Most of this phenomenal growth has been driven by the Hispanic community's rapid population increase. What makes the growth of Latino-owned businesses all the more impressive is that it happened over the course of the Great Recession. During that period, businesses overall in Arizona, among all ethnic groups, grew by just 2 percent. While researchers have yet to study this trend in depth, the evidence suggests that in the face of higher-than-average job layoffs among Hispanics our state's Hispanic entrepreneurs and especially Latina entrepreneurs, decided that despite the economic recession (or perhaps because of it) the time was right to start a business. The recession is behind us now and Arizona's economy is making strong gains, but we cannot ignore a fundamental building block that will drive all future economic growth across our state: the quality of our education system. By 2020, approximately two-thirds of all U.S. jobs will require more than a high school education, according to a Georgetown University study. In short, all Arizonans need to be better informed, better trained and better educated if we expect to meet the challenges of the 21st Century economy. That's why the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce does all it can to boost educational opportunities statewide and especially among our state's burgeoning Hispanic student population. Our main mission is to represent the interests of the state's Latino business owners. We know that Arizona Latinos cannot prosper without a good education. So, as part of our more than $500,000 investment in our Emerging Business Leaders Initiative, we work with students from high school through college and beyond by offering training, scholarships, paid internships and professional mentoring. Another way we're helping to build our increasingly knowledge-based economy is by publishing DATOS: The State of Arizona's Hispanic Market report. The report serves as a comprehensive and reliable source of fact-based information. It was created so policy and business leaders statewide would have the best data available to shape Arizona's economic agenda. Through DATOS, our other research publications, our public policy engagement and the more than 50 other networking and training events we host annually, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is committed to doing everything we can to promote our state's future economic development and global competitiveness. Thank you for your support and for joining us to celebrate the 21st anniversary of DATOS: The State of Arizona's Hispanic Market.

GONZALO A. DE LA MELENA, JR.

YOLANDA FRANCE

President & CEO Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Director, Customer Contact Operations Salt River Project (SRP) 1

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


EDITOR'S LETTER A CLEAR-EYED LOOK AT ARIZONA'S HISPANIC MARKET Welcome to the 21st Edition of DATOS: The State of Arizona's Hispanic Market. The datos (data) we present in this annual book is not an emotional response to heated political rhetoric. Rather, it is an extensive, thoroughly research document based on easily verifiable facts about Arizona's economy, one in which immigrants play a critical role in the growth and success of the state. Arizona is a small business environment where most jobs exist because of energetic entrepreneurs – and one-third of those entrepreneurs are immigrants. The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (AZHCC) has always been committed to the dissemination of relevant, reliable and responsible information about our community. We currently publish eight other publications, including our Minority Business Enterprise Report and its three supplements on women-owned, family-owned and Hispanic-owned businesses. We also launched a White Paper series in 2013 that covers a variety of best practice areas – Supplier Diversity, Employee Resource Groups, Sustainability, Global Trade and Economic Indicators (to be released in November 2017). For the past five years, I have collaborated on this market research report with my trusted colleagues, bright interns and subject matter experts who comprise the DATOS committee. We gathered some of the most intelligent professionals in the state so that we can guarantee that you have the tools you need to make well-informed business decisions. DATOS outlines, in elaborate detail, the business case for embracing our thriving Hispanic community. Latinos are Arizona's greatest resource and Arizona's advancement is largely dependent on how well our community does in school and in business. I sincerely hope our current political leaders make the clear connection between our education system and the future success of businesses within the state and the U.S. If our approach to education does not radically change, we will fail our students instead of setting them up for future success. Today's students will be tomorrow's entrepreneurs, corporate professionals and community activists. Through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program,* we have created a talented, law-abiding and educated group of immigrants who actively and enthusiastically contribute to the U.S. economy. Arizona's succession plan must include a legitimate place for hard-working DREAMers such as Antonio Valdovinos (see p.421), who will work hard to create a better world for all of us. Abrazos, * EDITOR'S NOTE: ON SEPT. 5, 2017, THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION ANNOUNCED AN END TO THE DACA PROGRAM CREATED IN 2012 UNDER PRESIDENT OBAMA. PRESIDENT TRUMP HAS URGED CONGRESS TO PASS A REPLACEMENT BEFORE HE BEGINS PHASING OUT ITS PROTECTIONS IN SIX MONTHS. IF CONGRESS DOES NOT ACT, SOME OF THE 800,000 YOUNG ADULTS BROUGHT TO THE U.S. ILLEGALLY AS CHILDREN COULD BE DEPORTED EARLY AS MARCH 2018. MORE DACA INFO WWW.INFORMEDIMMIGRANT.COM

MÓNICA S. VILLALOBOS

Vice-President, AZ Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Editor, DATOS: The State of Arizona's Hispanic Market

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

2

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS DATOS 2017 CONTENT COMMITTEE (LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER BY COMPANY/ORGANIZATION)

SUSAN CARLSON

EDYTA KOSCIELNIAK

SARAY LOPEZ

EDUARDO BORQUEZ

JERRY ROMO

NATALIA CUNEO

TODD LANDFRIED

KERRY MITCHELL

COX COMMUNICATIONS

AMEPAC

GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY

APOLLO EDUCATION GROUP

MARICOPA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS

ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS

ARIZONA EMPLOYERS FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM

ALANA CHAVEZ-LANGDON

MARICOPA COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

ALEXA LINGER

ARIZONA PUBLIC SERVICE (APS)

NAVIGATE RESEARCH

TARA JACKSON

DR. WADE ROUSSE

ARIZONA TOWN HALL

NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY (NAU)

ALBERTO REYES-OLIVAS

OYE! INTELLIGENCE

DR. DAVID GARCIA

GREG FRESQUEZ

JOSEPH GARCIA

MICHELE VALDOVINOS

ANDREA WHITSETT

YOLANDA FRANCE

DR. EILEEN DIAZ MCCONNELL

CHRISTINA TELLEZ

DR. LOUIS OLIVAS

DR. MARIA R. CHAVIRA

ASU MARY LOU FULTON TEACHERS COLLEGE

ASU MORRISON INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC POLICY

SALT RIVER PROJECT (SRP) THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC/AZCENTRAL.COM

ASU SCHOOL OF TRANSBORDER STUDIES ASU SCHOOL OF TRANSBORDER STUDIES

GONZALO A. DE LA MELENA, JR. AZ HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

JAMES E. GARCIA Associate Editor CARMEN G. MARTÍNEZ Creative Director KAREN MURPHY Copy Editor/Proofreader

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF PHOENIX

FELIPE CORRAL Intern/Journalism DINA DELEON Intern/Research Analyst LISA MARTINEZ LOPEZ Intern/Research Analyst

LEEANN LINDSEY

UNITED WAY - THRIVING TOGETHER

DR. ANABEL APORTELA

JAIME BOYD

AZ SCHOOL BOARDS ASSOCIATION

TERMINOLOGY AND RESEARCH

UNIVISION

ISRAEL BARAJAS

IN DATOS 2016, THE TERMS HISPANIC AND LATINO ARE USED SYNONYMOUSLY, AS ARE NATIVE AMERICAN AND AMERICAN INDIAN AND AFRICANAMERICAN AND BLACK. WHITE, NON-HISPANIC IS SOMETIMES REFERRED TO AS NON-HISPANIC WHITE. HISPANICS MAY BE OF ANY RACE.

KEVIN NORGAARD

BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA

UNIVISION

MARLA BAUER

YASMINE VERDUGO

BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA

UNIVISION

JAMES MONTOYA

ANGELA SERDA

CITY OF PHOENIX

VALLEY METRO

JESSICA GONZALEZ

LUIS R. SOTO

CITY OF PHOENIX - HIVE @ CENTRAL

VANTAGE WEST CREDIT UNION

MARJORIE DERUBEIS

DR. RAQUEL GUTIERREZ

COLLEGE SUCCESS ARIZONA

VITALYST HEALTH

ALEX ALVAREZ

GLENN IWATA

CONGRESSMAN RUBEN GALLEGO - CONSTITUENT SERVICES

DATO S

PHOENIX INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY RESEARCHBYDESIGN

ASU MORRISON INSTITUTE

MONICA S. VILLALOBOS Editor

PAUL PADILLA Lead Intern/Research Analyst

ERIC DIAZ

ASU CONGRESSMAN ED PASTOR CENTER FOR POLITICS AND PUBLIC SERVICE

PRODUCTION TEAM

THE INFORMATION PRESENTED HERE WAS SELECTED FROM STANDARD SECONDARY SOURCES. HOWEVER, DATA CHANGES QUICKLY AND IS NOT ALWAYS COLLECTED ANNUALLY. DATA OFTEN OFFERS A STATIC PICTURE OF AN EVER-CHANGING SITUATION. THE NUMBERS CALCULATED FOR ANY STATISTIC DEPEND ON THE DEFINITIONS AND ASSUMPTIONS USED TO PRODUCE THEM.

WESTGROUP RESEARCH

A Z

2 0 1 7

3

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


THE ROAD IS LINED WITH SAVINGS PEORIA

-

--

--

----------

--

--

---

----

-----

----

-----

---------

-

-

FORD X-PLAN MARKS THE SPOT

--

-- - - - - - - TEMPE

------

--

---

-

-

--

--

----

---

---

--

---

--

--

SCOT TS DA L E

-----

---

--------

----

------

--

---

--

-----------

PHOENIX

---

--

GLENDALE

--------------

---------

-

Your Phoenix Metro Ford Dealers are offering exclusive Ford X-Plan pricing for AZHCC Members on our full lineup of Ford vehicles. Visit FordPartner.com and enter partner code: MZYLV then follow the map to your closest Desert Ford Dealer today!

Phoenix Metro Dealers BuyFordNow.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS

7

CHAPTER 1

CHAPTER 2

CHAPTER 3

CHAPTER 4

CHAPTER 5

CHAPTER 6

PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER

TECHNOLOGY

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

HEALTH

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

9

91

139

157

183

195

CHAPTER 7

CHAPTER 8

CHAPTER 9

CHAPTER 10

CHAPTER 11

POPULATION

EDUCATION

HOUSING

TRADE WITH MEXICO

POLITICS

231

258

281

299

313

SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 12

SECTION III

NOTES:

IMMIGRATION

• THIS IS A COMPREHENSIVE COMPILATION OF SECONDARY RESEARCH MADE AVAILABLE TO THE AZHCC FROM VARIOUS SOURCES. IT IS EITHER PUBLIC INFORMATION OR USED WITH PERMISSION FROM THOSE SOURCES.

322

• ARTISAN LUTHIER WORKING ON THE CREATION OF VIOLIN FILE: #107549997, AUTHOR: FREEPROD © FOTOLIA • BLACKSMITH FORGING A METAL HORSESHOE FILE: #33501611 AUTHOR: ELLENAMANI © FOTOLIA • GRINDING PARTS ON A LATHE FILE: #134843747, AUTHOR: ROMASET © FOTOLIA • CHEF COOKING BURGERS, FILE: #150429245, AUTHOR: FUNKYFROGSTOCK © FOTOLIA • CREATIVE PROCESS FILE:

#143072583, AUTHOR: LUCKYIMAGES © FOTOLIA • SURGERY IN SURGERY ROOM FILE: #134064397, AUTHOR: OCEANDIGITAL © FOTOLIA • CHOOSING RIGHT SCREWS FILE: #125319726, AUTHOR: TOMASZ ZAJDA © FOTOLIA • SLEEPING NEWBORN BABY ON MALE HANDS FILE: #118232145, AUTHOR: ZFFOTO © FOTOLIA • CUTTING RIPE GRAPE FILE: #92534421, AUTHOR: ANNA KHOMULO © FOTOLIA

DATO S

A Z

• ELECTRICIAN HANDS WITH PLIERS FILE: #45807491, AUTHOR: ARPAD NAGY-BAGOLY © FOTOLIA • MEGA PACK ICON SET BUNDLE CIRCLE LONG SHADOW FILE: #134539777, AUTHOR: SAIFUL © FOTOLIA • INFOGRAPHICS VECTOR DESIGN TEMPLATE FILE: #77345968, AUTHOR: TARAPONG © FOTOLIA • ICONS SETS FILES: #103369115, AUTHOR: LEREMY © FOTOLIA • 484 ICONS BASICS FILE: #56241778, AUTHOR: ARTCO © FOTOLIA

2 0 1 7

5

• PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A SEARCHABLE PDF AND BY CLICKING CTL-F, A SEARCH BOX WILL APPEAR TO LOCATE ANY WORD OR PHRASE.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE CONTACT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (AZHCC) AT INFO@AZHCC.COM OR 602-279-1800.

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


HIGHLIGHTS • Fifty-one percent of Hispanics versus 29% of Whites believe that their race or ethnicity has made it difficult to achieve the American Dream.

• Hispanics accounted for nearly 100% of the growth in new car purchases between 2015 and 2016.

• Latino consumer spending nationwide in 2016 was $1.4 trillion.

• The average Hispanic household in Arizona spent more on groceries than non-Hispanics did in 2014.

• The rate of U.S. Hispanic population growth slowed from 4.4% (2000–2007) to 2.8% (2007– 2014). • 33 percent of Arizonans are Hispanic, according to 2016 U.S. Census data.

• More than 1 of 3 Hispanic women in AZ versus less than 1 of 5 non-Hispanic White women have a personal physician and 66% of Hispanic women versus 86% of non-Hispanic White women have health insurance.

• Latino consumer spending in Arizona was about $42 billion, or 16.8% of the total, in 2016.

• Spanish is the second most common language after English spoken in U.S. homes.

• There are about 4.8 million Latino-owned businesses in the U.S., including more than 123,000 in Arizona.

• Among viewers of Spanish-language television in Phoenix, 95% speak mainly Spanish at home, but 79% speak mainly English outside of the home.

• Sixty percent of U.S. Latino business owners are either immigrants or the children of immigrants.

• Internet usage was 84% for Hispanics and 89% of non-Hispanic Whites in 2016.

• Nearly 50% of U.S. Latino business owners have at least a bachelor's degree.

• More than 1 of 4 K-12 students nationwide is Hispanic. Hispanic children are predicted to be a majority of K-12 students in Arizona by 2020.

• Hispanic entrepreneurs are almost twice as likely to earn more than $100K a year as compared to other Hispanics.

• From 1990 to 2013, the Hispanic dropout rate nationwide among 16- to 24-year-olds decreased from 32% to 12%.

• Total sales receipts for the estimated 4.8 million Hispanic-owned companies in 2017 is projected to be $640 billion, triple what it was in 2002.

• In 2013, Hispanics were about 16% of the U.S. population but earned only 10% of all bachelor's degrees at colleges and universities nationwide.

• Forty percent of agricultural workers and 20 percent of construction workers in Arizona are undocumented.

• Fifty-two percent of new home purchasers between 2010 and 2030 will be Hispanic.

• In 1996, 77% of new businesses were started by Whites and 10 percent by Hispanics. In 2006, about 60 percent of new businesses were started by Whites and 20 percent by Hispanics. DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

• Hispanics are the youngest on average among all major ethnic groups in the U.S. at 28 versus 43 for non-Hispanic Whites. 7

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

The nation's nearly 59 million Latinos are becoming a greater share of the U.S. consumer base and entrepreneurial class. On the consumer front, Latinos continue to be a major and growing economic driver nationwide. Now 18 percent of the U.S. population, Hispanic purchasing power totaled $1.4 trillion in 2016, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia, or 10 percent of total U.S. purchasing power. Of the $247 billion in total consumer spending in Arizona, Hispanics spent about $42 billion in 2016, a figure predicted to grow to between $44 and $45 billion by the end of 2017. At the same time, Hispanics continue to account for a growing proportion of total purchasing power statewide. In 1990, just under 10 percent of consumer spending in Arizona was attributed to Latinos. Today, 17 percent of consumer purchasing statewide is by Hispanics. Arizona ranks seventh in the nation among states with the most Hispanic consumer spending. At the top of this list are California Hispanics, who spend 8.5 times as much as Arizona Hispanics. North Dakota has a comparatively small population, but the state recorded the largest increase (179 percent) in Hispanic consumer spending in 2016. Regarding Hispanic-owned small businesses, a recent study by the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative presents some fascinating data about the nation's estimated 4.6 million Latino-owned businesses. According to the Initiative's 2016 Survey of Latino Business Owners, Latino businesses are growing at a rate two to three times the national average, a pace that has not slowed for most of the past 15 years. In Arizona, the number of Latino-owned businesses, according to the U.S. Census, more than doubled from about 52,000 in 2007 to more than 123,000 in 2015. In the same period, the number of companies owned by Hispanic women tripled to more than 66,000, making them a majority of Hispanic-owned firms in the state. The 2016 survey collected data from 4,900 Latino business owners nationwide, listed these key findings: • Latino firms are located across the U.S., with 75 percent doing business in majority non-Latino neighborhoods serving mostly non-Latino customers. • 60 percent of all firms are located in four states, California, Texas, Florida and New York. • Immigrants own 29 percent of Latino-owned businesses nationwide. • While new business growth slowed overall during the recession, Latinos continued to create firms at rates comparable to the prior and post-recessionary periods. Most Latino firms are small businesses that earned about 25 percent of the average non-Latino firm in 2012 and have no employees. In Arizona, Latino-owned businesses in 2015 generated an average of $110,000 in annual gross receipts, as compared to nearly $500,000 for non-Latino firms. The Stanford survey calculated that if Latino-owned businesses nationwide were to earn as much as non-Latino firms, $1.38 trillion would be added to the U.S. economy. The Stanford data also found that "70 percent of Latino firms are owned by people born in the United States" and about 30 percent are owned by immigrants. Among Latino-owned companies in the U.S. earning more than $1 million, 42 percent are owned by immigrants. Latino millennials are diving into entrepreneurship. According to the Stanford study, nearly half of all Latino business owners in the U.S. are millennials (ages 18-35). The Stanford Survey also found "Latino firms are distributed across a variety of industries and most concentrated in industries with the highest growth rate….Less than one-quarter of Latino firms are in construction or manufacturing and even fewer are in leisure or hospitality, combating common stereotypes of Latinos owning mostly restaurants and construction-related firms."

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

9

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


CBC-4009-SupportAds-5.5X4.25-MM.pdf

1

4/7/14

12:34 PM

Let’s raise expectations of what our community can be. Join Comerica Bank in supporting our community. As a proud sponsor, together we can raise expectations of how great our community can be.

®

MEMBER FDIC. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY LENDER.

RAISE YOUR EXPECTATIONS.

presented by


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

U.S. BUYING POWER BY RACE(1990-2021) U.S. Buying Power by Race, 1990-2021

Figures in billions of dollars

Total

1,204.5 107.2 890.7 196.9

959.1 82.4 603.5 140.0

608.1 40.6 276.5 60.2 2000

2010

White

Black

1,457.9 133.2 1,207.4 266.2

13,862.9 11,463.7

11,221.6 9,436.6

7,399.4 6,414.1 320.4 19.8 116.9 0.0

4,297.1 3,840.0 1990

16,563.5 13,498.7

FIGURES IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS

2016

American Indian

2021

Asian

Multiracial

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

SHARE OF U.S. BUYING POWER BY RACE, 1990-2021

1990

2000

White

2010

Black

American Indian

2016

Asian

1.6%

7.3%

0.8%

8.8%

81.5% 1.4%

6.4%

0.8%

8.7%

1.2%

5.4%

0.7%

8.5%

82.7%

84.1% 0.8%

3.7%

0.5%

8.2%

0.0%

2.7%

0.5%

7.5%

86.7%

89.4%

Share of U.S. Buying Power by Race (1990-2021)

2021

Multicultural

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

11 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

U.S. HISPANIC BUYING POWER, 1990-2021 U.S. Hispanic Buying Power (1990-2021)

Figures in billions of dollars

1,392

1,013

495

213 1990

2000

1,802

4,084

6,905

10,209

12,471

14,762

FIGURES IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS

2010

Hispanic

2016

2021

Non-Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

HISPANIC SHARE OF U.S. BUYING POWER, 1990-2021

2000

2010

Hispanic

89.1% 10.9%

10.0%

9.0%

6.7%

4.9% 1990

90.0%

91.0%

93.3%

95.1%

Hispanic Share of U.S. Buying Power (1990-2021)

2016

2021

Non-Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

12

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

U.S. HISPANIC BUYING POWER BY HISPANIC/LATINO SUBGROUP, 2016 U.S. Hispanic Buying Power (by Hispanic/Latino Subgroup, 2016)

Figures in thousands of dollars

C UBA N

O T HER HI SPA N I C O R LA T I N O D O M I N I C A N

33,296,818

S O U T H A M ERI C A N

42,775,966

CENTRAL AMERICAN

51,734,913

121,533,203

PUERTO RICAN

74,241,217

124,930,372

MEXICAN

146,388,431

796,629,846

FIGURES IN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS

S PANIAR D

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 Share of Total Hispanic Buying Power (by Hispanic/Latino Subgroup, 2016) http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

SHARE OF TOTAL HISPANIC BUYING POWER BY HISPANIC/LATINO SUBGROUP, 2016 4%

3%

2%

MEXICAN

5%

PUERTO RICAN

9%

CENTRAL AMERICAN SOUTH AMERICAN CUBAN

9%

57%

OTHER HISPANIC OR LATINO DOMINICAN

11%

SPANIARD

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

13

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

Largest U.S. Hispanic Consumer Markets in 2016

LARGEST U.S. HISPANIC CONSUMER MARKETS IN 2016 Hispanic Buying Power Figures in millions of dollars

COLORADO

50.9

27.3

N E W M E XI C O

50.3

24.7

VIR GI N I A

41.6

23.1

ARIZONA

IL L INO IS

NEW JER S EY

NEW YO R K

143.5

100.8

269.5

358.9

FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

F L O R IDA

TEXA S

C A L I FO RN I A

HISPANIC BUYING POWER Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

Fastest-Growing U.S. Hispanic Consumer Markets Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 Percentage Change in Hispanic Buying Power http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

52.30%

52.80%

54.70%

DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA

OKLAHOMA

V ERM O N T

N EW HA M PSHI RE

MONTANA

A LA SK A

73.20%

52.20%

WY O MI N G

68.40%

48.50%

W E ST V I R GI N I A

61.70%

48.10%

169.70%

FASTEST-GROWING U.S. HISPANIC CONSUMER MARKETS

SO UT H D A K O TA NOR TH DAKOTA

PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN HISPANIC BUYING POWER Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016

www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

14

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

Most Concentrated U.S. Hispanic Consumer Markets

Hispanic Share of Total Buying Power

NEW JERSEY

COLORADO

N EV A D A

F LO RI D A

C A LI F O RN I A

22.3%

A RI ZO N A

19.5%

17.4%

NEW YORK

16.8%

10.9%

15.8% 10.8%

IL L IN O I S

10.4%

9.0%

33.0%

MOST CONCENTRATED U.S. HISPANIC CONSUMER MARKETS

T EX A S

NEW MEXICO

HISPANIC SHARE OF TOTAL BUYING POWER Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

TOTAL U.S. BUYING POWER BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2016

Total U.S. Buying Power (by Race/Ethnicity, 2016)

Figures in billions of dollars

FIGURES IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS $1,392.00 $890.70

WHITE

$196.90 $1,204.50

BLACK

$107.20

AMERICAN INDIAN ASIAN TWO OR MORE RACES $11,463.70

HISPANIC

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

15

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

PROJECTED CHANGE IN U.S. BUYING POWER BY RACE OR HISPANIC ORIGIN, 2010-2016

TOTAL

37%

30%

22%

26% 21%

24%

41%

48%

Projected Change in U.S. Buying Power (by Race or Hispanic Origin, 2010-2016)

WH I T E

BLACK

A MER ICA N INDIA N

A SIA N

MUL TIR A CIA L

HISPA NIC

N O N -H I S P A N I C

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

PROJECTED CHANGE IN U.S. BUYING POWER BY RACE OR HISPANIC ORIGIN, 2016-2021

TOTAL

WHITE

24%

BLACK

18%

21%

18%

19%

29%

35%

36%

Projected Change in U.S. Buying Power (by Race or Hispanic Origin, 2016-2021)

A M E RI C A N I N D I A N

A SI A N

M ULT I RA C I A L

HI SPA N I C

NON- HIS PANIC

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

16

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

HISPANIC/LATINO SHARE OF U.S. BUYING POWER, 2010 VS. 2016

9%

10%

90%

91%

Hispanic/Latino Share of U.S. Buying Power (2010 vs. 2016)

2010

2016

Hispanic/Latino

Non-Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

HISPANIC/LATINO SHARE OF ARIZONA BUYING POWER, 2010 VS. 2016

15.7%

16.8%

83.2%

84.3%

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 Hispanic/Latino Share of Arizona Buying Power http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig (2010 vs. 2016)

2010

2016

Hispanic/Latino

Non-Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

17

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

TOTAL BUYING POWER IN ARIZONA, 1990-2021

Total Buying Power in Arizona (1990-2021)

Figures in millions of dollars

293,519

56,446

119,791

201,782

247,547

FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

1990

2000

2010

2016

2021

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

HISPANIC BUYING POWER IN ARIZONA, 1990-2021

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 Hispanic Buying Power in Arizona (1990-2021) http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

Figures in billions of dollars

5.5

14.8

31.7

41.6

51.1

FIGURES IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS

1990

2000

2010

2016

2021

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

18

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

HISPANIC SHARE OF BUYING POWER IN ARIZONA, 1990-2021

9.8%

12.4%

15.7%

16.8%

17.4%

Hispanic Share of Buying Power in Arizona (1990-2021)

1990

2000

2010

2016

2021

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

HISPANIC BUYING POWER IN ARIZONA PERCENTAGE CHANGE, 1990-2021

1990- 2000

2 0 0 0 -2 0 1 0

Hispanic

2010- 2016

17.7

23.0

21.1

31.1

62.0

113.7

106.1

168.6

Hispanic Buying Power in Arizona Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 (Percentage Change, 1990-2021) http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

2016- 2 0 2 1

Non-Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig

19 Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, The Multicultural Economy 2016 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.terry.uga.edu/about/centers-institutes/selig


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 1

PURCHASING POWER

Hispanic Household Income Has Increased Significantly Since 2009

$1,528

$3,126

HISPANIC HOUSEHOLD INCOME HAS INCREASED SIGNIFICANTLY SINCE 2009

ALL

HI SPA N I C

CHANGE IN REAL MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2009-2015) Source: CEA, Economic Progress of the Hispanic Community During The Obama Administration, 2016 obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/docs/20161012_cea_hispanic_econ_issue_brief.pdf

Source: CEA, Economic Progress of the Hispanic Community During The Obama Administration, 2016 Hispanic Poverty Rate Has Decreased Significantly Since 2009 https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/docs/20161012_cea_hispanic_econ_issue_brief.pdf

HISPANIC POVERTY RATE HAS DECREASED SIGNIFICANTLY SINCE 2009

0

-1

-0.8

-0.5

-1.5 -2

-3.9

-2.5 -3 -3.5 -4 -4.5

ALL

HIS PA NIC

CHANGE IN POVERTY RATE (2009-2015) Source: CEA, Economic Progress of the Hispanic Community During The Obama Administration, 2016 obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/docs/20161012_cea_hispanic_econ_issue_brief.pdf

Source: CEA, Economic Progress of the Hispanic Community During The Obama Administration, 2016 20 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/docs/20161012_cea_hispanic_econ_issue_brief.pdf


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

TWO-PARENT WHITE HOUSEHOLDS HAVE SIGNIFICANTLY MORE WEALTH

WHITE

$5,400

LATINO

$5,200

BLACK

$35,800

$18,800

WHITE

$16,000

$161,300

Two-parent White Households Have Significantly More Wealth

BLACK

LATINO

TWO-PARENT HOUSEHOLDS WITH CHILDREN SINGLE-PARENT HOUSEHOLDS WITH CHILDREN

MEDIAN WEALTH OF HOUSEHOLDS WITH CHILDREN BY PARTNERSHIP STATUS MEDIAN WEALTH OF HOUSEHOLDS WITH CHILDREN BY PARTNERSHIP STATUS

Source: DEMOS, The Asset Value of Whiteness: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap, 2017 www.demos.org/publication/asset-value-whiteness-understanding-racial-wealth-gap

FULL-TIME JOBS SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASE THE WEALTH OF WHITE WORKERS

L AT I N O

$9,200 WHI T E

$4,600

BLACK

$2,500

WH I T E

$15,300

$10,800

$82,400

Full-Time Jobs Significantly Increase the Wealth of White Workers Source: DEMOS, The Asset Value of Whiteness: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap, 2017 http://www.demos.org/publication/asset-value-whiteness-understanding-racial-wealth-gap

BLA C K

L ATINO

FULL-TIME WORK PART-TIME WORK

MEDIAN WEALTH OF FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME WORKERS FOR WORKING HOUSEHOLDS UNDER AGE 55 Source: DEMOS, The Asset Value of Whiteness: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap, 2017 www.demos.org/publication/asset-value-whiteness-understanding-racial-wealth-gap

Source: DEMOS, The Asset Value of Whiteness: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap, 2017 21 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.demos.org/publication/asset-value-whiteness-understanding-racial-wealth-gap


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

62% OF HISPANICS EXPRESSED CONCERN ABOUT THEIR FINANCIAL FUTURE 60%

27%

39%

39%

38%

39%

50%

58%

62%

59%

62% of Hispanics Expressed Concern About Their Financial Future

I A M C O N C E R N E D A B O U T M Y F I N A NC I A L F U T U R E

Total

I F EEL F I N A N C I A LLY O V ERHWHELM ED

Hispanics

White

African-Americans

Asian-Americans

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

SAVING MONEY BY RACE/ETHNICITY

I AM AC T I V E L Y S A V I N G MO N E Y A ND / O R IN V ES T I N G FO R M Y R E T I R E M E NT

I H A V E E NO U G H M O N E Y S A V ED F O R A " R A I NY D A Y "

Total

Hispanics

SA V I N G M O N EY I S D I F F I C ULT F O R M E

Whites

African-Americans

29%

41%

41%

40%

40%

34%

44%

39%

41%

40%

55% 40%

50%

47%

49%

49%

57%

55%

56%

67%

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 Saving Money (by Race/Ethnicity) http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

I D O N O T M A K E EN O UG H MONEY TO S AVE AT ALL

Asian-Americans

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html 22

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

VIEWS ON INVESTING MONEY BY RACE/ETHNICITY

I B E L I E V E I N I NV E S T I N G M Y M O N E Y

Total

Hispanics

37%

41%

41%

42%

49%

66%

60%

63%

58%

62%

Views on Investing Money (by Race/Ethnicity)

I N V EST I N G M O N EY I N T HE ST O C K M A RK ET I S T O O R IS KY

Whites

African-Americans

Asian-Americans

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

VIEWS ON SPENDING MONEY BY RACE/ETHNICITY

29%

27%

25%

TOTAL

HISPANICS

15%

16%

18%

19%

22%

25%

27%

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 Views on Spending Money http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html (by Race/Ethnicity)

WHI T ES

Very cautious

A F RI C A N- A M ERI C A N S

A SI A N -AMER ICANS

Somewhat cautious

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

DATO S Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html A Z

2 0 1 7

23

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1 Luxury Purchases (by Race/Ethnicity)

LUXURY PURCHASES BY RACE/ETHNICITY

TOTAL

48%

25%

31%

32%

HISPANICS

14%

17%

19%

22%

32%

56%

34%

49%

57% 35%

51%

WHITES

AFRICAN-AMERICANS

ASIAN-AMERICANS

"I LIKE TO BUY MYSELF SOMETHING EXPENSIVE EVERY NOW AND THEN" Agree Completely

Somewhat Agree

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

OVERALL PERCEPTION OF BANKS BY RACE/ETHNICITY Overall Perception of Banks (by Race/Ethnicity)

39%

51%

12%

23%

29%

29%

60% 31%

52%

33%

59% 26%

24%

30%

54%

TOTAL

H I S P A NI C S

WHI T ES

Very Positive

A F RI C A N- A M ERI C A N S

A SI A N -AMER ICANS

Somewhat Positive

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

24

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

USE OF VARIOUS FINANCIAL PRODUCTS BY RACE/ETHNICITY

LIFE INSURANCE

INDIVIDUAL STOCKS

20% 10% 19%

17%

MORTGAGE

9%

AUTO LOAN

RETIREMENT SAVINGS ACCOUNT

17% 10% 20% 10% 22%

24% 21% 27% 17% 27%

CREDIT CARD

26% 17% 31% 22% 14%

38% 29% 40% 39% 31% CHECKING ACCOUNT SAVINGS ACCOUNT

31% 22% 34% 25% 34%

71% 67% 74% 59% 78%

71% 68% 74% 67% 69%

81% 74% 83% 79% 84%

Use of Various Financial Products (by Race/Ethnicity)

MUTUAL FUNDS

"WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING FINANCIAL PRODUCTS DO YOU CURRENTLY HAVE?" Total

Hispanics

Whites

African-Americans

Asian-Americans

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

USE OF VARIOUS FINANCIAL PRODUCTS BY RACE/ETHNICITY

MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT

PRE-PAID VISA OR MASTERCARD DEBIT CARD

PERSONAL LOAN

CD

REMITTANCE/MONEY TRANSFER SERVICE

PAYDAY LOAN

1%

4% 3% 5% 4%

2%

5% 4% 4%

7% 4% 3%

6%

4%

5% STUDENT LOAN

9%

12% 10% 12%

8%

11%

13% 12% 15% 11% 9%

8%

7%

8%

14% 16% 13%

16%

18% 15%

18%

12%

16%

21%

23%

Use of Various Financial Products (by Race/Ethnicity) Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

BUSINESS LOAN

"WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING FINANCIAL PRODUCTS DO YOU CURRENTLY HAVE?" Total

Hispanics

Whites

African-Americans

Asian-Americans

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

25 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html


REWARDING THE BUSINESSES THAT POWER OUR COMMUNITY We support Arizona businesses because WE are an Arizona business. As a member of the community, we understand your unique challenges and want to help you prosper. Choosing to bank with a credit union is an investment into the local community so we can thrive together.

VISIT A LOCAL BRANCH OR GO TO

vantagewest.org/business

Federally insured by NCUA


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER

CHAPTER 1

HISPANICS USUALLY SEARCH ONLINE TO CHOOSE A BANK

I RESEARCH ONLINE

REVIEW/RATINGS SEVICES

Total

BANK WEBSITE

FRIENDS

Hispanics

SPOUSES/SIGNIFICANT OTHERS

Whites

PARENT

ONLINE RECOMMENDATIONS

African-Americans

27% 18% 20% 17%

13%

26% 20% 20% 20% 18%

24% 26% 24% 22% 20%

28%

30%

18%

22%

27%

29% 32% 30% 25% 29%

30% 32% 28% 36% 37%

37% 35%

28%

31%

36%

45% 45% 44% 48% 50%

Hispanics Usually Search Online to Choose a Bank

ADVERTISING YOU SEE OR HEAR

Asian-Americans

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

AWARENESS OF POPULAR APP-BASED PAYMENT METHODS (BY RACE/ETHNICITY)

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 Awareness of Popular App-based Payment Methods, by Race/Ethnicity http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html % Never heard of

Total

SA M SUN G PA Y

16%

APPLE PAY

24% 23% 24% 27%

17% 20% 16% 19% 13%

GO O GL E WA L L E T

29% 27% 30% 26% 21%

16% 20% 16% 16% 10%

62% 66% 62% 58% 63%

% NEVER HEARD OF

A N D RO I D PA Y

PAYOL A

AWARENESS OF DIFFERENT PAYMENT METHODS Hispanics

Whites

African-Americans

Asian-Americans

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

27

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Think Now Research, Money Report 2017 http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-money-report-2017.html


Trusted. Community Minded. Forward Thinking. AAA Arizona is proud to support

the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and its commitment to Arizona’s future.


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PROFILE

LEVERAGING ARIZONA'S RETAIL SECTOR AS A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE ARIZONA'S COMMUNITY OF RETAILERS

As seen in the table (left), the distribution of gender among retail occupations is noteworthy. Hispanic or Latino workers and females are overrepresented in two of the front-line positions, but the inverse is true for supervisory positions. Across Arizona, approximately 25% of the state, 30% of Maricopa County and nearly half of the K-12 student population is Hispanic or Latino.

The Center for the Future of Arizona (CFA) launched RetailWorks AZ in early 2017 with initial funding provided by the Walmart Foundation to support collaborations with retail employers and workforce partners in the Greater Phoenix area. CFA brings partners together to develop innovative approaches designed to make it easier and faster for front-line, entry-level workers to move up the career ladder. Retail employers play an important role in Arizona's economy and in the lives of many Arizonans who first acquire work experience and professional skills in retail. In 2016, the Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA) conducted a landscape analysis of the retail sector in the Greater Phoenix area. The ACA examined the value of the retail sector to the Phoenix economy, its impact on wages, its competitive position versus comparable Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and the health of the sector and recovery from the recession. Read the full report.

IMPROVING THE LIVES OF ARIZONANS

The RetailWorks AZ initiative is the first of its kind for the Greater Phoenix area and has great potential to become a national model for tapping into economic development opportunities that come from strategically leveraging the retail industry within a region. The sector's broad reach amplifies the potential impact of the initiative to improve the lives of Arizonans. Through the RetailWorks AZ initiative, CFA brings education and training together with employee development in support of front-line, entry-level retail workers to help advance their careers in retail and build Arizona's pipeline of skilled talent for adjacent sectors such as hospitality, health care and business services.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

ABOUT CFA

The Center for the Future of Arizona is a nonpartisan, nonprofit "do tank" that combines research with collaborative partnerships and initiatives that drive the state's economic prosperity, quality of life and civic health and create a better future for all Arizonans. 29

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

LATINO GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT (GDP) REPORT QUANTIFYING THE IMPACT OF AMERICAN HISPANIC ECONOMIC GROWTH

JUNE, 2017 AUTHORS:

Werner Schink CO-FOUNDER AND CEO — LATINO FUTURES RESEARCH

David Hayes-Bautista UCLA DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER FOR THE SUDY OF LATINO HEALTH AND CULTURE — DAVID GEFFEN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AT UCLA

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

30

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

0


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

INDEX ABOUT THE AUTHORS ........................................................................................................................2 FOREWORD BY THE AUTHORS ......................................................................................................3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .........................................................................................................................4 REPORT .........................................................................................................................................................6 LATINOS – MYTHS VERSUS REALITIES .....................................................................................39

1

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

31

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Werner Schink is the co-founder and CEO of Latino Futures Research, which creates original economic and demographic research in the United States. He has been Chief Economist of the California Employment Development Department, Chief of California’s Job Training Program, and Chief of Research for the Department of Social Services during welfare reform, among other leadership and research positions. He has worked and partnered with the foremost social scientists in the U.S. from U.C. Berkeley, UCLA, Stanford, RAND, and many other organizations. His other roles and affiliations include former President of the National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics; member of the Joint Center for Poverty Research at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University; member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is the founder of Community and Local Neighborhood Research (CALNR), which provides socio-economic and evaluation research to non-profit and governmental organizations. David E. Hayes-Bautista, co-founder of Latinos Future Research, is also Distinguished Professor of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He is also the Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture, in the division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research. In addition, he is the Faculty Director for the UCLA Anderson Graduate School of Management’s Latino Leadership Institute for Executive Education. For 45 years, he has researched the epidemiology, demography, and behavior of Latino populations, and his ground-breaking research has included discovering: the Latino Epidemiological Paradox; Latino wellness metrics; inter-paternity and the limitations of race/ethnic categories for medical research; and the Latino physician shortage. He is a frequent commentator for Univision, TV Azteca, and Telemundo, and contributes columns to the Los Angeles Times and La Opinión. His most recent book is a new edition of La Nueva California: Latinos from Pioneers to Post-Millennials, a data-based analysis of Latinos in the U.S. from the 19th century through 2015, published by the University of California Press. Hayes-Bautista and Schink have collaborated on public policy topics related to Latinos during more than 35 years.

2

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

32

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

FOREWORD BY THE AUTHORS In 1983, we published our first report, The Hispanic Portfolio: An Investment Guide to the Future, on the generational effects of Latino population growth in California. Those early projections were the basis for our subsequent book The Burden of Support: Young Latinos in an Aging Society (Stanford University Press, 1988). For 35 years, we have seen two trends converging, first in California, and then in the nation: • The aging, largely non-Latino Baby Boom generation is withdrawing from the labor force, increasingly requiring support generated by those still working; • The younger, largely Latino population gradually is gaining an increasing share of the labor force, and their productivity is, and will continue to be, a mainstay of support for the aging, largely non-Latino Baby Boomers. The question for policy makers at the national and state levels, both public and private, is this: Are appropriate investments being made in the young Latino population that will maximize its ability to carry the country, including the burden of the retiring Baby Boom generation, in the 21st century? Over the past forty years, many piecemeal methodologies, such as report cards, have been used to measure progress on this question. Given the size of the Latino population—55 million in 2015, projected to be around 100 million by 2060—it made sense to us to use the same metric that is commonly used around the world to gauge the progress, or failure, of a region to move into the future: its Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The Latino Donor Collaborative provided us with an opportunity to implement this dream of calculating the Latino GDP. The results are in this report. Briefly, the Latino GDP is large, growing rapidly, and increasingly will provide the U.S. economy with the competitive edge needed to maintain its position as a world leader. The Latino Donor Collaborative urges policy makers at all levels to consider carefully how to invest this country’s resources into maximizing the Latino GDP’s potential. We appreciate the support of, and ongoing dialogue with, Sol Trujillo, Co-Founder of the Latino Donor Collaborative, and Ana Valdez, Executive Director of the LDC. The methodology we developed to estimate the Latino GDP is described at the end of the report. We welcome feedback from our peers.

Sincerely,

Werner Schink Co-Founder and CEO, Latino Futures Research

David E. Hayes-Bautista Distinguished Professor of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

3

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

33

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY To respond to questions about the nature of Latino contributions to the United States, the Latino Donor Collaborative commissioned original research, the first of its kind, which has produced the following study. It presents a factual view of the importance of Latinos to our economy, for all Americans to understand, in business, non-profit organizations, politics, etc. We thought that Latinos were powering in the economy, but were pleasantly surprised to discover what is actually happening: • The GDP produced by Latinos in the U.S. in 2015 was $2.13 trillion. • If it were an independent country, the Latino GDP would be the 7th largest in the world, larger than the GDP of India, Italy, Brazil or Canada. The Latino GDP would trail only the U.S., China, Japan, Germany, the U.K., and France. • Of the top ten economies, it would be the third-fastest growing GDP. • The U.S. Latino GDP is growing 70% faster that the country’s non-Latino GDP. • Latinos accounted for 70% of the U.S. work force’s increase in the first half of this decade. • As young Latinos enter the work force and the older non-Latinos leave it, the Latino GDP will account for an increasing portion of the total U.S. GDP growth, projected to be 24.4% of total US GDP growth by 2020. The common perception of Latinos being a burden to U.S. society is utterly wrong. To the contrary, Latinos are the element most needed to fuel the growth of this country. All Americans have benefitted from the $2.13 trillion contribution the Latino GDP makes to the country, and should take steps to make sure it continues.

4

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

34

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

REPORT I. Latino Gross Domestic Product The Latino GDP 2015 Figure GDP1. The Latino GDP, 2015. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) tells the story of a region in two numbers: size and growth. A region’s GDP is often used to compare its economy to other regions’ economies, and to measure its growth over time. A region’s GDP is often used by public and private policymakers to guide their investment decisions. The 55 million Latinos living and working in the U.S. in 2015 produced a Latino GDP of $2.13 trillion.

Figure GDP.2. Comparative Size of the Latino GDP. One of the first characterstics of a region’s GDP used by analysts is its size, relative to the GDPs of other regions. The 2015 Latino GDP of $2.13 trillion ranks as the seventh largest GDP in the world, compared to the world’s ten largest economies. The Latino GDP is larger than the GDP of India, Italy, Brazil, or Canada, and is only slightly smaller than the GDP of France or the United Kingdom.

5

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

35

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Figure GDP.3. Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR). Another important characteristic of a region’s GDP is its Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR). Ideally, a GDP should have a robust, positive CAGR. The Latino GDP demonstrated a positive CAGR of 2.9% for the period 2010–2015. This was the third highest CAGR of the ten largest economies in the world, higher than the CAGRs of Canada, the U.S. as a whole, Germany, Brazil, Japan, France, or Italy.

Figure GDP 4. Latino and Non-Latino CAGR in the U.S. Figure 5.1 shows the CAGR of the Latino GDP, compared to the non-Latino GDP for the period 2010– 2015. The Latino GDP had a CAGR of 2.9%, which is nearly two times higher than the non-Latino GDP of 1.7%.

Figure GDP 5. Powering the U.S. GDP The large size and faster growth rate of the Latino GDP enable it to power the country’s total GDP. Without the Latino GDP, the non-Latino GDP of the U.S. would have grown only to $15.91 trillion by 2015. Thanks to the Latino GDP’s size and growth rate, however, the total U.S. GDP reached $18.04 trillion by that date.

6

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

36

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Figure GDP 6. Latino GDP Powers Growth Disproportionately The faster growth of the Latino GDP enables it to power the growth of the total U.S. GDP out of proportion to its absolute size. By 2015, the Latino GDP grew to represent 11.8% of the total U.S. GDP, but contributed 18.3% of the growth in the total U.S. GDP during the period 2010–2015.

Figure GDP 7. Latino GDP and the Ten Largest State GDPs. When the Latino GDP of $2.13 trillion is compared to the GDPs of the 10 largest states in the U.S., it is larger than 9 of the 10. It is larger than the GDP of Texas, New York, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Georgia, or North Carolina. It should be noted that the four largest state GDPs belong to states that have a high percentage of Latino population.

Figure GDP 8. High Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR). In 2010–2015, only twelve states had a CAGR of 2.0% or above. The Latino CAGR of 2.9% was higher than that of 8 of the 12 states which had growth of 2.0% and higher. The Latino GDP CAGR was higher than the CAGR of Colorado, Utah, Tennessee, Washikington, Iowa, South Carolina, Michigan, or Nebraska.

Figure GDP 9 (below) shows the CAGR of the 48 contiguous states.

7

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

37

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Figure GDP 10. Projected Change in GDP. Comparing the Compound Annual Growth Rates for GDP for Latinos and non-Latinos demonstates the increasingly signifcant role of Latinos in the U.S. economy. Many factors may affect real GDP growth, including national policies on immigration and residency, foreign trade policies, and potential income shifts from workers to nonworkers.

Figure GDP 11. Projected % of Change in GDP Translating changes in GDP into percentages indicates that by 2020 the Latino share of the U.S. GDP is projected to grow to 12.7%. The Latino share of the growth in national GDP will approach one quarter of all of the growth in GDP.

8

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

38

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

II. U.S. Latino Population

Figure Population 1 shows that the Latino population of the U.S. in 2015 had a median age of 28 years, while the nonLatino population was considerably older, with a median age of 40 years. Figure Population 2 disaggregates the U.S. population into five-year age groups (e.g., 0–4 years, 5–9 years, 10–14 years) and shows the percentage of each age group that is Latino. Latinos are around 25% of the youngest age groups (0–4, 5–9, and 10–14) and somewhat less than 10% of the oldest age groups (65–69 and older).

Figure Population 3 shows the concentration of Latinos by county. It is highest in the Western states, Florida, Illinois, and New York–New Jersey.

9

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

39

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

IV. U.S. Latino Work and Labor Force Figure Work Force 1. Changes in the Young (Ages 16– 24) Civilian Work Force The future of the U.S. work force is seen clearly in Figure Population 1. Between 2010 and 2015, the population of young Latinos, ages 16–24, in the work force grew by 359,633, while the non-Latino population of the same age grew much more slowly, adding only 155,160 civilian workers. So, for every two young Latinos entering the civilian work force, roughly only one young non-Latino entered.

Figure Work Force 2. Changes in the Mature (Ages 25– 64) Civilian Work Force In 2010–2015, the non-Latino work force shrank slightly, by 4,036, and the non-Latino population not in the work force grew, by 1.57 million. At the same time, the Latino population in the work force grew, by 2.48 million: more than enough to compensate for both 0.9 million Latinos not in the work force and shrinkage in the non-Latino work force and growth in the non-Latino population not in the work force.

Figure Work Force 3. Changes in the Elderly (65 years +) Civilian Work Force As detailed in Figure 7.2, Latinos are less than 10% of the total population ages 65+ years. The greatest growth in the population not in the work force was seen in the non-Latino population. 2.54 million non-Latino elderly were added to the population not in the work force, as compared to only 326,603 Latino elderly who were not in the work force.

10

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

40

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Figure Work Force 4. Total Work Force Increase, 2010– 2015. The vast majority (70%) of the increase in the work force in 2010–2015 was due to Latinos joining. NonLatinos made up 30% of the increase. Latinos are the future of the U.S. work force.

Figure Work Force 5. Growth in the Mature (25–64) Civilian Work Force. In 2010–2015, the non-Latino work force shrank by 4,036. If Latino workers were not counted, the U.S. work force would be in a gradual decline. Thanks to 2.48 million Latinos joining the work force, however, the total work force actually grew in that period, by 2.47 million. In essence, Latinos supplied nearly all the growth in the mature work force segment, ages 25–64.

Figure Work Force 6. Latino Growth in Defending America. The ripple effect of the young Latino population entering adult-age activities also appears in the military. Young Latinos, ages 18–24, are more highly represented than older Latinos in all branches of the U.S. military, except the Military Reserve National Guard. In the Marine Corps and the Army, young Latinos make up nearly one fourth of the men and women in uniform.

11

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

41

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

V. U.S. Latino Educational Attainment Figure Education 1. Decrease in the Non-High School Graduate Population In 2010–2015, the percent of Latinos ages 20 to 29 years old who were not high school graduates decreased by over 30%. The corresponding decrease for non-Latinos was 13.5%.

Figure Education 2. Increase in the High School Graduate Population. In 2010–2015, the percentage of Latino high school graduates increased by nearly 20%, while the non-Latino high school graduate population increased by less than 4%.

Figure Education 3. Growth Rate of the College Graduate Population. In 2010–2015, the population of Latino college graduates grew by 40.6%. The population of non-Latino college graduates also grew, but at a slower rate, 13.6%. Latinos are rapidly becoming more educated than they were in the late 20th century.

12

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

42

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

VI. U.S. Latino Citizenship and Immigration Figure Citizenship 1. Change in the Citizenship of the U.S. Latino Population. Contrary to common public perception, growth in the Latino population between 2010 and 2015 was not driven by immigration, but by growth in the number of Latino U.S. citizens. Of the 6.376 million Latinos added to the U.S.-citizen population, 80.8% (5.151 million) were U.S.-born. The other 19.2% were naturalized U.S. citizens. The number of Latino non-citizens decreased by 625,256 during the same period.

Figure Citizenship 2. Non-Citizen Immigrant Growth is Non-Latino Also contrary to common public perception, growth in the non-citizen population of the U.S. is driven by immigration from Europe, Asia, and Africa, not from Mexico and Latin America. In 2010–2015, the population of non-citizen Latinos actually decreased, by 625,256, while the population of non-citizens who were not Latino grew, by 590,893. These were largely immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Africa.

Figure Citizenship 3. U.S. Citizenship of Latinos by 5Year Age Groups, 2015 In every Latino age group (0–4, 5–9, etc.), the majority of that group is composed of U.S. citizens, both U.S.born and naturalized. In the age groups from 0–24 years, over 90% of Latinos are U.S. citizens, largely by birth. In the Latino mature work force age group (25–64 years), about two thirds of each age group are U.S. citizens, and about one-third non-citizens.

13

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

43

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Figure Non-Citizens 1. Work Force Participation Rate, Male Latino Non-Citizens. Another common misperception is that non-U.S. citizen Latinos do not participate in the work force as much as other populations. In fact, male Latino non-citizens have an extremely high work force participation rate, over 90% for young mature workers aged 25 to 49. In contrast, non-Latino males born in the U.S. had a lower work force participation rate, ranging generally from 82– 86%.

.

Figure Non-Citizens 2. Percentage of Latino Non-Citizens by Public Use Micro Area, 2015. In most of the United States, non-citizen Latinos make up a very small share of the population. As seen on the map, the highest concentrations of non-citizen Latinos are in the western and southwestern U.S. These areas are predominantly agricultural. The likely net effect of arresting and deporting unauthorized Latinos (about half of non-citizen Latinos) will be to adversely affect rural agricultural economies and increase food prices. The “job opportunities” whereby created would be geographically inconvenient for non-Latino citizens living in more northerly areas, and would not pay wages that would induce them to move.

Figure Non-Citizens 3. Declining Unauthorized Immigrant Population from Mexico. The Pew Research Center estimated that, between 2005 and 2014, the unauthorized Mexican immigrant population of the U.S. decreased by more than 1,000,000 persons—in contrast to the common public perception that presence of unauthorized immigrants from Mexico is both ongoing and increasing.

14

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

44

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

VII.

EXCERPT

Methodology and References

The methodology used for estimating Latino GDP, and the associated data for population, employment and labor force, education and citizenship, relied almost exclusively on data and public use microdata from the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. Department of Labor. The starting point for this analysis was are from the latest input-output models available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics as of May 2017 – https://www.bea.gov/industry/xls/io-annual/IOUse_After_Redefinitions_PRO_19972015_Summary.xlsx These tables are available for every year from 1997 through 2015 and include price deflators by industry for each year, providing the basis for converting nominal dollar values to constant 2015 dollar values. These models delineate “interindustry production and sales relationships,” along with “final demand” sales. Interindustry relationships entail doublecounting; for example, sales of grain by farmers are processed and then milled into flour, which is sold to bakeries, and the baked goods are sold to consumers. The value of the grain is included in the value of the flour, and their value is included in the value of the baked goods. Thus the value of the wheat and milling is “double-counted” in the interindustry matrices. Sales that represent final consumption or use constitute the building blocks of “final demand,” which, summed up across all industries and forms of final demand, result in Gross Domestic Product. The primary components of the Gross Domestic Product Model by Component for the 71 Industries in the BEA tables are: •

• • • • • •

Personal Consumption Expenditures — 68.1% Residential Investment — 3.6% NonResidential Investment — 12.8% Change in Inventories — 0.5% Exports — 11.1% Imports (Negative) — (14.0%) Government — 17.8%

For each component, estimates were made of the relative shares for Latinos and non-Latinos, and these shares were applied to the total GDP component values. Briefly, the methodology for each component was: •

• • •

Personal Consumption Expenditures — Based on microdata from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor), which is a survey of approximately 25,000 households (consumer units) each year. These data are compiled from detailed expenditure diaries, as well as a series of interviews with households surveyed. Residential Investment — Based on tabulations of the American Community Survey of approximately 1.3 million households per year, which includes, for home owners, the year they moved in, the year the home was built, and the purchase price of the home. This survey also provides values for the Current Price Index to convert nominal dollar values into constant dollar values. NonResidential Investment — To allocate Latino and non-Latino shares, the cells in the BEA interindustry tables were decomposed into six categories: Latino Wages and Salary, Latino Business, Latino Investment, Non-Latino Wages and Salary, Non-Latino Business, and Non-Latino Investment. This was based on the share of business and investment income by industry. Change in Inventories — This was based on the share of business and investment income by industry. Exports — This was based on the share of business and investment income by industry. Imports (Negative) — This was based on the share of intermediate interindustry purchases, plus personal consumption purchases.

15

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

45

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Government — This was based on share of total population. Alternative methods were investigated. Because constant-dollar government expenditures declined slightly between 2010 and 2015, alternative methods that would lower Latino shares would result in a higher Latino share of the percentage change in GDP between 2010 and 2015.

The final GDP-Industry tables provided in the report cover 50 industries. The reduction in the number of industries was due to the inability to disaggregate some consumer expenditure survey data along the industry classifications of the GDP tables. For example, the BEA tables list “Hospitals” as a separate health industry, and there is no corresponding product code for hospitals in the Consumer Expenditure Survey. Also, some industries make up very small components in the GDP. For example, almost all mining industry purchases are between industries as intermediate goods, and only a very small fraction of them is purchased as final demand in GDP. Data on population, employment, work force participation, education, and citizenship were based on tabulations of the American Community Survey, of approximately 3.1 million individuals each year. American Community Survey data are collected continuously throughout the year and represent a 1% sample of the U.S. population.

16

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

46

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Bibliography Bureau of Economic Analysis, Gross Domestic Product by Industry: https://www.bea.gov/iTable/index_industry_gdpIndy.cfm. BEA, GDP by State: https://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/gdp_state/2016/pdf/qgsp0616.pdf. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Expenditure Survey: https://www.bls.gov/cex/.Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/data/pums.html. IPUMS-USA, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org. World Bank, Gross Domestic Product by Country: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/download/GDP.pdf. Selected Co-Authored Publications Hayes-Bautista, David E.; Schink, Werner O.; Chapa, Jorge. The Hispanic Portfolio: An Investment Guide to the Future. The California Hispanic Affairs Council, Sacramento, CA, 1983 Hayes-Bautista, David E.; Schink, Werner; Chapa, Jorge. The Burden of Support: The Young Latino Population in an Aging American Society. Stanford University Press, 1988. Hayes-Bautista, D.E.; Schink, W.O., & Hayes-Bautista, M. “Latinos and the 1992 Los Angeles Riots: A Behavioral Sciences Perspective,” Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 15(4) (1993). Hayes-Bautista, D.E.; Schink, W.O.; Hayes-Bautista, M. “Educational Diversity in the Inner City: Latino and Black Education Attainment of Southern Central Los Angeles,” Journal of the Association of Mexican American Educators. (1993) Hayes-Bautista, D.E., Schink, W.; Rodríguez, G. “Latino Immigrants in Los Angeles: A Portrait from the 1990 Census” (Los Angeles: Alta California Policy Research Center, 1995). Hayes-Bautista, D.E.; Chang, C.; Schink, W. “Latino and Non-Latino Elderly in Los Angeles County: A Pilot Study of Demographic Trends for Disability and Long-Term Care,” in J.L. Angel, F. Torres-Gil, & K. Markides, eds., Aging, Health, and Longevity in the Mexican-Origin Population (New York: Springer, 2012): 227–241. Sánchez, G.; Nevarez, T.; Schink, W.; Hayes-Bautista, D.E. “Latino Physicians in the United States, 1980–2010: A Thirty-Year Overview from the Censuses,” Academic Medicine, Epub, 27 Jan. 2015. Hayes-Bautista, T.M.; Schink, W.; Hayes-Bautista, D.E. “Latino Nurses in the United States: A Thirty-Year Overview (1980– 2010).” American Journal of Nursing (in press).

17

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

47

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix A.1: Summary of Latino Real GDP, 2010 and 2015, in Billions of 2015 Dollars

Total GDP, 2015

Personal Consumption Expenditures

Residential Investment

Nonresidential Investment

Change in Inventories

Exports

Imports

Govt

GDP

12,283.69

651.91

2,311.32

93.40

1,997.17

(2,519.14)

3,218.31

18,036.65

Latino GDP, 2015

1,411.16

46.89

144.48

4.97

228.65

(275.27)

567.18

2,128.05

10,872.53

605.02

2,166.84

88.43

1,768.52

(2,243.88)

2,651.13

15,908.59

11.5%

7.2%

6.3%

5.3%

11.4%

10.9%

17.6%

11.8%

Total Real GDP, 2010

11,144.84

429.02

1,770.15

63.53

1,759.12

(2,140.80)

3,463.40

16,489.26

Latino Real GDP, 2010

1,182.50

27.97

107.38

2.92

180.98

(225.93)

569.49

1,845.31

NonLatino GDP, 2010

9,962.34

401.05

1,662.77

60.61

1,578.15

(1,914.87)

2,893.91

14,643.95

10.6%

6.5%

6.1%

4.6%

10.3%

10.6%

16.4%

11.2%

1,547.39

Non-Latino GDP, 2015 Latino % of Total, 2015

Latino % of Total, 2010

Change, Total Real GDP, 2010–15

1,138.85

222.89

541.17

29.86

238.05

(378.34)

(245.09)

Change, Latino Real GDP, 2010–15

228.66

18.92

37.10

2.04

47.67

(49.34)

(2.31)

282.75

Change, NonLatino GDP, 2010–15

910.18

203.97

504.07

27.82

190.37

(329.00)

(242.78)

1,264.64

Latino % of Total, 2010

20.1%

8.5%

6.9%

6.8%

20.0%

13.0%

0.9%

18.3%

18

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

48

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix A.2: Latino GDP in 2015 in Billions of Dollars

Total Latino GDP 2015 Farms, Forest, Fisheries

Personal Consumption Expenditures

Residential Investment

Nonresidential Investment

Change in Inventories

Exports

Imports

Govt

GDP

1,411.16

46.89

144.48

4.97

228.65

(275.27)

567.18

2,128.05

12.10

-

-

0.06

8.78

(9.44)

-

11.51 (9.53)

0.02

-

6.37

0.01

3.83

(19.76)

-

35.24

-

-

-

0.19

(0.33)

-

35.10

-

35.53

64.13

-

0.01

-

50.89

150.55

Primary Metals

1.87

0.30

0.01

0.12

5.51

(14.05)

0.05

(6.19)

Metal Products & Machinery

2.95

-

6.29

0.30

17.38

(25.98)

1.49

2.43

Computer & Electronic Products

7.73

0.02

4.32

0.07

10.11

(30.78)

0.96

(7.57)

Electrical Equipment, Appliances

4.90

0.31

0.99

0.07

4.15

(11.88)

0.09

(1.37)

31.61

-

7.46

0.22

10.27

(35.60)

14.08

28.04

Other Transportation Equipment

2.46

-

2.76

0.12

13.95

(6.67)

3.74

16.37

Furniture & Related

6.27

0.03

2.32

0.08

0.60

(5.53)

0.15

3.92

Miscellaneous Manufacturing

10.07

-

2.41

0.23

3.50

(9.06)

0.05

7.21

Food, Beverage, Tobacco Products

78.24

-

-

0.93

12.08

(14.05)

-

77.20

Mining, Oil, Gas, Minerals Utilities Construction

Motor Vehicles, Trailers, Parts

Textile Mills Products Apparel Products Paper Products

3.03

0.01

0.01

0.05

1.19

(3.90)

0.00

0.40

26.43

-

-

0.46

0.67

(23.49)

-

4.07

3.43

-

-

0.08

2.71

(2.85)

-

3.37

0.22

-

-

0.05

0.25

(0.25)

-

0.27

Petroleum & Coal Products

26.24

-

-

0.20

11.00

(9.83)

-

27.60

Chemical Products

56.39

-

0.08

0.30

15.53

(28.87)

-

43.43

3.55

0.00

0.00

0.04

3.29

(6.05)

0.00

0.82

Wholesale Trade

56.31

0.15

9.79

0.73

19.73

4.79

2.27

93.76

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

21.53

0.00

1.79

-

-

-

-

23.32

Food & Beverage Stores

26.18

0.00

0.05

-

-

-

-

26.23

106.20

0.36

2.19

-

-

-

-

108.74

35.71

0.03

5.33

0.52

15.24

(3.32)

0.55

54.05

Publishing & Software

4.65

-

4.21

0.10

2.84

(0.30)

1.16

12.65

Motion Picture & Sound Recording

3.17

-

2.50

0.02

1.86

(0.72)

-

6.83

Broadcasting, Telecomm, Internet

45.29

-

1.50

-

1.88

(0.12)

-

48.55

Banks,& Credit Intermediation

30.36

-

-

-

5.07

(0.01)

-

35.43

Securities, Commodities, Investments

17.96

-

-

-

5.65

-

-

23.61

Insurance & Related

34.81

0.73

-

-

1.57

(4.39)

-

32.73

Funds, Trusts, & Related

17.78

-

-

-

-

-

-

17.78

254.37

8.29

0.20

-

0.33

-

-

263.19

Printing & Related Activities

Plastics & Rubber Products

General Merchanise Stores & Other Transportation & Warehousing

Housing & Real Estate Rental & Leasing Services

9.01

-

-

-

7.07

-

-

16.08

Legal Services

9.27

1.23

-

-

1.24

(0.25)

-

11.49

-

-

8.61

-

1.84

(2.82)

5.83

13.45

8.46

0.10

18.79

-

13.41

(9.15)

25.89

57.48

-

-

-

-

0.03

-

-

0.03

6.85

-

-

-

0.28

(0.21)

-

6.92

Computer Systems, Desig,n & Related Misc. Professional & Scientific Tech Services Management of Companies Administrative & Support Services

19

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

49

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

2.25

-

-

-

0.01

(0.03)

-

2.24

31.29

-

-

-

0.38

(0.11)

-

31.56

200.29

-

-

-

0.11

(0.28)

-

200.13

6.62

-

0.22

-

0.27

(0.10)

-

7.01

11.29

-

-

-

-

-

-

11.29

7.83

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.83

Food Services & Drinking Places

87.95

-

-

-

0.18

-

-

88.12

Other Services, Except Government

61.27

-

-

-

0.01

(0.39)

-

60.88

-

-

-

-

-

-

104.09

104.09

Federal Government, Nondefense

0.51

-

-

-

0.06

(0.04)

65.75

66.28

State & Local Government

5.63

-

-

-

-

-

289.23

294.86

(4.42)

(0.19)

(7.83)

0.21

24.58

0.54

0.92

13.81

Waste Management Services Educational Services Health & Human Services Performing Arts, Spectator Sports, Museums Amusements, Gambling, & Recreation Accommodation

Federal Government, Defense

Used Goods & Adjustments

20

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

50

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix A.3: Total U.S. GDP in Billions of Dollars, 2015

Total GDP 2015 Farms, Forest, Fisheries Mining, Oil, Gas, Minerals

Personal Consumption Expenditures

Residential Investment

Nonresidential Investment

Change in Inventories

Exports

Imports

Govt

GDP

12,283.69

651.91

2,311.32

93.40

1,997.17

(2,519.14)

3,218.31

18,036.65

77.93

-

-

1.91

47.08

(53.47)

-

73.46

0.46

-

102.66

(1.09)

29.56

(144.77)

-

(13.18)

265.52

-

-

-

1.65

(2.69)

-

264.49

-

493.91

404.70

-

0.12

-

288.76

1,187.49

Primary Metals

16.34

4.20

0.26

2.54

46.38

(117.23)

0.28

(47.23)

Metal Products & Machinery

29.95

-

243.15

8.36

142.99

(215.50)

8.47

217.41

Computer & Electronic Products

79.47

0.31

184.40

3.02

106.22

(321.77)

5.42

57.07

40.77

4.26

25.52

1.72

31.49

(92.43)

0.52

11.84

235.06

-

287.52

8.41

107.89

(316.58)

79.89

402.19

Utilities Construction

Electrical Equipment, Appliances Motor Vehicles, Trailers, Parts Other Transportation Equipment

18.33

-

60.07

2.62

128.90

(59.81)

21.21

171.31

Furniture & Related

45.58

0.44

29.70

1.04

3.92

(38.49)

0.85

43.03

Miscellaneous Manufacturing

97.07

-

45.41

4.39

35.10

(88.77)

0.31

93.51 550.36

Food, Beverage, Tobacco Products Textile Mills Products Apparel Products Paper Products

563.20

-

-

11.24

64.86

(88.94)

-

27.87

0.20

0.17

1.03

8.97

(31.66)

0.00

6.59

166.04

-

-

3.66

5.09

(150.83)

-

23.96

27.01

-

-

1.85

21.97

(23.00)

-

27.82

3.66

-

-

1.06

2.52

(2.57)

-

4.67

Petroleum & Coal Products

179.17

-

-

7.63

82.24

(71.04)

-

197.99

Chemical Products

325.24

-

2.86

11.08

156.92

(226.16)

-

269.93

31.85

0.02

0.01

2.87

26.17

(48.98)

0.00

11.94

Wholesale Trade

457.25

2.11

164.74

12.30

154.92

38.12

12.86

842.30

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

159.37

0.02

16.95

-

-

-

-

176.34

Food & Beverage Stores

198.26

0.00

0.42

-

-

-

-

198.68

General Merchanise Stores & Other

950.27

4.97

31.65

-

-

-

-

986.89

Transportation & Warehousing

267.53

0.38

31.83

3.11

121.05

(26.05)

3.12

400.97

76.27

-

71.62

1.74

35.79

(4.34)

6.57

187.66

Printing & Related Activities

Plastics & Rubber Products

Publishing & Software

37.02

-

35.99

0.24

20.32

(8.00)

-

85.57

Broadcasting, Telecomm, Internet

379.15

-

33.76

-

18.07

(1.05)

-

429.92

Banks & Credit Intermediation

258.79

-

-

-

48.64

(0.06)

-

307.37

Securities, Commodities, Investments

160.36

-

-

-

66.48

-

-

226.85

Insurance & Related

342.98

10.12

-

-

17.94

(47.16)

-

323.87

Motion Picture & Sound Recording

Funds, Trusts, & Related Housing & Real Estate Rental & Leasing Services Legal Services Computer Systems, Design & Related Misc. Professional & Scientific Tech Services Management of Companies Administrative & Support Services

158.77

-

-

-

-

-

-

158.77

1,921.62

115.24

3.53

-

2.92

-

-

2,043.32

87.62

-

-

-

60.40

-

-

148.02

101.81

17.05

-

-

12.27

(2.55)

-

128.58

-

-

243.64

-

17.92

(27.49)

33.07

267.14

69.17

1.36

378.33

-

124.79

(84.51)

146.89

636.01

-

-

-

-

0.23

-

-

0.23

56.03

-

-

-

2.57

(1.92)

-

56.68

21

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

51

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Waste Management Services Educational Services Health & Human Services

17.34

-

-

-

0.10

(0.21)

-

17.23

344.34

-

-

-

3.36

(1.21)

-

346.49

2,324.75

-

-

-

1.41

(3.21)

-

2,322.96

77.23

-

4.57

-

2.81

(1.10)

-

83.51

Amusements, Gambling, & Recreation

175.76

-

-

-

-

-

-

175.76

Accommodation

129.38

-

-

-

-

-

-

129.38

Food Services & Drinking Places

666.10

-

-

-

1.63

-

-

667.73

Other Services, Except Government

595.82

-

-

-

0.07

(3.69)

-

592.20 590.65

Performing Arts, Spectator Sports, Museums

Federal Government (Defense) Federal Government (Nondefense) State & Local Government Used Goods & Adjustments

-

-

-

-

-

-

590.65

8.20

-

-

-

0.51

(0.36)

373.10

381.44

68.44

-

-

-

-

-

1,641.17

1,709.61

(36.46)

(2.69)

(92.13)

2.66

232.95

(249.64)

5.20

(140.11)

22

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

52

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix A.4: Latino GDP 2010 in Billions of 2015 Dollars

Industry Total Latino Real GDP 2010 Farms, Forest, Fisheries Mining, Oil, Gas, Minerals Utilities

Personal Consumption Expenditures

Residential Investment

Nonresidential Investment

Change in Inventories

Exports

Imports

Govt

GDP

1,182.50

27.97

107.38

2.92

180.98

(225.93)

569.49

1,845.31

11.19

-

-

(0.17)

9.97

(7.94)

-

13.05

0.01

-

4.63

0.00

2.00

(17.46)

-

(10.82)

32.50

-

-

-

0.23

(0.28)

-

32.45

-

20.88

43.23

-

0.01

-

57.38

121.50

Primary Metals

1.53

0.19

0.01

0.16

4.47

(9.94)

0.00

(3.58)

Metal Products & Machinery

2.34

-

6.03

0.21

15.03

(17.14)

1.35

7.82

Computer & Electronic Products

7.12

0.02

5.13

0.09

8.97

(24.60)

6.86

3.59

Electrical Equipment, Appliances

3.31

0.27

0.40

0.02

3.00

(7.98)

0.62

(0.36)

Construction

17.98

-

3.39

0.24

6.74

(26.13)

5.12

7.34

Other Transportation Equipment

1.52

-

0.84

0.23

7.61

(3.35)

7.37

14.22

Furniture & Related

4.72

0.03

1.47

0.06

0.47

(4.31)

0.37

2.81

Miscellaneous Manufacturing

9.12

-

1.79

0.16

2.89

(8.66)

0.17

5.47

72.62

-

-

0.28

10.39

(10.97)

-

72.31

Motor Vehicles, Trailers, Parts

Food, Beverage, Tobacco Products

2.07

0.00

0.00

0.05

1.00

(2.87)

0.01

0.26

21.54

-

-

0.22

0.58

(23.78)

-

(1.43)

Paper Products

3.08

-

-

0.00

2.49

(2.57)

-

3.01

Printing & Related Activities

0.18

-

-

(0.01)

0.21

(0.22)

-

0.16

Petroleum & Coal Products

23.02

-

-

0.05

6.33

(10.90)

-

18.50

Chemical Products

46.59

-

0.16

0.34

13.82

(25.11)

-

35.80

3.19

0.00

0.00

0.03

2.82

(4.66)

0.00

1.38

Wholesale Trade

47.04

0.10

7.79

0.36

15.99

3.74

2.99

78.01

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

13.11

(0.00)

1.00

-

-

-

-

14.10

Food & Beverage Stores

26.71

0.00

0.06

-

-

-

-

26.76

General Merchanise Stores & Other

94.87

0.28

1.60

-

-

-

-

96.76

Transportation & Warehousing

27.23

0.02

4.20

0.27

12.82

(1.62)

0.53

43.45

Publishing & Software

3.85

-

3.09

0.01

3.45

(0.34)

0.89

10.95

Motion Picture & Sound Recording

2.36

-

2.31

0.01

1.48

(0.42)

-

5.74

Broadcasting, Telecomm, Internet

35.16

-

1.40

-

1.49

(0.09)

-

37.97

Banks & Credit Intermediation

32.33

-

-

-

3.69

(0.00)

-

36.01

Securities, Commodities, Investments

17.21

-

-

-

4.68

-

-

21.89

Insurance & Related

26.16

0.35

-

-

1.25

(5.74)

-

22.03

Funds, Trusts, & Related

15.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

15.50

Textile Mills Products Apparel Products

Plastics & Rubber Products

226.67

4.96

0.12

-

0.31

-

-

232.06

Rental & Leasing Services

5.55

-

-

-

5.52

-

-

11.07

Legal Services

9.61

1.15

-

-

1.10

(0.18)

-

11.67

-

-

12.31

-

1.00

(1.82)

4.93

16.41

6.24

0.07

13.90

-

9.09

(6.28)

26.94

49.96

-

-

-

-

0.03

-

-

0.03

Housing & Real Estate

Computer Systems, Design, & Related Misc. Professional & Scientific Tech Services Management of Companies

23

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

53

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Administrative & Support Services

5.38

-

-

-

0.25

(0.16)

-

Waste Management Services

2.44

-

-

-

0.01

(0.02)

-

2.42

26.51

-

-

-

0.34

(0.16)

-

26.69

148.45

-

-

-

0.05

(0.26)

-

148.25

Educational Services Health & Human Services Performing Arts, Spectator Sports, Museums Amusements, Gambling, & Recreation

5.47

5.12

-

0.17

-

0.27

(0.05)

-

5.51

11.42

-

-

-

-

-

-

11.42

5.47

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.47

Food Services & Drinking Places

74.48

-

-

-

0.25

-

-

74.73

Other Services, Except Government

45.45

-

-

-

0.04

(0.25)

-

45.24 114.49

Accommodation

-

-

-

-

-

-

114.49

Federal Government (Nondefense)

0.25

-

-

-

0.03

(0.03)

62.87

63.12

State & Local Government

5.04

-

-

-

-

-

274.48

279.51

(0.77)

(0.35)

(7.65)

0.33

18.81

(3.39)

2.11

9.10

Federal Government (Defense)

Used Goods & Adjustments

24

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

54

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix A.5: Total Real U.S. 2010 GDP in Billions of 2015 Dollars

Total Real U.S. GDP 2010 Farms, Forest, Fisheries Mining, Oil, Gas, Minerals Utilities

Personal Consumption Expenditures

Residential Investment

Nonresidential Investment

11,144.84

429.02

76.90

-

0.21

Change in Inventories

Exports

Imports

Govt

GDP

1,770.15

63.53

1,759.12

(2,140.80)

3,463.40

16,489.26

-

(6.34)

55.65

(47.54)

-

78.67

-

95.70

1.56

20.06

(172.90)

-

(55.37)

260.35

-

-

-

2.27

(2.31)

-

260.31

-

320.19

315.41

-

0.13

-

348.99

984.72

Primary Metals

15.16

2.96

0.29

3.49

43.12

(95.47)

0.03

(30.42)

Metal Products & Machinery

23.51

-

187.30

5.87

143.00

(159.59)

8.21

208.30

Computer & Electronic Products

70.96

0.31

161.36

2.88

104.20

(268.79)

41.71

112.64

Electrical Equipment, Appliances

37.29

4.11

21.85

1.01

26.81

(70.65)

3.78

24.19

Construction

161.73

-

154.91

10.95

83.28

(215.98)

31.14

226.03

Other Transportation Equipment

13.71

-

34.33

9.28

89.44

(35.73)

44.82

155.85

Furniture & Related

40.62

0.38

22.64

0.86

3.52

(30.24)

2.25

40.04

Miscellaneous Manufacturing

92.37

-

44.04

3.91

31.95

(87.00)

1.04

86.31

584.46

-

-

2.48

59.20

(72.89)

-

573.25

Motor Vehicles, Trailers, Parts

Food, Beverage, Tobacco Products

24.86

0.07

0.07

0.89

9.09

(27.55)

0.04

7.46

140.40

-

-

2.12

5.01

(135.61)

-

11.93

26.28

-

-

0.17

22.79

(23.03)

-

26.21

3.35

-

-

(0.13)

2.28

(2.44)

-

3.06

Petroleum & Coal Products

174.37

-

-

1.18

54.02

(71.83)

-

157.74

Chemical Products

258.12

-

3.88

8.45

153.28

(201.64)

-

222.08

29.62

0.01

0.19

1.22

24.60

(40.51)

0.02

15.14

Wholesale Trade

413.41

1.58

142.29

6.62

140.62

30.88

18.18

753.60

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

115.17

(0.01)

11.94

-

-

-

-

127.10

Food & Beverage Stores

206.38

0.00

0.50

-

-

-

-

206.88

General Merchanise Stores & Other

837.01

4.36

25.17

-

-

-

-

866.55

Transportation & Warehousing

227.25

0.28

25.37

2.31

115.09

(13.33)

3.24

360.18

71.73

-

52.51

0.11

44.27

(4.24)

5.42

169.79

Textile Mills Products Apparel Products Paper Products Printing & Related Activities

Plastics & Rubber Products

Publishing & Software

30.77

-

37.49

0.14

16.37

(4.79)

-

79.99

Broadcasting, Telecomm, Internet

304.59

-

27.71

-

15.41

(0.72)

-

346.98

Banks & Credit Intermediation

271.33

-

-

-

39.10

(0.05)

-

310.37

Securities, Commodities, Investments

167.08

-

-

-

59.56

-

-

226.64

Insurance & Related

306.98

5.39

-

-

15.96

(64.52)

-

263.82

Funds, Trusts, & Related

150.44

-

-

-

-

-

-

150.44

1,811.48

76.01

2.53

-

3.08

-

-

1,893.10

Housing & Real Estate Rental & Leasing Services Legal Services Computer Systems, Design, & Related Misc Professional & Scientific Tech Services Management of Companies

67.25

-

-

-

53.69

-

-

120.94

107.92

17.60

-

-

12.31

(2.13)

-

135.70

-

-

195.55

-

10.54

(19.24)

29.96

216.81

58.02

1.09

302.09

-

95.02

(63.64)

163.85

556.44

-

-

-

-

0.29

-

-

0.29

25

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

55

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Administrative & Support Services

50.01

-

-

-

2.59

(1.59)

-

Waste Management Services

18.21

-

-

-

0.05

(0.18)

-

18.08

332.03

-

-

-

3.38

(1.80)

-

333.60

2,045.36

-

-

-

0.69

(2.70)

-

2,043.35

66.70

-

4.31

-

3.18

(0.62)

-

73.57

Amusements, Gambling, & Recreation

151.97

-

-

-

-

-

-

151.97

Accommodation

106.30

-

-

-

-

-

-

106.30

Food Services & Drinking Places

575.57

-

-

-

2.57

-

-

578.14

Other Services, Except Government

550.35

-

-

-

0.33

(2.66)

-

548.02

-

-

-

-

-

-

696.27

696.27

Federal Government (Nondefense)

10.88

-

-

-

0.30

(0.32)

382.34

393.19

State & Local Government

63.49

-

-

-

-

-

1,669.25

1,732.73

Used Goods & Adjustments

(7.10)

(5.33)

(99.27)

4.50

191.05

(227.46)

12.86

(130.75)

Educational Services Health & Human Services Performing Arts, Spectator Sports, Museums

Federal Government (Defense)

51.01

26

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

56

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix A.6: Latino GDP as % of Total U.S. GDP, 2015

Latino GDP as % of Total GDP 2015

Personal Consumption Expenditures

Residential Investment

Nonresidential Investment

Change in Inventories

Exports

Imports

Govt

GDP

11.5%

7.2%

6.3%

5.3%

11.4%

10.9%

17.6%

11.8%

2.9%

18.7%

17.6%

15.7%

-1.4%

13.0%

13.6%

72.3%

11.3%

12.3%

15.5%

Farms, Forest, Fisheries

3.5%

Mining, Oil, Gas, Minerals

6.2%

13.3%

Utilities Construction

11.5%

Primary Metals

7.2%

15.8%

10.4%

7.2%

5.0%

4.5%

11.9%

2.6%

3.6%

13.3% 17.6%

12.7%

12.0%

17.6%

13.1%

12.2%

12.1%

17.6%

1.1%

Metal Products & Machinery

9.9%

Computer & Electronic Products

9.7%

7.2%

2.3%

2.3%

9.5%

9.6%

17.6%

-13.3%

Electrical Equipment, Appliances

12.0%

7.2%

3.9%

3.9%

13.2%

12.9%

17.6%

-11.6%

Motor Vehicles, Trailers, Parts

13.4%

2.6%

2.6%

9.5%

11.2%

17.6%

7.0%

Other Transportation Equipment

13.4%

4.6%

4.6%

10.8%

11.1%

17.6%

9.6%

Furniture & Related

13.8%

7.8%

7.8%

15.4%

14.4%

17.6%

9.1%

Miscellaneous Manufacturing

10.4%

5.3%

5.3%

10.0%

10.2%

17.6%

Food, Beverage, Tobacco Products

13.9%

8.3%

18.6%

15.8%

Textile Mills Products

10.9%

5.3%

13.2%

12.3%

Apparel Products

15.9%

12.4%

13.1%

15.6%

17.0%

Paper Products

12.7%

4.2%

12.3%

12.4%

12.1%

7.2%

7.2%

5.3%

7.7% 14.0%

17.6%

6.1%

6.1%

4.6%

10.0%

9.8%

5.8%

Petroleum & Coal Products

14.6%

2.6%

13.4%

13.8%

13.9%

Chemical Products

17.3%

2.7%

2.7%

9.9%

12.8%

Plastics & Rubber Products

11.1%

7.2%

1.4%

1.4%

12.6%

12.4%

17.6%

6.9%

Wholesale Trade

12.3%

7.2%

5.9%

5.9%

12.7%

12.6%

17.6%

11.1%

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

13.5%

7.2%

10.6%

13.2%

Food & Beverage Stores

13.2%

7.2%

11.6%

13.2%

General Merchanise Stores & Other

11.2%

7.2%

6.9%

Transportation & Warehousing

13.3%

7.2%

16.7%

16.8%

12.6%

12.8%

17.6%

13.5%

6.1%

5.9%

5.9%

7.9%

6.9%

17.6%

6.7%

6.9%

Printing & Related Activities

Publishing & Software

8.6%

6.9%

Broadcasting, Telecomm, Internet

11.9%

4.4%

Banks & Credit Intermediation Securities, Commodities, Investments

11.7%

Insurance & Related

10.2%

Funds, Trusts, & Related

11.2%

Housing & Real Estate

13.2%

Rental & Leasing Services

10.3%

Motion Picture & Sound Recording

11.2%

9.1%

Legal Services Computer Systems, Design, & Related Misc. Professional & Scientific Tech Services

12.2%

16.1%

11.0%

9.1%

8.9%

8.0%

10.4%

11.1%

11.3%

10.4%

11.0%

11.5%

8.5% 7.2%

8.8%

10.4% 9.3%

10.1% 11.2%

7.2%

5.7%

7.2%

7.2%

11.4%

12.9%

11.7%

10.9%

10.1%

9.8%

8.9%

3.5%

10.3%

10.3%

17.6%

5.0%

5.0%

10.7%

10.8%

17.6%

9.0%

27

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

57

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

12.5%

Management of Companies

12.5%

Administrative & Support Services

12.2%

10.7%

10.8%

12.2%

Waste Management Services

13.0%

12.7%

12.8%

13.0%

Educational Services

9.1%

11.4%

9.3%

9.1%

Health & Human Services Performing Arts, Spectator Sports, Museums Amusements, Gambling, & Recreation

8.6%

8.1%

8.6%

8.6%

9.5%

9.0%

8.4%

Accommodation

6.1%

8.6%

4.8%

6.4%

6.4% 6.1%

Food Services & Drinking Places

13.2%

10.8%

13.2%

Other Services, Except Government

10.3%

11.7%

10.7%

Federal Government (Nondefense)

6.2%

12.5%

11.8%

State & Local Government

8.2%

Used Goods & Adjustments

12.1%

Federal Government (Defense)

7.2%

8.5%

7.9%

10.6%

-0.2%

10.3% 17.6%

17.6%

17.6%

17.4%

17.6%

17.2%

17.6%

-9.9%

28

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

58

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix B.1: Latino Population Summary Latino

Non-Latino

Total

% Latino

Total, 2010

50,729,570

258,620,119

309,349,689

16.4%

Total, 2015

56,476,777

264,942,044

321,418,821

17.6%

5,747,207

6,321,925

12,069,132

11.3%

2.4%

3.9%

Change, 2010–15 % Change Ages 0–14 ,2010

14,502,393

46,794,038

61,296,431

23.7%

Ages 0–14, 2015

15,273,666

45,708,654

60,982,320

25.0%

Change, 2010–15

771,273

(1,085,384)

(314,111)

5.3%

-2.3%

-0.5%

Ages 15–24, 2010

8,891,287

34,815,842

43,707,129

20.3%

Ages 15–24, 2015

9,545,411

34,360,418

43,905,829

21.7%

Change, 2010–15

654,124

(455,424)

198,700

7.4%

-1.3%

0.5%

Ages 25–64, 2010

24,525,683

139,371,072

163,896,755

15.0%

Ages 25–64, 2015

27,912,489

140,903,374

168,815,863

16.5%

Change, 2010–15

3,386,806

1,532,302

4,919,108

13.8%

1.1%

3.0%

Ages 65+, 2010

2,810,207

37,639,167

40,449,374

6.9%

Ages 65+, 2015

3,745,211

43,969,598

47,714,809

7.8%

935,004

6,330,431

7,265,435

33.3%

16.8%

18.0%

% Change

% Change

% Change

Change, 2010–15 % Change

29

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

59

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix B.2: Latino Population, by 5-Year Age Cohort 2010

Latino

Non-Latino

Total

% Latino

0–4

5,088,608

15,006,724

20,095,332

25.3%

5–9

4,861,964

15,562,821

20,424,785

23.8%

10–14

4,551,821

16,224,493

20,776,314

21.9%

15–19

4,535,162

17,461,444

21,996,606

20.6%

20–24

4,356,125

17,354,398

21,710,523

20.1%

25–29

4,259,091

16,645,220

20,904,311

20.4%

30–34

4,137,660

15,844,433

19,982,093

20.7%

35–39

3,922,174

16,340,236

20,262,410

19.4%

40–44

3,473,523

17,606,730

21,080,253

16.5%

45–49

3,052,608

19,590,348

22,642,956

13.5%

50–54

2,443,693

19,837,989

22,281,682

11.0%

55–59

1,838,392

17,802,902

19,641,294

9.4%

60–64

1,398,542

15,703,214

17,101,756

8.2%

65–69

963,244

11,536,284

12,499,528

7.7%

70–74

709,301

8,664,375

9,373,676

7.6%

75–79

496,715

6,763,362

7,260,077

6.8%

80–84

358,006

5,393,608

5,751,614

6.2%

85–89

183,721

3,402,557

3,586,278

5.1%

99,220

1,878,981

1,978,201

5.0%

2015

Latino

Non-Latino

Total

% Latino

0–4

5,073,300

14,659,968

19,733,268

25.7%

5–9

5,199,097

15,394,145

20,593,242

25.2%

10–14

5,001,269

15,654,541

20,655,810

24.2%

15–19

4,728,888

16,536,848

21,265,736

22.2%

20–24

4,816,523

17,823,570

22,640,093

21.3%

25–29

4,460,885

17,778,511

22,239,396

20.1%

30–34

4,400,485

17,184,587

21,585,072

20.4%

35–39

4,310,165

16,248,692

20,558,857

21.0%

40–44

3,992,253

16,448,704

20,440,957

19.5%

45–49

3,468,268

17,353,770

20,822,038

16.7%

50–54

3,020,972

19,300,391

22,321,363

13.5%

55–59

2,390,548

19,180,537

21,571,085

11.1%

60–64

1,868,913

17,408,182

19,277,095

9.7%

65–69

1,355,819

14,744,244

16,100,063

8.4%

70–74

928,045

10,571,197

11,499,242

8.1%

75–79

632,333

7,513,351

8,145,684

7.8%

80–84

437,578

5,380,523

5,818,101

7.5%

85–89

245,728

3,521,543

3,767,271

6.5%

90+

145,708

2,238,740

2,384,448

6.1%

90+

30

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

60

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix C.1: Latino Employment and Work Force Participation Summary Latinos, Military

Latino Civilian Workers

Latinos, Not in the Work Force

Non-Latinos, Military

Non-Latino Civilian Workers

Non-Latinos, Not in the Work Force

Total, 2010 Total, 2015 Change, 2010–15 % Change, 2010–15

133,960 156,506 22,546 16.8%

23,809,586 26,823,994 3,014,408 12.7%

11,412,464 13,261,948 1,849,484 16.2%

925,188 863,733 (61,455) -6.6%

132,163,372 133,886,608 1,723,236 1.3%

75,401,604 81,246,056 5,844,452 7.8%

Ages 16–24, 2010 Ages 16–24, 2015 Change, 2010–15 % Change, 2010–15

62,337 73,360 11,023 17.7%

4,472,431 4,832,042 359,611 8.0%

3,485,352 3,679,346 193,994 5.6%

346,760 320,947 (25,813) -7.4%

17,807,773 17,962,933 155,160 0.9%

13,325,392 12,839,545 (485,847) -3.6%

Ages 25–64, 2010 Ages 25–64, 2015 Change, 2010–15 % Change, 2010–15

71,623 83,146 11,523 16.1%

18,905,736 21,383,333 2,477,597 13.1%

5,548,324 6,446,010 897,686 16.2%

578,428 542,786 (35,642) -6.2%

108,297,422 108,293,386 (4,036) 0.0%

30,495,222 32,067,202 1,571,980 5.2%

275,348 387,808 112,460 40.8%

787,116 1,113,719 326,603 41.5%

-

3,591,530 4,617,987 1,026,457 28.6%

9,823,735 12,364,997 2,541,262 25.9%

Ages 65+, 2010 Ages 65+, 2015 Change, 2010–15 % Change, 2010–15

32

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

61

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix C.2: Latino Employment and Work Force Participation, by 5-Year Age Cohort 2010

16–19 20–24 25–29 30–34 35–39 40–44 45–49 50–54 55–59 60–64 65–69 70–74 75–79 80–84 85–89 90+ 2015

16–19 20–24 25–29 30–34 35–39 40–44 45–49 50–54 55–59 60–64 65–69 70–74 75–79 80–84 85–89 90+

Latinos, Military

Latino Civilian Workers

Latinos, Not in the Work Force

Non-Latinos, Military

Non-Latino Civilian Workers

Non-Latinos, Not in the Work Force

16,226 46,111 28,243 18,264 12,725 7,731 3,146 1,157 293 64

1,279,211 3,193,220 3,325,373 3,290,736 3,134,872 2,827,028 2,453,154 1,884,749 1,261,568 728,256

2,368,558 1,116,794 905,475 828,660 774,577 638,764 596,308 557,787 576,531 670,222

73,921 272,839 204,127 121,592 109,380 79,371 42,030 16,340 4,895 693

5,348,179 12,459,594 13,600,332 13,064,889 13,523,450 14,528,064 16,111,211 15,829,436 12,967,137 8,672,903

8,703,427 4,621,965 2,840,761 2,657,952 2,707,406 2,999,295 3,437,107 3,992,213 4,830,870 7,029,618

-

274,209

689,035

-

3,571,877

7,964,407

-

99,907 39,777 12,221 4,166 1,139

609,394 456,938 345,785 179,555 98,081

-

1,481,445 667,576 244,599 73,027 19,653

7,182,930 6,095,786 5,149,009 3,329,530 1,859,328

Latinos, Military

Latino Civilian Workers

Latinos, Not in the Work Force

Non-Latinos, Military

Non-Latino Civilian Workers

Non-Latinos, Not in the Work Force

19,766 53,594 32,304 19,418 15,924 8,981 3,890 2,215 414 -

1,298,907 3,533,135 3,541,315 3,506,533 3,406,829 3,187,739 2,780,598 2,324,470 1,654,898 980,951 385,271

2,449,552 1,229,794 887,266 874,534 887,412 795,533 683,780 694,287 735,236 887,962 970,548

60,931 260,016 194,833 127,072 96,645 64,823 40,191 16,547 2,434 241 -

5,047,104 12,915,829 14,493,439 14,075,148 13,339,979 13,540,982 14,141,689 15,133,087 13,836,936 9,732,126 4,586,219

8,191,820 4,647,725 3,090,239 2,982,367 2,812,068 2,842,899 3,171,890 4,150,757 5,341,167 7,675,815 10,158,025

-

142,630

785,415

-

1,856,601

8,714,596

-

51,512 19,306 7,363 2,537

580,821 418,272 238,365 143,171

-

775,686 279,600 100,415 31,768

6,737,665 5,100,923 3,421,128 2,206,972

33

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

62

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix D.1: Latino Educational Attainment Summary

Latinos, Not HS Grads

Latinos, HS Grads

Latinos, College Grads

Non-Latinos, Not HS Grads

Non-Latinos, HS Grads

Non-Latinos, College Grads

Total

2010

29,172,521

17,730,186

3,826,863

79,157,380

122,800,524

56,662,215

309,349,689

2015

30,070,123

21,331,521

5,075,133

75,087,207

125,330,149

64,524,688

321,418,821

897,602

3,601,335

1,248,270

(4,070,173)

2,529,625

7,862,473

12,069,132

3.1%

20.3%

32.6%

-5.1%

2.1%

13.9%

3.9%

-28.3%

58.7%

13.7%

Change, 2010–15 % Change, 2010–15 Latino % Change Ages 20–24, 2010

1,087,736

3,030,492

237,897

1,494,525

13,287,715

2,572,158

21,710,523

Ages 20–24, 2015

731,639

3,754,408

330,476

1,253,766

13,684,660

2,885,144

22,640,093

Change, 2010–15

(356,097)

723,916

92,579

(240,759)

396,945

312,986

929,570

-32.7%

23.9%

38.9%

-16.1%

3.0%

12.2%

4.3%

59.7%

64.6%

22.8%

Ages 25–34, 2010

2,725,826

4,576,831

1,094,094

2,532,098

18,280,706

11,676,849

40,886,404

Ages 25–34, 2015

2,201,617

5,228,719

1,431,034

2,317,798

19,075,738

13,569,562

43,824,468

Change, 2010–15

(524,209)

651,888

336,940

(214,300)

795,032

1,892,713

2,938,064

-19.2%

14.2%

30.8%

-8.5%

4.3%

16.2%

7.2%

71.0%

45.1%

15.1%

Ages 35–64, 2010

6,017,980

7,875,546

2,235,406

9,201,664

63,641,314

34,038,441

123,010,351

Ages 35–64, 2015

6,673,593

9,463,900

2,913,626

8,375,809

61,402,305

36,162,162

124,991,395

Change, 2010–15

655,613

1,588,354

678,220

(825,855)

(2,239,009)

2,123,721

1,981,044

10.9%

20.2%

30.3%

-9.0%

-3.5%

6.2%

1.6%

-385.1%

-244.1%

24.2%

% Change, 2010–15 Latino % Change

% Change, 2010–15 Latino % Change

% Change, 2010–15 Latino % Change

34

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

63

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix D.2: Latino Educational Attainment by 5-Year Age Cohort 2010

Latinos, Not HS Grads

Latinos, HS Grads

Latinos, College Grads

Non-Latinos, Not HS Grads

Non-Latinos, HS Grads

Non-Latinos, College Grads

Total

0–4

5,088,608.0

-

-

15,006,724.0

-

-

20,095,332.0

5–9

4,861,964.0

-

-

15,562,821.0

-

-

20,424,785.0

10–14

4,551,821.0

-

-

16,224,493.0

-

-

20,776,314.0

15–19

3,276,464.0

1,258,325.0

373.0

11,742,175.0

5,713,084.0

6,185.0

21,996,606.0

20–24

1,087,736.0

3,030,492.0

237,897.0

1,494,525.0

13,287,715.0

2,572,158.0

21,710,523.0

25–29

1,314,272.0

2,425,228.0

519,591.0

1,324,549.0

9,474,730.0

5,845,941.0

20,904,311.0

30–34

1,411,554.0

2,151,603.0

574,503.0

1,207,549.0

8,805,976.0

5,830,908.0

19,982,093.0

35–39

1,418,417.0

1,951,834.0

551,923.0

1,195,793.0

9,239,066.0

5,905,377.0

20,262,410.0

40–44

1,241,997.0

1,740,713.0

490,813.0

1,372,268.0

10,261,043.0

5,973,419.0

21,080,253.0

45–49

1,110,322.0

1,521,644.0

420,642.0

1,710,131.0

11,992,644.0

5,887,573.0

22,642,956.0

50–54

920,968.0

1,174,915.0

347,810.0

1,787,683.0

12,291,378.0

5,758,928.0

22,281,682.0

55–59

731,175.0

861,755.0

245,462.0

1,562,542.0

10,700,941.0

5,539,419.0

19,641,294.0

60–64

595,101.0

624,685.0

178,756.0

1,573,247.0

9,156,242.0

4,973,725.0

17,101,756.0

65–69

469,540.0

388,587.0

105,117.0

1,589,722.0

6,843,854.0

3,102,708.0

12,499,528.0

70–74

388,900.0

255,312.0

65,089.0

1,542,857.0

5,127,913.0

1,993,605.0

9,373,676.0

75–79

294,420.0

161,081.0

41,214.0

1,441,663.0

3,914,829.0

1,406,870.0

7,260,077.0

80–84

220,446.0

107,327.0

30,233.0

1,338,803.0

3,041,795.0

1,013,010.0

5,751,614.0

85–89

120,126.0

52,406.0

11,189.0

886,052.0

1,956,846.0

559,659.0

3,586,278.0

68,690.0

24,279.0

6,251.0

593,783.0

992,468.0

292,730.0

1,978,201.0

2015

Latinos, Not HS Grads

Latinos, HS Grads

Latinos, College Grads

Non-Latinos, Not HS Grads

Non-Latinos, HS Grads

Non-Latinos, College Grads

Total

0–4

5,073,300.0

-

-

14,659,968.0

-

-

19,733,268.0

5–9

5,199,097.0

-

-

15,394,145.0

-

-

20,593,242.0

10–14

5,001,269.0

-

-

15,654,541.0

-

-

20,655,810.0

15–19

3,320,444.0

1,407,159.0

1,285.0

11,091,074.0

5,437,787.0

7,987.0

21,265,736.0

20–24

731,639.0

3,754,408.0

330,476.0

1,253,766.0

13,684,660.0

2,885,144.0

22,640,093.0

25–29

945,115.0

2,781,070.0

734,700.0

1,183,580.0

9,913,128.0

6,681,803.0

22,239,396.0

30–34

1,256,502.0

2,447,649.0

696,334.0

1,134,218.0

9,162,610.0

6,887,759.0

21,585,072.0

35–39

1,423,220.0

2,208,170.0

678,775.0

1,076,019.0

8,720,875.0

6,451,798.0

20,558,857.0

40–44

1,350,056.0

2,008,801.0

633,396.0

1,143,271.0

9,014,601.0

6,290,832.0

20,440,957.0

45–49

1,218,792.0

1,716,091.0

533,385.0

1,319,635.0

9,867,022.0

6,167,113.0

20,822,038.0

50–54

1,065,514.0

1,491,567.0

463,891.0

1,646,010.0

11,645,255.0

6,009,126.0

22,321,363.0

55–59

879,392.0

1,167,297.0

343,859.0

1,678,792.0

11,798,884.0

5,702,861.0

21,571,085.0

60–64

736,619.0

871,974.0

260,320.0

1,512,082.0

10,355,668.0

5,540,432.0

19,277,095.0

65–69

585,104.0

593,408.0

177,307.0

1,367,249.0

8,620,531.0

4,756,464.0

16,100,063.0

70–74

451,531.0

373,358.0

103,156.0

1,356,619.0

6,221,642.0

2,992,936.0

11,499,242.0

75–79

343,900.0

234,598.0

53,835.0

1,227,453.0

4,456,408.0

1,829,490.0

8,145,684.0

80–84

252,439.0

149,921.0

35,218.0

1,040,654.0

3,131,826.0

1,208,043.0

5,818,101.0

85–89

146,362.0

80,008.0

19,358.0

785,204.0

2,014,000.0

722,339.0

3,767,271.0

89,828.0

46,042.0

9,838.0

562,927.0

1,285,252.0

390,561.0

2,384,448.0

90+

90+

35

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

64

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix E.1: Latino Citizenship Summary Citizenship

Latinos, U.S.- Born

Latinos, Naturalized

Latinos, NonCitizens

Non-Latinos, U.S.-Born

Non-Latinos, Naturalized

Non-Latinos, Non-Citizens

Total

2010

31,912,465

5,544,860

13,272,245

237,520,349

11,911,452

9,188,318

309,349,689

2015

37,063,520

6,766,268

12,646,989

241,197,191

13,965,642

9,779,211

321,418,821

5,151,055

1,221,408

(625,256)

3,676,842

2,054,190

590,893

12,069,132

16.1%

22.0%

-4.7%

1.5%

17.2%

6.4%

3.9%

Ages 0–14, 2010

13,575,235

99,506

827,652

45,746,130

318,925

728,983

61,296,431

Ages 0–14, 2015

14,646,696

104,549

522,421

44,675,755

320,502

712,397

60,982,320

Change, 2010–15

1,071,461

5,043

(305,231)

(1,070,375)

1,577

(16,586)

(314,111)

7.9%

5.1%

-36.9%

-2.3%

0.5%

-2.3%

-0.5%

Ages 15–24, 2010

6,490,434

316,089

2,084,764

32,887,499

671,019

1,257,324

43,707,129

Ages 15–24, 2015

7,713,019

345,373

1,487,019

32,334,312

752,887

1,273,219

43,905,829

Change, 2010–15

1,222,585

29,284

(597,745)

(553,187)

81,868

15,895

198,700

18.8%

9.3%

-28.7%

-1.7%

12.2%

1.3%

0.5%

Ages 25-64, 2010

10,581,029

4,166,575

9,778,079

124,654,952

8,292,141

6,423,979

163,896,755

Ages 25-64, 2015

13,008,182

5,006,531

9,897,776

124,534,062

9,501,862

6,867,450

168,815,863

Change, 2010–15

2,427,153

839,956

119,697

(120,890)

1,209,721

443,471

4,919,108

22.9%

20.2%

1.2%

-0.1%

14.6%

6.9%

3.0%

Change 2010–15 % Change 2010–15

% Change, 2010–15

% Change, 2010–15

% Change, 2010–15 Ages 65+, 2010

1,265,767

962,690

581,750

34,231,768

2,629,367

778,032

40,449,374

Ages 65+, 2015

1,695,623

1,309,815

739,773

39,653,062

3,390,391

926,145

47,714,809

429,856

347,125

158,023

5,421,294

761,024

148,113

7,265,435

34.0%

36.1%

27.2%

15.8%

28.9%

19.0%

18.0%

Change, 2010–15 % Change, 2010–15

36

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

65

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Appendix E.2: Latino Citizenship by 5-Year Age Cohort Latinos, U.S.Born

Latinos, Naturalized

Latinos, NonCitizens

Non-Latinos, U.S.-Born

Non-Latinos, Naturalized

Non-Latinos, Non-Citizens

Total

0–4

4,994,392

18,151

76,065

14,838,901

35,650

132,173

20,095,332

5–9

4,584,908

28,281

248,775

15,215,885

109,493

237,443

20,424,785

10–14

3,995,935

53,074

502,812

15,691,344

173,782

359,367

20,776,314

15–19

3,666,907

108,355

759,900

16,711,722

260,803

488,919

21,996,606

20–24

2,823,527

207,734

1,324,864

16,175,777

410,216

768,405

21,710,523

25–29

2,214,518

302,694

1,741,879

15,044,575

578,335

1,022,310

20,904,311

30–34

1,821,618

408,183

1,907,859

13,938,869

763,648

1,141,916

19,982,093

35–39

1,548,970

527,862

1,845,342

14,209,619

1,046,569

1,084,048

20,262,410

40–44

1,354,627

649,979

1,468,917

15,497,969

1,182,191

926,570

21,080,253

45–49

1,208,633

719,503

1,124,472

17,557,350

1,273,824

759,174

22,642,956

50–54

1,010,882

643,017

789,794

17,943,852

1,253,659

640,478

22,281,682

55–59

787,346

504,376

546,670

16,195,598

1,134,659

472,645

19,641,294

60–64

634,435

410,961

353,146

14,267,120

1,059,256

376,838

17,101,756

65–69

427,866

314,341

221,037

10,495,530

766,109

274,645

12,499,528

70–74

304,992

246,218

158,091

7,799,489

657,619

207,267

9,373,676

75–79

226,567

176,262

93,886

6,147,532

479,046

136,784

7,260,077

80–84

172,275

125,468

60,263

4,927,042

374,753

91,813

5,751,614

85–89

88,549

66,593

28,579

3,121,869

235,608

45,080

3,586,278

90+

45,518

33,808

19,894

1,740,306

116,232

22,443

1,978,201

0–4

4,980,637

11,384

81,279

14,486,120

28,250

145,598

19,733,268

5–9

5,022,192

31,197

145,708

15,020,519

95,823

277,803

20,593,242

10–14

4,643,867

61,968

295,434

15,169,116

196,429

288,996

20,655,810

15–19

4,002,547

125,540

600,801

15,762,410

322,603

451,835

21,265,736

20–24

3,710,472

219,833

886,218

16,571,902

430,284

821,384

22,640,093

25–29

2,777,634

350,396

1,332,855

16,006,129

663,632

1,108,750

22,239,396

30–34

2,283,777

457,448

1,659,260

15,067,431

864,655

1,252,501

21,585,072

35–39

1,932,614

557,073

1,820,478

14,027,369

1,098,590

1,122,733

20,558,857

40–44

1,613,773

707,464

1,671,016

14,105,872

1,389,827

953,005

20,440,957

45–49

1,336,454

826,718

1,305,096

15,140,690

1,428,015

785,065

20,822,038

50–54

1,222,597

818,402

979,973

17,189,240

1,456,167

654,984

22,321,363

55–59

1,032,271

692,132

666,145

17,257,980

1,383,956

538,601

21,571,085

60–64

809,062

596,898

462,953

15,739,351

1,217,020

451,811

19,277,095

65–69

619,801

435,170

300,848

13,312,749

1,085,333

346,162

16,100,063

70–74

419,040

323,075

185,930

9,556,013

782,450

232,734

11,499,242

75–79

273,596

240,714

118,023

6,714,781

639,111

159,459

8,145,684

80–84

198,943

163,798

74,837

4,845,731

434,915

99,877

5,818,101

85–89

114,853

90,731

40,144

3,193,986

275,660

51,897

3,767,271

69,390

56,327

19,991

2,029,802

172,922

36,016

2,384,448

2010

90+

37

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

66

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

LATINOS – MYTHS VERSUS REALITIES Facts about the Latino GDP confute the common, but highly inaccurate, public image of Latinos as hopelessly dysfunctional miscreants. Two numbers, the size of Latino GDP and the growth rate of the Latino GDP, tell the story of how much 55 million Latinos contribute to the economic well-being of the United States.

We found the data resulting from this study so compelling that we have listed below some of the myths commonly repeated in the popular public perception vs. the data-based reality: MYTH: LATINOS LIVE ON THE MARGINS OF THE U.S. ECONOMY. REALITY: LATINOS CONTRIBUTE—A LOT At $2.13 trillion, the Latino GDP is the seventh largest GDP in the world, and the second largest among the GDPs of U.S. states. MYTH: LATINOS ARE A DRAIN ON U.S. ECONOMIC GROWTH REALITY: LATINOS GREATLY OUTPERFORM EXPECTATIONS IN DRIVING U.S. ECONOMIC GROWTH At 2.9%, the Latino Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of GDP between 2010 and 2015 was the third highest growth rate at the global level—behind only China and India, of the major economies— and nearly 70% higher than the non-Latino U.S. GDP rate of 1.7%. If these rates are sustained, Latinos will contribute nearly one quarter of all U.S. GDP growth between 2019 and 2020. MYTH: LATINOS DON’T CARRY THEIR FAIR SHARE OF THE WORKLOAD REALITY: LATINOS ARE THE MAJOR COMPONENT OF GROWTH OF THE U.S. WORK FORCE While the non-Latino work force shrank by about 4,000 workers between 2010 and 2015, the Latino work force grew by nearly 2.5 million, powering an overall increase of 2.4 million in the U.S. work force ages 25–64. MYTH: LATINOS DO NOT VALUE EDUCATION REALITY: LATINOS ARE GRADUATING FROM COLLEGE IN RECORD NUMBERS The Latino college graduate population, ages 20–24, grew by 40.6% between 2010 and 2015, compared to 13.6% for the non-Latino college graduate population in the same age group. MYTH: LATINOS ARE MOSTLY NON-CITIZEN IMMIGRANTS REALITY: A SUPER-MAJORITY OF LATINOS ARE NATIVE-BORN U.S. CITIZENS In 2015, a super-majority of all Latinos were U.S. Citizens, either U.S.-born or naturalized. Young Latinos are 25% of the Post-Millennial generation and virtually all are U.S. citizens. MYTH: LATINOS DO NOT DEFEND THE AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE REALITY: LATINOS ARE ON THE FRONT LINES, DEFENDING AND SUPPORTING THE USA Latinos comprise 25.7% of all 18 to 24-year-old Marines, and 22.2% of 18 to 24-year-olds in the Army. MYTH: UNDOCUMENTED LATINO IMMIGRANTS ARE A DRAIN ON THE AMERICAN ECONOMY, AND TAKE JOBS FROM OTHERS. REALITY: UNDOCUMENTED LATINO IMMIGRANTS ARE A SMALL, BUT ESSENTIAL, COMPONENT OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY. Undocumented Latinos are primarily honest, working-age males with very high labor force participation rates. They are critical to the country’s agricultural production, and their contributions directly translate into lower food prices and lower rates of imports. In most of the country, they represent an inconsequential share of the labor force.

39

latinofuturesresearch.com

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

67

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

2 0 17

A N N U A L

report

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

SPONSORED BY

68

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

acknowledgements The Hispanic Wealth Project (HWP) is grateful for the outstanding commitments of the people and organizations whose contributions of time, thought leadership, and financial resources made our work possible. Publication of the HWP Annual Report has been made possible through the generous financial contributions of the Hispanic Wealth Project annual and founding partners. The HWP is appreciative of the HWP Founding Board of Advisors and the HWP Board of Directors whose strategic guidance and leadership advance its efforts to triple Hispanic household wealth by 2024.

hwp annual partners CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

HWP Annual Report Author Marisa Calderon HWP Annual Report Contributors Gary Acosta

Diamond Founding Partner

Zaba Rashan Jaimie Owens

B E N E FAC TO R

HWP Annual Report Graphic Design Samira Rashan Andrea Munguia HWP Founding Board of Advisors

TRUSTEE

Chairman: Hon. Henry Cisneros, Founder and Chairman, CityView Julissa Arce, Author and Activist Nely Galan, Media Entrepreneur and Founder, Adelante Movement Dan Gilbert, Founder and Chairman, Quicken Loans Frank Herrera, Jr., Chairman, New America Alliance Luis Maizel, Chairman, LM Advisors

Bronze Founding Partner

Dr. Jerry Porras, Professor Emeritus, Stanford Graduate School of Business Landon Taylor, CEO, Base 11

C O N T R I B U TO R

HWP Board of Directors Gerardo “Jerry” Ascencio, Chairman Gary Acosta, Director Marisa Calderon, Director

Diamond Founding Partner

Fabian Casarez, Director Teresa Palacios Smith, Director Armando Tam, Director

Bronze Founding Partner

Established in 2012, the NAHREP Foundation, dba the Hispanic Wealth Project, is a non-profit charitable organization whose mission is to advance sustainable Hispanic homeownership through engagement in strategic efforts focused on Hispanic workforce participation in housing, small business development and wealth building.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

69

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

table of contents Executive Summary

p. 4

Homeownership

p. 8

2.1

Overview of Hispanic Homeownership

2.2 Requirements to Achieve Component Goal #1 2.3 Key Tactics Entrepreneurship 3.1

p. 12

State of Hispanic Small Business

3.2 Requirements to Achieve Component Goal #2 3.3 Key Findings Savings and Investment 4.1

p. 15

Overview of Hispanic Participation in Non-Cash Financial Assets

4.2 Requirements to Achieve Component Goal #3 4.3 Key Tactics NAHREP-Supported Initiatives 5.1

p. 17

Homeownership Commitments

5.2 Entrepreneurship Commitments 5.3 Savings & Investment Commitments NAHREP-Driven Initiatives 6.1

p. 19

Homeownership Commitments

6.2 Entrepreneurship Commitments 6.3 Savings & Investment Commitments 6.3.1

NAHREP 10 Disciplines

6.3.2 1,000 NAHREP Millionaires

9

Federal Policy

p. 21

Conclusion

p. 21

End Notes

p. 22

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

70

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Overview In 1931, James Truslow Adams coined the term “American Dream” in his book The Epic of America. Since that time, the notion of an American Dream has permeated American culture with the ideal that the country is indeed a place of “opportunity for each according to [their] ability or achievement.” However, the cognitive dissonance between the concept of the American Dream and the actual ability to achieve it is the impetus behind the Hispanic Wealth Project. Today, Hispanics are responsible for a majority of the U.S. population growth, its small business starts and homeownership gains. Hispanics are fueling the U.S. economy and actively contributing to its achievements and doing so despite an unequal economic playing field. Hispanics are an increasingly vital constituency within the U.S. and their economic success is of critical importance to the country overall. The Hispanic Wealth Project seeks to level the playing field so that Hispanics have an equal opportunity to achieve prosperity and experience the American Dream.

(It is) that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable.”

James Truslow Adams The Epic of America

Project Background In 2014, the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals® (NAHREP®) published the Hispanic Wealth Project™ (HWP) with an audacious goal to triple Hispanic household wealth within ten years. The HWP Blueprint outlined three primary areas of focus and a series of goals: homeownership, small business, and savings and investment. The plan additionally referenced two distinct types of initiatives: NAHREP-recognized and NAHREP-driven. NAHREP-recognized initiatives are efforts undertaken by industry partners which are monitored by the HWP. NAHREPdriven initiatives are undertaken by NAHREP or the HWP directly. In both cases, the resulting initiatives and their progress are included in the HWP Annual Report and are categorized by each component goal. The HWP’s initial concept included an expansive outline for all three key components. Project goals at the onset were generally focused on increasing the rate of Hispanic homeownership to 50 percent, improving the success of Hispanic small businesses and to increase by 25 percent the number of Hispanic households with non-cash financial assets. As the project has progressed those goals have developed to address targeted needs within the larger categories.

4 | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

71

executive summary

SECTION I

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


executive summary

SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

The refined component goals are noted as follows:

Component

Refined Goal

Homeownership, because it is the

Increase home equity wealth

primary vehicle for wealth creation

by achieving a Hispanic

for the middle class and core to

homeownership rate of 50 percent

NAHREP’s mission.

or greater.

Entrepreneurship, because small business is the engine that drives

Increase the wealth generated from

the U.S. economy and NAHREP’s

small businesses by improving

membership is comprised of

the number of Hispanic-owned

successful small business owners

businesses with $10 million or more

who have gained wealth by

in annual revenue.

establishing and growing their businesses.

Savings and investment, because Increase the wealth created from

the NAHREP membership is a microcosm of the professional

savings and investments by achiev-

Hispanic community for which

ing broad adoption of the NAHREP 10 Disciplines.

an understanding of financial management and investment has not sufficiently materialized.

This project was born from a desire to address the devastating impact of the housing crisis which depleted the overall household wealth of Latino families. While the country as a whole was seriously affected by the recession, its impact was felt more profoundly by the Hispanic community, which lost two-thirds of household wealth between 2008 and 2012 according to a study by the Pew Research Center. Historically, a growing number of Hispanics have invested in homeownership as a primary vehicle for wealth creation but have neglected to focus on much else. This reliance on a single investment strategy left them especially vulnerable during the housing recession. Cultural misgivings about the appropriateness of actively pursuing wealth have also contributed to the lingering wealth gap for the Latino community.

H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 5

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

72

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Updated Project Approach As the HWP has matured from concept to application the strategy has become more defined. The unique relationship that the HWP shares with the NAHREP network of real estate professionals and corporations provides a considerable platform to mobilize activities that can yield measurable results. Real estate professionals are influencers in their communities whose role frequently compels them to guide their clients to adopt certain financial behaviors in order to achieve their goal of becoming homeowners. Through their guidance, they can also direct their sphere of influence toward the related goal of building wealth. The original HWP Blueprint referenced initiatives that were supported by the organization, and initiatives that were to be directly driven by the organization. This strategy will continue moving forward as more companies and entities inspired by the goals of the HWP adapt initiatives that support specific components, while NAHREP will focus its efforts on initiatives that leverage its network of business professionals and its ability to influence public policy. The HWP was always intended to be a dynamic plan remaining committed to the overall goal to triple Latino household wealth in America while simultaneously maintaining the ability to adjust component goals and tactics in order to achieve the overall objective. In the coming months and years, the HWP will focus more of its efforts around activities that it can measure and drive forward more directly.

The HWP intends to triple Hispanic household wealth by 2024. Hispanic Wealth Data and Trends Since its inception, the HWP identified a substantial disparity between the household wealth of Latinos as compared to that of non-Hispanic Whites. In 2011, the median White household had $111,146 in household wealth while the median Hispanic household had only $8,348.1 In 2013, while both groups experienced gains, the gap further widened with median White household wealth at $141,900 and Hispanic household wealth at $13,7002, making median White household wealth 10 times that of Hispanic households.

6 | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

73

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

14th Amm Hispanic recogniz


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Median: The numeric value separating the higher half of a data set from the lower half; mid point. Mean: The arithmatic average of a set of numbers. Research suggests that wealth disparities are rooted in historic inequalities and perpetuated by public policy that does not address systemic inequity.3 Individual accomplishments such as attending college, working full-time, managing personal spending and raising children in a twoperson household do not necessarily advantage Latinos sufficiently to bridge the wealth divide. For example, in 1983, the average Latino household wealth was $58,000 and the average White household wealth was $355,000. By 2013, average Latino wealth grew to only $98,000, while average White household wealth nearly doubled to $656,000. Given the differences in their overall wealth, the average White household is more likely to receive assistance from family or inheritance to purchase their first home, while the average Latino family simply does not have the means to do so. This disproportionately benefits the average White household by enabling them to earn wealth through home equity more frequently and far sooner than the average Latino household. Essentially, individual action alone will not close the gap but it can be improved substantially in concert with well applied public policy. In the absence of public policy changes and other efforts, by 2043 the wealth divide between Hispanic and non-Hispanic White households will have doubled.4 Assuming nothing changes within the current policy landscape, and Latino wealth continues to grow at the same pace as it has for the past 30 years, the wealth gap will never close, it will only continue to widen. In fact, it would take the average Latino household 84 years to achieve parity with White household wealth of 2013; that’s almost as long as it took for Hispanics to go from first acknowledgement as U.S. citizens to obtaining equal rights under U.S. law (Figure 1.A).5 Tax code currently disadvantages Hispanics and other communities of color as it relates to higher education, savings & investment, homeownership and retirement. Additionally, there is a causal relationship between the escalating expenses associated with health care costs and coverage gaps as a wealth-building impediment for Hispanic households.

Figure 1.A

Hispanic Wealth Disparity Timeline 96 years

14th Ammendment Hispanics born in U.S. are recognized as citizens.

84 years

Civil Rights Act EEOC established, providing Hispanics with equal protection under the law

Hispanics achieve parity with White wealth of 2013

H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 7

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

74

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

component goal #1:

EXCERPT

homeownership

SECTION I

» Increase home equity wealth by achieving a Hispanic homeownership rate of 50 percent or greater 2.1 – Overview of Hispanic Homeownership The current rate of homeownership for Hispanics stands at 46 percent while the overall U.S. rate of homeownership of 63.4 percent is at a 51-year low (Figure 2.A). Hispanics have made notable gains in homeownership over the past two years, while the rate of homeownership for the rest of the country continues to decline. At the current rate of homeownership, the median Hispanic household is a renter. However, at a 50 percent Hispanic homeownership rate, the median Hispanic household would be an owner household, increasing access to home equity, which is often the source of seed funding for small business and college tuition for the children of homeowners.

Household Growth As detailed in the 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, the U.S. Hispanic population reached the 57 million threshold and now comprises 18 percent of the overall population. In fact, Hispanics have accounted for 42.5 percent of new household formations over the past 16 years. A household is simply a group of people living together and can consist of four roommates, a nuclear family with a grandmother, a single person living alone or any number of other combinations of people. Hispanic households are typically comprised of two parents and at least one child, resulting in a household formation that is much more likely to become an owner household in the near term. Indeed, for the second consecutive year, the rate of Hispanic homeownership increased while the overall U.S. homeownership rate continued to drop and currently stands at a 51year low. With a net increase of 209,000 owner households, Hispanics accounted for 74.9 percent of the total net growth in U.S. homeownership in 2016. The current rate of Hispanic homeownership is 46 percent with the median Hispanic household noted as a renter household. Fueled primarily by U.S. birth rates, the Hispanic population continues to increase at a substantial pace and is anticipated to account for 30 percent of the U.S. population by 2060.

Household: A group of people living together under one roof. Owner Household: A household where the people living within it purchased the residence, either outright or with financing.

8 | HOMEOWNERSHIP

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

75

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


homeownership

SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Capacity Hispanics continue to drive U.S. employment growth, accounting for 76.4 percent of U.S. labor force growth from 2010 - 2016. As of January 2017, the Hispanic labor force participation rate of 66.1 percent was higher than that of any other ethnic demographic and 3.2 percentage points greater than the overall labor force participation rate of 62.9 percent. In March of 2017, the rate of unemployment for Hispanics was at its lowest since 2007 – 5.1 percent, only slightly higher than the overall U.S. unemployment rate of 4.6 percent. Employment gains and increased labor force participation can be partially attributed to the relative youth of the Hispanic demographic that, at a median age of 29, is a full 14 years younger than non-Hispanic Whites. The labor force participation of Hispanics is expected to increase while that of non-Hispanic Whites is expected to continue to decrease as the population ages and boomers exit the workforce entering retirement. Educational attainment is increasingly linked to improved employment prospects and thus predictive of higher wage earning potential. Since 1971, the share of Hispanics with a bachelor’s degree has tripled and 15 percent of Hispanics today have earned a college diploma . Given these trends, Hispanics are expected to be a primary driver of U.S. employment growth for the foreseeable future.

Labor Force Participation Rate: The percentage of the population over the age of 16 who are either working or actively seeking work. The overall labor force is made up of two categories, the employed and the unemployed. Consequently, people who are neither employed nor looking for employment are not in the labor force. Unemployment Rate: The percentage of the population who are jobless, have actively looked for a job in the prior 4 weeks, and are available for work.

Figure 2.A

Overall Homeownership Rates Decline

Hispanic Homeownership Rates Increase

45.6% 2015

46%

63.7% 2015

2016

63.4% 2016

At a 51-year Low

Increased 2 Consecutive Years

Origin: 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 9

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

76

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

2.2 Requirements to Achieve Component Goal #1

Component Goal Requirement (CGR)

Objective

1

Consistent access to low down payment mortgage financing.

2

An increase in housing inventory especially in the stock of affordable homes.

3

An increase in the number of formally-trained Hispanics working in the mortgage and real estate industries.

4

Practical consumer protection that reduces the risk for predatory activity while simultaneously promoting fair housing and improving credit access.

Obtain commitments from additional lenders, government and other entities that will increase the supply of low down payment mortgages.

Obtain commitments from government, builders, servicers and other entities to deploy and support programs that increase the supply of affordable housing stock.

Secure commitments from – and partnerships with – entities that can support the recruitment of Hispanics into the real estate and finance industries, and can support Hispanic professional growth through training and mentorship.

Foster and support programs and policies that ensure an appropriate balance between consumer protection and mortgage access.

Increase the number of first-time buyers by supporting

5

Down payment assistance and a plan to assist more Hispanic families with access to available programs.

programs and policies that expand down payment assistance programs, increase awareness of program availability to Hispanic families and enhance Hispanic borrower access to first-time homebuyer mortgage programs.

6

Housing counseling that improves homeownership sustainability

7

Strong Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) and affordable housing goals that are met through programs that truly serve communities and homebuyers.

8

The continuation of government policies, including the mortgage interest tax deduction, that favor homeownership outcomes.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

77

Identify and support pre-purchase housing counseling programs for all first-time buyers, and specifically seeks to endorse programs that align with Hispanic cultural and demographic patterns and characteristics.

Recognize and support innovative and successful CRA programs and to endorse policies that establish ambitious CRA and affordable housing goals that serve communities and homebuyers.

Support policymakers who will work to preserve the mortgage interest deduction and will otherwise advance initiatives that support homeownership outcomes.

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

Sentiment Hispanics consistently rank homeownership as a primary goal noting benefits to financial wellbeing and family conditions. In a 2016 Fannie Mae consumer sentiment survey, 79 percent state they are better off owning than renting and 82 percent indicated it is the best way to build wealth. Despite a strong desire for homeownership, lack of housing inventory, tight credit, and a shortage of culturally competent real estate professionals persist as barriers to homeownership for Hispanics. Since the Hispanic population is also driving household formations and homeowner gains for the U.S. it is imperative for the housing industry to resolve these barriers. Failure to do so could make homeownership unattainable for many Hispanics, adversely impacting the health of the overall U.S. housing economy and further widening the wealth gap.

2.3 – Key Tactics While each of the eight objectives attached to the homeownership component goal remain important, the areas of critical focus are relative to the need to address housing inventory shortages, a lack of culturally competent professionals, and improving access to credit. Housing Inventory – With available housing stock at historic lows, a shortage of housing inventory continues to be a primary barrier to homeownership attainment. In its 2017 Policy Position statement, NAHREP notes inventory shortages as a concern and urges a decrease in the regulatory burdens and resulting costs to build affordable homes. Culturally Competent Professionals – Hispanics were responsible for 74.9 percent of the U.S. homeownership gains in 2016 and are expected to account for 50 percent of first-time buyer activity nationwide in the coming years. In a recent survey of NAHREP members, nearly 40 percent of respondents indicated their clients required Spanish as a main language in the home purchase transaction. Professional guidance from a culturally competent advisor is needed to help navigate the complicated home buying process for the burgeoning Hispanic market. However, estimates indicate that only 7 percent of real estate agents and 4 percent of mortgage professionals are Hispanic. Access to Credit for First-Time Buyers – Nearly 40 percent of Hispanics who have owned their homes since 2012 purchased their home with a down payment of less than 5 percent, as compared to 29 percent for all U.S. households. Access to affordable, low down payment financing continues to be a critical requirement to achieving a 50 percent rate of homeownership for Hispanics. Preserving and protecting Federal Housing Administration (FHA) programs is of vital importance to Hispanic homeownership gains and to the well-being of the overall U.S. housing economy. Low down payment conventional products like Fannie Mae’s HomeReady® Mortgage or Freddie Mac’s Home Possible Advantage® Mortgage allow for a 3 percent down payment, making mortgages affordable for first time homebuyers. Improving access and the affordability of low down payment mortgages is essential for accelerating the Hispanic homeownership rate.

H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 1 1

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

78

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

component goal #2

entrepreneurship

SECTION I

» To increase the wealth generated from small businesses by improving the number of Hispanicowned businesses with $10 million or more in annual revenue. 3.1 – State of Hispanic Small Business Entrepreneurship accounts for an increasing share of the country’s job creation. This is especially true of Hispanic small businesses which doubled over the ten year period between 2002 – 2012. Interestingly, the number of Hispanic owned firms increased by 46.3 percent in the five year period of time following the housing crisis in contrast to a 2.1 percent decline for non-Hispanic owned firms. Also during this period between 2007 – 20126, paid employees at Hispanic owned firms increased by 22.1 percent compared to an employment drop of 2.2 percent by non-Hispanic firms. Current estimates suggest Hispanics are responsible for 4.23 million of the country’s small business firms.7 This data suggests that during the economic downturn, Hispanics created opportunity for themselves and for employees whose labor was needed to grow their budding businesses. In fact, since 2002 Hispanics consistently out-index any other ethnic demographic in small business starts (Figure 3.A).8 A recent study by the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI) illustrated common Hispanic small business firm characteristics as being owned primarily by U.S. born persons, about half of whom are Millenials and about half of whom have college degrees. This owner profile is somewhat surprising given Latino business owners tend to be younger than owners of U.S. small businesses overall. While Hispanic firms in general tend to be concentrated in California, Texas, Florida and New York, scaled firms tend to be located in Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Texas. Owner demographics for scaled firms are disproportionately immigrant and college educated. Their study found a remarkable link in the success profile of Hispanic owned small businesses. For those that develop and maintain strong networks, including participation in trade associations like NAHREP, they tend to more easily scale and grow their businesses. Interestingly, this linkage is also the case for the success rate of Hispanic college students. Those who participate in networks and maintain active contact groups tend to have a greater propensity to complete college and improve their financial standing overall.9

Figure 3.A

Hispanic-Owned Business as a Percentage of All Business (2002-2012)

91.7

Non-Hispanics

Hispanics

Origin: NERA 12 | ENTREPRENEURSHIP

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

79

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


entrepreneurship

SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

3.2 Requirements to Achieve Component Goal #2

Component Goal Requirement (CGR)

Objective

Education programs that create awareness of small business formation opportunities and guide formation activities.

1

(1) Identify existing education programs with Spanish-language content that can be accessed via the Internet. (2) Support curriculum development that offers learning on small business fundamentals, and to make such curriculum available for use by a wide variety of public and private institutions.

Mentorship, by which successful Hispanic small business owners provide visible and tangible evidence and support for success, and peer-topeer groups that offer “mastermind” coaching.

(1) Identify business leaders who have worked through many

2

of the startup challenges faced by Hispanic businesses and encourage such leaders to share their stories. (2) Be a forum for the exchange of ideas and for matching mentors and protégés in program aimed to give Hispanic entrepreneurs clearer roadmaps for business success.

Incubators for technology and financial services entrepreneurship that allow small business owners to collaborate.

Availability of capital for small business lending.

Hispanic access to small business lending programs.

3

Build and sustain forums for collaboration where entrepreneurs can gather, examine business challenges and learn to apply proven solutions.

4

Identify, foster and publicize lending programs that address specific community, cultural and economic patterns.

5

Close the gap between lenders and would-be borrowers through outreach programs that encourage small business lenders to reach deeply into Hispanic communities, and that provide Hispanic entrepreneurs with the confidence and capability to apply for business financing.

H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 1 3

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

80

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

3.3 – Key Tactics Research – Hispanic businesses are growing at a faster rate than any other demographic and face unique challenges (Figure 3.B).10 In general, information about Hispanic small business is available sporadically and the absence of a consistent data set over time makes tracking long term trends difficult. Additional research is required to better understand scalability challenges and to ultimately recommend appropriate solutions. Mentorship, education and other programs, including capital funding, are critical elements of any suite of solutions.

Figure 3.B

Hispanic Business Growth

All other demographics

Origin: Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative

Business Education & Mentorship – SLEI is a research initiative within the Stanford Graduate School of Business which offers a program aimed at Hispanic small business owners with revenues in excess of $1 million who matriculate through an intensive educational program and are subsequently matched with mentors who are themselves successful entrepreneurs. Given a substantial number of Hispanic businesses exist in Texas, California, New York, Florida and Georgia, additional proactive efforts should be made to spur the creation of these kinds of programs across those specific geographies. Access to Capital – Irrespective of size or success, Hispanic owned firms tend to utilize external funding sources far less frequently than non-Hispanic owned firms. Additional resources are needed for Hispanic entrepreneurs in both credit education and in identifying sources of funding for their burgeoning businesses. The refined HWP focus on helping successful businesses scale intensifies the need for capital in order to grow a business to greater than 50 employees or to generate $1 million or more in annual revenues.

14 | ENTREPRENEURSHIP

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

81

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

component goal #3

savings & investment

SECTION I

» Increase the wealth created from savings and investments by achieving broad adoption of the NAHREP 10 Disciplines. 4.1 – Overview of Hispanic Participation in Non-Cash Financial Assets In general, Hispanic incomes and participation in financial services vehicles are improving. The number of Hispanics with checking accounts increased by 27 percent between 2005 – 2015, representing 2 million new consumer bank accounts. In the same time period, Hispanics were responsible for 49 percent of the U.S. growth in consumer credit card use (Figure 4.A).11 This increased adoption of financial services tools was evident as Hispanics substantially increased their expenditures on various types of insurance products including vehicle, health, life and personal insurance. As it relates to household income, Hispanics represent a growing segment of households in the middle- and upper- income tiers. Between 2005 - 2014 Hispanics represented 39 percent of the growth in incomes between $75,000 - $100,000. During this same timeframe, Hispanic households with incomes in excess of $100,000 more than doubled while overall U.S. household incomes in this range increased by only 53 percent. These income gains and increased participation in financial services are necessary precursors to more complex engagement in investment vehicles. In a study of Hispanic business owners, MassMutual identified that 51 percent of owners are invested in a retirement savings plan, such as a 401k.12 While these figures are on par with the general population of business owners, Hispanics overall continue to under-invest in retirement and under-participate in other noncash financial instruments.

Figure 4.A

Financial Service Trends for Hispanics

2015

2015

U.S. Consumer Credit Card Use

2005

2005

2 million new checking accounts

49% of Consumer Growth

Origin: Packaged Facts

H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 1 5

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

82

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

4.2 Requirements to Achieve Component Goal #3

Component Goal Requirement (CGR)

Objective

Investment education for small business owners.

1

Identify, endorse and deploy investment education that creates awareness and understanding of various investment instruments (e.g. stocks, bonds), explains the concepts underlying portfolio diversification, introduces channels for accessing investments, and provides tools for tracking and measuring investment risks and returns.

Training programs for employers to drive increases in Hispanic participation in retirement programs.

Tax policies that create incentives for diversified financial holdings.

2

Identify and highlight consumer education materials that make investments intriguing for a Hispanic audience.

3

Advocate for policies that create incentives for consumers who participate in employer-sponsored retirement programs (e.g. 401k), make investments (e.g. mutual funds) and otherwise diversify the repositories for their household wealth.

Awareness programs (including technology-based social media) that engender investment curiosity and offer clear paths for taking first steps.

4

Identify and support programs that make investing interesting and accessible, that lower minimum account balance requirements for the opening of an investment account, that allow small-dollar trades for low-risk investment experimentation, and that attach high-touch multi-lingual customer support to the process of establishing and sustaining an investment-firm relationship.

4.3 – Key Tactics Engagement – Hispanics across all income brackets and educational attainment levels continue to under participate in use of non-cash financial instruments. Notably, Hispanics out-index all other demographics in participation on social media with 75 percent of all Hispanics who use the internet participating on Facebook, and 28 percent active on Twitter making a social strategy a critical element of success for any company working to engage Hispanic consumers.13 With respect to language, use of Spanish as a primary language has shifted to a bilingual or primarily English focus for most U.S. born Hispanics. In-culture communication is still an important factor and could be helpful in designing an engagement strategy for this consumer segment.

1 6 | S AV I N G S A N D I N V E S T M E N T

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

83

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

NAHREP-Supported

I N I T I AT I V E S

The commitments that follow are led by entities external to NAHREP in

which NAHREP or the HWP may participate but which are driven by the

New American Funding (NAF) identified two key commitment areas relative to homeownership growth specifically. Beginning in 2017:

respective company. In all cases the HWP remains engaged with the

company to stay abreast of progress toward their end goal in support of

Hispanic borrowers by 2024.

the overall HWP project.

individuals who have no previous experience in the mortgage industry by 2024. •

Alterra Home Loans made three key commitments toward the HWP

Wells Fargo continues to make progress in three key areas since its commitment in September 2015: ◊

overall goal of achieving a Hispanic homeownership rate of 50

»

professionals in the mortgage banking and real estate industries.

$125 billion in mortgage originations for Hispanics and other low-to moderate- income borrowers.

percent, two of which are focused on increasing the number of Hispanic ◊

NAF commits to recruiting, training and providing employment opportunities for at least 1,000 Hispanic

5.1 – Component Goal #1: Homeownership Commitments •

NAF commits to lending $25 billion in new mortgages to

Provide 40,000 new homeowners with financing for their

to Hispanic borrowers, an increase of $1.7 billion over

home by 2024.

2015, surpassing their year-one goal of $9.1 billion

Commencing in 2017 Alterra Home Loans will:

toward the overall goal of $125 billion in mortgage

»

originations by 2024.

Launch an internship program coordinated with a ◊

college or university. The effort provides current

»

services industry during the course of their college

»

A commitment to increase the number of Hispanic home mortgage consultants on its sales team.

students with real world exposure to the financial

in the Hispanic sales producers, an increase of 150

in the mortgage banking industry.

Hispanic home mortgage consultants. Based on

Create an internal, structured career development

these and other efforts, Wells Fargo currently has 13.5

program as a means of attracting and retaining

percent Hispanic mortgage professionals, a full 9.5 percentage points higher than the industry average. ◊

development opportunity for individuals to grow within

$10 million to support a variety of initiatives that promote financial education and counseling for Hispanic homebuyers.

Alterra Home Loans and experience career prospects

»

and progression not as readily available to them in

As part of a larger strategic effort associated with their yourFirst Mortgage loan program, Wells Fargo

other parts of the industry.

began offering home loan borrowers a $500 credit

Bank of America continued a partnership with Down Payment

for completing financial education associated with

Resource providing an online tool that consumers or real estate

the purchase of a home. Developed in association

professionals can utilize to identify available down payment

with Fannie Mae, Wells Fargo originated 18,000 loans

assistance programs for borrowers. Its accompanying Affordable

under this program in 2016, 14.3 percent of which were

Loan Solution™ Mortgage allows for a 3 percent down payment

to Hispanic borrowers. This program is unique in its

tailored for low-to moderate-income borrowers. Additional data

approach of offering financial education with an incentive

regarding progress is forthcoming. •

In 2016, Wells Fargo experienced 16.2 percent growth

education with the intent of grooming them for a career

Latino talent. The program will provide intentional

In 2016, Wells Fargo issued $10.5 billion in home loans

as opposed to requiring it as part of a purchase.

Freddie Mac continues its support via a partnership with NAHREP in an event series aimed at increasing real estate agent awareness of products which meet the needs of Hispanics and other first-time homebuyers, including the Home Possible® Mortgage.

H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 1 7

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

84

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Wells Fargo HWP Commitment Summary — 2016 Results $ $

14.2

$

12.7

$

13.4

15.0

15.9

$

12.1

$

11.4

$

10.52

$

8.8

$

9.1

$

10.9

$

10.3

$

Mortgage Origination Commitment

Mortgage Origination Actual results

5.2 – Component Goal #2: Entrepreneurship Commitments

5.3 – Component Goal #3: Savings & Investment Commitments

Opportunities exist for additional companies to self-identify

In 2017, MassMutual will engage in a series of market specific

programmatic efforts in support of this goal.

events tailored to educate real estate and mortgage professionals

New American Funding (NAF) is developing a direct mentorship

on financial topics to help improve the economic well-being of their

program with a goal to reach 500 Hispanic-owned small

members and communities.

businesses by 2024. They will host an annual Hispanic Small Business Summit at the NAF HQ each year. The summit will feature

deployment of its Auction.com platform as a vehicle for investment

speakers and business leaders who will provide direct guidance,

and investor participation. The intent is to illustrate to real estate

insight and support to a select group of Hispanic business owners

agents how they can grow their income and graduate to participating

who are chosen to participate. Hispanic business owners need

in the platform as investors, utilizing the additional stream of revenue

not be from within the real estate, housing or finance industries in

as part of an overall investment strategy.

order to participate. •

Beginning in 2017, Ten–X will engage in strategic market focused

Realogy Franchise Group is deploying broker-specific training to select NAHREP brokers which provides instruction on succession planning, business valuation and other topics designed to help small business owners protect their company as an investment.

1 8 | N A H R E P - S U P P O R T E D I N I T I AT I V E S

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

85

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

NAHREP-Driven

I N I T I AT I V E S 6.1 – Component Goal #1: Homeownership Commitments •

NAHREP and the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) continue a partnership to deploy Mortgage Banking Bound curriculum to colleges and universities with a substantial Hispanic constituency. The goal is to introduce mortgage banking as a career to graduates and place them in internships with industry partners with the intended outcome of increasing the number of Hispanic entry level hires into the mortgage banking industry.

6.2 – Component Goal #2: Entrepreneurship Commitments •

NAHREP continues its partnership with SLEI to work collaboratively to study Hispanic small business owners in order to acquire a better understanding of the status, goals and challenges of Latino real estate professionals and entrepreneurs. NAHREP and SLEI will also work together to increase participation in this program by successful entrepreneurs from within the NAHREP membership.

6.3 – Component Goal #3: Savings & Investment Commitments 6.3.1 – NAHREP 10 Disciplines •

In 2016, NAHREP developed 10 core principles to help reshape the definition of wealth and prosperity amongst its membership and by extension, transform their clients, family members and contacts. Roll-out of the principles was met with broad enthusiasm within the NAHREP network. ◊

Chapter events – NAHREP chapters conducted events with a specific HWP theme or focus and incorporated NAHREP 10 into the event programming to increase adoption by NAHREP members.

National events – At its primary national events, the association included educational tracks and programming specifically focused on principles within the NAHREP 10 and incorporated elements of the NAHREP 10 into its general event programming.

H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 1 9

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

86

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

In 2017, NAHREP will launch an initiative to certify a cohort of trainers in the NAHREP 10 disciplines for the purpose of providing an available resource of professionally trained individuals who are able to serve as a public speaking and content delivery resource on any or all of the areas relative to the NAHREP 10. Initially intended as an internal resource to its growing chapter network, NAHREP 10 certified trainers will have the capability of serving as an external resource in the future.

6.3.2 – 1,000 NAHREP Millionaires ◊

In Q1 2017, NAHREP expanded its educational offerings to include an Investor’s Retreat pilot program. The retreat featured content focused on mindset and investment strategy and was geared toward successful business owners who do not currently participate in a varied investment strategy. The content focused on mindset is especially critical as it is geared toward dealing with gaps in knowledge, conviction and direction for Hispanics. These three elements inform a behavioral shift and create path to prosperity. NAHREP and the HWP plan to expand the offering as an Embrace Wealth Intensive and explore providing content via webinar to reach a broader audience.

Knowledge Conviction

Direction

P AT H T O PROSPERITY

2 0 | N A H R E P - D R I V E N I N I T I AT I V E S

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

87

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

7.0 – Federal Policy Historical inequities promulgated by federal policy over the course of U.S. history are well documented. The inherited effects in today’s policy landscape present themselves as wealthbuilding policies that disproportionately favor wealthy, primarily White households. The U.S. currently spends more than a half trillion dollars on tax related benefits that help households build wealth.14 Specifically, the typical millionaire receives public tax benefits affecting savings & investment, homeownership, retirement and higher education which amount to more than $145,000 while the average working family receives $174 across the same categories (Figure 7.A).15 Additional efforts are required to examine the tax code and make recommended changes so that Hispanics and others also receive tax related benefits to build household wealth.

Figure 7.A

Tax Benefits: Millionaires vs. Working Families MILLIONAIRES

Savings & Investment

$126,448

Homeownership

$10,636

Retirement

$9,889

Total for 2015

$146,973

Origin: CFED

8.0 – Conclusion Given the existing wealth gap and legitimate concerns impeding greater wealth gains by Hispanic households, the project goal to triple Hispanic household wealth is achievable under certain provisos. Hispanic households must continue to experience average household wealth gains achieved in the past 30 years accompanied by public policy and tax code changes which afford Hispanics the same benefits as non-Hispanic Whites in higher income brackets. Additionally, intentional engagement from industry participants is critical to offer programs which allow Hispanics to achieve homeownership gains, grow small businesses and participate in savings and investment vehicles. Household wealth data is not produced as regularly as homeownership data, which is available annually from organizations like the U.S. Census Bureau. Since the growing wealth gap persists as a concern for the entire country, further research is needed to generate more regular data sets and conduct ongoing analysis.

WORKING FAMILIES $10 $16

$64

Higher Education

$0

EXCERPT

federal policy

SECTION I

$84

$174

H I S P A N I C W E A LT H P R O J E C T A N N U A L R E P O R T | 2 1

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

88

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


EXCERPT

CHAPTER 1 PURCHASING POWER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

end notes

SECTION I

1 Demos and IASP, “The Racial Wealth Gap, Why Policy Matters,” Demos and Institute for Assets & Social Policy, Brandeis University, 2015. http://www.demos.org/sites/default/files/publications/RacialWealthGap_1.pdf

2 Rakesh Kochhar and Richard Fry, “Wealth inequality has widened along racial, ethnic lines since end of Great Recession,” Pew Research Center. December 12, 2014. http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/12/racial-wealth-gaps-great-recession/

3 Demos and IASP, “The Asset Value of Whiteness,” Demos and Institute for Assets & Social Policy, Brandeis University, 2017. http://www.demos.org/sites/default/files/publications/Asset%20Value%20of%20Whiteness_0.pdf

4 CFED & Institute for Policy Studies, “The Ever-Growing Gap. Without Change, African-American and Latino Families Won’t Match White Wealth for Centuries,” 2016. http://cfed.org/policy/federal/The_Ever_Growing_Gap-CFED_IPS-Final.pdf 5 CFED & Institute for Policy Studies.

6 Packaged Facts. Hispanics: Demographic and Consumer Spending Trends. June 2016. https://www.packagedfacts.com/ Hispanics-Demographic-Consumer-10124772/

7 Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative, “State of Latino Entrepreneurship 2016,” Stanford Graduate School of Business, 2016. https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/sites/gsb/files/publication-pdf/report-slei-state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016_0.pdf

8 Jeffrey A. Eisenach, “Making America Rich Again: The Latino Effect on Economic Growth,” NERA. December 2016. http://www. nera.com/content/dam/nera/publications/2016/PUB_LDC_Prosperity_1216.pdf 9 Demos and IASP. 2017. 10 SLEI 11 Packaged Facts.

12 MassMutual. “In Pursuit of the American Dream. The fiscal practices of today’s Hispanic business owners,” Business Owner Perspectives Study. 2015 https://www.massmutual.com/mmfg/pdf/execsummary_hispanic.pdf 13 Maeve Duggan, “The Demographics of Social Media Users,” Pew Center, August 19, 2015. http://www.pewinternet. org/2015/08/19/the-demographics-of-social-media-users/

14 Ezra Levin, “Congress Keeps Spending More To Make Wealth Inequality Worse,” CFED, May 6, 2016. https://cfed.org/blog/ inclusiveeconomy/congress_keeps_spending_more_to_make_wealth_inequality_worse 15 CFED & Institute for Policy Studies.

22 | END NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

89

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

90

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A ' S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

U.S. HISPANIC VS. NON-HISPANIC SALES GROWTH BY CATEGORY, 2016

2% 1% 1%

1% 0%

1%

2%

2%

2% 1%

PET CARE

2%

PERSONAL CARE

1%

2% 2%

3% 2%

2%

3% 3%

4% 3%

4%

5%

PRODUCE

5%

6%

ALCOHOL

5%

6% 6%

7% 7%

U.S. Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Sales Growth by Category, 2016

HEALTH CARE

TOBACCO & TOBACCO ALTERNATIVES

DELI

HOUSEHOLD BEAUTY CARE CARE

Total U.S. Food Hispanic

DAIRY

GROCERY

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

BAKERY

MEAT

FROZEN FOODS

Total U.S. Food Non-Hispanic

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016 www.acosta.com/Marketing_Solutions/The_Why_Behind_the_Buy_Download_Request_Form.aspx

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016 http://www.acosta.com/Marketing_Solutions/The_Why_Behind_the_Buy_Download_Request_Form.aspx

HISPANIC SHOPPERS ARE EXPERIENTIAL SHOPPERS WHO ENJOY GROCERY SHOPPING SIGNIFICANTLY MORE THAN THEIR U.S. COUNTERPARTS

Hispanic Shoppers Are Experiential Shoppers Who Enjoy Grocery Shopping Significantly More Than Their U.S. Counterparts

39%

21%

S H O P A L O N E ( N O O N E G O E S W I T H ME )

25%

A N O T H E R A D U L T ( F A M I L Y , F R I E N D , R O O MMA T E , E T C . )

34%

ANY CHILDREN (< AGE 18)

50%

SPOUSE/PARTNER

79%

S H O P W I T H S O ME O N E ( T O T A L- N E T )

U.S Hispanic Shoppers

Total U.S. Shoppers

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016 www.acosta.com/Marketing_Solutions/The_Why_Behind_the_Buy_Download_Request_Form.aspx

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016

91

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

19% 23% 37% 61%


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

HISPANIC SHOPPERS ENJOY THE GROCERY SHOPPING AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF STORES' SPECIAL OFFERINGS YES, I'VE TRIED THIS AT LEAST ONCE

Cookware, cooking utensils/equipment or appliances In-store cafeteria area for eating ready-to-go foods Florist/floral department Coffee bar or in-store coffeehouse Blood pressure testing machine Banking branch tellers In-store apparel & merchandise for professional sports teams Cooking demonstrations/lessons

% U.S. HISPANIC SHOPPERS

% TOTAL U.S. SHOPPERS

42% 38%* 37% 34%* 28% 25% 25%* 22%*

39% 27% 37% 24% 29% 23% 21% 16%

*INDICATES SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER THAN TOTAL U.S. SHOPPERS AT A 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016 www.acosta.com/Marketing_Solutions/The_Why_Behind_the_Buy_Download_Request_Form.aspx

HISPANIC SHOPPERS' OVERALL PERCENTAGE OF ORGANIC PRODUCTS IN SHOPPING BASKET IS SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER THAN ALL U.S. SHOPPERS 11%

14%

20%

22%

28%

31%

Hispanic Shoppers’ Overall Percentage of Organic Products In Shopping Basket is Significantly Higher Than All U.S. Shoppers

201 3

2014

U.S Hispanic Shoppers

2015

Total U.S. Shoppers

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016 www.acosta.com/Marketing_Solutions/The_Why_Behind_the_Buy_Download_Request_Form.aspx

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016

92

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

MORE HISPANIC SHOPPERS LOOK AT THE SUGAR CONTENT AND OVERALL CALORIES THAN NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION 36%

41%

42%

44%

More Hispanic Shoppers Look at the Sugar Content and Overall Calories than Nutritional Information

U . S H I S P A NI C S H O P P E R S

HI SPA N I C M I LLEN N I A L SHO PPERS

Sugar

Calories

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016 www.acosta.com/Marketing_Solutions/The_Why_Behind_the_Buy_Download_Request_Form.aspx

MORE HISPANIC SHOPPERS' PURCHASES ARE OFTEN AFFECTED BY IN-STORE MERCHANDISING AND PROMOTIONAL TACTICS, INCLUDING PRODUCT DISPLAYS

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016 http://www.acosta.com/Marketing_Solutions/The_Why_Behind_the_Buy_Download_Request_Form.aspx

More Hispanic Shoppers’ Purchases Are Often Affected by In-store Merchandising and Promotional Tactics, including Product Displays

11%

18%

P R ODU C T T A ST I N G S O R D E M O N S T RA T I O N S DIS P LA Y S A T T H E C H E C K O U T C O U N T E R

17%

13%

E N D -O F -T H E A I S L E D I S P L A Y

18%

14%

D I SP LA Y S I N T HE A I S L E

20%

16%

C O U P O N S A V A I LA BLE A T T HE S H E L F

26%

21%

U.S Hispanic Shoppers

Total U.S. Shoppers

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016 www.acosta.com/Marketing_Solutions/The_Why_Behind_the_Buy_Download_Request_Form.aspx

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study, 2016

93

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

PERCENTAGE OF MULTICULTURAL SHOPPERS PURCHASING FRESH FOOD PRODUCTS BY CHANNEL

18%

26%

57%

81%

99%

Percentage of Multicultural Shoppers Purchasing Fresh Food Products by Channel

D R UG

C ON V E N I E N C E & G A S

WAREHOUSE & CLUB

MASS & SUPERCENTER

G R O C E RY

Source: Nielsen, A Fresh Look Into Multicultural consumers: Refreshing the Retail Landscape, 2017 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/a-fresh-look-at-multicultural-consumers.html

U.S. AVERAGE ANNUAL SPENDING FOR HISPANIC AND NON-HISPANIC CONSUMERS, 2014-2015

Source: Nielsen, A Fresh Look Into Multicultural consumers: Refreshing the Retail Landscape, 2017

http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/a-fresh-look-at-multicultural-consumers.html

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

HOUSING

APPAREL & SERVICES

HEALTH CARE

Hispanic Consumers

EDUCATION

TOBACCO PRODUCTS & SMOKING SUPPLIES

MISCELLANEOUS

951 1885

READING

510 881

4751 6245

ENTERTAINMENT PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS & SERVICES

866 1438

568 693

2631 4646 TRANSPORTATION

164 365

FOOD AWAY FROM HOME

49 132

FOOD AT HOME

1750 2940

330 500

1956 1874

2596 2951

4147 3958

8875 9382

16399 18392

U.S. Average Annual Spending for Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumers (2014-2015)

CASH CONTRIBUTIONS

Non-Hispanic Consumers

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, The Multicultural Economy, 2016 estore.uga.edu/C27063_ustores/web/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=5177

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, The Multicultural Economy, 2016 https://estore.uga.edu/C27063_ustores/web/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=5177

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

94

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

PERSONAL INSURANCE & PENSIONS


“Your bilingual bridge to the Hispanic Community” ADVERTISING SERVICES Sponsorship Opportunity on "ConMaryRabago" Show on Radio 1190AM, Facebook Live, Twitter and You Tube SIMULTANEOUSLY •TV Spots • Corporate Videos • Non Profit Videos • Government Videos • Education Videos • Public Service Announcements

• Radio Spots • Ad Creation • Graphic Design • Events (Video & Pictures Gallery • Translations •Media Buy

• Web Design • Media Training •Seminars • MC / Host • Keynote Speaker • Panel Moderating • Endorsements

*IN SHOW EXPOSURE: Live mentions, product placement, *BRAND OPPORTUNITY: Connect with the Hispanic community via radio and Social Media. discussion topic catered to your brand.

Mary Rabago @(623) 570-0662 Jarvis Berry @(623) 570-3723 1008 E. Buckeye Rd. Suite #120 Phoenix, AZ 85034 mary@maryrabago.com maryrabago.com

BUILDING TOMORROW TOGETHER The Arizona Lottery is a proud supporter of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Together, we’re working to advance Arizona’s communities for years to come. Learn more at ArizonaLottery.com/Giving-Back


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

NOTES

WHY HISPANIC MILLENNIALS LOVE MLB BASEBALL

HOM E RU N S A N D H I TS

PLAYERS' SKILLS

Whites

G E N E R AL S P OR T S FAN

African-Americans

Asians

P I T CHE R S ' DUE L S

42% 41% 37%

30%

62% 60% 53% 65%

73%

S T R AT E G Y

62%

76% 75% 71% 76%

ENTERTAINMENT

72% 77%

76% 71% 69% 77%

73% 77% 74% 80%

85% 83% 79% 84%

Why Hispanic Millennials Love MLB Baseball

FA NT A S Y S P O R T S P LA YE R

Hispanics

Source: ThinkNow Research, Drivers of MLB Fandom Across a Multicultural Millennial Population campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-mlb-multicultural-fandom-report.html

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

96

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: ThinkNow Research, Drivers of MLB Fandom Across a Multicultural Millennial Population


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

REASONS DIFFERENT MILLENNIAL ETHNIC GROUPS LIKE MLB BASEBALL

61%

62%

63%

63%

65%

68%

69%

68%

67%

67%

71%

72%

Reasons Different Millennial Ethnic Groups Like MLB Baseball

ESCAPE EVERYDAY PRESSURES

M A K ES M E F EEL LI K E A K I D

Whites

African-Americans

BA SEBA LL I S EN T ERT A INING

Asian

Hispanics

Source: ThinkNow Research, Drivers of MLB Fandom Across a Multicultural Millennial Population campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-mlb-multicultural-fandom-report.html

HISPANIC MILLENNIALS PERCEIVE BASEBALL AS PART OF THEIR DAILY ROUTINE

BASEBALL REDUCES BOREDOM

BA SEBA LL I S BA C K GRO UN D

Whites

African-Americans

BA SEBA LL I S PA RT O F ROUTINE

Asians

Hispanics

Source: ThinkNow Research, Drivers of MLB Fandom Across a Multicultural Millennial Population campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-mlb-multicultural-fandom-report.html

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

97

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: ThinkNow Research, Drivers of MLB Fandom Across a Multicultural Millennial Population http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-mlb-multicultural-fandom-report.html

41%

35%

40%

37%

59%

56%

63%

62%

71% 64%

65%

68%

Source: ThinkNow Research, Drivers of MLB Fandom Across a Multicultural Millennial Population Hispanic Millennials Perceive Baseball as Part of Their Daily Routine http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-mlb-multicultural-fandom-report.html


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

WATCHING MLB BASEBALL IS A SOCIAL ACTIVITY FOR MILLENNIALS 63% 50%

61%

67%

72%

66%

66%

70%

77%

70%

68%

74%

Watching MLB Baseball Is A Social Activity for Millennials

S P E N D T I ME WI T H F A M I L Y / F R I E ND S

I N T ERA C T WI T H O T HERS

Whites

African-Americans

BUI LD F A M I LY T RA D I T IONS

Asian

Hispanics

Source: ThinkNow Research, Drivers of MLB Fandom Across a Multicultural Millennial Population campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-mlb-multicultural-fandom-report.html

Source: ThinkNow Research, Drivers of MLB Fandom Across a Multicultural Millennial Population http://campaigns.thinknowresearch.com/downloads/thinknow-mlb-multicultural-fandom-report.html

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

98

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

MILLENNIALS' OPTIMISM ABOUT THE FUTURE

H I S P A N I C M I L L E N NIA L S

A SIA N MIL L ENNIA L S

50%

54%

BLACK MILLENNIALS

54%

61%

Millennials' Optimism About the Future

WHITE MIL L E N N I A L S

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 http://www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

MILLENNIALS OPTIMISM ABOUT THE AMERICAN DREAM 31%

14%

16%

16%

16%

29%

36%

42%

43%

49%

53%

55%

Millennials Optimism About the American Dream

N O T L I V I N G T H E D R E A M , A ND D O N' T B E L I E V E I C A N

N O T L IV I N G T HE D REA M , BUT BELI EV E I C A N

Black

Hispanic

White

LI V I N G T HE D REA M

Asian

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

99

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 http://www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/


SECTION I

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

• ONE OF MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL'S POWERFUL AND IMPACTFUL PLAY BALL YOUTH SPORTS PROGRAMS DESIGNED TO GROW INTEREST AND PARTICIPATION IN BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL.

• IN 2017, THE PROGRAM PROVIDED 50,000 DONATED UNIFORMS TO PLAYERS AND COACHES IN 96 LEAGUES REPRESENTING 33 CITIES AND COMMUNITIES ACROSS ARIZONA, WHILE SAVING LEAGUES MORE THAN $800,000.

• THE ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS FOUNDATION LAUNCHED THE PROGRAM IN THE SPRING OF 2014 IN PARTNERSHIP WITH FRY'S FOOD STORES, WESTERN REFINING AND TIDE

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

PROFILE

• SADLY, YOUTH SPORTS LEAGUES IN ECONOMICALLY DEPRESSED AREAS ARE THE FIRST TO SUCCUMB TO THE FINANCIAL CRISIS.

100

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

PROFILE

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

DIAMONDBACKS GIVE BACK PEOPLE. PASSION. PURPOSE.

The D-backs are leading the way supporting Major League Baseball's Play Ball initiative with the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation's D-backs Give Back Youth Jersey program – the largest program of its kind in the country.

COMPASSION. COMMITMENT. COMMUNITY.

An astonishing 51% of Arizona's children live in low-income households. Baseball gloves, balls, bats, league fees and uniforms are out of reach for many families. Without the intervention and commitment of the Arizona Diamondbacks and volunteers to support leagues from across Arizona, the decline in youth baseball and softball, particularly among minority children, will continue. Quality D-backs uniforms provide a costeffective and exciting solution for leagues trying to connect with young players!

INVESTMENT. INNOVATION. IMPACT.

The marquee program started in 2014 and originally outfitted 22,000 kids and coaches. The demand for support is so great – the program has expanded each year since its inception. In 2017, the D-backs Give Back Youth Jersey Program directly impacted the lives of more than 50,000 youth baseball and softball players and coaches in 96 leagues—78 from economically depressed areas.

WORKING TOGETHER. GIVING BACK.

The Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation's donation represents a statewide commitment to Arizona's most financially at-risk leagues. Participating leagues represent 33 different cities/towns from every corner of Arizona. Participation also includes four tribal communities from the Navajo Nation, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, Gila River Indian Community and White Mountain Apache Nation.

100% OF LEAGUES REPORTED AN INCREASE IN LEAGUE ENROLLMENT!

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

101

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

OWNING A HOME AND HELPING OTHERS ARE TOP PRIORITIES FOR HISPANIC MILLENNIALS 41% 35% 26% 26%

16%

23%

27%

31%

37%

39% 35% 37%

43%

43% 38% 34% 28%

27% 29%

29% 21%

24%

29% 26%

37%

44% 40%

48%

Owning a Home and Helping Others Are Top Priorities for Hispanic Millennials

BEING FINANCIALLY COMFORTABLE OR STABLE

OWNING A HOME

BEING RECOGNIZED IN MY FIELD OF WORK

Black

BEING HAPPY REGARDLESS PASSIONATE ABOUT AND OF WHAT I HAVE ENJOYING WHAT I DO FOR A LIVING

Hispanic

Asian

HELPING OTHERS

GETTING MARRIED

White

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 http://www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

MILLENNIAL ASPIRATIONS BY ETHNICITY

OWN A HOME

HAVE A FAMILY

Black Millennials

HAVE A SPIRITUAL LIFE

Hispanic Millennials

BE RECOGNIZED IN MY FIELD OR WORK

Asian Millennials

BE FINANCIALLY COMFORTABLE OR STABLE

White Millennials

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

DATO S

A Z

56%

58%

60%

23% 15%

14%

23%

24%

23%

29%

39%

44%

49%

44% 36%

38%

39%

42%

49%

59%

Millennial Aspirations (By Ethnicity)

2 0 1 7

102

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 http://www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

WHAT MILLENNIALS WANT IN THE FUTURE

BEING FREE TO PURSUE MY PERSONAL/PROFESSIONAL PASSION

Black

HAVING CLOSE FRIENDS

Hispanic

Asian

TRAVELING

EXPERIENCING/LEARNING NEW THINGS

HAVING A SPIRITUAL LIFE

White

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 http://www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/ Almost Half of Hispanic Millennials Believe They Have Control Over Their Future

ALMOST HALF OF HISPANIC MILLENNIALS BELIEVE THEY HAVE CONTROL OVER THEIR FUTURE 48%

48%

48%

58%

Agree or Strongly Agree with the statement: "I believe that I have control over my future."

BLACK

HISPANIC

A S IA N

W HITE

AGREE OR STRONGLY AGREE WITH THE STATEMENT: "I BELIEVE THAT I HAVE CONTROL OVER MY FUTURE." Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017

www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/ Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 http://www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

DATO S

A Z

56% 53% 43%

46%

GETTING COLLEGE/ADVANCED DEGREE

17%

20%

LIVING IN A CITY I LOVE

32%

39% 37% 28% 26% 26% 32%

30% 29%

31% 26%

23% 22% HAVING A FAMILY

32% 29% 32%

39%

43% 37%

36%

38% 37%

41%

42% 42%

58%

What Millennials Want in The Future

2 0 1 7

103

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

MORE BLACKS AND HISPANICS BELIEVE THEIR RACE MAKES IT DIFFICULT TO ACHIEVE THE AMERICAN DREAM 29%

45%

51%

55%

More Blacks and Hispanics Believe Their Race Makes It Difficult to Achieve the American Dream % Responding Positively to This Statement: “Race has made it difficult for me to achieve the American Dream.”

BLACK

HISPANIC

A SIA N

WHIT E

PERCENTAGE RESPONDING POSITIVELY TO THIS STATEMENT: "RACE HAS MADE IT DIFFICULT FOR ME TO ACHIEVE THE AMERICAN DREAM." Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 http://www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/ Most Millennials Still See the American Dream as a Worthy Pursuit

MOST MILLENNIALS STILL SEE THE AMERICAN DREAM AS A WORTHY PURSUIT

% Responding Positively to This Statement: "The American Dream is something to strive for."

41%

WHITE

45%

H ISP AN I C

48%

AS I A N

49%

BL A C K

PERCENTAGE RESPONDING POSITIVELY TO THIS STATEMENT: "THE AMERICAN DREAM IS SOMETHING TO STRIVE FOR." Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/

Source: The University at Texas at Austin, Millennials Deconstructed: The American Dream(s), March 2017 http://www.millennialsdeconstructed.com/ 104 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7

DATO S


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

Major Consumer Purchases in 2017 (by Ethnicity) Answer to the Question: "Are you planning on purchasing any of the following in the next 12 months?"

NEW HOME ELECTRONICS

NEW TABLET

Total

N EW COM PU T ER OR LAPT OP

Hispanic

White

LAR G E K IT CH EN APPLIAN CE

B R AN D N EW CAR OR TRUCK

African-American

22%

22% 24% 18%

34%

42% 44% 38% 49% 41%

32% 34% 32% 28% 29%

43% 46% 38% 49% 45%

33% 37% 28% 36% 33%

52%

S M A R T P H O NE

34%

41% 45% 36%

41% 46% 36% 44% 48%

MAJOR CONSUMER PURCHASES IN 2017 BY ETHNICITY

H OM E O R CO ND O M I NI U M

Asian

ANSWER TO THE QUESTION: "ARE YOU PLANNING ON PURCHASING ANY OF THE FOLLOWING IN THE NEXT 12 MONTHS?" Source: ThinkNow Research, Total Market Consumer Sentiment, 2017 Source: ThinkNow Research, Total Market Consumer Sentiment, 2017 www.thinknowresearch.com/blog/thinknow-pulse-total-market-consumer-sentiment-report-qualitative-insights/

http://www.thinknowresearch.com/blog/thinknow-pulse-total-market-consumer-sentiment-report-qualitative-insights/

INDEX OF FRESH SPEND TO TOTAL BASKET ACROSS ETHNICITIES

PRODUCE

MEAT

Hispanic

SEA F O O D

Non-Hispanic White

D ELI

African-American

BAKER Y

Asian-American

Source: Nielsen, Fresh Foods and Flavors: How Multicultural Consumers Are Driving Fresh Grocery Trends, 2016 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/fresh-foods-and-flavors-how-multicultural-consumers-are-driving-fresh-grocery-trends.html

DATO S

A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Nielsen, Fresh Foods and Flavors: How Multicultural Consumers Are Driving Fresh Grocery Trends, 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/fresh-foods-and-flavors-how-multicultural-consumers-are-driving-fresh-grocery-trends.html 105

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

102

89

102

103

113 92

100

107 81

106

101

116 97

103

94

97

108

139

166

258

Index of Fresh Spend to Total Basket Across Ethnicities


Discover businesses in the Phoenix metro region

Grow your business with data! Grow your business with data!

Analyze the demographics of Arizona’s population Discover businesses in the Phoenix metro region

Explore regional recreational Analyze the demographics of Arizona’s population activity destinations Explore regional recreational

destinations Find activity the perfect bicycle route ... and Findmore! the perfect bicycle route

your web browser to:browser to: Point your web maps.azmag.gov aps.azmag.gov

... and more!

Training Available! FreeFree Training Available!

maps.azmag.gov

MAG offers free interactive map viewers for

Please visit:viewing, downloading, and analyzing both

free interactive map viewers for Phoenix metro and statewide data. Free training offered in east, for west, and central MAGand offers free interactive viewing, wnloading, analyzing bothmaps locations of the Phoenix metro area. downloading, and analyzing both Phoenix metro and tro and statewide data. is offered in east, west, g offeredstatewide in east, data. west,Free andtraining central and central locations of the Phoenix metro area. the Phoenix metro area.

64% of Pet Parents Agree They’d rather lose their job than give up their pet. The human-animal bond matters. And, we work hard to protect it by connecting more people and pets than ever before. Source: PetSmart Charities and Wakefield Research

learn more at: PetSmartCharities.org

www.azmag.gov

azmag.gov www.azmag.gov


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 2

CONSUMER

HISPANICS PURCHASE ADDED VEHICLES TO ACCOMMODATE THEIR FAMILY NEEDS "The Hispanic population is generally young, growing and composed of extended families living together with multiple children. There is certainly a need for Hispanics to have an additional vehicle to transport their families. Hispanics, in fact, are more likely than the surveyed Blacks or Whites to have purchased a vehicle because they simply needed another one." COURTESY OF

HISPANICS BUYING BECAUSE THEY NEED ADDITIONAL VEHICLE AND FINANCING CAR PURCHASING PROCESS – US – APRIL 2016, MINTEL OXYGEN REPORT

$1.2

2016 SPENDING BY PHOENIX HISPANICS ON NEW VEHICLES

BILLION

17% of all Phoenix New Auto Spending

COURTESY OF

Source: Polk New Vehicle Registrations (Includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYE, Phoenix DMA

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

108

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

HISPANICS ARE FUELING THE GROWTH OF NEW AUTO SALES IN PHOENIX HISPANICS ARE FUELING THE GROWTH OF NEW AUTO SALES IN PHOENIX

HISPANIC SHAREofOF TOTAL Hispanic Share Total New NEW VEHICLE UNIT Vehicle Unit Sales Trend SALES TREND

5.1%

PERCENTAGE % Change in NewCHANGE Vehicle Unit IN NEW VEHICLE UNIT SALES Sales Year over Year YEAR OVER YEAR 6%

20.0%

5%

19.0%

4%

18.0% 17.0%

3%

HISPANIC SHAREof Total OF TOTAL Hispanic Share New NEW VEHICLE GROWTH Vehicle Growth Year over Year YEAR OVER YEAR Hispanics Represented ALL (100%) of the Growth in New Vehicle Sales in Phoenix Y-Y

18.7%

17.9% 16.4%

16.0%

0.6%

2% 1%

14.0% 13.0%

-1%

12.0%

-0.3%

0%

Total

100%

15.0%

Hispanic

11.0% 10.0%

Non-Hispanic

2014 CY E

2015 CY E

2016 CY E

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic COURTESY OF

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2014- 2016 (Jan-Dec) CYE, Phoenix DMA.

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2014- 2016 (Jan-Dec) CYE, Phoenix DMA.

PHOENIX TOTAL

PHOENIX HISPANIC

BRAND RANKER RANK

BRAND

BRAND RANKER

S0M

HISPANIC % OF BRAND SALES

RANK

#1

14.4%

19.7%

#2

11.1%

#3

S0M

HISPANIC % OF BRAND SALES

#1

16.3%

27.5%

27.5%

#2

16.1%

31.6%

9.8%

19.0%

#3

15.2%

19.7%

#4

9.6%

14.2%

#4

9.9%

19.0%

#5

9.5%

31.6%

#5

7.3%

14.2%

#6t

5.1%

16.6%

#6

4.9%

17.9%

#6t

5.1%

17.9%

#7

4.5%

16.6%

#8

5.0%

14.3%

#8

4.3%

26.5%

#9

3.2%

19.4%

#9

3.8%

14.3%

#10

3.0%

26.5%

#10

3.3%

19.4%

COURTESY OF

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYE (Jan-Dec16), Phoenix DMA.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

BRAND

109

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

TOP 5 MAKES AMONG HISPANICS: 3 YEAR SHARE TREND

TOP 5 MAKES AMONG HISPANICS: 3–YEAR SHARE TREND Top 5 Makes: Share of Sales to Hispanics, Phoenix, 2014-2016 CYE

15.5%

15.4%

16.3%

16.8%

16.1%

16.1%

15.6%

15.6%

15.2%

9.6% 7.6%

9.0% 7.5%

9.9% 7.3%

35%

37%

35%

2 0 1 4 CY E

2015 CYE

2016 CYE

TOP 5 MAKES: SHARE OF SALES TO HISPANICS, PHOENIX, 2014-2016 CYE Other

Ford

Honda

Toyota

Nissan

Chevy COURTESY OF

Source: Automotive Driven by Polk, Newby Vehicle Personal Registrations (SalesPersonal & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2014-2016 DMA Enhanced Ethnic Source: IHSIHSAutomotive Driven Polk, New Vehicle Registrations (SalesCYE, & Phoenix leases) Data, 2014-2016 CYE, PhoenixDMA

TOP SEGMENTS AMONG PHOENIX HISPANICS TOP SEGMENTS AMONG PHOENIX HISPANICS

SEGMENT SHARE AMONG PHOENIX HISPANICS: 2014-2016 CYE

30.1%

28.5% 25.9% 22.4%

22.9% 22.1%

21.1%

15.6%

16.2%

7.3%

21.4% 18.9% 17.6%

6.4%

5.6%

2014

2015

2016

SEGMENT SHARE AMONG PHOENIX HISPANICS: 2014-2016 CYE SubCompact

Pickup

Note segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models

Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2014-2016 CYE (Jan-Dec); Phoenix (Prescott) DMA

Full/Mid-Size

CUV/SUV

Compact COURTESY OF

Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2014-2016 CYE (Jan-Dec); Phoenix (Prescott) DMA; Note segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models 110 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

TOP 10 MODELS BY SEGMENT: 2016 CYE RANKED BY MODEL SALES TO HISPANICS RANK

CUV/SUV

COMPACT

FULL/MIDSIZE

PICKUP

SUBCOMPACT

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10

NISSAN ROGUE KIA SOUL TOYOTA RAV4 JEEP PATRIOT HONDA CR-V DODGE JOURNEY CHEVY EQUINOX JEEP WRANGLER TOYOTA HIGHLANDER JEEP CHEROKEE

NISSAN SENTRA HONDA CIVIC TOYOTA COROLLA CHEVY CRUZE VOLKSWAGEN JETTA HYUNDAI ELANTRA SEDAN FORD FOCUS DODGE DART KIA FORTE MAZDA 3

NISSAN ALTIMA HONDA ACCORD TOYOTA CAMRY CHEVY MALIBU KIA OPTIMA HYUNDAI SONATA FORD FUSION DODGE CHARGER CHRYSLER 200 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT

CHEVY SILVERADO 150/1500 RAM 150/1500 FORD F-150 TOYOTA TACOMA TOYOTA TUNDRA CHEVY COLORADO NISSAN FRONTIER XE GMC SIERRA 150/1500 RAM 250/2500 CHEVY SILVERADO 250/2500

NISSAN VERSA CHEVY SONIC TOYOTA SCION CHEVY SPARK HYUNDAI ACCENT HONDA FIT FORD FIESTA MITSUBISHI MIRAGE KIA RIO FIAT 500

TOP 10 % SHARE OF SEGMENT

45%

85%

88%

93%

90%

Source: Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYE (JAN-DEC); Phoenix DMA; Note segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models; *Nissan Rogue includes Rogue and Rogue Select, Chevy Cruze includes Chevy Cruze Limited

COURTESY OF

HISPANIC SPENDING AT PARITY AVERAGE MSRP AMONG PHOENIX AUTO SALES, 2016 CYE AVERAGE BASE

HONDA M.S.R.P.

CHEVROLET M.S.R.P.

AVERAGE BASE

AVERAGE BASE

AVERAGE BASE

AVERAGE BASE

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

VS.

VS.

VS.

VS.

VS.

NON-HISPANICS

NON-HISPANICS

NON-HISPANICS

NON-HISPANICS

NON-HISPANICS

FORD M.S.R.P.

TOYOTA M.S.R.P.

KIA M.S.R.P.

$25,799 $31,368 $33,581 $26,654 $22,644 $26,657 $32,653 $33,663 $28,172 $22,666 Source: Polk New Vehicle Personal Retail Registrations (Sales and Leases), 2016 CYE, Phoenix DMA. *Average amount spent based on 2016 MSRP for new vehicle sales

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

111

COURTESY OF

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

$100

SPENT BY PHOENIX HISPANICS ON LUXURY AUTOMOTIVE IN 2016

MILLION

COURTESY OF

Source: R.L. Polk & Co, New Vehicle Registrations (Personal Retail includes Leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYE, Phoenix DMA; Luxury based on following brands: Acura , Audi, BMW, Cadillac, Infiniti , Genesis, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Volvo.

HISPANICS ARE FUELING THE GROWTH FUELING THE GROWTH OF OFHISPANICSARE NEW LUXURY AUTO SALES IN PHOENIX NEW LUXURY AUTO SALES IN PHOENIX HISPANIC SHARE OF TOTAL Hispanic Share ofVEHICLE Total New NEW LUXURY Luxury Vehicle Unit Sales Trend UNIT SALES TREND

7%

24%

6%

8.3%

5%

7.9%

3%

1.8%

2.2%

4% 2% 1% 0%

HISPANIC SHARE OF TOTAL NEW LUXURY VEHICLE GROWTH YEAR OVER YEAR

Hispanic Share of Total New Luxury Vehicle Growth Year over Year

6.5%

PERCENTAGE CHANGE Change in NewVEHICLE Luxury Vehicle IN% NEW LUXURY UNIT Unit Sales Year over Year SALES YEAR OVER YEAR

76%

7.1% % C H A N GE I N U N I T S A L E S Y E A R-Y E A R

Total

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

2 0 1 4 C YE

2015 C Y E

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2014-2016 CYE (Jan-Dec), Phoenix DMA. Share of Luxury brands only, Luxury Brands Include: Acura, Audi, BMW, Cadillac, Genesis, Infiniti, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Volvo.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

2016 C Y E

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic COURTESY OF

112

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2014-2016 CYE (Jan-Dec), Phoenix DMA. Share of Luxury brands only, Luxury Brands Include: Acura, Audi, BMW, Cadillac, Genesis, Infiniti, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, and Volvo


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

PHOENIX TOTAL

PHOENIX HISPANIC

LUXURY BRAND RANKER RANK

BRAND

LUXURY BRAND RANKER

S0M

HISPANIC % OF BRAND SALES

RANK

#1

18.2%

8.2%

#2

17.2%

#3

BRAND

S0M

HISPANIC % OF BRAND SALES

#1

18.0%

8.2%

7.2%

#2

15.8%

8.5%

15.4%

8.5%

#3

14.9%

7.2%

#4

10.3%

9.2%

#4

11.6%

9.2%

#5

8.6%

10.7%

#5

11.2%

10.7%

#6t

8.4%

9.9%

#6

10.1%

9.9%

#6t

8.2%

8.9%

#7

8.8%

8.9%

#8

4.3%

4.4%

#8

2.7%

7.4%

#9

3.1%

5.2%

#9

2.3%

4.4%

#10

3.0%

7.4%

#10

1.9%

5.2%

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYE (Jan-Dec), Phoenix DMA. Share of Luxury brands only, Luxury Brands Include: Acura, Audi, BMW, Cadillac, Genesis, Infiniti, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Volvo.

COURTESY OF

HISPANIC AUTO SPENDING IS AT PARITY WITH THE MARKET AMONG ALL AND LUXURY VEHICLES HISPANIC AUTO SPENDING IS AT PARITY WITH THE MARKET AMONG ALL AND LUXURY VEHICLES

51078.73211

31731.69028

28919.87444

53137.69461

Phoenix DMA ● Average MSRP ● 2016 CYE

ALL VEHICLES

LUX URY V EHICLES

Hispanic

Phoenix Market

PHOENIX DMA • AVERAGE MSRP • 2016 CYE COURTESY OF

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYE, Phoenix DMA. Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYE, Phoenix DMA.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

113

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

HISPANIC SPENDING ACROSS LUXURY BRANDS AVERAGE MSRP AMONG AUTO SALES, 2016 CYE AVERAGE BASE

AVERAGE BASE

AVERAGE BASE

AVERAGE BASE

INFINITI M.S.R.P.

CADILLAC M.S.R.P.

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

VS.

VS.

VS.

VS.

VS.

NON-HISPANICS

NON-HISPANICS

NON-HISPANICS

NON-HISPANICS

NON-HISPANICS

BMW M.S.R.P.

LEXUS M.S.R.P.

ACURA M.S.R.P.

AVERAGE BASE

$49,485 $43,868 $41,172 $44,639 $59,549 $50,476 $44,343 $41,978 $45,106 $58,187 COURTESY OF

*AVERAGE AMOUNT SPENT BASED ON 2016 MSRP FOR NEW VEHICLE SALES Source: Polk New Vehicle Personal Retail Registrations (Sales and Leases), 2016 CYE, Phoenix DMA.

DID YOU KNOW?

1.1

VEHICLES IN OPERATION ARE OWNED BY HISPANICS IN PHOENIX, REPRESENTING 28% OF TOTAL MARKET

MILLION

COURTESY OF

Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years 1981-2018; Phoenix DMA ; Data as of January 2017.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

114

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

TIME FOR A NEW VEHICLE? Time for a New Vehicle?

Vehicles In Operation O Phoenix Hispanics Are 2001

1 Out Of 2

Model Year Breakdown, C

MODEL YEAR BREAKDOWN, CURRENT VIO 22%

1 OUT OF 2

3% 25%

81-'90

50%

VEHICLES IN OPERATION OWNED BY PHOENIX HISPANICS ARE 2001-2010 MODELS

91-'00 01-'10 11-'18

50%

COURTESY OF

Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years 1981-2018, Phoenix DMA; Data as of January 2017.

Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years 1981-2018 DMA; Data as of January 2017.

MORE LIKELY TO BUY A CAR IN THE NEXT YEAR

OF PHOENIX HISPANICS INTEND TO PURCHASE A VEHICLE IN THE NEXT 12 MONTHS

19

%

Vs. 17% of Non-Hispanics COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough Hispanic Study, 2016 Release 2 (Aug 2015-Jul 2016), Phoenix DMA, A18+; Base: HHLD plans to buy any new/used/lease vehicle in the next 12 months

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

115

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

LOYALTY OVER LOCATION 55% OF PHOENIX HISPANIC NEW VEHICLE OWNERS TRAVELED 10+ MILES ONE WAY TO PURCHASE/LEASE THEIR LAST VEHICLE

55

%

COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough Hispanic Study, 2016 Release 2 (Aug 2015-July 2016), Phoenix DMA, A18+, Households, Base: Any new or leased vehicle in the HH

NEW VEHICLE CUSTOMERS 48% OF PHOENIX HISPANICS THAT PLAN ON PURCHASING A NEW VEHICLE WITHIN A YEAR WATCH, LISTEN OR LOG ON TO UNIVISION LOCAL MEDIA PHOENIX

48

%

COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough Hispanic Study, 2016 Release 2, (Aug 2015 – Jul 2016), Phoenix DMA, HA18+ HHLD's, Univision Local Media includes: Univision Radio (M-Su 6a-12mid cume) KHOT, KOMR and KQMR; Univision TV (M-Su 4a-2a cume) KTVW and KFPH; Univision.com/UnivisionArizona. com, 1003phoenix.univision.com, 1059phoenix.univision.com and 1063masvariedad.univision.com visitors in past 7 days

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

116

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

PROFILE

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A LATINA WOMAN IN NASCAR BREAKS BARRIERS AND MAKES STEM FUN BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

As a fifth grader in Puerto Rico, Alba Colon's dream was to reach for the stars and become an astronaut just like her inspiration, Sally Ride. "I wanted to become the first Hispanic to reach space," Colon says. "And my parents always told me I could do and be whoever I want." Her parents, a doctor and a teacher, prioritized engraving the value of an education within Colon and her siblings. The sacrifices her parents made are something Colon holds close to her, as she has had to make sacrifices of her own throughout her career. But as she completed her mechanical engineering degree from the University of Puerto Rico, her passion deviated to cars. During college she became active in the Society of Automotive Engineers and realized that she enjoyed something else as much as she loved space. Her journey to becoming one of the most influential figures in NASCAR began in 1994 when she became a data acquisitions engineer for General Motors (GM). Fast-forward 20 years later and she is the lead engineer for Chevy Racing at NASCAR. It's fair to state the obvious: She's a double minority, a Hispanic woman in a world traditionally full of white men. That reality has not mattered since she became lead engineer in 2001. Through years of exposure and experience, Colon has established herself as one of the most respected engineers in all of NASCAR. However, aside from the accolades and breaking of ceilings, it is evident that she is truly beloved. Her goal was never to be recognized for being influential in a maledominated industry; engineering was simply her passion. Now given her credibility and story, she understands her role in society and admits it can be a tough responsibility. "It is a huge honor because I looked up to Sally Ride and now I have not only young girls, but guys, coming up to me saying, 'I want to be like you someday,'" Colon says. "We need to inspire and encourage the people that come after us. [We should tell them] they can do this and they can be bigger and they can follow their dreams and it doesn't matter the color of their skin, their race or gender, they can do anything." Colon takes advantage of her platform in encouraging ways: She shares her journey by speaking often at universities, Hispanic initiative events at GM, diversity programs hosted by NASCAR and,

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

less formally, at elementary schools. The Puerto Rican has found a home at NASCAR, where she is optimizing her role by reaching the youth and younger generations. It is by no surprise that the barriers she faced throughout her career often get overshadowed by her success, but her focus to follow her passion helped her break them. There were not many Hispanics in engineering, not to mention a lack of Hispanic women engineers and an underrepresentation of minority groups involved. "I was trying to break the glass ceiling for three types of groups," Colon says. "With time they realized I am here to support [Chevy] and it took a lot of patience, hard work and perseverance." So when she speaks to different groups across the country, Colon preaches having the attitude of not to giving up and how any person pursuing his or her dream needs to work hard to achieve their dream. It does not matter the color of your skin, your gender or ethnicity, Colon says. As long as a person is working hard and doing their job right, people will notice and respect them for it. "At the end of the day, I just want everybody to be accepted for the skills that they bring, it doesn't matter what they look like," Colon says. "The bottom line is we can all do the jobs, we can be President some day and do anything we want." The number of women in NASCAR has increased and although she may not take credit for it, people around the sport know the role Colon plays. If there is one thing Colon is confident about, however, it is this: "[Women] can do anything that the guys can do." FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

Photo by Harold Hinson Photography 117

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

PROFILE

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

NASCAR DRIVER'S DREAM STARTED BY GO-KARTING BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

NASCAR's Drive for Diversity and NASCAR Next programs, which develop minority and female talent, opened doors for Daniel Suárez.

top circuit and his success is helping NASCAR gain fans in the Latino community. "The Latino community has really gravitated toward NASCAR and I'm glad I can play a small role in that," Suárez says. "The fan support we receive when we visit tracks like Phoenix Raceway has been amazing.…I'm noticing more and more fans with our T-shirts and hats when we visit those tracks and it's truly a great feeling to have. I love being part of NASCAR and look forward to being here for a long time to come."

The opportunities allowed him to compete in multiple series on the NASCAR circuit and offered him the chance to compete on different levels year-round. "[It] has been instrumental in my success in reaching the top level of NASCAR," says Suárez, who is Mexican born. "Without those programs, along with our great partner and team support, I might not be where I am today."

FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

But Suárez's journey to stardom was anything but easy. He didn't come from a racing family, struggled to learn English and his family struggled financially. His father did, however, know how to fix cars, which provided his son with the tools and skills Suárez needed when he took up go-carting in elementary school. His destiny was set and soon the Monterrey native was dreaming of going to NASCAR headquarters in Charlotte, N.C. Life happened fast for Suárez. In 2013, he drove 26 hours to Charlotte. Three years later he won his first race in a final-lap coup past Kyle Busch, making him the first Mexican-born driver to win in a NASCAR national touring series. He eventually overcame the language barrier, but he recounts how he overcame that obstacle today when talking to youth about how they should not allow any perceived weakness to keep them from reaching their goals. Suárez is also the first foreign-born NASCAR champion. His awards include 2016 NASCAR XFINITY Series Champion, 2015 NASCAR XFINITY Series Rookie of the Year and 2010 NASCAR Corona Series Rookie of the Year. At 25, his career has exceeded expectations and Suárez seems poised to accomplish even more. With his popularity in the NASCAR community skyrocketing, Suárez is committed to using his fame to popularize auto racing south of the border. This season, Suárez will become its second driver to make NASCAR's

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Photos by Nigel Kinrade

118

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

NOTES

21% OF U.S. HISPANICS ARE 'TRUE FOODIES' "I ESPECIALLY LOOK FOR ORGANIC OR NATURAL FOODS" HISPANICS ARE +13% MORE LIKELY

"I'M USUALLY FIRST AMONG MY FRIENDS TO TRY NEW FOOD PRODUCTS" HISPANICS ARE +10% MORE LIKELY

+13%

"I TRY TO EAT GOURMET FOOD WHENEVER I CAN" HISPANICS ARE +10% MORE LIKELY

+10%

+11

%

+14% +13

%

SIMMONS DEFINITION OF "TRUE FOODIES" SEGMENTATION: PASSIONATE ABOUT FOOD AND SPEND A LOT OF TIME COOKING AT HOME. THEY PREFER TO BUY ORGANIC FOOD, WANT THEIR INGREDIENTS FRESH AND BUY ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PRODUCTS. TRUE FOODIES TEND TO EAT A VARIETY OF FOOD, LOVE TO EXPERIMENT WITH DIFFERENT CUISINES AND AT THE SAME TIME HAVE ADOPTED A HEALTHY EATING LIFESTYLE. THEY HAVE THE MOST CULINARY EXPERTISE AND HAVE A LOVE RELATIONSHIP WITH FOOD."

"I PREFER FOOD THAT IS PRESENTED AS AN ART FORM" HISPANICS ARE +14% MORE LIKELY

"THE KITCHEN IS THE MOST IMPORTANT ROOM IN MY HOME" HISPANICS ARE +13% MORE LIKELY COURTESY OF

Source: Simmons NHCS, Winter 2017 (Jan 2016 – Feb 2017); Base: U.S. Adults 18+ Index compares % of Hispanics who agree vs. Total population

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

119

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

Her Kids Are Her Focus, Even When Shopping

31.5%

20.6%

22.8%

26.2%

40.8%

29.9%

HER KIDS ARE HER FOCUS, EVEN WHEN SHOPPING

"ANY AGREE" AMONG WOMEN 18+ Non-Hispanic W18+

HISPANIC WOMEN ARE +36% MORE LIKELY TO AGREE WITH THE STATEMENT, "I ENJOY SHOPPING WITH MY CHILDREN." Hispanic women are

+36% more likely to agree

with the statement,“I enjoy shopping with my children.”

Source: Simmons NHCS, Winter 2017 (Jan 2016 – Feb 2017); Base: U.S. Women 18+

Hispanic W18+

HISPANIC WOMEN ARE +11% MORE LIKELY TO AGREE WITH THE STATEMENT, "I FIND IT HARD TO RESIST MY CHILDREN'S REQUESTS FORHispanic NON-ESSENTIAL PURCHASES." women are +11% more likely to agree with the statement, “I find it hard to resist my children’s requests for non-essential purchases.”

HISPANIC WOMEN ARE +20% MORE LIKELY TO AGREE WITH THE STATEMENT, "MY KIDS HAVE SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON BRANDS I CHOOSE." Hispanic women are +20% more likely to agree with the statement, “My kids COURTESY OF have significant impact on brands I choose.”

Source: Simmons NHCS, Winter 2017 (Jan 2016 – Feb 2017); Base: U.S. Women 18+

2.3

AMOUNT SPENT BY PHOENIX HISPANICS ON "FOOD AT HOME" IN 2014

BILLION

Representing 22% of all "Food at Home" spending in Phoenix COURTESY OF

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

120

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

PHOENIX HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS SPEND MORE THAN NON-HISPANICS ON GROCERIES

Phoenix Hispanic Households Spend More Than Non-Hispanics on Groceries Average Amount Household Spent on Groceries in 2014 | Dollars in Millions

$5,145

$5,641

FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

H I SP A N I C S

N O N -H IS P AN IC S

AVERAGE AMOUNT HOUSEHOLDS SPENT ON GROCERIES IN 2014 COURTESY OF

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC SHARE SHARE SHARE SHARE OF OF OF CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: PHOENIX PHOENIX PHOENIX PHOENIX HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: PHOENIX HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC SHARE SHARE SHARE OF OF OF CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: PHOENIX PHOENIX PHOENIX HISPANIC SHARE OFOF CONSUMER SPENDING: PHOENIX HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: PHOENIX HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: PHOENIX HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC SHARE SHARE SHARE SHARE OF OF OF OF CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: PHOENIX PHOENIX PHOENIX PHOENIX HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: PHOENIX

FOOD FOOD ATFOOD HOME ATHOME AT HOME FOOD AT FOOD ATHOME HOME FOOD FOOD FOOD ATHOME ATHOME AT HOME HOME FOOD AT HOME FOOD AT FOOD AT HOME FOOD FOOD FOOD AT FOOD ATHOME AT HOME ATHOME HOME

NONNON NON ALCOHOLIC NON ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BEVERAGES BEVERAGES ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NON ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NON NON NON ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BEVERAGES BEVERAGES NONNON ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NON ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NON NON NON ALCOHOLIC NON ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BEVERAGES BEVERAGES BEVERAGES

CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS

BAKERY BAKERY BAKERY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY BAKERY BAKERY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY BAKERY BAKERY BAKERY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS

BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF

$2.3 $2.3 $2.3 Billion Billion Billion $2.3 Billion $2.3 Billion $2.3 $2.3 $2.3 Billion Billion Billion $2.3 Billion $2.3 Billion $2.3 Billion $2.3 $2.3 $2.3 $2.3 Billion Billion Billion Billion

$267 $267 $267 $267 Million Million Million Million $267 Million $267 $267 $267 Million Million Million $267 Million Million or $267 22.3% oror22.3% 22.3% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or22.3% 22.3% ofthe theTotal Total or22.3% or22.3% or 22.3% 22.3% ofthe of the the of Total the Total Total or$267 22.3% of the Total or$267 of Total $267 Million $267 $267 Million Million Million Million

$146 $146 $146 $146 Million Million Million Million $146 Million $146 $146 $146 Million Million Million $146 Million Million or $146 23.1% oror23.1% 23.1% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or23.1% 23.1% ofthe theTotal Total or23.1% or23.1% or 23.1% 23.1% ofthe of the the of Total the Total Total or$146 23.1% of the Total or$146 of Total $146 Million $146 $146 Million Million Million Million

$237 $237 $237 $237 Million Million Million Million $237 Million $237 $237 $237 Million Million Million $237 Million Million or $237 20.1% oror20.1% 20.1% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or20.1% 20.1% ofthe theTotal Total or20.1% or20.1% or 20.1% 20.1% ofthe of the the of Total the Total Total or$237 20.1% of the Total or$237 of Total $237 Million $237 $237 Million Million Million Million

$143 $143 $143 $143 Million Million Million Million $143 Million $143 $143 $143 Million Million Million $143 Million Million or $143 26.7% oror26.7% 26.7% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or26.7% 26.7% ofthe theTotal Total or26.7% or26.7% or 26.7% 26.7% ofthe of the the of Total the Total Total or$143 26.7% of the Total or$143 of Total $143 Million $143 $143 Million Million Million Million

PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK

POULTRY POULTRY POULTRY POULTRY & EGGS &&EGGS EGGS &&EGGS POULTRY EGGS POULTRY POULTRY POULTRY &EGGS EGGS & EGGS POULTRY & EGGS POULTRY &&EGGS POULTRY & &EGGS POULTRY POULTRY POULTRY POULTRY &EGGS EGGS & &EGGS EGGS

FISH FISH FISH & FISH SEAFOOD &FISH &SEAFOOD SEAFOOD &&SEAFOOD SEAFOOD FISH &SEAFOOD &SEAFOOD SEAFOOD & SEAFOOD FISH &FISH SEAFOOD FISH &FISH FISH &FISH FISH FISH &SEAFOOD FISH &SEAFOOD SEAFOOD & &SEAFOOD SEAFOOD

DAIRY DAIRY DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY DAIRY DAIRY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY DAIRY DAIRY DAIRY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS

FRESH FRESH FRESH FRESH FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS &FRUITS VEGETABLES &&VEGETABLES VEGETABLES &&VEGETABLES FRESH VEGETABLES FRESH FRESH FRESH FRUITS FRUITS &VEGETABLES VEGETABLES & VEGETABLES FRESH FRUITS &FRUITS VEGETABLES FRESH FRUITS &&VEGETABLES FRESH FRUITS &FRUITS FRESH FRESH FRESH FRESH FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS &VEGETABLES &VEGETABLES VEGETABLES & &VEGETABLES VEGETABLES

$91 $91 $91 $91 Million Million Million Million $91 Million $91 $91 $91 Million Million Million $91 Million $91 Million $91 Million $91 $91 $91 $91 Million Million Million Million

$239 $239 $239 $239 Million Million Million Million $239 Million $239 $239 $239 Million Million Million $239 Million Million or $239 27.6% or27.6% 27.6% orofor27.6% the ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or of27.6% ofthe theTotal Total or or 27.6% or 27.6% 27.6% of the of the ofTotal the TotalTotal or 27.6% of the Total $239 Million $239 $239 $239 Million Million or$239 27.6% ofMillion theMillion Total

$46 $46 $46 $46 Million Million Million Million $46 Million $46 $46 $46 Million Million Million $46 Million $46 Million $46 Million $46 $46 $46 $46 Million Million Million Million

$211 $211 $211 $211 Million Million Million Million $211 Million $211 $211 $211 Million Million Million $211 Million Million or $211 22.0% oror22.0% 22.0% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or22.0% 22.0% ofthe theTotal Total or or 22.0% or 22.0% 22.0% of of the the of Total the Total Total or 22.0% of the Total or$211 22.0% ofMillion theMillion Total $211 Million $211 $211 $211 Million Million

$295 $295 $295 $295 Million Million Million Million $295 Million $295 $295 $295 Million Million Million $295 Million Million or $295 24.2% oror24.2% 24.2% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or24.2% 24.2% ofthe theTotal Total or or 24.2% or 24.2% 24.2% of of the the of Total the Total Total or 24.2% of the Total or$295 24.2% ofMillion theMillion Total $295 Million $295 $295 $295 Million Million

PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS &FRUITS && && PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED FRUITS FRUITS PROCESSED FRUITS &FRUITS PROCESSED FRUITS && & & VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES PROCESSED FRUITS &FRUITS PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS && & & VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES

SUGAR SUGAR SUGAR &SUGAR SWEETS SWEETS &&SWEETS SUGAR &&SWEETS SWEETS SUGAR SUGAR &SWEETS SWEETS & SWEETS SUGAR &SUGAR SWEETS SUGAR &&SWEETS SUGAR &SUGAR SUGAR SUGAR SUGAR &SWEETS &SWEETS SWEETS & &SWEETS SWEETS

FATS FATS &FATS OILS &OILS OILS &&OILS FATS &FATS OILS FATS &OILS &OILS OILS & OILS FATS &FATS OILS FATS &FATS FATS &FATS FATS FATS &OILS FATS &OILS OILS & &OILS OILS

OTHER OTHER OTHER OTHER FOOD FOOD FOOD PRODUCTS FOOD PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER OTHER OTHER FOOD FOOD FOOD PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER OTHER OTHER OTHER FOOD FOOD FOOD PRODUCTS FOOD PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS

ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEV. BEV. BEV. ATBEV. AT HOME ATHOME AT HOME ALCOHOLIC BEV. ATHOME HOME ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEV. BEV. ATHOME ATHOME AT HOME HOME ALCOHOLIC BEV. ATBEV. HOME ALCOHOLIC BEV. AT ALCOHOLIC BEV. ATBEV. ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEV. BEV. ATHOME BEV. ATHOME AT HOME ATHOME HOME

$84 $84 $84 $84 Million Million Million Million $84 Million $84 $84 $84 Million Million Million $84 Million $84 Million $84 Million $84 $84 $84 $84 Million Million Million Million

$106 $106 $106 $106 Million Million Million Million $106 Million $106 $106 $106 Million Million Million $106 Million Million or $106 18.3% oror18.3% 18.3% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or18.3% 18.3% ofthe theTotal Total or or 18.3% or 18.3% 18.3% of of the the of Total the Total Total or 18.3% of the Total or$106 18.3% ofMillion theMillion Total $106 Million $106 $106 $106 Million Million

$54 $54 $54 $54 Million Million Million Million $54 Million $54 $54 $54 Million Million Million $54 Million $54 Million $54 Million $54 $54 $54 $54 Million Million Million Million

$422 $422 $422 $422 Million Million Million Million $422 Million $422 $422 $422 Million Million Million $422 Million Million or $422 19.1% oror19.1% 19.1% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or19.1% 19.1% ofthe theTotal Total or or 19.1% or 19.1% 19.1% of of the the of Total the Total Total or 19.1% of the Total or$422 19.1% ofMillion theMillion Total $422 Million $422 $422 $422 Million Million

$306 $306 $306 $306 Million Million Million Million $306 Million $306 $306 $306 Million Million Million $306 Million Million or $306 17.2% oror17.2% 17.2% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or17.2% 17.2% ofthe theTotal Total or or 17.2% or 17.2% 17.2% of of the the of Total the Total Total or 17.2% of the Total or$306 17.2% ofMillion theMillion Total $306 Million $306 $306 $306 Million Million

or 22.2% oror22.2% 22.2% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or22.2% 22.2% ofthe theTotal Total or22.2% 22.2% 22.2% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 22.2% ofor the Total oror22.2% of or or22.2% the Total or22.2% 22.2% orofor22.2% of 22.2% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or 24.3% oror24.3% 24.3% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or24.3% 24.3% ofthe theTotal Total or24.3% 24.3% 24.3% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 24.3% ofor the Total oror24.3% of or or24.3% the Total or24.3% 24.3% orofor24.3% of 24.3% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or 22.4% oror22.4% 22.4% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or22.4% 22.4% ofthe theTotal Total or22.4% 22.4% 22.4% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 22.4% ofor the Total oror22.4% of or or22.4% the Total or22.4% 22.4% orofor22.4% of 22.4% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or22.3% the Total or22.3% 22.3% orofor22.3% of 22.3% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or27.6% or27.6% 27.6% or ofor27.6% ofthe 27.6% oftheTotal the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or18.3% the Total or18.3% 18.3% orofor18.3% of 18.3% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or23.1% the Total or23.1% 23.1% orofor23.1% of 23.1% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or 25.1% oror25.1% 25.1% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or25.1% 25.1% ofthe theTotal Total or25.1% 25.1% 25.1% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 25.1% ofor the Total oror25.1% of or or25.1% the Total or25.1% 25.1% orofor25.1% of 25.1% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or 23.5% oror23.5% 23.5% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or23.5% 23.5% ofthe theTotal Total or23.5% 23.5% 23.5% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 23.5% ofor the Total oror23.5% of or or23.5% the Total or23.5% 23.5% orofor23.5% of 23.5% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or22.0% the Total or22.0% 22.0% orofor22.0% of 22.0% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or19.1% the Total or19.1% 19.1% orofor19.1% of 19.1% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or26.7% the Total or26.7% 26.7% orofor26.7% of 26.7% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or24.2% the Total or24.2% 24.2% orofor24.2% of 24.2% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or17.2% the Total or17.2% 17.2% orofor17.2% of 17.2% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

COURTESY OF

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

DATO S

or or20.1% the Total or20.1% 20.1% orofor20.1% of 20.1% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

A Z

2 0 1 7

121

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

TOP FOOD PRODUCTS IN PHOENIX RANKED BY % OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT USED FOOD PRODUCTS IN THE LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK

FOOD PRODUCTS USED LAST 7 DAYS

% OF HISPANIC

% OF NON-HISPANICS

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #6 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

TORTILLAS FRESH MEAT PACKAGED MEAT (BACON, HOT DOGS, LUNCH MEAT, ETC.) COFFEE PRETZELS, CHIPS, POPCORN ICE CREAM, FROZEN JUICE BARS, FROZEN YOGURT YOGURT (NOT FROZEN) READY-TO-EAT CEREAL CANDY NUTS SALSA ANY STORE BRAND FOOD SOUP (CANNED OR DRY MIX) PREPARED FOODS (CHICKEN, SALAD BARS, SANDWICHES, ETC.) FROZEN PIZZA

76.9% 74.4% 62.7% 61.9% 54.3% 54.0% 53.3% 52.3% 50.4% 44.4% 37.6% 32.2% 31.5% 31.0% 21.6%

42.6% 71.4% 64.1% 67.6% 58.5% 59.1% 43.6% 48.1% 48.6% 50.1% 42.6% 34.3% 38.7% 30.0% 29.4%

152 103 98 93 94 93 116 107 103 91 91 95 85 103 78

COURTESY OF

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016 – Jan 2017), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+

TOP GROCERY STORES IN PHOENIX RANKED BY % OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT SHOPPED AT EACH STORE IN LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK

GROCERY STORE

% OF HISPANIC

% OF NON-HISPANICS

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #6 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19

FRY'S - FRY'S MARKETPLACE WALMART SUPERCENTER FOOD CITY WALMART NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET SAFEWAY COSTCO SAM'S CLUB LOS ALTOS RANCH MARKET TARGET/SUPERTARGET SPROUTS WINCO FOODS OTHER HISPANIC GROCERY STORE BASHAS' WHOLE FOODS MARKET OTHER GROCERY STORE ALBERTSONS TRADER JOE'S SMART & FINAL AJ'S FINE FOODS

67.4% 61.0% 45.2% 30.9% 30.8% 25.6% 24.0% 22.5% 19.3% 16.3% 14.1% 13.2% 12.0% 8.6% 8.0% 7.2% 4.7% 4.5% 3.1%

68.3% 47.1% 8.7% 15.3% 36.5% 36.3% 11.7% 0.4% 19.1% 22.1% 10.6% 0.7% 18.7% 5.1% 7.1% 16.4% 12.6% 3.5% 7.5%

99 121 264 163 88 76 165 409 101 78 123 366 70 146 109 50 44 120 48

COURTESY OF

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016 – Jan 2017), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

122

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

Share of Voice in the Grocery Stores Category All Phoenix Market TV Stations Combined • Jan-Mar 2017

SHARE OF VOICE IN THE GROCERY STORES CATEGORY, JAN-MAR 2017 0%

16%

FRY'S FOOD BASHAS'

18%

FOOD CITY 66%

ALBERTSONS

ALL PHOENIX MARKET TV STATIONS COMBINED COURTESY OF

Kantar, Jan-Mar 2017 (adjusted data through Mar 31, 2017), Phoenix DMA

Share of Voice in the Grocery Stores Category All Phoenix Market Radio Stations Combined • Jan-Mar 2017

Kantar, Jan-Mar 2017 (adjusted data through Mar 31, 2017), Phoenix DMA

SHARE OF VOICE IN THE GROCERY STORES CATEGORY, JAN-MAR 2017 3%

3% 3% 2%

5%

29%

6%

8%

10% 17% 14%

FRY'S ALBERTSONS BASHAS' WHOLE FOODS MARKET SAFEWAY FOOD CITY LOS ALTOS RANCH MARKET AJ'S FINE FOODS TRADER JOE'S SMART & FINAL OTHER ADVERTISERS

ALL PHOENIX MARKET RADIO STATIONS COMBINED COURTESY OF

Miller Kaplan, Jan-Mar 2017, Phoenix Metro Miller Kaplan, Jan-Mar 2017, Phoenix Metro

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

123

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 2

CONSUMER

AMOUNT SPENT BY TUCSON HISPANICS ON "FOOD AT HOME" IN 2014

$757 MILLION

Representing 31% of all "Food at Home" spending in Tucson COURTESY OF

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

TUCSON HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS SPEND MORE THAN NON-HISPANICS ON GROCERIES

Tucson Hispanic Households Spend More Than Non-Hispanics on Groceries Average Amount Household Spent on Groceries in 2014 | Dollars in Millions

$4,931

$5,451

FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

HISPANICS

NO N-HIS PA NICS

AVERAGE AMOUNT HOUSEHOLD SPENT ON GROCERIES IN 2014 COURTESY OF

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

124

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC SHARE SHARE SHARE OF OF CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: TUCSON TUCSON TUCSON HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: TUCSON HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: TUCSON HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC SHARE SHARE SHARE OF OF OF CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: TUCSON TUCSON TUCSON HISPANIC SHARE OFOF CONSUMER SPENDING: TUCSON HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: TUCSON HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: TUCSON HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC HISPANIC SHARE SHARE SHARE SHARE OF OF OF OF CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER CONSUMER SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: SPENDING: TUCSON TUCSON TUCSON TUCSON HISPANIC SHARE OF CONSUMER SPENDING: TUCSON

FOOD FOOD AT ATHOME AT HOME FOOD ATFOOD HOME FOOD ATHOME HOME FOOD FOOD FOOD ATHOME ATHOME AT HOME HOME FOOD AT HOME FOOD AT FOOD AT HOME FOOD FOOD FOOD AT FOOD ATHOME AT HOME ATHOME HOME

NON NON ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BEVERAGES BEVERAGES NONNON ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NON ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NON NON NON ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BEVERAGES BEVERAGES NONNON ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NON ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NON NON NON ALCOHOLIC NON ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BEVERAGES BEVERAGES BEVERAGES

$757 $757 $757 $757 Million Million Million Million $757 Million $757 Million $757 $757 Million Million $757 Million Million or $757 31.3% oror31.3% 31.3% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or31.3% 31.3% ofthe theTotal Total or 31.3% of the Total or 31.3% or 31.3% of the of Total the Total or 31.3% of the Total or 31.3% of the Total $757 Million $757 $757 $757 $757 Million Million Million Million

$86 $86 $86 $86 Million Million Million Million $86 Million $86 $86 $86 Million Million Million $86 Million $86 Million $86 Million $86 $86 $86 $86 Million Million Million Million

CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS CEREALS

BAKERY BAKERY BAKERY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY BAKERY BAKERY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY PRODUCTS BAKERY BAKERY BAKERY BAKERY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS

$47 $47 $47 $47 Million Million Million Million $47 Million $47 $47 $47 Million Million Million $47 Million $47 Million $47 Million $47 $47 $47 $47 Million Million Million Million

$77 $77 $77 $77 Million Million Million Million $77 Million $77 $77 $77 Million Million Million $77 Million $77 Million $77 Million $77 $77 $77 $77 Million Million Million Million

BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF BEEF

$46 $46 $46 $46 Million Million Million Million $46 Million $46 $46 $46 Million Million Million $46 Million $46 Million $46 Million $46 $46 $46 $46 Million Million Million Million

or or31.3% the Total or31.3% 31.3% orofor31.3% of 31.3% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or 31.5% oror31.5% 31.5% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or31.5% 31.5% ofthe theTotal Total or31.5% 31.5% 31.5% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 31.5% ofor the Total oror31.5% of or or31.5% the Total or31.5% 31.5% orofor31.5% of 31.5% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or 32.4% oror32.4% 32.4% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or32.4% 32.4% ofthe theTotal Total or32.4% 32.4% 32.4% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 32.4% ofor the Total oror32.4% of or or32.4% the Total or32.4% 32.4% orofor32.4% of 32.4% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or 28.7% oror28.7% 28.7% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or28.7% 28.7% ofthe theTotal Total or28.7% 28.7% 28.7% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 28.7% ofor the Total oror28.7% of or or28.7% the Total or28.7% 28.7% orofor28.7% of 28.7% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or 36.8% oror36.8% 36.8% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or36.8% 36.8% ofthe theTotal Total or36.8% 36.8% 36.8% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 36.8% ofor the Total oror36.8% of or or36.8% the Total or36.8% 36.8% orofor36.8% of 36.8% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK PORK

POULTRY POULTRY POULTRY &&EGGS EGGS &&EGGS POULTRY & EGGS POULTRY EGGS POULTRY &EGGS EGGS POULTRY POULTRY & EGGS POULTRY & EGGS POULTRY &&EGGS POULTRY & &EGGS POULTRY POULTRY POULTRY POULTRY &EGGS EGGS & &EGGS EGGS

FISH FISH &FISH &SEAFOOD SEAFOOD &&SEAFOOD FISH & FISH SEAFOOD SEAFOOD &SEAFOOD SEAFOOD FISH &SEAFOOD & SEAFOOD FISH &FISH SEAFOOD FISH &FISH FISH &FISH FISH FISH &SEAFOOD FISH &SEAFOOD SEAFOOD & &SEAFOOD SEAFOOD

DAIRY DAIRY DAIRY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY DAIRY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY PRODUCTS DAIRY DAIRY DAIRY DAIRY PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS

FRESH FRESH FRESH FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS &&VEGETABLES VEGETABLES &&VEGETABLES FRESH FRUITS &FRUITS VEGETABLES FRESH VEGETABLES FRESH FRUITS &VEGETABLES VEGETABLES FRESH FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES FRESH FRUITS &FRUITS VEGETABLES FRESH FRUITS &&VEGETABLES FRESH FRUITS &FRUITS FRESH FRESH FRESH FRESH FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS &VEGETABLES &VEGETABLES VEGETABLES & &VEGETABLES VEGETABLES

$30 $30 $30 $30 Million Million Million Million $30 Million $30 Million $30 $30 Million Million $30 Million $30 Million $30 Million $30 $30 $30 $30 Million Million Million Million

$77 $77 $77 $77 Million Million Million Million $77 Million $77 Million $77 $77 Million Million $77 Million $77 Million $77 Million $77 $77 $77 $77 Million Million Million Million

or 33.9% oror33.9% 33.9% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or33.9% 33.9% ofthe theTotal Total or33.9% 33.9% 33.9% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 33.9% ofor the Total oror33.9% of or or33.9% the Total or33.9% 33.9% orofor33.9% of 33.9% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS && && PROCESSED FRUITS &FRUITS PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED FRUITS FRUITS PROCESSED FRUITS &FRUITS PROCESSED FRUITS && & & VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES PROCESSED FRUITS &FRUITS PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED PROCESSED FRUITS FRUITS FRUITS && & & VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES VEGETABLES

$27 $27 $27 Million Million Million $27 Million $27 Million $27 $27 $27 Million Million Million $27 Million $27 Million $27 Million $27 $27 $27 $27 Million Million Million Million

or or 37.8% or37.8% or 37.8% the ofofthe Total the ofof Total the Total orof37.8% 37.8% theTotal Total or37.8% or37.8% or37.8% of thethe of Total the Total Total or or 37.8% of 37.8% the Total ofofthe Total oror37.8% the or37.8% or 37.8% orof 37.8% of 37.8% oftheTotal the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

SUGAR SUGAR SUGAR &&SWEETS SWEETS &&SWEETS SUGAR &SUGAR SWEETS SWEETS SUGAR &SWEETS SWEETS SUGAR & SWEETS SUGAR &SUGAR SWEETS SUGAR &&SWEETS SUGAR &SUGAR SUGAR SUGAR SUGAR &SWEETS &SWEETS SWEETS & &SWEETS SWEETS

$34 $34 $34 Million Million Million $34 Million $34 Million $34 $34 $34 Million Million Million $34 Million $34 Million $34 Million $34 $34 $34 $34 Million Million Million Million

oror31.6% 31.6% orof of ofthe the ofTotal Total or 31.6% the Total or31.6% 31.6% ofthe theTotal Total or31.6% 31.6% 31.6% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 31.6% ofor the Total oror31.6% of or or31.6% the Total or31.6% 31.6% orofor31.6% of 31.6% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

oror26.3% 26.3% orof of ofthe the ofTotal Total or 26.3% the Total or26.3% 26.3% ofthe theTotal Total or26.3% 26.3% 26.3% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 26.3% ofor the Total oror26.3% of or or26.3% the Total or26.3% 26.3% orofor26.3% of 26.3% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

$15 $15 $15 $15 Million Million Million Million $15 Million $15 Million $15 $15 Million Million $15 Million $15 Million $15 Million $15 $15 $15 $15 Million Million Million Million

or 34.9% oror34.9% 34.9% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or34.9% 34.9% ofthe theTotal Total or34.9% 34.9% 34.9% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 34.9% ofor the Total oror34.9% of or or34.9% the Total or34.9% 34.9% orofor34.9% of 34.9% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

$68 $68 $68 $68 Million Million Million Million $68 Million $68 Million $68 $68 Million Million $68 Million $68 Million $68 Million $68 $68 $68 $68 Million Million Million Million

or 31.1% oror31.1% 31.1% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or31.1% 31.1% ofthe theTotal Total or31.1% 31.1% 31.1% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 31.1% ofor the Total oror31.1% of or or31.1% the Total or31.1% 31.1% orofor31.1% of 31.1% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

FATS FATS &FATS &OILS OILS &&OILS FATS &FATS OILS OILS &OILS OILS FATS &OILS & OILS FATS &FATS OILS FATS &FATS FATS &FATS FATS FATS &OILS FATS &OILS OILS & &OILS OILS

OTHER OTHER OTHER FOOD FOOD FOOD PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER OTHER FOOD FOOD PRODUCTS PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER FOOD PRODUCTS OTHER OTHER OTHER OTHER FOOD FOOD FOOD PRODUCTS FOOD PRODUCTS PRODUCTS PRODUCTS

$18 $18 $18 Million Million Million $18 Million $18 Million $18 $18 $18 Million Million Million $18 Million $18 Million $18 Million $18 $18 $18 $18 Million Million Million Million

$136 $136 $136 Million Million Million $136 Million $136 Million $136 $136 $136 Million Million Million $136 Million Million oror27.4% 27.4% orof of ofthe the ofTotal Total or $136 27.4% the Total or27.4% 27.4% ofthe theTotal Total or or 27.4% or 27.4% 27.4% of of the the of Total the Total Total or 27.4% of the Total or 27.4% of the Total $136 Million $136 $136 $136 $136 Million Million Million Million

oror32.9% 32.9% orof of ofthe the ofTotal Total or 32.9% the Total or32.9% 32.9% ofthe theTotal Total or32.9% 32.9% 32.9% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 32.9% ofor the Total oror32.9% of or or32.9% the Total or32.9% 32.9% orofor32.9% of 32.9% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

or or27.4% the Total or27.4% 27.4% orofor27.4% of 27.4% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

$95 $95 $95 $95 Million Million Million Million $95 Million $95 Million $95 $95 Million Million $95 Million $95 Million $95 Million $95 $95 $95 $95 Million Million Million Million

or 33.8% oror33.8% 33.8% orof the of ofthe Total the ofTotal Total or33.8% 33.8% ofthe theTotal Total or33.8% 33.8% 33.8% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 33.8% ofor the Total oror33.8% of or or33.8% the Total or33.8% 33.8% orofor33.8% of 33.8% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEV. BEV. BEV. ATBEV. AT HOME ATHOME AT HOME ALCOHOLIC BEV. ATHOME HOME ALCOHOLIC ATHOME HOME ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEV. BEV. ATHOME AT HOME ALCOHOLIC BEV. ATBEV. HOME ALCOHOLIC BEV. AT ALCOHOLIC BEV. ATBEV. ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC ALCOHOLIC BEV. BEV. ATHOME BEV. ATHOME AT HOME ATHOME HOME

$99 $99 $99 Million Million Million $99 Million $99 Million $99 $99 $99 Million Million Million $99 Million $99 Million $99 Million $99 $99 $99 $99 Million Million Million Million

oror24.8% 24.8% orof of ofthe the ofTotal Total or 24.8% the Total or24.8% 24.8% ofthe theTotal Total or24.8% 24.8% 24.8% ofthe of theTotal the ofTotal the Total Total or 24.8% ofor the Total oror24.8% of or or24.8% the Total or24.8% 24.8% orofor24.8% of 24.8% of the the ofTotal of the Total the Total Total

COURTESY OF

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

TOP FOOD PRODUCTS IN TUCSON RANKED BY % OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT USED FOOD PRODUCTS IN THE LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK

FOOD PRODUCTS USED LAST 7 DAYS

% OF HISPANIC

% OF NON-HISPANICS

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #6 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

FRESH MEAT TORTILLAS COFFEE PACKAGED MEAT (BACON, HOT DOGS, LUNCH MEAT, ETC.) ICE CREAM, FROZEN JUICE BARS, FROZEN YOGURT YOGURT (NOT FROZEN) CANDY READY-TO-EAT CEREAL PRETZELS, CHIPS, POPCORN SOUP (CANNED OR DRY MIX) NUTS SALSA PREPARED FOODS (CHICKEN, SALAD BARS, SANDWICHES, ETC.) FROZEN PIZZA ANY STORE BRAND FOOD

79.7% 79.4% 72.2% 66.1% 57.4% 52.9% 51.6% 50.9% 50.3% 43.7% 43.0% 39.4% 28.9% 28.5% 25.5%

71.5% 41.4% 66.3% 62.2% 50.8% 43.1% 43.7% 46.7% 53.0% 34.7% 48.4% 38.4% 30.9% 25.4% 28.3%

107 147 106 104 108 114 111 106 97 116 92 102 96 108 93

COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016 – Jan 2017), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

125

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CONSUMER

CHAPTER 2

TOP GROCERY STORES IN TUCSON RANKED BY % OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT SHOPPED AT EACH STORE IN LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK

GROCERY STORE

% OF HISPANIC

% OF NON-HISPANICS

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #6 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19

FRY'S WALMART SUPERCENTER FOOD CITY WALMART NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET SAFEWAY COSTCO EL SUPER TARGET/SUPERTARGET ALBERTSONS SPROUTS SAM'S CLUB BASHAS' TRADER JOE'S RINCON MARKET WHOLE FOODS MARKET OTHER HISPANIC GROCERY STORE AJ'S FINE FOODS OTHER GROCERY STORE NATURAL GROCERS

54.9% 54.8% 49.4% 38.2% 36.6% 34.8% 21.8% 19.2% 15.9% 15.3% 9.3% 8.9% 8.1% 7.9% 6.6% 5.9% 5.7% 4.4% 1.6%

60.8% 41.2% 17.4% 25.2% 39.9% 28.4% 2.1% 17.5% 20.3% 22.0% 6.7% 10.0% 14.9% 6.5% 4.9% 1.9% 5.1% 8.0% 1.6%

93 120 176 129 94 114 250 106 85 77 123 93 64 113 121 181 107 65 100

COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016 – Jan 2017), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+

hare of Voice in the Grocery Stores Category All Tucson Market TV Stations Combined • Jan-Mar 2017

SHARE OF VOICE IN THE GROCERY STORES CATEGORY 0% 17%

FRY'S FOOD BASHAS' FOOD CITY

18% 65%

RINCON MARKET GROCERY STORE

ALL TUCSON MARKET TV STATIONS COMBINED • JAN-MAR 2017 COURTESY OF

Kantar, Jan-Mar 2017 (adjusted data through Mar 31, 2017), Tucson DMA

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

antar, Jan-Mar 2017 (adjusted data through Mar 31, 2017), Tucson DMA

126

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

PROFILE

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

FEDERICO'S MEXICAN FOOD Isidro Pinales Araiza's journey in the restaurant industry began in 1986 as an employee cooking and cleaning. "As a worker you always dream of starting your own restaurant," Araiza says. In 1993 his dream became a reality when he started his first eatery. Araiza credits his success with conducting business operations the right way. "If you do things the right way, respect others, work hard, many opportunities open up," he says.

the years and has been informed of energy-efficient equipment that could benefit his operations. He also praised his SRP Strategic Energy Manager Julian Osorio. "Having an Energy Manager provided a lot of confidence that any issue we have will be solved," he says. As the company expands, the SRP Energy Manager assures the company's energy needs are met. Araiza urged Hispanic business owners to have faith, stay patient and keep fighting through difficult times. "In the beginning is where the most struggles are but don't be defeated quickly, we must keep fighting," Araiza says.

That's exactly what happened when he launched his first Federico's Mexican Food in 2005 located on the southwest corner of 43rd Avenue and Indian School Road in Phoenix. Along with five other members of his family, Araiza directed the growth of the restaurant. There are now 22 Federico's Mexican Restaurants located all across Maricopa County. The company has also expanded to New Mexico with four restaurants located in the state. They grow conservatively, opening one or two each year. They are now opening restaurants at state-of-the-art facilities, something he never imagined when they first started. The original restaurant was a small and old facility, times are changing, Araiza says. For Araiza, Federico's Mexican Food is a family business. He credits much of the company's success to the assistance his family has provided in all aspects of the organization's operations.

FIRST FEDERICO'S MEXICAN FOOD LOCATED AT 43RD AVENUE AND INDIAN SCHOOL ROAD

The company employs over 200 individuals and Araiza believes the key to his success is his employees. "It's critical to respect your employees and make sure your employees are happy and financially taken care of; it's part of my philosophy of success," Araiza says. Araiza is also in the process of helping an employee of over 15 years open his own restaurant. "It was time for him to open his own restaurant, Araiza says. Araiza feels blessed with the company's success, but is not content with what they've accomplished so far. "I hope to franchise Federico's Mexican Food and continue the company's growth," he says. Araiza has worked with power utility Salt River Project significantly since he began in 2005. He's received energy savings tips throughout

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

NEWEST FEDERICO'S MEXICAN FOOD LOCATED AT 43RD AVENUE AND UNION HILLS

127

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


Communities are like families

When everyone comes together, wonderful things can happen. This event is the result of a lot of hard work by many talented people. The spirit of community is alive and well, right here and now. DATOS, you represent the heart and soul of true community.

wellsfargo.com Š 2015 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. 724373 08/15


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HISPANIC MILLENNIAL PROJECT ONLINE CONVERSATION ANALYSIS

Produced by OYE! Business Intelligence, LLC

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

129

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

REPORT FOR MILLENNIAL PROJECT

Introduction

ABOUT OYE! OYE! is a solution designed to provide brands a deeper understanding of the Hispanic consumer through analysis of online conversation. OYE! not only identifies U.S. Hispanic conversation, but also analyzes the discussion based in Spanish, English or Spanglish. OYE! then derives meaning from that conversation to deliver insights about how Hispanics talk about brands as well as insights into their demographics and psychographics.

Table of Contents Page 3: Conversation Makeup Page 4: Findings: All Topics Page 5: Sentiment Page 6-7: Topic Breakdowns

DATA GATHERED OYE! is a social data analysis solution. Samples of conversation on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and blogs from various sites are pulled according to the privacy and security settings of both the platforms and the users on those platforms. The data reviewed is both independently generated user content as well as comments about and replies to brand content. A large sample size of data is pulled from the full universe of data available to provide statistically relevant samples of the conversation.

IDENTIFYING HISPANICS While the use of the Spanish language in social media is a significant indicator that someone may be Hispanic, it is not the only identifier. Other factors are leveraged to identify Hispanics. Name, images, location, following (who they follow as well as who follows them) all contribute to classifying a social profile as Hispanic. OYE! has created a proprietary technology to analyze and weight these factors to determine the likelihood the creator of a given piece of content is Hispanic

DETERMINING SENTIMENT OYE!’s determination of sentiment is also proprietary. Social conversation is analyzed for keywords that indicate strong emotional feelings, but the conversation is also analyzed to determine the effect of slang, sarcasm, emoticon use and word order to one’s overall sentiment. OYE! then uses it’s proprietary technology to process that collection of knowledge against large sets of social conversation data.

2

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

130

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

REPORT FOR MILLENNIAL PROJECT

Overall Conversation Makeup

51%

Millennials

40%

Other Age Groups

9%

OYE! Sampled over 6000 online conversations: ✦ 51% of posts were from millennials ✦ Posts from companies and other ages are excluded from the rest of this report ✦ All gathered conversation is US and Puerto Rico based Hispanics

Companies

75%

Snacks

5 overall topics were tracked: ✦ Chart represents the percent of total posts sampled each topic made up ✦ Sweets and candy were an overwhelmingly popular topic among Hispanic millennials

13%

Healthy Eating Eating Habits Beverages

7% 5%

Millennial Conversation Details

Female

64%

Male

Female millennials dominated the overall conversation in food and beverage among Hispanic millennials ✦ companies were excluded from totals

36%

English

Hispanics millennials that engage on social media tend to use english across industry verticals

2% 2% 2%

Spanish

94% 6%

10%

Facebook

Surprisingly, Twitter was the dominant platform in this vertical among millennials: ✦ Food and beverage is an “in the moment” experience ✦ Several shares about diet related habits in the moment

Twitter Forum YouTube Blog

84% 3

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

131

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

REPORT FOR MILLENNIAL PROJECT

Topic View Looking back to the overall tracking, the volume among millennials was highest for sweets and salty/snacks because millennials dominated that conversation: ✦ Numbers are based on the total number of posts across platforms in each topic ✦ Dieting and Healthy/Organic topics were the only topics not dominated by Millennial conversation ✦ Companies were excluded from the totals to create these percentages

90% 72%

63 37%

46%

54%

Other Ages Millennials

28%

10%

Snacks

Healthy Eating

Eating Habits

Beverages

No matter topic, female conversation was consistently ahead of male conversation in food and beverage: ✦ Numbers are based on the total number of posts across platforms in each topic ✦ Gender calculations below are for millennials only - other age groups and companies were excluded

70%

64%

67%

59%

36%

30%

Snacks

Healthy Eating

41%

Eating Habits

Female 33%

Male

Beverages

4

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

132

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

REPORT FOR MILLENNIAL PROJECT

Sentiment

22%

23%

Millennials

28%

24%

Male Millennials

Female Millennials

48%

49% 30%

42%

34%

25%

26%

38%

Snacks

36%

26%

30%

29% 52%

35%

48%

36% 16%

23%

45%

32%

36%

Healthy Eating

43%

27%

35%

12% 54%

30% 34%

49%

22% 24%

36%

Eating Habits

Beverages

5

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

133

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

REPORT FOR MILLENNIAL PROJECT

Topic Breakdowns Snacks: Sweet vs. Salty Salty 19%

81% Sweets

Salty Snacks Keywords

el tz Pr e

rs ke ac

hip at

Po t

Cr

ac Sn

oC

kin

g

s

m Cr ea

Ice

Ca

ke

Co ok ie

y nd Ca

Su

ga

r

Sweet Snack Keywords

ks rin yD

rg En e

Dr

Co ffe e

ink

s

e ak

ht Lig

Pr o

te

in

Sh

Di Ju

ice

Te a

et

lk Mi

So

da

Beverages Keywords

6

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

134

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


EXCERPT

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

REPORT FOR MILLENNIAL PROJECT

Topic: Health Food Among Hispanic Millennials

Eating: Healthy vs. Habits

Habit

34% 66%

Healthy

a Tu n

on lm Sa

li oc

co

d Br

oo af Se

en ut Gl

ss

We ig

ht

Lo

alt He

Fr ee

s od Fo

Di hy

Ap

ple

s

et

Healthy Eating Keywords

e ns ea Cl

ian

Ve g

et ar

to x De

Di et

o Pa le

as

n

Eating Habits Keywords

Ve g

SECTION I

7

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

135

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 2 CONSUMER

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EXCERPT

REPORT FOR MILLENNIAL PROJECT

Insights ✓

✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

✓ ✓

Trying but Failing at Losing Weight: - When Hispanics talk about the food to eat when losing weight, 55% of them mention they are trying to lose weight but falling short of their goals. Its interesting to note that Hispanic Millennials are not as vocal about this as their older peers, mentioning their failings 53% of the time compared to their older peers who mention it 57% of the time. Hispanics passionate about Almond Milk: - Hispanics of all ages were found to discuss almond milk at a significantly higher rate than other types of milk such as lactose free, soy, skim, or fat free milks. One third (33%) of Hispanic Millennial mentions of milk were about Almond milk which far surpassed other mentions. Hispanic Millennials quick to Share Content about Hopeful Diets: - Nearly 50% of the conversation about candy from Hispanic Millennials was related to a new study released indicating that candy may actually help to lose weight. Hispanic Millennials less Serious when conversing Vegetarian & Vegan Diets: - Hispanic Millennials joked at a much higher level about Vegetarian and Vegan diets (70% and 74% respectively) when compared with their elder Non-Millennial peers (38% and 51% respectively). The word Sugar has a negative connotation with Hispanic Millennials: - 40% of Hispanic Millennials spoke about sugar in a negative light. The importance of a Healthy Diet, not Losing Weight: - When comparing conversations from Hispanic Millennials that were either about living a healthy lifestyle or about losing weight it was found that 75% of the conversation was about maintaining a healthy diet, versus 25% about losing weight. This is roughly the same for their older peers which discussed a healthy diet 80% of the time. Hispanic Millennials likely to Juice or drink Protein Shakes: - When comparing conversations from Hispanic Millennials that were about a specific type of diet such as Cleanses, Detoxes, Organic, Gluten Free, Juicing, Veganism and more, the two that had the most conversation were a Juice Diet and a Protein Shake Diet. These two combined amounted for 60% of the conversation (Juicing - 35%, Protein Shakes - 25%). Among their older peers Juicing was equally as popular (39%) while Protein Shakes were not of interest (5%). Hispanic Millennials ask for Diet Advice half as often as their Older Peers: - When reviewing conversations related to sharing opinions or asking for opinions on diet, Hispanic Millennials were found to ask for guidance only 9% of the time compared to 20% for non-Millennial Hispanics. Hispanic Millennials ⅓ as likely to share tips for healthy diets when compared to non-Millennials: - Out of all conversation researched, Hispanic Millennials shared tips for dieting only 9% of the time while 27% of conversation from older Hispanics was dieting tips. Hispanic Millennials more inspired by salty snacks then sugary snacks: - Hispanic Millennials spoke much more favorably about salty snacks (chips, crackers etc) when compared with sweets (chocolate, donuts, etc) and with far less negativity, 13% versus 31% respectively.

8

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

136

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

137

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NO OTHER ORGANIZATION UNITES AS MANY PEOPLE TO FIGHT POVERTY IN AS MANY WAYS. Valley of the Sun United Way is a proud supporter of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

UNI T E A G A IN S T T HE C YC L E . Ã&#x161;NETE EN CONTRA DEL CICLO.

vsuw.org UW084_DATOS Print Ad_Spanish.indd 1

8/10/17 5:01 PM


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

HISPANICS ARE NARROWING THE INTERNET GAP Hispanics are Narrowing the Internet Gap

84%

81%

89% 64%

72%

80%

Internet Usage Among U.S. Adults by Race and Ethnicity

2009

2015

White

Black

Hispanic

INTERNET USAGE AMONG U.S. ADULTS BY RACE AND ETHNICITY Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 Foreign-born Latinos Are Gradually Narrowing the Internet Gap http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/ Latino Internet Usage (U.S. vs. Foreign Born) % who say they use the internet

FOREIGN-BORN LATINOS ARE GRADUALLY NARROWING THE INTERNET GAP % WHO SAY THEY USE THE INTERNET

91%

85%

78% 51%

2009

2016

U.S. born

Foreign born

LATINO INTERNET USAGE (U.S. VS. FOREIGN BORN) Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 139 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3 English-dominant Hispanics Are More Connected to the Internet

Internet Usage Among Latino Adults by Language Dominance

86%

36%

74%

76%

87%

94%

ENGLISH-DOMINANT HISPANICS ARE MORE CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET

2009

2015

English Dominant

Bilingual

Spanish Dominant

INTERNET USAGE AMONG LATINO ADULTS BY LANGUAGE DOMINANCE Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

YOUNGER HISPANICS ARE MORE CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET Younger Hispanics Are More Connected to the Internet

Internet Usage Among Latinos by Age Group (2015)

% who say they use the internet

93%

18- 29

3 0 -4 9

42%

67%

95%

% WHO SAY THEY USE THE INTERNET

50-64

65+

INTERNET USAGE AMONG LATINOS BY AGE GROUP (2015) Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

140

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 3

TECHNOLOGY % who say they use the internet

HISPANIC FAMILIES WITH HIGHER INCOME ARE MORE CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET Hispanic Families with Higher Income Are More Connected to the Internet

Internet Usage Among Latinos by Family Income (2014)

79%

90%

97%

% WHO SAY THEY USE THE INTERNET

LESS THAN $30,000

$30, 000 T O $49, 000

$50, 000 O R M O RE

INTERNET USAGE AMONG LATINOS BY FAMILY INCOME (2014) Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/ % who say they use the internet Higher Educated Hispanics Are More Connected to the Internet Internet Usage Among Latinos by Educational Attainment

HIGHER EDUCATED HISPANICS ARE MORE CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET 95%

67%

88%

% WHO SAY THEY USE THE INTERNET

L E S S T H A N HI G H S C H O O L

HI GH SC HO O L GRA D UA T E

SO M E C O LLEGE O R MOR E

INTERNET USAGE AMONG LATINOS BY EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 141 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

DATO S


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

INTERNET USAGE AMONG HISPANICS CONTINUES TO STEADILY INCREASE

% who say they use the internet

Internet Usage Among Hispanics Continues to Steadily Increase

% WHO SAY THEY USE THE INTERNET

87% 80%

78%

77%

72%

78%

66% 64%

65%

2009

2010

White

2012

Black

89% 84% 81%

2015

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

MOBILE INTERNET USAGE POPULAR WITH HISPANICS 18-49

35%

58%

89%

94%

Mobile Internet Usage Popular with Hispanics 18-49 Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 Mobile Internet Usage Among Latinos by Age (2015) http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

18- 29

3 0 -4 9

50-64

65+

MOBILE INTERNET USAGE AMONG LATINOS BY AGE (2015) Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 142 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

DATO S


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

% of Latino adults saying they access the internet on a Mobile Internet Usage by Dominant Language Mobile Internet Usage Among Latinos by Language Dominance cellphone, tablet or other mobile device, at least occasiona

MOBILE INTERNET USAGE BY DOMINANT LANGUAGE

71%

83%

86%

% OF LATINO ADULTS SAYING THEY ACCESS THE INTERNET ON A CELLPHONE, TABLET OR OTHER MOBILE DEVICE, AT LEAST OCCASIONALLY

E N GL I S H D O M I NA NT

BI LI N GUA L

SPA N I SH D O M I N A NT

MOBILE INTERNET USAGE AMONG LATINOS BY LANGUAGE DOMINANCE Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

EDUCATION LEVEL DETERMINES MOBILE INTERNET USAGE BY HISPANICS Education Level Determines Mobile Internet Usage by Hispanics

% of Latino adults saying they access the internet on a cellphone, tablet or other mobile device, at least occasionally

63%

83%

91%

% OF LATINO ADULTS SAYING THEY ACCESS THE INTERNET ON A CELLPHONE, TABLET OR OTHER MOBILE DEVICE, AT LEAST OCCASIONALLY

L E S S T H A N HI G H S C H O O L

HI GH SC HO O L GRA D UA T E

SO M E C O LLEGE O R MOR E

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

143

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

HISPANIC FAMILIES WITH HIGHER INCOMES ARE MORE CONNECTED TO MOBILE INTERNET Hispanic Families with Higher Incomes Are More Connected to Mobile Internet

Mobile Internet Usage Among Latinos by Family Income (2014)

% of Latino adults saying they access the internet on a cellphone, tablet or other mobile device, at least occasionally

77%

84%

94%

% OF LATINO ADULTS SAYING THEY ACCESS THE INTERNET ON A CELLPHONE, TABLET OR OTHER MOBILE DEVICE, AT LEAST OCCASIONALLY

LESS THAN $30,000

$30, 000 T O $49, 000

$50, 000 O R M O RE

MOBILE INTERNET USAGE AMONG LATINOS BY FAMILY INCOME (2014) Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

Source: Pew Research Center, Digital Divide Narrows for Latinos as More Spanish Speakers and Immigrants Go Online, 2016 Internet and Email Use by Race/Ethnicity http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/07/20/digital-divide-narrows-for-latinos-as-more-spanish-speakers-and-immigrants-go-online/

INTERNET AND EMAIL USE BY RACE/ETHNICITY 16%

20%

27%

84%

80%

73%

WHITE

B L A CK

Yes

HIS PA NIC

No

DO YOU USE THE INTERNET OR EMAIL, AT LEAST OCCASIONALLY? Do you use the internet or email, at least occasionally?

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/ 144

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

MOBILE INTERNET USE BY RACE/ETHNICITY Mobile Internet Use by Race/Ethnicity

23%

18%

17%

77%

82%

83%

WHITE

B L A CK

HIS PA NIC

DO YOU ACCESS THE INTERNET ON A CELLPHONE, TABLET OR OTHER MOBILE HANDHELD DEVICE, OR AT LEAST OCCASIONALLY? Yes

No

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

CELLPHONE DEVICE USE BY RACE/ETHNICITY 72%

20%

8%

7%

7%

20%

28%

65%

73%

Cellphone Device Use by Race/Ethnicity

N O C E L L / U N D E S I G NA T E D C E L L

C ELL, N O T A SM A RT PHO N E

White

Black

2 0 1 7

145

C ELL, SM A RT PHO NE

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

DATO S

A Z

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

DEVICE USE BY RACE/ETHNICITY 92%

93%

61%

49%

45%

20%

14%

12%

42%

58%

79%

93%

Device Use by Race/Ethnicity

H AN D H E L D D E V I C E FO R E- B O O K S

T A B L E T C O M P U T ER

White

D ESK T O P O R LA PT O P

Black

C ELLPHONE

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

Hispanics Are Strong Users of Messaging Based Apps

HISPANICS ARE STRONG USERS OF MESSAGING-BASED APPS

White

LI N K ED I N

PI N T EREST

Black

Hispanic

29%

42% 43% 21%

WHATSAPP

29% 30% 31%

30%

39%

TWITTER

19% 23% 30%

SN A P C H A T

20% 27%

35% 18% 20%

35%

78% 85% 78%

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 Social Media Use by Race/Ethnicity http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

I N ST A GRA M

FACEBOOK

SOCIAL MEDIA USE BY RACE/ETHNICITY Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 146 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/ T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7

DATO S


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

PERCEPTION OF INFORMATION VOLUME BY RACE/ETHNICITY

21%

25%

28%

69%

66%

73%

Perception of Information Volume by Race/Ethnicity

H A V I N G A L O T O F I N FO R M A T I O N A V A I L A B L E H E L P S S I M P L I F Y M Y LI F E

White

T HE V O LUM E O F I N F O RM A T I O N A V A I LA BLE M A K ES M Y LI F E SEE M MOR E COMPL EX

Black

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

INTERNET USAGE AMONG HISPANICS MATCHES GENERAL POPULATION Internet Usage Among Hispanics Match General Population

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

HISPANIC INTERNET USAGE AS A PERCENTAGE OF ADULT HISPANIC POPULATION, 2009-2015 Total

Hispanic

Source: NERA, The Latino Effect on Economic Growth, 2016 www.nera.com/content/dam/nera/publications/2016/PUB_LDC_Prosperity_1216.pdf

Source: NERA, The Latino Effect on Economic Growth, 2016 147 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.nera.com/content/dam/nera/publications/2016/PUB_LDC_Prosperity_1216.pdf

DATO S

81%

81%

81%

84%

81%

84%

79%

83%

73%

79%

71%

76%

68%

76%

Hispanic Internet Usage as a Percentage of Adult Hispanic Population (2009-2015) Source: Pew Research Center, Internet, Science, & Technology Project Libraries Survey 2016 http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

2015


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

HISPANICS LEAD IN CELLPHONE OWNERSHIP Hispanics Lead in Cellphone Ownership

Percentage of U.S. Adults who own cellphone or smartphone

A N Y C E LL P H O NE

SM A RT PHO N E

White

Black

23%

23%

17%

75%

77%

72%

98%

94%

94%

PERCENTAGE OF U.S. ADULTS WHO OWN CELLPHONE OR SMARTPHONE

C ELLPHO N E, BUT N O T SM AR TPHONE

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Mobile Fact Sheet, 2017 www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/mobile/

Source: Pew Research Center, Mobile Fact Sheet, 2017 http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/mobile/

PERCENTAGE OF U.S. ADULTS WHO DO NOT USE BROADBAND AT HOME BUT OWN SMARTPHONES BY RACE/ETHNICITY Percentage of U.S. Adults Who Do Not Use Broadband at Home But Own Smartphones (by Race/Ethnicity)

23%

16%

23%

19% 15%

10%

10%

9%

6% 201 3

2015

White

Black

2016

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Mobile Fact Sheet, 2017 www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/mobile/

DATO S

A Z

Source: Pew Research Center, Mobile Fact Sheet, 2017 http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/mobile/

2 0 1 7

148

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3 Older Hispanic Millennials Rely Heavily on Technology for Shopping

OLDER HISPANIC MILLENNIALS RELY HEAVILY ON TECHNOLOGY FOR SHOPPING

LIST/NOTES FUNCTION ON SMARTPHONE/TABLET

MOBILE APPLICATION

SMARTPHONE GROCERY/MEAL PLANNING APP

TEXT MESSAGES

SOCIAL NETWORKING

WEBSITES

30% 27%

25%

24% 19% 22%

17%

24% 16%

15% 12%

10%

10%

16%

19%

22%

21%

MOBILE WEBSITES

9%

14%

17%

18% 14% 11% 9% GROUP BUYING SITES

25% 26%

30%

Percentage of Hispanic Buyers that use Interactive Tools/Sites for Planning Shopping (2015)

EMAIL

PERCENTAGE OF HISPANIC BUYERS THAT USE INTERACTIVE TOOLS/SITES FOR PLANNING SHOPPING, 2015 U.S. Shoppers

Hispanic Shoppers

Older Hispanic Millennials (25-34)

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study 4th Edition, 2015 www.acosta.com/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=10737420343&libID=10737420344

Source: Acosta, The Why Behind the Buy: U.S. Hispanic Shopper Study 4th Edition, 2015 http://www.acosta.com/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=10737420343&libID=10737420344

NEARLY 9-IN-10 HISPANICS USE THE INTERNET FREQUENTLY Nearly 9-in-10 Hispanics use the Internet Frequently

Percentage of U.S. Adults who use the Internet by Race/Ethnicity

81% 78% 71%

72%

84%

85%

85%

79%

80%

81%

79%

79%

2013

2014

77%

87% 82%

88% 88% 85%

81%

72% 68% 2010

2011

2012

2015

PERCENTAGE OF U.S. ADULTS WHO USE THE INTERNET BY RACE/ETHNICITY White

Black

1 7

149

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet/Broadband Fact Sheet, 2017 www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/internet-broadband/

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet/Broadband Fact Sheet, 2017 A Z 2 0 http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/internet-broadband/

DATO S

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

U.S. ADULTS WHO ARE HOME BROADBAND USERS, PERCENTAGE BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2012-1016 U.S. Adults Who Are Home Broadband Users (Percentage by Race/Ethnicity, 2012-1016)

Black

56%

65%

55% 58%

53%

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet/Broadband Fact Sheet, 2017 www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/internet-broadband/

Source: Pew Research Center, Internet/Broadband Fact Sheet, 2017 http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/internet-broadband/

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

150

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

NOV-16

SEP-16

OCT-16

JUL-16

AUG-16

JUN-16

APR-16

MAY-16

MAR-16

JAN-16

47%

FEB-16

DEC-15

NOV-15

SEP-15

OCT-15

47%

JUL-15

MAR-15

JAN-15

FEB-15

DEC-14

NOV-14

SEP-14

OCT-14

JUL-14

AUG-14

JUN-14

APR-14

White

MAY-14

MAR-14

JAN-14

FEB-14

DEC-13

NOV-13

SEP-13

OCT-13

JUL-13

AUG-13

50%

JUN-13

APR-13

MAY-13

MAR-13

FEB-13

JAN-13

56%

53%

49%

DEC-12

SEP-12

JUL-12

AUG-12

JUN-12

APR-12

MAY-12

FEB-12

NOV-12

47%

44%

52%

66%

AUG-15

53%

51%

MAR-12

62%

70%

78%

75%

73%

71%

JUN-15

54%

64%

70%

60%

OCT-12

57%

74%

APR-15

69% 70%

74%

MAY-15

72%


SECTION I

CHAPTER 3 TECHNOLOGY

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CASE STUDY

LATINAS IN STEM LEADING THE WAY BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

The stereotype is that girls play with dolls, boys play with trucks and a career in technology is a guy thing.

"We (volunteer) every Saturday and see 60 or so kids building and creating robots," Camila Treviño, a member of the group, says. "So what keeps us going is the little boys and girls telling us, 'I want to be just like you,' and (we) get inspired by that because not only are they the future of engineering but we helped guide them."

Don't tell that to the brilliant young women from the Degrees of Freedom, a group that challenges those stereotypes and proves that women can excel just as much as men when it comes to pursuing a career in the fields of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math).

It's guidance and inspiration that's needed. According to the National Council for Women and Information Technology, there will be around 1.4 million computer specialist job openings expected in the U.S. by 2020.

Degrees of Freedom is a project of Si Se Puede Foundation created by Alberto Esparza. The group consists of predominantly Latinas from East Valley High School, which also features the first all-girls robotics team in Arizona.

"When I was younger I thought the most prestigious [job] I could [do] was becoming a teacher," Treviño says. "I never imagined I could be working as an engineer.…I can work in different countries with a lot of engineers from all over the world and there is also a lot of money involved in it."

Esparza says he told himself one day, "Why don't I bring robotics to the East Valley to communities deemed at risk. Your zip code shouldn't dictate whether or not these programs are available."

Today, women still make up a small percentage of the programmers, engineers and scientists around the world. Degrees of Freedom's overall impact on those numbers may be small, but the effect the program has on the lives of these young girls is immeasurable.

The girls of Degrees of Freedom have proven Esparza right. The group addresses the larger cultural influences that deter many young women from the STEM fields.

FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

The girls don't just spend their time tinkering and studying. The group is involved in community service projects, mentoring and teaching younger students interested in robotics. They volunteer at senior citizen centers instructing the elderly to use tech like Skype to help them stay in touch with their grandchildren. Aside from the community outreach, Degrees of Freedom participants compete statewide. In March they traveled to Flagstaff for a regional robotics competition with the goal of winning recognition as the rookie all-star team. They came up short, but placed seventh among more than 50 teams. Esparza's Si Se Puede Foundation partners with schools all over the Valley, offering programs for a range of ages. His only rule is that they don't charge students to participate. He says he has seen 85 students go on to study engineering at a variety of different universities.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

151

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

THE PHOENIX DIGITAL HISPANIC

HISPANICS ARE CONNECTED, ON MOBILE AND ON SOCIAL MEDIA

1.0 MILLION HISPANICS 18+ IN PHOENIX

ONLINE

MOBILE

SOCIAL

900,000

890,000

740,000

ARE ONLINE

OWN MOBILE DEVICES

USE SOCIAL MEDIA COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough Hispanic Study, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016-Jan 2017), Phoenix DMA, A18+. "Mobile Device" defined as a Smartphone or Tablet. "Use Social Media" defined as any time spent on Social Media.

AND IT'S THE The BEGINNING AndJUST It’s Just Beginning

HISPANICS ARE TURNING TO NEW TECHNOLOGY FASTER NON-HISPANICS Hispanics are turning to new technology fasterTHAN than Non-Hispanics MOBILE DEVICE OWNERSHIP

ACCESS THE INTERNET 93%

83% 72% 46%

67%

93%

88% 90%

75%

SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE

94%

91%

77%

94%

91%

67%

62%

60%

61%

2014

2015

67% 64%

71%

89%

48% 87%

2014

2015

2016

2 017

2 014

2015

2016

Hispanic

2017

2016

2017

Non-Hispanic

COURTESY OF defined as access Source:Scarborough Scarborough Hispanic Study, 2014-2017 Release 1,2014-2017 Phoenix DMA, A18+. "Mobile Device" defined as aDMA, SmartphoneA18+. or Tablet.“Mobile "Access Device” defined as a Smartphone or Tablet. “Access the Internet” Source: Hispanic Study, Release 1, Phoenix the Internet" –defined access the internet Media” – yes. "Use Social Media" defined as anytime time spent on Socialon Media. the internet yes.as“Use Social defined as any spent Social Media.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

152

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

PHOENIX HISPANIC SMARTPHONE/TABLET OWNERSHIP AND USAGE 91%

OF PHOENIX HISPANICS OWN A SMARTPHONE

60%

Vs. 81% for Non-Hispanics

OF PHOENIX HISPANICS OWN A TABLET Vs. 61% for Non-Hispanics

VARIOUS WAYS HISPANICS USE INTERNET/APPS ON SMARTPHONE VS TABLET SOCIAL NETWORKING

SMART PHONE TABLET

SEARCH (GOOGLE, YAHOO, ETC.)

MAPS/GPS

LISTEN TO FIND A INSTANT ONLINE MUSIC BUSINESS MESSAGING SERVICE (PANDORA, ETC.) INFORMATION

WEATHER

BANKING

SHOPPING

VIDEO CLIPS (YOUTUBE, ETC.)

69% 61% 59% 54% 49% 49% 46% 46% 39% 38% 23% 37% 12% 15% 21% 11% 14% 10% 13% 20% COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough Hispanic Study, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016-Jan 2017), Phoenix DMA, A18+. Base for Internet app %'s: A18+ who own a smartphone, A18+ who own a tablet.

PHOENIX HISPANICS ARE ONLINE SHOPPERS AMONG HISPANIC ADULTS 18+

73% PURCHASED AN ITEM ONLINE Representing Nearly 25% of All Internet Consumers In Phoenix TOP ITEMS SHOPPED ONLINE IN PHOENIX ITEM SHOPPED

HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

CLOTHING OR ACCESSORIES HEALTH AND BEAUTY ITEMS HOME ACCESSORIES BOOKS MOVIE TICKETS AIRLINE TICKETS FURNITURE/HOME FURNISHINGS GROCERIES, CANDY, OR OTHER FOOD ITEMS

53% 31% 30% 27% 24% 23% 21% 20%

ITEM SHOPPED MUSIC DOWNLOADS (ITUNES, ETC.) TOYS OR GAMES INSURANCE OFFICE SUPPLIES PET SUPPLIES SPORTS LOGO APPAREL VEHICLE (CAR, TRUCK, SUV, ETC.)

Source: Scarborough Hispanic Study, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016-Jan 2017), Phoenix DMA, A18+. Base: access the internet.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

TOTAL YEARLY SPENDING HISPANIC % COMPOSITION 19% 18% 16% 15% 15% 15% 14%

$377 MILLION SPENT ON ONLINE PURCHASES BY PHOENIX HISPANICS IN THE PAST YEAR COURTESY OF

153

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

THE TUCSON DIGITAL HISPANIC

HISPANICS ARE CONNECTED, ON MOBILE AND ON SOCIAL MEDIA

308 THOUSAND HISPANICS 18+ IN TUCSON

ONLINE

MOBILE

SOCIAL

273,000

268,000

212,000

ARE ONLINE

OWN MOBILE DEVICES

USE SOCIAL MEDIA COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016-Jan 2017), Tucson DMA, A18+. "Mobile Device" defined as a Smartphone or Tablet. "Use Social Media" defined as any time spent on Social Media.

AND And IT'S JUST THE The BEGINNING It’s Just Beginning

HISPANICS ARE TURNING TO NEW TECHNOLOGY FASTER NON-HISPANICS Hispanics are turning to new technology fasterTHAN than Non-Hispanics MOBILE DEVICE OWNERSHIP

67%

73%

81% 80%

SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE

ACCESS THE INTERNET 91%

87%

91%

91%

88%

84%

89% 87%

68% 58%

57%

59%

55%

57%

2014

2015

66% 67%

69% 63%

84% 82%

2014

2015

2016

2017

2 014

2015

2016

Hispanic

2017

2016

2017

Non-Hispanic

OF Source:Scarborough, Scarborough, 2014-20172014-2017 Release 1, TucsonRelease DMA, A18+. "Mobile Device"DMA, defined asA18+. a Smartphone or Tablet. "Access the Internet" Source: “Mobile Device” defined as a Smartphone or Tablet. “Access the Internet” definedCOURTESY as access the internet – defined as access the internet – yes. "Use Social Media" defined as1,anyTucson time spent on Social Media. yes. “Use Social Media” defined as any time spent on Social Media.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

154

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

TECHNOLOGY

CHAPTER 3

TUCSON HISPANIC SMARTPHONE/TABLET OWNERSHIP AND USAGE 80%

OF TUCSON HISPANICS OWN A SMARTPHONE

55%

Vs. 73% for Non-Hispanics

OF TUCSON HISPANICS OWN A TABLET Vs. 57% for Non-Hispanics

VARIOUS WAYS HISPANICS USE INTERNET/APPS ON SMARTPHONE VS TABLET SOCIAL NETWORKING

SMART PHONE TABLET

SEARCH (GOOGLE, YAHOO, ETC.)

MAPS/GPS

LISTEN TO FIND INSTANT ONLINE MUSIC BUSINESS MESSAGING SERVICE (PANDORA, ETC.) INFORMATION

WEATHER

BANKING

LISTEN TO RADIO (LOCAL OR INTERNET RADIO)

VIDEO CLIPS (YOUTUBE, ETC.)

70% 74% 53% 53% 45% 43% 45% 50% 33% 41% 25% 34% 9% 11% 13% 7% 6% 16% 7% 15% COURTESY OF

Source: Scarborough, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016-Jan 2017), Tucson DMA, A18+. Base for Internet app %'s: A18+ who own a smartphone, A18+ who own a tablet.

TUCSON HISPANICS ARE ONLINE SHOPPERS AMONG HISPANIC ADULTS 18+

67% PURCHASED AN ITEM ONLINE Representing Nearly 33% of All Internet Consumers In Tucson TOP ITEMS SHOPPED ONLINE IN TUCSON ITEM SHOPPED

TOTAL YEARLY SPENDING

HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

ITEM SHOPPED

HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

42% 23% 27% 23% 21% 20% 19%

MUSIC DOWNLOADS (ITUNES, ETC.) TOYS OR GAMES CONSUMER ELECTRONICS OFFICE SUPPLIES MEDICINE/PRESCRIPTIONS

12%

CLOTHING OR ACCESSORIES HEALTH AND BEAUTY ITEMS HOME ACCESSORIES BOOKS MOVIE TICKETS AIRLINE TICKETS FURNITURE/HOME FURNISHINGS GROCERIES, CANDY, OR OTHER FOOD ITEMS

OTHER PRODUCT OR SERVICE OTHER TRAVEL RESERVATIONS (HOTELS, AUTO RENTAL, ETC.)

18%

Source: Scarborough, 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016-Jan 2017),Tucson DMA, A18+. Base: access the internet.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

20% 20% 15% 16% 14% 14%

$102 MILLION SPENT ON ONLINE PURCHASES BY TUCSON HISPANICS IN THE PAST YEAR COURTESY OF

155

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


Building Better Communities When we collaborate to address the root causes of issues affecting health and well-being in Arizona, our potential for success knows no bounds. We invite you to join us to help build a more vibrant state. Learn more and get connected at livewellaz.org

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

156

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

TIME SPENT WEEKLY ON NEWS BY ETHNICITY AND TYPE OF MEDIA OUTLET Time Spent Weekly on News by Ethnicity and Type of Media Outlet

Figures in minutes

338 245 262

282

169

176

0

23 19 18 19

76 71 59 70

81

142 91

130

242

261

339

370

402

FIGURES IN MINUTES

N AT IO N A L B R O A D C A S T T V N E WS

LOCAL TV NEWS

N A T I O N A L CA BLE T V N EWS

White

Hispanic

PC V I EWS

Black

SM A RT PHO N E N EWS

RADIO NEWS *

Asian American

*NO DATA AVAILABLE FOR ASIAN AMERICANS IN RADIO NEWS CATEGORY Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html

WHITES CONSUME SIGNIFICANTLY MORE NEWS THAN OTHER RACES/ETHNICITIES 81%

85%

*No data available for Asian Americans in Radio News Category

N AT IO N A L B R O A D C A S T T V N E WS

0

9% 6%

13% 9% 5%

11% 8% 4%

13% 4%

5%

3%

2%

12% 15%

13% 21%

71%

77%

80%

81%

Whites Consume Significantly More News Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 Than Other Races/Ethnicities http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html

LOCAL TV NEWS

NA T I O N A L CA BLE T V N EWS

White

Hispanic

PC N EWS

Black

SM A RT PHO N E N EWS

RADIO NEWS *

Asian American

*NO DATA AVAILABLE FOR ASIAN AMERICANS IN RADIO NEWS CATEGORY Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html

DATO S

Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 157 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z *No data available for Asian Americans in Radio News O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html Category


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

WEEKLY TIME SPENT ON VARIOUS MEDIA AMONG U.S. POPULATION Weekly Time Spent on Various Media Among U.S. Population Figures in minutes

DVR/TIM ESHIFTED TV

819

AM/FM RADIO*

DVD/BLU-RAY DEVICE

Total

Black

I N TERN ET ON A PC

Hispanic

V I DEO ON A PC

44 73 74 39

M UL TI M EDI A DEV I C E

108 138 106 81

GA M E C ON SOL E

332 347 266 192

120 113 117 181

LIVE+DVR/TIME SHIFT ED TV

111 130 113 67

0

52 57 52 35

207 94 128 115

749 782 800

895

1069 1214 1185

1409

1855

2618

FIGURES IN MINUTES

A PP/WEB ON A SM A RTPHON E

VID E O O N A S MAR T P H O N E

Asian American

*NO DATA AVAILABLE FOR ASIAN AMERICANS IN AM/FM RADIO CATEGORY Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html

Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html

*No data available for Asian Americans in AM/FM Radio Category

MEDIA USAGE BY RACE/ETHNICITY IN THE U.S. BY PERCENTAGE

79 81 80

23

38 35 30

58 54 48 32

GA ME C ONSOLE

34 29 35

28 28 32 23

DVD/BLU-RAY DEV ICE

0

34 28 31 24

48

57 53

65 66

69

84

85

94 96 96

97 97 98

92 94 100

Media Usage by Race/Ethnicity in the U.S. (by Percentage)

LI V E +D VR/ TIM ESHI F TED TV

DVR/ TIMESH IFTED TV

AM/FM RADIO*

Total

Black

MULT IMEDIA DEVIC E

Hispanic

INT ERNET ON A PC

VIDEO ON A PC

A PP/WEB ON A SMA RT PHONE

VIDEO ON A S MA R T PH ON E

Asian American

*NO DATA AVAILABLE FOR ASIAN AMERICANS IN AM/FM RADIO CATEGORY Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 158 T H E S T AT E O F A R I*No data available for Asian Americans in AM/FM Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html Radio Category


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

MOBILE DEVICE PENETRATION AMONG ADULT SUBSCRIBERS

COMPOSITE

WHITE

BLA C K

96%

HI SPA N I C

Smartphone

4%

6%

9%

91%

94%

11%

13%

87%

89%

Mobile Device Penetration Among Adult Subscribers

A SI A N AMER ICAN

Feature Phone

NOTE: A Feature Phone is a cellphone that contains a fixed set of functions beyond voice calling and text messaging, but is not as extensive as a smartphone. For example, feature phones may offer Web browsing and e-mail, but they generally cannot download apps from an online marketplace. Source: www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/62894/feature-phone

Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017

www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html NOTE: A Feature Phone is a cellphone that contains a fixed set of functions beyond voice calling and text messaging, but is not as extensive as a smartphone. For example, feature phones may offer Web browsing and e-mail, but they generally cannot download apps from an online marketplace. SOURCE: www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/62894/feature-phone Source: Nielsen, The Nielsen Total Audience Report: Q4 2016, April 2017 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html Weekly National Black & Hispanic Radio Listeners (2012-2016)

WEEKLY NATIONAL BLACK & HISPANIC RADIO LISTENERS, 2012-2016 In millions

31.2

31.1

30.8 2013

2014

Hispanic

31.8

40.1

40.0

39.5 30.9

39.0 2012

41.3

FIGURES IN MILLIONS

2015

2016

Black

Source: Nielsen, State of Media: Audio Today - A Focus on Black & Hispanic Audiences, September 2016 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2016/audio-today-focus-on-black-and-hispanic-audiences.html

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

159

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Nielsen, State of Media: Audio Today - A Focus on Black & Hispanic Audiences, September 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2016/audio-today-focus-on-black-and-hispanic-audiences.html


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

RADIO IS THE LEADING MEDIA DEVICE AMONG BLACKS & HISPANICS Radio is the Leading Media Device Among Blacks & Hispanics

RADIO

TV

S M A R T PHO N E

PC

Hispanic

T V -C O N N EC T ED D EV I C E

28%

19%

40%

37%

45%

51%

75%

87%

90%

90%

92%

97%

Weekly Reach (% of Population)

TABL ET

Black

WEEKLY REACH (% OF POPULATION) Source: Nielsen, State of Media: Audio Today - A Focus on Black & Hispanic Audiences, September 2016 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2016/audio-today-focus-on-black-and-hispanic-audiences.html

Source: Nielsen, State of Media: Audio Today - A Focus on Black & Hispanic Audiences, September 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2016/audio-today-focus-on-black-and-hispanic-audiences.html

TOP RADIO FORMATS FOR HISPANICS, 2015 Top Radio Formats for Hispanics (2015)

% share of total listening

9.1%

PO P C O N T EM PO RA RY HI T S

SPA N I SH C O N T EM PO RA RY

6.3%

6.7%

9.0%

16.3%

% SHARE OF TOTAL LISTENING

SP A N I S H A D U L T H I T S

A D U L T C O NT E M P O R A R Y

M EX I C AN R EG IONAL

Source: Nielsen, State of Media: Audio Today - A Focus on Black & Hispanic Audiences, September 2016 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2016/audio-today-focus-on-black-and-hispanic-audiences.html

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

160

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Nielsen, State of Media: Audio Today - A Focus on Black & Hispanic Audiences, September 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2016/audio-today-focus-on-black-and-hispanic-audiences.html


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

Top 10 Hispanic Radio Markets (Metro vs. Hispanic Population)

TOP 10 HISPANIC RADIO MARKETS (METRO VS. HISPANIC POPULATION) Number of listeners

Metro 12+ Population

1,990,600 1,044,800

3,504,100 958,600

DALLAS-FT. WORTH SAN FRANCISCO

2,047,500 1,051,400

CHICAGO

6,601,300 1,461,300

HOUSTONGALVESTON

5,794,200 1,512,600

MIAMI-FT. LAUDERDALE

1,607,600

5,564,400 1,878,200

NEW YORK

7,974,700

3,968,900 2,020,900

LOS ANGELES

3,913,200

4,869,000

11,419,500

16,278,300

NUMBER OF LISTENERS

RIVERSIDE-SAN BERNARDINO

SAN ANTONIO

PHOENIX

Hispanic 12+ Population

Source: Nielsen, State of Media: Audio Today - A Focus on Black & Hispanic Audiences, September 2016 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2016/audio-today-focus-on-black-and-hispanic-audiences.html

Source: Nielsen, State of Media: Audio Today - A Focus on Black & Hispanic Audiences, September 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2016/audio-today-focus-on-black-and-hispanic-audiences.html

U.S. SOCIAL NETWORK USERS BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2013-2019 U.S. Social Network Users by Race/Ethnicity (2013-2019)

Users in millions

USERS IN MILLIONS

144.4

105.1

27.2 21.3 8.3 3.8

2013

4.4

4.2

2014

2015

White

10.5

10.0

9.5

9.0

Black

24.8

24.5

24.0

23.2

22.3

39.4

36.9

34.2

32.0

29.6

115.6

113.1

111.1

108.6

10.9

A Z

2 0 1 7

40.6 25.0 11.3

4.7

5.0

5.3

5.6

2016

2017

2018

2019

Asian

Hispanic

Other

Source: eMarketer, Hispanics Make Social a Crucial Part of Digital Lives, 2015 www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Make-Social-Crucial-Part-of-Digital-Lives/1012534

DATO S

117.6

161 THE Source: eMarketer, Hispanics Make Social a Crucial Part of Digital Lives, 2015 https://www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Make-Social-Crucial-Part-of-Digital-Lives/1012534

S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

SOCIAL NETWORK USER PENETRATION Social Network User Penetration (% of Internet Users in Each Group)

% OF INTERNET USERS IN EACH GROUP

79.5%

78.6% 76.6%

77.0%

72.5%

72.7%

80.0%

75.2% 72.9%

72.3%

72.9%

72.8%

72.0%

71.1%

72.1% 69.7%

68.5%

67.8% 67.0%

70.3%

68.5%

70.0%

69.7%

69.1%

66.9%

65.5% 64.9%

68.1%

67.0% 65.7%

64.9%

64.6%

63.8%

2013

73.0% 72.7%

2014

2015

Black

2016

White

2017

Asian

Other

2018

2019

Hispanic

Source: eMarketer, Hispanics Make Social a Crucial Part of Digital Lives, 2015 www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Make-Social-Crucial-Part-of-Digital-Lives/1012534

Source: eMarketer, Hispanics Make Social a Crucial Part of Digital Lives, 2015 https://www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Make-Social-Crucial-Part-of-Digital-Lives/1012534

SOCIAL NETWORK USER SHARE Social Network User Share (% of total)

% OF TOTAL 62.5%

63.4%

61.6%

17.8%

17.0% 16.4% 12.9% 5.0% 2.3%

2013

60.8%

59.8%

19.3%

18.4%

59.0%

20.1%

12.8%

12.9%

12.9%

12.8%

12.6%

5.2%

5.3%

58.8%

20.3%

12.5%

5.4%

5.5%

5.6%

5.6%

2.4%

2.5%

2.5%

2.6%

2.7%

2.8%

2014

2015

2016

White

Source: eMarketer, Hispanics Make Social a Crucial Part of Digital Lives, 2015 www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Make-Social-Crucial-Part-of-Digital-Lives/1012534

DATO S

A Z

Black

2 0 1 7

2017

Asian 162

Other

2018

Hispanic

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: eMarketer, Hispanics Make Social a Crucial Part of Digital Lives, 2015 https://www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Make-Social-Crucial-Part-of-Digital-Lives/1012534

2019


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

ADS MOST LIKELY TO INFLUENCE U.S. HISPANIC ONLINE SHOPPERS, JULY 2014 Ads Most Likely To Influence U.S. Hispanic Online Shoppers (July 2014)

% of respondents

SOCIAL

MO B IL E

O NL INE V IDEO

MA G A Z INES

R A DIO

19%

21%

32%

42%

ONLINE DISPLAY

37%

43%

TV

38%

43%

% OF RESPONDENTS

BI L L BO A RD S

Source: eMarketer, Hispanics Make Social a Crucial Part of Digital Lives, 2015 www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Make-Social-Crucial-Part-of-Digital-Lives/1012534

LANGUAGES SPOKEN BY U.S. IMMIGRANTS, 2015

Source: eMarketer, Hispanics Make Social a Crucial Part of Digital Lives, 2015 Languages Spoken by U.S. Immigrants (2015) https://www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Make-Social-Crucial-Part-of-Digital-Lives/1012534

18%

16%

ENGLISH ONLY SPANISH

2%

CHINESE

3%

HINDI

3%

FILIPINO/TAGALOG

4%

VIETNAMESE FRENCH

5%

KOREAN 43%

6%

ALL OTHER

Source: Pew Research Center, Languages Spoken Among U.S. Immigrants (2015), 2017 www.pewhispanic.org/chart/languages-spoken-among-u-s-immigrants-2015/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

163

Source: Pew Research Center, Languages Spoken Among U.S. Immigrants (2015), 2017 http://www.pewhispanic.org/chart/languages-spoken-among-u-s-immigrants-2015/

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY AMONG U.S. IMMIGRANTS, 1980-2015 English Proficiency Among U.S. Immigrants (1980-2015)

57.2%

53.0%

49.0%

1980

1990

50.4%

50.4%

2013

2014

50.9%

48.4%

2000

2010

2015

Source: Pew Research Center, Statistical Portrait of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States, 2017 www.pewhispanic.org/2017/05/03/statistical-portrait-of-the-foreign-born-population-in-the-united-states-2015/

Source: Pew Research Center, Statistical Portrait of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States, 2017 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2017/05/03/statistical-portrait-of-the-foreign-born-population-in-the-united-states-2015/

PRIMARY LANGUAGE SPOKEN IN U.S. HOMES Primary Language Spoken in U.S. Homes

Number of speakers

924,374

1,063,773

1,117,343

1,399,936

1,613,346

2,047,467

2,896,766

R US S I A N

ARABIC

GERMAN

KOREAN

VIETNAMESE

TAGALOG

FRENCH/FRENCH C R E OL E

CHINESE

37,458,470

879,434

231,122,908

NUMBER OF SPEAKERS

SPANISH

Source: WorldAtlas, The Most Spoken Languages in America, 2017 www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-most-spoken-languages-in-america.html

DATO S

Source: WorldAtlas, The Most Spoken Languages in America, 2017 A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-most-spoken-languages-in-america.html

164

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

ENGLISH


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

TOP 10 LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN U.S. HOMES, 2015 Top 10 Languages Other Than English Spoken in U.S. Homes (2015)

Number of speakers

905,000

933,000

1,109,000

1,157,000

1,266,000

1,468,000

1,737,000

FRENCH CREOLE

RUSSIAN

GERMAN

KOREAN

ARABIC

FRENCH

VIETNAMESE

TAGALOG

3,334,000

863,000

40,046,000

NUMBER OF SPEAKERS

CHINESE

SPANISH/SPANISH CREOLE

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

SPEAKERS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LIMITED ENGLISH POPULATION, 1980-2015 Speakers of Foreign Languages and Limited English Population (1980-2015)

Number of speakers in millions

NUMBER OF SPEAKERS IN MILLIONS

59.5

64.7

46.9 31.7 23.1

21.3

25.2

25.9

2010

2015

13.9

10.2

1980

1990

2000

Speakers of Foreign Languages

Limited English Proficiency

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

165

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS.


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

STATES WITH HIGHEST SHARE OF RESIDENTS WHO SPEAK LIMITED ENGLISH, 2015

NV

HI

NY

TX

9% NJ

14%

FL

14% MA

12%

9%

IL

12%

9%

AZ

12%

9%

NM

12% 9%

19%

States with Highest Share of Residents Who Speak Limited English (2015)

CA

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. Top 10 Languages Spoken by U.S.-Born Limited English Speakers (2015) http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

TOP 10 LANGUAGES SPOKEN BY U.S.-BORN LIMITED ENGLISH SPEAKERS, 2015 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 3%

10%

SPANISH GERMAN CHINESE FRENCH VIETNAMESE YIDDISH ARABIC ITALIAN KOREAN TAGALOG OTHER

3%

76%

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

166

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

U .S .


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

TOP 10 LANGUAGES SPOKEN BY FOREIGNBORN LIMITED ENGLISH SPEAKERS, 2015 Top 10 Languages Spoken by Foreign-Born Limited English Speakers (2015)

SPANISH

14%

CHINESE

1% 1% 2% 2% 2% 3%

VIETNAMESE

3%

ARABIC

KOREAN TAGALOG RUSSIAN 60%

4%

FRENCH CREOLE PORTUGUESE

8%

POLISH OTHER

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. Percentage of Limited English Speakers in Arizona http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

PERCENTAGE OF LIMITED ENGLISH SPEAKERS IN ARIZONA, 1990-2015

1990

2000

2010

8.9%

8.2%

9.9%

11.4%

(1990-2015)

2015

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 167 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

DATO S


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

AGE DISTRIBUTION BY ENGLISH PROFICIENCY, 2015 Age Distribution by English Proficiency (2015)

15.8%

16.2%

65.6%

74.6%

18.6%

9.2% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT SHARE

ENGLISH PROFICIENT SHARE

5 to 17 years old

18 to 64 years old

65+ years old

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 Limited English Population by Race/Ethnicity (2015) MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states Total 25.7 Million

LIMITED ENGLISH POPULATION BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2015 4% 12%

TOTAL

62%

25.7

NON-LATINO WHITE/OTHER NON-LATINO BLACK 22%

MILLION

NON-LATINO ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER LATINO

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

168

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

ource: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS.


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 4

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

English-Proficient Population by Race and Ethnicity (2015)

ENGLISH-PROFICIENT POPULATION BY RACE AND ETHNICITY, 2015 Total 275.9 Million

13% 5% 1%

13%

TOTAL

NON-LATINO WHITE/OTHER

275.9

NON-LATINO BLACK NON-LATINO AMERICAN INDIAN/ ALASKA NATIVE NON-LATINO ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER

MILLION

LATINO 68%

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

NOTES

Source: Migration Policy Institute, Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States, 2016 MPI tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2015 ACS. http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/language-diversity-and-english-proficiency-united-states

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

169

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


Carlos R.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing, 2006 Master of Science in Nursing, 2009 Doctor of Health Administration, Current Student

Success is a family affair When you go back to school, you’re not only proving something to yourself, you’re showing your family it’s never too late to pursue a brighter future.

Education has a ripple effect. | phoenix.edu

Business | Healthcare | Security | Technology | Sciences | Education

The University’s Central Administration is located at 1625 W. Fountainhead Pkwy., Tempe, AZ 85282. ©2017 University of Phoenix, Inc. All rights reserved | BRA-0003424


SECTION I

CHAPTER 4 LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PROFILE

BORN TO BE A VOICE FOR THE LATINO COMMUNITY Alejandra Santamaria could be the poster child for the Univision television network.

to earn a reputation as talented, hardworking and dependable. She readily admits, however, that it took her a while to get the nerve to let her bosses know about her goals and aspirations.

Now the general manager of Univision Arizona, Santamaria says, "If you look at my heart, it's probably in the shape of our logo.

"I knew I wanted to be a general manager at some point," she says, but admits that she did not know how to speak up for herself. "The minute I started to learn how to articulate what I wanted from my career, I got on the fast track." Santamaria eventually rose to become director of local sales for KMEX-TV Univision 34 and KFTR-TV UniMás 46 in Los Angeles. She also served as a senior account executive for KFTR-TV. She had previously also had held jobs in sales at the Hispanic Broadcasting Corp. (HBC).

"I was raised in a house where we had that TV channel on all of the time. Univision was the background of my life," she says. "When I met our local news anchor on a school field trip, you'd have thought I met Tom Cruise." Santamaria was raised in East Los Angeles, the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Growing up, she excelled academically and attended the Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies. Those who knew her back then would have logically assumed that she would pursue a career in musical theater because she appeared in several school plays and remembers really enjoying the experience. By the time she graduated from high school, however, her interests had shifted to mass media and business. When she enrolled at Loyola Marymount University, a private, Jesuit school on the west side of Los Angeles, she focused on those subjects.

Today, Santamaria is a founding member of Univision Communications Inc.'s Women's Leadership Council, an employee resource group designed to prepare the next generation of women leaders. The group gives her the perfect forum to teach other women how to promote their careers. Offered the opportunity come to Phoenix, Santamaria acknowledges that she "was a little nervous about it at first," mainly because she knew the state and especially its Latino community, was still recovering from the fallout of Senate Bill 1070. That bill, passed in 2010, was regarded at the time as the single most anti-immigrant law in the nation. Its approval by the state legislature sparked a national economic boycott and claims that state leaders were racist and anti-Latino.

"I applied to the College of Communication and Fine Arts at Loyola because I thought I might want to work in the news media," Santamaria says. "But I also loved math and science, so I did a minor in business." Though she was accepted by 14 universities across the country, Santamaria never regretted deciding to attend college close to home. Besides the added plus of being near her family, the choice almost certainly led to her career with Univision.

"I had already lived through that," she says, referring to the passage of California's anti-immigrant measure, Proposition 187, in the early 1990s. "But I also knew that Arizona has been moving in the right direction" in an attempt to move past the horrible legacy of SB 1070.

One day while she was at work Santamaria received an unexpected call from her mother, who had just heard that Univision was moving its headquarters from Hollywood to L.A.'s west side. Santamaria at first did not catch her mother's drift–until her mother finally proclaimed, "Mija, you need to apply!"

Santamaria says that one of her major goals as general manager of Univision Arizona is to build and strengthen ties with the state's community and business leaders, in and out of the Latino community, so that more of those leaders better understand that Univision is a valuable and growing segment of Arizona's total media landscape.

Within an hour, Santamaria was on the phone trying to reach the station. She kept calling and within weeks had an interview.

At the same time, the current negative shift in national public sentiment toward Latinos– and especially its undocumented immigrant community–means that Univision will be doubling down to ensure that its stations continue to serve as the vital platform they have become for Latinos nationwide.

"I'll do anything," she told the station's human resources manager at the job interview. "Yolanda was her name," Santamaria says. "She told me, 'Me caes bien,' meaning, 'I like you.'" Santamaria was soon interning at Univision.

"Our community has to get out there, be more vocal and register to vote before the next election," Santamaria says. "We need to express ourselves–and not just by asking nicely–but by prodding and pushing. Univision definitely will be part of the process for [the Latino] community to express its voice."

It was just the break she needed and Santamaria made the best of it. She began her internship in the promotions department, but eventually moved to research and sales. It didn't take long for her

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

171

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

RATINGS AMONG BILINGUAL ADULTS 18-49 Ratings Among Bilingual Adults 18-49 •

Phoenix DMA | M-Su 6A-2A

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.6

0.7

0.7

1.4

PHOENIX DMA | M-SU 6A-2A

Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Nov'16/Feb'17/May'17/Jul'17). Time Period Data, Phoenix DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 Speaking Mostly Spanish, Spanish / English Equally or Mostly English in the Home. Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a. Top 10 stations shown. Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Nov’16/Feb’17/May’17/Jul’17). Time Period Data, Phoenix DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 Speaking Mostly Spanish, Spanish / English Equally or Mostly English in the Home. Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a. Top 10 stations shown.

RATINGS AMONG BILINGUAL ADULTS 18-49 Ratings Among Bilingual Adults 18-49

TUCSON DMA | M-SU 6A-2A

Tucson DMA | M-Su 6A-2A

Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Nov'16/Feb'17/May'17/Jul'17). Time Period Data, Tucson DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 living in Bilingual HH's (Speaking Mostly Spanish, Spanish / English Equally or Mostly English in the Home) ,Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a. Top 10 stations shown. Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Nov’16/Feb’17/May’17/Jul’17). Time Period Data, Tucson DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 living in Bilingual HH’s (Speaking Mostly Spanish, Spanish / English Equally or Mostly English in the Home) ,Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a. Top 10 stations shown.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

172

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.3

0.6

0.6

0.7

0.7

1.0

1.4


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

BROADCAST SHARES SPANISH LANGUAGE 0%

0%

0%

ALL BROADCAST 0%

0% KTVW UNI

25%

4%

KFPH UMA

0%

4% 2% 2%

0%

KPDF AZA

0%

13%

7%

KTAZ TEL

7%

9%

KVPA ETV KMOH IND 25%

KPHE IND

50%

4 BOOK AVG

ADULTS 18-49

PHOENIX

PHOENIX | ADULTS 18-49BROADCAST | 4 BOOKSHARES AVG

20%

9% 11%

11%

UTG Stations Share: 75%

KTVW UNI

KFPH UMA

KSAZ FOX

KNXV ABC

KPNX NBC

KTVK IND

KPHO CBS

KTAZ TEL

KPPX ION

KASW CW

KUTP IND

KAZT IND

KPDF AZA

KVPA ETV

KMOH IND

KPHE IND

UTG Stations Share: 20%

NSI, Phoenix, 4 Book Average: November '16 (10/27/16-11/23/16), February '17 (2/2/17-3/1/17), May '17 (4/27/17-5/24/17) and July'17 Sweep (6/29/17-7/26/17), Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Percentages based on ratings. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a. NSI, Phoenix, 4 Book Average: November ‘16 (10/27/16-11/23/16), February ‘17 (2/2/17-3/1/17), May ‘17 (4/27/17-5/24/17), and July’17 Sweep (6/29/177/26/17), Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Percentages based on ratings. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a.

PHOENIX TV LANDSCAPE

PHOENIX | ADULTS 18-49 | 4 BOOK AVG (NOV'16/FEB'17/MAY'17/JUL'17)

TOTAL DAY AVERAGE AUDIENCE

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5

#6 #7 #8 #9 #10

18,600 11,300 10,800 9,200 8,700

8,000 5,900 5,100 3,700 3,400

NSI, Phoenix, 4 Book Average: November '16 (10/27/16-11/23/16), February '17 (2/2/17-3/1/17), May '17 (4/27/17-5/24/17) and July'17 Sweep (6/29/17-7/26/17), Live+SD, Adult 18-49 Viewers. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

173

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

DID YOU KNOW? OF HISPANIC SPANISH LANGUAGE TV VIEWERS IN PHOENIX SPEAK SPANISH INSIDE THE HOME…

95

%

HOWEVER,

79

%

OF THIS GROUP, ENGLISH IS THEIR LANGUAGE OF CHOICE OUTSIDE THE HOME. COURTESY OF

Hispanic Scarborough Study 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016 – Jan 2017) , Phoenix DMA, (Base: Hispanic Adults 18+); Spanish TV is: Any Univision, UniMás, Telemundo, Azteca, Telexitos and Estrella Watched in the Past 7 Days; Speak any Spanish in the home is defined by speak only Spanish, Spanish more than English, Spanish/English equal and 79% Phoenix Speak English more than Spanish. Speak any English is defined by speakof only English, Spanish more thanHispanics English, Spanish/English equal and English moreSome than Spanish. Spanish

At Home

79% OF PHOENIX HISPANICS SPEAK SOME SPANISH AT HOME 21%

29%

SPANISH ONLY/MOSTLY SPANISH/ENGLISH EQUAL ENGLISH MOSTLY ENGLISH ONLY

26% 24%

COURTESY OF

2016 Nielsen Phoenix Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+, Phoenix DMA

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

174

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

TOP 20 SPANISH LANGUAGE TV ADVERTISERS IN PHOENIX TOP 20 SPANISH LANGUAGE TV ADVERTISERS IN PHOENIX JAN – DEC 2016 ADVERTISER

RANK

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Cox Communications Honda Dealer Assocation Alcock & Assoc Attorney Nissan (Factory) Chevrolet (Factory) Ford Dealer Association Conns Home Plus Store Curacao Exports Joel W Black Attorney Jack In The Box Restaurant

JAN – JUN 2017 ADVERTISER

RANK 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

RANK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Ashley Furniture Mega Furniture Store Volkswagen Factory McDonalds Restaurant Emergency Chiropractic Mannys Air US Senate Candidate Toyota Dealer Association Honda Factory Hastings & Hastings Attorneys

ADVERTISER

RANK 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Cox Communications Honda Dealer Association Nissan Factory Alcock & Assoc Attorney Volkswagen Factory Joel W Black Attorney Jack In The Box Restaurant Conns Home Plus Store Tax Defense Group Law Firm Chevrolet Factory

ADVERTISER Mega Furniture Store Chevrolet Dealer Association Ashley Furniture Ford Dealer Association Campeones Del Cambio Amica Mannys Air Emergency Chiropractic Hastings & Hastings Attorneys Boost Mobile

COURTESY OF

Kantar, Jan-Dec 2016 & Jan-Jun 2017 (Market Advisor 8-9-17), Adjusted Data through 5/31/2017, Phoenix DMA; Spanish TV Stations Include KTVW-UNI, KFPH-UMA & KTAZ-TEL

BROADCAST SHARES TUCSON

BROADCAST SHARES TUCSON | ADULTS 18-49 | 4 BOOK AVG

4 BOOK AVG

ADULTS 18-49

SPANISH LANGUAGE

ALL BROADCAST 0%

0% 20%

4%

4% 2%

13%

9%

KUVE UNI

4%

KFTU UMA KHRR TEL

13%

19%

KUDF AZA

20% 60%

15%

KUVE/KFTU Share: 80%

KUVE UNI

KFTU UMA

KMSB FOX

KVOA NBC

KOLD CBS

KGUN ABC

KTTU IND

KHRR TEL

NHRR ION

KWBA CW

KUDF AZA 17%

KUVE/KFTU Share: 17% COURTESY OF

NSI, Tucson, 4 Book Average: November '16 (10/27/16-11/23/16), February '17 (2/2/17-3/1/17), May '17 (4/27/17-5/24/17) and July'17 Sweep (6/29/17-7/26/17), Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Percentages based on ratings. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a. NSI, Tucson, 4 Book Average: November ‘16 (10/27/16-11/23/16), February ‘17 (2/2/17-3/1/17), May ‘17 (4/27/17-5/24/17), and July’17 Sweep (6/29/177/26/17), Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Percentages based on ratings. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

175

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

TUCSON TV LANDSCAPE

TUCSON | ADULTS 18-49 | 4 BOOK AVG (NOV'16/FEB'17/MAY'17/JUL'17)

TOTAL DAY AVERAGE AUDIENCE

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5

#6 #7 #8 #9 #10

3,400 3,300 2,800 2,500 2,300

1,900 1,700 700 600 500 COURTESY OF

NSI, Tucson, 4 Book Average: November '16 (10/27/16-11/23/16), February '17 (2/2/17-3/1/17), May '17 (4/27/17-5/24/17) and July'17 Sweep (6/29/17-7/26/17), Live+SD, Adult 18-49 Viewers. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a.

DID YOU KNOW? OF HISPANIC SPANISH LANGUAGE TV VIEWERS IN TUCSON SPEAK SPANISH INSIDE THE HOME…

89

%

HOWEVER,

88

%

OF THIS GROUP, ENGLISH IS THEIR LANGUAGE OF CHOICE OUTSIDE THE HOME. COURTESY OF

Scarborough Study 2017 Release 1 (Feb 2016 – Jan 2017) , Tucson DMA, (Base: Hispanic Adults 18+); Spanish Media is: KUVE/KFTU/KHRR Watched in the Past 7 Days (M-Su 4a-2a cume audience); Speak any Spanish in the home is defined by speak only Spanish, Spanish more than English, Spanish/English equal and English more than Spanish. Speak any English is defined by speak only English, Spanish more than English, Spanish/English equal and English more than Spanish.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

176

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CONSUMER CHAPTER 4 BEHAVIOR 80% of Tucson Hispanics Speak Some Spanish At Home

80% OF TUCSON HISPANICS SPEAK SOME SPANISH AT HOME 20%

27%

SPANISH ONLY/MOSTLY SPANISH/ENGLISH EQUAL ENGLISH MOSTLY ENGLISH ONLY 19%

34%

COURTESY OF

2016 Nielsen Phoenix Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+, Tucson DMA

TOP 20 SPANISH LANGUAGE TV ADVERTISERS IN TUCSON

Phoenix Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+, Tucson DMA

TOP 20 SPANISH LANGUAGE TV ADVERTISERS IN TUCSON JAN – DEC 2016 RANK

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

ADVERTISER Cox Communications Nissan Factory Curacao Exports US Senate Candidate Peter Piper Pizza Restaurant Jim Click Local Dealer Toyota Factory Chapman Local Dealer Jack In The Box Restaurant Sam Levitz Furniture Store

RANK 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

JAN – JUN 2017 ADVERTISER

RANK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

McDonalds Restaurant Royal Local Dealer Chevrolet Dealer Association ORielly Local Dealer Conns Home Plus Store Ford Dealer Association Honda Dealer Association Jeep Frys Food AutoAmigo

Kantar, Jan-Dec 2016 & Jan-Jun 2017 (Market Advisor 8-9-17), Adjusted Data through 5/31/2017, Tucson DMA; Spanish TV Stations Include KUVEUNI & KHRR-TEL

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

177

ADVERTISER Peter Piper Pizza Restaurant Toyota Factory Tax Defense Group Law Firm Chapman Local Dealer Jim Click Local Dealer Nissan Factory Sam Levitz Furniture Store Campeones Del Cambio Chevrolet Dealer Association ORielly Local Dealer

RANK 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

ADVERTISER Curacao Exports Royal Local Dealer Frys Food Food City Ford Dealer Association Western Dental & Orthodontics Conns Home Plus Store Jack In The Box Restaurant Volkswagen Goldberg & Osborne Attorneys

COURTESY OF

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

178

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A ' S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 4 LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PROFILE

JOURNALIST TRADES ANCHOR POST FOR TEACHING ROLE Vanessa Ruiz calls her time in Phoenix "the most transformative experience of my adult life."

that still needs to be done," Ruiz says. The controversy inspired her to get more involved in issues impacting the Latino community. Her decision to join the ASU faculty is tied to that goal. She joined the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication on August 1.

That may be an understatement. In 2015, Ruiz became the main anchor for 12 News, where she was maligned early on by some of the station's viewers for speaking Spanish on the air (though in 2016 she and her co-anchor Mark Curtis had won an Emmy). Earlier this year, Ruiz joined the faculty at Arizona State University. And now she's engaged to be married.

As the nation's Latino population booms, the demand for bilingual journalists is growing. There are now 59 million Hispanics in the U.S. and Spanish is the second most common language spoken nationwide. "I keep hearing people ask, 'Where are the bilingual journalists?'" says Ruiz. "So my goal is to help [ASU] students navigate this industry and get jobs." Ruiz will direct "the borderlands coverage team at Cronkite News, the student-produced, faculty-led news division of Arizona PBS and help lead the new Spanish-language newscast, Cronkite Noticias," which airs on the Univision-operated UniMás channel and the digital Cronkite Noticias website, according to a story posted on the university's website. She will also work on special productions for Arizona PBS.

Until mid-July, Ruiz was the lead anchor for KPNX TV's weekday evening newscasts. She began her career in 2001 with the Telemundo, where she was recognized for her coverage of the September 11 terrorism attack. Ruiz later became Telemundo International's youngest news anchor. She has worked for WSVN-FOX and TV Marti in Miami, KNBC in Los Angeles and has been nominated several times for Emmys over her career.

Cronkite Noticias is based at ASU's downtown Phoenix, but Ruiz says the program's reporters will be traveling regularly to the U.S.—Mexico border and beyond. "We're going to go where the stories are."

Born in Miami, Ruiz was raised by her grandparents in Colombia. Fluent in English and Spanish, she describes herself as a proud American blessed by her Latina heritage.

Her rocky reception at 12 News aside, Ruiz says she has had no regrets about coming to Phoenix.

It was her fluency in Spanish that sparked a firestorm among a small but vocal contingent of 12 News viewers soon after she came to Phoenix. Simply put, some the station's audience didn't much like that she pronounced Spanish words in…well…Spanish.

"I think the universe put me here for a bigger reasons than myself or any professional aspirations," she says. "For some time now, I've wanted my life's mission to be helping others be the best they can be. It is important for me to give everyone a chance to pursue their dreams through education."

Ruiz was shocked by the reaction. Having worked in Miami, Los Angeles and New York, where the Hispanic communities are larger and more integrated, it was clear some Phoenicians didn't think she was quite "American enough."

Her career goals aside, Ruiz adds, "On a personal level, by moving to Phoenix I got to meet my future husband [Sam Alpert, senior vice president of business at Junior Achievement]."

Ruiz didn't back down – nor did 12 News – but the experience "opened my eyes and galvanized me. It made me realize there's a lot of work

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

The couple plan to wed in October. 179

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 4

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

SPANISH LANGUAGE IS HERE TO STAY HISPANICS AGE 5+ | (INSPANISH-LANGUAGE IS HERE TO STAY MILLIONS) | SPEAK ANY SPANISH AT HOME 73.3% 72.9%

Hispanic % Share

72.4% 71.9% 71.3%

34.0

30.7

27.4

41.3

37.6

9.4

10.7

11.8

13.0

14.0

2014

2019

2024

2029

2034

Speak Only Spanish at Home

Speak Spanish and English at Home COURTESY OF

Source: IHS Economics. Hispanic Immigration and US Economic Growth, February 2015.

HISPANIC AGE 5+ (IN MILLIONS) SPEAK ANY SPANISH AT HOME Source: IHS Economics. Hispanic Immigration and US Economic Growth, February 2015.

OF HISPANICS BELIEVE THAT LANGUAGE IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECTS OF THE CULTURE TO PRESERVE

62

%

COURTESY OF

SOURCE: 2015 U.S. YANKELOVICH MONITOR

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

180

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

CHAPTER 4

CULTURAL PRIDE IS STRONG AND ENDURING AMONG HISPANIC AMERICANS

83

76

%

93

%

FEEL THE NEED TO PRESERVE CULTURAL TRADITIONS

ARE VERY PROUD TO BE HISPANIC

70

%

%

SAY BEING A PART OF THE HISPANIC COMMUNITY IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT

WISH THEY HAD MORE WAYS TO SHOW THE WORLD HOW PROUD THE ARE TO BE HISPANIC COURTESY OF

Source: 2015 U.S. Yankelovich monitor

YOUR MESSAGES SHOULD BE IN-LANGUAGE AND IN-CULTURE, TOO

68

79

%

%

BELIEVE THERE SHOULD BE MORE COMMERCIALS DIRECTED SPECIFICALLY TO HISPANICS

SAY "COMPANIES THAT MAKE SINCERE EFFORTS TO BE A PART OF, OR INVEST IN, MY COMMUNITY DESERVE MY LOYALTY."

Source: 2015 U.S. Yankelovich monitor

DATO S

80

%

OF HISPANICS APPRECIATE BUSINESSES THAT COMMUNICATE WITH THEM IN SPANISH COURTESY OF

A Z

2 0 1 7

181

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


ยก Gracias ! The Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix

Most Rev. Thomas J. Olmsted

Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix

Most Rev. Eduardo A. Nevares

Auxiliary Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix

Committed to Faith, Family and Education


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HEALTH

CHAPTER 5

TOP 10 BRANDS HISPANIC CONSUMERS ASSOCIATE WITH POSITIVE HEALTH AND WELLNESS NESTLÉ PURE LIFE BOTTLED WATER COLGATE TOTAL ADVANCED PRO-SHIELD TOOTHPASTE AVOCADOS FROM MEXICO DOVE SHAMPOO & CONDITIONER DANNON ACTIVIA YOGURT HONEY BUNCHES OF OATS CEREAL NATURE VALLEY GRANOLA BARS V8 VEGETABLE JUICE SUN-MAID RAISINS ORAL-B DENTAL FLOSS

Source: Nielsen, Consumer Brands Health & Wellness, 2016 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/brand-equity-top-brands-consumers-associate-with-positive-health-wellness-impact.html

33%* OF HISPANICS/LATINOS IN 2015 REPORTED EXCELLENT HEALTH 33%* of Hispanics/Latinos in 2015 Reported Excellent Health

3%

10%

32%

EXCELLENT VERY GOOD GOOD 29%

FAIR POOR

*PERCENTAGES ARE AGE-ADJUSTED

26%

Source: Summary Health Statistics Tables for the U.S. Population: National Health Interview Survey, 2015 ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/NHIS/SHS/2015_SHS_Table_P-1.pdf

DATO S

Source: Summary Health Statistics Tables for the U.S. Population: National Health Interview Survey, 2015 183 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7 https://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/NHIS/SHS/2015_SHS_Table_P-1.pdf


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HEALTH

CHAPTER 5

NUMBER OF UNINSURED HISPANIC CHILDREN DECREASEDWHILE THE NUMBER OF HISPANIC CHILDREN INCREASED, 2009-2014 Number of Uninsured Hispanic Children Decreased While the Number of Hispanic Children Increased (2009-2014)

FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

2.6 2009

2.4

2.2

2010

2.1

20 1 1

2.0

2012

Total Number of Uninsured Hispanic Children

17.9

17.7

17.5

17.4

17.2

16.7

1.7

2013

2014

Total Number of Hispanic Children

Source: National Council of La Raza, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Center for Children and Families, 2016 ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/CCF-NCLR-Uninsured-Hispanic-Kids-Report-Final-Jan-14-2016.pdf

Source: National Council of La Raza, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Center for Children and Families, 2016 http://ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/CCF-NCLR-Uninsured-Hispanic-Kids-Report-Final-Jan-14-2016.pdf

College Success Arizona has provided over $16.7 million in scholarships and success services to nearly 1,300 of Arizona’s low income students so that they can pursue their educational dreams at Arizona colleges and universities.

Serving Arizona’s Students Since 1995

College Success Arizona & the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, working together to increase Arizona’s attainment rate.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

184

College Success Arizona is a proud

T H E S T AT E O F A R Imember Z O N A’of StheHAchieve60AZ I S P A N IAlliance C MARKET


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HEALTH

CHAPTER 5

UNINSURED RATE FOR HISPANIC CHILDREN VS. UNINSURED RATE FOR ALL CHILDREN, 2009-2014

Uninsured Rate for Hispanic Children Vs. Uninsured Rate for All Children (2009-2014)

15.8% 14.1%

12.8%

12.1%

11.5% 9.7%

8.6%

8.0%

2009

7.5%

2010

2011

Uninsured Hispanic Children

7.2%

7.1%

2012

2013

6.0%

2014

Hispanic Children

Source: National Council of La Raza, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Center for Children and Families, 2016 ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/CCF-NCLR-Uninsured-Hispanic-Kids-Report-Final-Jan-14-2016.pdf

IN STATES WITH THE LARGEST OVERALL NUMBER OF HISPANIC CHILDREN, ONLY FOUR HAD UNINSURANCE RATES LOWER THAN THE NATIONAL AVERAGE, 2014

In States with the Largest Overall Number of Hispanic Children, Only Four Had Uninsurance Rates Lower than the National Average (2014) Rates of Uninsured Hispanic Children Source: National Council of La Raza, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Center for Children and Families, 2016 http://ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/CCF-NCLR-Uninsured-Hispanic-Kids-Report-Final-Jan-14-2016.pdf

12.1% 9.7%

9.6%

3.8%

NATIONAL AVERAGE

NEW YORK

6.8%

7.0%

CALIFORNIA

NEW JERSEY

15.3%

15.3%

TEXAS

GEORGIA

12.7%

10.5%

4.5%

ILLINOIS

COLORADO

NORTH CAROLINA

FLORIDA

ARIZONA

Source: National Council of La Raza, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Center for Children and Families, 2016 ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/CCF-NCLR-Uninsured-Hispanic-Kids-Report-Final-Jan-14-2016.pdf

DATO S

A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: National Council of La Raza, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Center for Children and Families, 2016 http://ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/CCF-NCLR-Uninsured-Hispanic-Kids-Report-Final-Jan-14-2016.pdf 185

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HEALTH

CHAPTER 5

NUMBER OF FATAL WORK INJURIES BY EMPLOYEE STATUS(2003–2015)

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

201 4

2015

Wage & Salary

Self-Employed

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016 www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0014.pdf

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016 https://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0014.pdf

"A TOTAL OF 4,836 WORKERS DIED FROM AN OCCUPATIONAL INJURY IN 2015. THIS NUMBER INCREASED SLIGHTLY FROM 2014 AND IS THE HIGHEST COUNT SINCE 2008. SELF-EMPLOYED WORKERS HAVE CONSISTENTLY ACCOUNTED FOR AROUND ONE-FIFTH OF FATAL WORK INJURIES." Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016 www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0014.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

1085 3751

1093

950

1057

1051

1039

3728

2008

3635

2007

3571

4613

2006

3642

4808

2005

3651

4592

2004

3488

4587

2003

4183

4405

1063

1031

1044

1032

1142

1177

1170

Number of Fatal Work Injuries by Employee Status (2003–2015)

186

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HEALTH

CHAPTER 5

ADULT MEN HAVE A HIGHER PERCENTAGE OF PRE-DIABETES AMONG LATINOS, 2013

23.7%

33.0%

44.7%

46.9%

Adult Men Have a Higher Percentage of Pre-diabetes Among Latinos (2013)

18-44

4 5 -6 4

Men

Women

Source: National Hispanic Council on Aging, Hispanics and Latinos are Facing the Fastest Increase in the Rates of Type 2 Diabetes, June 14, 2017 www.nhcoa.org/hispanics-and-latinos-are-facing-the-fastest-increase-in-the-rates-of-type-2-diabetes/

Source: National Hispanic Council on Aging, Hispanics and Latinos are Facing the Fastest Increase in the Rates of Type 2 Diabetes, June 14, 2017 http://www.nhcoa.org/hispanics-and-latinos-are-facing-the-fastest-increase-in-the-rates-of-type-2-diabetes/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

187

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


Cancer is smart. It pushes us. We push back.

At Cancer Treatment Centers of

Finding smarter solutions. Like precision cancer treatment.

with advancements in medicine

Intelligent technology that helps us find and target it. We’re not just fighting cancer.

We’re outsmarting it.

America®, we’re forging ahead that weren’t available to cancer patients just a short time ago, including advanced genomic testing and immunotherapy.

888.214.9488 cancercenter.com/outsmart

© 2017 Rising Tide

CTCA-0005 - DATOS Ad 2017.indd 1

8/10/17 1:20 PM

Transit & the Future of the Valley Valley Metro provides Valley riders with a safe, efficient and reliable total transit network. As our system continues to grow, we look forward to working with local communities to fuel economic development throughout the region. Visit valleymetro.org.


SECTION I

PROFILE

CHAPTER 5 HEALTH

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

MIRIAM TREJO'S STORY OF SURVIVORSHIP I was 29 years old when I was diagnosed with breast cancer in March 2014. My husband and I were still newlyweds, filled with plans for our long life together.

right armpit. After recovering from the surgery, I received six chemotherapy treatments and then seven weeks of radiation. My experience at CTCA® was consistently empowering. I was part of the decision-making process at every step of the way. My Care Team was exactly that—a team of caring people—and I made lifelong friends with patients and employees. My naturopathic oncology provider and my clinical oncology dietitian helped me manage and prevent side effects, taught me how to shop for and cook healthier foods and recommended supplements to take during and after treatment to help my recovery. I took full advantage of all the integrative services offered at the hospital, including acupuncture, chiropractic care, lymphatic drainage massage, pastoral support, physical therapy and occupational therapy. I also joined the Cancer Fighters Care Network so that I could lend support to others coping with a cancer diagnosis. In short, CTCA helped me transition from feeling like a victim to becoming a fighter, a survivor and a health care advocate.

I suspected something wasn't quite right in 2012 when I felt a lump on my right breast. Ultrasound results came back normal. A year later, I had a second ultrasound, which also came back normal. The third time I saw my gynecologist, I had sharp, shooting pains in my chest. Eventually, biopsy results revealed that I had HER2-positive breast cancer as well as Paget's disease of the breast. I was entirely unprepared for the shock of the diagnosis. My heart raced and the tears streamed down my face. My husband held me close to him as tears streamed down his face, too. Later that day, we told our families.

NO LONGER A VICTIM

My father-in-law suggested I call Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA). As we toured the facility, I saw people smiling and hugging one another. My eyes filled with tears again, but this time, they were tears of hope and peace. I knew that I had come to the right place.

A NEW LIFE—AND A PLEA

Going through cancer and its treatment has changed me forever. Never again will I be a victim of circumstance. Instead, I will choose to have hope, have faith and seek support. This disease gave me a better perspective on what matters (and what doesn't) and a renewed appreciation for the people in my life.

Because the cancer had spread throughout my right breast, I decided to have a double mastectomy. During the procedure, the surgeon found cancer in my sentinel lymph nodes and he performed a second surgery to remove lymph nodes from my

And now my plea…Cancer doesn't discriminate. It can affect anyone at any age, of any ethnicity, of any education level and economic status. We all need to be proactive about our health. We need to take control, eliminate unhealthy habits from our lives and listen to our bodies. We need to live each day like it's our last and not wait for a near-tragedy to wake us up. Value today and make each day count. Use your talents and gifts to help others, train your mind to focus on what is important and love each other with all your heart. That is certainly what I am trying to do.

"Cancer doesn't discriminate. It can affect anyone at any age, of any ethnicity, of any education level and economic status. We all need to be proactive about our health. We need to take control, eliminate unhealthy habits from our lives and listen to our bodies." DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

189

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HEALTH

CHAPTER 5

PERCENTAGE OF ADULT WOMEN IN ARIZONA REPORTING FAIR OR POOR HEALTH STATUS BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2012-2014 Percentage of Adult Women in Arizona Reporting Fair or Poor Health Status (by Race/Ethnicity, 2012-2014

O TH ER

22%

A M ER I C A N I N D I A N

22%

LA TI N A

25%

B LA CK

25% 15%

NO N-HIS P A N I C W H I TE

Source: Arizona Foundation for Women, Status of Women in Arizona, 2016 docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/07bf62_5ac7a7d40f944f49b898c26c8776ee22.pdf

ARIZONA WOMEN REPORTING POOR MENTAL HEALTH (2012-2014)

Arizona Women Reporting Poor Mental Health (2012-2014) Source: Arizona Foundation for Women, Status of Women in Arizona, 2016

http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/07bf62_5ac7a7d40f944f49b898c26c8776ee22.pdf

LA T I N A

42%

B LA C K

42%

NO N-H IS P A N I C W H I T E

37%

A LL W O M E N

39%

Source: Arizona Foundation for Women, Status of Women in Arizona, 2016 docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/07bf62_5ac7a7d40f944f49b898c26c8776ee22.pdf

Source: Arizona Foundation for Women, Status of Women in Arizona, 2016 190 A Z 2 0 1 7 http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/07bf62_5ac7a7d40f944f49b898c26c8776ee22.pdf

DATO S

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HEALTH

CHAPTER 5

ARIZONA WOMEN WITH NO PERSONAL DOCTOR BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2014 Arizona Women With No Personal Doctor (by Race/Ethnicity, 2014)

37%

AM E R I C A N I N D I A N

34%

LATINA

21%

BLACK

17%

N O N -H IS P A N I C WH I T E

22%

A L L WO ME N

Source: Arizona Foundation for Women, Status of Women in Arizona, 2016 docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/07bf62_5ac7a7d40f944f49b898c26c8776ee22.pdf

PERCENTAGE OF ARIZONA WOMEN WITH HEALTH INSURANCE BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2013

Source: Arizona Foundation for Women, Status of Women in Arizona, 2016 http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/07bf62_5ac7a7d40f944f49b898c26c8776ee22.pdf Percentage of Arizona Women with Health Insurance (by Race/Ethnicity, 2013)

69%

AMERICAN INDIAN

84%

ASIAN / P A C I FI C I S L A N D E R

79%

BLACK

LATINA

66%

86%

N O N- H I S P A N I C WH I T E

Source: Arizona Foundation for Women, Status of Women in Arizona, 2016 docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/07bf62_5ac7a7d40f944f49b898c26c8776ee22.pdf

DATO S

191 A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Arizona Foundation for Women, Status of Women in Arizona, 2016 http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/07bf62_5ac7a7d40f944f49b898c26c8776ee22.pdf

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


DREAM. BELIEVE.

Build.

321264-17

Diverse cultures and people have made Arizona the great state it is today and they will continue to shape our future. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona is proud to support the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DATOS study. Your influence is helping to shape a better Arizona.


SECTION I

CASE STUDY

CHAPTER 5 HEALTH

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

EMPOWERING ARIZONA'S GIRL SCOUTS TO TAKE ACTION FOR HEALTHY LIVING THE CHALLENGE

The patch was launched in 2016 with the Girl Scouts of Arizona Cactus-Pine Council, which serves Maricopa County north to the Navajo Nation. The program was then expanded to the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona (GSSoAz) serving Pima, Yuma and Pinal counties.

Childhood is about laughing, playing and learning. In particular, it's an important time to learn lifelong habits that in adulthood can help us stay healthy and make good decisions about how to take care of ourselves and our loved ones. Unfortunately, many people have picked up bad habits or failed to learn how to incorporate healthy behavior into their everyday lives. Approximately 65 percent of Arizona residents are overweight and one in six children and adolescents is overweight.*

The program teaches the girls about fitness, community involvement, the power of friendship, career paths and overall health. Each topic requires participating in local activities. For example, GSSoAz arranges for the girls to participate in the Día de los Muertos All Souls Procession to meet the community involvement requirement. In addition, all Girl Scouts have the opportunity to attend World Thinking Day, which brings them together to learn about diversity in a multicultural world.

In a recent Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ) survey, 63 percent of Arizona children did not know they should eat at least five fruits and vegetables per day and avoid sweetened drinks altogether. Only 50 percent knew they should get at least one hour of physical exercise each day.

THE RESULTS

The All About Healthy Living patch program is the most comprehensive curriculum offered by the Girl Scouts. This progressive, ageappropriate, hands-on learning opportunity for girls from kindergarten through the 12th grade relies on more than 70 local community organizations around the state, which offer unique experiences to the girls. In just two years (since the program's inception):

Such startling statistics reinforce the need for ongoing education and community partnerships to reach Arizona's youth and their families. Through BCBSAZ's signature program Nourishing Arizona, we are working with organizations across the state so that individuals meet their nutritional needs and learn healthy habits.

• 4,218 girls have participated in the All About Healthy Living patch program.

Recently, BCBSAZ partnered with the Girls Scouts to develop the All About Healthy Living patch program. The program curriculum reaches girls of all ages and backgrounds throughout the state. In particular, it helps the Girl Scouts reach Latina girls and their families with programming that is appealing and relevant.

• Nearly 1,100 girls, adults, volunteers, staff and community organizations participated in the Phoenix World Thinking Day and 500 in the Yuma, Pinal and Cochise counties' World Thinking Day.

ABOUT NOURISHING ARIZONA

According to several recent health studies, Latina girls face:

As the state's largest local health insurer, BCBSAZ believes it is our responsibility to draw attention to preventable health issues. Nourishing Arizona aims to educate Arizonans about the problem we face as a state and the role good food can play in our overall health and well-being. What you eat affects your health, how you contribute to the community and what you will ultimately pay for health care. Our goal is to make a difference in the lives of Arizonans through tools, education and partnerships.

• Higher obesity rates than their peers at 21 percent, which mean they will be twice as likely to be overweight as adults • Higher diabetes rates than their peers at 53 percent

THE SOLUTION

Health, nutrition and fitness have always been essential to the Girl Scout experience. Teaming up with BCBSAZ to create a one-of-itskind patch ensured the girls would take meaningful steps in learning about what it takes to get and stay healthy.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

* www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/index.html To learn more about the All About Healthy Living program and BCBSAZ's Nourishing Arizona partners, go to www.nourishingarizona.com.

193

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

194

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 6 BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PROFILE

ACCION IN ARIZONA Accion (Accion) is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization that increases access to business credit, makes loans and provides training to enable entrepreneurs to realize their dreams and be catalysts for positive economic and social change. We offer loans up to $1 million, along with training and other support services to those who want to start or expand a small business.

obstacles and realize a dream of economic independence. Our clients, like Fernando Jimenez, owner of Tucson-based Tortillería Doña Esperanza, a family owned tortilla factory, are creating positive change, one small business at a time. Accion proudly supports many Hispanic/Latino small business owners throughout Arizona. In fact, since 2014, 58% of the loans we’ve issued have gone to self-identified Hispanic/Latino entrepreneurs across the state. In that time period, Accion funded 501 loans for $6.8 million in Maricopa county and 729 loans for $5.4 million in Pima county.

Accion was founded in Albuquerque in 1994. Since then, the organization has provided over 11,402 loans totaling more than $108.8 million to some 7,375 small businesses in 501 communities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas.

Across our five-state region during 2016, 89% of the small business loans issued by Accion went to low-income, minority, and/or women entrepreneurs. At year-end 2016, 97% of all active Accion loans were current —a remarkable testament to the strength of Accion's client relationships and the shared commitment of the organization and its clients to business success and sound financial management.

In 2008, Accion extended its services to entrepreneurs throughout Arizona. Since then, the organization has provided over 2,428 loans totaling more than $22.8 million to some 1,598 small businesses in 95 communities across the state. Accion’s work is creating tangible economic impact in Arizona, with an estimated 3,554 jobs created or sustained by the organization’s client businesses.

As a recognized innovator in the U.S. microenterprise development field, Accion has achieved performance that well outpaces national microenterprise standards for loans issued, cost per loan, and portfolio quality. Accion is certified by the U.S. Department of Treasury as a Community Development Financial Institution and is rated as a four-star organization by Charity Navigator with a top score in accountability. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) awarded Accion its national Access to Capital award.

By offering character-based business loans at fair market rates with quick turnaround times, Accion is helping hardworking and visionary entrepreneurs reach their full potential. Accion’s clients represent the foundation of the American economy— individuals who reach deep within themselves to overcome

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

195

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


The law firm of Quarles & Brady is a proud sponsor of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. For more information about our legal services, please contact Leonardo Loo at 602.229.5638/ leonardo.loo@quarles.com.

quarles.com

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

196

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A ' S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

FIVE-YEAR SNAPSHOT: SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMIC CONFIDENCE Five-year Snapshot: Small Business Economic Confidence

62% 51% 45%

42%

45%

38% 41%

35%

50%

34% 28%

45%

41%

40%

31%

32%

31%

49% 48%

52%

56%

50% 38%

45%

35%

21%

37%

29%

31%

18%

19%

SPRING 2016

FALL 201 6

35%

0 SPRING 2012

FALL 2012

SPRING 2013

FALL 2013

SPRIN G 2014

Local Economic Optimism

FALL 2014

SPRING 2015

FALL 2015

National Economic Optimism

S P RI NG 2017

Global Economic Optimism

Source: Bank of America Business Advantage, Small Business Owner Report, Spring 2017 newsroom.bankofamerica.com/files/press_kit/additional/Small_Business_Owner_Report_-_Spring_2017.pdf

Source: Bank of America Business Advantage, Small Business Owner Report, Spring 2017 http://newsroom.bankofamerica.com/files/press_kit/additional/Small_Business_Owner_Report_-_Spring_2017.pdf Hiring Plans for 2017 at a Five-year Low

64%

FA L L 2012

S P R I NG 2 0 1 3

FALL 2013

S P R I NG 2014

Plan to Hire

F A LL 2014

SPRI N G 2015

F A LL 2015

SPRI N G 2016

18%

29% 22%

SP R IN G 2012

25%

46% 46%

44%

51%

52% 42% 31%

31%

31%

31%

50%

59%

55%

56%

56%

67%

73%

HIRING PLANS FOR 2017 AT A FIVE-YEAR LOW

F A LL 201 6

S PR ING 2 0 1 7

Plan to Keep Employee Count the Same

Source: Bank of America Business Advantage, Small Business Owner Report, Spring 2017 newsroom.bankofamerica.com/files/press_kit/additional/Small_Business_Owner_Report_-_Spring_2017.pdf

Source: Bank of America Business Advantage, Small Business Owner Report, Spring 2017 197 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://newsroom.bankofamerica.com/files/press_kit/additional/Small_Business_Owner_Report_-_Spring_2017.pdf


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

IMMIGRANT STATUS OF LATINO BUSINESS OWNERS IN U.S. Immigrant Status of Latino Business Owners in U.S.

29% 39%

IMMIGRANT IMMIGRANT PARENT SELF AND PARENTS U.S. BORN

32%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

OWNERSHIP HISTORY OF LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES Ownership History of Latino-owned Businesses

2% 13%

STARTED BUSINESS ALONE STARTED BUSINESS WITH OTHERS 19%

PURCHASED BUSINESS 66%

INHERITED BUSINESS

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

198

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

Ages of Latino Business Owners

AGES OF LATINO BUSINESS OWNERS

43%

NON-MILLENNIAL (>35) MILLENNIAL (18-35) 57%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016

www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016 Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

EDUCATION ATTAINMENT OF LATINO BUSINESS OWNERS

Education Attainment of Latino Business Owners

13%

HIGH SCHOOL OR LESS

48%

SOME COLLEGE/VOCATIONAL EDUCATION BACHELOR'S DEGREE 39%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

199 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

MOST LATINO-OWNED FIRMS ARE IN FOUR STATES

Most Latino-owned Firms Are in Four States

6%

NE W Y O R K

12%

F L OR I D A

18%

TEX A S

22%

C A L IF O R N I A

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

NEW YORK HAS TWICE AS MANY LATINO-OWNED FIRMS

2%

2%

2%

2%

4%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 New York has Twice as Many Latino-owned Firms https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

LOS ANGELES

AUSTIN

S A N A NTO NIO

MIA MI

Top 5 Cities Latino Firms (by 5%)(BY 5%) TOP 5 CITIES WITHwithLATINO FIRMS

NEW Y O RK C I TY

*household figures in millions

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 200 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

ANNUAL REVENUE FOR LATINO-OWNED FIRMS LESS THAN 5 YEARS OLD Annual Revenue for Latino-owned Firms Less Than 5 Years Old

3% 15%

<$100K $100K-$999K >$1MILLION 82%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

ANNUAL REVENUE FOR LATINO-OWNED FIRMS LESS THAN 25 YEARS OLD

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 Annual Revenue for Latino-owned Firms Less Than 25 Years Old https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

3% 17%

<$100K $100K-$999K >$1MILLION 80% Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

201 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

ANNUAL REVENUE FOR LATINO-OWNED FIRMS MORE THAN 25 YEARS OLD Annual Revenue for Latino-owned Firms More Than 25 Years Old

2% 20%

<$100K $100K-$999K >$1MILLION 78%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

EMPLOYEE COUNT OF LATINO-OWNED FIRMS IN BUSINESS LESS THAN 5 YEARS Employee Count of Latino-owned Firms (in Business Less Than 5 Years)

5%

1%

0 EMPLOYEES 1-9 EMPLOYEES 10+ EMPLOYEES

94% Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

202 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

EMPLOYEE COUNT OF LATINO-OWNED FIRMS IN BUSINESS 5-25 YEARS Employee Count of Latino-owned Firms (in Business 5-25 Years)

3% 12%

0 EMPLOYEES 1-9 EMPLOYEES 10+ EMPLOYEES

85% Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 Employee Count of Latino-owned Firms https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016 (in Business More Than 25 Years)

EMPLOYEE COUNT OF LATINO-OWNED FIRMS IN BUSINESS MORE THAN 25 YEARS 4% 14%

0 EMPLOYEES 1-9 EMPLOYEES 10+ EMPLOYEES

82% Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

203

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

LATINO-OWNED FIRMS BY INDUSTRY IN BUSINESS LESS THAN 5 YEARS Latino-owned Firms by Industry (in Business Less Than 5 Years)

20%

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

29%

EDUCATION & HEALTH SERVICES LEISURE & HOSPITALITY 14% 5%

FINANCIAL SERVICES MANUFACTURING & CONSTRUCTION TRADE, TRANSPORTATION, UTILITIES OTHER

10% 18%

4%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 Latino-owned Firms by Industry https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016 (in Business 15-25 Years)

LATINO-OWNED FIRMS BY INDUSTRY IN BUSINESS 15-25 YEARS

21%

26%

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES EDUCATION & HEALTH SERVICES LEISURE & HOSPITALITY FINANCIAL SERVICES

8% 8%

MANUFACTURING & CONSTRUCTION TRADE, TRANSPORTATION, UTILITIES

8%

23%

OTHER

6% Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 204 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

LATINO-OWNED FIRMS BY INDUSTRY IN BUSINESS MORE THAN 25 YEARS Latino-owned Firms by Industry (in Business More Than 25 Years)

14% 26%

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

5%

EDUCATION & HEALTH SERVICES LEISURE & HOSPITALITY FINANCIAL SERVICES MANUFACTURING & CONSTRUCTION 9%

TRADE, TRANSPORTATION, UTILITIES

28%

OTHER 12% 6%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

NUMBER OF CAPITAL NUMBER OF CAPITAL SOURCES AS STARTUP SOURCES AS GROWTH FUNDS FUNDS Number of Capital Sources as Startup Funds

Number of Capital Sources as Growth Funds

9%

8%

0 SOURCE

45%

44%

1 SOURCE 2+ SOURCES 48%

46%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

205

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

INTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES USED BY LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES Internal Funding Sources Used by Latino-owned Businesses

B U S IN E SS R E VE N U E

43%

CREDIT CARDS

31%

0%

INHERITANCE

14%

0%

0%

62%

P ER SO N A L F U N D S

Startup Funds

54%

Growth Funds

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

INTERNAL STARTUP FUNDS USED BY LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 Internal Startup Funds Used by Latino-owned Businesses https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

14%

INHERITANCE

31%

CREDIT CARDS

62%

P ER S O N A L F U N D S

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

206

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

INTERNAL GROWTH FUNDS USED BY LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES Internal Growth Funds Used by Latino-owned Businesses

43%

B U S IN E SS R E VE N U E

54%

P ER SO N A L F U N D S

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES USED BY LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016 External Funding Sources used by Latino Owned Businesses

26%

H AR D M O N E Y

0%

VE N T U R E C AP I T AL

6%

7%

ANGEL INVESTORS

6%

7%

B U S IN ES S / B A N K L O A N S

15%

30% 8%

GO VER NM E NT L O A N S

4% 8%

V E ND O R C R E DI T

Startup Funds

Growth Funds

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

207 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

0%


Together, we create a better community. Cox Communications celebrates our friends and neighbors who have created and cultivated a strong community. We are proud to support the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Find out more at cox.com Š2017 Cox Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


SECTION I

CHAPTER 6 BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CASE STUDY

COX COMMUNICATIONS LATINA ENTREPRENEURS PROGRAM OUR CONTINUED CHALLENGE

outstanding cultural, social and economic contributions in Arizona. Cox's approach was to showcase and recognize successful Latina entrepreneurs through an aggressive four-week campaign called, "Latina Entrepreneur of the Year." To support this campaign and to expand its value and reach, numerous partnerships were formulated.

Latina entrepreneurs continued growth nationwide sees no signs of slowing down.

Cox partnered with local Spanish-language TV, print, and online media that serve as trusted source in the Latino community; the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Phoenix, which has been part of the state's business community for almost 70 years and has an established reputation of actively promoting small business growth in today's diversified market; and the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, which is one of the fastest-growing business organizations in the state. Cox knew that the Hispanic chambers of commerce have broad access to the Latino business community and would help expand the campaign's reach. The campaign is comprised of 30-second television spots in English and Spanish produced by Cox Media featuring each of the four Latina entrepreneur honorees.

Cox Communications knew it was important to keep Latinas top of mind and to keep in mind that Hispanic women everywhere are taking the reigns of their financial futures and are playing critical leadership roles at home, at work and in their communities. Latinas make up the single largest minority group among womenowned businesses. According to the 2014 AZHCC Arizona Womenowned Business Enterprise report, Latinas were significantly more optimistic about the future, with 72 percent anticipating their company's financial situation will improve. They were also more likely to plan on expanding over the next five years (68 percent) and add employees in the next two years (73 percent). Cox Business was formed in 2000 and it has presence in 17 states with over 300,000 business consumers – from retailers, professional services and start-up companies to large health care providers, K-12 and higher education, financial institutions and government organizations. It offers leading edge technology solutions such as hosted IP voice lines, data and video. Cox Business caters to the burgeoning Hispanic market by offering multigenerational Hispanic businesses a wide range of English- and Spanish-language products and services. Cox is also committed to the Hispanic market and diversity. For seven years, Cox has been recognized as the top operator for women by Women in Cable Telecommunications.

These spots highlighted their business and accomplishments and included logos of its media and chamber partners. The spots air on a variety of Cox English and Spanish channels throughout the fourweek campaign, as well as on Azteca America TV stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

UNBELIEVABLE SUCCESS

The campaign has continued to have remarkable exposure for Cox and its Latina honorees. Since the campaign's inception five years ago, Cox Communications secured over 8,000,000 impressions for the "Latina Entrepreneur of the Year" campaign in Phoenix and Tucson. During the five years, there were close to 200 stories placed in Hispanic and mainstream print, broadcast, online and social media, nearly doubling the intended goal of stories during the fourweek period. In all, the team generated outstanding impressions that exposed the public to the outstanding growth that Latinas have had in the business world and the never-ending efforts of Cox Communications' commitment to its community. Because of the exposure they have received through this campaign, the honorees have seen impressive growth in their businesses and have also been more recognizable in their communities.

Cox knows that Latina women continue to play a key role in the growth and development of the community and they want to keep recognizing the professionals who are leaving their mark everyday. Specifically they want to continue to develop a turnkey campaign that created awareness for Cox Communications services, while positioning Cox as top-of-mind among Latina business owners in Phoenix and Tucson.

OUR SOLUCIÓN

Cox Communications, develop a yearly campaign to honor successful Latina entrepreneurs in Phoenix and in Tucson who have made

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

209

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CHAPTER 6 BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CASE STUDY

2017 WINNERS

PAST HONOREES

2013

LINDA VALENZUELA, owner of MIA Cosmetics BEATRIZ ALATORRE DE HONG, owner of Paletas Betty JULIE GALLEGO-GONZALEZ, founder of Ballet Folklorico TANNYA GAXIOLA, owner of QuikHelp

ROSA CARDENAS, owner of Blush Boutique

2014

YESICA REINA, owner of Colados Coffee & Crepes

KATHY CANO-MURILLO, owner of CraftyChica.com STEPHANIE VASQUEZ, owner of Fair Trade Cafe LAURA PAREDES-OLDAKER, owner of By Your Side Senior Care CARLOTTA FLORES, owner of El Charro Café

2015

EDITH VILLALOBOSZAMORA, owner of EmV Design Build

SILVANA SALCIDO-ESPARZA, owner of Barrio Café LETY GARCIA, owner of Prensa Hispana CANDY RAMIREZ, owner of Candy's Cakes & More PATRICIA SCHWABE, owner of Peach Properties, Penca and Tooley's Café

2016

CANDACE FLORESCARRILLO, owner of The Stillwell House & Garden

TANIA TORRES, owner of Torres Multicultural Communications MARY RABAGO, owner of Mary Rabago Productions CECILIA MATA, owner of All Source Global Management AMANDA TOBAK, owner of Industrial Chemical of Arizona DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

210

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


THANKS FOR ALL YOU DO. With commitment, determination, and effort, great things happen. We at Anheuser-Busch and Hensley Beverage Company salute the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce for coming together and striving for a Better World.

Bringing people together for a better world

© 2016 ANHEUSER-BUSCH, BUDWEISER® BEER, ST. LOUIS, MO

Brand: AB Community Outreach Item #: PCS2016007

Job/Order #: 297462 QC: cs

MUST INITIAL FOR APPROVAL

PO:

PM:

Closing Date: 8/4/17

Pub: Arizona COC AM:

AD:

Trim: 7.25" x 10" Bleed: none"

CD:

Live: 7" x 9.75"

CW:

QC:


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

TOP THREE OCCUPATIONS IN ARIZONA FOR UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS (BY %, 2014) Top Three Occupations in Arizona for Unauthorized Immigrants (by %, 2014)

% of a state’s unauthorized immigrant workers in occupation

8%

17%

36%

PERCENTAGE OF A STATE'S UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANT WORKERS IN OCCUPATION

SERVICE

CO NS TR UCTIO N

S A L ES

Source: Pew Research Center, Size of US Unauthorized Immigrant Workforce Stable After the Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/11/03/size-of-u-s-unauthorized-immigrant-workforce-stable-after-the-great-recession/

ARIZONA OCCUPATIONS WITH HIGHEST SHARE OF UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANT WORKERS (% OF WORKFORCE, 2014)

Source: Pew Research Center, Size of US Unauthorized Immigrant Workforce Stable After the Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/11/03/size-of-u-s-unauthorized-immigrant-workforce-stable-after-the-great-recession/ Arizona Occupations with Highest Share of Unauthorized Immigrant Workers (% of workforce, 2014)

12%

20%

40%

PERCENTAGE OF OCCUPATION'S CIVILIAN WORKFORCE IN STATE THAT CONSISTS OF UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS

F AR M I N G

CO NS TR UCTIO N

S ER V ICE

Source: Pew Research Center, Size of US Unauthorized Immigrant Workforce Stable After the Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/11/03/size-of-u-s-unauthorized-immigrant-workforce-stable-after-the-great-recession/

% of occupation’s civilian workforce in state that consists of unauthorized immigrants

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

212

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

ORGANIZATIONS LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES JOIN Organizations Latino-owned Businesses Join

T R A D E A S S O C I A T I O N / O R G A N I Z A TIO N

GOVE RN M E NT A L B U S I N E S S O R E C O N O MI C D E V E L O P M E N T O R G A N I Z A TIO N

L O C A L B U S I N E S S O F G O V E R N ME N T B O A R D

15%

19%

8%

11%

26%

37%

24%

21%

H I S P A N I C C H A MB E R O F C O M M E R CE

13%

15%

G E N E R A L C H A M BE R O F C O M M E R CE

Increase in Employee Count

No Employee Count Increase

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

TOP ARIZONA INDUSTRIES FOR UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS (BY %, 2014)

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016 Top Arizona Industries for Unauthorized Immigrants (by %, 2014)

15%

17%

19%

PERCENTAGE OF A STATE'S UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANT WORKERS IN INDUSTRY

B U S I NE S S S E R V I C E S

CO NS TR UCTIO N

L EIS UR E/ HO S PITA L I TY

Source: Pew Research Center, Size of US Unauthorized Immigrant Workforce Stable After the Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/11/03/size-of-u-s-unauthorized-immigrant-workforce-stable-after-the-great-recession/

% of a state’s unauthorized immigrant workers in industry

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

213

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

INDUSTRIES IN ARIZONA WITH HIGHEST SHARE OF UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANT WORKERS, 2014 Industries in Arizona with Highest Share of Unauthorized Immigrant Workers (2014)

11%

16%

33%

PERCENTAGE OF INDUSTRY'S CIVILIAN WORKFORCE IN STATE THAT CONSISTS OF UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS

AG R I C U L T U R E

CO NSTR UCTIO N

O THER S ER V ICES

Source: Pew Research Center, Size of US Unauthorized Immigrant Workforce Stable After the Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/11/03/size-of-u-s-unauthorized-immigrant-workforce-stable-after-the-great-recession/

% of industry’s civilian workforce in state that consists of unauthorized immigrants

FIRM HISTORY OF LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES ACROSS REVENUE LEVELS Firm History of Latino-owned Businesses Across Revenue Levels

Source: Pew Research Center, Size of US Unauthorized Immigrant Workforce Stable After the Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/11/03/size-of-u-s-unauthorized-immigrant-workforce-stable-after-the-great-recession/

24%

22%

76%

78%

LESS THAN $1 MILLION

A T O R O V ER $1 MIL L IO N

Started Business Alone

Started Business with Others or Acquired it

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016 214

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

IMMIGRANT STATUS OF LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES ACROSS REVENUE LEVELS Immigrant Status of Latino-owned Businesses Across Revenue Levels

58%

68%

42%

32%

LESS THAN $1 MILLION

A T O R O V ER $1 MIL L IO N

Not U.S. Born

U.S. Born

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

EDUCATION OF LATINO BUSINESS OWNERS ACROSS REVENUE LEVELS

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 Education of Latino Business Owners Across Revenue Levels https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

46% 46%

64% 49%

LESS THAN $1 MILLION

Bachelor's Degree or Higher

AT O R O VER $ 1 M I L L I O N

Less Than a Bachelor's Degree

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 215 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

AGES OF LATINO BUSINESS OWNERS ACROSS REVENUE LEVELS Ages of Latino Business Owners Across Revenue Levels

58%

57%

42%

43%

LESS THAN $1 MILLION

A T O R O V ER $1 MIL L IO N

Millennial (18-35)

Non-Millennial (Over 35)

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

IMMIGRANT STATUS OF LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES ACROSS EMPLOYEE COUNT

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 Immigrant Status of Latino-owned Businesses Across Employee Count https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

52%

64%

48%

36%

1-49 EMPLOYEES

50+ EMPL O YEES

Not U.S. Born

U.S. Born

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

216

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

EDUCATION OF LATINO BUSINESS OWNERS BY EMPLOYEE COUNT Education of Latino Business Owners by Employee Count

36%

46%

64%

54%

1- 49 EMPLOYEES

5 0 + EM P L O Y EES

Less Than a Bachelor's Degree

Bachelor's Degree or Higher Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

AGE OF LATINO BUSINESS OWNERS BY EMPLOYEE COUNT Age of Latino Business Owners by Employee Count

61%

55%

45%

39%

1 - 4 9 E MP L O Y E E S

50+ EMPL O YEES

Millennial (18-35)

Non-Millennial (Over 35)

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

217

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, 2016 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/publications/state-latino-entrepreneurship-2016


SECTION I

CHAPTER 6 BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CASE STUDY

LATINOS LOVE DEL TACO With over 2 million Hispanics living in the state of Arizona and representing approximately one-third of the population, some might be surprised that a taco restaurant was not already reaching out to Valley Hispanics with Spanish-language advertising. However, prior to 2017 Del Taco had never engaged in a Spanish-language media campaign. After becoming district manager for Del Taco Phoenix, Hector Rodriguez decided the Hispanic opportunity in Phoenix was too great to ignore any longer.

we don't really care about the budget. We go with the family and we're like, 'My kid wants a combo; give him the combo. My kids want a churro; give him a churro. Whatever my kid wants.'" The media campaign included radio advertising and on-site events with Univision Radio's QuĂŠ Buena 105.9 FM radio station, accompanied by a social media campaign. After the campaign ended and the final sales figures were tallied, Rodriguez was delighted by the results of the test. The seven stores in high Hispanic population density locations saw sales increases of +7%. All Del Taco locations combined across the Phoenix market were up +3%. Rodriguez's stores in the East Valley had the most impressive results, with sales increases ranging from +13% to +17%.

"When I first came here, obviously my first market was my family. I asked them what do you think about Del Taco and they said, "We've never been to Del Taco,'" recalls Rodriguez.

"While it might not seem like many Hispanics live near my East Valley locations, they work here and those are the customers we are getting," explains Rodriguez.

In 2017 at a meeting with restaurant owners, Rodriguez convinced the team to have Phoenix be a test market for Del Taco restaurants. "One of the things I really pushed with the owners is that Hispanic people spend more money. As Latinos,

Del Taco & Univision Case Study Video https://youtu.be/TFTDW2PVOpU

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

219

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

CHANGES IN COMPOSITIONS OF NEW ENTREPRENEURS BY RACE, 1996 Changes in Compositions of New Entrepreneurs (by Race, 1996)

3.4% 1.0% 10.0%

8.4%

WHITE BLACK LATINO ASIAN OTHER 77.1%

Source: Geoscape, Hispanic Businesses and Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy, 2016 geoscape.com/hbr/

Source: Geoscape, Hispanic Businesses and Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy, 2016 Changes in Compositions of New Entrepreneurs http://geoscape.com/hbr/ (by Race, 2016)

CHANGES IN COMPOSITIONS OF NEW ENTREPRENEURS BY RACE, 2016 5.7%

3.9%

WHITE

20.8%

BLACK LATINO ASIAN OTHER 8.9%

60.7%

Source: Geoscape, Hispanic Businesses and Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy, 2016 geoscape.com/hbr/

Source: Geoscape, Hispanic Businesses and Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy, 2016 220 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://geoscape.com/hbr/


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CHAPTER 6

CHANGES IN COMPOSITIONS OF NEW ENTREPRENEURS BY RACE: 1996, 2016

BL A C K

L A TINO

A S IA N

1996

4%

1%

3% WHITE

6%

10%

9%

8%

21%

61%

77%

Changes in Compositions of New Entrepreneurs (by Race: 1996, 2016)

O TH E R

2016

Source: Geoscape, Hispanic Businesses and Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy, 2016 geoscape.com/hbr/

HISPANIC SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS ARE 1.7 TIMES MORE LIKELY TO EARN $100,000+/YEAR THAN OTHER HISPANICS

Source: Geoscape, Hispanic Businesses and Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy, 2016 http://geoscape.com/hbr/

7% $25-$49K

$ 5 0 K- $74K

$75K- $99K

All Hispanic Households

$100K- $149K

10% 5%

11%

9% L E S S T H A N $25K

12%

18%

20% 15%

20%

31%

42%

Hispanic Small Business Owners Are 1.7 Times More Likely to Earn $100,000+/Year Than Other Hispanics

MO R E TH A N $ 1 5 0 K

Hispanic Small Business Owners

Source: Geoscape, Hispanic Businesses and Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy, 2016 geoscape.com/hbr/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

221

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Geoscape, Hispanic Businesses and Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy, 2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

NUMBER OF SMALL AND MID-SIZED U.S. BUSINESSES REACHED ALL-TIME HIGH IN 2016 Number of Small and Mid-sized U.S. Businesses Reached All-Time High in 2016

7,779,325

7,812,400

7,705,018 7,601,169 7,488,353 7,431,808

7,396,628

7,562,085

7,433,465 7,354,056

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

SMALL AND MID-SIZED BUSINESSES ARE DEFINED AS HAVING BETWEEN 1 AND 499 EMPLOYEES. Source: Business Journals, SMB Insights Report, 2017 go.bizjournals.com/l/162121/2016-07-20/3vjc7

Source: Business Journals, SMB Insights Report, 2017 http://go.bizjournals.com/l/162121/2016-07-20/3vjc7 Small and Mid-sized businesses are defined as having between 1 and 499 employees. Total Sales Receipts of U.S. Hispanic-owned Businesses

TOTAL SALES RECEIPTS OF U.S. HISPANIC-OWNED BUSINESSES (in Billions of Dollars)

$222

$351

$474

$640

FIGURES IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS

2002

2007

2012

2017 (PR O J E C TE D )

Source: Business Journals, SMB Insights Report, 2017 go.bizjournals.com/l/162121/2016-07-20/3vjc7

DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Business Journals, SMB Insights Report, 2017 http://go.bizjournals.com/l/162121/2016-07-20/3vjc7

222

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

2016


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

HISPANIC ARE A GROWING FORCE IN THE LABOR MARKET Hispanic Are a Growing Force in the Labor Market

FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

4.8

3.3 2.3 2

2.3

2.3

2012

2017 (PR O J E C TE D )

1.9 1.5

2002

2007

Number of Businesses

Paid Employees

Source: Business Journals, SMB Insights Report, 2017 go.bizjournals.com/l/162121/2016-07-20/3vjc7

Source: Business Journals, SMB Insights Report, 2017 http://go.bizjournals.com/l/162121/2016-07-20/3vjc7

LEADING INDUSTRIES AMONG HISPANIC-OWNED BUSINESSES Leading Industries Among Hispanic-owned Businesses

3%

ACCOMMODATIONS & FOOD SERVICES REAL ESTATE/RENTIN G & LEASING

3%

4%

10% 7%

TRANSPORTATION & WAREHOUSING

4%

8%

R ETAIL TRADE

9%

8%

PRO FESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC & TECHNICAL

15% 11%

HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE

9%

14%

CONSTRUCTION

10% 16%

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

17%

OTHER SERVICES

Hispanic-owned Businesses

Non-Hispanic-owned Businesses

Source: Business Journals, SMB Insights Report, 2017 go.bizjournals.com/l/162121/2016-07-20/3vjc7

DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Business Journals, SMB Insights Report, 2017 http://go.bizjournals.com/l/162121/2016-07-20/3vjc7

223

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

7% 13%


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

TOP FRONT-LINE AND SUPERVISORY RETAIL WORKERS IN PHOENIX METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA (MSA) BY RACE/ETHNICITY Top Front-line and Supervisory Retail Workers in Phoenix Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) (by Race/Ethnicity)

21%

F IR ST - L I N E S U P E R V I S O R S O F R E T A I L S A L E S W O R K E R S SALES MANAGERS GE N E R A L A N D O P E R A T I O N S M A N A G E R S S T O C K C L E R K S A ND O R D E R F I L L E R S RETAIL SALESPERSONS CASHIERS

70% 4%

14%

79%

14%

20%

78% 32%

56%

25%

70% 65%

30%

Hispanic or Latino

30%

White

50%

56%

60%

Black or African-American

Source: Center for the Future of Arizona, Retail Trade in the Phoenix, AZ, 2017 www.arizonafuture.org/education-we-need/retailworks-az/

PHOENIX METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA (MSA) EMPLOYMENT BY RACE/ETHNICITY Phoenix Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Employment

Source: Center for the Future of Arizona, Retail Trade in the Phoenix, AZ, 2017 (by Race/Ethnicity) https://www.arizonafuture.org/education-we-need/retailworks-az/

63%

WHITE

26%

HISPANIC

4%

3%

ASIAN

25% 6%

5%

B L A C K O R A F R I C A N- A ME R I C A N

63%

A M E R I C A N I ND I AN O R A L A S K A N N A T I V E

2%

2%

T W O O R MO R E R A C E S

1%

1%

N A T IVE H A W A I I A N O R O T H E R P A C I F I C I S L A N D E R

0.20%

0.20%

Retail

All Industries

Source: Center for the Future of Arizona, Retail Trade in the Phoenix, AZ, 2017 www.arizonafuture.org/education-we-need/retailworks-az/

224 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: Center for the Future of Arizona, Retail Trade in the Phoenix, AZ, 2017 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://www.arizonafuture.org/education-we-need/retailworks-az/


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Top 5 Growing Industries in Arizona

G E N E R A L ME D I C A L A N D S U R G I C A L HOSPITALS

INDIV IDUA L A ND F A MIL Y S ER V ICES

EL ECTR O NIC SHO PPING A ND MA IL - O R DER HO USES

7,179

8,968

R E S T AU R AN T S

9,276

11,363

21,896

TOP 5 GROWING INDUSTRIES IN ARIZONA

CO MPUTER S Y S TE M S D E S I GN A N D R EL A TE D S E RV I C E S

3-YEAR EMPLOYMENT CHANGE (2013-2016) Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Statewide Report, 2017 laborstats.az.gov/special-reports

Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Statewide Report, 2017 https://laborstats.az.gov/special-reports

TOP INDUSTRIES FOR EMPLOYMENT IN ARIZONA

G E N E R A L ME D I C A L A N D SURGICAL HOSPITALS

PHYSICIA NS ' O F F ICES

G R O CER Y STO R ES

42,896

55,571

R E S T AU R AN T S

56,159

100,231

203,351

Top Industries for Employment in Arizona

SER V ICES TO BU I L D I N GS A N D DW E L L I N GS

CURRENT EMPLOYMENT NUMBERS (Q4 2016) Current employment numbers (Q4 2016) Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Statewide Report, 2017 laborstats.az.gov/special-reports

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

225

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Statewide Report, 2017 https://laborstats.az.gov/special-reports


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

TOP 5 GROWING INDUSTRIES IN MARICOPA COUNTY

ELECTRONIC SHOPPING AND MA I L -O R D E R H O U S E S

INS UR A NCE A G ENCIES A ND B R O KER A G ES

INDIV IDUA L A ND F A MIL Y SER V ICES

6,472

6,880

R E S T AU R AN T S

7,132

9,444

14,082

Top 5 Growing Industries in Maricopa County

CO MPUTER S YS TE M S D E S I GN A N D R EL A TE D S E RV I C E S

3-YEAR EMPLOYMENT CHANGE (2013-2016) 3 year employment change (2013-2016)

Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Maricopa County Report, 2017 laborstats.az.gov/special-reports

TOP INDUSTRIES FOR EMPLOYMENT IN MARICOPA COUNTY

R E S T AU R AN T S

G E N E R A L ME D I C A L A N D SURGICAL HOSPITALS

PHYSICIA NS ' O F F ICES

G R O CER Y STO R ES

32,204

36,353

41,239

59,036

139,045

Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Maricopa County Report, 2017 https://laborstats.az.gov/special-reports Top Industries for Employment in Maricopa County

DEPO SIT O RY C RE D I T INF O RM A TI O N

CURRENTCurrent EMPLOYMENT NUMBERS (Q4 2016) employment numbers (Q4 2016) Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Maricopa County Report, 2017 laborstats.az.gov/special-reports

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

226

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Maricopa County Report, 2017


SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER 6

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

TOP 5 GROWING INDUSTRIES IN PIMA COUNTY

I N D I V I D U A L A N D F A MI L Y SERVICES

B US INESS SUPPO R T S ER V ICES

INSUR A NCE CA R R IER S

1,274

1,498

1,634

R E S T A U R AN T S

1,674

2,889

Top 5 Growing Industries in Pima County

EMPL O YM E N T S E RV I C E S

3-YEAR EMPLOYMENT (2013-2016) 3 year employment CHANGE change (2013-2016) Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Pima County Report, 2017 laborstats.az.gov/special-reports

TOP INDUSTRIES FOR EMPLOYMENT IN PIMA COUNTY

Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Pima County Report, 2017 https://laborstats.az.gov/special-reports

R E S T AU R AN T S

G E N E R A L ME D I C A L A N D SURGICAL HOSPITALS

B USINESS SUPPO R T S ER V ICES

EMPL O YMENT S ER V ICES

7,835

8,935

11,280

17,993

29,373

Top Industries for Employment in Pima County

O F F ICES OF P H Y S I C I A N S

CURRENTCurrent EMPLOYMENT NUMBERS (Q4 2016) employment numbers (Q4 2016) Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Pima County Report, 2017 laborstats.az.gov/special-reports

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

227

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Growing & Declining Industries - Pima County Report, 2017


Resources Mentoring

Networking

Free cash. Want some? *

Ask Maria Brunner how to get up to $750 cash back with our Premier Member Perks program. Maria Brunner, Business Development Officer NMLS 512744 Visit OneAZcu.com for details or call Maria at your neighborhood branch. 602.644.4621

Federally insured by NCUA. Equal Housing Lender. NMLS 607456. *Please visit OneAZcu.com/premier for terms and conditions. For membership eligibility, visit OneAZcu.com/membership.

1.844.OneAZcu | OneAZcu.com


SECTION I

CHAPTER 6 BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PROFILE

THE PATH TO A COLLEGE DEGREE VARIES WIDELY BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

For Eric Rascon, his journey to achieving higher education began in his American history class at North High School in Phoenix. His teacher represented the Be A Leader Foundation, a program that provides workshops for students interested in college.

Rascon says Be A Leader improved his time management, organization and discipline and he continued using these skills throughout his internships. Following his tenure with AZHCC, he accepted an internship with AAA for six months before graduating in May. Rascon says he got to spend time in the insurance, marketing, travel and public relations departments â&#x20AC;&#x201C; giving him a wide range of experience. The challenges of adapting to a new learning environment, financial strains and personal difficulties created hardships for him at ASU, but Rascon didn't let it discourage him.

"To be honest, before that class I never knew what scholarships were," Rascon admits. "College was expensive and it wasn't until that moment that I realized I needed to take it seriously."

"There were and are problems in my life right now, but it could be worse," Rascon says. "I have a house, a bed, food on the table and am able to afford my belongings. Despite our new administration, America is the greatest country in the world."

Rascon says the workshops taught him the importance of selfinitiative and being prepared. He says the lessons he learned through Be A Leader helped him graduate from Arizona State University (ASU) with a bachelor's degree in communication. It helped him become president of Advocates for Education, a group he founded at ASU. It helped him qualify for multiple internships, including a stint at the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Rascon adds that he is a great admirer of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the work it does in Third World nations, such as providing vaccines, clean water and food. "[Bill and Melinda Gates] have transformed the lives of people who live in those countries," Rascon says. "I would like to reach that same status as well. It can be my local community or a Third World country, but I just want to help."

"It was probably the best experience out of all them," Rascon says regarding his time at the AZHCC. "The Chamber takes students in and gives them room to grow. They give them an opportunity to handle projects that an intern in a corporate job would not."

Felipe Corral Jr. is a 2017 journalism intern at the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and a student at the Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University.

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

229

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


GUARANTEE YOUR SEATS TO THE

SEMI-FINAL CAN-AM 500

NOV. 10-12

FOR TICKETS, VISIT

PHOENIXRACEWAY.COM OR CALL 866-408-RACE [7223]


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

It's often said "demography is destiny." But demographic trends can change. The tripling of the Latino population that Arizona experienced between 1990 and 2015, for instance, isn't likely to recur over the next 25 years. Yet, even though the state's Hispanic population growth has slowed, its effects could be felt for decades to come. According to the U.S. Census, Latinos were 30 percent of Arizona's population in 2000. Today, despite somewhat slower growth, Hispanics are 33 percent of the state's population. Experts believe Hispanics could become the state's majority population by 2035 or 2040. Already, nearly 50 percent of the state's K-12 students are Hispanic. Nationally, "The annual growth rate of the U.S. Hispanic population remained flat between 2016 and 2017," according to a recent report by Pew Research, "but Hispanics continue to account for more of the nation's overall population growth than any other race or ethnicity." Fueled by immigration and high fertility rates, Pew reported, "the Hispanic population's annual growth rate peaked at 4.2 percent in 2001." Since then, immigration (especially from Mexico) has plunged and the fertility rate has dropped from "98.3 births per 1,000 Hispanic women to 71.7 in 2015." Strong growth in the Mexican economy and threats of mass deportations by the Trump administration have reduce immigration even more. Despite a common misconception, Asians, not Latinos, are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, with an annual 2.9 percent growth rate as compared to 2 percent for Hispanics. In 2013, there were more Chinese and Indian immigrants to the U.S. than Mexicans. Census figures also show that the country's white population is dropping by .1 percent annually. There are 58.6 million Hispanics in the U.S., about 18 percent of the total population. While Hispanic population growth has slowed, Census figures show about half of the nation's total population growth between 2016 and 2017 was nevertheless due to Hispanics. Three states accounted for a majority of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2016: California (15.3 million), Texas (10.9 million) and Florida (5.1 million). Latinos are 2.4 million of the 6.9 million people who call Arizona home. It's worth noting that Arizona Latinos would likely be a larger percentage of the state's population today if not for the passage of Arizona Senate Bill 1070 in 2010 and the coinciding effects of the Great Recession. According to the Department of Homeland Security, about 200,000 undocumented immigrants left the state around that period. It's not known how many undocumented immigrants left Arizona because of fears of deportation tied to the passage of SB 1070 versus the loss of jobs and the collapse of the state's economy. But immigration experts point out that undocumented immigrants often live in households with relatives who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents, meaning the immigrants who left Arizona most likely did not relocate alone. DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

231

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


CHASE IS PROUD TO SUPPORT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

SO YOU CAN DO MORE FOR YOUR COMMUNITY. Contact Your Local Chase Business Banker Today. Ruben Meza Vice President Relationship Manager 480-902-7904

Earl Van Fossen Vice President Relationship Manager Area Manager 480-902-7957 ®

For more information, visit chase.com JPMorgan Chase, N.A. Member FDIC © 2017 JPMorgan Chase & Co.

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

232

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

PROFILE

CHAPTER 7 POPULATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

RIP, PETE GARCIA

INSPIRATIONAL COMMUNITY ACTIVIST LED CPLC FOR ALMOST 25 YEARS Arizona icon and past president of Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC), Pete Garcia, died May 3, 2017. He was 72.

"Arizona is a far better place because of Pete Garcia," Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton, says. Garcia was born and raised in Phoenix by his single mother in the Marcos de Niza housing projects. He graduated from Phoenix Union High School and, in 1962, joined the U.S. Army. After completing his military service, Garcia returned to the Valley and earned a teaching degree at Arizona State University. He earned a master's in public administration from the University of Southern California while working as a federal employee in Washington, D.C. before joining Valle del Sol, which provides behavioral health services. He was Valle's President & CEO from 1980 to 1984.

Garcia was best known for leading CPLC, a nonprofit community development organization that provides a wide range of economic, education and social services to hundreds of thousands of people in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico. He served as president and CEO of CPLC from 1984 to 2008. Under his direction, CPLC became the second-largest nonprofit corporation in the country. "Right now, Chicanos Por La Causa has 42 programs that stemmed mostly from him," Jose "Casper" Habre, a CPLC board member told the Arizona Republic.

After retiring from CPLC in 2008, Garcia founded The Victoria Foundation, named after his late mother. From 2008-2017, Garcia raised more than $4 million, which enabled students to pursue higher education. He also raised money through The Victoria Foundation to provide bikes for inner city youths, Christmas stockings for the elderly and turkey dinners for veterans on Thanksgiving.

Known as "Big Dog" to his friends, Garcia earned a reputation for his managerial and fundraising skills and his ability to lead and inspire people. "Pete's selfless commitment to the community, amplified by his love for all people, will profoundly impact the lives of countless many generations to come," says CPLC's current President and CEO, David Adame.

Among his many accolades, Garcia was recognized with other national leaders in 2005 by the Local Initiatives Support Corporation in Washington D.C. In 2007, He received the Raul Yzaguirre Community Leadership Award from Valle del Sol, the Cesar E. Chavez Leadership Institute Legacy Award and the National Hispanic Heritage Hall of Fame Award. He received an Inspire Award from AARP in 2008 and the ASU Medal of Excellence in 2009.

"Arizona lost a giant of our community," says Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Gonzalo A. de La Melena, Jr. "Pete had a profound influence on our state and especially its Latino communities." Janet Murguía, president and CEO of the National Council of La Raza, the nation's most influential Latino advocacy group, called Garcia, "a force of nature – not just as a champion of Arizona's Latino community, but as a man who committed his life to working tirelessly to improve the lives of the underserved and vulnerable."

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Garcia is survived by his wife, Sarah and three children, David, Iliana and Hilario. PHOTO BY PHIL SOTO

233

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

U.S. POPULATION DISTRIBUTION BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2015

ASIAN

5,969,700

HISPANIC

887,300

BLACK

2,493,900

WH ITE

17,741,700

39,257,300

56,872,700

195,645,900

U.S. Population Distribution by Race/Ethnicity (2015)

AME R ICAN IND IAN

NAT IV E H AW AIIAN

T W O OR M ORE RA CES

Source: Kaiser Family Foundation, Population Distribution By Race/Ethnicity, 2015 kff.org/other/state-indicator/distribution-by-raceethnicity

U.S. HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH SLOWS SINCE GREAT RECESSION

Source: Kaiser Family Foundation, Population Distribution By Race/Ethnicity, 2015 http://kff.org/other/state-indicator/distribution-by-raceethnicity U.S. Hispanic Population Growth Slows Since Great Recession

Average Annual Growth Rate

2.80%

4.40%

AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH RATE

2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 7

2007- 2014

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

234

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

SOUTH REGION EXPERIENCED HIGHEST HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH FROM 2000-2014

South Region Experienced Highest Hispanic Population Growth from 2000-2014 % of Hispanic Population growth

41%

43%

SOUTH

WEST

N O RT HEA ST

1990-2000

2000-2007

9%

10%

10%

14%

11%

12%

34%

35%

37%

44%

PERCENTAGE OF HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH

M I D WES T

2007-2014

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recessio

FASTEST GROWING COUNTIES BY LATINO POPULATION ARE LOCATED IN NORTH DAKOTA Fastest Growing Counties by Latino Population Are Located in North Dakota Latino Population Growth Rate From 2007 to 2014

LATINO POPULATION GROWTH RATE FROM 2007 TO 2014 B URL EIG H C O U N TY , NO R TH D AKOTA

82%

D UC HE SNE C O UNTY , UTAH

85%

BEA D LE C O UNTY , S O UTH D AKOTA

85%

ST. BER N AR D P AR I S H , LO UI SI ANA

89%

L UZERNE C O UNTY , P E NNS Y LVANI A

91%

BR Y AN C O U N TY , G E O R GI A

91%

RU SS E LL C O U N TY , ALAB AMA

92%

WA R D C O UNTY , NO R TH D AKOTA STA R K C O U N TY , NO R TH D AKOTA WIL L IA MS C O U N TY , NO R TH D AKOTA

117% 294% 367%

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

235 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

THE LATINO POPULATION HAS DISPERSED TO COUNTIES WITH HISTORICALLY FEWER HISPANICS

The Latino Population Has Dispersed to Counties with Historically Fewer Hispanics % of Latinos residing in counties where Latino population was _____ in 1990

PERCENTAGE OF LATINOS RESIDING IN COUNTIES WHERE LATINO POPULATION WAS ____ IN 1990

74

16 9

69

64

62

17

19

19

11

1

1990

13

3

2000

Less Than 1,000

14

4

2007

1,000-9,999

10,000-49,999

4

201 4

50,000 or more

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

SOUTH DAKOTA HAS THE FASTEST-GROWING PERCENTAGE GROWTH OF LATINO POPULATION SINCE 2000

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession

South Dakota Has the Fastest-growing Percentage Growth of Latino Population Since 2000 % Population Change, 2000-2014

136%

A R KA NS A S

NO R TH DA KO TA

MA R YL A ND

NO R TH CA R O L INA

120%

141%

K ENTUCKY

141%

A L A B A MA

141%

SOUTH CAROLINA

154%

TENNESSEE

164%

172%

SOUTH DAKOTA

176%

190%

PERCENTAGE POPULATION CHANGE, 2000-2014

V I RGI N I A

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

236

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

ARIZONA IN TOP 5 U.S. STATES WITH LARGEST HISPANIC POPULATION SHARE 39%

CALIFORNIA

TEXA S

NE W M E XI C O

28%

31%

39%

48%

Arizona in Top 5 U.S. States with Largest Hispanic Population Share

A R IZ O NA

NE V A D A

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

MORE THAN 50% OF U.S. HISPANICS LIVE IN THE TOP 15 METROPOLITAN AREAS FOR HISPANIC POPULATION, 2014

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

More Than 50% of U.S. Hispanics Live in the Top 15 Metropolitan Areas for Hispanic Population, 2014 Number of Hispanics in Millions

NUMBER OF HISPANICS IN MILLIONS O R L A N D O-K I S S I M M E E - S A N F O R D , F L EL PASO, TX M C AL L E N- E D I N B U R G -MI S S I O N , T X W A S H IN G T O N- AR L I N G T O N- AL E X A N D R I A , D C-V A -MD - W V S AN F R AN C I S C O - O A K L A N D -H A Y W A R D , C A SA N D I E G O-C A R L S B A D , C A S A N A N T O N I O- N E W B R A U N F E L S , T X P H O E N I X -M E S A - S C O T T S D A L E , A Z

0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.3

D A L L A S -F O R T W O R T H - A R L I N G T O N , T X C H I C A G O- NA P E R V I L L E -E L G I N , I L -I N -W I R I V E R S I D E - S A N BE R N A D I N O-O N T A R I O , C A H O U S T O N- T H E W O OD L A N D S - S U G A R L A N D , T X M IA M I - F O R T L A U DE R DAL E - W E S T P A L M B E A C H , F L N E W YO R K - NE W A R K -J E R S E Y C I T Y , N Y-N J - P A L O S AN G E L E S- L O N G BE A C H -A N A H E I M , C A

1.9 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.6 4.8 6.0

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

237 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

IN 2014, U.S.-BORN HISPANICS WERE THE MAJORITY IN 13 OUT OF 15 HISPANIC METROPOLITAN AREAS

In 2014, U.S.-born Hispanics Were the Majority in 13 out of 15 Hispanic Metropolitan Areas

O RL A NDO -KISSIMMEE- S ANF ORD, F L

72

28

EL PASO, TX

72

28

70

MC A L L E N- EDINB URG - MIS S ION, TX

30

47

W A S H I N G TO N- A RL INGTO N - A L EXANDRIA, DC- V A-MD- WV

53 59

SA N FRA NC ISC O- OAKLAND- HAY WARD, CA

41 66

SAN DIEGO- CARLSB AD, CA

34 84

SA N A NTO NIO- NEW B RAUNF ELS, TX 71

P H O E NIX -MESA- SCOTTSDALE, AZ 62

DA L L A S- FO RT WORTH- ARLINGTON, TX

36 70

RIVE RSIDE - SA N BERNADINO- ONTARIO, CA 61

H O U STO N- TH E W O O DLANDS- SUGAR LAND, TX 39

M I A MI- FO RT L A UDE RDA L E - WEST PALM B EACH, F L

U.S. Born

39 42

60

L O S A NGE L E S- L O NG B EACH- ANAHEIM, CA

30 61

58

NE W YO RK - NE W A RK- JERSEY CITY , NY- NJ- PA

29 38

64

C H IC A GO- NA P ERV ILLE- ELGIN, IL- IN- WI

16

40

Foreign Born

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S. Latino Population Growth and Dispersion Has Slowed Since Onset of The Great Recession, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/09/08/latino-population-growth-and-dispersion-has-slowed-since-the-onset-of-the-great-recession/

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

238

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

MAJORITY OF HISPANICS IN UNITED STATES ARE U.S. BORN, 2014 Majority of Hispanics in United States Are U.S. Born (2014)

35%

U.S. BORN FOREIGN BORN 65%

Source: Pew Research Center, Statistical Portrait of Hispanics in The United States, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/19/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-key-charts/

DETAILED ORIGIN OF HISPANICS IN THE UNITED STATES, 2014

35,371,314

Source: Pew Research Center, Statistical Portrait of Hispanics in The United States, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/19/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-key-charts/ Detailed Origin of Hispanics in the United States (2014)

MEXICAN PUERTO RICAN SALVADORAN CUBAN DOMINICAN ALL OTHER SPANISH/HISPANIC GUATEMALAN

614,151

659,166

753,538

812,731

1,046,332

1,324,694

1,683,332

HONDURAN 1,763,651

2,045,970

2,100,433

5,319,961

COLOMBIAN SPANIARD ECUADORIAN PERUVIAN

Source: Pew Research Center, Statistical Portrait of Hispanics in The United States, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/19/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-key-charts/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

239

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Pew Research Center, Statistical Portrait of Hispanics in The United States, 2016


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

MORE THAN 50% OF HISPANICS IN THE U.S. ARE UNDER 30, 2014

More Than 50% of Hispanics in the U.S. are Under 30 (2014) 1.2% 5.4%

0.3%

2.7%

YOUNGER THAN 10 18.6%

10-19 YEARS

9.3%

20-29 YEARS 30-39 YEARS 40-49 YEARS 13.2%

50-59 YEARS

17.2%

60-69 YEARS 70-79 YEARS 80-89 YEARS

15.5%

90 AND OLDER

16.6%

Source: Pew Research Center, Statistical Portrait of Hispanics in The United States, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/19/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-key-charts

Source: Pew Research Center, Statistical Portrait of Hispanics in The United States, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/19/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-key-charts

HISPANICS ARE THE NATION'S YOUNGEST MAJOR RACIAL/ETHNIC GROUP Hispanics are the Nation's Youngest Major Racial/Ethnic Group Median Age

MEDIAN AGE

39 31 29 24

34

34

31 29

25

1990

2000

43

35

36 33

32

30

25

42

27

28

21

1980

White

Asian

2010

Black

201 4

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, The Nation's Latino Population Is Defined By Its Youth, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/20/the-nations-latino-population-is-defined-by-its-youth/

Source: Pew Research Center, The Nation's Latino Population Is Defined By Its Youth, 2016 240 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/20/the-nations-latino-population-is-defined-by-its-youth/


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

NEARLY 75% OF U.S.-BORN HISPANICS ARE MILLENNIALS OR YOUNGER Nearly 75% of U.S. - Born Hispanics are Millennials or Younger % of Hispanics

PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS 3%

7%

9% 14%

24%

27% 37%

47%

26% 6%

U.S. BORN

Under 18

FOREIGN BORN

Millennials (18-33)

Gen X (34-49)

Boomer (50-68)

Silent/Greatest (69+)

Source: Pew Research Center, The Nation's Latino Population Is Defined By Its Youth, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/20/the-nations-latino-population-is-defined-by-its-youth/

Source: Pew Research Center, The Nation's Latino Population Is Defined By Its Youth, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/20/the-nations-latino-population-is-defined-by-its-youth/

MEDIAN AGE OF IMMIGRANT HISPANICS IS MORE THAN 20 YEARS OLDER THAN THAT OF U.S.-BORN HISPANICS

Median Age of Immigrant Hispanics is More Than 20 Years Older Than That of U.S. Born Hispanics Median Age

MEDIAN AGE

38 31

32

33

18

19

18

17

1980

1990

2000

2010

U.S. Born

41

19

2014

Foreign Born

Source: Pew Research Center, The Nation's Latino Population Is Defined By Its Youth, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/20/the-nations-latino-population-is-defined-by-its-youth/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

241

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Pew Research Center, The Nation's Latino Population Is Defined By Its Youth, 2016


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

NEARLY 6-IN-10 HISPANICS ARE MILLENNIALS OR YOUNGER

Nearly 6-in-10 Hispanics are Millennials or Younger

4% 14% 22%

8%

21%

21%

21%

13%

27%

25% 20%

26%

25%

32%

26%

HISPANIC

Under 18

7%

BLACK

Millennials (18-33)

Gen X (34-49)

25%

20%

20%

19%

ASIAN

WHITE

Boomer (50-68)

Silent/Greatest (69+)

Source: Pew Research Center, The Nation's Latino Population Is Defined By Its Youth, 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/20/the-nations-latino-population-is-defined-by-its-youth/

Source: Pew Research Center, The Nation's Latino Population Is Defined By Its Youth, 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/04/20/the-nations-latino-population-is-defined-by-its-youth/

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

242

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


MOST FINANCIAL COMPANIES ARE INTERESTED IN YOUR MONEY. WE’RE INTERESTED IN YOUR FUTURE.

Northwestern Mutual realizes that money matters, but what matters more is you and your family. Your goals. Your interests. And the things you’re passionate about most in life. So we’ll be right there with you every step of the way, helping you discover what’s possible and guiding you with a long-term financial plan that turns your biggest goals into your biggest achievements. You and Northwestern Mutual—stronger together.

Northwestern Mutual is the marketing name for The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company (NM), Milwaukee, WI, and its subsidiaries.


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

244

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

PROFILE

CHAPTER 7 POPULATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

SI SE PUEDE FOUNDATION BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

Students, volunteers and fellow coworkers consider Alberto Esparza a tĂ­o, father figure and a friend. These relationships, however, stem from the countless resources and experiences Esparza has provided through his Si Se Puede Foundation.

There are numerous influential stories that stem from the Si Se Puede Foundation and its programs. They take pride in providing cutting-edge extracurricular activities and resources for underserved communities and giving students hands-on opportunities to grow and develop. "Hispanics are not represented enough in the STEM field," Cornejo says. "Alberto is fighting a crusade of bringing kids into careers of science and technology....His message is, 'Consider a career in STEM.'"

Esparza founded the Si Se Puede Foundation in 1993, opening doors and paving the way for approximately 20,000 students from kindergarten through the university level. The foundation has a multitude of robotics, dance and soccer programs in the East Valley and provides students with scholarship opportunities.

Despite Esparza's endless outreach and list of accolades, those who worked close to him trace his success to his character. "He is very amicable, down to earth and friendly," Romero says. "He knows how to approach people at all levels and his humbleness makes it hard for people not to help. There is magnetism and charisma that makes everyone want to become part of the entire process."

"It's a beautiful example of the circle that is community, school and familia," Monica Romero, Director of Federal Programs at the Chandler Unified School District, says.

All in all, there is no doubt: Esparza embodies the concept of family.

The communities the foundation targets are typically underserved and underprivileged. In retrospect, the lack of resources reflects overwhelming dropout rates, lack of minority representation in professional fields and a deficiency in educational attainment.

FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

The launch of the Si Se Puede Foundation and Esparza's continuous community initiatives are not surprising to the people close to him, who have noticed the sacrifices he has made to serve the youth of Arizona. Carmen Cornejo, former member of the foundation's board of directors, described Esparza as a "family friend." Cornejo and her husband both served on the board of the foundation and made sure their two sons participated thoroughly. There was a specific individual who went through the program facing unimaginable circumstances. Roberto is legally blind, faced financial hardships and was raised by a single immigrant mother. Through adversity, Roberto received his engineering degree with the help of the robotics program and Esparza's mentorship. "His personality blossomed," Cornejo says. "[Roberto's] knowledge increased and he applied Alberto's mentoring and coaching in order to receive the Gates Millennium scholarship."

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

245

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

Arizona MARKET SNAPSHOT The Arizona Hispanic population continues to represent a substantial portion of the local population, accounting for close to one-third of Arizona residents. The 2015 statewide Hispanic population exceeds 2 million individuals. Arizona Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. A total of 52% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Aggregate Arizona household expenditures among Hispanic households (all consumer products and categories) exceed $25 billion annually, Market Snapshot 19% of total. The Arizona Hispanic population continues to represent a substantial portion of the local population, accounting for close to one-third of Arizona residents. The 2015 statewide Hispanic population exceeds 2 million individuals. Arizona Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 52% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Aggregate household expenditures among Hispanic households (all consumer products and categories) exceeds $25 billion annually, 19% of total.

% OF POPULATION

POPULATION

HISPANICS REPRESENT THE SECOND-LARGEST

2015 POPULATION

Hispanics Represent the second-largest population group in the POPULATION GROUP IN THE STATE AT CLOSE state at close to one-third of total.

TO ONE-THIRD OF TOTAL.

POPULATION % OF 2015 POPULATION POPULATION

Total

Total

100%

100%

Hispanic

Hispanic

31%

55%4%

280,390 3,757,632

Black Non-Hispanic

Asian NonHispanic

3%

Asian Non-Hispanic

American Indian NonHispanic

4%

4% 3%

**Carmen This is pg. **Carmen This is pg.Other NonAmerican IndianDATOSAZ14 Non-Hispanic Hispanic 4% 160 DATOSAZ14 160

3% 4%

2,136,185

2,136,185 3,757,632

Black NonHispanic

Other Non-Hispanic

6,796,459

31%55%

White NonHispanic

White Non-Hispanic

6,796,459

4% 2%

Hispanic

215,412 280,390

White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic

259,226

215,412

2%

Asian Non-Hispanic American Indian Non-Hispanic

147,614

259,226

2%

Other Non-Hispanic

55%

147,614

**Carmen This is pg. 160 DATOSAZ14;

2%

2,500,000 2,500,000

6% 2%

6%

Population

Population

31%

2,000,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 500,000

500,000

92%

92%

-

2000 2010 2015 2020 2000 2010 2015 2020 Hispanic 1,895,149 1,895,149 2,136,185 2,136,185 2,372,777 1 out2,372,777 of 4 Hispanics in Arizona are Bicultural, Hispanic 1,295,317 1,295,317 Black Non-Hispanic 146,183 239,101 280,390 321,361 ranked as HA3 of the HispanicityTM segments. Black 146,183 239,101 280,390 321,361 **Carmen This is Non-Hispanic pg. Asian Non-Hispanic 88,856 170,509 215,412 261,133 However, 27% Asian Non-Hispanic 88,856 170,509 215,412 261,133 of the Hispanic population fall into the 160 DATOSAZ14

Puerto Rican All OtherAll Other TM segments. Mexican Puerto HA4 andMexican HA5 Hispancity 1 out of 4 Hispanics in ArizonaRican are Bicultural,

ranked as HA3 of the HispanicityTM segments. However, 27% of the Hispanic population fall into the HA4 and HA5 in Hispancity segments. 1 out of 4 Hispanics ArizonaTMare bicultural, ranked as HA3

**Carmen This is pg. 160 DATOSAZ14

PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE 2015 V. 2020 Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

of the Hispanicity™ segments. However, 27% of the Hispanic population and HA5 HispancityTM segments. 13% fall into the HA419%

21%Percent Change 2015 v. 2020 Projected 21%

15% 11%

15% 11%

6% 1% Total Population

Hispanic Population

14%

Hispanicity

9%

1%

-1%

White NonBlack NonAsian NonAmerican Other NonHispanic TotalHispanic Indian NonHispanicHispanic White NonBlack Non- Hispanic Asian NonPopulation Population Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic

American Indian NonHispanic

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series| 2015

A Z

2 0 1 7

29%

25%

HA2

HA3

HA1

HA4 HA2

HA5

HA3

HA4

HA5

Hispanicity: See next page for HA1-HA5 definitions.

Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015 Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

DATO S

HA1

Other NonHispanic

TM

29%

25%

-1%

TM

Hispanicity

9%

6%

19%

13%

14%

246

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 7

POPULATION

Arizona

HISPANIC POPULATION % BY ZIP CODE

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado • English dominant (nearly no Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation

The Density Of The Hispanic Population Is Demonstrated For The State Of Arizona By Zip Code.

• Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often "retro-acculturate" HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY™ SEGMENTS BY ZIP CODE

• Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano • Spanish preferred

The Map Shows The Prevalent Hispanicity™ Segments For Zip Codes In Arizona.

(some English) • Immigrant as adult, • In U.S. 10+ years • Predominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

DATO S

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2015

A Z

2 0 1 7

247

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

Phoenix MARKET SNAPSHOT The population in the Phoenix metropolitan area has a strong Hispanic influence accounting for one out of every three residents for a total of close to 1.4 million individuals. Roughly 29% of the 1.4 million Hispanics in Phoenix area fall into Phoenix, AZ the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity™ segments, accounting for more than 400,000 individuals. Approximately $17.2 billion is Market Snapshot The population in the Phoenix metropolitan has a strong Hispanic influence accounting one out spent by Hispanics on household expenditures (all consumer products and area categories), accounting for 18% of totalfor household of every three residents for a total of close to 1.4 million individuals. Roughly 29% of the 1.4 million expenditures. TM Hispanics in Phoenix are fall into the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity segments accounting for more than 400,000 individuals. Approximately $17.2 billion is spent by Hispanic s on household expenditures

for a total of 18% of total household expenditures. HISPANICS REPRESENT THE SECOND-LARGEST % OF(all consumer products 2015 and categories), accounting POPULATION GROUP IN THE PHOENIX METROPOLITAN POPULATION POPULATION Hispanics represent the second-largest population AREA AT CLOSE TO ONE-THIRD OF TOTAL

POPULATION

group in the Phoenix metropolitan area at close to one-third of total.

**Carmen This is pg.

Total

162 DATOSAZ14 100% 4,471,779

Hispanic

31%

White Non-Hispanic

56%

POPULATION

Black Non-Hispanic

5%

Asian Non-Hispanic **Carmen This is pg. **Carmen This is pg. 162 DATOSAZ14 American Indian Non-Hispanic 162 DATOSAZ14

31%

230,244 1,389,987

White NonHispanic

56%

2,500,712

2%

4%

American Indian Non-Hispanic

2%

Other NonHispanic

2%

Hispanic White Non-Hispanic

4,471,779

Black Non-Hispanic

172,384 230,244

5%

Asian NonHispanic

2%

Asian Non-Hispanic American Indian Non-Hispanic

172,384 76,254

Other Non-Hispanic

56%

76,254

102,198 102,198

1,800,000 1,800,000 1,600,000 1,600,000 1,400,000 1,400,000 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 800,000 800,000 600,000 600,000 400,000 400,000 200,000 200,000

Population Population

31%

POPULATION

100%

Hispanic

Hispanic

4% 2% 2%

5%

2,500,712 2015

% OF POPULATION

Total

4% Black Non-

Other Non-Hispanic

1,389,987

2%

2% 7%

7%

2000 2010 2015 2020 2000 2010 2015 2020 Hispanic 817,021 1,235,718 1,235,718 1,389,987 1,389,9871,543,188 1,543,188 Hispanic 817,021 Black Non-Hispanic 113,185 113,185 193,497 193,497 230,244 230,244 267,065 267,065 Black Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic 65,557 65,557 134,415 172,384 172,384 Over211,310 half211,310 of Hispanics theofPhoenix metropolitan Asian Non-Hispanic 134,415 Overinhalf Hispanics in the Phoenix

metropolitan Mexican Puerto Rican All Other Hispanic TM Mexican Puerto Rican All Other Hispanic Segments area fall into the H3 to HA5 Hispanicty area fall into the H3 to HA5 HispanictyTM Segments

**Carmen This is pg. **Carmen This is pg. 162 DATOSAZ14 162 DATOSAZ14

PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE 2015 V. 2020 Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

Over half of Hispanics in the Phoenix metropolitan area fall into the H3 to HA5 Hispanicty™ Segments.

Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020 23% 23%

16% 11% 6%

15%

15% 19%

19%

16%

14%

11%

10%

14% 10%

Hispanicity TM Hispanicity

TM

6%

2%

Total

91% 91%

Hispanic

White TotalNonHispanic

2%

-1%

-1%

Black Non- White AsianNonNon- Black American Other Non- American Hispanic NonAsian NonHispanic Hispanic Indian Non- Hispanic Hispanic Indian NonHispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic

888.211.9353 | E.P.geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P.P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com || URL. www.geoscape.com 888.211.9353 E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American American Marketscape DataStream™ SeriesMarketscape 2015 Source: Geoscape American DataStream™ Series 2015 Source: Geoscape Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

28% 25% Other NonHispanic

HA1

28%

25% HA2

HA3 HA1 HA4 HA2 HA5 HA3

HA4

HA5

Hispanicity: See next page for HA1-HA5 definitions.

248

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

Phoenix

HISPANIC POPULATION % ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado • English dominant (nearly no Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation

Over 40% Of The Hispanic Population Is Concentrated Just Southwest Of The Phoenix Metro Area.

• Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often "retro-acculturate" HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY ™ SEGMENTS ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

• Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano

This Map Illustrates Zip Codes In Phoenix By The Postal Carrier Routes With The Largest Percentages Of HA4 And HA5 Hispanics.

• Spanish preferred (some English) • Immigrant as adult, • In U.S. 10+ years • Predominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

DATO S

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

A Z

2 0 1 7

249

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

Tucson, AZ MARKET SNAPSHOT The Hispanic population in Tucson continues to represent a substantial portion of the local population, accounting for more than 37% of Tucson residents. **Carmen More than Hispanics call Tucson homeAZ and it is a figure that has been increasing This300,000 is pg. Tucson, and expected to continue to grow in the next five years. The Tucson Hispanic population is primarily bicultural, accounting Market Snapshot 164 DATOSAZ14 for one out of three individuals. However, over 20% of the Hispanic population in the Tucson metropolitan area falls into the The Hispanic population in Tucson continues tohousehold represent a substantial expenditures portion of the local population, accounting for than 37% of products Tucson residents. More than 300,000 Hispanics call Tucson home and it HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity™ segments. Aggregate (all consumer and categories) among is a figure that has been increasing and expected to continue to grow in the next 5 years. The Tucson Hispanic population is primarily Bi-cultural accounting for 1 out of 3 individuals. However, over 20% of the Hispanic population in the Tucsonwith metropolitan area falls into the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity segments. Aggregate household expenditures (allevery consumer products and categories) among Tucson Tucson households exceed $4.7 billion annually, Hispanics accounting for more than one out of five dollars spent. households exceeds $4.7 billion annually, with Hispanics accounting for more than 1 out of every 5 dollars spent. TM

POPULATION

% OF POPULATION

2015 POPULATION

100%

1,039,345

Total Hispanic White Non-Hispanic

POPULATION

% OF POPULATION

Total

100%

37%

Hispanic

37%

White Non-Hispanic

53%

Black Non-Hispanic

3%

53%

Black Non-Hispanic

3% Asian Non-Hispanic

**Carmen This is pg. Asian Non-Hispanic 164 DATOSAZ14

3%

American Indian Non-Hispanic **Carmen This is pg.

2%

Other Non-Hispanic

2%

2%

164 DATOSAZ14 Other Non-Hispanic

2015 POPULATION

3%

383,508 1,039,345

3%

2% 2% 37%

383,508

Hispanic

546,738 546,738

White Non-Hispanic

34,704

Black Non-Hispanic

34,704 29,093

3%

American Indian Non-Hispanic

HISPANICS REPRESENT SECOND-LARGEST POPULATION Hispanics THE represent the second-largest population group in the Tucson metropolitan. GROUP IN THE TUCSON METROPOLITAN

Asian Non-Hispanic

23,036 29,093

Amercain Indian Non-Hispanic Other Non-Hispanic

22,266

23,036

2%

53%

22,266

1% 4%

500,000 450,000

Population

400,000

Population

350,000 300,000

1% 4% 500,000 450,000 400,000 350,000

250,000

300,000

200,000

250,000

150,000 100,000 50,000 -

200,000 150,000 100,000

95%

50,000

2000-

2010

**Carmen This is pg. Hispanic 247,577 Hispanic 164 DATOSAZ14 Black Non-Hispanic

2015

2000

2010

247,577

338,802

338,802

24,045 Black Non-Hispanic

Asian Non-Hispanic 16,595 Asian Non-Hispanic

383,508

31,075 24,045

34,704 31,075

24,592 16,595

29,093 24,592

**Carmen This is pg. 164 DATOSAZ14

95%

2020

2020 1 out of 3 of Hispanics in the Tucson metropolitan area 428,975 383,508 428,975 fall into the HA3 HispanictyTM Segment. However, 1 out 38,179 38,179 34,704 of 5 Hispanics fall into the HA4 to HA5 unacculturated 33,521 33,521 29,093 Mexican Puerto Rican other Hispanic Mexican Puerto RicanAllAll other Hispanic segments. 2015

1 out of 3 of Hispanics in the Tucson metropolitan area fall into the HA3 HispanictyTM Segment. However, 1 out of 5 out Hispanics into the HA4 to HA5 unacculturated One of threefallHispanics in the Tucson metropolitan area fall segments. into the HA38% Hispanicty™ Segment. However, one out of five

Projected Percent Change 20152015 v. 2020 PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE V. 2020

Hispanics fall into the HA4 to18% HA5 unacculturated segments.

15% Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020 12%

10%

1%

8%

15%

Hispanicity

10%

6%

8%

TM

TM Hispanicity 32%

-4% 1%

18%

15%

8%

12%

6%

15%

27%

-4%

32% 27%

Total

Hispanic

White NonHispanic

Total

Black NonHispanic

Hispanic

Asian NonHispanic

American Other NonIndian NonHispanic Hispanic White NonBlack NonAsian NonAmerican Hispanic

Hispanic

Hispanic

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series P. 888.211.9353 | E. 2015 geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com

A Z

2 0 1 7

Other NonHispanic

HA2

HA3 HA1

HA4 HA2

HA3

HA5 HA4

HA5

Hispanicity: See next page for HA1-HA5 definitions.

Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015 Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

DATO S

HA1

Indian NonHispanic

250

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 7

POPULATION

Tucson, AZ

HISPANIC POPULATION % ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTES

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado • English dominant (nearly no Spanish)

Most Of The Zip Codes In The Tucson Metro Area Have A Total Population That Is Over 30% Hispanic.

• Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation • Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often "retro-acculturate" HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY™ SEGMENTS ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

• Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano

The Map Indicates That There Is A Large Concentration Of HA4 And HA5 Hispanics At The Center Of The Tucson Metro.

• Spanish preferred (some English) • Immigrant as adult, • In U.S. 10+ years • Predominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

DATO S

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2015

A Z

2 0 1 7

251

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

Flagstaff, AZ MARKET SNAPSHOT The population in Flagstaff has a modest Hispanic influence, accounting for 15% of the metro's 140,000 residents and is second fastest-growing population behind Asians. Over half of the Hispanic population in the Flagstaff metropolitan area are acculturated, falling into the HA1 and HA2 Hispanicity™ segments that account Flagstaff,for AZ just over 10,000 residents. Hispanics Market Snapshotfor roughly 10% of total household in Flagstaff spend more than $240 millionTheon household expenditures, accounting population in Flagstaff has a modest Hispanic influence, accounting for 15% of the metro’s 140,000 residents and is second fast growing population behind Asians. Over half of the Hispanic population in the Flagstaff metropolitan area are acculturated falling into the HA1 and HA2 Hispanicity spending. segments accounting for just over 10,000 residents. Hispanics in Flagstaff spend more than $240 million on household expenditures accounting for roughly TM

10% of total household spending.

HISPANICS REPRESENT THIRD-LARGEST POPULATION Hispanics representTHE the third-largest population in theFLAGSTAFF Flagstaff metropolitan area. GROUPgroup IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA

% OF**Carmen This is2015 pg. 166 DATOSAZ14 POPULATION POPULATION

POPULATION

Total

100%

143,710

Hispanic

15%

21,834

White Non-Hispanic

54%

78,296

Black Non-Hispanic

1%

POPULATION

Asian Non-Hispanic

2015 POPULATION

Total

100%

143,710

Hispanic

15%

White NonHispanic

54%

Black NonHispanic

1%

Asian NonHispanic

2%

American Indian Non-Hispanic

25%

Other NonHispanic

3%

25%

**Carmen This is pg. 166 DATOSAZ14 Other 166 Non-Hispanic DATOSAZ14

3%

15%

25%

% OF POPULATION

2%

American IndianThis Non-Hispanic **Carmen is pg.

3%

Hispanic White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic

1,581

Asian Non-Hispanic

21,834

2%

78,296

2,283

American Indian Non-Hispanic

1%

1,581

Other Non-Hispanic

2,283

36,094 36,094

54%

3,622

3,622

30,000

5%

1% 5%

1%

30,000

Population Population

25,000

25,000

20,000 20,000 15,000 15,000 10,000 10,000 5,000 5,000 -

-

Hispanic

HispanicThis is pg. **Carmen Black Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic 166 Asian DATOSAZ14 Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic

2000

2010

2015

12,728

18,166

21,834

26,279

1,150

1,495

1,581

1,716

895

1,787

2,283

2000

12,728 1,150 895

2010

18,166

2015

21,834

1,495 1,787

**Carmen This is pg. 166 DATOSAZ14

1,581 2,283

2020

2,857

2020 26,279 1,716 2,857

93% 93% Close to 50% of Hispanics in the Flagstaff metropolitan area fall into the HA1 and TM Segment. Mexican Rican All other . Hispanic HA2Puerto Hispanicty ClosePuerto to 50% ofRican HispanicsAll in the Flagstaff Mexican other Hispanic metropolitan area fall into the HA1 and HA2 HispanictyTM Segment..

Close to 50% of Hispanics in the Flagstaff metropolitan area 9%the HA1 and HA2 Hispanicty™ Segment. fall into

Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020 PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE 2015 V. 2020 Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

25%

25%

20% 20%

9%

8%

Total

Hispanic

White NonHispanic

Black NonHispanic

White NonAsian NonHispanic

Hispanic

15%

Black NonAmerican Hispanic

Indian NonHispanic

TM

2% Asian NonAmerican Other Non-Indian NonHispanic Hispanic Hispanic

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

2 0 1 7

31% Other Non-

TM

26%

31%

26%

Hispanic

HA1

www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

A Z

Hispanicity

Hispanicity

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

DATO S

23%

9%

2% Hispanic

23%

12%

15%

8% 9% 9%

Total

9%

12%

HA2

HA1

HA2

HA3

HA3

HA4

HA4

HA5

HA5

Hispanicity: See next page for HA1-HA5 definitions.

252

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

Flagstaff, AZ

HISPANIC POPULATION % ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado • English dominant (nearly no Spanish)

The Zip Codes With The Largest Percentage Of Hispanics Are Just Northwest Of The Flagstaff Metropolitan Area.

• Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation • Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often "retro-acculturate" HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY™ SEGMENTS ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

• Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano

This Map Shows Zip Codes In The Metro Area By Postal Carrier Routes With The Largest Percentages Of HA4 And HA5 Hispanics.

• Spanish preferred (some English) • Immigrant as adult, • In U.S. 10+ years • Predominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

DATO S

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

A Z

2 0 1 7

253

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

CHAPTER 7

Yuma, AZ MARKET SNAPSHOT Roughly six out of 10 residents in the Yuma Metropolitan area are Hispanic, accounting for over 130,000 individuals. The Hispanic population is projected to increase by over 14,000 individuals or 11% by 2020. Yuma Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. One out of three Hispanics in the Yuma metropolitan area fall into the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity™ Yuma, AZ among Yuma's Hispanics exceed $1.3 segments. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) Market Snapshot billion annually, or 45% of total households. Roughly 6 out of 10 residents in the Yuma Metropolitan area are Hispanic presence, accounting for over 130,000 individuals. The Hispanic population is projected to increase

by over 14,000 individuals or 11% by 2020. Yuma Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 1 out of 3 Hispanics in the Yuma metropolitan area fall into the HA4 and HA5 HispanicityTM segments. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) among Yuma’s Hispanics exceeds $1.3 billion annually, or 45% of total households.

HISPANICS REPRESENT THE LARGEST POPULATION GROUP IN THE YUMA METROPOLITAN AREA

% OF 2015 **Carmen ThisPOPULATION is pg. POPULATION

POPULATION

168 DATOSAZ14

Total

100%

207,527

Hispanic

63%

131,256

White Non-Hispanic

32%

Black Non-Hispanic

2% Total

65,915

POPULATION

63%

White Non1% Hispanic

32%

Black NonHispanic

2%

Asian NonHispanic

1%

American Indian **Carmen Non-HispanicThis is pg. 1% 168 DATOSAZ14 Other Non-Hispanic

% OF POPULATION 100%

Hispanic

Asian Non-Hispanic **Carmen This is pg. 168 DATOSAZ14

2%

American Indian 1% Non-Hispanic Other NonHispanic

1% 1%

1%

Hispanic

32%

White Non-Hispanic

2015 POPULATION

Black Non-Hispanic

3,154 207,527

Asian Non-Hispanic

131,256

65,915 2,428

American Indian Non-Hispanic Other Non-Hispanic

3,154

1,862 2,428

1%

1,862 2,912

1%

2,912

63%

1%

160,000

Population

140,000

120,000

60,000

60,000

40,000

40,000

20,000

20,000

100,000

80,000

-

2000

80,774 Black Non-Hispanic

**Carmen This is pg.Asian Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic 3,136 168 DATOSAZ14 Asian Non-Hispanic 1,362

97% 97%

2000

2010

2015

2020

80,774

116,912

131,256

145,377

2010

Hispanic

Hispanic

2015

116,912 3,136

2020

131,256 3,169

3,169 1,362

3,154 2,041

2,041

145,377 3,088 3,154 3,088 2,428

2,428

**Carmen This is pg. 168 DATOSAZ14

2,805

2,805

Close to 30% of Hispanics in Rican the YumaAll other Hispanic Mexican Puerto metropolitan area fall Puerto into the HA4 and HA5 Mexican Rican All other Hispanic TM Hispanicty CloseSegment. to 30% of Hispanics in the Yuma metropolitan area fall into the HA4 and HA5 HispanictyTM Segment.

Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE 2015 V. 2020

Close to 30% of Hispanics in the Yuma metropolitan area fall into the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicty™ Segment. 16% 15%

Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

16%

16%

16%

11% 5%

9%

5%

TM

Hispanicity

16%

TM

27%

27%

-2%

-6%

-6%

26% -8%

Hispanic Black Non- Other AsianNonNonWhite Non-TotalBlack NonAsianWhite Non-Non- American Hispanic Indian Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic NonHispanic Hispanic

-8%

American Indian NonHispanic

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com

A Z

2 0 1 7

Other NonHispanic

HA1

26%

HA2

HA1 HA3

HA2 HA4

HA3 HA5 HA4

HA5

Hispanicity: See next page for HA1-HA5 definitions.

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015 Source: Geoscape DataStream™ Series 2015 Source: Geoscape AmericanAmerican MarketscapeMarketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

DATO S

Hispanicity

16%

-2%

Hispanic

15%

9%

11%

Total

2%

100,000

80,000

-

2%

140,000

Population

120,000

1%

160,000

254

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 7

POPULATION

Yuma, AZ

HISPANIC POPULATION % ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado • English dominant (nearly no Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation

Most Of The Zip Codes In The Yuma Metro Area Have Total Populations That Are Over 47% Hispanic.

• Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often "retro-acculturate" HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY™ SEGMENTS ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

• Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano

This Map Shows The Zip Codes In The Metro Area By The Postal Carrier Route With The Largest Percentage Of HA4 And HA5 Hispanics.

• Spanish preferred (some English) • Immigrant as adult, • In U.S. 10+ years • Predominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

DATO S

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2015

A Z

2 0 1 7

255

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

256

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


Community is more than neighborhoods and businesses. It’s people you care for. Every year, MassMutual Arizona is proud to support communities across Arizona – and the extraordinary people who work so hard to improve our lives through education, economic development and so much more. MassMutual Arizona is proud to be a Platino sponsor of The Hispanic Chamber. Jeffrey C. Dollarhide, CFP®, CLU®, CLTC, ChFC® General Agent MassMutual Arizona 17550 N. Perimeter Drive, Suite 450 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 480-538-2997 jdollarhide@financialguide.com www.arizona.massmutual.com

LIFE INSURANCE + RETIREMENT/401(K) PLAN SERVICES + DISABILITY INCOME INSURANCE LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE + ANNUITIES

Insurance Representative of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual), Springfield, MA 01111-0001, and its affiliated US insurance companies. Local sales agencies are not subsidiaries of MassMutual or its affiliated companies. Insurance products issued by MassMutual (Springfield, MA 01111) and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Co. and MML Bay State Life Insurance Co. (Enfield, CT 06082). CRN201903-209231


SECTION II

PROFILE

CHAPTER 8 EDUCATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

A DREAMER'S JOURNEY BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

Maria Belen Sisa loves America.

Growing up, Sisa's parents insisted she know she was undocumented. But her status did not impact her directly until she realized her friends were getting their first jobs and driver's licenses and applying to college – things she couldn't do.

So do her parents. The family traveled here from Buenos Aires when she was six, but overstayed their tourist visas.

By the end of her senior year in high school, President Obama signed an executive order approving DACA. Sisa attended information sessions and became an activist on the issue. "Once I met people who were also undocumented, I was inspired by them because they were on the front lines fighting for DACA," Sisa says. "I started being empowered and realized I could not stand on the sidelines anymore and didn't want me and my family's futures to be in the hands of anyone else."

Since coming to the U.S., Sisa has attended school and readily adapted to American life and culture, including paying taxes. So she was surprised by the mixed (and often harsh) reaction she received when she proudly displayed her 1040 Income Tax form on Facebook to try and educate people who think undocumented immigrants do not pay taxes.

In recent years, Sisa has worked for organizations like Mi Familia Vota, working to register people to vote and putting on citizenship fairs for low-income immigrants to help give them a voice.

"I just had enough. I told myself that it is more important now than ever to tell the truth," Sisa says. "I am going to make this post and educate people who don't understand. I am empowered enough and know who I am and know I can take the blows."

She says her most profound experience has involved her work with the Bernie Sanders presidential election last year.

Sisa is a student at Arizona State University studying political science and an undocumented immigrant temporarily shielded from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Sisa says she has routinely faced anti-immigrant sentiment and has long been aware of the lack of exposure the undocumented population receives for paying taxes and contributing to the economy.

"To think that the daughter of two undocumented immigrants was working for a senator who could have been the next President of the United States…a few years ago, before the Dream Act, would have been completely unheard of." Sisa says she wants to continue empowering others. She is the cofounder of Undocumented Students for Education Equity at ASU. She also plans on applying to Law School.

"As I was doing my taxes this year, I thought it was unbelievable that I am paying into a system will never see any benefits," Sisa says. "(But) I am not paying taxes because I want to see the benefits, I am paying taxes because our local economy needs it."

"My dream job would be to work for the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union)," Sisa says. "I think the biggest form of resistance for me would be to become a young, undocumented Latina, with a law degree to fight back against attacks on our community."

Regarding the reaction to her Facebook post, she says the outpouring of positivity and support overshadowed the negative responses, though she did not display all of the hate messages she received.

FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

One message said, "Reported you to ICE and Homeland Security. Crime doesn't pay lady." Another says, "Get the [expletive]; out of this country you ILLEGAL piece of [expletive]. Another one read, "Too bad you are cute, but you need to come back the right way." Despite the criticism, Sisa says she drew the attention of major politicians and although their views didn't always align they praised her for shining a light on issues that matter and were not all fully aware of.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

258

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

BREAKDOWN OF U.S. PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS BY ETHNICITY, 2002-2024

WHITE

BLACK

H I S PA NIC

2002

A S IA N/ PA CIF IC IS L A NDER

2012

A MER ICA N INDIA N

4%

3% 0

1%

1%

1%

6%

5%

4%

29%

24%

18%

15%

16%

17%

46%

51%

59%

Breakdown of U.S. Public School Students By Ethnicity (2002-2024)

TWO O R M O RE RA C E S

2024

*PAST AND PROJECTED ENROLLMENT PRE-K THROUGH 12TH GRADE Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

NUMBER OF ENGLISH-LANGUAGE LEARNER (ELL) PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLLMENT

*Past and projected enrollment Pre-K through 12th grade

Number of English Language Learner (ELL) Program Participants as a Percentage of Public School Enrollment

TOTAL

WHITE

BLACK

HISPA NIC

2009 Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

A SIA N

2011

PA CIF IC ISL A NDER

N/A 2 2

N/A

N/A

1.7 2 2.1

0.8 0.9 1

6.4 7.1 6.9

9 9 9.2

13.1 13.7

21.1 20.4

31 29.7 28.7

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

A MER ICA N INDIA N

TW O O R M O RE RA C E S

2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf 259 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

PERCENTAGE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS RETAINED IN GRADE BY ETHNICITY, 1994-2014 Percentage of Elementary and Secondary School Students Retained in Grade by Ethnicity (1994-2014)

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

Total

2002

2003

White

2004

2005

2006

Black

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Hispanic

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

STATUS COMPLETION RATES OF 18- TO 24-YEARS-OLD, 1990-2013 Status Completion Rates of 18- to 24-Year-Olds (1990-2013)

100 95 90 85 80 75 70 65 60 55 50

1 99 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 93 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 20 1 1 2 0 1 2 2 0 1 3

Total

White

Black

Hispanic

Note: The status completion rate is the number of 18- to 24-year-olds who complete high school as a percentage of the total number of 18- to 24-year-olds who are not enrolled in high school or a lower level of education Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 260 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

PERCENTAGE OF RECENT HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ENROLLED IN 2- AND 4-YEAR COLLEGES (1990-2013)

Percentage of Recent High School Graduates Enrolled in 2- and 4-Year Colleges (1990-2013)

80 75 70 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30

1 9 9 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 99 9 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 2 0 0 9 2 0 1 0 2011 2012 2013

Total

White

Black

Hispanic

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

TOTAL COLLEGE ENROLLMENT RATES OF 18- TO 24-YEAR-OLDS IN 2- OR 4-YEAR UNIVERSITIES/ COLLEGES BY SELECTED HISPANIC SUBGROUPS, 2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

40%

62%

TOTAL HISPANIC CUBAN DOMINICAN MEXICAN PUERTO RICAN SPANIARD

57%

53% 42%

35% 26%

25%

32%

48%

53%

50% 42%

44% 34%

41% 32%

34%

46%

56%

60%

Total College Enrollment Rates of 18- to 24-Year-Olds in 2- or 4-Year Universities/Colleges by Selected Hispanic Subgroups (2013)

TOTAL CENTAL AMERICAN COSTA RICAN GUATEMALAN HONDURAN NICARAGUAN PANAMANIAN SALVADORAN TOTAL SOUTH AMERICAN CHILEAN COLOMBIAN ECUADORIAN PERUVIAN VENEZUELAN OTHER SOUTH AMERICAN OTHER HISPANIC

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

261

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT ENROLLMENT IN DEGREE-GRANTING INSTITUTIONS BY ETHNICITY, 1990-2013

WHITE

BLACK

HI S P AN I C

1990

AS I AN /P AC I F I C I S L AN D ER

2000

1%

1%

1%

6%

7%

4%

17%

10%

6%

15%

12%

10%

58%

70%

79%

Percentage Distribution of Total Undergraduate Student Enrollment in Degree-granting Institutions by Ethnicity (1990-2013)

AM ER I C A N INDIA N

2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL POSTGRADUATE ENROLLMENT IN DEGREE-GRANTING INSTITUTIONS BY ETHNICITY, 1990-2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 Percentage Distribution of Total Postgraduate Enrollment In Degree-granting Institutions https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

WHITE

B L AC K

H ISPAN IC

1990

2000

ASIAN /PACIF IC ISL AN D ER

1%

1%

1%

8%

7%

4%

9%

6%

3%

14%

9%

6%

66%

77%

86%

by Ethnicity (1990-2013)

AMERICA N I NDI AN

2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

262 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

PERCENTAGE OF FULL-TIME, FULL-YEAR UNDERGRADUATES WHO RECEIVED FINANCIAL AID BY ETHNICITY 59%

62% 51% 38%

51%

56%

57%

72%

73%

85% 63%

67%

80%

69%

72%

85%

Percentage of Full-time, Full-year Undergraduates Who Received Financial Aid by Ethnicity

GRANTS

Total

White

L O A NS

Black

Hispanic

Asian

Pacific Islander

American Indian

Two or more races

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

NUMBER OF BACHELOR'S DEGREES GIVEN BY UNIVERSITIES/COLLEGES BY ETHNICITY, 2002-2013

87,964 126,177 130,144

HISPA NIC

A SIA N/ PA CIF IC IS L A NDER

2002-2003

2011-2012

0 27,234 34,338

89,029 169,736 186,650

BLACK

WHITE

9,875 11,498 11,445

124,253 185,916 191,180 TOTAL

994,616 1,212,417 1,221,576

1,348,811 1,792,163 1,840,164

Number of Bachelor's Degrees Given By Universities/Colleges by Ethnicity (2002-2013)

A MER ICA N INDIA N

TW O O R M O RE RA C E S

2012-2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

263

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

NUMBER OF MASTER'S DEGREES GIVEN BY UNIVERSITIES/COLLEGES BY ETHNICITY, 2002-2013

HI S P AN I C

AS I AN/P AC I F I C I S L AN D ER

2002-2003

2011-2012

N/A 9,823 11,839

BLACK

2,886 3,681 3,697

27,492 45,379 44,912

WHITE

25,200 50,994 52,990

TOTAL

45,150 86,007 87,988

346,003 470,822 455,892

518,699

755,967 751,751

Number of Master's Degrees Given by Universities/Colleges by Ethnicity (2002-2013)

AM ER I C AN I N D I AN

TW O OR MORE RA CES

2012-2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

NUMBER OF DOCTORAL DEGREES GIVEN BY UNIVERSITIES/COLLEGES BY ETHNICITY, 2002-2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdfNumber of Doctor's Degrees Given

2002-2003

2011-2012

A S IA N/ PA CIF IC ISL A NDER

0 1,571 2,438

HISPA NIC

759 915 900

BL A C K

12,008 17,896 18,408

5,503 9,223 10,107

WHITE

7,537 11,794 12,084 T O T AL

82,549 109,365 110,775

121,579

170,217 175,038

by Universities/Colleges by Ethnicity (2002-2013)

A MER ICA N INDIA N

TWO O R M O RE RA C E S

2012-2013

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

264 Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

PERCENTAGE OF BACHELOR'S DEGREES AWARDED BY UNIVERSITIES/COLLEGES IN SELECTED FIELDS OF STUDY BY ETHNICITY

4%

4%

2%

4% 4%

6%

6% 7%

6% 6% 7% 8% 6% 6% 6% 7%

10% 9% 9% 11% 10% 8% 9% 12%

10% 9%

8%

10%

10% 10% 12%

13%

20% 18% 22% 19% 21% 23% 18% 16%

Percentage of Bachelor's Degrees Awarded By Universities/Colleges in Selected Fields of Study by Ethnicity

BUSINESS

Total

HEALTH PROFESSIONS

White

Black

Hispanic

S O C I AL S C I EN C E AN D HI S TO R Y

Asian

P S YC HO L O G Y

Pacific Islander

American Indian

ED UCA T ION

Two or more races

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016, 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

PERCENTAGE OF MASTER'S DEGREES AWARDED BY UNIVERSITIES/COLLEGES IN SELECTED FIELDS OF STUDY BY ETHNICITY 42% 36% 42%

Total

White

Black

Hispanic

4%

2%

5% 4% 3% 4% 4% 2% 3% 3%

LEGAL PROFESSIONS

5% 3% 2% 2% 4% 2% 1% 3%

H EA L T H P R O F E S S I O NS

9% 9%

16% 6% 6%

7%

38%

19%

27% 31% 29%

38% 32% 35%

37% 39% 31% 33%

60%

Percentage of Master's Degrees Awarded by Universities/Colleges in Selected Fields of Study by Ethnicity

ENG INEER ING

B IO L O G ICA L A ND BI O M E D I C A L S CIEN C E S

EDUCA TIO N

Asian

Pacific Islander

American Indian

Two or more races

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 265 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF HISPANICS AGE 25+ BY ETHNICITY OF 12TH GRADE STUDENTS, 2005-2013 Educational Attainment of Hispanics Age 25+ (2013)

14% 6% 18% 27%

10% 5%

18%

17%

8%

25% 8%

21%

TOTAL HISPANIC

19%

8% 4% 14% 26%

32%

23%

21%

PUERTO RICAN

CUBAN

High School Only

32%

24%

SALVADORAN

Some College, No Degree

23%

20% 24%

42%

15% DOMINICAN

23% 8%

9%

26% 48%

Less Than High School Completion

13% 5% 15%

30%

41%

MEXICAN

7%

16%

27% 30%

35%

17%

OTHER CENTRAL AMERICAN

Associate's Degree

27% 19%

SOUTH AMERICAN OTHER HISPANIC OR LATINO

Bachelor's or Higher Degree

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

Source: National Center For Education Statistics, Status and Trends In The Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016 https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT RATE FOR LATINO MALES HAS DECREASED SIGNIFICANTLY, 2005-2004 High School Dropout Rate for Latino Males Has Decreased Significantly Since 2005

12%

26%

54%

2005

2014

Source: Excelencia In Education, Latino Males In Higher Education, 2016 www.edexcelencia.org/research/latino-males

266 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: Excelencia In Education, Latino Males In Higher Education, 2016 DA TOS A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/latino-males


SECTION II

CHAPTER 8 EDUCATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

PROFILE

A BOLD EDUCATION EXPERIMENT SUCCEEDS IN SOUTH PHOENIX In 2009, a group of committed educators and community members came together to do something that was considered bold in South Phoenix. Our plan was to start a school that would intentionally serve low-income minority students in one of the most challenged parts of Phoenix and make a promise that all students would be prepared to go to a four-year university or college upon graduation. Why was this bold? First, no one else in South Phoenix was saying it. Sure, there were schools with banners that said "college prep" and that offered dual enrollment, but none were actively committing to college readiness and acceptance to four-year institutions for all students. Second, this was an area that had never seen stellar academic results and most families who had the option were sending their students out of the area for school. And third, it was bold because in the middle of the worst economic recession in the last 30 years, when people's hopes and dreams were being crushed, PCA set out to make dreams and hopes come true.

and he knew the stories of how his mother worked as a farm laborer and housekeeper as a young woman. He not only wanted to have a different life for himself, but to help his parents with a different life. Norma also wanted something different for her sons. She came to this country because there was a hope for the future that she did not feel when she was growing up. Together, they were committed to taking full advantage of the PCA promise. Fast forward to 2016 and PCA's first graduating class. Jose Diaz is one of 25 graduates and one out of 21 who were accepted to a four-year university. Not only was he accepted to ASU, but he received a full-tuition scholarship due to his passion, commitment and desire to be a leader within his community. Norma cried and clung to her Jose when he told her and his youngest brother (who completed kindergarten at PCA in 2016) cried too, though he was not sure why, he just knew it was what people were doing. Not only was Jose going to college, but five more brothers behind him were seeing that the promise was real and that they too could have the future their mother had dreamed of for them.

July 23, 2009, was the first day of school. Seventy sixth graders attended PCA in that first year and there was a total staff of six people (one being part-time) to support them. Every staff member had at least three roles and many times more. In order to ensure PCA delivered on our promise we ran school differently. Our school day was nine hours long, students stayed in the same classroom and teachers rotated by subject area to cut down on transition time. We used breaks as times to play academic games so as to not lose a moment. The truth is, we needed every moment. The students we served came in on average three grade levels behind in reading and math and we had to not only make that up, but also push past sixth grade material to ensure that students would be ready for college entrance in only seven short years. One of the students who started with us on that very first day was Jose Diaz. His mother, Norma, was so impressed by our school that she had him repeat sixth grade so that he could be in our founding class. Jose was the second oldest son out of seven boys and he knew he wanted to go to college before he even came through our doors. He saw how hard his father worked six days a week at a salvage yard

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

267

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

HISPANIC COLLEGE ENROLLMENT RATE NEAR WHITE ENROLLMENT RATE BY 2014 Hispanic College Enrollment Rate Near White Enrollment Rate by 2014

68% 64% 65%

49%

1994

2014

White

Hispanic

Source: Excelencia In Education, From Capacity To Success, 2016 www.edexcelencia.org/research/capacity

HISPANIC TOTAL COLLEGE ENROLLMENT INCREASED AS WHITE COLLEGE ENROLLMENT DECREASED, 1994-2014

Source: Excelencia In Education, From Capacity To Success, 2016 Hispanic Total College Enrollment Increased as White College Enrollment Decreased (1994-2014) http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/capacity

Percentage of Total College Enrollment

23% 58%

75%

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL COLLEGE ENROLLMENT

8%

17%

113%

WHITE

HI SPA N I C

1994

2014

Source: Excelencia In Education, From Capacity To Success, 2016 www.edexcelencia.org/research/capacity

Source: Excelencia In Education, From Capacity To Success, 2016 268 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/capacity

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

From 2008 to 2014, The Hispanic Graduation Rate At 4 Year Institutions Increased By 17% Graduation Rates At 4 Year Institutions

FROM 2008 TO 2014, THE HISPANIC GRADUATION RATE AT 4-YEAR INSTITUTIONS INCREASED BY 17%

58%

46%

1996

60%

62%

63%

63%

49%

50%

52%

54%

2002

2004

White

2006

2008

Hispanic

GRADUATION RATES AT 4 YEAR INSTITUTIONS Source: Excelencia In Education, From Capacity To Success, 2016 www.edexcelencia.org/research/capacity

Source: Excelencia In Education, From Capacity To Success, 2016 http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/capacity Percentage of Latino Adults Who Earned a Bachelor’s Degree or Higher Increased 67% (1995-2014)

PERCENTAGE OF LATINO ADULTS WHO EARNED A BACHELOR'S DEGREE OR HIGHER INCREASED 67%, 1995-2014 Hispanic Educational Attainment

23%

12%

15%

9%

1995

2014

Bachelor's Degree or Higher

Associate's Degree or Higher

HISPANIC EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Source: Excelencia In Education, From Capacity To Success, 2016 www.edexcelencia.org/research/capacity

Source: Excelencia In Education, From Capacity To Success, 2016 http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/capacity 269 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 8 EDUCATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

PROFILE

ACADEMIC DEL PUEBLO'S EVERLASTING BOND WITH STUDENTS AND FAMILIES BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

Frank Lomeli, Assistant Principal for Student & Community Engagement at Academia del Pueblo School K-8, understands the challenges his students face every day.

The technology offers teachers the opportunity to create customized learning modules that help boost student engagement. One of the stipulations of the grant through 21st Century is to have a focus on family engagement. With that in mind, Academia provides English as a Second Language (ESL) courses, family literacy programs and computer classes for families.

Born and raised in Phoenix, he says after school and summer programs are critical components of a student's development. Academic Del Pueblo is located in South Phoenix and serves largely disadvantaged youth.

"One of the programs we had was basically families coming in and teaching our parents how to create their own email," Lomeli says. "They do not have to be scared; they can create it and send the teachers an email so they can communicate."

To achieve its goals, Academia Del Pueblo partners with the From One Hand to AnOTHER Inc. (FOHTA), a program focused on Science, Technology, Engineering Arts, Math and Motivation (S.T.E.A.M.M.).

Lomeli says his school is empowering families to get more involved in a student's education, which they believe is an essential component to a student's personal and academic growth. It also creates a sense of equity for families.

FOHTA facilitates the Academia Del Pueblo middle school summer program for six weeks. Academia is one of four schools selected nationally by FOHTA. The S.T.E.A.M.M. summer camp features Film Production, Entrepreneurship, Financial Literacy, Dream Mapping, Coding and Digital Literacy.

Aside from the FOHTA and Apple partnerships, Academia Del Pueblo offers other resources, such as after school and summer programs funded by the Arizona Department of Education 21st Century Community Learning Centers, Valley of the Sun United Way and the Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence.

One of the program's most noteworthy projects is the creation of a public service announcement where students produce a video highlighting the need to keep kids safe.

"The message is, '[Community] can do this, [students] can do this,’ – without any constraints," Lomeli says. FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 JOURNALISM INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY.

"They feel empowered," says Lomeli, "and they don't even notice but by exposing them to this technology we are setting them up for positions that haven't been created yet." Academia del Pueblo was also only one of two schools in the Valley awarded the Apple ConnectED Tech Grant, which provides an iPad for every student, an iPad and Macbook for every teacher and an AppleTV for every classroom. "We remind everyone that it is just a tool, that the iPad doesn't take the place of quality authentic teaching," Lomeli says. "We have seen student engagement increase. In the past where we had our students [only] reading about volcanos, now they can open an app and they are in the volcano and entrenched in their learning."

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

270

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

271

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

P-12 Enrollment Trend By Race/Ethnicity P-12 Enrollment Trend By Race/Ethnicity

sixth edition

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2016

The Transformation Continues

(In Percentage)

Milem Salazar Bryan

(PERCENTAGE) 51.3 41.1

44.7

44.4

35.3

2.1

2.8

4.7

2.8

Asian

5.6

5.2

6.5

Black

5.5

4.7

American Indian

2002

40.1

Hispanic

2008

White

2014

Source :Milem, J.F., Salazar, K., and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation

Source: Milem, J.F., Salazar, K. and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Continues. Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

P-12 Enrollment Trend P-12 Enrollment Trend By Minority Status By Minority Status (In Percentage) (PERCENTAGE) 59.9

55.3

51.3

48.7

44.7

2002

40.1

2008

White

2014

Total Minority

Source: Milem, J.F., Salazar, K. and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Source :Milem, J.F., Salazar, K., and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center. Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

272

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

Arizona University Eligibility 2002-2014 Within Race By Year Arizona University Eligibility 2002-2014 within race by year

sixth edition

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2016

The Transformation Continues

(In Percentage) Milem Salazar Bryan

(PERCENTAGE)

66

70

70 49 31

32

37

34 21

Asian

Black

35

29

26

American Indian

2002

56

55

48

42

34

Hispanic

2006

White

Arizona

2014

Source: Milem, J.F., Salazar, K. and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center. Source :Milem, J.F., Salazar, K., and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016:

Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

The Transformation

Arizona Public 4-Year Undergraduate EnrollmentEnrollment Arizona Public 4-Year Undergraduate (In Percentage)

(PERCENTAGE)

60

57.1

53.9 47.9

50

50.8

42.8 40 28.4

30

24.2 20.8

19.5

20 13.4 10

0

5.2 4.9

2

3.4 2.9

Asian Public 4-Year

12.1 6

4.1 4.6

5.6

Black

6

2.9

2.3

3.5

American Indian

Not ForProfit, Profit,4-Year 4 year Not For

For-Profit 4-Year 4 year For-Profit,

5.5

Hispanic Public year Public, 2 2-Year

White

For Profit 2-Year 2 year For-Profit,

Milem, J.F., Salazar, K. and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016:  Source Source: :Milem, J.F., Salazar, K., and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation The Transformation Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center. Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

273

47

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

sixth edition

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2016

The Transformation Continues

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

CHAPTER 8

Arizona Master's Degree Arizona Master’s Degree by Race/Ethnicity By Race/Ethnicity (In Percentage) (PERCENTAGE)

Milem Salazar Bryan

61 MASTER DEGREE

4.2 1.9 3.9

1.6

Asian

4.3 5.6 Black

1.1

2

1.4

American Indian

1994

6.7

53.6

9.5 9.3

Hispanic

2010

57.1

White

2013

Source: Milem, J.F., Salazar, K. and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Continues.  Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

Source :Milem, J.F., Salazar, K., and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

Arizona Doctoral Degrees Arizona Doctoral Degrees (In Percentage) (PERCENTAGE)

64.2 56.6

DOCTORAL DEG

REE

50.5

2.8 3.9 4.7 Asian

10.1 0.5

3

10.1 0.4

Black

3

American Indian

1994

2010

Source: Milem, J.F., Salazar, K. and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016:  The Transformation Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

4.9 5.9 5.5 Hispanic

White

2013

Source :Milem, J.F., Salazar, K., and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Continues. Phoenix: 274 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D AArizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center. TOS A Z 2 0 1 7


SECTION II

CASE STUDY

CHAPTER 8 EDUCATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHARTER SCHOOL FORGES A STRONG BOND WITH THE LOCAL COMMUNITY Imagine School at Camelback is a nonprofit charter school located at 19th Avenue and Camelback Roads in Phoenix. Situated in a densely populated urban area where more than 62% of children live in poverty,* the school offers tuitionfree educational choice to families that typically have few educational options. Established in 2007 and located in a repurposed former medical building, this four-story school is a safe haven for K-8 students and their families who discover personalized education as well as a variety of evening and weekend educational programs for adults.

outreach program into the community, using a trusted voice and visible advocate for the Hispanic community. They reached out to Mary Rábago Productions to develop that community partnership, positioning Imagine Camelback as a vital advocate and resource for children and families within the local community. Mary Rábago, a former television news anchor for Univisión, brings credibility to her work as a publicist and community connector. She crafted an outreach plan for Imagine Schools that included Spanish language social media, radio and print advertising. This partnership also included Rábago's personal appearances at school and community events, drawing the local community to the school via her 51,000+ online followers. Additionally, she worked with the school leadership team and front office personnel, training them on how to address the unique needs, concerns and questions of the local Hispanic community.

THE RESULTS

In the first three months of this partnership, Imagine Schools saw their Imagine Camelback campus regain a strong presence within the local community. Mary Rábago Productions reached out to other visible and strong advocates within the Hispanic community, including the Mexican Consulate's office and Promise Arizona to establish community services at the school's location. Through this collaboration, the school enrolled more than 100 new students within the first 30 days of this effort. Sixty days later, they doubled that number – 100% of new students qualifying for the federal Free and Reduced Lunch Program and 90% of them Hispanic.

Despite this, the school's enrollment has declined in the last two years. A high mobility rate among neighborhood families, combined with a turnover in school leadership, diminished ties to the local community that had previously resulted in enrollment from word-of-mouth referrals. With a clear mission of partnering with families in high-need communities in order to prepare students for lives of leadership, accomplishment and exemplary character, Imagine Schools recognized the need to re-establish this campus as a center of achievement and hope within the local Spanish-speaking community.

With almost 700 K-8 students now attending this nonprofit, urban school, educational options centered on strong academic achievement and character development have been strengthened in the heart of metro Phoenix.

THE SOLUTION

Imagine Schools prioritized the placement of a seasoned school leader, Principal Freddie Villalon, who understood and could become an intrinsic part of the local community, 52.2% of whom identify as Mexican with Spanish being the predominant language spoken at home.* In addition to an engaged and visible school leader, Imagine Schools identified the need for a strong

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Imagine Schools is building on this partnership with Mary Rábago Productions, adding several of their other urban and rural campuses, to ensure they are reaching Hispanic families with effective and tuition-free educational options. *Statistics from neighborhoodscout.com 275

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EDUCATION Arizona Law Degrees by Race/Ethnicity CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 8

Arizona Law Degrees (In Percentage) By Race/Ethnicity

sixth edition

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2016

The Transformation Continues

(PERCENTAGE)

Milem Salazar Bryan

5.2 4.3

6

6.8

Asian

2.3 4.6 Black

14.5 11.9

11.9 3.1

2010

64.8

8.6

2.5

American Indian

1994

69.2 66.7

Hispanic

White

2013

Source: Milem, J.F., Salazar, K. and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Continues.  Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

urce :Milem, J.F., Salazar, K., and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The ansformation Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

Arizona Pharmacy Degrees Arizona Pharmacy Degrees by Race/Ethnicity By Race/Ethnicity (In Percentage) (PERCENTAGE)

82.4 65.4 55.7

28.7 20.1 2

0 Asian

0.5 3.3 Black

2

0.9

0

American Indian

1994

2010

5.9 6.1 Hispanic

7 White

2013

Source: Milem, J.F., Salazar, K. and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation Continues.  Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.

Source :Milem, J.F., Salazar, K., and Bryan, W.P. (2016). Arizona Minority Student Progress Report 2016: The Transformation 276 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Continues. Phoenix: Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center.


SECTION II

CHAPTER 8 EDUCATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

PROFILE

ARIZONA EDUCATION PROGRESS METER STRONG CLASSROOMS EQUAL STRONG COMMUNITIES Arizona voters believe that education is a top priority. The success of every child is vital to our state's economic prosperity, quality of life and civic health. We must close the achievement gap that leaves so many children behind, increase educational attainment overall and prepare a highly skilled workforce.

receive an excellent education every step of the way. The Education Progress Meter is the result of broad collaboration among government agencies, nonprofit organizations, school districts and business groups from around the state. The goal-setting process alone involved the participation of nearly 200 organizations. Progress made in each area will ultimately create a more prosperous economy, ensure a robust talent pool for Arizona businesses and equip students with the knowledge, skills and credentials necessary to obtain good jobs and contribute to the improved civic health of their communities.

To fully understand how far we need to go, we need reliable information that tells us where we stand as a state on issues ranging from access to quality early learning to postsecondary attainment and everything in between. Expect More Arizona and the Center for the Future of Arizona launched the Arizona Education Progress Meter to serve as this nonpartisan, shared source of information.

The Education Progress Meter provides a roadmap for success by helping us understand what is important to measure; where we are now and where we need to go; how to track our progress; and where we can celebrate successes and take actions together. We expect the Education Progress Meter to drive meaningful conversation about the policies and funding needed to reach the goals by 2030.

Recently, the groups updated this unique tool with specific goals that support a shared vision for education in Arizona. The vision is that all students, regardless of their background, income or zip code,

To learn more or get involved, visit ExpecMoreArizona.org/Progress

SOURCES ATTAINMENT: U.S. Census Bureau, 1-year Public Use Microdata Series person file for Arizona, 2015; and Arizona Board of Regents, 2016. POST HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: National Student Clearinghouse via Arizona Board of Regents, 2014-15. National Center for Education Statistics. OPPORTUNITY YOUTH: U.S. Census Bureau, 1-year Public Use Microdata Series person file for Arizona, 2015. HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION: Arizona Department of Education, 2015 Graduation Rate Report. 8TH GRADE MATH: Arizona Department of Education, 2015-16 AzMERIT results. (As measured by students passing the 8th grade AzMERIT math assessment, Algebra I EOC test, Geometry EOC test, or Algebra II EOC test.) 3RD GRADE READING: Arizona Department of Education, 2015-16 AzMERIT results. QUALITY EARLY LEARNING: First Things First, Arizona Department of Education, Arizona Department of Economic Security, U.S. Census Bureau, 2015-16. TEACHER PAY: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, 2016. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Regional Price Parities, 2016. Adjusted for cost of living by the Morrison Institute for Public Policy at ASU.

* CURRENT FIGURES FOR MEDIAN ELEMENTARY TEACHER PAY BASED ON SOURCE INFO: ARIZONA - $42,474 U.S. $55,800

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

277

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 8 EDUCATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

PROFILE

JABBING HER WAY THROUGH GLASS CEILINGS BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

In a small and dense boxing gym in South Phoenix, a 16-year-old began wrapping her hands, focused on watching the younger girls practice before she began boxing practice herself.

with the younger girls. She helps them if they are having trouble or if it's something I can't communicate with the other girls, she will step in and talk to them." Mentoring the younger generation is the foundation of Gaytan's motivation, as she admits it helps her train harder and strengthens her willingness to empower. It is no secret that boxing is a maile-dominated industry, but she believes the sport can diversify the more women succeed in it.

For the past couple of years, Victoria Gaytan and many female athletes-in-the-making have been training at the Phoenix Salvation Army Kroc Center's intimate boxing gym, for a sport known more for its male domination than for breaking glass ceilings.

"Maybe I can change the way in which people look at girls and not just judge them for being girls," Gaytan says. "I want [the younger girls] to be inspired by me and it motivates me to train harder."

Some practice boxing to break a sweat, some do it as a stressreliever but some like Victoria Gaytan do it with one goal in mind: to become a champion. Gender does not determine an athlete's mindset and though she enjoys getting ready and dancing at quinceñeras, it should not limit the amount of recognition she deserves.

Almost every story of prosperity contains a source of inspiration and for the young boxer out of the inner city it was her two older brothers. Both had a part to play in engraving the sport of boxing in Gaytan and although they no longer box, they continue to push their little sister.

Since Gaytan gave up karate and began boxing at an early age, she has developed a winner's routine along the way and it is simple – go to school, do her homework, spend time with family and practice her jabs, hooks and other components of boxing for hours in the hope that she will become a junior Olympic champion in her weight class.

"They have always told me to keep pushing and following my dreams," Gaytan says. "So when I fight, I fight for them and the rest of my family." Gaytan's recent achievement of becoming a champion is viewed as a milestone not just for herself, but for the young girls who look up to her at the Kroc Center. Her success should push women in general to break all the barriers revolving around gender roles in boxing and avoid falling into the stereotypes.

On June 29, she did just that and conquered her milestone of becoming champion in her division at the junior Olympics in West Virginia. It wasn't easy, however, as she overcame numerous obstacles throughout the process that included weight struggles, difficulty finding preparation fights and coming up with the funds.

"When I was small, I was very shy and gentle. Once I got into boxing people started telling me, 'You are a girl, you won't be able to do this,'" Gaytan says. "Then I just began to build myself up both physically and mentally."

But striving under uncertain circumstances is a testament to the recent development of her character, something her coach, John Mireles, admitted caught him by surprise.

Now she is a junior Olympic champion and will be training with Team USA in Colorado this year with the hope of one day turning pro.

"She has always had the physicality and skills, but mentally something changed in her," coach Mireles says. "Her training became serious, and she stepped into more of a leadership role

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

278

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

PROFILE

CHAPTER 8 EDUCATION

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

TARA JACKSON LEADS AZ TOWN HALL It was Tara Jackson's longstanding, heartfelt desire to help rid the world of "unnecessary human conflict" that persuaded her to quit a successful law practice and take the helm at the venerable Arizona Town Hall (ATH).

Changing how it raises revenue isn't the only way the organization has evolved. Arizona's shifting demographics have prompted ATH to rethink how it picks people to attend its events. Jackson says the organization's leadership came to realize it needed to do a better job representing the state's diverse communities. Arizona is now about 33 percent Hispanic and fast approaching majority minority status. Already, people of color make up most of the population in Phoenix and Tucson. In addition to boosting its racial and ethnic diversity, Jackson says ATH also has to do a better job recruiting small business owners, rural residents, young people and low-income and working-class Arizonans.

"I loved practicing law, but I began to ask myself what I wanted my life to stand for," Jackson says. So, after 16 years as an attorney, she says, "I decided I wanted to have an impact, bring people together to solve problems and make the world a better place."

To help meet these goals, Jackson says ATH has begun to "bring our process to those segments of the population where they are at." ATH is partnering with organizations to host smaller versions of its major events, like the Community Town Hall it is hosting at this year's AZHCC DATOS conference.

Eleven year later, Jackson's commitment to the nonprofit organization's mission of facilitating conversation over confrontation, especially in light of the country's deep social and political divisions, is needed now more than ever.

ATH has scheduled nearly a dozen of these smaller town halls across the state. This year's discussions will focus on how best to fund preK-12 education in Arizona.

ATH encourages civic action and engagement on the issues vital to Arizonans. Its signature events include major, annual statewide town halls in the spring and fall and about 50 other smaller outreach projects. The next town hall will be held Nov. 12-15 in Mesa.

Polls show that funding education in Arizona is at the top of the agenda for most state residents, although solving the problem has proven polarizing and elusive.

Remarkably, the organization accomplishes all of its work with one full-time employee (Jackson), two part-timers and a large pool of well-trained volunteers. Taking the top job at ATH came with some early challenges. Two years after Jackson accepted the post, the nation's economy was rocked by the Great Recession. That led to the loss of many of ATH's bigger philanthropic donors, which led in turn to budget cuts and a need for new revenue sources.

The issue sounds like a prime opportunity for Jackson and her ATH team to help people set aside "unnecessary human conflict" and "make the world a better place."

To make up for lost earnings, ATH began offering its specialized services to agencies, cities and private and nonprofit groups on a paid consulting basis. Today, the bulk of its budget is funded by consulting fees.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

279

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


The Colangelo College of Business Business as a Force for Good

The entrepreneurial culture at the Colangelo College of Business emphasizes higher purpose and academic success through… • INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE AT LOCAL AND NATIONAL COMPANIES • ENTREPRENEURSHIP OPPORTUNITIES • ACCESS TO IDEA CLUB, STUDENT BUSINESS INCUBATOR, LOPES LAB, NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER, CANYON ANGELS AND MORE • CONSCIOUS CAPITALISM PRINCIPLES

Learn more at: gcu.edu/AZHCC For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program and other important information, please visit our website at gcu.edu/ disclosures. Please note, not all GCU programs are available in all states and in all learning modalities. Program availability is contingent on student enrollment. Grand Canyon University is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. (800-621-7440; http://hlcommission.org/) Important policy information is available in the University Policy Handbook at https://www.gcu.edu/academics/academic-policies.php GCU, while reserving its lawful rights in light of its Christian mission, is committed to maintaining an academic environment that is free from unlawful discrimination. Further detail on GCU’s Non-Discrimination policies can be found at gcu.edu/titleIX, ©2017 Grand Canyon University. 17COBE0044

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

280

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CASE STUDY

CHAPTER 9 HOUSING

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

UNLOCKING HIS DOOR, UNLOCKING HIS FUTURE After 30 years of living a homeless life, moving from place to placeâ&#x20AC;ŚMarcos Torres at the age of 46, jingled the keys to his first home last week.(see photo) He came to Trellis three years ago and went through the financial literacy course with ongoing guidance from Brenda Lopez, his Trellis advisor and director of the Trellis Home Ownership Center. Marcos worked hard to get a job, established credit, rented a room and now is moving into his home. On an income of $10.50/hour he saved $5000 and he was eligible to participate in the IDEA Match Savings Program through Newtown Community Development Corporation (Newtown). Thr program matches savings 3 to 1, which qualified Torres for $15,000 in down payment assistance. Fox 10 covered this unique client's story, prompting an immediate overflow of donations and heartfelt community help. Due to the televised feature story, a company called OpenDoor donated and delivered a complete set of furniture for his home within 48 hours of the news.

created 3,450 first-time homeowners, along with saving more than 4,800 homes from foreclosure. In the years between 2012-2016 this activity has created an average of almost 90 jobs. With 58% of Latinos living in households with children under the age of 17 vs. 27% for non-Latino families and with the purchasing power of the Hispanic market projected to grow 46% faster than that of non-Hispanics this homeowner expansion and financial education, coupled with over $133M in loan transactions by Trellis Lending has had a significant impact on our Maricopa County community. WATCH THE FOX10 STORY ON TORRES

Torres is the perfect example of how hard work, faith and persistence pays off. When he was asked how he felt owning a home, one of his first comments was, "I have a laundry room! It's bigger than any of the rooms I've rented for years." At the onset of his journey with Trellis, he had no credit history and had never owned a credit card. To establish a credit score, his first expenditure was a tithe to his church, Victory Outreach, which was the place where he first heard a Trellis loan officer speak about our services. His story has inspired many to donate money, grocery gift cards and even an entire household of furniture. While unlocking the door to his future, his journey has unlocked the hearts of many. There has been a visible increase in interest from first time homeowners and Trellis is so pleased to have played a part in this motivating story. Trellis, formerly known as Neighborhood Housing Services of Phoenix, has been creating happy homeowners for 42 years. According to a recent study by Univision, Hispanic home ownership is predicted to grow at triple the rate of non-Hispanics by the year 2021. Trellis hopes to continue to serve these new homeowners. Since our inception, Trellis has educated and/or counseled over 35,489 households and

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

281

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 9

"HISPANICS WILL ACCOUNT FOR 52% OF NEW HOMEOWNERS BETWEEN 2010 AND 2030."

HOUSING

52

%

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

"SINCE 2010, HISPANICS HAVE ATTAINED A CUMULATIVE NET INCREASE OF 1,103,000 HOMEOWNERS, ACCOUNTING FOR 60% OF TOTAL HOMEOWNERSHIP GROWTH IN THE U.S."

60

%

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

282

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS HAVE INCREASED BY 18% SINCE 2010

Hispanic Households have Increased by 18% Since 2010

6,198,000

7,092,000

7,301,000

18%

201 0

2015

2016

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

HISPANIC HOMEOWNERSHIP RATE HAS DECREASED BY 7% SINCE 2005 Hispanic Homeownership Rate Has Decreased by 7% Since 2005

2005

2010

2015

46.0%

45.6%

47.5%

49.5%

7%

2016

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

283 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 9

HOUSING

"HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS ARE MORE LIKELY THAN THAT OF NON-HISPANIC WHITES TO BE COMPRISED OF TWO PARENTS AND AT LEAST ONE CHILD, A HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION THAT IS ALSO MORE LIKELY TO BECOME AN OWNER HOUSEHOLD." Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

"IN 2016, HISPANICS ACCOUNTED FOR 38% OF NEW HOUSEHOLD FORMATIONS IN THE COUNTRY."

38

%

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

284

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

THE NUMBER OF HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS GREW BY 73%, FROM 2000-2016 The Number of Hispanic Households Grew by 73% From 2000-2016

HOUSEHOLD FIGURES IN MILLIONS

93.4

102.4

10%

9.2

15.9

73%

HISPANIC

N O N -HI S P AN I C

2000

2016

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

*household figures in millions

HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS ACCOUNTED FOR 38% OF TOTAL U.S. HOUSEHOLD FORMATION GROWTH IN 2016 Hispanic Households Accounted for 38% of Total U.S. Household Formation Growth in 2016 Number of New Household Formations

38%

HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC

62%

NUMBER OF NEW HOUSEHOLD FORMATIONS Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf 285 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

HISPANICS WERE THE ONLY GROUP TO SEE AN INCREASE IN HOMEOWNERSHIP RATES, 2015-2016

OV E R A LL

N O N -H I S P A N I C W H I T E S

HISPA NIC S

2015

55.5%

42.2%

43.2%

46.0%

45.6%

56.5%

71.9%

71.9%

63.4%

63.7%

Hispanics Were the Only Group to See an Increase in Homeownership Rates (2015-2016)

BLA C K S

A SIA NS /OTH ERS

2016

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

NUMBER OF HISPANIC OWNER HOUSEHOLDS INCREASED BY 209,000, ACCOUNTING FOR 75% NET GROWTH IN OVERALL U.S. HOMEOWNERSHIP, 2015-2016 7,092,000

+209,000

7,301,000

Number of Hispanic Owner Households Increased by 209,000 Accounting for 75% Net Growth in Overall U.S. Homeownership from 2015-2016

2015

2016

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

286 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

HISPANIC ATTITUDES TOWARD HOMEOWNERSHIP 87%

SAY THEY PREFER OWNING A HOME AS A GOOD PLACE TO RAISE CHILDREN

SAY IT IS A WAY TO ACHIEVE HAVING CONTROL OVER ONE'S LIVING SPACE

77%

79%

81%

82%

87%

Hispanic Attitudes Toward Homeownership

SAY IT IS THE BEST WAY TO BUILD WEALTH

SAY IT IS A WAY TO LIVE IN A SAY THEY ARE BETTER OFF NICER HOME OWNING RATHER THAN RENTING

SAY IT IS THE BEST INVESTMENT PLAN

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf U.S. Homeownership Diversity

U.S. HOMEOWNERSHIP DIVERSITY AMONG ALL HOMEOWNERS BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2016 Among All Homeowners by Race/Ethnicity (2016)

1%

5% 9%

WHITE

9%

HISPANIC/LATINO BLACK/AFRICAN-AMERICAN ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER OTHER 77% Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

287

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

U.S. Homeownership Diversity Among Millennials by Race/Ethnicity (2016)

U.S. HOMEOWNERSHIP DIVERSITY AMONG MILLENNIALS BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2016 7% 10%

WHITE HISPANIC/LATINO 17%

BLACK/AFRICAN-AMERICAN ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER 66%

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

NET HOMEOWNERSHIP CHANGE BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 2010-2016

OVERALL

750,000 -46,000

-2,270,000

-427,000

1,103,000

Net Homeownership Change by Race/Ethnicity (2010-2016)

N O N -H I S P A N I C W H I T E S

HISPA NICS

B L A CK/ A F R ICA N- A MER ICA NS

A SIA N & O TH E R

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf 288

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN GROWTH OF HISPANIC OWNER HOUSEHOLDS IN THE U.S., 2001-2016

Percentage Changes in Growth of Hispanic Owner Households in the U.S. (2001-2016)

10.0%

9.2% 7.4%

8.0%

6.0%

5.6% 6.0%

5.3%

5.3%

4.2%

4.0%

3.6%

3.4% 2.1%

2.0%

-2.0%

1.4%

0.2%

0.0%

1.0% -1.0%

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2.9%

2008

2009

-0.9% 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf

DENIAL RATE FOR CONVENTIONAL LOANS FOR A PRIMARY RESIDENCE DECREASED FROM 26.6% TO 17.3% FOR HISPANICS, 2008-2016

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 Denial Rate for Conventional Loans for a Primary Residence Decreased from 26.6% to 17.3% for Hispanics http://hispanicwealthproject.org/shhr/2016-state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report.pdf (2008-2016)

33%

AL L

ASIAN

B L A CK

2008 Source: Zillow, Getting A Mortgage Was Easier Overall in 2015 But Remains More Challenging For Minorities, 2016 www.zillow.com/research/mortgage-denial-rates-hmda-13773/

HISPA NIC

8.7%

12.3%

29% 17.3%

22.4%

26.6%

33.6%

35%

10.4%

14.8%

17.3%

30%

26.6%

35%

W H I TE

2016

Source: Zillow, Getting A Mortgage Was Easier Overall in 2015 But Remains More Challenging For Minorities, 2016 289 https://www.zillow.com/research/mortgage-denial-rates-hmda-13773/ T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

DENIAL RATES FOR FHA LOANS FOR A PRIMARY RESIDENCE DECREASED FROM 20.2% TO 15.5% FOR HISPANICS, 2008-2016 Denial Rates for FHA Loans for a Primary Residence Decreased from 20.2% to 15.5% for Hispanics, 2008-2016

11% 20.2%

11.2%

11.4%

2%

15.5%

19.6%

22.1% 16.4%

17.4%

13.9%

14.6%

5%

ALL

23%

6%

A SIA N

BLACK

2008

HI S PANI C

WHIT E

2016

Source: Zillow, Getting A Mortgage Was Easier Overall in 2015 But Remains More Challenging For Minorities, 2016 www.zillow.com/research/mortgage-denial-rates-hmda-13773/

Source: Zillow, Getting A Mortgage Was Easier Overall in 2015 But Remains More Challenging For Minorities, 2016 https://www.zillow.com/research/mortgage-denial-rates-hmda-13773/

BETWEEN 2014 AND 2024, HISPANICS ARE EXPECTED TO ADD 5.5 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS TO THE UNITED STATES LANDSCAPE

Between 2014 and 2024, Hispanics Are Expected To Add 5.5 Million Households To The United States Landscape

0.73

1.8

2.4

3.4

5.5

PROJECTED HOUSEHOLD GROWTH (IN MILLIONS) FROM 2014-2024

WHITE

H ISPAN IC

BLACK

ASI AN

OT H ER

Source: Mortgage Bankers Association, Demographics And The Numbers Behind The Coming Multi-Million Increase In Households, 2015 www.mba.org/Documents/Research/15292_Research_Growth_White_Paper.pdf

Z 2 0 1 7 DGrowth A T(InO S fromA2014-2024 *Projected Household Millions)

290

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Mortgage Bankers Association, Demographics And The Numbers Behind The Coming Multi-Million Increase In Households, 2015


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

NEW HISPANIC HOUSEHOLD FORMATION EXPECTED TO INCREASE FROM 25% TO 49%,1990-2030 New Hispanic Household Formation Is Expected to Increase from 25% to 49% (1990-2030)

10%

HISPANIC

1990-2000

B L A CK

2000-2010

22%

19%

18%

20%

19%

20%

16%

15%

21% WHITE

10%

21%

25%

29%

37%

75%

40%

40%

49%

96%

O THER

2010-2020

2020-2030

Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold?, 2015 www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold

Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold?, 2015 http://www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold

25% OF HISPANICS LIVED IN MULTIGENERATIONAL HOUSEHOLDS IN 2014

ASIAN

B L A CK

HISPA NIC

2009

15%

13% TOTAL

21%

20%

25%

23%

25%

24%

28%

19%

17%

26%

25% of Hispanics Lived in Multigenerational Households in 2014

WHITE

O TH E R

2014

Source: Pew Research Center, A Record 60.6 Million Americans Live In Multigenerational Households, 2016 www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/08/11/a-record-60-6-million-americans-live-in-multigenerational-households/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

291

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Pew Research Center, A Record 60.6 Million Americans Live In Multigenerational Households, 2016 http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/08/11/a-record-60-6-million-americans-live-in-multigenerational-households/


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

HISPANICS TO HAVE HIGHEST NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLD FORMATIONS THAN ANY OTHER ETHNIC GROUP, 2010-2030 Hispanics to Have Highest Number of Household Formations Than Any Other Ethnic Group (2010-2030)

H ISP A N IC

B LACK

10.4

9.1

2.5

1.9

2.2

1.3 WHITE

2.1

4.8

2.7

4.6

8.9

11.6

HOUSEHOLD FIGURES IN MILLIONS

OTHER

2010-2020

TOTAL MI NORI TY

T OT A L

2020-2030

Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold?, 2015 www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold

Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold?, 2015 http://www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold

HOMEOWNERSHIP RATES BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 1990-2030

*household figures in millions

Homeownership Rates by Race/Ethnicity (1990-2030)

70.1% 65.3%

72.4%

72.2%

66.2%

65.1%

55.9%

46.3%

47.3%

46.9%

45.7%

44.3%

2000

2010

53.0%

45.2%

1990

62.7%

56.3%

53.7%

43.3%

70.8%

White

Black

Hispanic

41.1%

2020

Other

69.7% 61.3% 56.9%

48.2% 40.0%

2030

Total

Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold?, 2015 www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold

292 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold?, 2015 http://www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

HEADSHIP RATES BY RACE/ETHNICITY

DEFINITION: HEADSHIP

1990

2000

38.1% 40.6% 40.2% 38.5% 40.2% 40.3%

WHITE

38.2% 37.2% 37.3% 36.6% 37.9% 38.0%

T O T AL

45.5% 47.2% 46.9% 45.4% 48.0% 48.7%

48.7% 50.0% 50.1% 48.6% 50.3% 50.8%

47.1% 47.7% 47.2% 46.2% 45.6% 46.9%

THE PACE AT WHICH PEOPLE CREATE NEW HOUSEHOLDS Headship Rates By Race/Ethnicity

HISPA NIC

OTH E R

B L A CK

2010 Census

2013

2020 Average

2030 Average

NOTE: Headship Rate defined as, “the pace at which people create new households.”

Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold, 2015 www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold

HOMEOWNERSHIP RATES BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 1990-2030

Total

2 0 1 0 CENSUS

White

2013

Black

Hispanic

48% 40%

41% 47% 2020 A V ER A G E

57%

61.3% 70%

56%

62.7% 71% 55%

56%

42% 45%

2000

44% 47%

46% 46%

1990

63.6% 71%

65.1% 72%

45% 43%

53%

54%

65.3% 70%

66.2% 72%

Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold, 2015 Homeownership Rates By Race/Ethnicity (1990-2030) http://www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold

203 0 A V E RA GE

Other

Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold?, 2015 www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold

DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Urban Institute, Headship and Homeownership: What Does The Future Hold?, 2015 http://www.urban.org/research/publication/headship-and-homeownership-what-does-future-hold 293

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

Arizona Surpasses the National Hispanic izona Surpasses the United States in Home Ownership Average for Homeownership

53% 45%

Arizona

United States

Source: Pew Research Center Source: Pew Research Center www.pewhispanic.org/states/state/az/ www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/the-hispanic-home-ownership-gap.html http://www.pewhispanic.org/states/state/az/ http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/the-hispanic-home-ownership-gap.html

Arizona Hispanic Occupied Home Ownership Arizona Hispanic Occupied Homeownership Arizona

500,823

331,658

184,942

1990

2000

2010

Source: U.S Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf

www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf Source: U.S Census Bureau www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf http://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

294

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

Maricopa Hispanic Occupied Homeownership Maricopa Hispanic Occupied Home Ownership Maricopa

288,443

186,202

90,408

1990

2000

2010

Source: U.S Census Bureau

Source: U.S Census Bureau http://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

Yavapai Hispanic Occupied Homeownership Yavapai Hispanic Occupied Home Ownership Yavapai

7,729

4,507

2,093

1990

2000

2010

Source: U.S Census Bureau Source: U.S Census Bureau http://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

295

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

Pima Hispanic Occupied Home Ownership Pima Hispanic Occupied Homeownership Pima

99,911

70,944 47,029

1990

2000

2010

Source: U.S Census Bureau Source: U.S Census Bureau http://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

296

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

CHAPTER 9

Phoenix CCD Hispanic Occupied Home Ownership Phoenix CCD* Hispanic Occupied Homeownership

254,148

170,347

51,723

1990

2000

1990

2000

2010

2010

*CCD = Census County Division

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Source: U.S. Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf http://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

Tucson Hispanic Occupied Home Ownership Tucson Hispanic Occupied Homeownership 88,496

64,950

35,008

1990

2000

2010

Source: U.S Census Bureau Source: U.S Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf http://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/ch-1/ch-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf

http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

297

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


Ask yourself if you’re reaching the multicultural consumer.

STEP 1

(Are you getting your fair share?)

Give us a call.

STEP 2

(Ask for Mark.)

480 648 7539 mosaicmulticultural.com ADVERTISING

PR

INTERACTIVE

MEDIA

STRATEGY

LEADERSHIP

Arizona’s EDUCATION and TRAINING PARTNER The Maricopa Community Colleges are leaders in business and industry workforce training, fulfilling the job training needs of employers throughout Maricopa County for over five decades. • Largest provider of workforce training in Arizona

• Educating more than 200,000 credit and non-credit students annually

• Maintaining partnerships with hundreds of local organizations

• Attracting an estimated $7.3 billion in direct and indirect economic benefits to the County

• Providing affordable, quality education

• Offering customized non-credit training for employers and organizations through the Corporate College

maricopa.edu

Chandler-Gilbert | Estrella Mountain | GateWay | Glendale | Maricopa Corporate College Mesa | Paradise Valley | Phoenix | Rio Salado | Scottsdale | South Mountain

The Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) is an EEO/AA institution and an equal opportunity employer of protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or national origin.


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

TRADE WITH MEXICO

CHAPTER 10

WHAT DOES THE UNITED STATES IMPORT FROM MEXICO? (2015)

What Does The United States Import from Mexico? (2015)

V EH ICL E P A R T S

DE LI VE R Y TRUCKS

C O M P U T E R S VI DEO DI S PLAY S

I N S U LATED WI R E

6.99

TELEPH ON ES

8.28

C R U DE PETR OLEUM

10.10

11.40

CA R S

11.80

12.60

17.00

19.60

21.30

24.00

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

TR AC TOR S

SE ATS

Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, What Does The United States Import From Mexico?, 2015 atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/import/usa/mex/show/2015/

WHAT DOES THE UNITED STATES EXPORT TO MEXICO? (2015)

Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, What Does The United States Import From Mexico?, 2015 What Does the United States Export to Mexico? (2015) *All figures are in billions (USD) http://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/import/usa/mex/show/2015/

INSUL A TED W IR E

L O W V O L TA G E PR O TECTIO N EQ UIPMENT

CO R N

2.42

2.39

CA R S

2.51

2.79

3.71

C O MB U S T I O N P E T R O L E U M G A S ENGINES

3.05

VEHICLE PARTS

3.16

15.1

R E F I NE D PETROLEUM

4.02

16

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

TEL EPHO NES V I D E O D I S P L A Y S

Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, What Does The United States Export To Mexico?, 2015 atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/export/usa/mex/show/2015/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

299

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, What Does The United States Export To Mexico?, 2015 http://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/export/usa/mex/show/2015/

*All figures are in billions (USD)


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 10

TRADE WITH MEXICO

UNITED STATES TOP EXPORT CATEGORIES TO MEXICO, 2016

United States Top Export Categories to Mexico (2016)

V EHICL ES

MINER A L F UEL S

16 E L E C T R I C A L MA C H I N E R Y

20

41

M AC H I N E R Y

21

42

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

PL AS TI C S

Source: Office of the United States Trade Representative, U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts, 2016 ustr.gov/countries-regions/americas/mexico

UNITED STATES TOP IMPORT CATEGORIES FROM MEXICO, 2016 United States Top Import Categories from Mexico (2016)

Source: Office of the United States Trade Representative, U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts, 2016 https://ustr.gov/countries-regions/americas/mexico

*All figures are in billions (USD)

VEHICLES

E L E C T R I C A L MA C H I N E R Y

MA CHINER Y

O PTICA L A ND MEDICA L INSTR UMENTS

11

13

51

62

75

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

F UR NITUR E A N D BE D D I N G

Source: Office of the United States Trade Representative, U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts, 2016 ustr.gov/countries-regions/americas/mexico

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

300

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Office of the United States Trade Representative, U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts, 2016 https://ustr.gov/countries-regions/americas/mexico

*All figures are in billions (USD)


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 10

TRADE WITH MEXICO

U.S. TOTAL EXPORTS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS TO MEXICO, 2016 U.S. Total Exports of Agricultural Products to Mexico (2016) Leading Agricultural Categories

CORN

S O Y BE A N S

PO R K & PO R K PR O DUCTS

DA IR Y PR O DUCTS

0.975

1.2

1.4

1.5

2.6

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

B EEF & B E E F P RO D U C TS

LEADING AGRICULTURAL CATEGORIES Source: Office of the United States Trade Representative, U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts, 2016 ustr.gov/countries-regions/americas/mexico

Source: Office of the United States Trade Representative, U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts, 2016 U.S. Total Imports of Agricultural Products from Mexico (2016) https://ustr.gov/countries-regions/americas/mexico Leading Agricultural Categories

U.S. TOTAL IMPORTS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS FROM MEXICO, 2016

1.5

2

3.1

4.9

5.6

*All figures are in billions (USD)

FRESH VEGETABLES

FRESH FRUIT

WINE A ND B EER

S NA CK F O O DS

PR O CES S ED F R U I T & V E GE TA BL E S

LEADING AGRICULTURAL CATEGORIES Source: Office of the United States Trade Representative, U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts, 2016 ustr.gov/countries-regions/americas/mexico

Source: Office of the United States Trade Representative, U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts, 2016 301 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://ustr.gov/countries-regions/americas/mexico


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 10

TRADE WITH MEXICO

MEXICO RANKS 2ND IN IMPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES, 2015 Mexico Ranks 2nd in Imports to the United States Source of U.S. Imports (2015)

C AN ADA

123

M E XI C O

129

289

CH INA

291

458

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

JAPAN

GERM ANY

SOURCES OF U.S. IMPORTS Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, Where Does The United States Import From?, 2015 atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/import/usa/show/all/2015/

MEXICO RANKS 2ND IN EXPORTS FROM THE UNITED STATES, 2015

Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, Where Does The United States Import From?, 2015 http://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/import/usa/show/all/2015/

*All figures are in billions (USD)

Mexico Ranks 2nd in Exports from the United States Countries Where U.S. Exports (2015)

ME X I C O

CHINA

63.3

C AN A D A

63.5

129.0

188.0

219.0

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

JA PA N

G ER M A N Y

COUNTRIES WHERE U.S. EXPORTS Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, Where Does The United States Export To?, 2015 atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/export/usa/show/all/2015/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

302

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, Where Does The United States Export To?, 2015


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

CHAPTER 10

TRADE WITH MEXICO

THE UNITED STATES IS MEXICO'S MAIN SOURCE FOR IMPORTS, 2015 The United States is Mexico’s Main Source for Imports Source of Mexico Imports (2015)

CHINA

JAPAN

S OU TH K OR EA

6.7

13.6

U NIT ED S T AT ES

15.5

64.0

188.0

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

MAL AYSIA

SOURCES OF MEXICO IMPORTS Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, Where Does Mexico Import From?, 2015 atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/import/mex/show/all/2015/

MOST MEXICAN EXPORTS GO TO THE UNITED STATES, 2015

Source: The Observatory of Economic Complexity, Where Does Mexico Import From?, 2015 Most Mexican Exports Go to the United States http://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/import/mex/show/all/2015/

Where Mexico Exports To (2015)

4.45

CANADA

4.74

U NI T E D S T AT E S

6.83

22.60

291.00

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

CHINA

G ER MA NY

JA P A N

WHERE MEXICO EXPORTS TO Source: The Observatory For Economic Complexity, Where Does Mexico Export To?, 2015 atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/export/mex/show/all/2015/

303 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: The Observatory For Economic Complexity, Where Does Mexico Export To?, 2015 http://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualize/tree_map/hs92/export/mex/show/all/2015/


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

TRADE WITH MEXICO

CHAPTER 10

U.S. TRADE WITH MEXICO, 2010-2015 U.S. Trade with Mexico 2010-2015

ALL FIGURES ARE IN MILLIONS (USD) 262,864.40

277,652.70

280,455.50

216,330.90

226,152.90

294,074.10

294,741.10

240,248.70

236,377.40

229,907.90 198,377.60 163,473.00

-66,434.90

-64,486.90

-61,321.80

-54,302.60

-53,825.40

-58,363.70

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Export

Import

Deficit

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file

TOP FOUR EXPORTS TO MEXICO BY VALUE

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file

$14.30

$12.60

S P A C EC R A F T AN D R E L AT E D C O MMO D I T I E S

$19.80

$292.30

ALL FIGURES ARE INTop MILLIONS (USD) Four Exports to Mexico by Value

MI L I T A R Y A I R C R A F T A N D R EL A TED C O MMO D I T I E S

A R MO R ED A ND PR O TECTIV E EQ UIPMENT A ND R EL A TED CO MMO DITIES

MIL ITA R Y G A S TUR B I N E E N GI N E S A N D R EL A TED CO M M O D I TI E S

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

304

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

TRADE WITH MEXICO

CHAPTER 10

TOP FOUR U.S. EXPORTS TO MEXICO BY SHIPMENT COUNT, 2015

204

350

597

1,290

Top Four U.S. Exports to Mexico by Shipment Count (2015)

MI LI TA R Y A IR C R A F T A N D R E L A T E D C O M M O D ITIE S

E QU I PM E N T F O R M A N U F A C T U R I N G O F S E M I C ON D U C T OR D E V I C E S O R M A T E R I A L S

M I L I T A R Y G A S T U R BI N E E N G I N E S A N D RELATED COMMODITIES

CHEMICALS THAT MAY BE USED AS PRECURSORS FOR TOXIC CHEMICAL AGENTS

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file

U.S. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTS (ATP) TRADE WITH MEXICO, 2010-2015 U.S. Advanced Technology Products (ATP) Trade with Mexico (2010-2015)

ALL FIGURES ARE IN MILLIONS (USD) 48,782

27,149

-21,597 2010

52,413

47,782

49,627

47,815

45,453

31,925

33,252

35,612

36,452

-15,857

-16,375

2011

2012

ATP Export

-12,203

2013

ATP Import

-9,001

2014

40,310

-12,103

2015

ATP Deficit

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

305

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

TRADE WITH MEXICO

CHAPTER 10

U.S. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTS (ATP) EXPORTS TO MEXICO BY TYPE, 2011-2015 U.S. ATP Exports to Mexico by Type (2010-2015)

22,608

21,858

21,514 2012

Information and Communications

2013

Electronics

Aerospace

7,255 3,948 1,315 1,011

6,884 3,359 1,193 911

2011

6,827 3,487 1,092 1,007

1,820 896 633

2010

5,814 2,761 1,080 854

1,588 799 477

6,203

7,202

15,730

21,133

25,347

ALL FIGURES ARE IN MILLIONS (USD)

2014

Life Science

2015

Flexible Manufacturing

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file

U.S. IMPORTS FROM MEXICO BY TYPE, 2011-2015

Source: Bureau of Industry and Security, Statistical Analysis of U.S. Trade with Mexico for Calendar Year 2015, 2015 https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/technology-evaluation/ote-data-portal/country-analysis/1515-2015-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-mexico-pdf/file U.S. Imports from Mexico by Type (2011-2015)

2011

2012

Motor Vehicles Audio and Video Equipment

2013

Motor Vehicle Parts Communications Equipment

43.7 2014

17.7 14.6 13.3 12.5

27.8 14.3 14.2 10.7

14.8 13.8 13.5

32

40.1

40.1 36.2

37.2

35.3 33.3 16 14.2 13.8

14.5 14.7 13.2

30.5 28.5

39.6

46.4

50.5

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

2015

Computer Equipment Oil and Gas

Source: Congressional Research Service, U.S.-Mexico Economic Relations: Trends, Issues and Implications, 2016 fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL32934.pdf

306 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Congressional Research Service, U.S.-Mexico Economic Relations: Trends, Issues, and Implications, 2016 https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL32934.pdf *All figures are in billions (USD)


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

TRADE WITH MEXICO

CHAPTER 10

U.S. EXPORTS TO MEXICO BY TYPE, 2011-2015

U.S. Exports to Mexico by Type (2011-2015)

13.5

2013

8.5 8.2

8.2

10.1 8.7

13 10.1

2012

16.3 15.4 13.9

19 16.3

16 7.7

2011

23.8

21.5

19.3

21.1

20.7

10.9 9.1 7.3

11.4 10.1

14.5

14.8

17.2

19.4

20.3

ALL FIGURES ARE IN BILLIONS (USD)

2014

MOTOR VEHICLE PARTS PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS BASIC CHEMICALS

2015

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT SEMICONDUCTORS AND OTHER ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS RESIN AND SYNTHETIC RUBBER OR FIBER

Source: Congressional Research Service, U.S.-Mexico Economic Relations: Trends, Issues and Implications, 2016 fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL32934.pdf

Source: Congressional Research Service, U.S.-Mexico Economic Relations: Trends, Issues, and Implications, 2016 *All figures are in billions (USD) https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL32934.pdf

U.S. AND MEXICAN FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT POSITIONS, 1994-2015 U.S. and Mexican Foreign Direct Investment Positions (1994-2015)

1994

1995

1996

199 7

2000

2001

2002

2003

U.S. FDI In Mexico

2006

2007

2009

2010

2011

201 3

Mexico FDI in the U.S.

Source: Congressional Research Service, U.S.-Mexico Economic Relations: Trends, Issues and Implications, 2016 fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL32934.pdf

*All figures are in millions (USD)

307 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: Congressional Research Service, U.S.-Mexico Economic Relations: Trends, Issues, and Implications, 2016 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL32934.pdf

2014

16,597

92,812

89,650 16,567

86,433 2012

15,869

12,751

85,599 12,500

10,970

85,751

104,388 2008

11,111

84,047

8,420

87,443

91,046 8,478

82,965

73,687 2005

5,310

7,592 2004

3,595

63,384

56,851 9,022

7,829

56,303

6,645

52,544

39,352

37,151 1999

7,642

2,055 1998

1,999

26,657

24,050 3,100

1,641

19,351

16,873 1,850

2,069

16,968

ALL FIGURES ARE IN MILLIONS (USD)

2015


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

TRADE WITH MEXICO

CHAPTER 10

UNITED STATES & MEXICO ECONOMIC PROFILES MEDIUM

MEXICO 2006

MEXICO 2016

U.S. 2006

U.S. 2016

Population (millions) Nominal GDP (US$ billions) Nominal GDP, PPP Basis (US$ billions) Per Capita GDP (US$) Per Capita GDP in $PPPs Nominal Exports of Goods & Services (US$ billions) Exports of Goods & Services as % of GDP Nominal Imports of Goods & Services Imports of Goods & Services as % of GDP

111 966 1,466 8,675 13,157 266 28% 278 29%

129 1,046 2,268 8,128 17,630 399 38% 418 40%

299 13,856 13,856 46,064 46,064 1,476 11% 2,247 16%

324 18,565 18,565 57,321 57,321 2,223 12% 2,733 15%

Source: Congressional Research Service, U.S.-Mexico Economic Relations: Trends, Issues and Implications, 2016 fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL32934.pdf

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

308

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

TRADE WITH MEXICO

CHAPTER 10

Total Arizona Exports Total Arizona Exports (U.S. dollars in millions) (U.S. DOLLARS IN MILLIONS)

21,248

19,477 18,405 17,885

2011

2012

2013

2014

NOTE: These figures are as of Q1 2016 but are constantly updated.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Source: U.S. Census Bureau https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html

Most Arizona Exports Go to These 5 Countries Top 5 Country Exports From Arizona (U.S. dollars in millions)

(U.S. DOLLARS IN MILLIONS)

9,162

2,303 1,266

Mexico

Canada

China

1,066

United Kingdom

830 Germany

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Source: U.S. Census Bureau www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

309

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


DRIVING GROWTH IN LATINO-OWNED BUSINESSES

National Bank of Arizona® is dedicated to driving and supporting growth in Arizona’s Latino-owned businesses. That’s why NB|AZ® is proud to sponsor the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market. Specializing in forming one-on-one relationships, taking a big picture view of your needs and providing superb customer service, we offer a broad suite of customized products and services for individuals and businesses. Backed by the financial strength and soundness of Zions Bancorporation, you get the resources you need with the responsiveness and personalized service you expect from a community bank—which makes NB|AZ THE ONLY BANK YOU NEED.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Marcos Garay Director Of Strategic Business Development Marcos.Garay@nbarizona.com 602.212.5543

NBAZ.COM | A division of ZB, N.A. Member FDIC

Equal Housing Lender © 2017 ZB, N.A.


SECTION II

CHAPTER 10 TRADE WITH MEXICO

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

PROFILE

THE CONSUL GENERAL OF MEXICO-PHOENIX EMBARKS ON YET ANOTHER JOURNEY BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

President Enrique Peña Nieto of Mexico appears to have appointed someone with just the right background and temperament needed to serve as Consul General of Mexico in Phoenix—particularly as the Mexican immigrant community here continues to reel from the latest developments in U.S. immigration policy.

[link] to an important Hispanic leadership population that the United States has benefitted from." Since Donald Trump became president, however, Franco-Hijuelos acknowledges that much of her duty as Consul General has focused on keeping the Mexican community in Arizona informed about its rights, encouraging them to learn about her office and its services and providing them with resources to guide them to U.S. citizenship, if they decide to pursue that path.

Claudia Franco-Hijuelos began her job in July 2016 believing that it is now more important than ever to build a stronger partnership between the two areas, partly because of Arizona's and Mexico's past ties and despite recently strained relations.

Because of the recent wave of deportations in which parents have been separated from their children, Franco-Hijuelos has strongly advised undocumented immigrant parents to register their children at the Consulate, even if they were born in the United States.

As she has set out to rebuild bridges between Arizona and Mexico, Franco-Hijuelos has come to be known as someone who performs her duties with dignity, charisma and poise. These are characteristics she works hard to embody in her professional and personal life, which she says she works hard to keep in balance.

"[If]...the children’s parents are deported, it would be much easier to reunify the family," Franco-Hijuelos says. The passage of Senate Bill 1070 in 2010 created serious challenges for Arizona Hispanics, most of whom are of Mexican descent and damaged relations between Mexico and Arizona.

"It is hard for me to survive in a professional setting if I don't have peace in my personal life," Franco-Hijuelos says. "I enjoy walking at 5 a.m. I love listening to birds chirp [and]; the sky is beautiful at that time. I love to swim. I also enjoy spending time with my husband."

In 2010, people in Mexico watched horrified as Mexican immigrants faced a wave of discrimination. Fast-forward to 2017 and SB 1070 has been largely gutted, most Arizonans now support a path to legalization for the undocumented and Arizona's current governor has jump-started relations with Mexican leaders.

Franco-Hijuelos is known for her confident and composed personality, characteristics she says both of her college-aged daughters emulate. If there's one thing that grounds her and fills her with pride, she says it is how at peace her daughters are with themselves.

"I have hope that our bilateral relationships inspire the country and state of Arizona," Franco-Hijuelos says. "I have hope because I am confident that with personal contact and proper information all stereotypes can change....The prosperity that we have had in the last 25 years [since the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement] has been thanks to...students, tourists and documented and undocumented workers."

Franco-Hijuelos is trilingual, has earned degrees in Mexico and the United States and has been a university professor. She served as Consul General of Mexico in Vancouver, Canada before coming to Arizona as a representative of Mexico to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and she was recently award the title of Ambassador.

In other words, Franco-Hijuelos says, we have a future together."

"I am very fortunate to be in the professional position I am in today because Arizona is conscientious and cares about the importance of its relationship with Mexico," Franco-Hijuelos says. "Arizona is the

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY. 311

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


ZCENTRAL.COM NTRAL.COM • LA VOZ Z • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC REPUBL BLIC IC DIRECT • REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING PUBLISH SHIN ING G • ARIZONA BUSINESS GAZETTE GAZ AZETTE • AUTOSHOPPE AUTOSHOPP • CARS.COM • HOM HOMEFINDER.COM OMEF EFINDER.COM • CAREER CAREERBUILDER.COM ERBU BUILDER.COM • TEMPE/AHWATUKEE REPUBLIC • CH CHAN CHANDLER ANDLER REPUBLIC • GILB GILBERT LBERT REPUBLIC • GLENDALE ENDALE RPUBL RPUBLIC BLIC • MESA REPUBLIC IC • N NORTHEAST ORTHEAST PHOENIX REPUBLIC• PHOENIX REPUBLIC • NO NORT NORTHWEST RTHWEST VALLEY REP REPUBLIC EPUB UBLIC • PEORIA REPUBLIC • SCO SCOTTSDALE COTTSDALE COTTSD CO SDAL SD ALE AL E RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBLIC • SOUTHWEST OUTHWEST ST V VALLEY ALLE AL LEY LE Y RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBL PU BLIC IC • S SURPRISE URPR UR PRIS ISE IS E RE REPUBLIC REPU PUBL PU BLIC • AZ BL AZCENT AZCENTRA AZCENTRAL.COM NTRA NT RAL.COM RAL.CO RA COM CO M • LA A VO VOZ • B BUY BUYER’S UYER’S EDGE UY • REPUBLIC D DIRECT IRECT IREC IR ECT EC T • REPUB REPUBLIC UBLIC CU UB CUSTOM PUBLISH PUBLISHIN PUBLISHING SHIN SH ING G • ARIZONA ARIZON ONA ON A BU BUSINESS SINE SI NESS NE SS G GAZETTE AZET AZ ETTE ET TE • A AUTOSHOPPER UTOSHOPPER UTOS OSHO OS HOPPER HO ER • C CARS.COM ARS.COM ARS. AR S.CO S. COM CO M • HO HOME HOMEFIND HOMEFINDER.COM MEFI ME FINDER.COM • CAREERBUILDER.COM REERBUILDE DER.COM R.CO R. COM • TEMPE CO TEMPE/A TEMPE/AHWATUKEE PE/A PE /AHWATUKEE /AHW EE REP REPUB REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLIC UB C • CHANDL CHANDLER DLER R DL REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C • GI GILB GILBERT LBER LB ERT ER T RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBLIC PUBL PU BLIC • G BL GLENDAL GLENDALE LEND LE NDAL ND ALE RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBL PU BLIC BL IC • M MES MESA ESA A REPUBL REPUBLIC • NORTHE NORTHEAST HEAS AST T PH PHOE PHOENIX OENI OE NIX REPU NI REPUBLIC PUBLIC • PHOENIX PUBL PU HOENIX IX R REPUBLIC EPUB UBLI UB LIC • NORT LI NORTHWEST RTHWEST RT T VA VALL VALLEY LLEY LL EY R REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C • PE PEOR PEORIA ORIA OR IA R REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C • SC SCOTTSDALE SCOT OTTS OT TSDA TS DALE DA LE REP REPUBLIC EPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST UTHWES EST VALLEY R REPUB REPUBLIC EPUBLI UBLI LIC LI C • SU SURPRISE SE R REPUBLIC EPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI LIC LI C• A AZCEN AZCENTRAL.COM ZCEN ENTR TRAL TR AL.C .COM OM • LA V VOZ OZ • BU BUYE BUYER’S YER’ YE R’S R’ S ED EDGE GE • R REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C DI DIRE DIRECT RECT RE CT • RE REPU REPUBLIC PU C CUSTOM USTO PUBLISHING BLISHING NG • ARIZONA NA BUSIN BUS BUSINESS USINESS INES IN ESS S GA GAZETT GAZETTE TTE TT E • AUTO AUTOSHOPPE AUTOSHOPPER TOSH TO SHOP SH OPPE OP PER • CA CARS CARS.COM RS.C RS .COM • H HOMEFIN HOMEFINDER.COM OMEF OM EFIN EF INDE IN DER.COM DER. DE R.CO R. COM CO M • CA CARE CAREERBUILDER.COM REERBUILDER.CO REER RE ERBU ER BUIL BU ILDE IL DER. DE R.CO R. COM CO M• T TEMPE/AHW TEMPE/AHWATUKEE EMPE EM PE/AHWAT PE ATUK REPUBLIC PUBLIC IC • CHANDLER HANDLER R RE REPUBL REPU REPUBLIC PUBLIC BLIC • G BL GILBE GILBERT ILBE IL BERT BE RT R REPUBLIC EPUBLIC • GL GLENDALE R REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C • ME MESA SA R REP REPUBLIC EPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C • NO NORT NORTHEAST RTHEAST RTHE RT HEAS HE AST AS T PH PHOE PHOENI PHOENIX OENI OE NIX NI X RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBL BL • PHO PHOENIX HOEN REPUBLIC REPU PUBLIC • NOR NORTHWE NORTHWEST ORTH OR THWE TH WEST V VALLEY ALLE AL LE RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBLIC PU BLIC BL IC • P PEO PEORIA EORI EO RIA RI A REPUBL REPUBLIC BLIC BL IC • S SCOTTSDALE COTT CO TTSD TT SDAL SD ALE AL E RE REPU REPUBL REPUBLIC PUBL PU BLIC BL IC • S SOUTHWE SOUTHWEST OUTH OU THWE TH WEST WE ST V VALLEY ALLE AL LEY RE LE REPUBLIC REPU PUBL PU BLIC BL IC • SURPR SURPRISE PRISE REPUBLIC PUBL BLIC • AZCENTRAL.CO AZCENTRAL.COM CENT NTRA NT RAL. RA L.CO L. COM CO M • LLA A VO VOZ Z• B BUYER’S UYER’S EDG UY EDGE DGE E • RE REPU REPUBL REPUBLIC PUBL PU BLIC BL IC DIR DIRECT IREC ECT EC T• R REPUBLIC EPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C CU CUST CUSTOM STOM ST OM P PUBLISH PUBLISHING UBLI UB LISH LI SHING SHIN SH ING IN G • AR ARIZ ARIZON ARIZONA IZON IZ ONA ON A BU BUSI BUSINESS SINE SI NE GAZ GAZETTE AZETTE • AUTOSHOPPER TOSH SHOPPER • CA CARS CARS.C CARS.COM RS.C RS .COM .C OM • H HOMEF HOMEFINDER.COM OMEF OM EFINDER.COM EFIN EF INDE IN DER. DE R.CO R.CO COM M • CA CAREERBUIL CARE CAREERBUILDER.COM REERBUIL REER ERBU ER BUIL BU ILDER.COM IL ILDE DER. R.CO • TEMPE TEMPE/AHWATUKEE PE/AHWATUK UKEE REPUBLI REPUBLIC LIC • CHANDLER ER REPUBLIC • GILB GILBERT LBER REPUBLIC PUBL BLIC • GLENDALE NDAL ALE AL E RE REPUBLIC REPU PUBL PU BLIC • MES MESA ESA REPUBLIC IC • NOR NORTHEA NORTHEAST ORTH THEA TH EAST EA ST P PHOENIX HO REPUB REPUBLIC• UBLIC• PHOEN PHOENIX ENIX REPUBLI REPUBLIC LIC • NORTHWEST VALLEY REPUB REPUBLIC UBLI • PEORIA ORIA IA REPUBLIC • SCOT SCOTTSDALE OTTSDALE REP REPUBLIC EPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST VA VALLEY REPUBLIC • SU SURPRISE REP REPUBLIC EPUBLIC • AZC AZCENTRAL.COM ZCENTRAL.COM OM • LA VOZ • BUYE BUYER’S YER’ EDGE GE • R REPUBLIC EPUBLIC DIRECT RECT RE CT • RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBL PU BLIC BL IC C CUSTOM USTOM USTO US TOM TO M PU PUBL PUBLISHING BLISHING BLIS BL ISHI IS HING HI NG • A ARI ARIZONA RIZONA RIZO RI ZONA ZO NA B BUSINESS USIN US INES IN ESS ES S GA GAZETTE GAZE ZETT ZE TTE TT E • AU AUTOSHOPPE AUTO AUTOSHOPPER TOSH TO SHOP SH OPPE OP PER PE R • CA CARS CARS.COM RS.C RS .COM .C OM • H HOMEFINDER. HOMEFINDER.COM OM R.CO • CAREERBUILDER.COM REERBU BUILDER.COM COM CO M• T TEMPE/AHWATUKEE EMPE/AHWAT EMPE EM PE/A PE /AHW /A HWAT HW ATUKEE ATUK AT UKEE UK EE R REPUB REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLIC UBLI UB LIC LI C • CH CHAN CHANDL CHANDLER ANDL AN DLER DL ER R REPUBLI REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI LIC LI C • GI GILB GILBERT LBER LB ERT ER T RE REPUBLIC REPU PUBL PU BLIC BL IC • G GLE GLENDALE LENDALE LEND LE NDAL ND ALE AL E RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBLIC PUBL BLIC IC • MESA REPU REPUBLIC PUBL • NORT NORTHEAST RTHEAST PHOE PHOENIX OENIX X RE REPUBLIC REPU PUBL BLIC IC • P PHOENIX HOENIX HOEN HO ENIX IX R REP REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLIC UBLI UB LIC LI C • NO NORT NORTHWES NORTHWEST RTHW RT HWES HW EST ES T VA VALLEY VALL LLEY EY R REPUBLI REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C • PE PEOR PEORIA ORIA OR IA R REP REPUBLIC EPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C • SC SCOT SCOTTSDALE OTTSDALE OTTS TSDA DALE REPUB REPUBLIC UBLI LIC • SOUTHWEST UTHW HWEST VALLEY REPUB REPUBLIC UBLIC • SURPRI SURPRISE RISE REPUBLIC C • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BU BUYE BUYER’S YER’S EDGE • R REPUBLIC EPUBLIC DIRE DIRECT RECT CT • REPUBLIC CUS CUSTOM USTO PUBLISHING BLISHING NG • ARIZONA BUS BUSINESS USINESS GAZETT GAZETTE TTE E • AU AUTO AUTOSHOP AUTOSHOPPER TOSH TO SHOPPE OPPE PER • CARS.COM • HOMEFIN HOMEFINDER.COM INDE DER.COM • CARE CAREERBUILDER.COM REERBUILDER.CO REER COM • TEMPE/AHW TEMPE/AHWATUKEE HWAT ATUK REPUBLIC PUBLIC • CHANDLER REPU REPUBLIC PUBL BLIC • GILBERT RT R REPUBLIC EPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC C • GL GLEN GLENDA GLENDALE ENDA EN DALE DA LE R REPUBLI REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI UB LIC LI C • ME MESA SA R REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLI LIC C • NO NORTHEAST PHOE NORT PHOENIX OENIX REPUBLIC • P PHOENIX HOEN REPUBLIC BLIC • NOR NORTHWEST ORTHWEST VALLE VALLEY LEY Y REPUBLIC • P PEO PEORIA EORIA EORI EO RIA A RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBL BLIC BL IC • S SCOTTSDALE COTT CO TTSD TT SDAL SD ALE AL E REPU RE REPUBLIC PUBL PU BLIC IC • S SOUTH SOUTHWEST OUTH OU THWE WEST WE ST VALLEY REPUBLIC RE • SURPRIS SURPRISE ISE E REPU REPUBLIC PART OF THE USA TODAY NETWORK • AZCENTRAL.COM ENTRAL.C .COM • LA VOZ • BUYE BUYER’S YER’S EDGE GE • R REPUB REPUBLIC EPUB EP UBLIC UBLI UB LIC LI C DIRECT • RE REPU REPUBLICAZCENTRAL.COM PUBL BLIC ICAZ AZCE CENT NTRA RAL. L.CO COM CO M • LA VOZ • BUYER BUYER’S ER’S ’S EDGE • REPUBLIC IC CARS.CO CARS.COM • HOMEFINDER.COM MEFINDER.C .COM OM • CAREERBUILD CAREERBUILDER.COM LDER ER.COM • TEMPE/AH TEMPE/AHWATUKEE AHWA WATUKEE REPUBLIC • CHANDLE CHANDLER LER R RE REPUBLIC • GILBERT RT REPUBLIC • GLENDA GLENDALE DALE RPUBL RPUBLIC • MESA SA REPUBLIC C • NORTHEAST PHOE PHOENIX OENI NIX REPUBLIC• PHOENI PHOENIX NIX X RE REPU REPUBLIC PUBLIC • N NORTHWEST ORTH OR THWE WEST VALLEY REPUBL REPUBLIC BLIC IC • PEORIA REPUBLIC IC • SCOTTSDAL SCOTTSDALE REPUBLIC BLIC • SOUTHWE SOUTHWEST WEST VALLEY REPUBL REPUBLIC BLIC IC • SURPRISE REPUBLIC • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER BUYER’S ER’S ’S EDGE • REPUBLIC D DIRECT IRECT • REPUB IR REPUBL CUSTOM PUBLISHING • ARIZONA BUSINESS

4 STRONG

MILLION

WE ARE WHERE YOUR CUSTOMERS ARE.

“Know YOUR Customer” Customers, Clients, Constituents, Stakeholders...whatever you call

them, knowing who they are and what they want is

critical to your success.

Give us a call or visit our

website for more information on how we can help YOU stay in touch.

602.707.0050 | westgroupresearch.com


SECTION II

PROFILE

CHAPTER 11 POLITICS

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

NALEO FOCUSES ON ARIZONA ISSUES WITH NEW STATE OFFICE BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

The pressing need to improve the quality of education in Arizona inspired the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) to open its first fulltime office here.

The state's Hispanic population is growing rapidly, but Latino representation on school boards and other policymaking roles has lagged. NALEO wants to change that. "It is very tricky to be the lone Latino school board member in a board of 5-7 and have to navigate those politics," says Karyn Pina, associate vice president of outreach at Arizona State University, which is partnering with NALEO on its initiative. "How do (they) create consensus, how do [they] advance a policy when the board is split and often times Latinos are the newest to be elected and the learning curve is immediate."

In April, NALEO appointed Gloria Montaño-Greene the organization's new state director and assigned her to lead the NALEO Educational Fund's effort to help boost educational outcomes for Arizona youth, especially in underserved, Latino communities.

"If you want to raise education attainment in the state, an initiative of the governor [or] various organizations," MontañoGreene says, "you are not going to get any traction if you don't raise education attainment of Latino students."

Latino students make up nearly 50 percent of the student population in Arizona and experts say the educational attainment gap between Latino and non-Latino students must close if the state's economy is going to prosper.

While the focus is on improving education, NALEO is also interested in boosting opportunities for Latinos who want to run for office. David Garcia, associate professor at ASU and a candidate for Arizona governor, says the NALEO initiative will give individuals interested in education policy and running for public office the tools they need to get more engaged in the political process.

"There is not one answer to [improving] education, but we know education attainment is not as high as it should be," MontañoGreene says. Montaño-Greene is leading NALEO's effort to establish a public policy academy that will provide in-depth training for Latino education leaders in the state. Her main responsibility is to provide Latino elected officials with high-level resources and training, networking opportunities and other support necessary to help the state meet the goals of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

Equipping Latino education policymakers with proper training and resources is vital to boosting education attainment, but policymakers must also be able to relate to the unique experiences of the state's growing Latino student population.

Montaño-Greene says NALEO's work will not be confined to major urban areas.

"Those are the experiences that make us who we are," State Rep. Isela Blanc, District 26, says. "It allows us to reflect on why [policymakers] are making those decisions, how it impacts kids or family or communities, or just being reminded that that it is part of [the policymakers] stories."

"There are a lot of elected officials outside of Maricopa County that we don't hear from as much," she says. "They have distinct needs because they are in rural or transitional communities. So how can they go from a town of 10,000 to a town of 750,000 in five years and the Latino communities not get lost in that growth?"

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

313

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POLITICS

CHAPTER 11

Increasing Share of Hispanics Perceive Their Situation in the U.S. as Worse Than a Year Ago

INCREASING SHARE OF HISPANICS PERCEIVE THEIR SITUATION IN THE U.S. AS WORSE THAN A YEAR AGO

% who say the situation of Hispanics in this country today is ______ compared with one year ago

PERCENTAGE WHO SAY THE SITUATION OF HISPANICS IN THIS COUNTRY TODAY IS ______ COMPARED WITH ONE YEAR AGO 58% 50%

46%

35%

38%

25%

13%

13%

15%

2008

2011

2013

54%

49%

38% 33%

23%

26%

2007

About the Same

Worse

21% 2014

32% 16% 2017

Better

Note: Voluntary responses of Neither/other, don't know and refused not shown. "Not citizens and not residents" refers to immigrants who are neither U.S. citizens nor lawful permanent residents Survey was conducted Dec. 7, 2016-Jan. 15, 2017 Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017

www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/ Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/

DEPORTATION A SERIOUS CONCERN FOR FOREIGN-BORN HISPANICS Deportation a Serious Concern for Foreign-born Hispanics

33%

47%

52%

67%

34%

31%

FOR EI GN-B OR N LAWFU L PER MAN EN T R ES I DEN TS

N ON -C I TI ZE NS AND NO NR ESID E NTS

66%

52%

AL L

66%

45%

U . S. B O R N

FOR EI GN-B OR N U .S . C I TI ZEN S

Not Much/Not At All

A Lot/Some

Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/

Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 314 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POLITICS

CHAPTER 11

EDUCATION AND TERRORISM ARE TOP PRIORITIES FOR LATINOS

DEFENDING THE COUNTRY FROM FUTURE TERRORIST ATTACKS

U.S. Citizens

STRENGTHENING THE NATION'S ECONOMY

Lawful Permanent Residents

REDUCING HEALTH CARE COSTS

47%

48%

43%

52%

58% 49%

IMPROVING THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

61%

67%

60%

69%

74%

61%

70%

72%

74%

Education and Terrorism Are Top Priorities for Latinos

DEALING WITH THE ISSUE OF IMMIGRATION

Non-citizens and Non-residents

Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/

POLITICAL IDENTIFICATION INFLUENCES LATINOS' TOP PRIORITIES FOR TRUMP AND CONGRESS

STRENGTHENING THE NATION'S ECONOMY

DEFENDING THE COUNTRY FROM FUTURE TERRORIST ATTACKS

IMPROVING THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

Republican

Democrat

REDUCING HEALTH CARE COSTS

DEALING WITH THE ISSUE OF IMMIGRATION

Independent

Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

315

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/

46%

45%

53%

52%

58%

55%

73%

75%

74% 65%

70% 61%

70%

82%

83%

Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/ Political Identification Influences Latinos' Top Priorities For Trump and Congress


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POLITICS

CHAPTER 11

NEARLY HALF OF ALL LATINOS RATE IMMIGRATION AS A TOP PRIORITY FOR THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION 47%

ALL U.S. BORN

39%

46%

48%

52%

61%

Nearly Half of All Latinos Rate Immigration as a Top Priority for the Trump Administration

FOREIGN-BORN FOREIGN-BORN U.S. CITIZENS FOREIGN-BORN LAWFUL PERMANENT RESIDENTS NON-CITIZENS AND NON-RESIDENTS Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/

EXACTLY HALF OF LATINOS ARE CURRENTLY DISSATISFIED WITH THE DIRECTION OF OUR COUNTRY

Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 Exactly Half of Latinos Are Currently Dissatisfied with the Direction of Our Country http://www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/

*% who say they are ______ with the way things are going in this country today

PERCENTAGE WHO SAY THEY ARE ______ WITH THE WAY THINGS ARE GOING IN THIS COUNTRY TODAY 70% 57%

56%

36%

38%

2010

2011

60% 51% 43%

46%

46%

47%

50%

46%

47%

46%

45%

2014

2015

2016

2017

34%

25% 2 008

2012

2013

Dissatisfied

Satisfied

Note: Voluntary responses of Don't know/Refused not shown Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/

316 not shown Source: Pew Research Center, Latinos And The New Trump Administration, 2017 T H E S T AT E O F ANote: R I Z OVoluntary N A’ S H Iresponses S P A N I C of M Don’t A R K Eknow/Refused T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2017/02/23/latinos-and-the-new-trump-administration/


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

317

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POLITICS

CHAPTER 11

2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION BY AGE AND RACE

91%

90%

61%

58%

31% BLACKS 45-64

0

8%

9%

1%

7% 4% BLACKS 30-44

9%

9% 6%

WHITES WHITES 65 BLACKS 45-64 AND 18-29 OLDER

3%

WHITES 30-44

4%

9%

LATINOS LATINOS LATINOS 30-44 45-64 65 AND OLDER

39%

62% 34%

37%

WHITES 18-29

2%

32%

25%

10%

LATINOS 18-29

4%

6%

7%

26%

28%

43% 47%

54%

73%

64%

65%

68%

85%

89%

2016 Presidential Election by Age and Race

BLACKS 65 AND OLDER

ALL OTHERS

Note: Exit polls are surveys of a small percentage of voters taken after they leave their voting place. There were 24558 participants Clinton Trump Other/No Answer in this poll. Source: CNN, 2016 Exit Polls, 2016 edition.cnn.com/election/results/exit-polls/national/president

W H I T E C O L L E G E G R AD U A T E S

W H I T E N O D E G R EE

Clinton

20%

NO N-WHITE CO L L EG E G R A DUA TES

Trump

4%

6%

5%

7%

22%

29%

48%

45%

66%

72%

2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION BY EDUCATION AND RACE

76%

Note: Exit polls are surveys of a small percentage of voters taken after they leave their Source: CNN, 2016 Exit Polls, 2016 2016 Presidential Election by Education and Race voting place. There were 24558 participants in this poll. http://edition.cnn.com/election/results/exit-polls/national/president

NO N- W HITE NO D E GRE E

Other/No Answer

Note: Exit polls are surveys of a small percentage of voters taken after they leave their voting place. There were 24558 participants in this poll. Source: CNN, 2016 Exit Polls, 2016 edition.cnn.com/election/results/exit-polls/national/president

Note: Exit polls are surveys of a small percentage of voters taken after they leave their Source: CNN, 2016 Exit Polls, 2016 voting place. There were 24558 participants in this poll. http://edition.cnn.com/election/results/exit-polls/national/president

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

318

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

POLITICS

CHAPTER 11

ARIZONA LATINO VOTERS OVERWHELMINGLY VOTED FOR CLINTON IN 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

Arizona Latino Voters Overwhelmingly Voted for Clinton in 2016 Presidential Election

4% 12%

CLINTON TRUMP OTHER

84% Source: Latino Decisions, Latino Decisions 2016 Election Eve Poll, 2016 www.latinovote2016.com/app/#all-az-all

IMMIGRATION WAS MOST IMPORTANT TO ARIZONA LATINOS IN 2016 ELECTION

E C O N O M Y / J O BS

EDUCA TIO N

11%

I M M I G R AT I O N

12%

17%

31%

45%

Source: Latino Decisions, Latino Decisions 2016 Election Eve Poll, 2016 Immigration was Most Important to Arizona Latinos in 2016 Election http://www.latinovote2016.com/app/#all-az-all

HEA L TH CA R E

R A CE RE L A TI O N S

Source: Latino Decisions, Latino Decisions 2016 Election Eve Poll, 2016 www.latinovote2016.com/app/#all-az-all

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

319

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

Source: Latino Decisions, Latino Decisions 2016 Election Eve Poll, 2016 http://www.latinovote2016.com/app/#all-az-all


SECTION II

PROFILE

CHAPTER 11 POLITICS

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

VALLE DEL SOL'S LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS TRAIN THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS Founded in 1970 in Phoenix, Valle del Sol is mainly known for providing behavioral health and primary care services to tens of thousands of people every year in the Valley's underserved, minority and lower-income communities.

"The training that Valle del Sol offers is, without a doubt, top notch," says Gonzalo A. de La Melena, president and CEO of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. "Valle is connecting the dots when it comes to preparing our community's next generation of leaders." Valle del Sol offers its leadership training programs statewide. Courses last between 10 and 18 weeks and are held once a week in the evenings to accommodate the working professionals who attend the sessions. Hispanic Leadership Institutes are currently held in seven locations: Phoenix, the West Valley and the East Valley; Pinal County; Tucson; Yuma County; and the Copper Corridor.

In what may seem like an odd fit to some, the organization is now equally well-known for offering leadership training programs through its Hispanic Leadership Institute (HLI) and its African-American Leadership Institute. Although the bulk of the programs are aimed specifically at the state's fast-growing Latino community, Valle del Sol offers the African-American Leadership Institute in partnership with the State of Black Arizona and the Arizona Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC).

Lopez Falk says the curriculum encourages HLI fellows to directly "engage their views" to ultimately develop their professional and personal growth in the community. He added that all participants are required to sign a pledge to get involved in their communities and help shape public policy.

Angela Florez, chief development officer for Valle del Sol, says the organization created its leadership programs in 1986 to address the dearth of Hispanics prepared to participate and direct the public policy initiatives that impact our lives. To date, more than 1,500 people from all walks of life have graduated from the programs. The success of these programs is obvious, since the graduates have become a virtual Who's Who of Latino and African-American leaders.

"The most important thing is that when they're done, they're ready to be civically involved in the policy-making process and community engagement, two things that shape the lives of the families we serve," says Florez.

"You see alumni in key leadership roles across the state," says Adam Lopez Falk, program manager for Valle del Sol's leadership institutes. "The training is definitely making a difference."

For those who wonder why Valle del Sol offers leadership training at all, Florez says her organization's focus on behavioral health and primary care is not confined to addressing only the needs of its individual clients, but also the health and welfare of the society as a whole.

HLI participants get to interact with Arizona's top business and community leaders. The course presentations highlight ethics, cultural and personal identity, leadership self-assessment, community issues, public relations and media skills, serving on boards and commissions and a wide range of other topics.

"Community health should be defined more broadly," Flores says. "Not only does it encompass the physical and mental health of our residents, it also includes the health of the systems that serve within our community.

Valle del Sol's Hispanic Leadership Institute was initially developed as a community partnership between Valle del Sol, Valley of the Sun United Way and South Mountain Community College. In 1994, Valle del Sol and Arizona State University partnered to expand the institute. In 2007, ASU's College of Public Programs and Valle del Sol joined forces to further ensure that more Hispanics are prepared to take their places front and center in the public nonprofit and private sectors for years to come.

"HLI and Valle del Sol are working hard every day to ensure that our systems [represent] the very demography they serve," she emphasizes. "Teaching leadership skills addresses the needs of not only the people we train but our community overall."

Those community partnerships have paid off. "Today, we have more people running for office, sitting on boards and other decision-making bodies and serving as grassroots activists, c-suite professionals and elected officials," Florez says.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

320

GET MORE INFO Adam Lopez Falk Leadership Program Manager 602-258-6797, x777 AdamF@valledelsol.com 2018 ONLINE APPLICATIONS Hispanic Leadership Institute www.valledelsol.com/hli/ African-American Leadership Institute www.valledelsol.com/aali/

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

321

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

President Donald Trump’s "great, great wall" has come to symbolize his administration’s particularly unique approach to U.S. immigration policy. At every turn, President Trump’s agenda has been aimed at restricting both illegal and legal immigration to the United States. The president backs the Raise Act, a bill introduced by Sens. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia, that would halve the number of people annually who are granted legal permanent residence and awarded so-called green cards, which usually lead to U.S. citizenship. Trump has also ordered dramatic cuts in the number refugees entering the country and has tried to restrict entry to the U.S. from seven predominantly Muslim nations. As a result of the president’s decision to stop taking any new applications for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA ) program instituted by President Obama in 2012, tens of thousands of young immigrants brought to the U.S. by their undocumented parents are blocked from receiving temporary legal status–and nearly 800,000 more DACA recipients could eventually lose their protected status unless Congress acts to save the program by March 5, 2018. In Arizona, there are nearly 28,000 DACA recipients. At press time, between 5,000 and 6,000 DREAMers are facing an Oct. 5 deadline to renew their DACA applications. Those who miss the deadline could face immediate deportation. The DACA renewal application fee is nearly $500, which means that DACA renewals in Arizona alone would cost as much as $3 million. Nationally, the Pew Research Center estimates that DACA’s shutdown could cost the country $460 billion in lost economic activity in the next decade. An untold number of DACA recipients would be deported (a job made easier by the fact that federal authorities now have their personal information on file), while most would likely step back into the shadows and rejoin the ranks of the country’s 11.4 million undocumented immigrants. As for President Trump’s wall at the U.S.–Mexico border, the gargantuan $20 billion construction project that critics are calling a colossal boondoggle, has failed to gain traction in Congress. Despite the president’s hyper-rhetoric on the subject, Mexico also has made it clear it has no intention of ever paying to build it. That contentious issue aside, President Trump’s stated goal for this impenetrable 2,000-mile barrier is to stop the flow of undocumented immigrants into the United States. In reality, his view flies in the face of the facts: Most new undocumented immigrants are not illegally crossing our Southwest border–or any other U.S. border. They are instead simply overstaying their legally issued visas. Here are the actual facts, according to the Center for Migration Studies: • Overstays have exceeded people who have entered the U.S. without proper immigration documents every year since 2007, and 600,000 more overstays than illegal border crossers have arrived since 2007. • Overstays accounted for about 66 percent of those who joined the undocumented population in the U.S. in 2014. • While Mexico remains the leading country for both overstays and people who cross our border (usually at the U.S.–Mexico line), more immigrants come to the U.S. today from China and India.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

322

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

And, there is one more flaw: Most experts believe President Trump’s wall will hardly be impenetrable. According to the federal government’s own figures, between Oct. 1, 2010, and Sept. 30, 2015, "the current 654-mile pedestrian wall [at the U.S.–Mexico border] was breached 9,287 times." In other words, the idea that building a 2,000-mile long, 30-foot high wall is the most effective way to reduce undocumented immigration is complete folly. Likewise, the ongoing immigration debate in this country is often fueled by misconceptions and sometimes intentionally misleading information. Because of all the "alternative facts" floating around, the final section of the 2017 DATOS report challenges a wide range of these commonly accepted myths about immigration. For instance, many Americans believe undocumented immigrants do not pay taxes. The fact is, according to the Institute on Taxation & Economic Policy, undocumented immigrants nationwide actually pay about $11.5 billion in local and state taxes every year, and billions more annually to the federal government. Many Americans also think immigrants send most of their wages back home, suggesting that United States does not benefit from the money undocumented immigrants earn or the business profits they generate. Latin American immigrants, for example, actually only send between 12 and 14 percent of their total income back to their countries of origin. We are not trying to suggest that the question of how to reform our immigration policy is not a pressing matter or that any single political party or faction has all of the answers. Our goal instead is to do what we can to ratchet down the heated rhetoric and turn people’s attention on both sides of the issue toward the facts so that a realistic and compassionate solution to our immigration issues can be found. Another misconception is that the U.S. labor force would do just fine with no new immigrants. The reality? America’s population is rapidly aging. The reality? The median age for non-Hispanic whites is 45 and the median age for Latinos is 28. At the same time, the non-Hispanic white population is decreasing while the Hispanic population is increasing by 2.8 percent annually. Combine these two facts with the growth of the Asian-American and African-American populations in the U.S. and you get a crystal clear view of the future American workforce: In the not-too-distant future, the majority of our country’s workforce will be people of color and immigrants. Instead of viewing immigration as a threat or destabilizing force in American society, we should view it instead as an opportunity to be exploited, in only the best sense of the word, if we, as a nation, want to avoid economic, cultural and societal stagnation in the coming decades. Said another way, our wonderful country began as a "nation of immigrants" and to survive and prosper going forward, we must endeavor to remain a proud nation of immigrants.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

323

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


New

from Bilingual Press

Late FaLL 2017 New Directions

‘‘ ’’ ‘‘ ’’ Assessment And PrePArAtion of HisPAnic college students

T

The data, perspectives, and recommendations presented in New Directions make the volume a must read for educational practitioners, advocates, and policymakers. José luis cruz,

President, Lehman CoLLege, City University of new york

Moving Forward

Policies, PlAnning, And Promoting Access of HisPAnic college students

A rich collection of insightful perspectives on advancing access and opportunities for Hispanic students from a distinguished group of thought leaders and successful practitioners. diAnA nAtAlicio,

President, the University of texas at eL Paso

Both volumes edited by Alfredo G. de los Santos, Jr., Laura I. Rendón, Gary Francisco Keller, Alberto Acereda, Estela Mara Bensimón, and Richard J. Tannenbaum

Available in cloth and paper For prepublication prices contact Bilingual Press 866-965-3867 or brp@asu.edu bilingualpress.clas.asu.edu Bilingual Press is located at ASU’s Hispanic Research Center


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

5 Facts About Illegal Immigration In The U.S. By JENS MANUEL KROGSTAD and JEFFREY S. PASSEL

The number of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. has stabilized in recent years after decades of rapid growth. But there have been shifts in the states where unauthorized immigrants live and the countries where they were born.

President Obama's executive action on immigration, announced Nov. 20, 2014, would among other things expand deportation relief to almost half the unauthorized immigrant population, though this part of the program is on hold due to a lawsuit to stop the move.While executive actions on immigration have a long history, Obama's recent action was the most significant protection from deportation offered to unauthorized immigrants since 1986, when Congress passed a law that allowed 2.7 million unauthorized immigrants to obtain a green card.

Here are five facts about the unauthorized immigrant population in the U.S. 1. THERE WERE 11.3 MILLION UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS IN THE U.S. IN 2014. The population has

remained essentially stable for five years and currently makes up 3.5% of the nation's population. The number of unauthorized immigrants peaked in 2007 at 12.2 million, when this group was 4% of the U.S. population.

2. MEXICANS MAKE UP ABOUT HALF OF ALL UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS (49%), THOUGH THEIR NUMBERS HAVE BEEN DECLINING IN RECENT YEARS. There were 5.6 million Mexican unauthorized immigrants

living in the U.S. in 2014, down from 6.4 million in 2009, according to preliminary Pew Research Center estimates.

3. SIX STATES ALONE ACCOUNT FOR 60% OF UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; California, Texas, Florida, New York, New Jersey and Illinois. But the distribution of the population is changing. From 2009 to 2012, several East Coast states were among those with population increases, whereas several Western states were among those with population decreases. There were seven states overall in which the unauthorized immigrant population increased: Florida, Idaho, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Meanwhile, there were 14 states in which the population decreased over the same time period: Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Mexico, New York and Oregon. Despite a decline, Nevada has the nation's largest share (8%) of unauthorized immigrants in its state population. 4. UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS MAKE UP 5.1% OF THE U.S. LABOR FORCE. In the U.S. labor force, there were 8.1 million unauthorized immigrants either working or looking for work in 2012. Among the states, Nevada (10%), California (9%), Texas (9%) and New Jersey (8%) had the highest shares of unauthorized immigrants in their labor forces.

5. ABOUT 7% OF K-12 STUDENTS HAD AT LEAST ONE UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANT PARENT IN 2012. Among these students, about eight-in-ten (79%) were born in the U.S. In Nevada, almost one-in-five students (18%) have at least one unauthorized immigrant parent, the largest share in the nation. Other top states on this measure are California (13%), Texas (13%) and Arizona (11%). Note: This is an update of a post originally published on Nov. 18, 2014.

Source: www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/11/19/5-facts-about-illegal-immigration-in-the-u-s/?utm_content=buffer56471&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

325

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

MYTH #1

"IN 2014, ABOUT 4.5 MILLION U.S. RESIDENTS, OR 42 PERCENT OF THE TOTAL UNDOCUMENTED POPULATION, WERE OVERSTAYS."

20

%

OF AMERICANS BELIEVE IMMIGRANTS DON'T ENTER THE COUNTRY LEGALLY

Source: Center for Migration Studies, The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays Have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million, 2017 cmsny.org/publications/jmhs-visa-overstays-border-wall/ Leading Countries for Overstays

Source: Benson Strategy Group, Immigration Opinions Poll, May 9-12, 2009

21,688

19,636

19,519

CHINA

INDIA

V EN EZUELA

UK

C O LO M BI A

GERM A N Y

15,320

23,927

BRAZIL

24,396

MEXICO

25,486

CAN A D A

39,053

46,658

119,418

LEADING COUNTRIES FOR OVERSTAYS

ITAL Y

ESTIMATED FOREIGN VISITORS IN THE U.S. AT THE END OF FISCAL 2016 WITH PERMITS THAT EXPIRED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR, BY COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP Source: Pew Research Center, Higher Share of Students Than Tourists, Business Travelers Overstayed Deadlines to Leave U.S. in 2016, 2017

www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/06/06/higher-share-of-students-than-tourists-business-travelers-overstayed-deadlines-to-leave-u-s-in-2016/ Source: Pew Research Center, Higher Share of Students Than Tourists, Business Travelers Overstayed Deadlines to Leave U.S. in 2016, 2017 http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/06/06/higher-share-of-students-than-tourists-business-travelers-overstayed-deadlines-to-leave-u-s-in-2016 326 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

"OVERSTAYS ACCOUNTED FOR ABOUT TWO-THIRDS (66 PERCENT) OF THOSE WHO ARRIVED IN 2014." Source: Center for Migration Studies, The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays Have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million, 2017 cmsny.org/publications/jmhs-visa-overstays-border-wall/

STATES WITH THE LOWEST PERCENTAGE OVERSTAYS AMONG UNDOCUMENTED POPULATION (2014) States with the Lowest Percentage Overstays Among Undocumented Population (2014)

31%

31%

29%

28%

27%

27%

27%

24%

23%

22%

69%

69%

71%

72%

73%

73%

73%

76%

77%

78%

C O L ORADO

MI S S I S S I PPI

ID AHO

NEBR ASKA

TEXAS

A RI ZONA

OKLA H OMA

KA NSA S

A RKA NSA S

N E W M E XI C O

Percent EWIs

Percent Overstays

NOTE: THE TERM EWI REFERS TO UNDOCUMENTED RESIDENTS WHO ENTERED WITHOUT PROPER IMMIGRATION DOCUMENTS ACROSS THE SOUTHERN BORDER. Source: Center for Migration Studies, The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays Have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million, 2017 cmsny.org/publications/jmhs-visa-overstays-border-wall/

Source: Center for Migration Studies, The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays Have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million, 2017 327 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://cmsny.org/publications/jmhs-visa-overstays-border-wall/ Note: The term EWI refers to undocumented residents who entered without proper immigration documents across the southern border.


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

"OVERSTAYS HAVE EXCEEDED EWIs EVERY YEAR SINCE 2007 AND 600,000 MORE OVERSTAYS THAN EWIs HAVE ARRIVED SINCE 2007." NOTE: THE TERM EWI REFERS TO UNDOCUMENTED RESIDENTS WHO ENTERED WITHOUT PROPER IMMIGRATION DOCUMENTS ACROSS THE SOUTHERN BORDER. Source: Center for Migration Studies, The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays Have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million, 2017 cmsny.org/publications/jmhs-visa-overstays-border-wall/

UNDOCUMENTED POPULATION FROM MEXICO BY YEAR OF ENTRY (ROUNDED TO 5000S, 1995-2013) Undocumented Population from Mexico by Year of Entry (rounded to 5000s, 1995-2013)

Figures in Thousands

FIGURES IN THOUSANDS 390

310

300

205 130

1995

2000

2002

2005

2010

110

2013

Source: Center for Migration Studies, The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays Have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million, 2017 cmsny.org/publications/jmhs-visa-overstays-border-wall/

328 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Center for Migration Studies, The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays Have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million, 2017


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

U.S. FEDERAL PRISON POPULATION BY CITIZENSHIP

MYTH #2

U.S. Federal Prison Population by Citizenship

22%

44

%

TOTAL POPULATION

188,777

OF AMERICANS BELIEVE IMMIGRANTS INCREASE THE CRIME RATE

U.S. CITIZEN

78%

NON-CITIZEN

Source: The Sentencing Project, Immigration and Public Policy, 2017 www.sentencingproject.org/publications/immigration-public-safety/

Source: Rasmussen Reports, March, 29, 2017

FEDERAL CRIMINAL SENTENCES FOR NON-CITIZENS BY OFFENSE (2015)

2%

8%

24%

66%

Federal Criminal Sentences for Non-citizens by Offense (2015) Source: The Sentencing Project, Immigration and Public Policy, 2017 http://www.sentencingproject.org/publications/immigration-public-safety/

IMMIGRATION LAW

D RUG

OTHE R NON- VI OLE NT

VI OLE NT

Source: The Sentencing Project, Immigration and Public Policy, 2017 www.sentencingproject.org/publications/immigration-public-safety/

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Source: The Sentencing Project, Immigration and Public Policy, 2017

329

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

INCARCERATION RATES BY IMMIGRATION STATUS (AGES 18-54)

0.47%

0.85%

1.53%

Incarceration Rates by Immigration Status (Ages 18-54)

NATIVES

IL L EGAL IMMIGR AN T S

L EGAL IMMIGR AN T S

Source: CATO Institute, Criminal Immigrants - Their Numbers, Demographics and Countries of Origin, 2017 https://www.cato.org/publications/immigration-reform-bulletin/criminal-immigrants-their-numbers-demographics-countries

SHARE OF INCARCERATED POPULATION COMPARED TO SHARE OF TOTAL POPULATION (AGES 18-54)

Source: CATO Institute, Criminal Immigrants - Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin, 2017 Share of Incarcerated Population Compared https://www.cato.org/publications/immigration-reform-bulletin/criminal-immigrants-their-numbers-demographics-countries

NATIVES

ILLE G AL IMMIG R AN T S

Share of Incarcerated Population

8.49%

2.92%

9.08%

5.61%

82.43%

91.48%

to Share of Total Population (Ages 18-54)

LE G AL IMMIG R AN T S

Share of Total Population

Source: CATO Institute, Criminal Immigrants - Their Numbers, Demographics and Countries of Origin, 2017 https://www.cato.org/publications/immigration-reform-bulletin/criminal-immigrants-their-numbers-demographics-countries

330 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: CATO Institute, Criminal Immigrants Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin, 2017 2 0 1 7 DATO S A Z https://www.cato.org/publications/immigration-reform-bulletin/criminal-immigrants-their-numbers-demographics-countries


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

INCARCERATION RATES BY RACE, ETHNICITY, NATIVITY (AGES 18-54)

A S IAN

Natives

HISPANIC

Legal Immigrants

O THER

Illegal Immigrants

0.48% 0.85% 1.38%

1.53%

2.34% 0.40%

0.97%

BL A CK

0.68% 1.23% 1.51%

0.57% 0.85%

W H I TE

0.49% 0.21% 0.19% 0.28%

0.09% 0.31% 0.31% 0.87%

1.95%

2.54%

3.83%

4.21%

Incarceration Rates by Race, Ethnicity, Nativity (Ages 18-54)

ALL

All

Source: CATO Institute, Criminal Immigrants - Their Numbers, Demographics and Countries of Origin, 2017 www.cato.org/publications/immigration-reform-bulletin/criminal-immigrants-their-numbers-demographics-countries

Source: CATO Institute, Criminal Immigrants - Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin, 2017 Removals by Crime Category https://www.cato.org/publications/immigration-reform-bulletin/criminal-immigrants-their-numbers-demographics-countries (2013)

REMOVALS BY CRIME CATEGORY (2013) 3%

3%

2% 3% 2%

3% 36% 12%

18%

IMMIGRATION DRUGS TRAFFIC OFFENSES ASSAULT BURGLARY WEAPONS LARCENY FRAUD SEXUAL ASSAULT

18% Source: American Immigration Council, The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States, 2015 www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/research/criminalization-immigration-united-states

331 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: American Immigration Council, The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States, 2015 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 https://www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/research/criminalization-immigration-united-states


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

MYTH #3

"UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS CONTRIBUTE SIGNIFICANTLY TO STATE AND LOCAL TAXES, COLLECTIVELY PAYING AN ESTIMATED $11.74 BILLION A YEAR."

62

%

OF AMERICANS BELIEVE IMMIGRANTS DON'T PAY ENOUGH TAXES

Source: Gallup Historical Trends, June 11-13, 2010

Source: The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, Undocumented Immigrants' State & Local Tax Contributions, 2017 itep.org/wp-content/uploads/immigration2017.pdf

TAX CONTRIBUTIONS AND SPENDING POWER BY FOREIGN-BORN RESIDENTS IN ARIZONA Tax Contributions and Spending Power by Foreign-born Residents in Arizona

0.53

1.00

4.90

FIGURES IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS

STATE AND LOCAL TA X C ONT R I BU T IONS

FE D E R A L TA X C O N TR I B UTI O N S

SP E N D I N G P O W E R

Source: New American Economy, New Americans in Phoenix, 2017 www.newamericaneconomy.org/research/new-americans-in-phoenix/

DATO S

A Z

332 T H E S T AT E 2 0Figures in billions of dollars 1 7

Source: New American Economy, New Americans in Phoenix, 2017

O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION III

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION

"UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS NATIONWIDE PAY ON AVERAGE AN ESTIMATED 8 PERCENT OF THEIR INCOMES IN STATE AND LOCAL TAXES. TO PUT THIS IN PERSPECTIVE, THE TOP 1 PERCENT OF TAX PAYERS PAY AN AVERAGE NATIONWIDE EFFECTIVE TAX RATE OF JUST 5.4 PERCENT." Source: The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, Undocumented Immigrants' State & Local Tax Contributions, 2017 itep.org/wp-content/uploads/immigration2017.pdf

REFUGEE EARNINGS AND TAX CONTRIBUTIONS (2015)

$6.4

$14.5

$56.3

Refugee Earnings and Tax Contributions (2015)

S T A T E A N D L O C AL TAXES

FE D E R A L T A X E S

S PE N D IN G PO W E R

Source: New American Economy, From Struggle to Resilience: The Economic Impact of Refugees in America, 2017 www.newamericaneconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/NAE_Refugees_V5.pdf

333 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T Source: New American Economy, From Struggle to Resilience: The Economic Impact of Refugees in America, 2017 DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.newamericaneconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/NAE_Refugees_V5.pdf


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

"GRANTING LEGAL STATUS TO ALL UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS IN THE UNITED STATES AS PART OF A COMPREHENSIVE IMMIGRATION REFORM AND ALLOWING THEM TO WORK LEGALLY WOULD INCREASE THEIR STATE AND LOCAL TAX CONTRIBUTIONS BY AN ESTIMATED $2.18 BILLION A YEAR."

Source: The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, Undocumented Immigrants' State & Local Tax Contributions, 2017 itep.org/wp-content/uploads/immigration2017.pdf

STATES WHERE REFUGEES CONTRIBUTED THE MOST IN STATE AND LOCAL TAX REVENUE (2015)

Figures in Billions of Dollars

States Where Refugees Contributed The Most in State and Local tax Revenue (2015)

$0.213

$0.197

$0.182

$0.174

$0.165

$0.134

$0.131

$0.103

$0.319 IL

$0.227

TX

$0.242

NY

$0.260

CA

$0.422

$0.625

$1.900

FIGURES IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS (USD)

VA

WA

MN

NJ

MA

MD

PA

FL

GA

MI

OH

Source: New American Economy, From Struggle to Resilience: The Economic Impact of Refugees in America, 2017 www.newamericaneconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/NAE_Refugees_V5.pdf

334 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: New American Economy, From Struggle to Resilience: The Economic Impact of Refugees in America, 2017 http://www.newamericaneconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/NAE_Refugees_V5.pdf


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

TOTAL AMOUNT OF REMITTANCES RECEIVED BY COUNTRY (2016)

MYTH #4

Total Amount of Remittances Received by Country, (2016)

Figu

FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS (USD)

IMMIGRANTS SEND ALL THEIR MONEY BACK TO THEIR HOME COUNTRIES

B RAZI L

$2,365

H AI TI

$2,443

E CU ADO R

$2,602

PE RU

$2,879 $3,845

H O NDU RAS E L S ALV ADO R

$4,576

CO LO M B I A

$4,857

DO M I NI CAN RE PU B LI C

$5,262 $7,160

GU ATE M ALA

$26,970

M E XI CO

Source: Centro De Estudios Monetarios LatinoAmericanos, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016: A New Record, 2017 www.cemla.org/PDF/remesaseinclusion/2017-06-new-record-remmittances.pdf

RECIPIENTS OF REMITTANCES SENT BY MIGRANTS FROM LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN Recipients of Remittances Sent by Migrants From Latin America and the Caribbean

MEXICO

Mother

Father

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Spouse

Parents

E L SA L VA DO R

Siblings

Children

Spouse & children

4.9% GU A TE MA LA

Aunts & Uncles

NOTE: ADDS UP TO MORE THAN 100% BECAUSE SOME SENDERS MENTIONED SENDING REMITTANCES TO MORE THAN ONE RECIPIENT Source: Centro De Estudios Monetarios LatinoAmericanos, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016: A New Record, 2017 www.cemla.org/PDF/remesaseinclusion/2017-06-new-record-remmittances.pdf

Source: Centro De Estudios Monetarios LatinoAmericanos, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016: A New Record, 2017 335 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T A Z 2 0 1 7 http://www.cemla.org/PDF/remesaseinclusion/2017-06-new-record-remmittances.pdf Note: Adds up to more than 100% because some senders mentioned sending remittances to more than one recipient

DATO S

3.8% 3.1%

12.7%

21.9%

31.8% 26.4% 24.9%

54.9% 3.9% 5.9% 3.3% 2.2% H O N DU R A S

Grandparents

31.8%

50.5% 19.9% 17.0% 14.7% 27.6% 20.7%

7.5% 6.0% 6.4%

12.7%

40.3% 32.7% 26.1% 22.4%

43.4% 4.4% 4.4% 3.2% 2.3%

6.6% 4.3% 3.1% 2.5% 1.0%

24.0% 23.7% 19.5% 17.1% 16.6%

26.1% 20.8% 15.9% 14.6%

48.6%

49.1%

58.2%

Source: Centro De Estudios Monetarios LatinoAmericanos, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbea http://www.cemla.org/PDF/remesaseinclusion/2017-06-new-record-remmittances.pdf

Cousins


SECTION III

IMMIGRATION

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

AVERAGE INCOME OF REMITTANCE SENDERS AND MONTHLY REMITTANCES U.S. Dollars per Month

Average Income of Remittance Senders and Monthly Remittances

M EXICO

D O MI N I C A N RE PUBL I C

EL SALV ADOR

Monthly Income

HON DUR AS

$406

$3,388

$326

$385

$3,047

$2,641 $357

$336

$2,620

$2,669

U.S. DOLLARS PER MONTH

GUAT EMA L A

Monthly Remittance

Source: Centro De Estudios Monetarios LatinoAmericanos, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016: A New Record, 2017 www.cemla.org/PDF/remesaseinclusion/2017-06-new-record-remmittances.pdf

MONTHLY REMITTANCE TO AVERAGE MONTHLY INCOME RATIO

LatinoAmericanos, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016: A New Record, 2017 http://www.cemla.org/PDF/remesaseinclusion/2017-06-new-record-remmittances.pdf

ME X I C O

DO MI NI C AN REP UB L I C

E L S A LV A D O R

12.0%

12.3%

12.8%

13.4%

14.3%

Source: Centro De Estudios Monetarios Monthly Remittance to Average Monthly Income Ratio

HONDURAS

GU A T E M A L A

Source: Centro De Estudios Monetarios LatinoAmericanos, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016: A New Record, 2017 www.cemla.org/PDF/remesaseinclusion/2017-06-new-record-remmittances.pdf

336 T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T DATO S A Z 2 0 1 7 Source: Centro De Estudios Monetarios LatinoAmericanos, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016: A New Record, 2017 http://www.cemla.org/PDF/remesaseinclusion/2017-06-new-record-remmittances.pdf


SECTION II

PROFILE

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ENCOUNTERING CHRIST IN IMMIGRANTS AND REFUGEES There are many reasons people come to the State of Arizona: Its natural wonders, its sunsets and scenery and yes, even its climate. Our vibrant cultural diversity also should be counted as one of the reasons that makes this state so attractive to people from around the world to find work and to raise a family. Such is the case for the many migrants and refugees who have found a home among us.

The Arizona Catholic Conference, the public policy arm of the Catholic bishops in Arizona, said in January of this year, "Comprehensive immigration reform is the best and most appropriate solution for addressing immigration issues." In the statement, the bishops urged "our elected officials to seek solutions that will not only help with national security, but also facilitate family unification and assist immigrant 'dreamers' who, although born elsewhere, were brought to this country at a young age and know no other country. Similarly, our hearts and prayers go out to refugee families who have faced terrible violence and lost their own homes and now need a new place to live."

In a December 2014 column in The Catholic Sun, Phoenix Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted wrote: "Jesus calls us, His followers, to be instruments of His love, to hand on to others the mercy and compassion that He has showered upon us, regardless of their faith, culture, age, or immigration status. We are all God's children and all redeemed by His Precious Blood."

In addition to the policy work through the Arizona Catholic Conference, the Diocese of Phoenix works hand-in-hand with the community through its offices and its partner agencies to care for vulnerable people and families. These community efforts include:

Here in the Diocese of Phoenix and throughout the United States, the Catholic Church has a long history of accompanying and supporting the vulnerable in our society. When we respond to Christ's call to "welcome the stranger among us," we are encountering Christ in our immigrant and refugee brothers and sisters.

• Catholic Charities Community Services: catholiccharitiesaz.org • Catholic Campaign for Human Development: dphx.org/cchd • Catholic Legal Immigration Network: cliniclegal.org • V Encuentro: vencuentro.org • Hispanic Mission Office: dphx.org/ethnic-ministries/hispanic-missions-office • The Society of St. Vincent de Paul: stvincentdepaul.net The Catholic Church cares deeply about the humanitarian needs of immigrants and refugees. As Bishop Olmsted wrote in that 2014 column, "The suffering of these vulnerable populations cannot help but move our hearts and prompt us to respond. Because of who we are in Christ, we not only pray for them, but are also called to respect their human dignity and to alleviate their suffering."

Three basic principles of Catholic social teaching on immigration, as called for in the Gospel, help guide our efforts at the national, local and parish level. 1. People have the right to migrate to sustain their lives and the lives of their families; 2. A country has the right to regulate its borders and to control immigration; and 3. A country must regulate its borders with justice and mercy. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, through years of statements and pastoral letters, consistently reinforces our moral obligation to treat the stranger as we would treat Christ Himself:

La Virgen de Guadalupe, pray for us.

In the 2001 pastoral statement, "Welcoming the Stranger Among Us: Unity in Diversity," the bishops of the United States called upon the Catholic faithful to a conversion of minds and hearts, imploring us to communion and solidarity with diverse newcomers and entreating us to find new and meaningful ways to welcome our immigrant sisters and brothers into our parishes, schools and communities. In 2003, the bishops of the United States, together with the bishops of Mexico. In the 2003 pastorial statement, "Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope (Juntos en el Camino de la Esperanza Ya no Somos Extranjeros)," acknowledged that the current immigration system is badly in need of reform and offered a comprehensive set of recommendations for changing U.S. laws and policies to bring about a more humane and just immigration system in the United States.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

MORE INFO http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-life-and-dignity/ immigration/index.cfm 337

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

EXCERPT

Undocumented Immigrants’ State & Local Tax Contributions

Lisa Christensen Gee Matthew Gardner Meg Wiehe

Updated February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

338

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

About The Institute on Taxation & Economic Policy

The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP) is a non-profit, non-partisan research organization that works on federal, state, and local tax policy issues. ITEP’s mission is to ensure that elected officials, the media, and the general public have access to accurate, timely, and straightforward information that allows them to understand the effects of current and proposed tax policies. ITEP’s work focuses particularly on issues of tax fairness and sustainability.

Acknowledgments

ITEP extends special thanks to David Dyssegaard Kallick at the Fiscal Policy Institute, Michael Leachman at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Jeanne Batalova at the Migration Policy Institute and Tanya Broder and Kamal Essaheb at the National Immigration Law Center for their guidance on this report.

THE INSTITUTE ON TAXATION & ECONOMIC POLICY 1616 P Street, NW Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036 Tel: 202.299.1066 www.itep.org

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

339

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

EXCERPT

Public debates over federal immigration reform often suffer from insufficient and inaccurate information about the tax contributions of undocumented immigrants particularly at the state level. The truth is that undocumented immigrants living in the United States pay billions of dollars each year in state and local taxes. Further, these tax contributions would increase significantly if all undocumented immigrants currently living in the United States were granted a pathway to citizenship as part of a comprehensive immigration reform. Accurate information about the tax contributions of undocumented immigrants is needed now more than ever. Congress has yet to pass comprehensive immigration reform legislation. President Obama took executive action in 2012 and announced his intention to take action in 2014 to grant relief to eligible individuals who came to the United States as children (DACA) and to eligible parents of children who are citizens or lawful permanent residents (DAPA). The 2014 executive actions are facing review by the Supreme Court in the spring of 2016. And immigration is a leading issue among the 2016 presidential candidates. To better inform the ongoing debates on immigration policy reform, this report provides state-by-state and national estimates on the current state and local tax contributions of the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States as of 2013, the increase in contributions if all these taxpayers were granted legal status as part of comprehensive reform, and the increase in contributions of the more than 5 million undocumented immigrants who could be directly affected by President Obama’s 2012 and 2014 executive actions.1

Key Findings: • Undocumented immigrants contribute significantly to state and local taxes, collectively paying an estimated $11.64 billion a year.2 Contributions range from almost $2.2 million in Montana with an estimated undocumented population of 4,000 to more than $3.1 billion in California, home to more than 3 million undocumented immigrants. • Undocumented immigrants nationwide pay on average an estimated 8 percent of their incomes in state and local taxes (this is their effective state and local tax rate). To put this in perspective, the top 1 percent of taxpayers pay an average nationwide effective tax rate of just 5.4 percent.3 1

Migration Policy Institute (MPI) analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from the 2009-2013 ACS pooled, and the 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participa-

tion (SIPP) by Colin Hammar and James Bachmeier of Temple University and Jennifer Van Hook of Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute.

1

2

See the methodology section for more information on the calculation of estimated undocumented immigrant state and local tax payments.

3

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, Who Pays? A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All 50 States, January 2015. Available: www.whopays.org

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

340

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

• Granting legal status to all undocumented immigrants in the United States as part of a comprehensive immigration reform and allowing them to work legally would increase their state and local tax contributions by an estimated $2.1 billion a year. Their nationwide effective state and local tax rate would increase to 8.6 percent. • The state and local tax contributions of the undocumented immigrants who could be directly impacted by President Obama’s 2012 and 2014 executive actions would increase by an estimated $805 million a year once fully in place. The effective state and local tax rate for this population would increase from 8.1 to 8.6 percent. State and local revenue gains from the executive actions are smaller than gains from granting legal status to all undocumented immigrants because the actions (if upheld) would only affect around 46 percent of the undocumented population and the actions do not grant a full pathway to lawful permanent residence or citizenship.

Undocumented Immigrants Pay State and Local Taxes: Current Contributions Like other people living and working in the United States, undocumented immigrants pay state and local taxes. They pay sales and excise taxes when they purchase goods and services (for example, on utilities, clothing and gasoline). They pay property taxes directly on their homes or indirectly as renters. Many undocumented immigrants also pay state income taxes. The best evidence suggests that at least 50 percent of undocumented immigrant households currently file income tax returns using Individual Tax Identification Numbers (ITINs), and many who do not file income tax returns still have taxes deducted from their paychecks. 4 Collectively, undocumented immigrants in the United States pay an estimated total of $11.64 billion in state and local taxes a year (see Table 1 for state-by-state estimates). This includes more than $6.9 billion in sales and excise taxes, $3.6 billion in property taxes, and just under $1.1 billion in personal income taxes. Another way to measure the state and local taxes that undocumented immigrants pay is through their effective tax rate, which is the share of total income paid in taxes. The effective tax rate is useful for more accurate state-to-state comparisons because it accounts for differences between states’ tax structures and population size. Undocumented immigrants’ nationwide average effective tax rate is an estimated 8 percent. To put this in perspective, the top 1 percent of taxpayers pay an average nationwide effective tax rate of just 5.4 percent.5

4

See this report’s methodology section for more information about current personal income tax compliance.

5

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (see footnote 3).

Undocumented Immigrants’ State & Local Tax Contributions

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

341

2

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Table 1: Undocumented Immigrants' State and Local Tax Contributions Current vs. Full Legal Status for All Undocumented Immigrants Current State and Local Taxes

State and Local Taxes if Granted Full Legal Status

Tax Change

Alabama

$63,783,000

$81,984,000

+$18,201,000

Montana

$2,207,000

$3,047,000

+$840,000

Alaska

$3,512,000

$3,863,000

+$351,000

Nebraska

$42,096,000

$49,529,000

+$7,433,000

Arizona

$231,450,000

$273,902,000

+$42,452,000

Nevada

$91,035,000

$100,138,000

+$9,103,000

Arkansas

$58,605,000

$71,934,000

+$13,329,000

New Hampshire

$8,205,000

$9,076,000

+$871,000

California

$3,170,401,000

$3,619,437,000

+$449,036,000

New Jersey

$590,302,000

$667,608,000

+$77,306,000

Colorado

$134,582,000

$170,450,000

+$35,868,000

New Mexico

$67,999,000

$76,022,000

+$8,023,000

Connecticut

$136,233,000

$157,772,000

+$21,539,000

New York

$1,108,625,000

$1,355,008,000

+$246,383,000

Delaware

$11,966,000

$17,244,000

+$5,278,000

North Carolina

$275,840,000

$368,514,000

+$92,674,000

Dist. of Col.

$27,083,000

$33,157,000

+$6,074,000

North Dakota

$3,759,000

$4,311,000

+$552,000

Florida

$588,086,000

$646,894,000

+$58,808,000

Ohio

$84,857,000

$110,595,000

+$25,738,000

Georgia

$358,753,000

$464,430,000

+$105,677,000

Oklahoma

$77,268,000

$94,278,000

+$17,010,000

Hawaii

$30,231,000

$39,881,000

+$9,650,000

Oregon

$78,169,000

$114,882,000

+$36,713,000

Idaho

$26,248,000

$31,468,000

+$5,220,000

Pennsylvania

$139,404,000

$190,931,000

+$51,527,000

Illinois

$743,288,000

$897,781,000

+$154,493,000

Rhode Island

$33,438,000

$40,442,000

+$7,004,000

Indiana

$89,253,000

$116,970,000

+$27,717,000

South Carolina

$67,697,000

$86,085,000

+$18,388,000

Iowa

$37,381,000

$46,292,000

+$8,911,000

South Dakota

$4,252,000

$4,677,000

+$425,000

Kansas

$69,278,000

$80,435,000

+$11,157,000

Tennessee

$105,277,000

$115,836,000

+$10,559,000

Kentucky

$37,368,000

$53,352,000

+$15,984,000

Texas

$1,542,397,000

$1,696,637,000

+$154,240,000

Louisiana

$61,060,000

$74,726,000

+$13,666,000

Utah

$67,102,000

$87,109,000

+$20,007,000

Maine

$4,344,000

$5,483,000

+$1,139,000

Vermont

$3,918,000

$4,543,000

+$625,000

Maryland

$308,055,000

$393,669,000

+$85,614,000

Virginia

$245,857,000

$324,148,000

+$78,291,000

Massachusetts

$201,369,000

$262,080,000

+$60,711,000

Washington

$292,169,000

$321,385,000

+$29,216,000

Michigan

$83,833,000

$109,845,000

+$26,012,000

West Virginia

$4,204,000

$5,596,000

+$1,392,000

Minnesota

$77,066,000

$94,713,000

+$17,647,000

Wisconsin

$80,863,000

$98,333,000

+$17,470,000

Mississippi

$21,872,000

$26,930,000

+$5,058,000

Wyoming

Missouri

$48,273,000

$62,690,000

+$14,417,000

All States

State

Current State and Local Taxes

State

State and Local Taxes if Granted Full Legal Status

Tax Change

$3,625,000

$3,987,000

+$362,000

$11,643,936,000

$13,770,107,000

+$2,126,171,000

Granting Legal Status to All Undocumented Immigrants Would Boost Their State and Local Tax Contributions Creating a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States and allowing them to work here legally would boost their current state and local tax contributions by more than $2.1 billion a year (See Table 1). Personal income tax collections would increase by more than $1 billion a year. Sales and excise taxes would increase by $695 million, and property taxes would grow by $360 million. As a result, the overall state and local taxes paid by undocumented immigrants as a share of their income would increase from 8 percent to 8.6 percent.

3

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

342

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

EXCERPT

The most significant revenue gain (50 percent) would come from the personal income tax, due to both increased earnings and full compliance with the tax code.6 Multiple studies have shown that legal immigrants have higher wages than undocumented immigrants, thus gaining legal status could lead to a boost in wages. The wage boost is in part due to better job opportunities that would be made available to workers with legal status and also in part to an increase in higher-level skills and better training. Most comprehensive reform measures to date have included strong incentives or requirements for undocumented immigrants granted legal status to fully comply with tax law. See Appendix 1 for state-by-state estimates of the current and post-reform state and local tax contributions of the total undocumented immigrant population. The appendix includes effective tax rates and totals for personal income, property, and sales and excise taxes.

President Obama’s Executive Actions Would Increase State and Local Tax Revenues President Obama took executive actions in 2012 and 2014 to provide temporary relief from deportation and grant work permits to eligible undocumented immigrants. Under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, this relief was made available to up to 1.2 million eligible undocumented immigrants who came to the country as children. Under the 2014 executive action, President Obama expanded DACA by another 275,000 undocumented immigrants and announced the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program, which would allow 3.6 million eligible undocumented parents to apply for relief from deportation and for work authorization.7 Pending Supreme Court review of the 2014 executive action, more than 5 million undocumented immigrants could benefit from these executive actions, amounting to about 46 percent of the total population of undocumented immigrants living in the United States. If fully implemented, granting temporary immigration relief to these 5 million undocumented immigrants through DACA and DAPA would boost their current state and local tax contributions by more than $805 million (See Table 2). Personal income tax collections would increase by $442 million a year. Sales and excise taxes would increase by $239 million, and property taxes would grow by $123 million. As a result, the overall state and local taxes paid by this population as a share of their income would increase from 8.1 percent to 8.6 percent. The most significant revenue gain (55 percent) would come from the personal income tax, due to both increased earnings and full compliance with the tax code. Since the undocumented immigrants who would benefit from the executive actions would be allowed to apply for a three-year renewable 6

See this report’s methodology for a detailed description of wage boost and tax compliance assumptions applied to the change in state and local tax contributions post-

reform. 7

Migration Policy Institute (see footnote 1).

Undocumented Immigrants’ State & Local Tax Contributions

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

343

4

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

work permit, some amount of wage boost could be expected. Due to the mandates of the executive actions and the strong incentives undocumented immigrants have for compliance with the tax laws, it is also logical to assume full tax compliance for this impacted population (see the methodology section for more information). See Appendix 2 for state-by-state estimates of the current and post-reform state and local tax contributions of the 5 million undocumented immigrants directly affected by President Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive actions. The appendix includes effective tax rates and totals for personal income, property, and sales and excise taxes. Table 2: State and Local Tax Contributions of Undocumented Immigrant Population Impacted by Executive Actions Current vs. Post Implementation of Executive Actions

Alabama

$27,462,000

Taxes Under Full Implementation of Exec. Actions $34,497,000

+$7,035,000

Montana

$659,000

Taxes Under Full Implementation of Exec. Actions $889,000

Alaska

$1,049,000

$1,127,000

+$78,000

Nebraska

$20,479,000

$23,548,000

+$3,069,000

Arizona

$119,232,000

$137,894,000

+$18,662,000

Nevada

$43,538,000

$46,804,000

+$3,266,000

Arkansas

$30,388,000

$36,452,000

+$6,064,000

New Hampshire

$2,450,000

$2,648,000

+$198,000

California

$1,591,470,000

$1,775,584,000

+$184,114,000

New Jersey

$227,307,000

$251,232,000

+$23,925,000

Colorado

$68,932,000

$85,320,000

+$16,388,000

New Mexico

$34,971,000

$38,209,000

+$3,238,000

Connecticut

$50,457,000

$57,106,000

+$6,649,000

New York

$421,968,000

$504,025,000

+$82,057,000

Delaware

$4,895,000

$6,894,000

+$1,999,000

North Carolina

$122,595,000

$160,062,000

+$37,467,000

Dist. of Col.

$7,583,000

$9,073,000

+$1,490,000

North Dakota

$1,122,000

$1,258,000

+$136,000

Florida

$222,598,000

$239,292,000

+$16,694,000

Ohio

$34,761,000

$44,274,000

+$9,513,000

Georgia

$158,837,000

$200,952,000

+$42,115,000

Oklahoma

$35,736,000

$42,613,000

+$6,877,000

Hawaii

$10,581,000

$13,641,000

+$3,060,000

Oregon

$40,104,000

$57,600,000

+$17,496,000

Current State and Local Taxes

State

Tax Change

State

Current State and Local Taxes

Tax Change +$230,000

Idaho

$15,241,000

$17,856,000

+$2,615,000

Pennsylvania

$52,277,000

$69,972,000

+$17,695,000

Illinois

$373,792,000

$441,224,000

+$67,432,000

Rhode Island

$13,584,000

$16,056,000

+$2,472,000

Indiana

$41,267,000

$52,854,000

+$11,587,000

South Carolina

$27,352,000

$33,991,000

+$6,639,000

Iowa

$17,175,000

$20,786,000

+$3,611,000

South Dakota

$1,269,000

$1,365,000

+$96,000

Kansas

$35,172,000

$39,908,000

+$4,736,000

Tennessee

$43,349,000

$46,613,000

+$3,264,000

Kentucky

$14,947,000

$20,856,000

+$5,909,000

Texas

$785,948,000

$844,894,000

+$58,946,000

Louisiana

$18,318,000

$21,908,000

+$3,590,000

Utah

$36,992,000

$46,930,000

+$9,938,000

Maine

$1,297,000

$1,600,000

+$303,000

Vermont

$1,170,000

$1,325,000

+$155,000

Maryland

$107,092,000

$133,744,000

+$26,652,000

Virginia

$89,583,000

$115,426,000

+$25,843,000

Massachusetts

$70,751,000

$89,989,000

+$19,238,000

Washington

$143,220,000

$153,961,000

+$10,741,000

Michigan

$35,434,000

$45,374,000

+$9,940,000

West Virginia

$1,255,000

$1,633,000

+$378,000

Minnesota

$36,155,000

$43,424,000

+$7,269,000

Wisconsin

$37,239,000

$44,256,000

+$7,017,000

Mississippi

$7,571,000

$9,110,000

+$1,539,000

Wyoming

Missouri

$21,172,000

$26,871,000

+$5,699,000

All States

5

$1,082,000

$1,163,000

+$81,000

$5,308,882,000

$6,114,086,000

+$805,204,000

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

344

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

EXCERPT

Methodology While the spending and income behavior of undocumented immigrant families is not as well documented as that of US citizens, the estimates in this report represent a best approximation of the taxes families headed by undocumented immigrants likely pay. The ITEP methodology used to calculate the current and potential tax contribution of undocumented immigrants uses six main data points: 1. Estimated undocumented immigrant population in each state 2. Estimated impacted population under the 2012 and 2014 Executive Actions in each state 3. Average size of undocumented immigrant families/taxpaying units 4. Range of annual undocumented immigrant family/taxpayer income in each state 5. Estimated number of undocumented immigrants who are homeowners 6. Estimated effective tax rates (taxes as share of income) for income, sales, and property taxes paid by low- and moderate-income families in each state Additional assumptions are made (and described below) about the change in tax contributions that would occur in two instances: if all 11 million undocumented immigrants were granted legal status under comprehensive immigration reform; and if 5 million undocumented immigrants were granted temporary deferred action by President Obama’s 2012 and 2014 executive actions. See Appendix 3 for state-by-state details on data used to assist in calculating the state and local tax contributions.

1. Estimated undocumented immigrant population in each state Estimates of each state’s undocumented immigrant population are from the Migration Policy Institute (MPI).8 According to MPI, an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants resided in the U.S. as of 2013 (an estimate that is roughly 400,000 lower than MPI’s estimate from 2012 data.)

2. Estimated impacted population under the 2012 and 2014 Executive Actions in each state Estimates of each state’s impacted undocumented immigrant population under the 2012 and 2014 executive actions are from the MPI.9 According to MPI, an estimated 5 million undocumented immigrants (46 percent of the total undocumented population) are potentially eligible to receive immigration relief under the executive actions.

8

Ibid.

9

Ibid. Undocumented Immigrants’ State & Local Tax Contributions

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

345

6

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

3. Average size of undocumented immigrant families/taxpaying units The Pew Research Center calculated a nationwide estimate of the number of people per undocumented immigrant family. The most recent estimate, 2.29, is used to find an estimated number of undocumented families, or taxpaying units, by state.10 ITEP divided population estimates for each state (total and affected populations) by the average family size to find an estimated number of undocumented families/taxpaying units living in each state and the number of families/taxpaying units impacted by the 2012 and 2014 executive actions.

4. Range of annual undocumented immigrant family/taxpayer income in each state Estimates of the income distribution of undocumented families are from MPI data on the number of undocumented families in five discrete income groups.11 ITEP used the midpoint of the income ranges in each group as an estimate of average income within each group and multiplied by the number of families/taxpaying units in each group to calculate aggregate income in these groups.

5. Estimated number of undocumented immigrants who are homeowners ITEP used MPI data on undocumented families’ homeownership rates for each state. We then calculated separate property tax incidence analyses for homeowners and renters in each state. Applying the homeowner effective tax rates to the homeowner population and the renter tax rates to the renter population yielded a combined property tax estimate for all undocumented families in each state.12

6. Estimated effective tax rates (taxes as share of income) for income, sales, and property taxes paid by low- and moderate-income families in each state13 ITEP’s microsimulation computer model is a sophisticated program that applies the state and local tax laws in each state (including income, sales, excise and property tax laws) to a statistically valid database of tax returns to generate estimates of the effective tax rates paid by taxpayers at various income levels under state and local tax law in place as of December 31, 2014. In January of 2015, ITEP released the 5th edition of Who Pays? which estimates the effect of the state and local tax laws as of January 2015 on taxpayers at 2012 income levels. This report applies effective tax rates calculated in the 2015 Who Pays? report to the undocumented population with one exception. The effective tax rates in five states: California, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island were slightly modified for the analysis to include the enactment or enhancement of state EITCs in 2015 (this change applies only to the analysis post-reform for both granting legal status to all undocumented immigrants and under the executive actions and does not impact the current tax contributions).

10

Passel and Cohn, Unauthorized Immigrant Population, National and State Trends, 2010, Pew Research Center, Feb. 1, 2011.

11

Migration Policy Institute (see footnote 1).

12

Ibid.

13

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (see footnote 3).

7

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

346

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

EXCERPT

The following assumptions were made to calculate the sales, property, and income taxes of the undocumented immigration population: • Sales tax: Sales taxes are collected by retailers every time a purchase is made on a taxable good or service. It is reasonable to assume that undocumented immigrants pay sales tax at similar rates to U.S. citizens and legal immigrants with similar incomes. This analysis adjusts the estimated annual incomes for each state downward by 10 percent for purposes of calculating the sales tax paid to account for remittances. Research shows that undocumented immigrants send about 10 percent of their income to families in their countries of origin, so this portion of undocumented taxpayers’ income is unavailable for taxable consumption.14 • Property tax: The first step in calculating property taxes was to identify the share of undocumented immigrant families who are homeowners or renters in each state. This analysis used state-by-state data from the MPI to estimate homeownership rates for undocumented immigrants in each state. The model assumes that for renters, half of the cost of the property tax paid initially by owners of rental properties is passed through to renters. • Income tax: Various studies have estimated between 50 and 75 percent of undocumented immigrants currently pay personal income taxes using either false social security (SSN) or individual tax identification (ITIN) numbers.15 This analysis assumes a 50 percent compliance rate for current taxes and 100 percent post-reform (for both granting legal status to all undocumented immigrants and under the executive actions). Undocumented immigrants are currently ineligible to receive the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and state versions of the credit because they lack the legal authority to work in the U.S. Accordingly, the impact of state EITCs has been removed from the current personal income tax estimates. This has the effect of increasing the effective income tax rates paid by these undocumented taxpayers under current law. Additional indicators used to make calculations for anticipated state and local tax changes if legal status is granted as part of comprehensive immigration reform or under the executive actions: • Wage boost: This study assumes that having the authority to work legally in the United States would increase undocumented immigrants’ wages and thus increase the taxes paid by those same immigrants, based on research by the Fiscal Policy Institute. Examining a number of studies on immigrant wages, this research consistently found that legal immigrants had higher wages than undocumented immigrants and gaining legal

14

See, for example, Manuel Orozco, Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean: Issues and Perspectives on Development, Report Commissioned by the Organization of American

States, September 2004. 15

See among others: Feinleib, Joel and David Warner, The Impact of Immigration on Social Security and the National Economy, Social Security Advisory Board, Issue Brief No. 1, Decem-

ber 2005 (Available at www.ssab.gov/brief-1-immigration.pdf); Singer, Paula and Linda Dodd-Major, Identification Numbers and U.S. Government Compliance Initiatives, Tax Analysts Special Report, 2004; and Cornelius, Wayne and Jessica Lewis, Impacts of Border Enforcement on Mexican Migration: The View from Sending Communities, La Jolla, Calif.: University of California at San Diego, Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, 2007.

Undocumented Immigrants’ State & Local Tax Contributions

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

347

8

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

status could boost wages anywhere between 6 and 15 percent.16 A Congressional Budget Office report on the economic impact of immigration reformestimated the eventual wage boost to be 12 percent.17 An analysis from the Center for American Progress estimates that the 5 million workers who would directly benefit from the president’s action will see a wagepremium of 8.5 percent. 18 This study assumes a conservative estimate of a 10 percent wage hike under granting legal status to all 11 million undocumented immigrants and a 7.5 percent wage hike under the terms of the president’s executive actions since the work status would only be temporary. An increase in income would also contribute to a slight increase in the sales, property, and income tax payments of the currently undocumented immigrant population. • Personal income tax compliance: As explained above, current estimates of undocumented immigrants’ income tax compliance rates range from 50 to 75 percent. To calculate the anticipated income tax gain from allowing undocumented immigrants to work in the U.S. legally (under full legal status or the executive actions), this analysis assumes full compliance with state personal income tax laws post-reform given the strong incentives for tax compliance likely to be included in a comprehensive reform measure. It is important to note that the same tax rules and provisions that apply to the general population will apply to undocumented immigrants filing income taxes. • Earned Income Tax Credit eligibility: Post-reform (for both granting legal status to all undocumented immigrants via comprehensive reform and under the executive actions), the study assumes that working immigrants granted the legal right to live and work in the U.S. and who are otherwise eligible for the EITC will claim the credit. This analysis also assumes that working immigrants meeting EITC eligibility criteria and granted the legal right to work under comprehensive immigration reform and the executive actions will claim the state versions of the credit. The states with permanent EITCs included in this report are: California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Delaware, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and Wisconsin. This study includes the impact of the newly enacted EITC in California and improvements made to EITCs in Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island since the publication of the 2015 report.

16

Kallick, David Dyssegaard, Three Ways Immigration Reform Would Make the Economy More Productive, Fiscal Policy Institute, June 4, 2013 (see Appendix A: A Review of the

Literature on Legalization and Earnings). Available at: http://fiscalpolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/3-ways-reform-would-improve-productivity.pdf. See also this report’s methodology section for more information on the wage effects of granting legal status to the entire undocumented population as well as the wage effects on those affected by the president’s executive actions. 17

Congressional Budget Office, Cost Estimate for S. 744 (Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act), June 2013. Available at: http://cbo.gov/sites/

default/files/cbofiles/attachments/s744.pdf 18

Oakford, Patrick and Philip E. Wolgin, The Economic and Fiscal Benefits of Deferred Action, 2014, Center for American Progress. Available at: https://www.americanprogress.org/

issues/immigration/news/2014/11/21/102041/the-economic-and-fiscal-benefits-of-deferred-action/

9

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

348

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

EXCERPT

Changes from ITEP’s April 2015 Undocumented Immigrants’ State & Local Tax Contributions Report The analysis presented in this report is an update to an ITEP report published in 2015. The 2016 report uses 2013 estimates on the undocumented immigrant population (size, income, homeownership, and population impacted by the executive actions) whereas the 2015 report used 2012 data. Most notably, the number of undocumented immigrants declined by more than 400,000 between 2012 and 2013, a decade-long trend that has been well documented amongst numerous researchers. The decline in the undocumented immigrant population and subsequently lower aggregate income led to a small drop in the total amount of state and local taxes undocumented immigrants pay in this study compared to the 2015 study.

Undocumented Immigrants’ State & Local Tax Contributions

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

349

10

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 1: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Total Undocumented Immigrant Population Current vs. Full Legal Status for All Undocumented Immigrants State

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Dist. of Col. Florida Georgia Hawaii

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Undocumented Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$46,296,000

$10,748,000

$6,739,000

$63,783,000

7.2%

Full Legal Status

$50,925,000

$23,647,000

$7,412,000

$81,984,000

8.4%

Current

$1,590,000

$1,922,000

$3,512,000

4.5%

Full Legal Status

$1,749,000

$2,115,000

$3,863,000

4.5%

Current vs. Full Legal Status

No Income Tax

Current

$155,014,000

$17,552,000

$58,883,000

$231,450,000

8.0%

Full Legal Status

$170,516,000

$38,615,000

$64,772,000

$273,902,000

8.6%

Current

$44,115,000

$6,790,000

$7,700,000

$58,605,000

9.1%

Full Legal Status

$48,527,000

$14,938,000

$8,470,000

$71,934,000

10.2%

Current

$1,951,824,000

$155,623,000

$1,062,954,000

$3,170,401,000

8.0%

Full Legal Status

$2,147,006,000

$303,181,000

$1,169,250,000

$3,619,437,000

8.3%

Current

$79,453,000

$20,373,000

$34,756,000

$134,582,000

6.7%

Full Legal Status

$87,398,000

$44,820,000

$38,232,000

$170,450,000

7.7%

Current

$67,193,000

$15,392,000

$53,649,000

$136,233,000

8.3%

Full Legal Status

$73,912,000

$24,847,000

$59,014,000

$157,772,000

8.8%

Current

$4,393,000

$3,999,000

$3,574,000

$11,966,000

3.9%

Full Legal Status

$4,832,000

$8,481,000

$3,931,000

$17,244,000

5.1%

Current

$16,605,000

$5,718,000

$4,760,000

$27,083,000

7.3%

Full Legal Status

$18,266,000

$9,656,000

$5,236,000

$33,157,000

8.1%

Current

$454,050,000

$134,036,000

$588,086,000

7.3%

Full Legal Status

$499,455,000

$147,439,000

$646,894,000

7.3%

Current

$218,843,000

$63,457,000

$76,453,000

$358,753,000

7.3%

Full Legal Status

$240,727,000

$139,605,000

$84,099,000

$464,430,000

8.6%

Current

$19,185,000

$6,024,000

$5,022,000

$30,231,000

9.0%

Full Legal Status

$21,103,000

$13,254,000

$5,525,000

$39,881,000

10.8%

No Income Tax

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 3.8% 2.5% 4.6% 5.6% 8.7% 4.6% 5.3% 4.8% 6.4% 1.9% 5.0% 7.0%

11 Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

350

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 1: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Total Undocumented Immigrant Population Current vs. Full Legal Status for All Undocumented Immigrants State

Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Undocumented Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$15,537,000

$2,359,000

$8,352,000

$26,248,000

7.2%

Full Legal Status

$17,091,000

$5,191,000

$9,187,000

$31,468,000

7.8%

Current

$344,326,000

$93,465,000

$305,497,000

$743,288,000

10.3%

Full Legal Status

$378,759,000

$182,975,000

$336,047,000

$897,781,000

11.3%

Current vs. Full Legal Status

Current

$53,794,000

$19,145,000

$16,314,000

$89,253,000

8.1%

Full Legal Status

$59,173,000

$39,852,000

$17,945,000

$116,970,000

9.7%

Current

$21,709,000

$6,019,000

$9,653,000

$37,381,000

7.9%

Full Legal Status

$23,880,000

$11,793,000

$10,619,000

$46,292,000

8.9%

Current

$43,982,000

$6,541,000

$18,755,000

$69,278,000

8.2%

Full Legal Status

$48,381,000

$11,424,000

$20,630,000

$80,435,000

8.7%

Current

$20,981,000

$11,134,000

$5,253,000

$37,368,000

7.1%

Full Legal Status

$23,079,000

$24,495,000

$5,778,000

$53,352,000

9.2%

Current

$46,877,000

$7,678,000

$6,505,000

$61,060,000

7.8%

Full Legal Status

$51,565,000

$16,006,000

$7,156,000

$74,726,000

8.7%

Current

$2,568,000

$665,000

$1,111,000

$4,344,000

6.6%

Full Legal Status

$2,825,000

$1,436,000

$1,222,000

$5,483,000

7.6%

Current

$153,958,000

$71,017,000

$83,079,000

$308,055,000

8.3%

Full Legal Status

$169,354,000

$132,927,000

$91,387,000

$393,669,000

9.7%

Current

$87,506,000

$45,589,000

$68,274,000

$201,369,000

7.2%

Full Legal Status

$96,256,000

$90,722,000

$75,101,000

$262,080,000

8.5%

Current

$45,416,000

$17,681,000

$20,736,000

$83,833,000

7.0%

Full Legal Status

$49,958,000

$37,078,000

$22,809,000

$109,845,000

8.3%

Current

$45,493,000

$13,387,000

$18,186,000

$77,066,000

7.5%

Full Legal Status

$50,042,000

$24,667,000

$20,005,000

$94,713,000

8.3%

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 6.4% 4.6% 5.2% 6.0% 3.6% 6.0% 4.2% 7.5% 6.7% 4.9% 5.1% 7.5%

Undocumented Immigrants' State and Local Tax Contributions 12

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

351

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 1: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Total Undocumented Immigrant Population Current vs. Full Legal Status for All Undocumented Immigrants State

Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Undocumented Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$16,666,000

$2,610,000

$2,595,000

$21,872,000

7.5%

Full Legal Status

$18,333,000

$5,743,000

$2,855,000

$26,930,000

8.4%

Current

$28,068,000

$8,718,000

$11,487,000

$48,273,000

6.8%

Full Legal Status

$30,875,000

$19,180,000

$12,635,000

$62,690,000

8.1%

Current vs. Full Legal Status

Current

$663,000

$563,000

$981,000

$2,207,000

4.2%

Full Legal Status

$730,000

$1,238,000

$1,079,000

$3,047,000

5.3%

Current

$22,831,000

$4,048,000

$15,216,000

$42,096,000

9.0%

Full Legal Status

$25,114,000

$7,677,000

$16,738,000

$49,529,000

9.6%

Current

$69,387,000

$21,648,000

$91,035,000

5.0%

Full Legal Status

$76,326,000

$23,812,000

$100,138,000

5.0%

Current

$2,172,000

$5,987,000

$8,205,000

6.3%

Full Legal Status

$2,390,000

$6,586,000

$9,076,000

6.3%

No Income Tax No Income Tax on Wages

Current

$267,243,000

$49,370,000

$273,688,000

$590,302,000

7.7%

Full Legal Status

$293,968,000

$72,583,000

$301,057,000

$667,608,000

7.9%

Current

$50,204,000

$3,950,000

$13,846,000

$67,999,000

9.2%

Full Legal Status

$55,224,000

$5,568,000

$15,230,000

$76,022,000

9.3%

Current

$568,456,000

$182,416,000

$357,754,000

$1,108,625,000

8.9%

Full Legal Status

$625,301,000

$336,177,000

$393,529,000

$1,355,008,000

9.9%

Current

$162,322,000

$59,173,000

$54,345,000

$275,840,000

6.8%

Full Legal Status

$178,554,000

$130,181,000

$59,779,000

$368,514,000

8.3%

Current

$2,903,000

$161,000

$695,000

$3,759,000

7.2%

Full Legal Status

$3,194,000

$353,000

$764,000

$4,311,000

7.5%

Current

$47,519,000

$15,684,000

$21,654,000

$84,857,000

8.0%

Full Legal Status

$52,271,000

$34,505,000

$23,819,000

$110,595,000

9.5%

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 5.3% 5.5% 4.7% 6.3% 1.4% 2.6% 7.1% 4.8% 8.1% 5.3% 3.0% 5.5%

13 Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

352

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 1: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Total Undocumented Immigrant Population Current vs. Full Legal Status for All Undocumented Immigrants State

Current vs. Full Legal Status

Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Undocumented Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$52,790,000

$9,693,000

$14,785,000

$77,268,000

7.8%

Full Legal Status

$58,069,000

$19,945,000

$16,264,000

$94,278,000

8.7%

Current

$14,868,000

$28,340,000

$34,962,000

$78,169,000

5.6%

Full Legal Status

$16,354,000

$60,070,000

$38,458,000

$114,882,000

7.4%

Current

$66,902,000

$34,169,000

$38,333,000

$139,404,000

7.5%

Full Legal Status

$73,592,000

$75,172,000

$42,166,000

$190,931,000

9.3%

Current

$18,286,000

$4,081,000

$11,071,000

$33,438,000

7.6%

Full Legal Status

$20,115,000

$8,149,000

$12,179,000

$40,442,000

8.4%

Current

$43,861,000

$10,563,000

$13,274,000

$67,697,000

5.5%

Full Legal Status

$48,247,000

$23,238,000

$14,601,000

$86,085,000

6.4%

Current

$3,391,000

$861,000

$4,252,000

8.1%

Full Legal Status

$3,730,000

$947,000

$4,677,000

8.1%

Current

$88,060,000

$17,188,000

$105,277,000

7.7%

Full Legal Status

$96,866,000

$18,907,000

$115,836,000

7.7%

$494,733,000

$1,542,397,000

8.7%

$544,206,000

$1,696,637,000

8.7%

Current

$1,047,664,000

Full Legal Status

$1,152,431,000

No Income Tax No Income Tax on Wages No Income Tax

Current

$39,131,000

$12,088,000

$15,883,000

$67,102,000

6.9%

Full Legal Status

$43,044,000

$26,594,000

$17,471,000

$87,109,000

8.1%

Current

$1,990,000

$426,000

$1,502,000

$3,918,000

7.5%

Full Legal Status

$2,189,000

$701,000

$1,652,000

$4,543,000

7.9%

Current

$124,534,000

$56,756,000

$64,567,000

$245,857,000

6.5%

Full Legal Status

$136,988,000

$116,137,000

$71,024,000

$324,148,000

7.8%

Current

$223,135,000

$69,034,000

$292,169,000

10.8%

Full Legal Status

$245,448,000

$75,937,000

$321,385,000

10.8%

No Income Tax

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 4.3% 6.5% 4.2% 6.3% 4.5% 1.8% 3.0% 2.9% 4.8% 7.7% 5.1% 2.4%

Undocumented Immigrants' State and Local Tax Contributions 14

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

353

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 1: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Total Undocumented Immigrant Population Current vs. Full Legal Status for All Undocumented Immigrants State

Current vs. Full Legal Status

West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

All States

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Undocumented Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$2,895,000

$883,000

$426,000

$4,204,000

6.4%

Full Legal Status

$3,184,000

$1,944,000

$468,000

$5,596,000

7.8%

Current

$41,762,000

$11,098,000

$28,002,000

$80,863,000

8.2%

Full Legal Status

$45,938,000

$21,593,000

$30,802,000

$98,333,000

9.1%

Current

$2,936,000

$688,000

$3,625,000

5.5%

Full Legal Status

$3,230,000

$757,000

$3,987,000

5.5%

No Income Tax

Current

$6,951,347,000

$1,095,221,000

$3,597,367,000

$11,643,936,000

8.0%

Full Legal Status

$7,646,482,000

$2,166,521,000

$3,957,104,000

$13,770,107,000

8.6%

+$695,135,000

+$1,071,300,000

+$359,737,000

+$2,126,171,000

33%

50%

17%

Change % Total Change

1

Personal Income Tax Total

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 6.5% 6.2% 1.2%

5.4%

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All Fifty States, 5th Edition, January 2015. www.whopays.org

15 Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

354

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 2: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Undocumented Immigrant Population Impacted by Executive Actions Current vs. Post Implementation of Executive Actions State

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Dist. of Col. Florida Georgia Hawaii

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Impacted Undoc.Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$19,933,000

$4,628,000

$2,901,000

$27,462,000

7.2%

Executive Actions

$21,428,000

$9,950,000

$3,119,000

$34,497,000

8.4%

$574,000

$1,049,000

4.5%

$617,000

$1,127,000

4.5%

Current vs. Executive Actions

Current

$475,000

Executive Actions

$510,000

No Income Tax

Current

$79,856,000

$9,042,000

$30,334,000

$119,232,000

8.0%

Executive Actions

$85,845,000

$19,441,000

$32,609,000

$137,894,000

8.6%

Current

$22,875,000

$3,521,000

$3,992,000

$30,388,000

9.1%

Executive Actions

$24,590,000

$7,569,000

$4,292,000

$36,452,000

10.2%

Current

$979,772,000

$78,119,000

$533,579,000

$1,591,470,000

8.0%

Executive Actions

$1,053,255,000

$148,731,000

$573,598,000

$1,775,584,000

8.3%

Current

$40,695,000

$10,435,000

$17,802,000

$68,932,000

6.7%

Executive Actions

$43,748,000

$22,435,000

$19,137,000

$85,320,000

7.7%

Current

$24,886,000

$5,701,000

$19,870,000

$50,457,000

8.3%

Executive Actions

$26,753,000

$8,993,000

$21,360,000

$57,106,000

8.8%

Current

$1,797,000

$1,636,000

$1,462,000

$4,895,000

3.9%

Executive Actions

$1,932,000

$3,391,000

$1,572,000

$6,894,000

5.1%

Current

$4,649,000

$1,601,000

$1,333,000

$7,583,000

7.3%

Executive Actions

$4,998,000

$2,642,000

$1,433,000

$9,073,000

8.1%

$50,734,000

$222,598,000

7.3%

$54,539,000

$239,292,000

7.3%

Current

$171,863,000

Executive Actions

$184,753,000

No Income Tax

Current

$96,892,000

$28,095,000

$33,850,000

$158,837,000

7.3%

Executive Actions

$104,159,000

$60,405,000

$36,388,000

$200,952,000

8.6%

Current

$6,715,000

$2,109,000

$1,758,000

$10,581,000

9.0%

Executive Actions

$7,218,000

$4,533,000

$1,890,000

$13,641,000

10.8%

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 3.8% 2.5% 4.6% 5.6% 8.7% 4.6% 5.3% 4.8% 6.4% 1.9% 5.0% 7.0%

Undocumented Immigrants' State and Local Tax Contributions 16

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

355

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 2: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Undocumented Immigrant Population Impacted by Executive Actions Current vs. Post Implementation of Executive Actions State

Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Impacted Undoc.Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$9,021,000

$1,370,000

$4,849,000

$15,241,000

7.2%

Executive Actions

$9,698,000

$2,945,000

$5,213,000

$17,856,000

7.8%

Current

$173,158,000

$47,002,000

$153,631,000

$373,792,000

10.3%

Executive Actions

$186,145,000

$89,925,000

$165,154,000

$441,224,000

11.3%

Current vs. Executive Actions

Current

$24,872,000

$8,852,000

$7,543,000

$41,267,000

8.1%

Executive Actions

$26,738,000

$18,007,000

$8,109,000

$52,854,000

9.7%

Current

$9,974,000

$2,765,000

$4,435,000

$17,175,000

7.9%

Executive Actions

$10,723,000

$5,295,000

$4,768,000

$20,786,000

8.9%

Current

$22,330,000

$3,321,000

$9,522,000

$35,172,000

8.2%

Executive Actions

$24,004,000

$5,668,000

$10,236,000

$39,908,000

8.7%

Current

$8,392,000

$4,454,000

$2,101,000

$14,947,000

7.1%

Executive Actions

$9,022,000

$9,575,000

$2,259,000

$20,856,000

9.2%

Current

$14,063,000

$2,303,000

$1,952,000

$18,318,000

7.8%

Executive Actions

$15,118,000

$4,693,000

$2,098,000

$21,908,000

8.7%

Current

$767,000

$199,000

$332,000

$1,297,000

6.6%

Executive Actions

$824,000

$419,000

$357,000

$1,600,000

7.6%

Current

$53,522,000

$24,688,000

$28,882,000

$107,092,000

8.3%

Executive Actions

$57,536,000

$45,160,000

$31,048,000

$133,744,000

9.7%

Current

$30,745,000

$16,018,000

$23,988,000

$70,751,000

7.2%

Executive Actions

$33,051,000

$31,151,000

$25,787,000

$89,989,000

8.5%

Current

$19,197,000

$7,473,000

$8,765,000

$35,434,000

7.0%

Executive Actions

$20,636,000

$15,316,000

$9,422,000

$45,374,000

8.3%

Current

$21,342,000

$6,281,000

$8,532,000

$36,155,000

7.5%

Executive Actions

$22,943,000

$11,309,000

$9,172,000

$43,424,000

8.3%

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 6.4% 4.6% 5.2% 6.0% 3.6% 6.0% 4.2% 7.5% 6.7% 4.9% 5.1% 7.5%

17 Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

356

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 2: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Undocumented Immigrant Population Impacted by Executive Actions Current vs. Post Implementation of Executive Actions State

Current vs. Executive Actions

Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Impacted Undoc.Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$5,769,000

$904,000

$898,000

$7,571,000

7.5%

Executive Actions

$6,202,000

$1,943,000

$966,000

$9,110,000

8.4%

Current

$12,310,000

$3,824,000

$5,038,000

$21,172,000

6.8%

Executive Actions

$13,234,000

$8,221,000

$5,416,000

$26,871,000

8.1%

Current

$198,000

$168,000

$293,000

$659,000

4.2%

Executive Actions

$213,000

$361,000

$315,000

$889,000

5.3%

Current

$11,107,000

$1,969,000

$7,402,000

$20,479,000

9.0%

Executive Actions

$11,940,000

$3,650,000

$7,958,000

$23,548,000

9.6%

Current

$33,185,000

$10,353,000

$43,538,000

5.0%

Executive Actions

$35,674,000

$11,130,000

$46,804,000

5.0%

$1,788,000

$2,450,000

6.3%

$1,922,000

$2,648,000

6.3%

Current

$649,000

Executive Actions

$697,000

No Income Tax No Income Tax on Wages

Current

$102,907,000

$19,011,000

$105,389,000

$227,307,000

7.7%

Executive Actions

$110,625,000

$27,314,000

$113,293,000

$251,232,000

7.9%

Current

$25,819,000

$2,031,000

$7,121,000

$34,971,000

9.2%

Executive Actions

$27,755,000

$2,798,000

$7,655,000

$38,209,000

9.3%

Current

$216,367,000

$69,432,000

$136,169,000

$421,968,000

8.9%

Executive Actions

$232,595,000

$125,049,000

$146,382,000

$504,025,000

9.9%

Current

$72,143,000

$26,299,000

$24,153,000

$122,595,000

6.8%

Executive Actions

$77,554,000

$56,543,000

$25,965,000

$160,062,000

8.3%

Current

$867,000

$48,000

$207,000

$1,122,000

7.2%

Executive Actions

$932,000

$103,000

$223,000

$1,258,000

7.5%

Current

$19,466,000

$6,425,000

$8,870,000

$34,761,000

8.0%

Executive Actions

$20,925,000

$13,813,000

$9,535,000

$44,274,000

9.5%

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 5.3% 5.5% 4.7% 6.3% 1.4% 2.6% 7.1% 4.8% 8.1% 5.3% 3.0% 5.5%

Undocumented Immigrants' State and Local Tax Contributions 18

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

357

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 2: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Undocumented Immigrant Population Impacted by Executive Actions Current vs. Post Implementation of Executive Actions State

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Impacted Undoc.Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$24,416,000

$4,483,000

$6,838,000

$35,736,000

7.8%

Executive Actions

$26,247,000

$9,015,000

$7,351,000

$42,613,000

8.7%

Current

$7,628,000

$14,540,000

$17,937,000

$40,104,000

5.6%

Executive Actions

$8,200,000

$30,118,000

$19,282,000

$57,600,000

7.4%

Current

$25,088,000

$12,813,000

$14,375,000

$52,277,000

7.5%

Executive Actions

$26,970,000

$27,549,000

$15,453,000

$69,972,000

9.3%

Current

$7,429,000

$1,658,000

$4,498,000

$13,584,000

7.6%

Executive Actions

$7,986,000

$3,235,000

$4,835,000

$16,056,000

8.4%

Current

$17,721,000

$4,268,000

$5,363,000

$27,352,000

5.5%

Executive Actions

$19,051,000

$9,176,000

$5,765,000

$33,991,000

6.4%

Current

$1,012,000

$257,000

$1,269,000

8.1%

Executive Actions

$1,088,000

$276,000

$1,365,000

8.1%

Current

$36,260,000

$7,078,000

$43,349,000

7.7%

Executive Actions

$38,979,000

$7,608,000

$46,613,000

7.7%

Current

$533,851,000

$252,097,000

$785,948,000

8.7%

Executive Actions

$573,890,000

$271,005,000

$844,894,000

8.7%

Current

$21,572,000

$6,664,000

$8,756,000

$36,992,000

6.9%

Executive Actions

$23,190,000

$14,328,000

$9,413,000

$46,930,000

8.1%

Current

$594,000

$127,000

$448,000

$1,170,000

7.5%

Executive Actions

$639,000

$205,000

$482,000

$1,325,000

7.9%

Current

$45,377,000

$20,680,000

$23,527,000

$89,583,000

6.5%

Executive Actions

$48,780,000

$41,355,000

$25,291,000

$115,426,000

7.8%

Current

$109,380,000

$33,840,000

$143,220,000

10.8%

Executive Actions

$117,583,000

$36,378,000

$153,961,000

10.8%

Current vs. Executive Actions

Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington

No Income Tax No Income Tax on Wages No Income Tax

No Income Tax

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 4.3% 6.5% 4.2% 6.3% 4.5% 1.8% 3.0% 2.9% 4.8% 7.7% 5.1% 2.4%

19 Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

358

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 2: Detailed State and Local Tax Contributions of Undocumented Immigrant Population Impacted by Executive Actions Current vs. Post Implementation of Executive Actions State

West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

All States

Sales and Excise Tax Total

Personal Income Tax Total

Property Tax Total

Total State and Local Taxes

Impacted Undoc.Immigrant Effective Tax Rate

Current

$864,000

$264,000

$127,000

$1,255,000

6.4%

Executive Actions

$929,000

$567,000

$137,000

$1,633,000

7.8%

Current

$19,232,000

$5,111,000

$12,896,000

$37,239,000

8.2%

Executive Actions

$20,675,000

$9,718,000

$13,863,000

$44,256,000

9.1%

$205,000

$1,082,000

5.5%

$221,000

$1,163,000

5.5%

Current vs. Executive Actions

Current

$877,000

Executive Actions

$942,000

Current

$3,189,881,000

$470,356,000

$1,648,645,000

$5,308,882,000

8.1%

Executive Actions

$3,429,122,000

$912,671,000

$1,772,293,000

$6,114,086,000

8.6%

+$239,241,000

+$442,315,000

+$123,648,000

+$805,204,000

30%

55%

15%

Change % Total Change

1

No Income Tax

Top 1% Effective Tax Rate (All Taxpayers)1 6.5% 6.2% 1.2%

5.4%

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All Fifty States, 5th Edition, January 2015. www.whopays.org

Undocumented Immigrants' State and Local Tax Contributions 20

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

359

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 3: Data Used to Estimate State and Local Tax Contributions of Undocumented Immigrants TOTAL UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANT POPULATION

STATE

EXECUTIVE ACTION IMPACTED POPULATION

Est. Share of Undocumented Estimated Total Undocumented Average Undocumented Family Immigrant Population who are Immigrant Population1 Income3 Homeowners2

Est. Executive Action Impacted Undocumented Immigrant Population4

Share of Total Undocumented Population

Alabama

72,000

30%

$28,300

31,000

43%

Alaska

6,000

33%

$30,100

1,800

30%

Arizona

264,000

38%

$25,000

136,000

52%

Arkansas

54,000

39%

$27,300

28,000

52%

California

3,034,000

27%

$29,900

1,523,000

50%

Colorado

164,000

33%

$28,200

84,000

51%

Connecticut

108,000

26%

$34,700

40,000

37%

Delaware

22,000

29%

$32,200

9,000

41%

Dist. of Col.

25,000

22%

$34,200

7,000

28%

Florida

605,000

34%

$30,300

229,000

38%

Georgia

393,000

33%

$28,500

174,000

44%

Hawaii

20,000

42%

$38,600

7,000

35%

Idaho

31,000

46%

$26,900

18,000

58%

Illinois

519,000

39%

$31,800

261,000

50%

Indiana

93,000

39%

$27,100

43,000

46%

Iowa

37,000

39%

$29,200

17,000

46%

Kansas

65,000

44%

$29,700

33,000

51%

Kentucky

45,000

22%

$26,700

18,000

40%

Louisiana

60,000

20%

$29,800

18,000

30%

Maine

5,000

33%

$30,100

1,500

30%

Maryland

233,000

35%

$36,400

81,000

35%

Massachusetts

185,000

23%

$34,800

65,000

35%

Michigan

97,000

40%

$28,400

41,000

42%

Minnesota

81,000

36%

$29,200

38,000

47%

Mississippi

26,000

22%

$25,700

9,000

35%

Missouri

57,000

39%

$28,400

25,000

44%

Montana

4,000

33%

$30,100

1,200

30%

Nebraska

37,000

38%

$29,000

18,000

49%

Nevada

138,000

33%

$30,100

66,000

48%

21 Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy I February 2016

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

360

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Appendix 3: Data Used to Estimate State and Local Tax Contributions of Undocumented Immigrants TOTAL UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANT POPULATION

STATE

EXECUTIVE ACTION IMPACTED POPULATION

Est. Share of Undocumented Estimated Total Undocumented Average Undocumented Family Immigrant Population who are Immigrant Population1 Income3 Homeowners2

Est. Executive Action Impacted Undocumented Immigrant Population4

Share of Total Undocumented Population

New Hampshire

10,000

33%

$30,100

3,000

30%

New Jersey

509,000

24%

$34,500

196,000

39%

New Mexico

70,000

46%

$24,300

36,000

51%

New York

867,000

19%

$32,800

330,000

38%

North Carolina

342,000

33%

$27,100

152,000

44%

North Dakota

4,000

33%

$30,100

1,200

30%

Ohio

83,000

29%

$29,300

34,000

41%

Oklahoma

80,000

37%

$28,300

37,000

46%

Oregon

115,000

30%

$27,900

59,000

51%

Pennsylvania

136,000

33%

$31,300

51,000

38%

Rhode Island

32,000

23%

$31,400

13,000

41%

South Carolina

99,000

29%

$28,400

40,000

40%

South Dakota

4,000

33%

$30,100

1,200

30%

Tennessee

119,000

28%

$26,300

49,000

41%

Texas

1,464,000

42%

$27,700

746,000

51%

Utah

78,000

40%

$28,700

43,000

55%

Vermont

4,000

33%

$30,100

1,200

30%

Virginia

247,000

33%

$35,200

90,000

36%

Washington

204,000

33%

$30,400

100,000

49%

West Virginia

5,000

33%

$30,100

1,500

30%

Wisconsin

76,000

34%

$29,600

35,000

46%

Wyoming

5,000

33%

$30,100

1,500

30%

All States

11,022,000

33%

$30,100

5,044,000

46%

1

Migration Policy Institute (MPI) analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from the 2009-2013 ACS pooled, and the 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) by Colin Hammar and James Bachmeier of Temple University and Jennifer Van Hook of The Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute.

2

Ibid. Ibid. 4 Ibid 3

Undocumented Immigrants' State and Local Tax Contributions 22

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

361

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

PROFILE

IMMIGRANTS HAVE ALWAYS CONTRIBUTED TO THE U.S. ECONOMY BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

Despite the contributions immigrants have always made to the U.S. economy, since the November 2016 election, President Trump has signed a multitude of executive orders, including several targeting the nation's immigrant population. Civil rights activists and other observers say Trump's often strident, anti-immigrant rhetoric has been aimed squarely at diminishing the value of immigrant contributions.

Mexico, of course, has repeatedly stated that it will not pay to build the wall.

Petra Falcon, executive director of Promise Arizona, says immigrants are "exhausted" after months of having to respond to the president's stepped-up law enforcement efforts and negative characterizations of their communities.

Compass CBS provides bilingual training resources. Every Monday Compass gathers about 50-60 Hispanic/immigrant business owners for training, but Olivo says the day after the election only two business owners showed up.

"They are having to survive in an environment where they are afraid to drive, go to work, take their children to school or even just go buy groceries," says Falcon. "People are staying close to home."

"Right after the election…a taco restaurant owner came into our office and wanted to liquidate and sell everything," Olivo says. "I told him not to…but that is what fear has caused."

The president's rhetoric is fueling uncertainty in the entire business community, but especially among immigrant-owned companies in Arizona. The state is home to more than 123,000 Hispanic-owned businesses, about 25 to 30 percent of which are owned by immigrants. Edgar Olivo, CEO of Compass CBS, says the bombast Trump employs makes it difficult for immigrant-owned companies or those that cater to immigrants to plan accordingly.

The sense of fear is also tamping down consumer spending amount Hispanic immigrant consumers. Francisco Salas, owner of three restaurants in the Valley, says he's seen his business drop steadily since Trump took office.

In addition to stepped-up federal immigration law enforcement efforts, the president routinely discounts the positive economic and social impact immigrants have on this country.

"I have two Mexican food restaurants where 93 percent of consumers are Hispanic," Salas says. "I also have a restaurant where 93 percent of consumers are (white), but even they express they don't like the way Trump treats us."

"They have been here contributing to the country," Falcon says. "They take the jobs nobody else wants to take, be it be farm work, labor, domestic, childcare, etc. That is a huge economic base and if that weren't the case Arizona wouldn't have such a great relationship with Mexico on trade."

Salas came to the country undocumented in 1995 and started off handing out flyers, washing dishes and working at restaurants. He is now a U.S. citizen.

Despite nearly $20 billion in total trade with Mexico, Arizona's diplomatic and economic ties to our neighbor to the south have been tested by Trump’s ongoing threats: to impose large tariffs on Mexico imports; his overwhelmingly negative comments about the North American Free Trade Agreement (which was signed by Canada, Mexico and the United States in 29914 and is currently being renegotiated); and his pledge to build a 30foot wall at the U.S.-Mexico border and make Mexico pay for it.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

"I pay taxes on all three restaurants and I have immigrant workers who also pay taxes," Salas says. "So instead of coming to the United States and taking people's jobs, I came and offered my services and contribute to the economy." FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

362

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

363

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


Hispanic immigrants in Arizona hold over $7 billion in spending power. Contributions like these have been lost in the debate over immigration in Washington. New American Economy (NAE) brings together more than 500 Republican, Democratic, and Independent mayors and business leaders who understand the need for economic-based reform. Through this effort, we have shaped our footprint in both Arizona and across the country. Using data analysis, story gathering, local organizing and more, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re building a strong movement to engage members of Congress to help make smart, sensible immigration reform a reality. NewAmericanEconomy.org

@NewAmericanEcon

/NewAmericanEconomy


NAE has had a busy 2017, building the economic case for immigration reform. We released our report “New Americans in Phoenix” and launched it in partnership with the Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry. The roundtable event was joined by government and business leaders in the region, including Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton. We built the Arizona Immigration Reform Coalition to cultivate local support for reform and to initiate conversations with the state’s congressional delegation. Coalition members include the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, AT&T Arizona & New Mexico, Arizona Farm Bureau, and more.

“Immigrants are central to Arizona’s prosperity and we’re all better off for their contributions.” — Glenn Hamer, President & CEO, Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry

“Phoenix takes pride in being a welcoming city. This report shows how immigrants drive our economy to be more innovative and entrepreneurial.” — Greg Stanton, Mayor of Phoenix

We held a National Day of Action press conference in Phoenix with local partners to highlight our report “The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona.” The event marked a national Day of Action with similar events taking place in all 50 states. We launched MapTheImpact.org, an interactive tool that equips policymakers and Americans with an understanding of how immigration impacts all 435 congressional districts across the country.

And the year isn’t even over yet. Find out how you can help create the movement for immigration reform. Visit NewAmericanEconomy.org or contact us at info@NewAmericanEconomy.org.


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

REPORT AUGUST, 2016

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

366

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

EXCERPT

Partners

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

367

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

CONTENTS

Demographics 

 1

Naturalization 

 19

The Role of Immigrants as Entrepreneurs 

 2

International Students 

 20

Income and Tax Contributions 

 4

Voting Power 

 21

The Role of Immigrants in the Broader Workforce 

 6

Undocumented Population 

 22

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math 

 10

 Healthcare

 12

Methodology 

 28

Agriculture 

 14

Endnotes 

 35

Housing 

 16

Endnotes: Methodology 

 38

Visa Demand 

 17

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Spotlight On: Carla Chavarria

368

 27

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Demographics

Demographics

A

Arizona, which shares a 372-mile border with Mexico, is now home to more than 920,000 foreign-born residents.

fter decades when states such as California, Florida, and New York attracted the majority of immigrants to the country, Arizona—which shares a 372-mile border with Mexico—has recently emerged as a major destination for New Americans. In 1990, 7.6 percent of Arizona residents were foreignborn. By 2010, that figure had risen to 13.4 percent.

Today Arizona boasts the 11th largest immigrant population in the United States, with over 920,000 foreign-born residents. New Americans in Arizona serve as everything from entrepreneurs to farm laborers, making them critical contributors to the state’s economic success overall.

Over the next four years, such growth patterns only continued. In fact, the growth of Arizona’s foreign-born population figured prominently in the state’s overall population growth between 2010 and 2014. The nativeborn population increased by just 4.6 percent, but the state’s immigrant population grew by 7.0 percent during that period.

921,641

60,417

Arizona residents were born abroad.

people immigrated to Arizona between 2010 and 2014. 7.0% Growth in immigrant population, AZ

13%

14%

Share of Arizona residents born abroad

5.8% Growth in immigrant population, U.S.

Share of U.S. residents born abroad

2010

2014 1

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

369

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

The Role of Immigrants as Entrepreneurs

The Role of Immigrants as Entrepreneurs 60,132

22%

immigrants in Arizona are self-employed.

Share of entrepreneurs in Arizona who are immigrants

113,760 people in Arizona were employed by immigrant owned companies in 2007

Immigrant-owned businesses generated $1.3 B in business income in 2014.

G

In 2010, roughly 1 in 10 American workers with jobs at private firms were employed at immigrantfounded companies.

iven that the act of picking up and moving to another country is inherently brave and risky, it should be little surprise that immigrants have repeatedly been found to be more entrepreneurial than the U.S. population as a whole.1 According to The Kauffman Foundation, a nonprofit group that studies entrepreneurship, immigrants were almost twice as likely to start a new business in 2015 than the nativeborn population.2 The companies they founded ranged from small businesses on Main Street to large firms responsible for thousands of American jobs. Recent studies, for instance, have indicated that immigrants own more than half of the grocery stores in America and 48 percent of nail salons.3 Foreign-born entrepreneurs are also behind 51 percent of our countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s billion dollar startups.4 In addition, more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 firms have at least one founder who was an immigrant or the child of an immigrant.

The super-charged entrepreneurial activity of immigrants provides real and meaningful benefits to everyday Americans. In 2010, roughly one in 10 American workers with jobs at private firms were employed at immigrant-founded companies. Such businesses also generated more than $775 billion in annual business revenue that year.5 In Arizona, like the country as a whole, immigrants are currently punching far above their weight class as entrepreneurs. Foreignborn workers currently make up 22.0 percent of all entrepreneurs in the state, despite accounting for 13.7 percent of Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population. Their firms generated

2

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

370

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

The Role of Immigrants as Entrepreneurs

$1.3 billion in business income in 2014. Arizona firms with at least one immigrant owner also provided jobs to roughly 114,000 Americans in 2007.6

entrepreneurs sell a majority stake in their company and then apply for a visa as a high-skilled worker, rather than the owner of their firm. And a few enterprising venture capitalists, led by Jeff Bussgang in Boston and Brad Feld in Colorado, have launched programs that bring over foreign-born entrepreneurs to serve as “entrepreneurs in residence” at colleges and universities. Because nonprofit academic institutions are exempt from the H-1B cap, such entrepreneurs can secure their visas by working as mentors at a school, and then build their startups in their free time.

Immigrant entrepreneurs have played an important part of Arizona’s economic success story. Avnet, a Fortune 500 technology distributer based in the state, was originally founded by Charles Avnet, a Russian immigrant. Avnet started out by selling spare radio parts in downtown Manhattan. By World War II, he had turned his company into one of the country’s leading radio distributors.7 Freeport-McMoRan, another Fortune 500 firm based in Arizona, had one founder whose parents immigrated to America. Together, these two companies employ 54,000 people globally and bring in almost $50 billion in revenues each year.

These innovative programs, which are currently available at 13 colleges and universities across the country, are already resulting in meaningful economic contributions. As of mid-2016, 23 entrepreneurs had secured visas through these programs nationally. The companies they founded had created 261 jobs and raised more than $100 million in funding.9

Currently, there is no visa to come to America, start a company, and create jobs for U.S. workers — even if an entrepreneur already has a business plan and has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to support his or her idea. Trying to exploit that flaw in our system, countries around the world — from Canada to Singapore, Australia to Chile — have enacted startup visas, often with the explicit purpose of luring away entrepreneurs who want to build a U.S. business but cannot get a visa to do so.8 Here in the United States, many individuals have gone to great lengths to circumnavigate the visa hurdles. Many

40% of Fortune 500 companies based in Arizona were founded by immigrants or their children. Those firms generate $49.6 B in annual revenue, and employ 54,000 people globally. 3

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

371

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Income and Tax Contributions

Income and Tax Contributions

I

mmigrants in Arizona play an important role contributing to the state as both taxpayers and consumers. In 2014, immigrant-led households in Arizona earned $21.4 billion dollars — or 13.0 percent of all income earned by Arizonan that year. With those earnings, the state’s foreign-born households were able to contribute more than one in every eight dollars paid by Arizona residents in state and local tax revenues, payments that support important public services such as public schools and police. Through their individual wage contributions, immigrants also paid almost $2.7 billion into the Social Security and Medicare programs that year.

By spending the money they earn at businesses such as hair salons, grocery stores, and coffee shops, immigrants also support small business owners and job creation in the communities where they live. In Arizona immigrants held $16.0 billion in spending power in 2014, defined in this brief as the net income available to a family after paying federal, state, and local taxes. We highlight the spending power and tax contributions of several subsets of Arizona’s foreign-born population below, including Hispanics and immigrants from Northern Africa or the Middle East.

INCOME AND TAX CONTRIBUTIONS OF KEY GROUPS WITHIN ARIZONA'S IMMIGRANT POPULATION, 2014 Asian

$5.4 B

Hispanic

Middle Eastern & North African

$9.4 B

$667.8 M

Total Income in 2014

Total Income in 2014

Total Income in 2014

$1.5 B

Total amount paid in taxes

$2.1 B

$ 184.2 M

Total amount paid in taxes

Total amount paid in taxes

$1.3 B

$5.4B

$1.1 B

$667.8M

$49.4M

$859.8M

$388.1 M

Total income

$134.8M

$9.4 B

Amount paid in federal taxes

Sub-Saharan African

$531.4 M

Total Income in 2014

$137.3 M

Total amount paid in taxes

$531.4M

$95.8M

$41.6 M

Amount paid in state and local taxes 4

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

372

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Income and Tax Contributions

In 2014, immigrants in Arizona earned $21.4 B.

$1.7 B  — went to state and local taxes … $3.7 B — went to federal taxes …

Leaving them with $16.0 B in spending power.

ENTITLEMENT CONTRIBUTIONS

Arizona's immigrants also contribute to our country’s entitlement programs. In 2014, through taxes on their individual wages, immigrants contributed $543.6 M to Medicare and $2.1 B to Social Security.

$543.6M $2.1 B

Medicare

Social Security 5

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

373

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

The Role of Immigrants in the Broader Workforce

The Role of Immigrants in the Broader Workforce Because they tended to be working-age,

14%

Immigrants made up 14% of Arizona's population in 2014…

17%

But they made up 17% of the employed population in the state.

Immigrants were 31% more likely to work than native-born Arizonans.

P

eople who come to the United States often come here to work. Because of that, they often have skills that make them a good fit for our labor force — and a strong complement to American workers already here. In the country as a whole, immigrants are much more likely to be working-age than the U.S.born. They also have a notably different educational profile. The vast majority of Americans – more than 79 percent of the U.S.-born population – fall into the middle of the education spectrum by holding a high school or bachelor’s degree. Immigrants, by contrast, are more likely to gravitate toward either end of the skill spectrum. They are more likely to lack a high school diploma than the native born, but also more likely to have an advanced degree. This makes them good candidates for labor-intensive positions, such

53.4%

40.7%

of immigrants of all ages worked in 2014.

of the native-born population worked.

as housekeeping, that many more educated U.S.-born workers are less interested in pursuing, as well as highlevel positions that allow innovation-driven firms to expand and add jobs for Americans at all skill levels.

In Arizona, 70.5% of the foreignborn population is working aged, compared to only 46.8% of the native-born population. Immigrants in Arizona in many ways resemble the trend in the country as whole. In Arizona 70.5 percent of the foreign-born population is working aged, defined in this brief as falling between the ages 25 and 64, while only 46.8 percent of the native-born population is. That

6

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

374

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

The Role of Immigrants in the Broader Workforce

AGE BREAKDOWN OF ARIZONA'S FOREIGN-BORN AND NATIVE-BORN POPULATIONS, 2014

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF ARIZONA'S FOREIGN-BORN AND NATIVE-BORN POPULATION (AGES 25+), 2014

FOREIGN-BORN

FOREIGN-BORN WORKING AGE

15%

70%

15%

38%

NATIVE-BORN

42%

12%

9%

NATIVE-BORN WORKING AGE

37%

0-24

47%

25-64

16%

9%

65+

23.8-percentage point gap, which is larger than the national average, has major implications for the state’s workforce. In 2014, immigrants in the state were 31.1 percent more likely to be actively employed than the state’s native-born residents — a reality driven largely by the fact that a larger than average portion of the nativeborn population was under the age of 25. Foreign-born individuals punched above their weight class as workers in the state as well: In 2014, they made up 17.2 percent of all employed individuals in the state, despite accounting for 13.7 percent of the Arizona’s population overall.

62%

19%

Less than High School

Bachelor's Degree

High School/Some College

Graduate Degree

10%

economy. Foreign-born residents make up almost half the employees in the state’s landscaping industry. They also account for 63.1 percent of the state’s workers in crop production, contributing to Arizona’s sizeable agriculture industry, which added $2.5 billion to the state’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2014. Immigrants also frequently gravitate toward sectors where employers may struggle to find enough interested U.S.-born workers. Immigrants in Arizona, for instance, make up 37.5 percent of workers providing services to buildings and dwellings, an industry that includes office cleaners, exterminators, and carpet cleaners.

When it comes to education, however, Arizona differs from the national pattern. Immigrants here are less likely to have either a bachelor’s degree or graduate level training than native-born residents. Instead, they are considerably more likely to have less than a highschool education: More than one in three of the state’s immigrants fall into that category, compared to just 8.6 percent of natives.

In recent decades, immigrants have also played an important role in Arizona’s manufacturing industry. Studies have found that the arrival of immigrants to a community can have a powerful impact creating or preserving manufacturing jobs. This is because foreign-born workers give employers access to a large and relatively affordable pool of laborers, making it less attractive for firms to move work to cheaper locations offshore. One study by the Partnership for a New American Economy and the Americas Society/ Council of the Americas, for instance, found that every

The immigrants who are working in Arizona contribute to a wide range of different industries in the state — many of which are growing and important parts of the local

7

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

375

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

The Role of Immigrants in the Broader Workforce

time 1,000 immigrants arrive in a given U.S. county, 46 manufacturing jobs are preserved that would otherwise not exist or have moved elsewhere.10

The 860,000 immigrants who were living in Arizona in 2010 were responsible for creating or preserving almost 40,000 manufacturing jobs. Aside from just looking at overarching industry groups, our work also examines the share of workers that are foreign-born in specific occupations and jobs. Reflecting their unique educational profile, immigrants in Arizona are often overrepresented in particularly labor-intensive positions. While foreign-born workers make up 17.2 percent of the state’s employed population, they account for 73.9 percent of the subset of farm laborers that hand pick fresh fruits and vegetables in the fields. They also make up 55.0 percent of those working as maids and housekeepers, and more than half of grounds maintenance workers.

INDUSTRIES WITH LARGEST SHARE OF FOREIGN-BORN WORKERS, 2014 Share of workers who are immigrants 1

2

3

4

5

Crop Production

Landscaping Services

Services to Buildings and Dwellings

Private Households

Groceries and Related Products

63%

49%

38%

33%

30%

15,954 immigrant workers

25,992 immigrant workers

18,498 immigrant workers

9,498 immigrant workers

6,473 immigrant workers

25,281 total workers

52,898 total workers

49,334 total workers

28,545 total workers

21,903 total workers 8

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

376

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

The Role of Immigrants in the Broader Workforce

OCCUPATIONS WITH LARGEST SHARE OF FOREIGN-BORN WORKERS, 2014 1

2

3

4

Misc. Agricultural Workers including Animal Breeders

Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

Grounds Maintenance Workers

Painters, Construction and Maintenance

55%

74%

15,661 immigrant workers 21,198 total workers

50%

26,050 immigrant workers 51,920 total workers

25,566 immigrant workers 46,483 total workers

40%

5,330 immigrant workers 13,442 total workers

5

6

7

8

Cleaners of Vehicles and Equipment

Carpenters

Janitors and Building Cleaners

Construction Laborers

4,707 immigrant workers 11,884 total workers

10,848 immigrant workers 29,854 total workers

9

10

Cooks

Miscellaneous Assemblers and Fabricators

32% 18,371 immigrant workers 57,559 total workers

32%

36%

40%

21,237 immigrant workers 65,475 total workers

32%

16,249 immigrant workers 50,648 total workers

29%

4,494 immigrant workers 15,313 total workers

Share of workers who are immigrants 9

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

377

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

B

etween 2014 and 2024, science, technology, engineering, and math — or “STEM” — fields are projected to play a key role in U.S. economic growth, adding almost 800,000 new jobs and growing 37.0 percent faster than the U.S. economy as a whole.11 Immigrants are already playing a huge part ensuring that Arizona remains a leading innovator in STEM fields like advanced manufacturing and aerospace.

to expand and add jobs for U.S.-born workers. It also makes little sense, given the country’s ongoing shortage of STEM talent — an issue that heavily impacts employers here. In 2014, 9.0 STEM jobs were advertised online in Arizona for every one unemployed STEM worker in the state. Immigrants, however, are not just a crucial piece of Arizona’s STEM workforce now — they are also likely to power it in the future. In 2014 students on temporary visas made up roughly one out of every 4 students earning a STEM Master’s degree at Arizona’s universities, and 36.8 percent of students earning a PhD-level degree in STEM. Even after America’s universities invest in their education, however, many of those students struggle to remain in the country after graduation. Creating visa pathways that would make it easier for them to stay would have a major economic benefit to Arizona. A study by the Partnership for a New American

Despite making up 13.7%of the state’s population, foreign-born Arizonans made up 17.3% of STEM workers in the state in 2014. Our outdated immigration system, however, makes it difficult for STEM employers to sponsor the highskilled workers they need to fill critical positions. This is problematic because it can slow the ability of firms

60,755

The resulting ratio of open jobs to available workers was

9.0 to 1

available STEM jobs were advertised online in 2014, compared to 6,768 unemployed STEM workers.

10

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

378

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

Economy and the American Enterprise Institute found that every time a state gains 100 foreign-born STEM workers with graduate-level STEM training from a U.S. school, 262 more jobs are created for U.S.-born workers there in the seven years that follow.12 For Arizona, that means that retaining even half of the 1,070 graduates earning advanced-level STEM degrees in 2014 could result in the creation of more than 1,400 new positions for U.S.-born workers by 2021.

If half of Arizona's 1,070 advanced level STEM grads on temporary visas stayed in the state after graduationâ&#x20AC;Ś

1,402

jobs for U.S.-born workers would be created by 2021.

26%

Share of students earning STEM Master's degrees who are foreign-born.

37%

Share of students earning STEM PhDs who are foreign-born.

11

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

379

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Healthcare

Healthcare

I

n the coming years, the American healthcare industry is projected to see incredibly rapid growth— adding more new positions from 2014 to 2024 than any other industry in our economy.13 Already, caregivers are facing near unprecedented levels of demand. Between 2013 and 2015, the number of Americans with health insurance rose by almost 17 million,14 opening the door for many patients to receive more regular care. The country’s 76.4 million baby boomers are also aging rapidly—at a major cost to our healthcare system.

Studies have found that elderly Americans spend three times more on healthcare services than those of working age each year.15 In Arizona, a state where almost one out of every six residents is currently elderly, finding enough healthcare workers remains a challenge—and one that will likely worsen in the future. Currently the state has 246.9 practicing physicians per 100,000 people—a figure that ranks it 32nd in the country in terms of physician

ARIZONA HAS A SHORTAGE OF HEALTHCARE WORKERS

72,964

The resulting ratio of open jobs to available workers was

12.1 to 1

available healthcare jobs were advertised online in 2014, compared to 6,024 unemployed healthcare workers. Additional number of psychiatrists needed: 309

Shortage of occupational therapists by 2030: 3,368

Shortage of dentists projected by 2025: 405

Projected shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2025 : 9,590 16

12

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

380

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Healthcare

FOREIGN-BORN AND FOREIGN-EDUCATED PROFESSIONALS HELP FILL HEALTHCARE LABOR GAPS Foreign-Educated

Foreign-Born

Doctors

Psychiatrists

Nurses

4,601 graduates of foreign medical schools

288 graduates of foreign medical schools

8,422 foreign-born nurses

35%

27%

14%

Nursing, Psychiatric, and Home Health Aides 5,776 foreign-born nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides

17%

In 2016 more than 1 in 4 physicians in Arizona graduated from a foreign medical school, a likely sign they were born elsewhere.

coverage relative to other states. The ratio of practicing psychiatrists per capita is also low. All this comes on top of shortages already impacting the state across the entire healthcare workforce. In 2014, 12.1 healthcare jobs were listed online in Arizona for every one unemployed healthcare worker in the state. As baby boomers age a variety of other healthcare professions that cater largely to seniors, such as occupational therapists, will feel additional strain. Immigrants are already playing a valuable role helping Arizona meet some of its healthcare workforce gaps. In 2016 more than one in four physicians in Arizona graduated from a foreign medical school, a likely sign they were born elsewhere. Immigrant healthcare practitioners also made up 13.5 percent of the state's nurses in 2014, as well as 16.6 percent of those working as nursing, psychiatric, or home health aides.

13

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

381

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Agriculture

Agriculture 18.6%

$2.5 B

of farms in Arizona produced Amount agriculture contributes to fresh fruits and vegetables in 2014. Arizona's GDP annually. 80%

Share of miscellaneous agriculture workers on farms who are immigrants. (This is the occupation made up largely of laborers who hand pick crops in the field.)

77%

One sector of the economy of particular importance to Arizona is agriculture. In 2014, the agriculture industry contributed nearly $2.5 billion to Arizona’s GDP. It also directly provided jobs to almost 30,000 Arizonans. Within that massive industry, fresh fruits and vegetables played a prominent role. In 2014, farmers in the state grew almost $897 million worth of fresh fruits, vegetables, and tree nuts. Arizona also grew more lettuce, as measured in farm receipts, than any other state in the country except California.

Share of hired farmworkers in the state who are immigrants.

immigrants are still a huge part of the state’s overall agricultural workforce. In 2014, 77 percent of all hired farmworkers in the state were born abroad.

From 2008 to 2012, foreign-born workers made up 72.9% of field and crop laborers in the country as a whole. The current visa system for agriculture presents many problems for states like Arizona. The H-2A visa program, which is designed to bring in temporary farm laborers, is 17 too expensive and burdensome for many U.S. farms. Growers frequently complain that delays issuing H-2A visas result in workers arriving weeks late, which can lead to crop loss. The visa’s lack of portability also means that growers must often commit to pay workers for a longer period than they actually need them. For Arizona growers, the lack of a workable visa—coupled with a huge drop-off in the number of farmworkers who have immigrated in recent years—has led to a labor

Arizona’s leading role as a produce producer makes the state’s agriculture industry inherently reliant on immigrants. Fresh fruits and vegetables—unlike commodity crops such as corn, soybeans, and wheat— almost always must be harvested by hand. And the so-called “field and crop workers” that perform that work are overwhelmingly immigrant: From 2008 to 2012, foreign-born workers made up 72.9 percent of field and crop laborers in the country as a whole In Arizona, that reality means that even when managers, packers, and equipment managers are included,

14

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

382

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Agriculture

$896.9M

TOP FIVE PRODUCE ITEMS PRODUCED IN THE STATE IN 2014, AS MEASURED BY FARM RECEIPTS

Farm receipts generated from the sale of fruits, vegetables, and nuts in 2014.

Lettuce $377.2 M Lemons $136.9 M Cantaloupe

Arizona's leading agricultural exports include plant products (such as sweeteners and planting seeds), dairy products, and cotton.

$93.3 M Spinach $49.5 M Cabbage $41.4 M

picture that is increasingly untenable. Between 2002 and 2014, the number of field and crop workers in Arizona and New Mexico decreased by 14 percent. Wage trends indicate that caused a major labor shortage on Arizona farms: Real wages for field and crop workers jumped by 22.1 percent during the period.

27 percent of that market share loss. Many farmers say a shortage of manpower has forced them to either cut back on the acres devoted to labor intensive crops or 18 abandon expansion plans altogether. Such moves, in Arizona and elsewhere, have cost the U.S. economy in recent years. If labor shortages had not been an issue, the country would have had an additional 24,000 jobs by 2012, including 17,000 in fields outside agriculture like transportation and irrigation. The U.S. economy would have had $1.3 billion in additional farm income by 2012 as well.

The shortage of qualified field and crop workers has made it difficult for many farmers in Arizona to keep pace with rising consumer demand for fresh fruits and vegetables. Between the 1998-2000 and 2010-2012 time periods, for instance, the share of produce consumed by Americans that was imported from other countries grew by 79.3 percent. Labor issues explain an estimated

1,853

THE SUPPLY OF FIELD AND CROP WORKERS IN ARIZONA IS DECREASING, LEADING TO LABOR SHORTAGES 2002

Decline in the number of field and crop workers in Arizona and New Mexico from 2002-2014

2014

Number of field and crop workers

14%

*Data on individual states is unavailable.

Wages of field and crop workers

22.1%

15

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

383

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Housing

Housing

I

mmigrant families have long played an important role helping to build housing wealth in the United States. One study released by the Partnership for a New American Economy and Americas Society/Council of the Americas, for instance, found that in recent decades the country’s more than 40 million immigrants collectively raised U.S. housing wealth by $3.7 trillion. Much of this was possible because immigrants moved into neighborhoods once in decline, helping to revitalize communities and make them more attractive to U.S.19 born residents.

households held more than $41 billion in housing wealth in Arizona or more than one out of every eight dollars concentrated in real estate that year. They also paid 15.3 percent of the money Arizonans spent on rent, despite making up 15.6 percent of the state’s households. Because Arizona’s immigrants are more likely to be working age, they help address another major concern of housing experts as well—that the large wave of baby boomers retiring in the coming years could result in more homes going up for sale than there are buyers to purchase them. In a state where seniors already own 35.6 percent of homes, immigrant families made up more than one in six new homebuyers from 2010 to 2014.

In Arizona, immigrants are actively strengthening the state’s housing market. In 2014, immigrant-led

212,392

Immigrants are bolstering the housing market by buying the wave of homes coming on the market as the baby boomers retire. 36%

Number of immigrant homeowners in 2014

$41.4 B

Amount of housing wealth held by immigrant households

Share of homeowners who are already elderly.

12% OF TOTAL

$136.4 M 16%

Amount paid by immigrant-led households in rent

Share of homebuyers in the last four years who were foreign-born.

15% OF TOTAL

16

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

384

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Visa Demand

Visa Demand

O

ne key measure of the demand for immigrant workers involves the number of visas requested by employers in a given state. Before an employer can formally apply for many types of visas, however, it must first obtain “certification” from the Department of Labor—essentially a go-ahead from the DOL that the employer can apply for a visa to fill a given job or role. For the H-1B visa, which is used to sponsor high-skilled workers, an employer gains certification by filing what’s known as a Labor Condition Application, or LCA. In the LCA the employer must detail H-1B

GREEN CARD

Number of positions:

Number of positions:

13,382

Top jobs:

Computer Systems Analysts

Software Developers, Applications

Software Developers, Applications

CERTIFIED POSITIONS BY VISA TYPE, 2014

831

Top jobs:

Computer Programmers

the position the foreign national would fill, the salary he would be paid, and the geographic location of the job. Firms must also attest that hiring an immigrant will not adversely impact similarly situated American workers. For two other large work visa categories—the H-2A for agricultural laborers and the H-2B for seasonal or temporary needs—employers file what is known as a Labor Certification application, or a “labor cert” for short. To get a labor cert approved, the employer must demonstrate that it is unable to locate an American worker that is available, willing, and able to fill the job.

H-1B: 13,382

GREEN CARD: 831

H-2A: 3,751

H-2B: 1,959

* This includes only employment-based green cards

Electronic Engineers, Except Computer Computer Systems Analysts

IF ALL APPROVED LCAS HAD TURNED INTO VISAS… 13,382 LCAs for H-1B workers could have created 24,489 jobs.

H-2A

H-2B

Number of positions:

Number of positions:

3,751

1,959

Lettuce

Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers

Top crops or jobs: Livestock Melons

13,382

24,489

Top jobs:

Amusement and Recreation Attendants

Approved LCAs

Helpers, Construction Trades, All Other

Potential jobs created by 2020

17

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

385

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Visa Demand

CITIES ARE DEMANDING VISAS ALL OVER THE STATE

2 1 3

H-2A

H-2B

H-1B

Top cities:

Top cities:

Top cities:

3 1

3, 2 2

1 Yuma

1 Phoenix

1 Phoenix

2 Casa Grande

2 Laveen

2 Chandler

3 Somerton

3 Chandler

3 Tempe

In fiscal year 2014, Arizona employers received DOL certification for almost 20,000 positions, including jobs across a wide variety of occupations and geographies within the state. They included more than 13,000 positions for potential workers on H-1B visas, as well as roughly 3,800 for H-2A workers. Federal officials also issued more than 2,000 certifications for H-2B visas, which are frequently used to staff places like hotels, fisheries, and stables during the high season. Given that it is expensive and cumbersome for employers to obtain labor certs—and similarly daunting to formally apply for an H-1B visa—the large interest in all these visa categories indicates Arizona employers likely were having real trouble finding the workers they needed on U.S. soil.

created for U.S.-born workers in the seven years that 21 follow. The fact that H-1B visa holders actually create— not take away—jobs from Americans has also been widely supported in the literature. A 2013 paper written by professors at Harvard University looking at the 1995 to 2008 period found that 1 additional young, highskilled immigrant worker hired by a firm created 3.1 jobs for U.S.-born workers at that same company during the 22 period studied. Other academics have tied each H-1B 23 visa award or labor request with the creation of four or 24 five American jobs in the immediate years that follow. In this brief, we rely on a more conservative estimate of the impact of the H-1B program on the American workforce. Specifically, we use the estimate that every 1 additional H-1B visa awarded to a state was associated with the creation of 1.83 more jobs for U.S.-born workers 25 there in the following seven years. On the previous page, we show the number of jobs that would have been created for U.S.-born workers in Arizona by 2020 if all the fiscal year 2014 LCAs for H-1Bs had turned into actual visas.

Applying for certification, however, is not the same as receiving a visa. The H-1B program is currently capped at 85,000 visas a year for private sector employers. In the country as a whole, this resulted in almost half of all such applications being rejected in fiscal year 2014 alone. The H-2B program is similarly limited to just 66,000 visas per year. Even permanent immigrants get ensnared in the limitations of our outdated immigration system. Only seven percent of all green cards can go to nationals of any one country in a given year—resulting in backlogs lasting years for many Indian, Chinese, Mexican, and 20 Filipino workers.

We also show how the large number of H-1B visas denied to Phoenix metropolitan area in 2007 and 2008 cost U.S.-born tech workers there in the two years that followed. PHOENIX METRO AREA

When companies are denied the visas they need, company expansion is commonly slowed—often at a real and meaningful cost to the U.S.-born population. One study by the Partnership for a New American Economy and the American Enterprise Institute estimated that when a state receives 100 H-2B visas, 464 jobs are

1,140 denials for H-1B workers in computer related fields cost U.S.born computer-related workers in Phoenix’s metro area as many as

1,921

potential new jobs and $14.6M in aggregate wage growth in the two years that followed.

18

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

386

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Naturalization

Naturalization

A

26

rizona’s immigrants are not only living in the state, they are also laying down roots in the state as well. Our analysis found that 39.7 percent of immigrants in Arizona, or well over one in three of them, have already become naturalized citizens. Although that figure is lower than the naturalization rate for immigrants in the county as a whole, it still means that almost 366,000 immigrants in the state have taken that important step.

education at greater rates than non-citizens. Because citizenship allows immigrants to pursue a greater range of positions, including public and private sector jobs requiring a security clearance, it also has been found to raise a person’s annual wages. One study by researchers at the University of Southern California pegged the size 27 of that wage increase at 8 to 11 percent. If the average non-citizen in Arizona saw a wage boost at the low end of that range, or 8 percent, they would earn almost $2,200 more per year —  money that could be reinvested in the state’s economy through their spending at local businesses. Multiplied by the roughly 290,000 noncitizens in Arizona currently eligible to naturalize, such policy initiatives could collectively boost wages in the state by almost $630 million.

Like almost all parts of the country Arizona is also home to a population of immigrants who are eligible to naturalize, but haven’t yet done so. Embracing public policies that would help those individuals navigate the naturalization process could have an important economic impact on the state. Studies have found that immigrants who become citizens seek out higher

289,676

NATURALIZATION RATES IN ARIZONA

Number of non-citizens eligible to naturalize in 2014

52%

40%

Share of non-citizen population eligible to naturalize.

Share of immigrants in Arizona who are citizens.

The average non-citizen in Arizona earns $27,168 per year. If they naturalized, they each could earn an average of $2,173 more per year.

$629.6 M

47%

Aggregate additional earnings if eligible non-citizens naturalized.

Share of immigrants in the U.S. as a whole who are citizens.

19

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

387

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

International Students

International Students

P

International students in the United States contributed $30.5 B to the U.S. economy in the 2014-2015 school year and supported more than 370,000 jobs.

olicymakers are increasingly realizing that international students provide huge benefits to the communities where they live and study. The World Bank has found that an increase in the number of international graduate students studying at American schools leads to large boosts in the number of patents awarded to local research universities in the years 28 that follow. Through their tuition payments and dayto-day spending, international students in the broader United States also contributed more than $30.5 billion to the U.S. economy in the 2014-2015 school year and supported more than 370,000 jobs.29 In Arizona, the roughly 16,000 international college students studying on temporary visas make up just 4.1 percent of all college students in the state. Still, their economic contribution is enormous. They support more than 6,700 jobs in the state, including positions in transportation, health insurance, and retail.

International students represent a very small portion of all students in Arizona, but they make a big impactâ&#x20AC;Ś

4%

International students make up only 4% of all students in Arizona.

$479.1 M 6,726 Economic contribution of international students to the state, 2015.

Jobs supported by international students, 2015.

20

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

388

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Voting Power

Voting Power

I

mmigrants in Arizona do not only make a difference to the state’s economy, they also play a role at the voting booth. In 2014, Arizona was home to roughly 352,000 foreign-born residents who were eligible to vote, including an estimated 209,000 foreign-born residents who had formally registered. Although few would call Arizona a swing state today, the sheer size of the state’s immigrant voting bloc means it has the potential to powerfully impact which way the state votes in national and state elections. In 2012, for instance, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney won Arizona almost by 208,000 votes — a smaller vote tally than the current number of eligible immigrant voters in the state.

The power of immigrant voters in Arizona is also poised to continue growing rapidly. Based on voting participation patterns in recent years, we would expect roughly 163,000 foreign-born voters to cast formal ballots in the presidential election this year. An additional 61,000 more immigrants will either naturalize or turn 18 by 2020, expanding the pool of eligible new American voters in Arizona to almost 385,000 people. If this group comes out to vote at similar rates to eligible voters in the state overall, Arizona could easily become competitive in upcoming elections. THE GROWING POWER OF THE IMMIGRANT VOTE

2016

351,859

18,416

Immigrants who will become eligible to vote through naturalization

993

Number of immigrants eligible to vote.

Immigrants who will become eligible to vote by turning 18

2020

55,247 5,805

8%

Share of eligible voters who are immigrants.

PROJECTED POOL OF ELIGIBLE IMMIGRANT VOTERS, 2014-2020

208,882

208,422 Margin of victory in the 2012 presidential election

Number of immigrants registered to vote.

351,859

362,499

384,994

2014

2016

2020

208,422

Margin of victory in the 2012 presidential election.

21

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

389

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Undocumented Population

Undocumented Population

T

he United States is currently home to an estimated 11.4 million undocumented immigrants, the vast majority of whom have lived in the United States for more than five years. The presence of so many undocumented immigrants in our country for so long a time presents many legal and political challenges that are beyond the scope of this report. But while politicians continue to debate what to do about illegal immigration without any resolution, millions of undocumented immigrants are actively working across the country, and collectively, these immigrants have a large impact on the U.S. economy. One recent study found that 86.6 percent of undocumented males in the country were employed in 2012 and 2013, suggesting that most immigrants who come here illegally do so because of work opportunities.30 And because employers are required by

law to gather Social Security numbers for all their hires, many undocumented individuals are paying into our tax system as wellâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;often under falsified or incorrect Social Security numbers.31 These undocumented immigrants generally lack access to federal aid programs such as Medicaid, food stamps, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, so they also draw down far less from these programs than their native-born counterparts.32 Of course, there are many compelling reasons that having a large undocumented population is a problem for a society. It undermines law and order, permits a shadow economy that is far harder to regulate, and is simply unfair to the millions of people who have come here legally. But as the undocumented immigration problem has gone largely unaddressed for the past 30 years, undocumented workers in the country have

284,378

UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE WORKING-AGED THAN NATIVES OR OTHER IMMIGRANTS Share of population ages 25-64, 2014

Estimated number of undocumented immigrants in Arizona.

Undocumented immigrants 80%

4%

All immigrants

Share of Arizona's population made up of undocumented immigrants.

71%

Native-born 47%

22

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

390

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Undocumented Population

24,656

THE ARIZONA INDUSTRIES WHERE UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS MAKE UP THE LARGEST SHARE OF THE WORKFORCE, 2014

Estimated number of undocumented entrepreneurs in Arizona.

11%

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Agriculture

Share of workforce that is undocumented

27% 6,199 undocumented workers

Total number of workers

Administrative, support, waste management services

Rate of entrepreneurship among undocumented population (ages 25-64).

19% 25,767 undocumented workers

Construction

$464.2 M

17% 29,060 undocumented workers

Accommodation and food

Total business income of self-employed entrepreneurs.

15% 20,845 undocumented workers

8.8%

11% 12,175 undocumented workers

Other services

Wholesale trade 8% 4,987undocumented workers

Share of all working-age entrepreneurs in Arizona who are undocumented immigrants.

Retail trade 5% 13,255 undocumented workers

begun to play an increasingly integral role in many U.S. industries. In some sectors, such as agriculture, undocumented immigrants account for 50 percent of all hired crop workers, making them a critical reason why the industry is able to thrive on U.S. soil.33 Many studies have also indicated that these undocumented workers are not displacing the U.S.-born, but rather, taking jobs few Americans are interested in pursuing. Economists have found that low-skilled immigrants, the group that most undocumented immigrants fall into, tend to pursue different jobs than less-skilled natives. While U.S.-born workers without a high school degree are often overrepresented in forward-facing roles like

cashiers, receptionists, and coffee shop attendants, many less-skilled immigrants pursue more laborintensive work requiring less human interaction, filling jobs as meat processors, sewing machine operators, or nail salon workers.34 This phenomenon exists within industries as well. In construction, for instance, lessskilled immigrants often work as painters and drywall installers, allowing natives to move into higher paying positions requiring more training, such as electricians, contractors, and plumbers.35 The challenge of undocumented immigration is particularly evident in Arizona, which is home to one of 23

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

391

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Undocumented Population

the larger undocumented populations in the country. But just as with the nation as a whole, as these immigrants spend years and decades in America, they get further integrated into our economy. In Arizona, there is evidence that undocumented immigrants are playing an important role in the workforce. In this section, we estimate the size and the characteristics of the undocumented population in Arizona by conducting a close analysis of the American Community Survey from the U.S. Census. This work uses a series of variables to identify immigrants in the survey who are likely to lack legal status—a method that has recently emerged in the academic literature on immigration.36 (See the Methodology Appendix for more details.)

an estimated $464.2 million in business income that year.

In 2014, we estimate that Arizona households led by undocumented immigrants earned almost $3.5 B in income. The larger political debate around the economic cost or benefits of undocumented immigration tends to focus on the expense of educating immigrant children or the healthcare costs associated with increased use of emergency rooms and other services. These costs are real and can be substantial, but taken alone they paint an incomplete picture of the impact of undocumented immigration. This is because the debate infrequently recognizes that since most undocumented immigrants are working, they make large federal and state tax contributions and frequently are net contributors to many of our most important—and most imperiled— benefits programs. Social Security’s Chief Actuary, for example, has credited unauthorized immigrants with contributing $100 billion more to Social Security than they drew down in benefits during the last decade.37 Several in-depth studies at the state level have similarly come to the conclusion that undocumented immigrants represent a net benefit to the states in which they live. One paper, from researchers at Arizona State University, estimated that undocumented immigrants in that state pay $2.4 billion in taxes each year—a figure far eclipsing the $1.4 billion spent on the law enforcement, education, and healthcare resources they use.38 Another study estimated that, on a per capita basis, Florida’s undocumented immigrants pay $1,500 more in taxes than they draw down in public benefits each year.39

Using this technique, we estimate that Arizona is home to more than 284,000 undocumented immigrants. These individuals are far more likely than the nativeborn population—or even the broader foreign-born one—to be in the prime of their working years, or ranging in age from 25-64. They also contribute to a range of industries that could not thrive without a pool of workers willing to take on highly labor-intensive roles. In 2014, for instance, undocumented immigrants made up 18.5 percent of all employees in Arizona’s administrative, support, and waste management services industry, a sector that includes grounds maintenance workers, janitors and building cleaners, and security guards. They also made up more than one in four workers employed in the agriculture sector, as well as 8.3 percent of workers in the wholesale trade industry. Large numbers of undocumented immigrants in Arizona have also managed to overcome licensing and financing obstacles to start small businesses. In 2014, an estimated 10.9 percent of the state’s working-age undocumented immigrants were self-employed— meaning Arizona was one of about two dozen states where unauthorized immigrants boasted higher rates of entrepreneurship than either legal permanent residents or immigrant citizens of the same age group. Almost 25,000 undocumented immigrants in Arizona were self-employed in 2014, many providing jobs and economic opportunities to others in their community. Undocumented entrepreneurs in the state also earned

Although we are currently unable to calculate the amount spent on any public benefits or services used by undocumented immigrant families, we can gain a fairly clear sense of the amount they are paying in taxes each year. A variety of studies have estimated that anywhere from 50 to 80 percent of households led by undocumented immigrants file federal income taxes annually.40 Federal government officials have also 24

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

392

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Undocumented Population

In 2014, undocumented immigrants in Arizona earned $3.5 B. $162.2 M — went to state and local taxes … $226.6 M — went to federal taxes …

Leaving them with $3.1 B in spending power.

ENTITLEMENT CONTRIBUTIONS

Undocumented immigrants also contribute to our country’s entitlement programs. In 2014, through taxes on their individual wages, immigrants contributed $66.6 M to Medicare and $273.9 M to Social Security.

$66.6 M $273.9 M

Medicare

Social Security 25

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

393

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Undocumented Population

estimated that 75 percent of undocumented workers have taxes withheld from their paychecks.41 In this paper, we make the assumption that 50 percent of the country’s undocumented households paid income taxes in 2014. Although many experts would call this share highly conservative, it has been modeled in several academic papers, and also by think tanks that specialize exclusively in the study of U.S. tax policy.42

and local governments. But because legalization is expected to raise the earning power of undocumented immigrants and give them access to a wider array of jobs and educational opportunities, it would have the opposite effect as well, potentially allowing them to spend more as consumers and pay more in taxes each year.43 Provisions within immigration reform requiring that undocumented immigrants pay any back taxes before normalizing their status would temporarily boost U.S. tax revenues still further.

In 2014, we estimate that Arizona households led by undocumented immigrants earned almost $3.5 billion in income. Of that, they paid an estimated $226.6 million in federal taxes. They also contributed more than $273.9 million directly to the Social Security program through taxes on their individual wages. Arizona’s undocumented immigrants also made an important impact through their state and local tax contributions— money that many localities use to pay for police forces, public education, and city services like garbage collection and recycling. We estimate that Arizona’s undocumented immigrants paid almost $162.2 million in state and local taxes in 2014.

But while the debate over legalization continues without resolution, the data suggests that the undocumented immigrants in Arizona have largely assimilated into the United States, making it less likely that mass deportation will ever be a realistic option. We estimate that 85.6 percent of the state’s undocumented population has been in the United States for five or more years. More than 54.6 percent speak English well, very well, or fluently. Studies show that when immigrants with limited English proficiency learn the language, they see a substantial wage benefit and become less isolated in their communities.44 The labor market outcomes and educational levels of their children increase with time as well.45

Giving legal status to undocumented immigrants would increase their access to a variety of public benefits— resulting in potentially higher costs for federal, state,

MEASURES OF ASSIMILATION AMONG ARIZONA'S UNDOCUMENTED POPULATION, 2014

Time in the United States

English Proficiency (population ages 5+)

21%

86%

8%

29%

24% 18%

Share of undocumented immigrants who have been in the U.S. for five years or more.

Speaks only English

Speaks English well

Speaks English very well

Does not speak English well Does not speak any English

26

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

394

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Spotlight On: Carla Chavarria

SPOTLIGHT ON

Carla Chavarria YCM Marketing, Founder

I

n high school, Carla Chavarria never thought of herself as different from her classmates. She was a point guard on the basketball team and was an active member of the graphic design club. “I knew I was undocumented,” she says, “but I didn’t really know what it meant.”

advocacy. Self Us Now works with political campaigns and nonprofit advocacy groups, while YCM Marketing continues to help a variety of local businesses attract new customers, including law firms, real estate agents, and restaurants. Chavarria applied for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in 2012, when it was first created, and is now safe from deportation as long as the program continues—and as long as she applies for a renewal of her status every 2 years. In the meantime, she is focusing on expanding her business and creating more jobs and opportunities for others in her state. She also hopes to go back to school to study business or design.

It was only when she tried applying for college financial aid that she realized the severe limitations of not having a Social Security number. Chavarria enrolled at a local community college, but without the documentation necessary to apply for scholarships, she couldn’t afford to take many classes. Without a Social Security number, she couldn’t get a job either. So she focused on art and activism, and got involved with the Arizona DREAM Act Coalition, a group of students that advocates for undocumented students who have college ambitions. This advocacy work inspired her to start her own business, doing graphic design and digital marketing for advocacy groups. She started her business, YCM Marketing, in 2012, and by 2015, she had brought in two business partners. “We were referring clients to each other constantly,” Chavarria says, so joining up “just made sense.” Now, when things get busy, YCM Marketing employs up to eight people on a contract basis. Her staff is a mix of citizens and folks in limbo like herself. Just a couple of months ago, she opened a second company, Self Us Now, to focus on political work, so that YCM Marketing can go after bigger contracts with corporate clients who might be uncomfortable with her

But though DACA has given her more stability, it still doesn’t allow her to apply for student loans to help finance her education. That’s something only citizenship would provide. Which is why Chavarria wants immigration reform to provide a clear path to citizenship for people in her position. Only full security would enable her to attain the level of education—and, through her business, make the tremendous economic contributions—that she’s capable of. “As an entrepreneur, we’re always looking for the next thing,” she says. “Hopefully, in five or 10 years, I will be able to walk away from this business and have it be standing on its own.” But it’ll be hard for her to keep expanding her business in her current uncertain situation. For example, she has a client in Mexico who’d like her to make a site visit—but she’s nervous about traveling outside the country while she’s still technically undocumented. People like her, she says, need “a clear path” to citizenship to start planning fully for the future.

27

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

395

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Methodology

Methodology The vast majority of data that appears in this brief was calculated by the Partnership for a New American Economy research team, using a variety of publicly available data sources. Our work relied most heavily on the 2014 American Community Survey (ACS) 1-year sample using the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) database.1 Unless otherwise noted this data is weighted using the person weight for analysis at the individual level, and is weighted using the household weight for analysis at the household level.

500 employees or more. As a result, the final number of employees at immigrant-owned companies in this report is a conservative estimate, and is likely lower than the true value. Fortune magazine ranks U.S. companies by revenue and publishes a list of top 500 companies and their annual revenue as well as their employment level each year. To produce our estimates, we use the 2015 Fortune 500 list.3 Our estimates in this section build on past work done by PNAE examining each of the Fortune 500 firms in the country in 2011, and determining who founded them.4 We then use publicly available data, including historical U.S. Census records and information obtained directly by the firms, to determine the background of each founder. In the rare cases where we could not determine a founder’s background, we assumed that the individual was U.S.-born to be conservative in our estimates. Some firms created through the merger of a large number of smaller companies or public entities were also excluded from our analysis. These included all companies in the utilities sector and several in insurance.

Demographics The data points on the foreign-born population in the demographics section are calculated using both the 2010 and 2014 ACS 1-year sample.

Entrepreneurship The data on self-employed immigrants and the business income generated by immigrant entrepreneurs come from the 2014 ACS 1-year sample. We define immigrants as foreign-born individuals (excluding those that are children of U.S. citizens or born on U.S. territories).

To produce the Fortune 500 estimates for each state, we allocate firms to the states where their current headquarters are located. We then aggregate and report the annual revenue and employment of the firms in each state that we identify as “New American” Fortune 500 companies. These are firms with at least one founder who was an immigrant or the child of immigrants.

The number of employees at immigrant-owned firms is estimated by using the 2007 Survey of Business Owners (SBO) Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS),2 which is the most recent microdata on business owners currently available. The estimates are weighted using the tabulation weights provided in the dataset. We define immigrant-owned businesses as firms with at least one foreign-born owner. For confidentiality, the data exclude businesses classified as publicly owned firms because they can be easily identified in many states. Based on our own analysis, we believe that many of the publicly owned firms excluded from this data are companies with

Income and Tax Contributions Using the 2014 ACS 1-year data, we estimate the aggregate household income, tax contributions, and spending power of foreign-born households.

28

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

396

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Methodology

To produce these estimates, a foreign-born household is defined as a household with a foreign-born household head. Immigrant sub-groups are defined as follows: 1) Asian immigrants refer to the foreign-born persons who self identify as Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Filipino, Asian Indian, Korean, Native Hawaiian, Vietnamese, Bhutanese, Mongolian, Nepalese, Cambodian, Hmong, Laotian, Thai, Bangladeshi, Burmese, Indonesian, Malaysian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, Samoan, Tongan, Guamanian/Chamorro, Fijian, or other Pacific Islanders; 2) Hispanic immigrants include those foreign-born persons who report their ethnicity as Hispanic; 3) Immigrants grouped under Sub-Saharan Africa originate from African countries, excluding the North African countries of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco ; 4) Middle Eastern and North African immigrants are foreign-born persons from North Africa as well as the following Middle Eastern countries: Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arab, Syria, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

program is capped at $117,000, while there no such limit for the Medicare program.9 We use a flat tax rate of 12.4 percent to estimate Social Security contributions and 2.9 percent for to capture Medicare contributions. This estimates the total amount that immigrants and their employers contributed in 2014.10 It is also worth noting that half of the amount contributed to Social Security and Medicare (6.4 percent of Social Security tax rate and 1.45 percent of Medicare tax rate) comes from individual workers, while the other half comes directly from their employers. Self-employed workers have to pay the full tax themselves. When estimating Social Security and Medicare contributions, we include all individual wage earners in the households and aggregate the amount paid by state.

Workforce We use the 2014 ACS 1-year sample to estimate all data points in the workforce segment of the report. We define the working age population as those 25 to 64 years old. When estimating how much more foreign-born persons are likely to be employed than native-born persons, however, we calculate the percentage of native-born and foreign-born residents of all ages who were employed in 2014. The reason why we choose a more inclusive population for that estimate is because we want to make the point that the increased likelihood of being working aged that we see among immigrants leads to higher employment in the vast majority of states.

In this brief, mirroring past PNAE reports on this topic, we use the term “spending power.”5 Here and elsewhere we define spending power as the disposable income leftover after subtracting federal, state, and local taxes from household income. We estimate state and local taxes using the tax rates estimates produced by Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy by state income quintiles.6 For federal tax rate estimates, we use data released by the Congressional Budget Office in 2014 and calculate the federal tax based on the household income federal tax bracket.7

Because the employment status of people who are 16 years old or younger is not available in the ACS, we assume that these young people are not employed. The employed population also does not include those in the Armed Forces.

Social Security and Medicare contributions are drawn from taxes on an individual’s wage earnings.8 This is far different from a household’s overall income, which may include other revenue streams such as rental income and returns on investments. To account for this difference between overall federal taxes and Social Security and Medicare contributions, we estimate Medicare and Social Security contributions based on wage and salary data provided at the individual level in the ACS. For self-employed individuals, we use the selfemployment income as the income base. The amount of earnings that can be taxed by the Social Security

To estimate how much more likely immigrants are to be employed than natives, we calculate the percent difference between the immigrant and native-born employment rates. Our estimates on the share of immigrants and natives of different education levels only take into consideration individuals aged 25 or older.

29

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

397

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Methodology

The North American Industry Classification System, or NAICS Industry code, is used to estimate the industries with the largest share of foreign-born workers. All individuals 16 years old and above are included in these calculations. The total number of workers for certain industries in some states is extremely small, thus skewing results. In order to avoid this, we calculate the percentile distribution of the total number of workers per industry per state and drop the industries in each state that fall below the lowest 25th percentile. Estimated occupations with the largest share of foreign-born workers per state also follow the same restrictions — the universe is restricted to workers age 16 and above, and the occupations per state that fall under the 25th percentile benchmark are not included. Our estimates on the number of manufacturing jobs created or preserved by immigrants rely on a 2013 report by the Partnership for a New American Economy and the Americas Society/Council of the Americas. That report used instrumental variable (IV) strategy in regression analysis and found that every 1,000 immigrants living in a county in 2010 created or preserved 46 manufacturing jobs there.11 We use that multiplier and apply it to the 2010 population data from the ACS to produce our estimates.

Agriculture We access the agriculture GDP by state from Bureau of Economic Analysis, which includes GDP contributions from the agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting industry.12 The share of foreign-born agricultural workers is estimated using 2014 ACS 1-year sample. Additional data on agriculture output, top three crops per state, and leading agricultural exports come from United State Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s state fact sheets.13 When displayed, data on sales receipts generated by the top fresh produce items in each state come the Farm and Wealth Statistics cash receipts by commodity tables available from the USDA’s Economic Research Service.14

percentage of crop farms producing fresh fruits and vegetables, and change in real wage of agricultural workers between 2002 and 2014. The QCEW data uses the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) to assign establishments to different industries. We identify the following farms as fresh fruits and vegetable farms: other vegetable and melon farming, orange groves, citrus, apple orchards, grape vineyards, strawberry farming, berry farming, fruit and tree nut combination farming, other non-citrus fruit farming, mushroom production, other food crops grown under cover, and sugar beet farming. The decline in the number of field and crop workers comes from the quarterly Farm Labor Survey (FLS) administered by USDA.15 Stephen Bronars, an economist with Edgeworth Economics, previously analyzed and produced these estimates for the PNAE report, “A Vanishing Breed: How the Decline in U.S. Farm Laborers Over the Last Decade has Hurt the U.S. Economy and Slowed Production on American Farms” published in 2015. Additional information on those calculations can be found in the methodology section of that paper.16 Finally, for a small number of states, we also produce estimates showing how growers in the state are losing market share for specific produce items consumed each year by Americans, such as avocados or strawberries. Those estimates originate in a 2014 report produced by PNAE and the Agriculture Coalition for Immigration Reform.17 The author used data from the USDA’s annual “yearbook” for fresh fruits and vegetables, among other sources, to produce those estimates. More detail can be found in the methodology of that report.

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math We use the STEM occupation list released by U.S. Census Bureau to determine the number and share of foreign-born STEM workers as well as the number of unemployed STEM workers from 2014 ACS 1-year data.18 Per U.S. Census classification, healthcare workers such as physicians and dentists are not counted as working in

The agriculture section uses the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wage (QCEW) to estimate the

30

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

398

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Methodology

the STEM occupations. All unemployed workers who list their previous job as a STEM occupation are counted as unemployed STEM workers.

Unemployed healthcare workers are individuals who report their previous job as a healthcare occupation, and their employment status as currently not working but looking for work. We took the number of job postings for healthcare workers from the Burning Glass Labor Insight tool, a database that scours online sources and identifies the number and types of job postings. We describe this resource in detail in the section on STEM methodology.

To capture the demand for STEM workers, we use the Labor Insight tool developed by Burning Glass Technologies, a leading labor market analytics firm. Burning Glass, which is used by policy researchers and academics, scours almost 40,000 online sources daily and compiles results on the number and types of jobs and skills being sought by U.S. employers. This search includes online job boards, individual employer sites, newspapers, and public agencies, among other sources. Burning Glass has an algorithm and artificial intelligence tool that identifies and eliminates duplicate listings — including ones posted to multiple job boards as part of a broad search.19

We then delve into specific occupations within the broader healthcare industry. To produce the figures on the total number of physicians and psychiatrists and the share born abroad, we use American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile data. To give a sense of the supply and demand of physicians and psychiatrists, we also calculate the physician and psychiatrist density in each state by dividing the total number of physicians or psychiatrists by the population estimates in 2015 for each state.24 As for the share of foreign-born nurses and home health aides, we use the 2014 ACS 5-year sample data because data from the 1-year sample is too small to make reliable estimates.

The data on STEM graduates are from the 2014 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) completion survey.20 A study by the Partnership for a New American Economy and the American Enterprise Institute found that every time a state gains 100 foreignborn STEM workers with graduate-level STEM training from a U.S. school, 262 more jobs are created for U.S.born workers there in the seven years that follow.21 We use this multiplier and the number of STEM advanced level graduates on temporary visas to estimate the number of jobs created for U.S.-born workers.

We estimate the shortage of psychiatrists, dentists, and occupational therapists using data from the various U.S. government offices. For example, the shortage of psychiatrists refers to the current lack of psychiatrists per the U.S. government’s official definition of a mental health shortage area (1/30,000 residents) in each county, aggregated within each state.25 The shortage of dentists is from an analysis by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,26 and the shortage of occupational workers is from a journal article published by PM&R, the official scientific journal of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.27 For psychiatrists, we project future shortages by accounting for individuals in these occupations as they reach the retirement age of 65.

The last part of the STEM section presents data on patents with at least one foreign-born inventor. The data is originally from a study by Partnership for a New American Economy in 2012, which relied on data from U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s database as well as LinkedIn, direct correspondence, and online profiles to determine the nativity of individual inventors.22

Healthcare We estimate the number of unemployed healthcare workers using the 2014 ACS 1-year sample. Healthcare workers are healthcare practitioners and technical occupations, or healthcare support occupations as defined by U.S. Census Bureau.23

Housing The data in the housing section comes from the 2014 ACS 1-year sample. Immigrant homeowners are defined as foreign-born householders who reported living in 31

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

399

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Methodology

their own home. We estimate the amount of housing wealth held by immigrant households by aggregating the total housing value of homes owned by immigrant–led households. We also estimate the amount of rent paid by immigrant-led households by aggregating the rent paid by such families. We then calculate the share of housing wealth and rent that immigrant households held or paid compared to the total population. For characteristics of homeowners, a foreign-born new homebuyer is defined as a household with a foreign-born household head who owned and moved to the current residence within the last five years.

In many of the state reports, we also present figures showing how visa denials resulting from the 2007 and 2008 H-1B lotteries cost the tech sectors of metropolitan areas both employment and wage growth in the two years that followed. The economists Giovanni Peri, Kevin Shih, and Chad Sparber produced these estimates for a PNAE report on the H-1B visa system that was released in 2014. That report relied on Labor Condition Application and I-129 data that the authors obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, as well as American Community Survey data from 2006 and 2011. The authors did regressions that examined the causal relationship between a “shock” in the supply of H-1B computer workers and computer employment in subsequent years for more than 200 metropolitan areas. More information on those estimates can be found in the methodology appendix of that report.30

Visa Demand The data on visa demand are drawn primarily from the 2014 Annual Report produced by the Office of Foreign Labor Certification within the U.S. Department of Labor.28 Our figures on the number of visa requests authorized for each state — as well as the occupations and cities those visas are tied to — originate directly from that report.

Naturalization Using the ACS 2014 1-year sample, non-citizens eligible to naturalize are defined as non-citizens who are 18 years or above, can speak English, and have continuous residence in the United States for at least five years.

In this section, we also present estimates on the number of jobs that would have been created if all the visas authorized in 2014 had resulted in actual visa awards. The multipliers we use to produce these estimates originate in a 2011 report released by PNAE and the American Enterprise Institute. That report, written by the economist Madeline Zavodny, used a reducedform model to examine the relationship between the share of each state’s population that was immigrant and the employment rate of U.S. natives. More detail on Zavodny’s calculations and the multipliers produced for each visa type can be found in the methodology appendix of that report.29

Researchers at the University of Southern California’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration published a report in 2012, “Citizen Gain: The Economic Benefits of Naturalization for Immigrants and the Economy,” which concluded that immigrants experience an 8 to 11 percent gain in their individual wages as a result of becoming naturalized. Because this earnings gain phases in over time — and we want to be conservative in our estimates — we model a wage increase of just 8 percent when discussing the possible gains that could accrue due to naturalization.31 We use this multiplier and the mean individual wages of non-citizens in each state to estimate the additional earnings that non-citizens would earn if they naturalized. Finally, we calculate the aggregate wage earnings boost by multiplying the total number of non-citizens who are eligible for naturalization by the average increase in wage income per person.

For purposes of these briefs, we use Zavodny’s finding that the award of 100 additional H-1B visas in a state is tied to 183 additional jobs for natives there in the 7 years that follow. The award of 100 additional H-2B visas creates 464 additional jobs for natives in the state during that same time period. We apply these multipliers to the number of visas in those categories authorized for each state in 2014.

32

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

400

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Methodology

International Students

naturalization, as well as the total number of foreignborn voters in these years. The estimates of newly eligible voters for 2016 include naturalized citizen ages 16 and 17 as of 2014 (thereby becoming of voting age by 2016). Those eligible to vote in 2020 include all naturalized citizens ages 12-17 in 2014. Applicable mortality rates are also applied.33 In addition, we estimate newly naturalized citizens using data from the Department of Homeland Security, which show the twoyear average of new naturalized citizens by state.34 We discount from these numbers the percentage of children below 18 in households with a naturalized householder by state. Estimates of total foreign-born voters include naturalized citizens aged 18 or older in 2014, discounted by average U.S. mortality rates by age brackets, summed to the pool of newly eligible foreign-born voters.

We obtain the size and share of postsecondary students who are international in each state from the 2014 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) fall enrollment data. Those figures are then applied to preexisting work previously done by NAFSA, an organization representing professionals employed in the international offices of colleges and universities across the United States. NAFSA has developed an economic value tool and methodology that estimates the total economic benefit and jobs created or supported by international students and their dependents in each state.32 The economic contributions include the costs of higher education along with living expenses minus U.S.-based financial support that international students receive.

Margin of victory in 2012 refers to President Barack Obama’s margin of victory over Republican candidate Mitt Romney in terms of popular vote. The margins are negative in states that Romney won in 2012.35

Because the enrollment data from IPEDS that we use in this brief is different from the underlying data used by NAFSA, our figures differ slightly from the NAFSA estimates of the economic contributions made by international students in the 2014-2015 school year.

Undocumented

Voting

Using data from the 2014 ACS, we applied the methodological approach outlined by Harvard University economist George Borjas36 to arrive at an estimate of the undocumented immigrant population in the overall United States and individual states. The foreign-born population is adjusted for misreporting in two ways. Foreign-born individuals who reported naturalization are reclassified as non-naturalized if the individual had resided in the United States for less than six years (as of 2014) or, if married to a U.S. citizen, for less than three years. We use the following criteria to code foreign-born individuals as legal U.S. residents:

The estimates for the number of registered and active voters who are foreign-born are calculated from the Voter Supplement in the Current Population Survey (CPS) for the years 2008, 2010, 2012, and 2014 using the IPUMS database. The sample in CPS includes civilian non-institutional persons only. Foreign-born individuals who stated having voted between 2008 and 2014 are termed active voters. Using data from the 2014 ACS 1-year sample, we estimate the number and share of foreign-born eligible voters. We define them as naturalized citizens aged 18 or older who live in housing units. Persons living in institutional group quarters such as correctional facilities or non- institutional group quarters such as residential treatment facilities for adults are excluded from the estimation. We also estimate the number of new foreign-born voters who will become eligible to vote in 2016 and 2020, either by turning 18 or through

• Arrived in the U.S. before 1980 • Citizens and children less than 18 year old reporting that at least one parent is native-born • Recipients of Social Security benefits, SSI, Medicaid, Medicare, Military insurance, or public assistance

33

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

401

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

EXCERPT

Methodology

• Households with at least one citizen that received SNAP • People in the armed forces and veterans • People attending college and graduate school • Refugees • Working in occupations requiring a license • Government employees, and people working in the public administration sector • Any of the above conditions applies to the householder’s spouse The remainder of the foreign-born population that do not meet this criteria is reclassified as undocumented. Estimates regarding the economic contribution of undocumented immigrants and the role they play in various industries, and tax contributions are made using the same methods used to capture this information for the broader immigrant population in the broader brief. When estimating the aggregate household income, spending power, and tax contributions, we are not able to make reliable estimates for undocumentedled households in Alaska, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and West Virginia due to the small sample size of undocumented-led households in ACS. Finally, the variables giving a sense of the undocumented population’s level of assimilation — including their English proficiency and time in the United States — are estimated by examining the traits of the undocumented population in the 1-year sample of the ACS.

34

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

402

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Endnotes

Endnotes 1

Vivek Wadhwa et al., “America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs: Part I,” SSRN Scholarly Paper, Social Science Research Network, 2007, http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=990152; Robert Fairlie, “Open For Business: How Immigrants Are Driving Small Business Creation In The United States,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2012, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/research/ open-for-business-how-immigrants-are-driving-smallbusiness-creation-in-the-united-states-2/.

2

3

8

Somini Sengupta, “Countries Seek Entrepreneurs From Silicon Valley,” The New York Times, 2013, http:// www.nytimes.com/2013/06/06/technology/wishing-youand-your-start-up-were-here.html?_r=0.

9

Craig Montuori, email message to author, June 23, 2016.

10 Jacob Vigdor, “Immigration and the Revival of American Cities,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2013, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/issues/american-cities/.

Arnobio Morelix et al., “The Kauffman Index 2015: Startup Activity | State Trends,” SSRN Scholarly Paper, Social Science Research Network, 2015, http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2614598.

11

Based on author’s analysis of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment projections, 2014-2024. Accessed May 19, 2016, available here: http://www.bls.gov/ emp/ep_table_107.htm.

David Dyssegaard Kallick, “Bringing Vitality to Main Street: How Immigrant Small Businesses Help Local Economies Grow,” New York: Fiscal Policy Institute and Americas Society/Council of the Americas, 2015, http://www.as-coa.org/articles/bringing-vitality-main-street-how-immigrant-small-businesses-help-local-economies-grow.

12 Madeline Zavodny, “Immigration and American Jobs,” The Partnership for a New American Economy and the American Enterprise Institute, 2011, http://www. renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pnae/img/ NAE_Im-AmerJobs.pdf.

4

Stuart Anderson, “Immigrants and Billion Dollar Startups,” NFAP Policy Brief March, 2016, http://nfap. com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Immigrants-and-Billion-Dollar-Startups.NFAP-Policy-Brief.March-2016.pdf.

13 “Employment Projections: 2014-24 Summary,” Bureau of Labor Statistics Economic News Release, last updated December 8, 2015. Available here: http://www.bls. gov/news.release/ecopro.nr0.htm.

5

Robert Fairlie, “Open For Business: How Immigrants Are Driving Small Business Creation In The United States”

14 Katherine Grace Carman, Christine Eibner, and Susan M. Paddock, “Trends in Health Insurance Enrollment, 2013-15,” Health Affairs, 2015, http://www.rand.org/ pubs/external_publications/EP50692.html.

6

This is the most recent year for which data on employment is available.

7

15 Sean P. Keehan et al., “Age Estimates in the National Health Accounts,” Health Care Financing Review 26, No. 2, 2004

Jon Avnet, “Fifty Years of Making History”, Avnet Incorporated, 2005, http://www.avnet.com/en-us/Documents/Avnet_50th_Book-s.pdf

35

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

403

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Endnotes

25 Madeline Zavodny, “Immigration and American Jobs,” The Partnership for a New American Economy and the American Enterprise Institute, 2011, http://www. renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pnae/img/ NAE_Im-AmerJobs.pdf.

16 The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, “The Future of the Nursing Workforce: National- and State-Level Projections, 2012-2025”, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014 17

EXCERPT

Patrick O’Brien, John Kruse, and Darlene Kruse, “Gauging the Farm Sector’s Sensitivity to Immigration Reform via Changes in Labor Costs and Availability -,” WAEES and the American Farm Bureau Federation, 2014, http://oppenheimer.mcgill.ca/Gauging-the-FarmSector-s.

These positive benefits have been documented despite well-known problems regarding the H-1B visa system. The safeguards to protect American workers have not been updated since 1998, opening the door to increased use of the visa by a small number of outsourcing firms. This has left many U.S. companies with no reliable avenue to bring in the top talent they need to grow. PNAE has long advocated for legislation that would reform the H-1B program, including the recently introduced Protect and Grow American Jobs Act. Read more here: http://www.renewoureconomy.org/ uncategorized/press-release-statement-of-partnership-for-a-new-american-economy-on-the-protectand-grow-america-jobs-act/.

18 Stephen Bronars and Angela Marek Zeitlin, “No Longer Home Grown: How Labor Shortages Are Increasing America’s Reliance on Imported Fresh Produce and Hampering U.S. Economic Growth,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2014, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/no-longerhome-grown.pdf.

26 Jacob L. Vigdor, From Immigrants to Americans: The Rise and Fall of Fitting In (Rowman & Littlefield, 2010);

19 Jacob Vigdor, “Immigration and the Revival of American Cities,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2013, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/issues/american-cities/.

Bernt Bratsberg, James F. Ragan, Jr., and Zafar M. Nasir, “The Effect of Naturalization on Wage Growth: A Panel Study of Young Male Immigrants,” Journal of Labor Economics 20, No. 3 (2002)

20 “Visa Bulletin for May 2016,” U.S. Department of State, last modified April 12, 2016.

27 Manuel Pastor and Justin Scoggins, “Citizen Gain: The Economic Benefits of Naturalization for Immigrants and the Economy,” 2012, http://www.immigrationresearch-info.org/report/university- southern-california/ citizen-gain- economic-benefits- naturalization-immigrants- and-e.

21 Madeline Zavodny, “Immigration and American Jobs,” The Partnership for a New American Economy and the American Enterprise Institute, 2011, http://www. renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pnae/img/ NAE_Im-AmerJobs.pdf. 22 Sari Pekkala Kerr, William R. Kerr, and William F. Lincoln. "Skilled Immigration and the Employment Structures of U.S. Firms." NBER Working Paper No. 19658, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, MA, 2013.  

28 Aaditya Mattoo, Gnanaraj Chellaraj, and Keith E. Maskus, “The Contribution of Skilled Immigration and International Graduate Students to U.S. Innovation”, The World Bank, 2005, http://documents.worldbank.org/ curated/en/2005/05/5800523/contribution-skilled-immigration-international-graduate-students-innovation.

23 Matthew J. Slaughter, “Job Clocks Backgrounder,” Hanover, NH, 2013, http://faculty.tuck.dartmouth.edu/ images/uploads/faculty/matthew-slaughter/jobs_clock. pdf.

29 NAFSA, “NAFSA International Student Economic Value Tool,” accessed May 17, 2016 30 George J. Borjas, “The Labor Supply of Undocumented Immigrants,” NBER Working Paper (National Bureau of Economic Research, 2016), https://ideas.repec.org/p/ nbr/nberwo/22102.html.

24 “NFAP Policy Brief: H-1B Visas by the Numbers,” National Foundation for American Policy, 2009, http:// www.nfap.com/pdf/1003h1b.pdf.

36

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

404

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

EXCERPT

Endnotes

39 Emily Eisenhauer et al., “Immigrants in Florida: Characteristics and Contributions,” Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy, Florida International University, 2007, https://risep.fiu.edu/research-publications/immigration/immigration-in-florida/2007/immigrants-in-florida-characteristics-and-contributions/ immigrants_spring_2007_reduced.pdf.

31 Lisa Christensen Gee, Matthew Gardener, and Meg Wiehe, “Undocumented Immigrants’ State & Local Tax Contributions,” The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, 2016, http://www.immigrationresearch-info.org/report/other/undocumented-immigrants%E2%80%99-state-local-tax-contributions. 32 Ryan Honeywell, “How Language Fits Into the Immigration Issue,” Governing, 2012, http://www.governing. com/topics/public-workforce/gov-how-language-fitsinto-the-immigration-issue.html.

40 Laura E. Hill and Hans P. Johnson, “Unauthorized Immigrants in California: Estimates for Counties,” Public Policy Institute of California, 2011, http://www.ppic.org/ main/publication.asp?i=986.

33 Thomas Hertz, Zahniser Steven, “USDA Economic Research Service - Immigration and the Rural Workforce,” United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, 2014, http://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/in-the-news/immigration-and-the-rural-workforce. aspx.

41 Eduardo Porter, “Illegal Immigrants Are Bolstering Social Security With Billions,” The New York Times, 2005, http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/05/business/illegal-immigrants-are-bolstering-social-security-with-billions.html. 42 Aaron Williams and Michael Cassidy, “Undocumented, But Not Untaxed,” The Commonwealth Institute, 2016, http://www.thecommonwealthinstitute.org/2016/01/08/ undocumented-but-not-untaxed/.

34 Maria E. Enchautegui, “Immigrant and Native Workers Compete for Different Low-Skilled Jobs,” Urban Institute, 2015, http://www.urban.org/urban-wire/ immigrant-and-native-workers-compete-different-lowskilled-jobs.

43 Sherrie A. Kossoudji and Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, “Coming out of the Shadows: Learning about Legal Status and Wages from the Legalized Population,” Journal of Labor Economics 20, No. 3, 2002;

35 Scott A. Wolla, “The Economics of Immigration: A Story of Substitutes and Complements,” Page One Economics Newsletter, 2014.

Raul Hinojosa-Ojeda, “Raising the Floor for American Workers: The Economic Benefits of Comprehensive Immigration Reform,” Immigration Research and Information, 2010, http://www.immigrationresearch-info.org/ report/immigration-policy-center/raising-floor-american-workers-economic-benefits-comprehensive-immi.

36 George J. Borjas, “The Labor Supply of Undocumented Immigrants,” NBER Working Paper (National Bureau of Economic Research, 2016), https://ideas.repec.org/p/ nbr/nberwo/22102.html. 37 Roy Germano, “Unauthorized Immigrants Paid $100 Billion Into Social Security Over Last Decade”, VICE News, 2014, https://news.vice.com/article/unauthorized-immigrants-paid-100-billion-into-social-security-over-last-decade.

44 Hoyt Bleakley and Aimee Chin, “Age at Arrival, English Proficiency, and Social Assimilation Among U.S. Immigrants,” American Economic Journal. Applied Economics 2, No. 1, 2010;

38 Judith Gans, “Immigrants in Arizona: Fiscal and Economic Impact”, Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, University of Arizona, 2007

45 Jill H. Wilson, “Investing in English Skills: The Limited English Proficient Workforce in U.S. Metropolitan Areas,” The Brookings Institution, 2014, http:// www.brookings.edu/research/reports2/2014/09/english-skills.

37

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

405

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

Endnotes: Methodology

Endnotes: Methodology 1

9

Steven Ruggles, Katie Genadek, Ronald Goeken, Josiah Grover, and Matthew Sobek. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 6.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2015.

Ibid.

10 Ibid. 11

Jacob Vigdor, “Immigration and the Revival of American Cities,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2013, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/issues/american-cities/.

2

U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Business Owner and Self-Employed Persons Data Sets. http://www.census. gov/programs-surveys/sbo/data/data-sets.html

3

“Fortune 500,” Fortune, 2015, http://fortune.com/fortune500/2015/.

12 Bureau of Economic Analysis, http://www.bea.gov/regional/index.htm

4

“The ‘New American’ Fortune 500,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2011, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/new-american-fortune-500-june-2011.pdf.

13 United States Department of Agriculture, “State Fact Sheets, Economic Research Service” 2016, http://www. ers.usda.gov/data-products/state-fact-sheets.aspx

5

“The Power of the Purse: The Contributions of Hispanics to America’s Spending Power and Tax Revenues in 2013,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2014, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/research/page/2/.

6

“Who Pays? A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All 50 States (5th edition),” Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, 2014, http://www.itep.org/ whopays/full_report.php.

7

“The Distribution of Household Income and Federal Taxes, 2011”, Congressional Budget Office, Washington, D.C., 2014, https://www.cbo.gov/publication/49440#title0.

8

14 United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Cash Receipts by Commodity, 2010-2015,” http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/farm-income-and-wealth-statistics/cash-receipts-by-commodity.aspx. 15 United State Department of Agriculture, “Farm Labor Survey”, https://www.nass.usda.gov/Surveys/Guide_to_ NASS_Surveys/Farm_Labor/ 16 Stephen Bronars, “A Vanishing Breed: How the Decline in U.S. Farm Laborers Over the Last Decade has Hurt the U.S. Economy and Slowed Production on American Farms,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2015, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/wp-content/ uploads/2015/08/PNAE_FarmLabor_August-3-3.pdf.

Office of Retirement and Disability Policy U. S. Social Security Administration, “OASDI and SSI Program Rates & Limits,” 2014, https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/ quickfacts/prog_highlights/RatesLimits2014.html.

38

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

406

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

17

|

EXCERPT

Endnotes: Methodology

26 National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, “National and State-Level Projections of Dentists and Dental Hygienists in the U.S., 2012-2025”, 2015, http://bhpr. hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/supplydemand/dentistry/ nationalstatelevelprojectionsdentists.pdf.

Stephen Bronars, “No Longer Home Grown: How Labor Shortages are Increasing America’s Reliance on Imported Fresh Produce and Slowing U.S. Economic Growth”, Partnership for a New American Economy, 2014, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/wp-content/ uploads/2014/03/no-longer-home-grown.pdf.

27 Vernon Lin, Xiaoming Zhang, and Pamela Dixon, “Occupational Therapy Workforce in the United States: Forecasting Nationwide Shortages,” PM & R: The Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation 7, No. 9, 2015: 946–54, doi:10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.02.012.

18 U.S. Census Bureau, “STEM, STEM-related, and NonSTEM Occupation Code List 2010,” 2010, https://www. census.gov/people/io/files/STEM-Census-2010-occcode-list.xls 19 “About Us,” Burning Glass, accessed July 1, 2016, available here: http://burning-glass.com/labor-insight/.

28 “2014 Annual Report,” Office of Foreign Labor Certification, Employment and Training Administration, United States Department of Labor, 2014, https://www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/pdf/oflc_annual_report_fy2014.pdf.

20 National Center for Education Statistics, “Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System,” http://nces. ed.gov/ipeds/

29 Madeline Zavodny, “Immigration and American Jobs,” The Partnership for a New American Economy and the American Enterprise Institute, 2011, http://www. renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pnae/img/ NAE_Im-AmerJobs.pdf.

21 Madeline Zavodny, “Immigration and American Jobs,” The Partnership for a New American Economy and the American Enterprise Institute, 2011, http://www. renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pnae/img/ NAE_Im-AmerJobs.pdf.

30 Giovanni Peri, Kevin Shih, Chad Sparber, and Angela Marek Zeitlin, “Closing Economic Windows: How H-1B Visa Denials Cost U.S.-Born Tech Workers Jobs and Wages During the Great Recession,” 2014, http://www. renewoureconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/ pnae_h1b.pdf.

22 “Patent Pending: How Immigrants Are Reinventing The American Economy,” Partnership for a New American Economy, 2012, http://www.renewoureconomy.org/research/patent-pending-how-immigrants-are-reinventing-the-american-economy-2/.

31 Manuel Pastor and Justin Scoggins, “Citizen Gain: The Economic Benefits of Naturalization for Immigrants and the Economy,” 2012, http://www.immigrationresearch-info.org/report/university- southern-california/ citizen-gain- economic-benefits- naturalization-immigrants- and-e.

23 U.S. Census Bureau. “2010 Occupation Code List,” https://www.census.gov/people/io/files/2010_OccCodeswithCrosswalkfrom2002-2011nov04.xls 24 U.S. Census Bureau, “Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015,” http://factfinder. census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview. xhtml?pid=PEP_2015_PEPANNRES&prodType=table

32 NAFSA, “International Student Economic Value Tool,” http://www.nafsa.org/Explore_International_Education/ Impact/Data_And_Statistics/NAFSA_International_Student_Economic_Value_Tool/#stateData

25 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, “Shortage Designation: Health Professional Shortage Areas and Medically Underserved Areas/Populations,” http://www.hrsa.gov/shortage/

39

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

407

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

EXCERPT

Endnotes: Methodology

33 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, “National Vital Statistics Reports, Deaths: Final Data for 2013”, 2016, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/ nvsr64/nvsr64_02.pdf 34 Department of Homeland Security, “Yearbook of Immigration Statistics: 2014 Naturalizations, Table 22 - Persons Naturalized by State or Territory of Residence: FY 2005 to 2014”, https://www.dhs.gov/yearbook-immigration-statistics-2014-naturalizations 35 Federal Election Commission. “Federal Elections 2012: Elections for the President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. Representatives”, 2013, http://www.fec.gov/ pubrec/fe2012/federalelections2012.pdf. 36 George J. Borjas, “The Labor Supply of Undocumented Immigrants,” NBER Working Paper (National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, 2016), https://ideas.repec. org/p/nbr/nberwo/22102.html.

40

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

408

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ABOUT

New American Economy The Partnership for a New American Economy brings together more than 500 Republican, Democratic and Independent mayors and business leaders who support sensible immigration reforms that will help create jobs for Americans today. Visit www.renewoureconomy.org to learn more.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

409

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

CONFIDENTIAL – NOT FOR PUBLIC DISTRIBUTION New Americans in New Orleans

New Americans in Phoenix A Snapshot of the Demographic and Economic Contributions of Immigrants in the City1

POPULATION GROWTH

Between 2010 and 2014, the foreign-born population grew by

The share of the total population that was foreign-born in the city increased slightly, from 19.9% to 20%.

18,288

20+80R 20+80R

people.

19.9%

6.4%

Immigrant population growth: 287,183 → 305,471 5.5% Population growth: 1,445,622 → 1,525,146

Share of immigrants in Phoenix, 2010

2010

A Z

2 0 1 7

Share of immigrants in Phoenix, 2014

As a result of the new immigrants who came between 2000 and 2014

2014

Growth in the foreign-born population accounted for 23% of overall population growth for Phoenix during this period.

DATO S

20%

13,494

U.S.-born residents were attracted to the city.2

410

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

SPENDING POWER AND TAX CONTRIBUTIONS

In 2014, given their income, foreign-born residents contributed greatly to federal, state, and local taxes, including property, income, sales, and excise taxes levied by either the State of Arizona or by municipal governments. $534.7 M — State and local tax contributions3 $1B — Federal tax contributions4 $4.9 B — Spending power This constituted 18.5% of the city’s total spending power.5 Hispanic Immigrant Contribution

Foreign-born residents also supported federal social programs in 2014.

Asian Immigrant Contribution

Immigrants in Phoenix contributed $698.6M to Social Security and $177.4M to Medicare.

50.9%

23.4% Immigrant Spending Power $4.9B

2

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

411

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

HOUSING WEALTH

$3.2B

Between 2000 and 2014, immigration to Phoenix increased the total housing value in the city by $3.2B. Looking just at the period after the Great Recession, 2010 to 2014, immigrants raised the total housing value in the city by $1.2B.6

47+53 13+87 53+47 12+88 HOME OWNERSHIP

DEBT

46.6%

13%

53.1%

12.7%

of foreign-born residents were homeowners.

of U.S.-born residents were homeowners.

of foreign-born residents owned their homes debt-free.

of U.S.-born residents owned their homes debt-free.

52.3% of foreign-born residents contributed to the rental property market, compared with just 45.8% of U.S.-born residents. 3

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

412

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

22,304

Foreign-born residents are more likely than U.S.-born residents to start new businesses.

immigrants in Phoenix are self-employed. Their businesses generated...

$390M

in business income in 2014.

32.5%

9%

of the self-employed population is foreign -born, much more than their share of the population of 20%.

13.2%

In 2014, 9% of U.S. -born residents in Phoenix were self-employed.

Meanwhile, 13.2% of foreign-born residents were self-employed.

Number of Businesses Owned, 2012

Sales Revenue, 2012

Number of Paid Employees, 20127

Hispanic Residents in Phoenix

26,348

$2.7B

16,230

Asian Residents in Phoenix

5,954

$1.9B

11,724 4

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

413

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

ENTREPRENEURSHIP CONT.

Share of entrepreneurs in different industries who were foreign-born: General Services8 - 26.9% Professional Services9 - 24.4% Construction10 - 23.1% Other - 25.6%

In 2015, half of the Fortune 500 companies in Phoenix were founded by immigrants or their children.

5

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

414

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

LABOR FORCE

20+80P 25+75P 20%

24.8%

In fact, immigrants are overrepresented in key industries in Phoenix, including: Immigrants made up only 20% of the population in Phoenix…

Immigrant Share of Population - 20% Construction 44% General Services11 39.2%

But they made up 24.8% of the area’s employed labor force in 2014.

Manufacturing 31.3% Professional Services12 30.3% Recreation & Accommodation 27.7%

Because of the role immigrants play in the workforce helping companies keep jobs on U.S. soil, we estimate that the 305,471 immigrants living in Phoenix in 2014 helped create or preserve

14,052

local manufacturing jobs that would have vanished or moved elsewhere.13

6

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

415

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

EDUCATION AND LONG-TERM ECONOMIC IMPACTS

In 2014, 13% of immigrants in Phoenix held at least a bachelor’s degree, and 5.1% held an advanced degree.

506

181

Number of students with temporary resident visas in the area enrolled in higher education during the fall of 2014.14

Local jobs they supported.

$13.4M Spending contribution that academic year.15

7

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

416

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

LANGUAGE

Share of residents living in Phoenix who spoke a language other than English at home in 2014: ADULTS

YOUTH UNDER 18

41+59F 85+15F

36+64F 55+45F

40.5% Share of Youth 85.4% of them were citizens

35.7% Share of Adults 55.0% of them were citizens

NATURALIZATION

90,736

30+70Q

Number of foreign-born residents who had naturalized as of 2014.

29.7%

Share of foreign-born residents who had naturalized as of 2014

Among the residents who were not citizens, 26.1%, or 56,025, were eligible for naturalization. 8

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

417

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

MIGRATION

In 2014, a vast majority, 95.7%, of the foreign-born had lived in Phoenix for more than a year. Top five countries of origin:

4.3% of foreign-born residents were recent arrivals to Phoenix...

62.2%

came from other U.S. states.... Other countries of origin 24.4%

33.7%

came from abroad... 1 2

And

4.1%

3 4

came from within Arizona.

16

5

Mexico India Philippines Vietnam Canada

65.2% 3.8% 2.9% 2.1% 1.6% 9

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

418

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

New Americans in Phoenix

Endnotes 1

Unless otherwise specified, data comes from one-year samples of the American Community Survey from 2010 and 2014, as well as the five-percent sample from 2000 census, and figures refer to the City of Phoenix.

11 These industries include personal services (e.g. laundry services, barber shops, and repair and maintenance), religious organizations, social services, and labor unions.

2

Vigdor, Jacob. 2013. “Immigration and the Revival of American Cities: From Preserving Manufacturing Jobs to Strengthening the Housing Market.” Partnership for a New American Economy.

12 These industries generally include professions that require a degree or a license such as legal services, accounting, scientific research, consulting services, etc.

3

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. 2015. “Who Pays? A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All Fifty States.”

4

U.S. Congressional Budget Office. 2014. “The Distribution of Household Income and Federal Taxes, 2011.”

5

Estimates are based on federal tax rates from the U.S. Congressional Budget Office, and state and local tax rates from the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

6

Vigdor, Jacob. 2013. “Immigration and the Revival of American Cities: From Preserving Manufacturing Jobs to Strengthening the Housing Market.” Partnership for a New American Economy.

7

The 2012 Survey of Business Owners, U.S. Census Bureau

8

These industries include personal services (e.g. laundry services, barber shops, and repair and maintenance), religious organizations, social services, and labor unions.

9

These industries generally include professions that require a degree or a license such as legal services, accounting, scientific research, consulting services, etc.

13 Vigdor, Jacob. 2013. “Immigration and the Revival of American Cities: From Preserving Manufacturing Jobs to Strengthening the Housing Market.” Partnership for a New American Economy. 14 Data on total student enrollment in the city is derived from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System maintained by the National Center for Education Statistics. 15 Economic data is derived from the International Student Economic Value Tool maintained by NAFSA, the association of international educators. 16 Number of observations is below 50.

Want more information about this region? See our report: The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

10 Number of observations is below 50.

10

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

419

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

420

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

PROFILE

THE ACCIDENTAL ENTREPRENEUR At 18, I tried joining the Marines, but I was rejected because I was undocumented, even though I had been pledging allegiance "to the flag" since I was in kindergarten.

Our success has been about innovation. How do we take the "old school" book and do it better by using the technology. I always work to achieve two things: efficiency and effectiveness. The efficiency is about getting our people out to the polls and the effectiveness is about making sure the message we deliver resonates and gets voters involved.

I went through a period just not knowing what I was going to do in life, but in 2011 I discovered there was a big need for Latino voter turnout and got involved with politics.

What we're trying to prove is that with investment and boots on the ground, by talking to people in their own language about real issues and by informing them Latino voters will show up. We've been successful in turning out more Latino voters in every campaign we've run.

We didn't have a formal group. We were just a lot of kids from the neighborhood who were trying to matter. We were seeing a lot of decisions being made that were not helping the Hispanic community.

Most people will target voters who have an established track record of voting. We've been able to win by going after voters who were often disenfranchised and showing them why their vote could make a difference in the election.

Through our efforts, we increased Latino voter turnout by 500 percent in Phoenix District 5 on the west side of the city and helped elect Daniel Valenzuela the first Latino to the Phoenix City Council. We called ourselves Team Awesome and even Time magazine wrote about our success in a February 2012 article.

One of our greatest achievements was helping Isela Blanc get elected the first woman legislator who was once undocumented. One of our biggest setbacks was when the Republican Party falsely accused us of working to increase Latino voter turnout by "harvesting" ballots and telling people who to vote for.

In 2013, I got DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) status and my first job was as an aide to Phoenix City Council Member Kate Gallegos. I led field organizing for her campaign. Kate Gallegos became the first women to represent South Phoenix.

I believe we are literally fighting voter suppression efforts. It sometimes makes me frustrated and angry, but I feel better reminding myself that although I can't vote in U.S. elections I'm proud to say La Machine has played a role in helping get hundreds of thousands of voters to participate in elections.

I became the first DREAMer to work for the City of Phoenix, but I discovered I wasn't cut out to work behind a desk. So when Ruben Gallego decided to run for Congress I quit my job and went to work for his campaign. We had five months to devise one of the largest field efforts in the state. We won and made him one of the youngest members of Congress.

I never meant to be an entrepreneur. For me this is not a job. It's a way to help elect people who really will fight for our community. I've always said leadership isn't leading it's getting behind people and pushing them to build a stronger community.

I knew then it was time to start my company La Machine Field Operations LLC.

I'm not an advocate. I'm an organizer who is showing people how to vote and why it makes a difference, so they'll vote again and again.

By the 2016 election, La Machine had 14 contracts and was running the minimum wage ballot initiative, which we won, on behalf of Living United for Change in Arizona (LUCHA). We won that campaign.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Antonio Valdovinos owns La Machine. 421

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

What Part of Legal Immigration Don’t You U Opponents of illegal immigration are fond of telling foreigners to “get in line” before coming to work in America. But what does that line actually look like, and how many years (or decades) does it take to get through? Try it yourself!

UNITED STATES CITIZEN

Are you that relative’s parent, spouse, or minor child?

Adult children and siblings of U.S. citizens can apply for a green card.

LAWFUL PERMANENT RESIDENT

Yes

No

Wait time depends on home country and marital status.

Are you the spouse or child of a lawful permanent resident?

Yes

Do you have family in the USA?

Yes

No

Sorry, you’re out of luck.

Is your relative a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident?

No

Are you skilled?

Can you prove that you are a genius? How about a star athlete? Or an investor with $1 million?

Sorry, you’re out of luck.

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: SIX TO SEVEN YEARS

After your green card, count on another five to six years for citizenship.

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: 11 TO 13 YEARS

With your green card you can become a citizen in five to six years.

le ful t:

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T zen s.

422

No

Congratulations! You have found the quickest way to get a green card, taking 12 to 18 months. But you would have made it anywhere, Mr. Beckham.

card,

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: 12 TO 28 YEARS

2 0 1 7 d,

A Z

Sorry! There is virtually no process for unskilled immigrants without relations in the U.S. to apply for permanent legal residence. Only 10,000 green cards are allotted every year, and the wait time approaches infinity. (Those who receive H-2A or H-2B temporary visas for seasonal work cannot transition to a green card.)

cs

32 | reason | October 2008

e f ,

DATO S

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: BEST CASE: SIX TO SEVEN YEARS

Illustrated by Terry Colon

Reason magazine, October 2008 Issue

No

...you have a job offer.

OK. Then you have a shot, if...

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: 11 TO 16 YEARS

Do you have a college degree in a specialty occupation?

Yes

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: 14 TO 20 YEARS

Yes


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

Reason magazine, Reason magazine, October 2008 October Issue 2008 Issue

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: 11 TO 16 YEARS

Yes

Yes

If an employer If an employer can’t can’t wait six to wait 10 years six to for 10 years for you to start youwork... to start work... ...is he willing ...is hetowilling apply to apply

Yes

visa (H-1B)? visa (H-1B)?

Is your employer willing to file the paperwork for a labor certification? And conduct a new job search for your position? And pay up to $10,000 in legal and other fees?

No

No

Yes

Sorry, you don’t qualify to apply.

Are you single?

Then youThen haveyou a 50/50 havechance a 50/50ofchance gettingof getting your H-1B, your because H-1B, because these visas these arevisas are capped atcapped 85,000atper 85,000 year,per wellyear, below well thebelow the total demand. total demand. They run They out on run the out first onday the first day they become they available. become available. If you areIflucky you are lucky get one, get one, can start you can working start in working in enough to enough to you the country theand country yourand employer your employer can applycan forapply for your labor your certification labor certification and green and card. green card.

No

Total timeTotal to time to immigrate immigrate and and become abecome citizen:a citizen: 11 TO 16 YEARS 11 TO 16 YEARS

for your temporary work work Yesfor your temporary

No

No

After yourAfter green your card, green card, count on count another on five another to five to six years six for years citizenship. for citizenship.

No

No

Wait time depends on home country.

The wait The timewait for atime green forcard a green card is typically is typically six to 10 years. six to 10 years.

Then you have a 50/50 chance of getting your H-1B, because these visas are capped at 85,000 per year, well below the total demand. They run out on the first day they become available. If you are lucky enough to get one, you can start working in the country and your employer can apply for your labor certification and green card.

No

If you’re Are you athe minor? child, are you a minor?

Single adult children: six-to14-year wait.

Sorry, you’re Sorry, out you’re of luck. out of luck.

Spouses and minor children of lawful permanent residents can apply.

Married adult children: sevento-15-year wait.

Is your employer Is your employer willing towilling to file the paperwork file the paperwork for a for a labor certification? labor certification? And And conduct aconduct new joba search new job search for your position? for your position? And pay And pay up to $10,000 up to $10,000 in legal and in legal and other fees? other fees?

number of spouses, minor children, or parents of U.S. citizens who can enter, and they generally can receive green cards.

Yes

Wait time depends on home country. Wait time: five to seven years.

Yes

Sorry, you’re Sorry, you’re out of luck. out of luck. Sorry, you’re out of luck.

Yes

Total timeTotal to time to immigrate immigrate and become and abecome a citizen: 14 citizen: TO 14 TO 20 YEARS20 YEARS ...is he willing to apply for your temporary work visa (H-1B)?

No

Siblings of U.S. citizens: 11-to-22-year wait.

holder is eligible to become a citizen.

Yes

Wait timeWait for atime single for a single Wait timeWait time of achild lawful of a lawful adult child adult dependsdepends on on permanent permanent resident:resident: home country. home country. nine to 14nine years. to 14 years.

Yes

No Sorry, you Sorry, don’tyou don’t qualify toqualify apply. to apply.

Wait time for a single adult child of a lawful permanent resident: nine to 14 years.

Are you single? NoAre you single? With a green card, you likely can become a citizen after six years.

No

Yes

With a green card, you likely can become a citizen after six years.

Yes

Yes

Yes

Total timeTotal to time to immigrate immigrate and become and abecome a citizen: 11citizen: TO 11 TO 13 YEARS13 YEARS

If an employer can’t wait six to 10 years for you to start work...

Yes

With a green Withcard, a green card, Wait timeWait time you likelyyou canlikely can dependsdepends on on become abecome citizen a citizen home home after six years. after six years. country. country. Wait time: Wait time: five to seven five to seven years. years.

The wait time for a green card is typically six to 10 years.

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: 12 TO 28 YEARS

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: 11 TO 13 YEARS

If you’re the Ifminor? you’re Are you aAre you athe minor? child, arechild, you aare you a Spouses Spouses and minor and minor minor? minor? children of children lawful of lawful permanent permanent residentsresidents can apply. can apply.

(Flynn is(Flynn directorisofdirector government of government affairs and affairs Dalmia andisDalmia a seniorispolicy a senior analyst policyatanalyst ReasonatFoundation. Reason Foundation. This chartThis waschart developed was developed by Reasonby Reason Foundation Foundation in collaboration in collaboration with the with National the National Foundation Foundation for American for American Policy.) Policy.)

423

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T ou’re ck.

2 0 1 7

ve er.

A Z

No

Yes

DATO S

reason | October reason | 2008 October | 33 2008 | 33

reason | October 2008 | 33

With a green Withcard, a green card, you likelyyou canlikely can become abecome citizen a citizen after six years. after six years.

Total timeTotal to time to immigrate immigrate and become and abecome a citizen: 12 citizen: TO 12 TO 28 YEARS28 YEARS

(Flynn is director of government affairs and Dalmia is a senior policy analyst at Reason Foundation. This chart was developed by Reason Foundation in collaboration with the National Foundation for American Policy.)

Siblings of Siblings of U.S. citizens: U.S. citizens: 11-to-22-year 11-to-22-year wait. wait.

Total timeTotal to time to immigrate immigrate and and become abecome citizen:a citizen: BEST CASE: BEST SIXCASE: SIX TO SEVENTO YEARS SEVEN YEARS

Sorry, you’re out of luck.

After youAfter file your you file your naturalization naturalization papers and papers endure and endure six to 12 months six to 12of months of processing processing delays, delays, you can take you can a take a languagelanguage and civicsand civics test. Passtest. it, and Pass it, and you’re a citizen. you’re a citizen.

After your green card, count on another five to six years for citizenship.

Married adult Married adult Single adult Single adult seven- sevenchildren:children: six-to- six-to- children:children: wait. wait. 14-year wait. 14-year wait. to-15-yearto-15-year

Illustrated Illustrated by Terry by Colon Terry Colon

After fiveAfter five years (three years (three if you’re aif you’re a spouse), spouse), a a green card green card holder isholder is eligible to eligible to become abecome a citizen. citizen.

Total time to immigrate and become a citizen: 14 TO 20 YEARS

Congratulations! Congratulations! You’ve You’ve found one found of the one easiest of the easiest ways to become ways to an become an American. American. There is no There is no annual cap annual on the cap on the number of number spouses, of spouses, minor children, minor children, or parents or parents of U.S. citizens of U.S.who citizens can who can enter, and enter, theyand generally they generally can receive cangreen receive cards. green cards.

you can take a language and civics test. Pass it, and you’re a citizen.

TO SEVEN YEARS

Understand? u Understand? Mike Flynn Mike Flynn and Shikha and Shikha Dalmia Dalmia


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

PROFILE

A BISHOP'S FAITH OFFERS A LESSON FOR IMMIGRANTS BY FELIPE CORRAL JR.

If Bishop Eduardo Nevares used one word to describe the plight of immigrants here and across the country, it would be sufridos, which means “long suffering” in Spanish.

his parents were not "terribly religious" but taught him the importance of having faith in his life. He is the youngest of six and recalled what family Sundays looked like as he grew up. He described a simple but bonding ritual of sharing a 5-cent ice cream cone and hamburger at a local restaurant called Prices that his family frequented in Houston. Sharing those meals brought his family together, which are the sort of experiences he hopes immigrant families today can enjoy.

"We have no idea the suffering they go through, for the sake of their children or the sake of their family back home," says Nevares, who serves as Auxiliary Bishop for the Catholic Diocese in Phoenix. "They come looking for work, advantage and a better life. Until they find that and are settled, they will suffer a lot so their children and family gain more prosperity."

His journey to becoming a bishop has taken him across the country, which he says in retrospect helped shape his views and provided him an open mind. Like many Hispanics across the country, he also faced cultural and ethnic discrimination, even as he pursued what would eventually become his chosen vocation.

Leadership in the Catholic Church typically avoid political involvement during presidential elections, but Nevares noted that bishops across the country have consistently called for a dramatic reform of our nation's immigration policies.

"While I was in the seminary, I was the only Hispanic in my class of 36 and so, of course, I dealt with some bantering back and forth," Nevares says. "Some prejudicial statements made were names like 'taco' or sometimes I was called a 'wetback' and stuff like that," so he says he fully understands the challenges that immigrants today are facing based on language or even the color of their skin.

"It is a horrible reality where poor children are wrenched from their family members because immigration [expels] them back to Mexico," he says. "It is an unethical thing to do and the bishops are very concerned about the immigration policies that do not respect the individual and family unity." Nevares makes it clear he is committed and prepared to defend immigrants against the policies President Donald Trump, who many content has instilled fear in the undocumented population across the nation.

But the San Antonio native says he was able to block that negativity out and carry on. "It was not going to make me mad or want to have vengeance on anybody," Nevares says. "So I had to be strong, self-motivated and self-reliant to not allow that negative stuff to get me down." Nevares says.

"If we are people of faith, those are our brothers and sisters that are less fortunate and are coming over for a great need," Nevares says. "There is a lot of rhetoric and politicization of the theme, but we need to understand that as Christians we need to stand up for our brothers and sisters, the least of God's people."

It's a take on life that immigrants facing similar hardships in the U.S. today might do well to emulate.

Coming from a family of immigrants, Bishop Nevares knows the importance and value of having family support. He says

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

FELIPE CORRAL JR. IS A 2017 COMMUNICATIONS INTERN AT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND A STUDENT AT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY; SUPERVISED BY JAMES GARCIA, AZHCC DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY.

424

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

PROFILE

GIVING LATINOS AN ON-AIR VOICE It's been (19) years since Maria Barquin's passion for broadcasting brought her to Radio Campesina.

to support Latino communities across the Southwest. "Around the time (Senate Bill) 1070 came up, we got even more involved," Barquin says, recalling the passing of the Arizona law in 2010 that allowed local police to inquire about the immigration status of anyone detained or arrested.

Today, she is (Program Director) at the nationally acclaimed radio network founded in the 1960s by the late civil rights leader, Cesar Chavez.

"People were afraid to go out or drive or just step outside of their home," Barquin says. "We wanted to make sure, through our [programming], that people felt safe and that they felt part of this community."

Born in Mexicali, Mexico, Barquin earned a bachelor's degree in broadcasting business management from Arizona State University. Climbing the ladder quickly at Campesina, she became the nation's first woman programming director for a Spanish-language radio network.

The network relocated its operations from Bakersfield, Calif., to Phoenix eight years ago, in part, according to Barquin, because of SB 1070. "We decided we needed to be where the fight is," Barquin says.

Radio Campesina, a division of the Cesar Chavez Foundation, has more than 500,000 daily listeners and is the third largest Spanish-language radio network in the country.

Working at Radio Campesina has always been more than a job to Barquin. "I think I'm so emotional about La Campesina because I relate to our audience," she says. "I am one of them."

Barquin says Campesina has always maintained a strong engagement in civic activities by using the network's resources

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

425

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

EXCERPT

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES • An analysis provided by the research firm, OYE! Business Intelligence identified words that were mentioned with the phrase "Hispanic immigrants" in social media among Hispanics (not just Arizona); the words illegal (26%), border (23%) and voting (12%) were mentioned most often.

The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, WestGroup Research and OYE! Business Intelligence worked together to benchmark opinions about current immigration policies affecting Arizonans. The purpose of the research is to better understand where Arizonans' stand today regarding impressions of Hispanic immigrants, their economic impact and support/opposition to the immigration policies. Insights from these findings could help Arizona determine how and where to strategically position itself in this continually shifting landscape.

WHAT IMPACT DO HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS HAVE ON THE STATE'S ECONOMY? Concerns that immigrants are an economic burden to Arizona appears to be a fairly one-sided "non-issue." Most feel that immigrants contribute more to the economy (41%) or contribute as much as they cost to taxpayers (22%). Only 24% feel that immigrants cost more to taxpayers than they contribute to the economy; 12% were not sure.

KEY FINDINGS

HOW DO ARIZONANS' FEEL ABOUT THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATIONS' ACTIONS SO FAR WITH IMMIGRATION POLICIES?

Results from this research are based on 1,216 telephone surveys conducted with Arizona heads of household from July 1 – August 31, 2017 by WestGroup Research through the WestTrack Market Monitor. A mix of both Hispanic and nonHispanic heads of household were interviewed for this study and results were matched to reflect the state's population. OYE! Business Intelligence findings were based on comments/ tweets/posts made on social media from June 1 - August 31, 2017. The following are key findings from the research.

Both Hispanics and non-Hispanics appear to support DAPA and DACA. The Trump administration's recent announcement to rescind DACA runs counter to Arizonans' position. Support for the wall is split among non-Hispanics (48% oppose/46% support), while Hispanics are over three times more likely to oppose than support this action. • The OYE! social media analysis of posts about DAPA and DACA highlighted that Hispanics gave higher percentage of positive posts about DAPA and DACA than negative. Posts about the wall were evenly split among Hispanics.

WHAT DO ARIZONANS ASSOCIATE WHEN THEY HEAR THE PHRASE "HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS?" Most associate the phrase "Hispanic immigrants" with "people" characteristics, such as hardworking (15%), specific people they know (6%), or people trying to find a better life (4%). On the other hand, the word "illegals" was mentioned by 8% of Arizonans and Mexicans/from Mexico was also mentioned by 8%.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

HOW DO ARIZONANS FEEL ABOUT THE DREAM ACT? A strong level of support has been given from both Hispanics and non-Hispanics to the Dream Act; 88% of Arizonans feel 426

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

CONCLUSIONS

that undocumented immigrant children should be granted citizenship through the Dream Act as a result of military service, employment and/or college enrollment.

Living in an SB 1070 world – Looking over the past seven years, More Arizonans feel that passing SB 1070 has had a negative impact on the state. In addition, almost half feel that Arizona is identified as a state that Latinos are likely to experience discrimination. On the other hand…

WHAT TYPE OF IMPACT DID SB 1070 HAVE ON THE STATE? Looking back seven years after the passing of SB 1070, more Arizonans feel the bill had a negative impact (46%) than positive (24%); 20% felt it had no impact; 11% were not sure.

WHAT REPUTATION DO ARIZONANS FEEL THE STATE HAS REGARDING DISCRIMINATION AGAINST LATINOS?

• Arizonans have a positive view of Hispanic immigrants. More feel that immigrants contribute more to the economy compared to those who feel they cost more to taxpayers. Arizonans associate Hispanic immigrants as hardworking people who are trying to find work to support their families.

Almost half of Arizonans (44%) agree that the state is identified as the place where Latinos are most likely to experience discrimination; the rest either disagree (51%) or are not sure (6%).

WHAT WERE THE DIFFERENCES IN OPINIONS BY DEMOGRAPHIC GROUPS?

• Arizonans tend to follow a "pro-immigration" line when it comes to current policies:

• Ethnicity – Hispanics are expectedly more likely to support DAPA, DACA and the Dream Act than non-Hispanics. They are also more likely to feel Hispanic immigrants contribute more than they cost to the economy than non-Hispanics and feel SB 1070 has had a negative impact. More Hispanics than non-Hispanics agree Arizona is a place where Latinos were likely to experience discrimination.

• More support than oppose DAPA and DACA. • More oppose than support the building of the wall. • A strong majority (90%) agree that undocumented children should become citizens under the Dream Act.

• Political – Opinions tend to follow political party lines with Democrats and most Independents supporting DAPA, opposing the wall and SB 1070 and feeling that immigrants contribute more to the state than they cost. Republicans tend to take the opposite position for each of these points. The main exceptions that surfaced are that Republicans tend to support DACA and the Dream Act.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

Despite the recent decision to rescind DACA, Hispanics immigrants appear to be gaining public support throughout the state on these key issues.

427

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

DETAILED FINDINGS 1. Impressions and associations with "Hispanic immigrants"

WHAT DO ARIZONANS ASSOCIATE WITH WHEN THEY HEAR SOMEONE MENTION "HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS?"

The top responses Arizonans provided when they were asked, "What is the first word or phrase that comes to your mind when you hear the phrase "Hispanic immigrants?" were "people" characteristics, such as hardworking people/trying to find work (15% of all respondents – Hispanics and non-Hispanics combined), someone I know (6%), a person/human being (6%) and people trying to find a better life (4%). The next highest associations with "Hispanic immigrants" were "illegals," (8%) and Mexicans/from Mexico (8%). The following is a breakdown of responses by Hispanics/non-Hispanics:

TOP RESPONSES ASSOCIATED WITH THE PHRASE "HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS" ARIZONA HEADS OF HOUSEHOLDS JULY/AUGUST 2017

PERCENT MENTIONED 17%

H A R D W O R K I N G / LO O K I N G F O R W O RK

14% 7%

S O M E O N E I K N O W - F A M I L Y / F RI E N D

5% 7%

LO O K I N G F O R B E T T E R L I F E

3% 6%

ILLEGALS

9% 5%

MEXICANS

9% 5%

P E O P LE / H U M A N B E I N G S

6% 0%

2%

4%

6%

Hispanic

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

428

8%

10%

12%

14%

16%

Non-Hispanic T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

18%


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

WHAT IS BEING DISCUSSED WHEN SOMEONE MENTIONS "HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS?"

An interest contrast to the top-of-mind association with the phrase "Hispanic immigrants" was what is being discussed in social media through tweets/retweets and other postings. An analysis provided by the research firm, OYE! Business Intelligence identified what phrases that were most mentioned along with the words "Hispanic immigrants" throughout social media (not just Arizona). The following topics were mentioned most often among Hispanics:

TOP RESPONSES MENTIONED ALONG WITH THE PHRASE "HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS" AMONG HISPANICS AUGUST 2017

PERCENT MENTIONED 26%

ILLEGAL

23%

BO R D E R

12%

VOTING

9%

B RE A K I N G T H E L A W

7%

RAPISTS

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

WHAT WE ARE THINKING IS DIFFERENT THAN WHAT WE DISCUSS.

There is a clear difference between what Hispanics associate with the phase "Hispanic immigrants" and what they discuss in social media. Hispanics think about the character and goals of these immigrants and much less about their status and public discourse about the border and political rhetoric (e.g., law breakers, rapists). While these social media responses are not exclusive to Arizonans, this does provide a clear distinction between the image of Hispanic immigrants and what is being discussed.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

429

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T

30%


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

2. Immigrants impact on the Arizona economy

DO ARIZONANS' FEEL HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS ARE CONTRIBUTORS OR A BURDEN TO THE STATES' ECONOMY?

Almost twice as many Arizonans feel immigrants contribute more to the state's economy than cost the taxpayers (41% contribute more, 24% cost more). The rest feel that immigrants cost as much as they contribute (22%) or are not sure (12%). Significantly more Hispanics feel immigrants contribute more than they cost (58%) than non-Hispanics (36%).

HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS CONTRIBUTION AND COST TO THE ECONOMY ARIZONA HEAD OF HOUSEHOLDS JULY/AUGUST 2017 HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

7%

14%

15% 36%

CONTRIBUTE MORE THAN THEY COST CONTRIBUTE AS MUCH AS THEY COST CONTRIBUTE LESS THAN THEY COST DON'T KNOW

20%

27%

58%

23%

CONCERNS THAT IMMIGRANTS ARE AN ECONOMIC BURDEN TO ARIZONA APPEARS TO BE A FAIRLY ONE-SIDED "NON-ISSUE" AMONG BOTH HISPANICS AND NON-HISPANICS. ONLY 24% OF ARIZONANS FEEL THAT IMMIGRANTS COST MORE TO TAXPAYERS THAN THEY CONTRIBUTE.

3. Trump Administration Immigration Policy Support/Opposition

HOW DO ARIZONANS' FEEL ABOUT THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATIONS' ACTIONS REGARDING IMMIGRATION POLICIES? Prior to the recent announcements to rescind DACA, Arizonans' were asked if they supported or opposed the Administration's actions taken so far on immigration.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

430

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

• Rescinded the Obama Administration's program that protected undocumented immigrants from deportation if they have a child who is a U.S. citizen. (DAPA) • Continued (at the time of the survey) the Obama Administration's program to grant reprieves from deportation to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children. (DACA) • Is planning on building a wall along the U.S. southern border. Support and opposition tend to lean towards whatever direction the Obama Administration originally set for the policies. If Trump rescinded the Obama policy, Arizonans are more likely to oppose his actions. If Trump continued the policy, they are more likely to support the action. Public support for building the wall is split among non-Hispanics and opposed by Hispanics.

HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS CONTRIBUTION AND COST TO THE ECONOMY ARIZONA HEAD OF HOUSEHOLDS JULY/AUGUST 2017 RESCINDED OBAMA'S PROGRAM PROTECTING UNDOCUMENTED IF CHILD IS U.S. CITIZEN (DAPA) CONTINUED OBAMA'S PROGRAM TO GRANT REPRIEVES TO UNDOCUMENTED WHO ARRIVED IN US AS CHILDREN (DACA)

PLANS TO BUILD A WALL ALONG THE SOUTHERN BORDER

23%

68%

N ON - H I S PA N I C

15%

20%

65%

H I S PA N I C

48% 6%

46%

N ON - H I S PA N I C

0%

10%

20%

Support

9%

73% 6%

21%

H I S PA N I C

11%

49%

40%

N ON - H I S PA N I C

13%

55%

32%

H I S PA N I C

30%

40%

50%

Oppose

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Don't know

BOTH HISPANICS AND NON-HISPANICS SUPPORT DAPA AND DACA. THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION'S RECENT ANNOUNCEMENT TO RESCIND DACA RUNS COUNTER TO ARIZONANS' POSITION. SUPPORT/OPPOSITION FOR THE WALL IS ALMOST SPLIT IN HALF AMONG NON-HISPANICS, WHILE HISPANICS ARE OVER THREE TIMES MORE LIKELY TO OPPOSE THAN SUPPORT THIS ACTION.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

431

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

The OYE! social media analysis of posts about the DAPA, DACA and the wall highlighted that Hispanic gave higher percentage of positive posts about DAPA and DACA than negative. Posts about the wall along the Southern border were almost evenly split positive to negative. A high percentage of the posts on all three topics were considered "neutral" because they were more informational in nature.

SENTIMENT OF HISPANICS SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS ABOUT DAPA

SENTIMENT OF HISPANICS SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS ABOUT DACA 11%

SENTIMENT OF HISPANICS SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS ABOUT "WALL" 14%

18%

29%

16%

36%

71%

70%

35%

POSITIVE

NEUTRAL

NEGATIVE

SAMPLE OF HISPANICS' COMMENTS ABOUT DAPA IN SOCIAL MEDIA INCLUDED: • Positive comment (i.e., support of DAPA): If the administration does not comply, the lawsuit against Deferred Action for Parents of Americans program will be amended to include both DAPA and DACA. • Negative comment: Ending DAPA is great! End DACA too! SAMPLE OF HISPANICS' COMMENTS ABOUT DACA IN SOCIAL MEDIA INCLUDED: • Positive comment: DACA recipients should not be an ICE priority. They are young people working and contributing to a great country. • Negative comment: What about the dreams of American citizens killed by illegals? End DACA. SAMPLE OF HISPANICS' COMMENTS ABOUT "THE WALL" IN SOCIAL MEDIA INCLUDED: • Positive comment: I'm Hispanic and for real…Mexico can keep their flag! Trump 2020 build the wall, baby. • Negative comment: The ridiculously-expensive, country-bankrupting Trump Wall of Death won't do what Trump claims it will do. It WILL cause a lot of harm.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

432

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

4. Support/Opposition for the Dream Act

HOW DO ARIZONANS FEEL ABOUT THE DREAM ACT?

A description of the Dream Act was read and asked if these undocumented immigrants should be granted citizenship. A surprisingly strong level of support was given by both Hispanics and Hispanics (88% total).

CITIZENSHIP AND UNDOCUMENTED CHILDREN WHO ENTER MILITARY OR COLLEGE ARIZONA HISPANICS HEAD OF HOUSEHOLDS JULY/AUGUST 2017 HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

7%

14%

15% 36%

CONTRIBUTE MORE THAN THEY COST CONTRIBUTE AS MUCH AS THEY COST CONTRIBUTE LESS THAN THEY COST DON'T KNOW

20%

27%

58%

23%

OYE's social media analysis of posts about the DREAM Act was significantly more positive than negative (28% to 3%).

SENTIMENT OF HISPANICS SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS ABOUT DREAM ACT 3% 28%

POSITIVE NEUTRAL NEGATIVE 69%

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

433

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

SAMPLE OF HISPANICS' COMMENTS ABOUT THE DREAM ACT IN SOCIAL MEDIA INCLUDED: • Positive comment: Our legislation allows these young people --- who grew up in the United States – to contribute more fully to the country they love. • Negative comment: Well if Zuckerberg wants to allow over 15 million illegals into America, let them ALL stay at his place first!

5. Impact of Senate Bill 1070

IN RETROSPECT, WHAT TYPE OF IMPACT DID ARIZONANS FEEL SB 1070 HAS HAD ON THE STATE?

Arizonans' were read a brief description of the SB 1070 and asked if the bill had a positive or negative impact on the state. A total of 24% of Arizonans feel the impact was positive, 46% negative, 20% had no effect and 11% are not sure. Hispanics feel that bill had more of negative impact on the state than non-Hispanics, but neither group feels the bill had a positive impact on the state.

HISPANIC 12%

IMPACT OF SB 1070 ARIZONA HISPANICS HEAD OF HOUSEHOLDS JULY/AUGUST 2017

NON-HISPANIC

10%

11%

27% 20%

20%

POSITIVE NEGATIVE NO EFFECT DON'T KNOW

43%

57%

LOOKING BACK SEVEN YEARS AFTER THE PASSING OF SB 1070, MORE ARIZONANS FEEL THE BILL HAD A NEGATIVE IMPACT THAN POSITIVE, INCLUDING BOTH HISPANIC AND NON-HISPANICS.

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

434

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


SECTION II

EXCERPT

CHAPTER 12

IMMIGRATION

ARIZONANS FACING CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES

6. Reputation of Discrimination

WHAT TYPE OF REPUTATION DO ARIZONANS FEEL THE STATE HAS REGARDING DISCRIMINATION AGAINST LATINOS?

Arizonans' were asked how strongly they agreed or disagreed with the statement, "Arizona was identified as the place where Latinos are most likely to experience discrimination." A total of 44% strongly agree/agree that Arizona has that reputation with more Hispanics feeling this way (60% strongly agree/agree) compared to non-Hispanics (39%).

ARIZONA LATINOS ARE MORE LIKELY TO EXPERIENCE DISCRIMINATION ARIZONA HISPANICS HEAD OF HOUSEHOLDS JULY/AUGUST 2017 HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

6%

4% 10%

11%

22% 18%

STRONGLY AGREE AGREE DISAGREE STRONGLY DISAGREE 26%

28%

DON'T KNOW

37%

38%

NOTES

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

435

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T


THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PROUDLY THANKS

#DATOSAZ PRESENTED BY

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A ' S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T EFFECTIVE 09/13/17


THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PROUDLY THANKS

#DATOSAZ

LOS AMIGOS PARTNERS P L A T I N O

O R O

P L A T A

B R O N C E

paradieslagardere.com

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT WWW.AZHCC.COM DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 7

T H E S T AT E O F A R I Z O N A ' S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T EFFECTIVE 09/18/17


PRESENTING SPONSOR

DATOS Book 2017  

The annual DATOS report, published by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, also highlights the overall economic impact of the state’s f...

DATOS Book 2017  

The annual DATOS report, published by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, also highlights the overall economic impact of the state’s f...