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2015

PRESENTING SPONSOR


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A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

WELCOME TO DATOS 2015

“SRP is proud to sponsor the release of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s 19th Annual DATOS: State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market because we believe all Arizonans should know that our state’s future economic vibrancy and prosperity is inextricably linked to the growing influence and buying power of its diverse and burgeoning Hispanic population.” —Mark Bonsall, General Manager & CEO, SRP

The Growing Economic Influence Of Arizona Latinos Arizona’s Latino population has nearly tripled in the past 25 years to just over 2 million people, and experts say it could double again by the end of the next generation. Not since the advent of the railroad and the arrival of a wave of white settlers into the Arizona territory in the late 1800s has the state undergone such a far-reaching demographic and cultural transformation. For the past 19 years, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has been documenting this historic societal shift in our state and the growing economic influence of the Arizona’s Latino community in a comprehensive report called DATOS: The State of the Hispanic Market. In this year’s report, we show that the state’s Hispanic consumers will spend about $40.3 billion on goods and services in 2015, while Hispanic purchasing power nationwide could top $1.5 trillion—a figure roughly equivalent to the GDP of Australia. Interestingly, a recent study published by the Cervantes Institute found the United States is now home to 52 million Spanish speakers, more than any other country on earth except Mexico. Spanish is now the second most spoken language next to English in all but six states. As Arizona’s economic engine starts to rev up again, Hispanic-owned firms are poised to play a critical role in expanding our state’s increasingly diverse business environment. Consider that from 2007 to 2012, according to a recent U.S. Census report, Hispanic-owned businesses overall grew an astonishing 70 percent from 52,667 to 89,673, while going from just about 10 percent of all businesses in Arizona to more than 17 percent. Perhaps even more impressive, Census data shows that companies owned by Hispanic women skyrocketed by 116 percent from 19,367 in 2007 to 41,843 firms in 2012. By comparison, during that same period, the total number of all businesses statewide grew barely 2 percent from 491,529 to 499,927 companies. DATOS also forecasts that based on the compounded annual growth rate of Hispanic-owned businesses statewide from 2007 and 2012, Arizona is now home to an estimated 123,406 Hispanic companies overall, a majority of which (66,429 businesses, or 54 percent) are owned by Hispanic women. On behalf of the entire Chamber Board and its staff, we congratulate Arizona Latina entrepreneurs like our very own Lorena Valencia of Reliance Wire and Cable, Lisa Urias of Urias Communications, Cathy Garcia of Cha Cha Chic and the estimated 66,000-plus other Latinas across the state who are leading the way in Hispanic business growth. The DATOS report was created to serve as a comprehensive and reliable source of fact-based information about the state’s Hispanic market that could be utilized by not only Arizona Hispanics but all public and private industry officials tasked with crafting our state’s economic agenda—an agenda that must include the state’s Latino community. Why do we do it? Because the Arizona Hispanic Chamber knows that while it’s important to talk about the intrinsic value of an inclusive society, it is imperative that we make that argument grounded in the type of well-researched data we proudly bring to you every year in DATOS. In addition to DATOS, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber invites you to attend our Fourth Annual Business Diversity Summit on November 13, 2015, where we will gather business leaders to discuss the intersection between a strong environment and vibrant economy. On December 4, 2015, the Chamber will again partner with Hensley Beverage Company and ASU’s Hispanic Business Alumni Association to host the 24th Annual Bud Shootout. Tournament proceeds go to help fund our college scholarship program aimed at growing the pool of young business and STEM graduates. The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is committed through our nearly 60 annual events to serve as the state’s leading advocate for Hispanic consumers and business owners, all as part of a wider effort to promote Arizona’s economic development and global competitiveness. Respectfully,

Gonzalo A.

de la

Melena, Jr.

Yolanda France

President & CEO Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

DATO S

Director, Customer Contact Operations Salt River Project (SRP) AZHCC Board of Directors

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REACH ARIZONA

HISPANICS ANYTIME. ANYWHERE.

TV, Radio, Digital, and Social. All under one roof.


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H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 2015 DATOS 2015 CONTENT COMMITTEE (Listed in alphabetical order of Company/Organization)

Christina Tellez

Victor Holland

Jorge Luna

Kenny Farrell

Laura Fullington

Anel Mercado

Alana Chavez Langdon

Luis R. Soto

AAA ARIZONA

GEOSCAPE

ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS

Dr. Alfredo G.

de los

Santos, Jr.

MARICOPA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS

Andrea Whitsett

Ruth Soberanes

ASU, SEIDMAN RESEARCH INSTITUTE

NORTH AMERICAN RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP

Dr. Bert Valencia

ASU, THUNDERBIRD SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEMENT AZHCC

REPUBLIC MEDIA

AZHCC

Yolanda France

Monica S. Villalobos

SALT RIVER PROJECT (SRP)

AZHCC

Dr. Raquel Gutierrez

Catherin Vargas

ST. LUKE’S HEALTH INITIATIVES

BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA

Marjorie DeRubeis

COLLEGE SUCCESS ARIZONA

Edyta Koscielniak

COX COMMUNICATIONS

PHOENIX INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY

Michele Valdovinos

James E. Garcia

Dr. Maria R. Chavira THE ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF PHOENIX

Jaime Boyd

STUDENT TEAM

RESEARCH PROFESSOR

Dr. Loui Olivas STUDENT RESEARCHERS

Adriana Grado

Graduated, Spring 2015

Gilberto Lopez

Graduated, Spring 2015

Deidre Zuniga

Graduated, Spring 2015

Carolina Aguirre Management Major

Felipe Corral Marketing Major

Axel Martinez

UNIVISION

Business Communications Major

Kevin Norgaard UNIVISION

Flor Uribe

Accounting Major

PRODUCTION TEAM

TERMINOLOGY AND RESEARCH

Monica S. Villalobos Editor

Carmen G. Martínez Creative Director

James E. Garcia Associate Editor

Miguel Angel Lopez Gonzalez Research Analyst

K aren Murphy Copy Editor/Proofreader

Aurelio Herrera Intern, Research

Lisa Martinez Lopez Intern, Executive Services

Eric R ascon Intern, Business Development

DATO S

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Director

Greg Fresquez

Melena, Jr.

Marla Bauer

Glenn Iwata

MARICOPA COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

Melissa Gamez

VANTAGE WEST CREDIT UNION WESTGROUP RESEARCH

Kerry Mitchell

ASU, MORRISON SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC POLICY

de la

VALLEY OF THE SUN UNITED WAY

MACERICH

ARIZONA MINORITY EDUCATION POLICY ANALYSIS CENTER

Gonzalo A.

VALLEY METRO

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In DATOS 2015, the terms Hispanic and Latino are used synonymously, as are Native American and American Indian and African-American and black. White, NonHispanic is sometimes referred to as Non-Hispanic white. Hispanics may be of any race. The information presented here was selected from standard secondary sources. However, data changes quickly and is not always collected annually. Data often offers a static picture of an ever-changing situation. The numbers calculated for any statistic depend on the definitions and assumptions used to produce them.

2 0 1 5


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Cuando visitas México, 1GB de datos, 500 minutos & 500 textos.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER

HIGHLIGHTS

PAGE

7

1 2 3 4 5 6

SECTION I: CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

PURCHASING POWER CONSUMER TECHNOLOGY LANGUAGE & MEDIA HEALTH BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

9 29 73 91 107 135

SECTION II: CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

7 8 9 10 11

SECTION III: SEGMENTATION

POPULATION EDUCATION HOUSING IMMIGRATION TRADE WITH MEXICO

12 MILLENNIALS 13 MAINSTREAMING 14 MESSAGING

303 334 340

349

RESOURCES

NOTE: This is a comprehensive compilation of secondary research made available to the AZHCC from various sources. It is either public information or used with permission from those sources.

DATO S

171 196 253 263 285

For more information or any questions, please contact the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (AZHCC) at info@azhcc.com or 602-279-1800.

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“If we can design our universities to produce master learners who are more dedicated to the breadth and betterment of our society, and to the overall health of our democracy, we will have a major impact on the outcome of humanity.” — ASU President Michael Crow

Since 2000:

193%

Increase in Hispanic enrollment

28.5%

asu.edu

228%

Increase in Hispanic bachelor’s degrees

196%

Increase in Hispanic graduate degrees

Increase in minority tenured/tenure-track faculty. More than UCLA, Washington, UT, Ohio State and Penn State.


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DATOS 2015 HIGHLIGHTS

• Hispanic purchasing power in Arizona is an estimated $40.3 billion in 2015. (Earlier estimates indicated that it would reach $50 billion this year but were revised downward by the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth based on the state’s economic crash and a dramatic drop in net immigration to the state, particularly between Arizona and Mexico.) • Hispanic purchasing power nationwide is an estimated $1.5 trillion in 2015, roughly equivalent to the GDP of Australia. • There are more than 55 million Hispanics in the United States, 17 percent of the country’s population. • There are nearly 2.1 million Hispanics in Arizona, 30.3 percent of the total population. • The Hispanic population in Arizona tripled between 1990 and 2015 and is predicted to reach majority status by the end of the next generation. • The number of Hispanic-owned businesses soared 70 percent from 52,667 to 89,673 between 2007 and 2012. Based on the compounded growth trend for that period, there are now estimated to be more than 123,000 Hispanic-owned firms in Arizona. • The number of businesses owned by Hispanic women in Arizona more than doubled between 2007 and 2012 from 19,367 to 41,843. Based on the compounded growth trend for that period, women now own 54 percent of Hispanic-owned businesses in Arizona. • Hispanic children are now a majority of K-8 students and will be a majority of all school children in Arizona by 2020. • A Hispanic baby is born in the United States every 1.68 minutes. • The median age in Arizona is 25 for Latinos and 45 for non-minorities. • 92.7 percent of Hispanic children in the United States are U.S. citizens. • Phoenix Hispanics spent nearly $1 billion on health care in 2012. • The percentage of U.S. Hispanics without health insurance dropped from 41 percent to 34 percent between 2013 and 2014. • The United States now has 55 million Spanish speakers, more than any country in the world except Mexico. Eight million people in the United States are studying Spanish. • In 2015, trade between Arizona and Mexico reached $16 billion in 2014. • Between 2005 and 2010, 1.4 million Mexicans moved to the United States. During that same period, 1.4 million Mexicans moved from the United States to Mexico. • In 2014, U.S. Census figures show that, of the more than 1.2 million new immigrants to the United States in 2013 (documented or undocumented), China (147,000) and India (129,000) led Mexico (125,000).

DATO S

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T H E

S T A T E SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CHAPTER 1

PURCHASING POWER

“DATOS has been an exceptional resource in helping us build the foundation for our Hispanic market outreach, and we will continue to turn to this valuable tool as we expand our efforts to better serve this important and growing segment.” —Robert D. Ramirez, President/CEO, Vantage West Credit Union

Selig Research Revises Downward Hispanic Purchasing Power Figures In Arizona The growth of Latino consumer purchasing power in Arizona

Daily spending, on average, was higher among Hispanics

slowed between 2010 and 2014, due to the effects of the

than whites and other minorities in the United States, accord-

recession and a drop in the state’s immigrant population,

ing to a 2014 Gallup survey. Gallup found Hispanic adults

according to revised estimates from the Selig Center for

spent $96, while U.S. adults overall spent an average of $90

Economic Growth at the University of Georgia.

per day. One reason for the higher daily spending by Hispanics may involve the fact that they tend to have more children.

The Selig Center had previously predicted that Hispanic purchasing power in Arizona would grow 48 percent from 2010

“Half of Hispanics report having children younger than 18,”

to 2015 and reach $50 billion. But in its June 2014 report,

Gallup reported, “compared with 29% of whites, 39% of

Selig revised its calculations downward and now puts Hispan-

blacks and 36% of Asians. Previously, Gallup has found that

ic purchasing power in Arizona at about $40.3 billion, while

having children is associated with higher daily spending.”

estimating growth of 28 percent between 2014 and 2019.

In Phoenix, the average Hispanic household income grew 14 percent from 2009 to 2014 to $56,709, according to IHS

Nationally, Hispanic purchasing power is expected to reach

Global Insight’s Hispanic Market Monitor. In Tucson, the aver-

$1.5 trillion this year, roughly equivalent to the economy of Australia in 2015.

age Hispanic household income was $54,072.

Arizona Hispanics are 30 percent of the state’s population

Total consumer spending by Hispanic households in Phoenix is expected to more than double from $23.5 billion in 2014 to

and account for 16.7 percent of total purchasing power in

nearly $52 billion by 2024.

the state. In only three states, Hispanic account for a larger proportion of total spending power: New Mexico (32 per-

Hispanics in Phoenix are driving spending growth in a wide

cent), Texas (22 percent) and California (19 percent). Hispan-

range of categories, including medical services, automobile

ics make up 10 percent of total consumer purchasing power

purchases, food, recreational services, furniture and house-

nationwide, Seelig reports.

hold equipment and clothing.

Purchasing power among Hispanics nationwide is forecast to

In a 2014 survey by Prudential Research of the top five

grow 32 percent from 2014 to 2019, or about 12 percent high-

financial priorities among U.S. Hispanics, survey respon-

er than the purchasing power of Non-Hispanics. In Arizona,

dents said they were most interested in saving for retirement,

during that same period, the growth in buying power among

reducing debt, building an emergency savings fund, saving

Hispanics is expected to increase by 28.2 percent, while

for their children’s education and protecting their existing

non-Hispanic buying power will grow 23.6 percent.

investments.

DATO S

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SECTION I

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H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Hispanic Purchasing Power Is Expected To Reach 1.5 Trillion U.S. Dollars In 2015. That Figure Is Expected to Increase to 1.7 Trillion U.S. U.S.Hispanics HispanicsAccounted AccountedFor ForNearly Nearly 10% 10% Of OfThe TheNational NationalU.S. U.S.Buying BuyingPower PowerInIn2014 2014 In 2017. Buying BuyingPower Powerby byRace Raceand andHispanic Hispanic Origin, Origin,United UnitedStates, States,2014 2014 (billions (billionsofofdollars) dollars)

Source: Statista, 2015. www.statista.com/statistics/251438/hispanics-buying-power-in-the-us/

$168.3 $769.5 $168.3 U.S. $769.5 Hispanics Accounted For Nearly 10% Of The National U.S. Buying Power In 2014 $1,117.4 $1,117.4 $100.1 $100.1

$1,251 $1,251

U.S. Hispanics Accounted For Nearly 10% Of The National U.S. Buying Power In 2014

Buying Power by Race and Hispanic Origin, United States, 2014 BUYING POWER BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN, UNITED STATES, 2014 (billions of dollars) (BILLIONS OF DOLLARS)

$100.1

$769.5

$168.3

$1,251

$1,117.4

$11,660 $11,660

$10,755.5 $10,755.5 $11,660

$10,755.5

White White

Black Black

American American Indian Indian Asian Asian Two Twoor orMore More White Black American Indian Asian Two or More

Hispanic

Hispanic Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Non-Hispanic Non-Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014. Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014.

Source: Source:Selig SeligCenter CenterforforEconomic EconomicGrowth, Growth,Terry TerryCollege CollegeofofBusiness, Business,The TheUniversity UniversityofofGeorgia, Georgia, June June2014. 2014.

U.S. Hispanics And Asians Are Projected To Drive The Largest Growth Of Buying Power For Single Minorities U.S. Hispanics And Asians Are Projected To Drive The Largest Growth Of Buying Power For Single Minorities

Change in Buying Power, by Race Hispanic Origin, States, 2014-2019 PROJECTED CHANGE INProjected BUYING POWER, BYandRACE ANDUnited HISPANIC ORIGIN, UNITED STATES 2014-2019

37% 32%

29% 21%

Total

20%

White

32%

23%

Black

20%

American Indian

Asian

Multiracial

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014. Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014.

DATO S

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U.S. Hispanic Projected Percentage Change In Buying Power Is Nearly 12% Higher Than Non-Hispanics U.S. Hispanic Projected Percentage Change In Buying Power Is Nearly 12% Higher Than Non-Hispanics

PROJECTED PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN BUYING POWER FOR U.S. Projected Percentage Change in Buying Power for U.S., 2014-2019 2014-2019 32.1%

21.3%

20.2%

Total

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for EconomicSource: Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014. Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014.

Latinas Are Economic Decision Makers With 19.3 Million Latina Shoppers In The U.S., They Command The Bulk Of The $1.2 Trillion In Hispanic Purchasing Power--A Number That Is Estimated To Climb To $1.7 Trillion By 2017. Source: Latin Post, Young, Passionate and Tech-Savvy Latina Shoppers Command Bulk of $1 Trillion in Latino Buying Power, 2014 www.latinpost.com/articles/27098/20141224/the-significance-of-latina-shopping-trends-19-3-million-latina-shoppers-command-the-bulk-of-the-1-trillion-in-hispanic-purchasing-power.htm

Latinas Are The Primary Or Joint Decision Maker In Every Household Category Latinas Are The Primary Or Joint Decision Maker In Every Household Category Latina Perceived Decision-Making By Gender

LATINA PERCEIVED DECISION-MAKING BY GENDER Food

67%

Beverages Clothes Home Electronics

66%

Insurance Social Activities

4% 34%

50%

38%

0% 17%

50%

30%

12%

48%

Pharmaceuticals Family Finances

1%

41%

33%

Personal Electronics Auto/Transport

33%

55%

22%

59%

38%

41%

50%

38%

50%

45%

Primarily Latinas

11% 52%

Both Latino Genders

Primarily Latino Males

Source: Nielsen Women of Tomorrow Report, 2011. Source: Nielsen Women of Tomorrow Report, 2011. http://www.fronterasdesk.org/sites/default/files/field/docs/2013/08/Nielsen_Latina_Report_2013_.pdf www.fronterasdesk.org/sites/default/files/field/docs/2013/08/Nielsen_Latina_Report_2013_.pdf

DATO S

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2% 9%

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3%


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The Arizona Hispanic Share Of Buying Power Continues To Outpace The National U.S. Hispanic Share of Buying Power The Arizona Hispanic Share Of Buying Power Continues To Outpace The National U.S. Hispanic Share of Buying Power

Percent Hispanic Share of BuyingOF Power, for U.S. and Arizona - 2000,2010,2014, and 2019 PERCENT HISPANIC SHARE BUYING POWER, FOR U.S. AND ARIZONA 2000, 2010, 2014, AND 2019

17.2%

16.7%

16.1% 12.4%

10.5%

9.7%

9.0% 6.7%

2000

2010

2014

United States

2019

Arizona

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014. Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014.

The Projected Percentage Change Of Arizona Hispanic’ Buying Power Is Almost 5% Higher Than Non-Hispanics The Projected Percentage Change Of Arizona Hispanic’s Buying Power Is Almost 5% Higher Than Non-Hispanics Projected PercentageIN Change in Total, Hispanic, andAND Non-Hispanic Buying Power for Arizona, 2014-2019 PROJECTED PERCENTAGE CHANGE TOTAL, HISPANIC, NON-HISPANIC BUYING POWER FOR ARIZONA 2014-2019

28.2%

24.4% 23.6%

Total

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014. Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014.

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In 2014, Arizona Was The 4th Most Concentrated Hispanic Buying Power Market HISPANIC SHARE OF TOTAL BUYING POWER

RANKED STATE

32.4% 22.0% 19.6% 16.7% 16.6% 15.4% 10.6% 10.3% 10.2% 8.7%

1. NEW MEXICO 2. TEXAS 3. CALIFORNIA 4. ARIZONA 5. FLORIDA 6. NEVADA 7. COLORADO 8. NEW JERSEY 9. NEW YORK 10. ILLINOIS Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014.

From 2014 To 2019 Arizona’s Hispanic From 2014  To  2019   Arizona’s  HIsispanic   Purchasing  Power   rojected  To  By Grow  B28% y  28% Purchasing Power Projected ToIs  PGrow Buying  Power  By  Race/Ethnicity  1990-­‐2019 (Billions  of  dollars) BUYING POWER BY RACE/ETHNICITY –1990-2019 (BILLIONS OF DOLLARS)

18% Increase

60 50 40 30

172% Increase

20 10

49.2 38.3

32.4

14.7

11.7

8.3 5.8

6.6 5.1

2.5

13.0

9.2

7.2

5.4 0.7

0

120% Increase

28% Increase

7.0

1990

2000

2010

2014

Hispanic

5.4

14.7

32.4

38.3

49.2

Asian

0.7

2.5

7.2

9.2

13.0

Black

1.2

2.9

6.6

8.3

11.7

American Indian

1.1

2.5

5.1

5.8

7.0

Hispanic

Asian

Black

American Indian

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014. Source: S elig  Center  for  Economic  Growth,  Terry  College  of  Business,  The  University  of  Georgia,  J une  2014.  

DATO S

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2019


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PURCHASING POWER

From 2010 To 2014 Arizona Hispanic Buying Power Increased By 18%, And Is Projected From 2010 To 2014 Arizona Hispanic Buying Power Increased By 18%, And Is Projected To Increase By 28% In 2019 To Increase 28% 2014 And 2019 HispanicBetween Buying Power in Arizona (millions of dollars)

HISPANIC BUYING POWER IN ARIZONA (MILLIONS OF DOLLARS)

49,160 38,344 32,363

14,720 5,387 1990

2000

2010

2014

2019

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014. Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014.

Top 5 Hispanic Financial Priorities Are Consistent With The Rest Of The Population —Except That Hispanics Are More Concerned With Funding Children’s Education Than Protecting Investments HISPANIC

GENERAL POPULATION

1. Saving For Retirement

53%

62%

2. Reducing Debt

52%

50%

3. Building An Emergency Savings Account

42%

41%

4. Funding Education For Children/Grandchildren

31%

18%

5. Protecting Existing Investments And Savings

25%

47%

Source: Prudential Research, 2014 www.dropbox.com/home/DATOS%202015/DATOS%20AZ%202015/II.%20Consumer%20Behavior/1.%20Purchasing%20Power?preview=The+Hispanic+American+Financial+Experience.pdf

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U.S.-born Hispanic Consumers Are More Likely To Make Purchases Using Smartphones (42%) Than Foreign-born Hispanics (34%)

U.S. Born Hispanic Consumers Are More Likely To Make Purchases Using Smartphones (42%) Than Foreign Born Hispanics (34%) Percent U.S. and Foreign Born Hispanic That Engage In The Following Shopping Activities Via Table/Smartphones

PERCENT U.S.- AND FOREIGN-BORN HISPANIC THAT ENGAGE IN THE FOLLOWING SHOPPING ACTIVITIES VIA TABLET/SMARTPHONES 75

60 44

65

63 64 54

50

41

63

62 42

29

Reading A Purchasing New Item on Review Mobile

Using A Store Locator

Using A Coupon

42 25

Researching Checking An Item Price

Reading A Purchasing New Item On Review Mobile

18

Using A Coupon

U.S. Born

Foreign Born Tablet

65 65

44 34

Researching Checking An Item Price

65

53

23

Using A Store Locator

71

Tablet

Smartphone

Smartphone

Source: Nielsen Mobile Insights Q1 2014 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2014/engaging-the-evolving-hispanic-consumers.html Source: Nielsen Mobile Insights Q1 2014 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2014/engaging-the-evolving-hispanic-consumers.html

Hispanic And Asian Households Will Outspend Non-Hispanics Over The Remainder Of Their Lives Hispanic And Asian Households Will Outspend Non-Hispanics Over The Remainder Of Their Lives Cumulative Life Spending, by Race/Ethnicity Consumer spending potential exists for the remaining life of an average US household CUMULATIVE LIFE that SPENDING, BY RACE/ETHNICITY

CONSUMER SPENDING POTENTIAL THAT EXISTS FOR THE REMAINING LIFE OF AN AVERAGE US HOUSEHOLD $2,400,112 $1,971,498 $1,569,005 $1,347,123

Asian

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream, April 2013

Black

Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream, April 2013 http://www.marketingcharts.com/topics/demographics/asian-and-hispanic-households-will-outspend-whites-over-the-remainder-of-their-lives-28440/attachment/geoscape-cumulative-life-spending-by-race-ethnicity-apr2013/ www.marketingcharts.com/topics/demographics/asian-and-hispanic-households-will-outspend-whites-over-the-remainder-of-their-lives-28440/attachment/geoscape-cumulative-life-spending-by-raceethnicity-apr2013/

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Hispanics Spend More Per Day Than Non-Hispanics And The U.S. Average AVERAGE DAILY SPENDING

$96 $95 $88 $87 $90

Hispanics Asians Non-Hispanic Whites Non-Hispanic Blacks All U.S. Adults Source: Gallup Daily Tracking, January-November 2014 www.gallup.com/poll/180002/hispanics-daily-spending-above-average.aspx

Average Daily Consumer Spending Affected By Having Children Under 18 % HAVE CHILDREN UNDER 18

AVG DAILY SPENDING, THOSE WITHOUT CHILDREN UNDER 18

AVG DAILY SPENDING, THOSE WITH CHILDREN UNDER 18

50% 36%

$76 $82

$116 $119

29% 39% 33%

$79 $72 $79

$108 $111 $111

Hispanics Asians Non-Hispanic Whites Non-Hispanic Blacks All U.S. Adults Source: Gallup Daily Tracking, January-November 2014 www.gallup.com/poll/180002/hispanics-daily-spending-above-average.aspx

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The Average Hispanic Household Income in Phoenix Grew By 14% From 2009-2014

$57K

Average Hispanic Household Income

2014

# OF HOUSEHOLDS

AVERAGE HH INCOME

PHOENIX

415,000

$56,709

Source: IHS Global Insight Hispanic Market Monitor 2015, Average HH income, Phoenix DMA Courtesy of

The Phoenix Hispanic Average Household Income Is Projected To Increase By 23% In 2019 The Phoenix Hispanic Average Household Income Is Projected To Increase By 23% In 2019 Phoenix Hispanic Average Household Income

PHOENIX HISPANIC AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME $69,878

2019

$56,709

2014

Source: IHS Global Insight, Hispanic Market Monitor, 2015, Phoenix DMA Courtesy of

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Phoenix Hispanic Consumer Spending Is Projected To Continue To Rise

Source: IHS Global Insight, Hispanic Market Monitor, 2015, Phoenix DMA

Phoenix Hispanic Consumer Spending Is Projected To Continue To Rise Phoenix Hispanic Consumer Spending Projections: 2014-2024 ($ in Billions)

PHOENIX HISPANIC CONSUMER SPENDING PROJECTIONS: 2014-2024 ($ IN BILLIONS) $51.8 $35.8

+120%

Hispanic Growth

$23.5

+78%

Total Growth 2014

2019

2024

Source: Source: IHS Global Insight 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Forecast, Phoenix DMA Courtesy of

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Phoenix Hispanic Spending Is Driving Demand Across Major Industries Phoenix Hispanic Spending Is Driving Demand Across Major Industries Phoenix Consumer Spending: 2014-2019, % Growth Forecast

PHOENIX CONSUMER SPENDING: 2014-2019, % GROWTH FORECAST MEDICAL SERVICES

+80%

MOTOR VEH. & PARTS

TRANSPORT. SERVICES

+64%

+60%

+43%

FOOD & BEVERAGE

+54%

+29%

+22% -3%

RECREATIONAL GOODS

FURNITURE & HH EQUIP.

APPAREL & SHOES

+53%

+50%

+44%

+18%

+34%

+36%

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic Source: IHS Global Insights 2015 Consumer Spending Forecast (2014-2019), Phoenix DMA

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Source: IHS Global Insights 2015 Consumer Spending Forecast (2014-2019), Phoenix DMA

$1.3 Billion

Courtesy of

• Spent By Phoenix Hispanics On Clothing & Footwear In 2014 • 26% Of Spending In Phoenix

Source: IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA

Hispanics In Phoenix Tend To Spend More On Clothing And Footwear Than Non-Hispanics Hispanics In Phoenix Tend To Spend More In Clothing And Footwear Than Non-Hispanics Amount Spent Per Household on Clothing & Footwear in 2014

AMOUNT SPENT PER HOUSEHOLD ON CLOTHING & FOOTWEAR IN 2014 Mens BoysClothing Clothing Mens && Boys

$848

$618

+37%

More Spending

Women GirlsClothing Clothing Womens & &Girls

Children under 2

Children underClothing 2 Clothing

$1,140 $186 $114

Footwear Footwear

+63%

More Spending $423

Hispanic

$1,302

$693

+14%

More Spending

+64%

More Spending

Non-Hispanic

Source: IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Clothing & Footwear Courtesy of

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19

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Top Malls & Shopping Centers RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS WHO VISITED IN THE PAST 3 MONTHS MALL/SHOPPING CENTER

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

Arizona Mills Desert Sky Mall Arrowhead Towne Center Tempe Marketplace Other shopping center or area Metrocenter Christown Spectrum Mall Chandler Fashion Center Tanger Outlets Phoenix/Glendale Superstition Springs Center Westgate City Center Scottsdale Fashion Square Fiesta Mall Arizona Center Outlets at Anthem

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #10 #12 #13 #14 #15

33.3% 26.7% 17.3% 16.6% 16.0% 15.0% 13.8% 13.7% 11.7% 11.6% 11.6% 9.9% 9.5% 9.4% 8.8%

#4 #31 #2 #6 #2 #12 #13 #4 #14 #7 #18 #6 #15 #32 #11

16.7% 2.5% 16.8% 15.7% 16.8% 8.3% 7.0% 16.1% 6.9% 13.5% 4.9% 14.4% 6.8% 1.8% 8.3%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 - Jan 2015), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+. Courtesy of

Top Department Stores In Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS WHO VISITED IN THE PAST 3 MONTHS DEPARTMENT STORES

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

Walmart Fry’s - Fry’s Marketplace Target Ross Dress For Less 99 Cents Only Store Dollar Tree Amazon Goodwill Costco Kmart Family Dollar Sam’s Club Big Lots Kohl’s Dollar General

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

85.2% 67.9% 49.6% 49.1% 48.6% 40.8% 38.5% 36.6% 35.5% 28.8% 28.6% 27.7% 27.6% 25.7% 24.6%

#1 #2 #3 #10 #7 #8 #5 #9 #4 #18 #16 #14 #12 #6 #17

77.7% 65.2% 49.4% 26.2% 34.5% 32.5% 42.5% 26.7% 45.6% 14.6% 16.3% 21.1% 22.5% 35.0% 15.7%

Projected Percentage Change in Total, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic Buying Power for U.S., 2012-2017 Courtesy of

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20% Of Hispanics Are “True Foodies” Simmons Experian definition of “true foodies” segmentation: Passionate about food and spend a lot of time cooking at home. They prefer to buy organic food, want their ingredients fresh and buy environmentally friendly products. True Foodies tend to eat a variety of food, love to experiment with different cuisines and at the same time have adopted a healthy eating lifestyle. They have the most culinary expertise and have a love relationship with food.”

“I prefer food that is presented as an art form”.

Hispanics are +14% more likely than Non-Hispanics

Hispanics are +9% more likely than Non-Hispanics

Hispanics are +15% more likely than NonHispanics

“I especially look for organic or natural foods”.

“I’m usually first among my friends to try new food products”.

“I try to eat gourmet food whenever I can”.

“The kitchen is the most important room in my home”.

Hispanics are +24% more likely than Non-Hispanics

Hispanics are +24% more likely than Non-Hispanics

Source: Simmons NHCS, Winter 2015 (Feb 2014 – Mar 2015); Base: U.S. Adults 18+ Index compares % of Hispanics who agree vs. Total population

Courtesy of

Kids Are A Latina’s Focus, Even When Shopping “ANY AGREE” AMONG WOMEN 18+

Kids Are Latina’s Focus, Even When Shopping “Any Agree” Among Women 18+

I find it hard to resist my children’s requests for non-essential purchases.

I enjoy shopping with my children 38%

My kids have significant impact on brands I choose

31% 27% 21%

24%

19%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

Projected Percentage Change in Total, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic Buying Power for U.S., 2012-2017

Courtesy of Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Source: Simmons NHCS,, Winter 2015 (Feb 2014 – Mar 2015); Base: U.S. Women 18+

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Latina Moms Now Is The Time to Grab Their Attention! PERCENT HISPANIC MOMS WHO AGREE

32

Remember advertised products when shopping

34

Feel respected when a company advertises in Spanish

% %

Source: Simmons NHCS, Winter 2015 (Feb 2014 – Mar 2015); Base: U.S. Women 18+ who are parents Courtesy of

$2.3 Billion

• Spent by Phoenix Hispanics on “Food at Home” in 2014 • 22% of all “Food at Home” spending in Phoenix

Projected Percentage Change in Total, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic Buying Power for U.S., 2012-2017

Phoenix Hispanic Households Spent 10% Courtesy of More Than NonHispanics On Groceries In 2014 AVERAGE AMOUNT HOUSEHOLD SPENT ON GROCERIES IN 2014

Average Amount Household Spent on Groceries in 2014

Phoenix Hispanic Households Spent 10% More Than Non-Hispanics On Groceries In 2014

$5,641

$5,145

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

Source: Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

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Courtesy of

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)


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Hispanic Share of Consumer Spending: Phoenix Hispanic Share of Consumer Spending: Phoenix Food at Home

$2.3 Billion

or 22.2% of the Total

Pork

$91 Million

Non-Alcoholic Beverages

$267 Million

Cereals

Bakery Products

$146 Million

Beef

$237 Million

or 22.3% of the Total

or 23.1% of the Total

or 20.1% of the Total

Poultry & Eggs

Fish & Seafood

Dairy Products

$239 Million

$46 Million

$211 Million

$143 Million

or 26.7% of the Total

Fresh Fruits & Vegetables

$295 Million

or 24.3% of the Total

or 27.6% of the Total

or 25.1% of the Total

or 22.0% of the Total

or 24.2% of the Total

Processed Fruits & Vegetables

Sugar and Sweets

Fats and Oils

Other Food Products

Alcoholic Bev. at Home

$84 Million

or 22.4% of the Total

$106 Million

or 18.3% of the Total

$54 Million

$422 Million

or 23.5% of the Total

or 19.1% of the Total

$306 Million

or 17.2% of the Total

Source: Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic DMATotal Totalconsumer consumerdollars dollars spending: Food at Home Source: Global Insight - 2015 HispanicMarket MarketMonitor, Monitor, Phoenix Phoenix DMA spending : Food at Home

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Courtesy of

Top Grocery Stores in Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT SHOPPED FROM EACH GROCERY STORE IN THE LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20

FOOD PRODUCTS USED LAST 7 DAYS

% OF HISPANIC

Fry’s - Fry’s Marketplace Walmart Supercenter Food City Walmart Neighborhood Market Costco Safeway Sam’s Club Pro’s Ranch Market El Super Target/SuperTarget Sprouts Albertsons Bashas’ Other grocery store Other Hispanic grocery store WinCo Foods Trader Joe’s Whole Foods Market Smart & Final Fresh & Easy

% OF NON-HISPANICS

68.5% 47.3% 43.9% 26.7% 25.6% 23.6% 19.4% 18.0% 16.0% 14.8% 13.0% 10.9% 9.1% 7.3% 6.5% 6.3% 5.4% 4.6% 3.8% 3.6%

66.9% 51.0% 10.2% 14.4% 30.5% 36.4% 12.8% 2.6% 0.4% 18.6% 21.4% 19.6% 21.5% 10.5% 0.3% 9.6% 9.2% 4.3% 3.1% 3.8%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 – Jan 2015), Phoenix, Adults 18+ Courtesy of

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HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL) 102 94 238 154 88 71 134 283 378 84 67 62 49 75 351 72 65 105 118 96


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Top Food Products In Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT USED FOOD PRODUCTS IN THE LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK

FOOD PRODUCTS USED LAST 7 DAYS

% OF HISPANIC

% OF NON-HISPANICS

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1

Fresh Meat

72.6%

70.8%

102

#2

Tortillas

66.4%

39.0%

145

#3

Packaged Meat

57.1%

60.9%

95

#4

Coffee

55.2%

62.7%

91

#5

Ice Cream And Frozen Novelties

53.4%

54.0%

99

#6

Ready-To-Eat Cereal

51.6%

48.9%

104

#7

Candy

50.7%

47.9%

104

#8

Yogurt (Not Frozen)

40.0%

44.9%

92

#9

Pretzels, Chips, Popcorn

39.5%

52.3%

80

#10

Soup (Canned Or Dry Mix)

39.2%

39.0%

100

#11

Nuts

38.3%

44.8%

89

#12

Salsa

37.9%

41.8%

93

#13

Any Store Brand Food

31.8%

34.6%

94

#14

Prepared Foods

31.1%

26.6%

112

#15

Frozen Pizza

25.3%

25.8%

98

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 – Jan 2015), Phoenix, Adults 18+ Courtesy of

The Average Hispanic Household Income In Tucson Grew By 12% From 2009-2014

$54K

Average Hispanic Household Income

2014

# OF HOUSEHOLDS

AVERAGE HH INCOME

TUCSON

139,000

$54,072

For More Information On Southern Arizona, Refer To Datos Tucson 2015 DON’T MISS OUT!

Source: IHS Global Insight Hispanic Market Monitor 2015, Average HH income, Tucson DMA Courtesy of

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Phoenix, AZ

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Located at Skyline Drive and Campbell Avenue, La Encantada is an open-air lifestyle center nestled in the foothills of Tucson. Offering a unique mix of national, regional and local retailers, many which are the first and only locations in the Tucson market – Anthropologie, Apple, Tiffany, Michael Kors, Kate Spade, Crate & Barrel, Pottery Barn, Williams-Sonoma - the center caters to the Tucson resident, seasonal visitor and neighboring Mexican national market.

the Mexican National has within the Tucson community and strives to be the shopping destination for these visitors as well as their local friends and family. In order to garner awareness in the targeted market, La Encantada launched a partnership with the Tucson Mexico Trade Office (TMTO). Through this partnership, La Encantada regularly participates in trade shows and fashion events in Sonoran cities including Hermosillo, Ciudad Obregon, San Carlos, Sinaloa, and Los Mochis, showcasing the center’s retail brands, dining options and unique shopping experiences.

La Encantada means “the enchanted” in Spanish, a name intended to capture the experience people have when they visit the center, as well as the unique outdoor environment, authentic architecture and village-like setting.

This direct connection to the Mexican National – across the border and in the community – has positioned La Encantada as an essential shopping destination, resulting in notable sales successes at the property.

With close proximity to the U.S./Mexico border, La Encantada has long recognized the strong connection

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Photos Courtesy of La Encantada

T H E


Ad Name:Teamwork General Item #:PCS2012xxxx Order #: 275805

Closing Date:8/1/15 QC: cs Pub: AZ Hispanic

Trim:7.75x10 Bleed: none Live:7.25x9.5


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“As a business that serves more than 3 million customer relationships in Arizona, the information provided by DATOS gives Cox a valuable tool that keeps us better connected to the Hispanic consumer, which helps us to better serve our customers in the way they want to do business with us. Additionally, having access to this research, helps Cox continue to provide services and products that are the most valuable to this growing market.” —John Wolfe, Senior Vice President & General Manager, Southwest region, Cox Communications

Hispanics Now A Bigger And Fast-Evolving Segment Of Every Major Product Category One of the biggest challenges for retailers is knowing not only what people are buying today, but what they might want to purchase months or even years down the road. Predicting buyers’ tastes and needs means retailers have to know and understand their customer base.

hold as compared to $3,700 for non-Hispanic households, according to a 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor survey. And while 45 percent of Hispanic households in Phoenix eat out at Mexican food restaurants, almost as many (44 percent) said they dine out on Chinese food. Pizza restaurants are the next highest category at 30 percent.

In Arizona and nationwide, that customer base is dramatically changing.

Phoenix Hispanics are a growing segment of the new car sales market, growing at a rate three times faster than the general market and accounting for $249.2 million in new automobile purchases, or 17 percent of all spending in the first quarter of 2015 alone. Hispanics are also a big part of the used car sales market. In 2014, Hispanics shoppers spent $386 million on used cars, or 23 percent of all used car sales in Phoenix.

Consider that in the past 25 years, the Latino population in Arizona has nearly tripled to about 30 percent of the total population. Between now and 2050, 86 percent of population growth in the United States will be attributed to Hispanics. And U.S. Census figures show that by 2060, about one-third of the U.S. population will be Hispanic and there will be no majority population group.

In the entertainment arena, Hispanics love going to the movies, casinos, theme parks and big name sports.

Even within Hispanic households, cultural and demographic dynamics are shifting. Over the past decade, Hispanic households overall have become more bilingual in nature. That is to say, fewer Hispanics are speaking only English or only Spanish. In the meantime, more Hispanics and Non-Hispanics alike are taking Spanish-language classes, and the U.S. now has 55 million Spanish speakers, the largest number in the world except for Mexico.

In Phoenix in 2014, nearly one of every four movie tickets, about $49 million worth, was sold to Hispanics, a Hispanic Market Monitor survey found. Hispanic moviegoers were 66 percent more likely than Non-Hispanics to see a movie on opening weekend and 41 percent are more likely to go to the movies four times a month. A Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough survey also found that nearly 400,000 Hispanics said they visited a casino in the previous 12 months and nearly one-third of Hispanic adults with children under 18 visited a theme park in 2014.

Hispanic shoppers, meanwhile, are a fast-growing segment of virtually every major product market. Nationally, for instance, Hispanics, per capita, outpace NonHispanics in the purchase of the top 15 categories of package goods, such as soft drinks, candy, milk, beer, wine, dog food and coffee, according to a 2015 Nielsen survey.

Hispanic men, perhaps to no great surprise, are big professional sports fans. A Hispanic Scarborough survey earlier this year found 86 percent of respondents are interested in professional football, 50 percent enjoy baseball and 50 percent enjoy basketball.

In Phoenix, Hispanics spent $1.5 billion on food outside of the home in 2014, an average of about $4,100 per house-

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By 2060, Half Of All Americans By 2060, Half Of All Americans Will Be Multicultural! Share of Consumers Hispanics vs. White Non-Hispanic Will Be Multicultural! SHARE OF CONSUMERS HISPANICS VS. WHITE NON-HISPANIC

1970

83%

2018

60%

5% 1970

2060

19%

2018

White (Non-Hisp)

Hispanic (All races)

1970 2 in 10 Americans are multicultural

2 In 10 AMERICANS ARE MULTICULTURAL

2018 1 in 3 Americans are multicultural

1 In 3

AMERICANS ARE MULTICULTURAL

2060 1 in 2 Americans are multicultural

1 In 2

AMERICANS ARE MULTICULTURAL

Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers,” Nielsen, February 2015. Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers.” Nielsen. February 2015.

By 2020, U.S. Hispanics Will Account For 54% Of The Population Growth And 86% By 2050 Share in Growth in Population by Hispanics By 2020, U.S. Hispanics Will AccountSHARE For 53%IN Of GROWTH The Population Growth And 86%BY By 2050 IN POPULATION HISPANICS 100% 90% 80% 70% 60%

86%

85%

2050

2060

79% 64% 54%

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

2020

2030

2040

Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers,” Nielsen, February 2015. Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers.” Nielsen. February 2015.

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Hispanics Live In Larger Households! Hispanics Live In Larger Households!

HOUSEHOLD SIZE Household Size

4

3.53

3.5

2.98

3

2.5

2.54

2.4

2

1.5

1

0.5

0

Non-Hispanic White

African American

Asian

Hispanic

Source: “Beyond Multicultural Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers.” Nielsen, Nielsen. February 2015. Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Super Consumers,” February 2015.

Homes That Speak Both English And Spanish Are Growing The Most Language Distribution among Hispanic Households

“Homes That Speak Both English And Spanish Are Growing The Most”

LANGUAGE DISTRIBUTION AMONG HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS 120%

100%

18%

22% 80%

60%

25%

27%

12% 40%

20%

10%

23% 9%

35%

19% 0%

2002-2003

Spanish English Equally

Only Spanish

2012-2013

Only English

Mostly Spanish

Source: “Beyond Purchasing Multicultural Consumers,” February 2015. February 2015. Source: “Beyond Power: Purchasing Power:Super Multicultural SuperNielsen, Consumers.” Nielsen.

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Advertising In Spanish Resonates With Hispanic Consumers Hispanics Like Ads

40

%

Hispanics Recall Commercials In English As Well As Non-Hispanics

More When Viewed In Spanish

Ads Including Spanish Speaking Talent Perform Better % LIFT

BRAND RECALL

+27%

MESSAGE RECALL

+33%

LIKEABILITY

+21%

Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers,” Nielsen, February 2015.

The Young Urban Hispanic Is, And Will Be, The Trendsetter For America For Many Years To Come! HISPANIC POP (000’S)

% OF HISPANIC TOTAL POP

HISPANIC POP 21-34

% HISP 21-34 OF TOTAL 21-34

RANK

MARKET

1

LOS ANGELES

8,507

48%

2,871

55%

2

NEW YORK

4,435

21%

1,475

38%

3

MIAMI-FT LAUDERDALE

2,152

49%

619

54%

4

HOUSTON

2,064

35%

729

60%

5

CHICAGO

1,973

20%

700

37%

6

DALLAS-FT WORTH

1,758

26%

653

46%

7

S.FRAN./OAKLAND/SJ

1,712

24%

591

44%

8

PHOENIX

1,378

27%

509

53%

9

SAN ANTONIO

1,259

55%

402

57%

10

HARLINGEN/MCALLEN

1,153

97%

359

90%

Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers,” Nielsen, February 2015.

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Hispanics Have The Highest Purchasing Power Compared To Other Minorities Hispanics Have Purchasing The Highest Purchasing Power To Other Minorities Hispanics Have The Highest Power Compared To Compared Other Minorities Purchasing by (Trillions) Ethnic Group (Trillions) PurchasingPOWER Power by Ethnic Group PURCHASING BYPower ETHNIC GROUP (TRILLIONS) 1.8

1.8

1.6

1.6

1.4

1.4

1.2

1.2

1

1

0.8

0.8

0.6

0.6

0.4

0.316 0.4

0.2 0

0.21

0.2 0.115 0

1990

Multicultural Purchasing Power MULTICULTURAL PURCHASING POWER Multicultural Purchasing Power

1.6

1.6

1.2

1.2

1 0.962

1 0.951

0.951 0.601

$2.5tn $2.5tn

0.962

0.713

0.713 0.599

0.599 0.491

0.316 0.491 0.21

1.3

1.3

1

1

0.601

$3.2tn $3.2tn

0.274

0.274 0.115

1990 2000

2000 2010

2010 2013

2013 2018

African American Hispanic Hispanic African American Asian

2018

2010

Asian

2010

2018

2018

African American Hispanic Hispanic African American Asian

Asian

Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers,” Nielsen, February 2015. Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers.” Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers.” Nielsen. February 2015.Nielsen. February 2015.

Hispanics Are 5x More Likely To Have An Individual Debit Card And 38x More Likely To Have A Prepaid Card Hispanics Are 5x More Likely To Have An Individual Debit Card And 38x More To Have A Prepaid Card Financial Products Owned by Hispanics

FINANCIAL PRODUCTS OWNED BY HISPANICS 80%

160

138

70% 60% 50%

120

96

107

105 86

40%

91

88

100

83

80

61

30%

60

20%

40

10% 0%

140

20

70%

63%

57%

43%

41%

38%

31%

24%

22%

Individual Checking Account

Individual Debit Card

Individual Credit Card

Store Card

Joint Checking Account

Loyalty Card

Joint Account Debit Card

Joint Credit Card

Prepaid Card

% of Hispanic Ownership of Financial Products

Index vs. Total

Source: “Nielsen ShareLite,” of Wallet Lite.” Nielsen. March 2015 Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Nielsen, March 2015.

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0


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Overall, Credit Card Ownership Is Lower Than The Total U.S. Share. However, Higher Income Hispanics AreIs Lower More Likely To Higher Have Credit Cards Overall, Credit Card Ownership Than The Total U.S. Share. However, Income Hispanics Are More Likely To Have Credit Cards Individual Credit Card Ownership

INDIVIDUAL CREDIT CARD OWNERSHIP Hispanic

Total

82%

$150,000+

$100,000-149,999

75%

$100,000-149,999

$50,000-99,999

74%

$50,000-99,999

59%

<$50,000

<$50,000

64%

Female

Female

69%

Male

83% 71% 52% 50% 64%

Male

66%

Total

90%

$150,000+

57%

Total

“Nielsen Wallet Lite.” March Nielsen. March 2015 Source:Source: “Nielsen Share ofShare WalletofLite,” Nielsen, 2015.

Hispanics Are More Likely To Use Cash/Check Or Are Debit And Debit LessCardHispanics Likely To Use Credit Cards As Their Hispanics More Likely Card ToWhen Use Cash/Check And LessAre Likely Use Credit As Their Preferred Method Of Making FoodOrPurchases, EvenToMore ReliantCards On Cash Or Checks Payment For All Purchases Payment Used Most Often – All– Purchases Payment Used Most Often Food Purchases Preferred Method Of Payment For All Purchases PAYMENT USED MOST OFTEN – ALL PURCHASES

2% 7%

35% 31%

3% 7% 28% 26%

19% 16%

34% 39% Cash/Check Cash/Check

Total Total

Hispanic Hispanic

37% 35%

44% 38%

Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Lite,” Nielsen, March 2015.

Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Lite.” Nielsen. March 2015 Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Lite.” Nielsen. March 2015

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DebitCard Card Debit CreditCard Card Credit Other Other


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When Making Food Purchases, Hispanics Are Even More Reliant On Cash Or Checks Payment Used Most Often – Food Purchases When Making Food Purchases, Hispanics Are Even More Reliant On Cash Or Checks Payment Used Most Often – Food Purchases PAYMENT USED MOST OFTEN – FOOD PURCHASES

When Making 7% Food Purchases, Hispanics Are Even 31% More Reliant On Total Cash Or Checks

7% 7% 28%

7%

28%

16%

39% 39%

16%

Cash/Check

31%

Cash/Check

Debit Card

Hispanic

Total

Debit Card Credit Card

Hispanic

Other Credit

Other

38%

35%

38%

35%

Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Lite.” Nielsen. March 2015

Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Lite,” Nielsen, March 2015.

Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Lite.” Nielsen. March 2015

Hispanic Volume Growth Outpaces Non-Hispanic In Top 15 Customer Packaged Goods Hispanic Volume Growth Outpaces Non-Hispanic In Top 15 Customer Packaged Goods Top 15 CPG Category Performance

TOP 15 CPG CATEGORY PERFORMANCE

18.0%

13.5% 13.0%

11.4%

10.4%

12.9% 8.8%

8.0%

3.4% 3.0%

7.9%

9.4%

8.1%

9.0% 6.7%

2.0% 2.6%

1.9%

3.4% 3.4%

2.1%

1.1%

1.2% 1.7%

-0.5%

Salty Snacks

-1.1%

-2.7%

-3.7% -7.0%

3.5%

0.6%

-2.0%

Soft Drinks Cheese

Vegetables Candy

Milk

Beer

Bread

Traditional Frozen Tobacco Entrees

Non-Hispanic

6.2%

5.5%

4.5%

Fruit

Wine

-5.7%

Dog Food RTE Cereal

Coffee

Hispanic

Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers,” Nielsen, February 2015.

Hispanics’ Spending On Consumer Packaged Goods Is Above Average

Hispanic Spending On Consumer Packaged Goods Is Above Average Average Spend per Visit on Consumer Packaged Goods

Source: “Beyond Purchasing Power: Multicultural Super Consumers.” Nielsen. February 2015.

AVERAGE SPENT PER VISIT ON CONSUMER PACKAGED GOODS $90 $80 $70

$81

$71 $51

$60 $50

$47

$39

$40

$32

$30

$43 $30

$37

$26

$20 $10 $0

Food

Adult Beverages

Household Products

Hispanic

Health and Beauty Aids

Total

Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Lite,” Nielsen, March 2015. Source: “Nielsen Share of Wallet Lite.” Nielsen. March 2015

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Over-the-counter Medications

Card


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CUSTOMER SUCCESS STORY

Turbana Takes a Fresh Approach to Multicultural Retail with Geoscape Geoscape Intelligence System’s RetailTarget module helped educate Turbana’s retail community to grow a core product line

The Business Issue

Challenge: When Tropicals Go North Turbana is a leading producer, marketer and distributor of high quality tropical fruits and vegetables, with a mission to provide healthy tropical foods that transform people’s lives. As a grower-owned company founded in 1970, Turbana is one of the main importers of bananas, plantains and pineapples to the United States, available in hundreds of stores nationwide. Turbana also produces a growing line of packaged products, including plantain chips (otherwise known as mariquitas) along with other healthy snacks. However, the U.S. fruit and vegetable industry is occupied by several large multinational competitors. To differentiate their produce and attract new retail partners, Turbana introduced a new line of tropical fruits and vegetables, called Turbana Tropicals, to give their retailers an opportunity to attract a new type of consumer. Turbana realized that the success behind its new product line would come from America’s New Mainstream populations, especially the U.S. Hispanic and Asian communities. These populations often over index in the fresh produce category because they are shown to consume more fruits and vegetables, cook from scratch more often and either has larger average households (Hispanics) or greater spending power (Asians) than the general population. By selling new produce that caters to Hispanic and Asian heritage and tradition, Turbana was helping their community of retailers have a more appealing line of products within arm’s reach of their multicultural base of consumers. While Turbana understood the opportunity that tropicals posed to many multicultural groups throughout the United States, many of its local retailers did not. “Our retailers understood that these populations are growing, but they do not understand what these groups are looking for,” said Marion Tabard, marketing director for Turbana. “When it comes to many of our products, they were literally clueless. With limited time and knowledge, produce managers have too much on their plate. To them, tropical produce is another headache, not an opportunity.”

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In a highly competitive North American produce market, Turbana wanted to gain a competitive advantage by capitalizing on the growing consumption of tropical produce. Yet many of these products were unknown to Turbana’s community of retailers, despite demand from a variety of ethnic groups surrounding their stores. To understand a complex demographic picture, Turbana needed to demonstrate the demand for these foods, including which products are especially relevant to each ethnicity, how they are used and when they are especially popular.

The Solution By equipping their retailers with a greater understanding of the surrounding multicultural population, Geoscape helped Turbana’s retail community to understand the sophisticated demographic makeup of each store’s trade area. These powerful insights helped Turbana grow its produce line by 300 percent, by helping its customers understand their products’ need and value.

Business Benefits • Increases sales volumes by targeting products at relevant local demographics • Refines and streamlines inventory • Improves retailer relationships by assisting in understanding the makeup of their customers

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Growing Sales with Demographic Data To help retailers find the hidden opportunity, Tabard’s team introduced a broader educational campaign to demonstrate the revenue that tropicals can bring to their stores. At the heart of the education strategy was Geoscape, who was able to demonstrate the sophisticated ethnic breakdown for all of Turbana’s retail partner locations. Specifically, Geoscape’s RetailTarget module allowed produce managers to see the exact ethnic demographic breakdown around their store trade area, then carry the right assortment of tropical produce accordingly. In densely populated states such as New Jersey, for example, one store may have a large number of Mexican Americans, while another store a few miles away may be predominantly Puerto Rican. Each ethnic group uses different fruits and vegetables on different occasions, for distinct dishes, making the need for precise demographic breakdowns essential. “We show our retailers the potential of these markets around their stores, and Geoscape’s relevant data makes this opportunity possible,” said Tabard.

“ To us, multicultural means that a high degree of customization is necessary. Geoscape was a natural fit for us, providing us the customization and data that’s of real value to our retailers.”

Geoscape’s micro-local mapping data is embedded directly into a mobile app that Turbana created for its retail community, which includes a “demographics” tab where retailers can see the exact ethnic breakdown of their store. Depending on the ethnic mix, retailers can stock their shelves accordingly. Turbana takes the education process one step further, with detailed pages about each product’s usage and characteristics, including potential holidays where certain ethnic groups consume larger amounts of select produce. “To us, multicultural means that a high degree of customization is necessary,” said Tabard. “Geoscape was a natural fit for us, providing us the customization and data that’s of real value to our retailers.” As Turbana increased its use of Geoscape, it found the technology helpful in launching additional products. By identifying a consumer type that would be interested in smaller, crownless pineapples for example, Turbana was able to target the exact stores with large populations of relevant households for its pilot program. The end result was a thriving new product line, as Turbana’s tropicals business grew by over 300 percent in 2014. As Turbana continues to grow its tropical presence with retail partners, one retailer increased sales 30 percent in under six months. Turbana is delivering quality produce and bringing a fresh approach to multicultural retail through powerful consumer insights from Geoscape’s high-quality data.

About Geoscape Geoscape is an innovator of business intelligence and a provider of data-rich systems, research and analytic services. The Geoscape Intelligence System, an online analytics platform, delivers the most accurate data on an increasingly diverse American and international marketplace. Take a FREE TEST DRIVE of GIS at www.geoscape.com/testdrive to capitalize on the tremendous growth of the New Mainstream of culturally-diverse consumers.

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P. 1(888)211-9353 E. info@geoscape.com URL. www.geoscape.com


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$1.7

Billion Spent by Phoenix Hispanics on “Food Away from Home” in 2014

22

%

Of Spending In Phoenix IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Courtesy of

“Food Away   from  Home”  Amount   Spent  per  Household   Phoenix Hispanics Spend More On Eating Out in  2014

Phoenix Hispanics Spend More On Eating Out

“FOOD AWAY FROM HOME” AMOUNT SPENT PER HOUSEHOLD IN 2014

$3,728

Non-Hispanic

$4,113

Hispanic

$3,500

$3,600

$3,700

$3,800

$3,900

$4,000

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor IHS Globaldollars Insight spending: - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Total consumer Quick Service Restaurants

$4,100

$4,200

Courtesy of Courtesy of

Total consumer dollars spending : Quick Service Restaurants

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Hispanics Enjoy A Variety Of Menu Choices Hispanic Enjoy A Variety Of Menu Choices

Restaurant types visited in the past 30 days by Phoenix Hispanics

RESTAURANT TYPES VISITED IN THE PAST 30 DAYS BY PHOENIX HISPANICS Any upscale restaurant

8%

Any other Asian restaurant

9%

Any Italian restaurant

9%

Any coffeehouse/coffee bar

11%

Any seafood restaurant

12%

Any ice cream/yogurt shop

12% 13%

Any steakhouse

30%

Any pizza restaurant

44%

Any Chinese restaurant

45%

Any Mexican restaurant

Hispanic Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release (Feb 2014 - JanHispanic 2015), Hispanic Adults Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 11 (Feb 2014 - Jan 2015), Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA 18+, Phoenix DMA *Index compares Hispanics the total *Index compares Hispanics vs.vs.the totalmarket market

Courtesy of

Hispanic Diners Are Most Likely To Visit Sit-Down Restaurants For Dinner Hispanic Diners Are Most Likely To Visit Sit-Down Restaurants For Dinner Types of meals at sit-down restaurants in the past 30 days

TYPES OF MEALS AT SIT-DOWN RESTAURANTS IN THE PAST 30 DAYS 61%

60%

40% 31% 23%

25%

Breakfast

Lunch

Hispanic

Dinner

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 - Jan- 2015), AdultsAdults 18+, Phoenix DMA DMA HispanicScarborough, Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 Jan 2015), 18+, Phoenix

Courtesy of

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Courtesy of


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Phoenix Hispanics Over Index On 10 Of The Top 15 Casual Dining Restaurants PROJECTED CHANGE IN BUYING POWER, BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN, UNITED STATES, 2013-2018

Courtesy of

RANK

SIT-DOWN RESTAURANTS VISITED FOR ANY MEAL

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #7 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

Denny’s Olive Garden IHOP Applebee’s Golden Corral Red Lobster Chili’s Outback Steakhouse Cracker Barrel The Cheesecake Factory Macayo’s Oregano’s Pizza Bistro Garcia’s LongHorn Steakhouse Sizzler

18.4% 14.4% 13.6% 12.0% 11.2% 8.2% 7.9% 5.4% 5.3% 4.9% 4.5% 4.4% 4.2% 4.2% 3.6%

15.5% 15.4% 9.9% 9.8% 7.6% 9.4% 9.9% 5.9% 7.0% 4.8% 2.3% 3.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.3%

113 95 126 116 133 91 85 93 81 101 158 110 151 163 197

Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 - Jan 2015), Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA

DATO S

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40

E N I L A N E R D . A Y H L I G U M ENO E FA

L O H W E H T R O

F

dly n e i r f y l i o fam SCAR w t h t i w NA ush Feel the r at PIR: The 2015 he 2016 t s weekend i-Final race and om 500. Sem pingWorld.c A S T . Cam ILL GO F ATS W ng GOOD SE ure tickets by calli E Sec -RAC 866-408 [7223]

NOV. 12-15, 2015 15-PIR-1181_AZHCC_Print_Ad_R03.indd 1

MAR. 11-13, 2016*

*

DATES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO THE 2016 NASCAR SCHEDULE, WHICH HAS NOT YET BEEN RELEASED.

8/7/15 4:50 PM


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Big Spending Power At Quick Serve Restaurants (QSRs) In 2014!

25%

Phoenix Hispanics Spent

of Phoenix Spending

$1.05 Billion On QSR

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Courtesy of

Hispanics Spent Nearly $600 More Amount Spent per Household at QSR in 2014 Than Non-Hispanics at QSRs in 2014

Hispanics Spent Nearly $600 More Than Non-Hispanics at QSRs in 2014

AMOUNT SPENT PER HOUSEHOLD AT QSR IN 2014

$1,932 Phoenix

$2,525

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Total consumer dollars spending : Quick Service Restaurants

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Total consumer dollars spending : Quick Service Restaurants

Courtesy of

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Number Of QSR Visits In The Last 30 Days

51

%

57

%

vs.

Phoenix Non-Hispanics

Of Phoenix Hispanics Have Visited QSRs 5+ Times

Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 - Jan 2015), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

Courtesy of

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Phoenix Hispanics Are More Likely To Visit QSRs For Lunch & Dinner Phoenix Hispanics Are More Likely To Visit QSR’s For Lunch & Dinner

Types of meals at quick service restaurants in the past days TYPES OF MEALS AT QUICK SERVICE RESTAURANTS IN30THE PAST 30 DAYS

75% 68%

67%

65%

44% 34%

Breakfast

Lunch

Hispanic

Dinner

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 - Jan 2015), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 - Jan 2015), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanics Over Index At 12 Of The Top 15 QSR’s RANK

QSR VISITED FOR ANY MEAL IN PAST 30 DAYS

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

Any QSR

93%

87%

105

#1

McDonald’s

47%

39%

116

#2

Burger King

29%

20%

131

#3

Jack in the Box

28%

17%

143

#4

Little Caesars

28%

11%

183

#5

Taco Bell

25%

25%

101

#6

Subway

24%

21%

113

#7

Panda Express

23%

14%

144

#7

In-N-Out Burger

22%

18%

119

#9

Filiberto’s Mexican

21%

7%

203

#10

Starbucks

16%

17%

98

#11

Peter Piper Pizza

15%

3%

265

#12

Other QSR

15%

12%

117

#13

Carl’s Jr.

14%

13%

111

#14

Chipotle

14%

14%

104

#15

Wendy’s

13%

20%

68

Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb 2014 - Jan 2015), Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA Courtesy of

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Hispanics Have A Strong Purchasing Power In The Automotive Industry Total Spent In 1Q 2015 Was

1.5 Billion

Phoenix Hispanics Spent

So Hispanics Accounted For

$249.2M on NEW Automobile Purchases in 1Q 2015

17

%

of all New Vehicle spending in Phoenix in 1Q 2015!

Hispanics Spend At Par

$27,750 Average MSRP Paid Vs. $30,500 Total Market

Source: Amount spent based on 2015 MSRP and new Hispanic unit sales; RL Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 1Q 2015 CYTD

Courtesy of

Hispanic NEW Auto Sales Are Growing at 4X The Rate Of Non-Hispanics In Phoenix Hispanic NEW Auto Sales Are Growing at 4X The Rate Of Non-Hispanics In Phoenix

% Change in New Vehicle Unit Sales Year over Year

% CHANGE IN NEW VEHICLE UNIT SALES YEAR OVER YEAR

12.80%

4.70% 3.10%

% Change in Unit Sales Year-Year

Total

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: R.L.&Polk Co. Vehicle New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Enhanced Ethnic Data, Source: R.L. Polk Co.&New Personal Registrations (includes Leases),Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, (Jan-May15 & Jan-May14), Phoenix May May 20152015 CYTDCYTD (Jan-May15 & Jan-May14), Phoenix DMA. DMA.

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CONSUMER Share of new total sales to Hispanics has grown by +3.7 points since 2013

Hispanics Account For Growing Percentage of NEW Total Sales

Hispanics Account For Growing Percentage of NEW Total Sales

SHARE OF NEW TOTAL SALES TO HISPANICS HAS GROWN BY +3.7 POINTS SINCE 2013

17.90%

16.60%

14.20%

2013

2014

2015

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, MAY CYTD (Jan-May13, Jan-May14 & Jan-May15), Phoenix DMA.

Courtesy of

PHOENIX TOTAL

PHOENIX HISPANIC Courtesy of

BRAND RANKER

BRAND RANKER

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, MAY CYTD (Jan-May13, Jan-May14 & Jan-May15), Phoenix DMA.

RANK

BRAND

S0M

RANK

BRAND

#1

14.6%

#1

16.5%

#2

11.0%

#2

15.6%

#3

10.0%

#3

14.3%

#4

9.4%

#4

9.2%

#5

9.2%

#5

8.1%

#6

5.2%

#6

5.4%

#7

5.1%

#7

5.2%

#8

5.0%

#8

4.2%

#9

3.6%

#9

3.9%

#10

2.8%

#10

3.0%

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, May 2015 CYTD (Jan’15-May’15), Phoenix DMA.

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Top 10 Models by Segment RANKED BY MODEL SALES TO PHOENIX HISPANICS RANK

CUV/SUV

FULL/MID-SIZE

COMPACT

PICK-UP

#1

TOYOTA RAV4

NISSAN ALTIMA

TOYOTA COROLLA

CHEVY SILVERADO 150

#2

KIA SOUL

CHEVY MALIBU

HONDA CIVIC

RAM 150

#3

DODGE JOURNEY

TOYOTA CAMRY

NISSAN SENTRA

TOYOTA TUNDRA

#4

JEEP PATRIOT

HONDA ACCORD

CHEVY CRUZE

FORD F150

#5

NISSAN ROGUE

KIA OPTIMA

HYUNDAI ELANTRA SEDAN

TOYOTA TACOMA

#6

CHEVY EQUINOX

FORD FUSION

VW JETTA

GMC SIERRA 150

#7

HONDA CR-V

CHRYSLER 200

DODGE DART

NISSAN FRONTIER

#8

JEEP WRANGLER

HYUNDAI SONATA

FORD FOCUS

RAM 250/350

#9

HONDA PILOT

CHEVY CAMARO

KIA FORTE

CHEVY COLORADO

#10

FORD ESCAPE

FORD MUSTANG

MAZDA 3

CHEVY SILVERADO 250/350

TOP 10 % SHARE OF SEGMENT

46%

81%

86%

95%

Source: Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2015 CYTD (JAN-MAY); Phoenix (Prescott) DMA;Note segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models

Courtesy of

$386 Million

Phoenix Hispanics Spent on Used Vehicles in 2014 (23% of the Total Used Vehicle Sales in Phoenix) Source: IHS 2015 Global Insight Hispanic Market Monitor Courtesy of

Hispanics Generate

28

%

Of All Automotive Word-Of-Mouth Activity Source: 2014 Keller Fay Group, Talk Track® Hispanic Argument Courtesy of

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CASE STUDY

Phoenix International Raceway Who:

What: Where: Why:

a targeted demographic” but rather to have a conversation with the Hispanic Community where PIR not only invited Hispanics to attend races, but also for PIR to participate with the Hispanic Community. This was done through many avenues; several key organizations include: Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Valle del Sol and Fuerza Local. Building relationships with local Hispanic influencers has been instrumental. Regular communications with Hispanic media, media management, business owners and education institutions has been a key factor in creating a loop of communication which has provided feedback, recommendations and support.

-Phoenix International Raceway in conjunction with NASCAR and NASCAR Mexico Series -Increase Hispanic onsite attendance from <5% to >15.5% between 2013 and 2015 -Phoenix International Raceway – Avondale, AZ -Hosting the Toyota 120, NASCAR Mexico Series race -Creating dialog with the Hispanic Community where new comers to the sport feel inclusive to the experience both on and off the race track. -Providing an open invitation to Hispanics through targeted communications efforts

As Hispanics are the emerging majority not only Arizona but nationally, PIR recognized the opportunity to make an impact in the development of young Hispanics in Arizona. In February of 2015, PIR partnered with Tolleson Union High School District to initiate a program where 19 year old NMS driver Ruben Garcia Jr. spoke to 2,000 high school students about the value of education. The event was emceed by Jesus Quinones of Univision at La Joya Community High School; between Garcia and Quinonez they engaged the entire student body and delivered a simple but powerful message: 1.) Stay in School, 2.) Graduate and 3.) Pursue higher education. The message was simple in concept but powerful in inspiration. It was not about how to become a race car driver, but rather that the youth could do whatever they want if they had vision, put their mind to it, committed and worked hard.

In the fall of 2012 Phoenix International Raceway announced a commitment to reach the Hispanic Community in a way that had never been done before; in 2013 PIR hosted the Toyota 120, NASCAR Mexico Series (NMS) race. Over past three years the 2013-15 Toyota 120 races were the only NMS races held outside of Mexico. The NASCAR Mexico Series is a 15-race series where all the drivers, teams, crew, owners and sponsors are from Mexico. Sponsors include Mexican brands such as Telcel, La Costeña, Volaris, Canel’s, Jarrito’s and Coca-Cola. The winners of the Toyota 120 races at PIR include: • 2013, Abraham Calderon from Monterrey, Mexico now driving for ARRIS Telcel in the NMS • 2014, Daniel Suarez from Monterrey, Mexico now driving for ARRIS-Joe Gibbs Racing in the NASCAR XFINITY Series and the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series in the United States • 2015, Ruben Pardo from Mexico City, Mexico driving for CITIZEN Watches-Potosinos-Toyota in the NMS as well as the IMSA Sports Car Challenge in the United States.

It is with ongoing efforts to provide an authentic experience and constant messages that PIR plans to increase attendance at PIR and exposure to the sport of NASCAR, but additionally to make a positive and lasting positive impact in the Hispanic Community. With the continued vision of PIR and the support of the leadership of the Hispanic Community soon the face of PIR will resemble the community at over 30+% Hispanics in Arizona.

Over the three-year period from 2013 to 2015, PIR has documented an attendance increase among Hispanic fans from less than 5% (reports prior indicated only 3%) to over 15.5% during the past two NASCAR Sprint Cup (NSCS) race weekends, the Quicken Loan Race for Heroes 500 on Nov. 15, 2014 and the Camping World 500 on March 15, 2015.

Photos Courtesy of PIR

Promotion and Hispanic outreach for the NMS races as well as the NSCS weekends was focused in the Phoenix area through targeted paid advertising, earned media, community relations and attending festivals and social events. It was conscious of PIR to not create a message “speaking to

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Valley Metro Connects The Hispanic Population With A Very Accessible Transit Network 17 § ¨ ¥

± ³

PEORIA

± ³

303 101

51 ) ¯

± ³

SURPRISE 101

FOUNTAIN HILLS

± ³ 101

51 ¯ )

GLENDALE

PARADISE VALLEY

PHOENIX

± ³

101

101

303

§ ¨ ¥

10

17 § ¥ ¨

AVONDALE

± ³

TOLLESON

202

§ ¨ ¥

10

10

202

± ³

§ ¨ ¥

BUCKEYE

± ³

± ³

87 ) ¯

17 § ¥ ¨

± ³

LITCHFIELD PARK

14 3

MESA

TEMPE

APACHE JUNCTION

60 ¡ ¢

¢ ¡ 60

± ³

EL MIRAGE YOUNGTOWN

SCOTTSDALE 17 § ¥ ¨

PEORIA

202

± ³

GUADALUPE 101

§ ¨ ¥ 10

GILBERT CHANDLER

± ³

GOODYEAR

202

QUEEN CREEK BUCKEYE LEGEND Percent Hispanic Population

Percent of Hispanic Population- American Community Survey 2013 Within 1/2 mile of Bus Routes

0 - 12%

28% - 50%

13% - 27%

51% - 69%

70% - 100%

¯

Bus Route

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6


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Phoenix Hispanics Are Huge Sports Fans Men 18-49

Phoenix Hispanics Are Huge Sports Fans

MEN 18-49

% Interest Among Sports Fans* (sorted by Hispanic %)

NHL

MLS

LIGA MX

34%

17% 6% 28% 6%

32%

MLB

50%

35% 16%

UFC

41%

NBA

42%

50%

NFL

78% Non-Hispanic

86%

Hispanic

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Hispanic Men 18-49; Source: Phoenix Hispanic 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Hispanic Base: Sports Fans definedScarborough by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL,Men MLS18-49; Base: Sports Fans defined by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS

Courtesy of

Courtesy of

Live Sports Attendance Among Phoenix Hispanic Men 18-49 Sports Fans SPORTS: ATTENDED 1+ GAMES - PAST YEAR

SPORTS: ATTENDED IN THE PAST YEAR

% OF HISPANIC MEN 18-49 SPORTS FANS

AZ Cardinals Football Game

51%

National Football League (NFL) Major League Baseball (MLB)

36%

National Basketball Assoc (NBA)

31%

AZ Diamondbacks Baseball Game Suns Basketball Game ASU Football Game

8%

National Hockey League (NHL) Mexican League Soccer (LigaMX)

6%

Major League Soccer (MLS)

4%

% OF HISPANIC MEN 18-49 SPORTS FANS

Cactus League Spring Training Baseball Game

8%

Coyotes Hockey Game

6% 4% 2% 1%

NASCAR Auto Race ASU Baseball Game AZ Rattlers Indoor Football Game

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Hispanic Men 18-49; Base: Sports Fans defined by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS

Courtesy of

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35% 31% 25% 9%

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OUR FUTURES ARE ALL CONNEC+ED Did you know that 35% of rail passengers choose to ride instead of drive, removing over 10,000 cars from the road? valleymetro.org/connected

ENJOYING THE SOCIAL MEDIA DATA ON THIS REPORT? WE LOVED PULLING IT. OYE! CREATES ACTIONABLE HISPANIC MARKET INSIGHTS FOR FORTUNE 500 FIRMS NATIONWIDE. LEARN HOW OYE! LEADS THE INDUSTRY IN HISPANIC ONLINE RESEARCH.

OYEINTELLIGENCE.COM/DATOS FEATURED CLIENTS


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Phoenix Suns, Univision Arizona & Maricopa County Department of Public Health

Join the Challenge: Dance Workout Video for Kids The Phoenix Suns and Mercury organizations partnered

The video was distributed among 24 School Districts in the

with the Maricopa County Department of Public Health and

Maricopa County who participated in the SNAP-Ed Grant

Univision Arizona to create the ‘Join the Challenge’ dance

Program (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Edu-

video which was an all-out effort to continue the battle in

cation Program). There are 216 schools and approximately

childhood obesity. The Join the Challenge project encour-

166,000 students all of which are low-income schools

aged students across the Valley to be active and live a

(50% or more free and reduced lunches).

healthy lifestyle. Results Why •

• 14% of children age 2-4 in low income families in

ings, health events and more.

Arizona are obese • • •

600 DVD’s were distributed through schools, train-

15% of children age 2-4 in low-income families in

Video was distributed among 24 School Districts in the Maricopa County

Maricopa are obese

216 participating schools

20% of 10-17 year old children in Arizona are

166,000 kids enrolled in participating schools

obese

56,000+ Views in YouTube

41% of Hispanic Boys are obese or overweight compared to 28% of White boys.

Recap The Join the Challenge: Dance Workout Video for Kids was a collaborative effort between the Maricopa County Department of Public Health, Phoenix Suns, Phoenix Mercury, and Univision to battle childhood obesity for Kids age Media coverage: univisionarizona.univision.com/salud/videos-desalud/video/2014-10-21/programa-contra-laobesidad-entre-menores The Video was is available to download at www.WeArePublicHealth.org

8-13. The video was used in classrooms to encourage kids to exercise during break times. The video was 40 minutes long and split into 10 minute low impact routines so that kids can do easily in the classroom, at home or during after school programs. The DVD was released in November 2014 and featured Suns and Mercury mascots, Univision talent as well as kids from Garfield Elementary.

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Hispanic Entertainment Insights ABOUT OYE!

SAMPLE SIZE

OYE! is a tool designed to bring a deeper understanding of the Hispanic consumer to brands through analysis of social conversation. OYE! not only identifies U.S. Hispanic conversation, but also analyzes the discussion based in Spanish, English or Spanglish. OYE! then derives meaning from that conversation to deliver insights on overall Hispanic use of social media as well as insights into Hispanic demographics and psychographics.

This report covers over 17,000 verified Hispanic conver-

DATA GATHERED

SUMMARY

sations about the topics of favorite actors/actresses, movies, video games, cable networks and more engaged with among the Hispanic community. A sample of general market conversations was analyzed as well to provide comparisons between ethnicity. All data was pulled between June 15th –and July 15th of 2015.

OYE! is a social data analysis tool. Samples of conversation on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are pulled according to the privacy and security settings on those platforms. The data reviewed is both independently generated user content as well as comments about and replies to brand/ organization content. A large sample size of data is pulled from the full universe of data available to provide statistically relevant samples of the conversation.

In the entertainment industry Hispanics were found to talk

IDENTIFYING HISPANICS

game most discussed by the Hispanic audience.

about Latino musicians such as Selena Gomez who owned 29% of the total Hispanic conversation among other artists such as Pitbull and Romeo Santos. Netflix and SoundCloud dominated Hispanic mentions in their respective industries of streaming video and audio. Nintendo, with high affinity for the Mario Bros franchise, dominated video game console conversation while Call of Duty was the individual

While the use of the Spanish language in social media is a significant indicator that someone may be Hispanic, it is not the only identifier. Other factors are leveraged to identify Hispanics: name, images, location, following (who they follow as well as who follows them) all contribute to classifying a social profile as Hispanic. OYE! has created a proprietary technology to analyze and weight these factors to determine the likelihood the creator of a given piece of content is Hispanic.

The importance of the Hispanic moviegoer is an often mentioned theme and Minions was found to be the most popular movie, pushing 43% of the total movie conversation when evaluating the top 10 movies in theaters from June 15-July 15.

ALL FINDINGS 1. Selena Gomez was the most mentioned artist among Hispanics with 29% of the total conversa-

CONFIDENTIALITY

tion. 14% of the time fans expressed their admira-

OYE! leverages data that is available publicly either via purchase from 3rd party vendors and/or directly from the social platforms. OYE! does not violate any individual user’s privacy at the time of data collection. All conclusions about any individual’s race, gender, language preferences, etc. is

tion for her, mentioning their “love” for her. Mentions of Selena’s new song, “Good for You” drove 10% of total conversation. A final driver noticed was mentions of her recent Pantene sponsorship

kept secure and is not shared with any 3 party or client.

which drove 3% of the conversation.

rd

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Hispanic Entertainment Insights 2. Netflix was by far the Hispanic favorite as it was

6. The movie Minions drove the most mentions with

the most mentioned online movie platform with 97%

43% of the total conversation when evaluating the

of the conversation. Their hit series, “Orange is the

top 10 movies in theaters from June 15-July 15. On

New Black” pushed over 40% of the conversation.

average 9% of movie conversation was confirmed

Mentions of the movie Daredevil (5%) helped drive

to be from Hispanics while Minions over-indexed

conversation as well. Platforms Hulu and HBO Go

with the Latino audience gaining 12% from this

were not mentioned nearly as much by Hispanics

demographic. The movie, The Gallows also over

making up 3% of the conversation.

indexed with Hispanic mentions making up 10% of its total conversation. The majority of Minions posts

3. Nintendo was the most mentioned game console

were from users expressing their desire to see the

with 61% of the conversation. Games associated

movie.

with the Mario Brothers franchise propelled over 18% of Nintendo conversation. Smash Brothers

7. The Call of Duty video game was the most men-

was the next highest driver for Nintendo, owning

tioned game with 30% of the Hispanic total conver-

15% of that brand’s conversation. Additionally,

sation, 28% of the Call of Duty conversation was

the NES and WII systems helped inspire 11% and

sparked by the version Black Ops III, Hispanics also

10% of posts respectively. Xbox was the next high-

mentioned the version Advance Warfare 6% of the

est discussed console with 21% of the conversation

time.

but was highly varied in topics. The most discussed category among Hispanics was the game Elder

8. When comparing mentions of ‘favorite actors’

Scrolls, driving 3% of Xbox conversation. Finally,

among top entertainers both Hispanic and non-

PlayStation owned 18% of total conversation with

Hispanic, actor Adam Sandler drove 14% of total

mentions of the video game conference E3 power-

conversation from Non-Hispanics and 7% from His-

ing 25% of this brand’s conversation.

panics. 51% of Non-Hispanic conversation were shares/retweets about Adam Sandler meeting a

4. Univision was the TV channel driving the highest

cancer patient from Australia while 21% of Hispan-

conversation volume among Hispanics. The novela,

ics mentioned the same conversation.

“Lo Imperdonable” drove the highest quantity of mentions with 32% of the Univision conversation.

9. Actress, Scarlet Gruber (Venezuelan) was the most

Mentions of the hashtag, “Growing up Hispanic”

mentioned among Hispanics with 44% of the His-

also drove 11% of the Univision volume.

panic conversation. The largest segment of the Hispanic conversation came from a desperate (yet

5. SoundCloud (47%) was mentioned the most over

passionate) fan in Dallas, TX posting over 200

iHeartradio (34%) and Spotify (19%). Sound

Tweets tagging the actress, asking her to follow her

Cloud appears to be a popular music platform for

account.

Hispanics as they can create, upload, and share their music themselves. Conversation was very dis-

10. The TV channel, BET had mentions that were 3%

persed among users, the biggest topic found was

Hispanic and 97% were non-Hispanic. The BET

self-promotion of the song “Pour it Up” from a user,

awards were the highest driver for both Hispanics

Narada Vanegas with 4% of the conversation.

(84%) and for Non-Hispanics (65%).

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Selena Gomez and Pitbull Were The Most Mentioned Artists Among Hispanics Selena Gomez and Pitbull Were The Most Mentioned Artists Among Hispanics Driving Over Half The Total Conversation Driving Over Half The Total Conversation Top 5 Artists Mentioned by Hispanics June 15th-July 15th,2015

TOP 5 ARTISTS MENTIONED BY HISPANICS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 29%

Selena Gomez

27%

Pitbull

14%

Romeo Santos

8%

Taylor Swift

6%

Ariana Grande

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

Courtesy of

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

Add OYE logo

SoundCloud Was The Most Mentioned Online Music Platform By Hispanics SoundCloud Was The Most Mentioned Online Music Platform By Hispanics

Top Online Music Platforms Mentioned by Hispanics June 15th – July 15th, 2015

TOP ONLINE MUSIC PLATFORMS MENTIONED BY HISPANICS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 19%

47%

35%

SoundCloud

iheartradio

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

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The BET Awards Were The Highest Driver For Both Hispanics And For Non-Hispanics (65%) The BET Awards Were(84%) The Highest Driver For Both Hispanics (84%) And For Non-Hispanics (65%) TV Channel BET – BET Awards by Race June 15th – July 15th, 2015

TV CHANNEL BET – BET AWARDS BY RACE JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015

BET Channel

3%

BET Awards By Race

84% 65%

97%

Hispanics

Non-Hispanics

Hispanic

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

Non-Hispanic Courtesy of

Add OYE logo

Netflix Was By Far The Hispanic Favorite As It Was The Most Mentioned Online Movie Platform With 97% Of The Conversation Netflix Was By Far The Hispanic Favorite As It Was The Most Mentioned Online Movie Platform With 97% Of The Conversation Top Online Movie Platforms for Hispanics

15th-July 15th, 2015 FOR HISPANICS TOP ONLINE June MOVIE PLATFORMS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015

3% 1%

97%

Netflix

Hulu

HBO GO

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. conversations nationwide.

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Courtesy of Add OYE logo


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The Movie ‘Minions’ Drove The Most Hispanic Mentions, Which Overall Accounted For

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

TOP MOVIE MENTIONS – MINIONS MOVIE MENTIONS

The Movie Minions Drove The Most HispanicBY Mentions, RACE Overall Hispanic Mentions Of The Movie Minions Accounted For 12% Of Total Conversation

Top Movie Mentions – Minions Movie June 15th – July 15th, 2

JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015

10%

Dope

88%

6%

Inside out

Of The Total Conversation

Minions

8%

Max

12%

12%

59%

Minions

5%

Amy

Non-Hispanics

Hispanics

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

Courtesy of

Nintendo Was The Most Mentioned Game Console By Hispanics, Driving 61% Of The Conversation Nintendo Was The Most Mentioned Game Console By Hispanics, Driving 61% Of The Conversation Top Game Consoles Used by Hispanics TOP GAME CONSOLES USED BY HISPANICS June 15th-July 15th, 2015 JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015

18%

61% 21%

Nintendo

Xbox

PlayStation

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

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Courtesy of

Add OYE logo

A


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The Call Of Duty Video Game Was The Most Mentioned The Call Of Duty Video Game Was The Most Mentioned Game With 30% Of The Hispanic Total Conversation Game With 30% Of The Hispanic Total Conversation Top Video Games Mentioned By Hispanics June 15th – July 15th, 2015

TOP VIDEO GAMES MENTIONED BY HISPANICS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 30%

Call of Duty

28%

Halo

10%

Bungie

9%

Need For Speed

6%

Assassin's Creed

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.

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57

The law firm of Quarles & Brady is a proud sponsor of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

For more information about our legal services, please contact Leonardo Loo at (602) 229-5638 or leonardo.loo@quarles.com.

quarles.com


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$49 Million

Spent By Phoenix Hispanics On Motion Picture Admissions In 2014

22

%

That’s

H I S P A N I C

Of The Total Spent On Movie Admissions

Source: Hispanic Market Weekly, Vol. 17, Issue 41, October 21, 2013 Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanics Have Influence At The Movie Theater Cash Register

66

%

More Likely To See A Movie Opening Weekend

41

%

More Likely To Go To Movies 4+ Times/Month

vs. vs.

22

%

Less Likely For Non-Hispanics

13

%

Less Likely For Non-Hispanics

Projected Percentage Change in Total, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic Buying Power for U.S., 2012-2017 Courtesy of

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395,000

Hispanics Visited A Casino In The Past 12 Months Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Adults 21+ Courtesy of

Eighty-Three Percent Of Phoenix Hispanics 21+ Visited A Casino In The Past Year And Played The Slots Vs. 73% Of Non-Hispanics Eighty-Three Percent Of Phoenix Hispanics 21+ Visited A Casino In The Past Year Played The Slots Vs. 73% Of Non-Hispanics Casino Activities in the Past 12 Months

CASINO ACTIVITIES IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS 90% 80%

83%

73%

70% 60% 50% 40%

26% 28%

30%

25% 22%

24%

33% 18%

20%

24%

10% 0%

Slot Machines

Stage Show/Concert

Bar/Nightclub

Hispanic

Upscale Restaurant

Table Games

Non-Hispanic

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Hispanic Adults 21+; base: visited any casino in past year Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Hispanic Adults 21+; base: visited any casino in past year

Courtesy ofCourtesy of

Casinos Visited in the Last Year

CasinoCasinos Patrons 21+, sorted by Hispanic % ) Phoenix Hispanic Casino Patrons Visit (Among Local Phoenix Hispanic Casino Patrons Visit Local Casinos

CASINOS VISITED IN THE LAST YEAR (AMONG CASINO PATRONS 21+, SORTED BY HISPANIC % ) 33%

30% 20%

32%

29% 21%

24%

16%

20%

17%

23%

20% 15%

14%

13% 8%

Casino Arizona

Vee Quiva Casino

Wild Horse Pass Casino

Talking Stick Fort McDowell Resort & Casino Casino

Hispanic

A Z 59

Harrah's AkChin Casino

Any Las Vegas Casino

Non-Hispanic

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Phoenix DMA, Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 21+ Who Visited Any Casino in the Past 12 Source: Months Base: Adults 21+ Who Visited Any Casino in the Past 12 Months

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Forty-Five Percent of Phoenix Hispanics Purchase Lottery Tickets and Scratch-Off Tickets are their Favorite Forty-Five Percent of Phoenix Hispanic Purchase Lottery Tickets and Scratch-Off Tickets are their Favorite Types of Lottery Tickets Purchased

TYPES OF LOTTERY TICKETS PURCHASED

80%

71% 70% 60%

64%

64%

59%

47%

50% 40%

29%

30% 20% 10% 0%

Scratch-Off Tickets

Powerball Tickets

Hispanic

Other Tickets

Non-Hispanic

Sources: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Adults DMA; Base: Purchased a lottery ticket Sources: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough, 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Adults21+, 21+, Phoenix Phoenix DMA; in the past 30Base: daysPurchased a lottery ticket in the past 30 days

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NOTES

Notes

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Thirty-Seven Percent Of Phoenix Hispanic Adults 18-49 Thirty Percent Of Phoenix Hispanic Adults 18-49 With Kids Visited A Theme Park Last Year With Kids Visited A Theme Park Last Year

37%

63%

Non-Hispanic Hispanic

Hispanic

Source: PhoenixBase: Hispanic 2015 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Base: Adults 18-49 with 1+ kids under 18 Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), AdultsScarborough 18-49 with 1+ kidsRelease under 18 Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanics Are More Likely To Visit Theme Parks Phoenix Hispanics Are More Likely To Visit Theme Parks

Theme/Water Park Visited in the Past Year - Index

THEME/WATER PARK VISITED IN THE PAST YEAR - INDEX

180

163

160 140 120

150

149

127 111

100

82

80 60 40 20 0

Castles & Coasters

Wet 'n' Wild

Hispanics

Other Theme Park

Non-Hispanics

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Base: Adults 18-49 with 1+ kids

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Base: Adults 18-49 with 1+ kids under 18 under 18 Courtesy of

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The National Electorate Is Increasingly Diverse The National Electorate Is Increasingly Diverse

The percentage the iselectorate that is white is20 dramatically declining. • The percentage of the electorate that of is white dramatically declining. In the last years, white voters are making up 2-4% less of the overall electorate than the previous presidential election Beginning in 1992, white voters made up 2-4% less of the overall electorate than in each previous presidential election.

88%

88%

85%

85%

83%

83%

81%

77%

74%

72%

17%

19%

23%

26%

28%

1996

2000

2004

2008

2012

12%

12%

13%

13%

16%

1976

1980

1984

1988

1992

Non-Hispanic Whites

Minorities

Source: Resurgent Republic

Advertising Plays Significant Role

urce: Resurgent Republic

PERCENT THAT PREFERS TO RECEIVE CAMPAIGN INFORMATION VIA

TV Advertising

Radio Advertising

Newspaper Advertising

40 26 25 %

%

%

Sources: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

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President Obama’s Favorability Is High Among Millennials and Democratic Hispanics President Obama’s Favorability Is High Among Millennials and Democratic Hispanics…

Favorability: President Barack Obama

FAVORABILITY: PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA 39%

Independent

Party ID

Rep

48% 78%

14% 13%

Dem

77% 31%

Non-Millennials (35+)

58%

25%

Millennials (18-34)

62%

30%

Overall

59%

Unfavorable

Favorable

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore

Source: Univision’s Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Information,Hispanic/Latino May 2014. Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

The Majority Of Hispanic Voters Have Favorable Opinions Of President Obama And The Democratic Party The Majority Of Hispanic Voters Have Favorable Opinions Of President Obama And The Democratic Party

Phoenix DMA Hispanics

PHOENIX DMA HISPANICS 10%

28%

Democratic Party

10%

60%

30%

President Obama

59%

21%

41%

US Congress

35% 14%

55%

Republican Party

28% 25%

Tea Party

44%

15% No opinion/never heard of

Unfavorable

Favorable

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Research and Moore Information, May 2014. Information, May 2014.

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Overall, 78% Of Hispanics Are In Favor Of A Path To Citizenship, 85% Among Hispanic Millennials

Overall, 78% of Hispanics are in Favor of a Path to Citizenship, 85% among Hispanic Millennials “Generally speaking, do you favor or oppose a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants?”

85% 78%

“GENERALLY SPEAKING, DO YOU FAVOR OR OPPOSE A PATH TO CITIZENSHIP FOR

15%

UNDOCUMENTED

12%

6%

IMMIGRANTS?” Favor

Oppose

Overall

3%

Don't know

Millennials

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

Making College More Affordable Tops The List For Education Improvement “Which one of the following, in your opinion, would do the IN most to improve education in our country?” “WHICH ONE OF THE FOLLOWING, YOUR OPINION, WOULD DO THE MOST

MakingCollege MoreAffordable Tops TheListForEducation Improvement

TO IMPROVE EDUCATION IN OUR COUNTRY?” 2%

School vouchers

3% 4%

More charter schools

5% 6%

Increase funding for early childhood education programs

6% 5%

Increase funding for vocational education and training

7% 3%

More accountability for teachers

8%

Ensure all schools have necessary resources regardless of their neighborhoods

13% 17%

Increase funding for K-12 education Making college more affordable

Millennials

27%

20%

40% 28%

Overall

Sources: Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014. Sources: Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

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When Voting, Education And Jobs Are The Most Important Issues For Hispanics. Education Is Significantly More When Voting, Education And Jobs Are The Most Important Issues For Hispanics. Education Being Significantly More ImportantFor For The Younger Generation of Generation Hispanics. Important The Younger ofof Hispanics “Which one the following issues is most important in your vote for Congress and U.S. Senator, a candidate’s position on …”

11%

Crime and personal safety

“WHICH ONE OF THE FOLLOWING ISSUES IS MOST IMPORTANT IN YOUR VOTE FOR CONGRESS AND U.S. SENATOR, A CANDIDATE’S POSITION ON …”

How what they do will affect my personal economy Health care Government spending and the deficit Social Security and Medicare Immigration Jobs

6%

10% 7% 5% 9% 11% 11% 3% 12% 15% 12% 18% 19%

Education

Millennials

27%

21%

Overall

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino VoterUnivision’s Surveys: Hispanic/Latino California, Texas, DMA, Phoenix DMA , DMA, MiamiPhoenix DMA DMA and ,Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted collaboration with David Source: Voter Chicago Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAsinconducted in collaboration withBinder David Binder Research and Moore Research and Moore Information, Information, May 2014.May 2014.

What Influences Their Vote? “WHICH ONE OF THE FOLLOWING WOULD YOU SAY HAS THE GREATEST INFLUENCE ON YOUR DECISION TO VOTE IN ELECTIONS?” ALL

MILLENNIALS

38%

CANDIDATE DEBATES

43%

CANDIDATE DEBATES

16%

CANDIDATE INTERVIEWS

17%

CANDIDATE INTERVIEWS

13%

LOCAL NEWS COVERAGE

14%

LOCAL NEWS COVERAGE

11%

CAMPAIGN ADVERTISING

13%

CAMPAIGN ADVERTISING

10%

FAMILY AND FRIENDS

13%

FAMILY AND FRIENDS

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

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Consistent Communication Is The Most Important Consistent Communication Is The Most Important Determinant For The Hispanic Vote Determinant For TOTAL The Hispanic Vote “If you could tell a candidate who wants your vote one thing that would help them get your vote, which one of the following things would you say?”

TOTAL

“IF YOU COULD TELL A CANDIDATE WHO WANTS YOUR VOTE ONE THING THAT WOULD HELP THEM GET YOUR VOTE, WHICH ONE OF THE FOLLOWING THINGS WOULD YOU SAY?”

9%

Talk to me directly, in Spanish if you can

Make your message simple

13%

Meet the people

14%

25%

Tell me who you are and what you represent

32%

Communicate consistently, not just before the election

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

urce: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore ormation, May 2014.

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Arizona Hispanics Represent 18% Of The Total Electorate & 32% Adult 18-24 Voters REGISTERED VOTERS

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

ARIZONA

2,886,972

519,212

18%

REGISTERED VOTERS BY AGE

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

18 TO 24

220,928

70,038

25 TO 34

425,226

107,347

35 TO 49

656,024

137,081

50 TO 64

797,286

120,891

65+

786,165

83,731

32% 25% 21% 15% 11%

ARIZONA HISPANIC REGISTERED VOTER

46 % 54 GENDER

%

Source: Audience Partners/Labels and Lists, Voter Registration Data, Data Run May 2015, State of Arizona

Arizona Latino Voter Party Affiliation

REGISTERED VOTERS

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

ARIZONA

2,886,972

519,212

18%

REGISTERED VOTERS BY PARTY

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

DEMOCRAT

845,044

233,177

REPUBLICAN

997,434

78,298

INDEPENDENT

993,425

200,850

OTHER

51,069

6,887

28% 8% 20% 13%

% TOTAL

% HISPANIC

29% 35% 34% 2%

45% 15% 39% 1%

% Of Total Registered Voters By Party

DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN INDEPENDENT OTHER

Source: Audience Partners/Labels and Lists, Voter Registration Data, Data Run May 2015, State of Arizona

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Phoenix Hispanics Represent 15% Of The Total Electorate & 29% Adult 18-24 Voters REGISTERED VOTERS

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

PHOENIX DMA

2,259,668

348,675

15%

REGISTERED VOTERS BY AGE

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

18 TO 24

170,889

48,751

25 TO 34

332,134

73,031

35 TO 49

526,749

93,714

50 TO 64

624,291

80,069

65+

604,550

53,031

29% 22% 18% 13% 9%

PHOENIX HISPANIC REGISTERED VOTER

47 % 53 GENDER

%

Source: Audience Partners/Labels and Lists, Voter Registration Data, Data Run May 2015, Phoenix (Prescott) DMA

Phoenix Latino Voter Party Affiliation

REGISTERED VOTERS

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

PHOENIX DMA

2,259,668

348,675

15%

REGISTERED VOTERS BY PARTY

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

DEMOCRAT

616,430

148,751

REPUBLICAN

812,050

54,297

INDEPENDENT

788,263

140,659

OTHER

42,925

4,968

24% 7% 18% 12%

% TOTAL

% HISPANIC

27% 36% 35% 2%

43% 16% 40% 1%

% Of Total Registered Voters By Party

DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN INDEPENDENT OTHER

Source: Audience Partners/Labels and Lists, Voter Registration Data, Data Run May 2015, Phoenix DMA

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PHOENIX DMA HISPANIC ELECTORATE Phoenix  DMA  Hispanic  Electorate AGES 18+ Ages  18+  

1 in 5 Phoenix DMA Hispanics is a Millennial

1 In 5

21%

Phoenix DMA Hispanics Is A

Millennial

47%

33%

55+

Age 35-54

Age 18-34

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys:Source: California, Texas,Hispanic/Latino Chicago DMA, Phoenix , Miami DMA and DMA, Tampa/Orlando Univision’s Voter Surveys:DMA California, Texas, Chicago Phoenix DMADMAs , Miamiconducted in collaboration with David Binder DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Research and Moore Information, May 2014. Information, May 2014.

High Percentage of the Phoenix DMA Hispanic Electorate is Bilingual

High Percentage of the Phoenix DMA Hispanic Electorate is Bilingual

Language use Hispanic vo Phoe

LANGUAGE USED AT HOME AMONG HISPANIC VOTERS THAT RESIDE IN PHOENIX DMA

19%

*Bilingual includes: Mostly Spanish but some English, Spanish and English about equally, Mostly English but some Spanish.

65%

16% Phoenix Only Spanish

Bilingual

Only English

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

*Bilingual includes: Mostly Spanish but A Z DA O S about some English, Spanish andTEnglish 69 equally, Mostly English but some Spanish .

2 0 Source: 1 5Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texa

DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with D Information, May 2014.


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Except for Millennials, Phoenix DMA Hispanic Voters Are Pessimistic “IN GENERAL, HOW DO YOU THINK THINGS IN THE PHOENIX DMA ARE GOING? – ARE IN THE DIRECTION, “JustTHINGS in general,MOVING how do you think thingsRIGHT in the Phoenix DMA are going – are things Phoenix DMAHispanicVoe t rsArePessimisitc in the THE right direction, or are things off on the wrong track?” OR ARE THINGSmoving OFF ON WRONG TRACK?”

47%

52%

51%

50%

49% 42%

36%

Overall

35%

Millennials (18-34)

32%

43%

40%

31%

Non-Millennials (35+)

Right Direction

Democrat

Republican

Independent

Wrong Track

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino VoterInformation, Surveys: California, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014. Research and Moore May Texas, 2014.

Three-Fourths of Hispanic Voters

73

Consume Media in Spanish

%

In The Phoenix DMA

(TV, RADIO, NEWSPAPERS)

Source: Univision’s Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

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A Sense of Duty Motivates Them to Vote “I want to do my part. Sometimes we take for granted the possibility we have of voting, and we have to take advantage of that for our future and our kids. If we don’t vote, we are leaving the responsibility to others to decide our future.” —Older bilingual millennial Sources: Hispanic/Latino Voter Surveys: California, Texas, Chicago DMA, Phoenix DMA , Miami DMA and Tampa/Orlando DMAs conducted in collaboration with David Binder Research and Moore Information, May 2014.

Tucson Hispanics Represent 25% Of The Total Electorate & 39% Adult 18-24 Voters REGISTERED VOTERS

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

TUCSON DMA

537,731

134,727

25%

REGISTERED VOTERS BY AGE

TOTAL

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

18 TO 24

41,000

16,103

25 TO 34

76,628

26,085

35 TO 49

108,476

33,889

50 TO 64

151,245

33,097

65+

160,170

25,518

39% 34% 31% 22% 16%

TUCSON DMA HISPANIC REGISTERED VOTER

47 % 53 GENDER

Source: Audience Partners/Labels and Lists, Voter Registration Data, Data Run May 2015, Tucson (Sierra Vista) DMA

For More Information On Southern Arizona, Refer To Datos Tucson 2015 DON’T MISS OUT!

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%


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TECHNOLOGY

“The information provided by DATOS is a valuable resource, and is essential reading for anyone in public policy, working with nonprofits or wanting their business to thrive.” —Suzanne Pfister, President and CEO, St. Luke’s Health Initiatives

Hispanics Narrow The Digital Divide In a wide range of categories from cellphone and smartphone

Among the reason PwC study cites for high mobile phone

usage to social media and Internet access, U.S. Hispanics are

usage among Hispanics:

adopting new media technology at a record pace and nar-

rowing the digital divide.

Hispanic consumers also report that mobile technology is appealing to them given its relative affordability.

“Hispanic consumers have adopted and embraced mobile

technology at an equivalent or greater extent than Non-

Hispanic consumers mentioned the appeal of mobile devices as an intriguing “new toy.”

Hispanics across a wide variety of activities,” a PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) study found. “Among Hispanic consum-

ers who use mobile devices, smartphone and tablet ownership

Through streaming and downloading content, especially from free sites, mobile technology provides

is similar, but frequency of mobile device usage skews higher

access to a full complement of video entertainment

among Hispanic consumers across a wide array of activities.”

(including Spanish language, as desired).

For example, the percentage of Hispanics using mobile phones

Of the approximately 970,000 Hispanic adults in the Phoenix

has reached parity with the general population nationwide, according to the Journal of Medical Internet Research. His-

metro area, 89 percent, or 860,000, go online, according to

panics are more likely than Non-Hispanics to use their smart-

a 2015 Hispanic Scarborough survey. Of the approximately

phones for a variety of activities, including downloading elec-

298,000 Hispanic adults in the Tucson metro area, 84 per-

tronic coupons, paying for goods and services with a credit

cent, or 249,000, go online.

card and downloading a video, according to the findings in

Scarborough also reports that Internet access among Hispan-

PwC’s Consumer Intelligence series called “Mi Movíl.” That

ics in Phoenix has grown 28 percent since 2010. More than

report also concluded that Hispanics are also more likely to

half of Hispanic households in Phoenix have a laptop or desk-

own a smartphone or tablet than Non-Hispanics.

top computer, as compared to 70 percent of Non-Hispanic

In Phoenix, the percentage of Hispanics who own a mobile

households. Asked in a survey by Simmons NHCS if the Inter-

device has now surpassed mobile device ownership by Non-

net is a “trusted medium,” 63 percent of Hispanics said “yes.”

Hispanics, 87 to 79 percent, according to a 2015 Hispanic Scarborough survey. In the 10 major urban markets, which

Hispanics are big social media fans. As Facebook’s audience

account for more than 80 percent of the U.S. Hispanic popula-

topped 1 billion in August, 90 percent of Hispanics online

tion, Phoenix has the third highest rate of smartphone penetra-

use social media. Hispanic Scarborough also found that 67

tion behind Denver and Dallas and just ahead of Houston.

percent of Hispanics with smartphones use social media apps.

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Hispanic Usage Of Technology Is Gaining Parity CONSUMER TECHNOLOGY CHAPTER 3 Adjusted Digital Technology Usage Percentages by Race/Ethnic Group

BEHAVIOR

Hispanic Usage Of Technology Is Gaining Parity

96% 96% ADJUSTED DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY USAGE PERCENTAGES BY RACE/ETHNIC GROUP 91% Use Internet via Smartphone (b) 85% 91% Use Email (b) 82% 81% Use Text (b) 80% 79% Use Facebook (b) 74% 79% Use Internet via Computer (b) 61% 58% Download any apps 44% 38% Use Twitter (b) 18% 20% Download health apps 12% Use Mobile Phone (a,b)

All (N=904)

Latino (N=248)

Mobile phone=non-smartphones+smartphones. At least 1x/week in the last month. (a) Mobile phone=non-smartphones+smar tph ones. Some variables have missing data, percentages are based on the n for each individual variable per group. (b) At least 1x/week in the last month. Source: JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2014 Oct-Dec; 2(4): Some variables have missing data, percentages are based on the n for each individual variable per group.e43 Source: JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2014 Oct-Dec; 2(4): e43 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4259923/table/table2/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4259923/table/table2/

Hispanics Are More Likely Than Non-Hispanics To Use Hispanics MoreToLikely Than Non-Hispanics To Use Their Are Phone Go Online Than A Computer Their Phone To Go Online Than A Computer

PERCENT OF SMARTPHONE OWNERS WHO USE THEIR PHONE TO GO ONLINE Percent of Smartphone Owners WhoTHAN Use Their Phone to go Online More Than a Computer MORE A COMPUTER

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

45

38

%

%

Source: Experian Marketing Services, 2014 http://www.experian.com/blogs/marketing-forward/2014/05/19/hispanics-are-mobile-dominant-are-your-campaigns/

Source: Experian Marketing Services, 2014 www.experian.com/blogs/marketing-forward/2014/05/19/hispanics-are-mobile-dominant-are-your-campaigns/

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Hispanics Are More Likely To Use Messaging And Visit Websites On Their Smartphone Than Non-Hispanics SMARTPHONE ACTIVITIES DURING A TYPICAL WEEK HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

Messaging

93%

91%

Talk

92%

93%

Visit Websites

90%

89%

Email

80%

82%

Social Network

71%

70%

Download apps

69%

69%

Play games

57%

56%

Watch video

55%

40%

Camera

53%

53%

GPS

48%

40%

Listen to music

36%

31%

IM/Chat

36%

21%

Read News

17%

19%

Source: Experian Marketing Services, 2014 www.experian.com/blogs/marketing-forward/2014/05/19/hispanics-are-mobile-dominant-are-your-campaigns/

Hispanics Are More Likely To Use Their Phones While Engaging In A Variety Of Activities

Hispanics MoreDoing Likely Use Their Phones PercentAre of Respondents These To Activities At Least Once a Week While Engaging In A Variety Of Activities

27% 24%

Use an app to access a business network

25% 17%

Download electronic coupons which are then scanned at the store register from my phone Pay for physical goods/services in a store with a credit/debit card electronically stored on my phone Use an app to access customer service/get answers regarding Internet (cell service)

13% 12%

Make travel reservations or purchases online (e.g. airline, hotel, car rental, train ticket, etc.) Purchase movie/show tickets Purchase tickets to a live show, concert or sporting event

Hispanics

9% 9% 7%

A Z 75

15%

10% 6%

Non-Hispanics

2 0 1 5

17%

13%

Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Consumer Intelligence Series, Mi Móvil, 2014 Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Consumer Intelligence Series, Mi Móvil, 2014 www.pwc.com/us/en/industry/entertainment-media/publications/consumer-intelligence-series/assets/pwc-consumer-intelligence-series-hispanic-consumers-mobile-technology.pdf http://www.pwc.com/us/en/industry/entertainment-media/publications/consumer-intelligence-series/assets/pwc-consumer-intelligence-series-hispanic-consumers-mobile-technology.pdf

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21%

19% 13%

Get loyalty/points at checkout when using my phone to pay (replaces loyalty cards) Download (permanently transfer a video file from the internet), e.g. a movie/TV show

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Hispanic Consumers Stream and Download

Hispanic Consumers Stream and Download Video VideoContent ContentMore More Than Non-Hispanics Than Non-Hispanics Percent of respondents doing activity at least once per week

PERCENT OF RESPONDENTS DOING ACTIVITY AT LEAST ONCE PER WEEK

43% 37% 25% 17%

Streaming Video

Downloading Video

Hispanics

Non-Hispanics

Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Consumer Intelligence Series, Mi Móvil, 2014 Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Consumer Intelligence Series, Mi Móvil, 2014 http://www.pwc.com/us/en/industry/entertainment-media/publications/consumer-intelligence-series/assets/pwc-consumer-intelligence-series-hispanic-consumers-mobile-technology.pdf

www.pwc.com/us/en/industry/entertainment-media/publications/consumer-intelligence-series/assets/pwc-consumer-intelligence-series-hispanic-consumers-mobile-technology.pdf

Among Mobile Users, Hispanics Tend To Own More Among Mobile Users, Hispanics TendThan To Own More Smartphones Smartphones And Tablets Non-Hispanics And Tablets Than Non-Hispanics

Device Ownership Among MobileUSERS Users DEVICE OWNERSHIP AMONG MOBILE

95% 93%

Smartphone

53% 51%

Tablet

65%

Laptop

73%

54% 53%

Desktop Computer

Hispanics

Non-Hispanics

Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Consumer Intelligence Series, Mi Móvil, 2014 http://www.pwc.com/us/en/industry/entertainment-media/publications/consumer-intelligence-series/assets/pwc-consumer-intelligence-series-hispanic-consumers-mobile-technology.pdf

Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Consumer Intelligence Series, Mi Móvil, 2014 www.pwc.com/us/en/industry/entertainment-media/publications/consumer-intelligence-series/assets/pwc-consumer-intelligence-series-hispanic-consumers-mobile-technology.pdf

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Latinos And Blacks Are More Likely Than Whites To Use Instagram, But Less Likely To Use Pinterest Latinos%And AreUSERS More Likely Whites To Use Instagram, ButRACE Less Likely To Use Pinterest OF Blacks INTERNET WHO Than USE EACH SOCIAL MEDIA SITE, BY AND ETHNICITY % of internet users who use each social media site, by race and ethnicity

Black

Latino 73%

Facebook

34%

Instagram Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn

67%

Facebook

38%

Instagram

25%

27%

Twitter

21%

12%

Pinterest

18%

28%

LinkedIn

White

All 71%

Facebook Instagram

21%

Instagram

Twitter

21%

Twitter

32%

Pinterest

29%

LinkedIn

71%

Facebook

26% 23%

Pinterest

28%

LinkedIn

28%

Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet Project September Combined Omnibus Survey, Sept. 11-14, 2014 and Sept. 18-21, 2014. N=1,445 internet Users

Source:http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/02/03/social-media-preferences-vary-by-race-and-ethnicity/ Pew Research Center’s Internet Project September Combined Omnibus Survey, Sept. 11-14, 2014 and Sept. 18-21, 2014. N=1,445 internet Users www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/02/03/social-media-preferences-vary-by-race-and-ethnicity/

The Mobile Phone/Smartphone Is Quickly Becoming The Device Of Choice To Access The Mobile Phone / Smartphone Is Quickly The Internet By Hispanic Users Becoming The

Device Of Choice To Access The Internet By Hispanic Users

PRIMARY DEVICE USED TOToACCESS THEinternet INTERNET ACCORDING TO US HISPANIC INTERNET USERS Primary Device Used Access the according to US Hispanic Internet Users, 2012-2014 2012-2014 48%

2012

41%

2013

2014

24%

24%

34%

Laptop

16%

22%

24%

Desktop Computer

26%

Mobile Phone/Smartphone

Tablet

Note: Ages 18+; numbers may not add up to 100% due to rounding Note: Ages 18+; numbers may not add up to 100% due to rounding Source: Gfk, “The Quest: Connect In-Language or In-Culture Across Generations,” 2014 Source:Unended Gfk, “The Unended Quest:How How toto Connect In-Language or In-Culture Across Generations,” 2014 http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Dont-Skimp-on-Mobile-Data/1012192 www.emarketer.com/Article/Hispanics-Dont-Skimp-on-Mobile-Data/1012192

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4% 2% 4%

4% 2% 5%

8% 3% 4%

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Hispanics Are Active Digital Consumers The Internet Is A Trusted Medium

Increased Access To Information

%

%

63

Using For Entertainment

54

Agree, “For Information, The First Place I Look Is The Internet”

36

%

Agree, “The Internet Has Increased My Desire To Search For Information”

Agree, “The Internet Has Become A Primary Source Of Entertainment For My Family” vs. 30% Non-Hispanic

Source: Simmons NHCS Winter 2015, Full Year. Base: Hispanic A18+ Online User (used any websites in the last 30 days).

Courtesy of Hispanic Internet Access Lags Slightly Behind Non-Hispanic

U.S. Adults 18+ Who Access The Internet

U.S. ADULTS 18+ WHO ACCESS THE INTERNET

Hispanic Internet Access Lags Slightly Behind Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic 83.5%

81.3%

88.9%

80.0%

77.8%

86.4% 85.6%

74.2% 74.7%

84.7%

+5%

+13% 2010

2011

86.9% 87.0%

2012

2013

2014

2015

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Courtesy of (Univision AZ logo)

Source: Simmons NHCS Winter 2010 – Winter 2015, Full Year, Population Adults 18+; “Online” defined as Access Internet - YES

Source: Simmons NHCS Winter 2010 – Winter 2015, Full Year, Population Adults 18+; “Online” defined as Access Internet - YES Courtesy of

Despite Access Issues, U.S. Hispanics Are Online More Increasingly Than Non-Hispanics Access Issues, U.S. Hispanics Are Online

Despite Those Who Have Been Online In Past 30 Days 2010-2015 More Increasingly Than Non-Hispanics THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN ONLINE IN PAST 30 DAYS – 2010-2015 75%

66%

61%

59%

43% 30%

21% 9%

3% A18-34

21%

A35-44

A45-54

Non-Hispanic

A55+

A18+

Hispanic

Source: Simmons NHCS Winter 2010 – Winter 2015, Full Year, Population US A18+; Base: Who have visited a website in past 30 days Source: Simmons NHCS Winter 2010 – Winter 2015, Full Year, Population US A18+; Base: Who have visited a website in past 30 days

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Phoenix Has…

967,000 Hispanic Adults

IN THE PHOENIX DMA

861,000

89%

838,000

87%

Hispanic Adults THAT ARE ONLINE

Hispanic Adults

WITH A MOBILE DEVICE

651,000

67%

Hispanic Adults ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, Phoenix, 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Hispanics 18+ Courtesy of

Since 2010, Internet Use By Hispanics

Since 2010, Internet Use By Hispanics Grew 28% Points GrewVs.28% Vs. Non-Hispanics 9% Non-Hispanics 9% Points Internet Penetration in Phoenix

INTERNET PENETRATION IN PHOENIX 82%

61%

2010

84%

68%

2011

85%

84%

90%

91%

87%

89%

2014

2015

77%

74%

2012

2013

Non-Hispanics

Hispanics

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2010-2015 Release 1, Phoenix; “Internet Use” defined as any Internet Access.

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2010-2015 Release 1, Phoenix; “Internet Use” defined as any Internet Access.

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Courtesy of (Univision AZ logo) Courtesy of


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More Than Half Of Phoenix Hispanic Households Have A Desktop And/Or Laptop Computer More Than Half Of Phoenix Hispanic Households Have A Desktop And / Or Laptop Computer Technology Usage In Household

Phoenix-Metropolitan TECHNOLOGY USAGE IN HOUSEHOLD April/May 2015 PHOENIX-METROPOLITAN APRIL/MAY 2015 72.3%

70.9%

70.7%

65.7% 58.9%

55.5%

50.9% 42.3%

46.9%

39.3%

34.5% 22.9%

Basic Cellphone

Smartphone

Desktop Computer

Hispanic

Laptop Computer

Tablet Computer

E-Reader

Non-Hispanic

Source: WestTrack Market Monitor April/May 2015, WestGroup Research

Source: WestTrack Market Monitor April/May 2015, WestGroup Research

Half Of Phoenix Hispanic Households Conduct Online Banking And One-Third Make Half Of Phoenix Hispanic Households Conduct Online Banking And OneRegular Purchases Online Third Make Regular Purchases Online

Online Services Usage USAGE ONLINE SERVICES Phoenix-Metropolitan PHOENIX-METROPOLITAN April/May 2015 APRIL/MAY 2015

66.4% 54.0%

48.0% 34.9%

Conducts at least some online banking

Hispanic

Shops regularly online

Non-Hispanic

Source: WestTrack Market Monitor April/May 2015, WestGroup Research

Source: WestTrack Market Monitor April/May 2015, WestGroup Research

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Mobile Device Ownership By Phoenix Hispanics Has Now Surpassed Mobile Device Mobile Device OwnershipByByNon-Hispanics Phoenix Hispanics Has Now Ownership Surpassed Mobile Device Ownership By Non-Hispanics MOBILE DEVICE PENETRATION IN Phoenix PHOENIX Mobile Device Penetration in

100%

87%

90% 80%

79%

70% 60%

46%

50% 40%

41%

30%

17%

20% 10%

9%

0%

2010

2011

2012

2013

Non-Hispanics

2014

2015

Hispanics

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2010-2015 Release 1, Phoenix; “Mobile Device” defined as a Tablet or Smartphone.

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2010-2015 Release 1, Phoenix; “Mobile Device” defined as a Tablet or Smartphone.

Courtesy of (Univision AZ logo)

Courtesy of

Since Phoenix Hispanics Have At The The Since2010, 2010, Phoenix Hispanics HaveIncreased Increased At Same Usage SameRate Rate As Non-Hispanics Non-HispanicsWith WithSocial Social Media Media Usage Social Media Penetration in Phoenix SOCIAL MEDIA PENETRATION IN PHOENIX

47% 29%

37%

62%

57%

50%

68% 67%

59%

56%

43%

23%

2010

2011

2012

2013

Non-Hispanics

2014

2015

Hispanics

Courtesy of (Univision AZ logo) Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2010-2015 Release 1, Phoenix; Source: Hispanic Scarborough 1, Phoenix; “Social “Social Media” defined as having spent 2010-2015 any time on socialRelease media websites in the past 30 days.Media” defined as having spent any time on social media websites in the Courtesy of past 30 days.

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Phoenix Online Hispanics Top Website/Apps Visited During Past Month AMONG PHOENIX HISPANIC ONLINE ADULTS 18+ (SORTED BY HISPANIC %) WEBSITE/APP VISITED (PAST MONTH)

PHOENIX HISPANIC % COMPOSITION INDEX

WEBSITE/APP VISITED (PAST MONTH)

PHOENIX HISPANIC % COMPOSITION INDEX

1.

Google

75%

105

11. Cox

20%

79

2.

Facebook

69%

113

12. MSN

19%

117

3.

YouTube

59%

132

13. ESPN

19%

114

4.

craigslist

47%

127

14. Google+

18%

161

5.

Pandora

44%

168

15. Wikipedia

18%

78

6.

Netflix

40%

123

16. Pinterest

17%

126

7.

Yahoo!

36%

117

17. Bing

15%

86

8.

Amazon

36%

91

18. Groupon

14%

82

9.

eBay

25%

117

19. FOXNews

14%

91

10. Instagram

23%

170

20. ABCNews

13%

99

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Release 1 2015 (Feb14-Jan15), Phoenix, Hispanic Adults 18+; Base: Access Internet Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person

Courtesy of

Phoenix Online Hispanics Top Media Websites Visited During Past Month AMONG PHOENIX ONLINE HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ (SORTED BY HISPANIC %)

MEDIA WEBSITE VISITED (PAST MONTH) 1.

Azcentral.com/12 News online

2.

MyFoxPhoenix.com

3.

ABC15.com

4.

Cox.com

5.

AZFamily.com

6.

Univision.com/UnivisionArizona.com

7.

AZTV.com

8.

TelemundoArizona.com

9.

Power983.com (KKFR-FM)

PHOENIX HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

PHOENIX SPANISH-DOMINANT HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

21% 18% 15% 15% 13% 13% 7% 7% 5% 4% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2%

10. My45.com 11. Tricolor1035.com (KLNZ-FM) 12. KPHO.com 13. Mega1043.com (KAJM-FM) 14. Azthebeat.com (KNRJ-FM) 15. 1047kissfm.com (KZZP-FM)

7% 8% 7% 10% 5% 25% 1% 13% 3% 2% 5% 1% 0.1% 0% 3%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Phoenix, Hispanic Adults 18+ and Span Dom Hispanic Adults 18+; Base: Access Internet

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Education Evangelist Preaches The Gospel Of Technology Jaime Casap Jaime Casap may have one of the most provocatively grandiose job titles around: Chief Education Evangelist.

Casap said he also been impressed by the students participating in the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, or YEA!, which teaches high schoolers from Phoenix Union the start-to-finish skills needed to launch and operate a small business. Casap served as a judge in last year’s regional YEA! competition. The national program trains thousands of students every year. Eighteen Phoenix Union students took part in the local YEA! program, sponsored by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Then again, he does work for Google, Inc., one of the most provocatively innovative technology companies on the planet. So, maybe his job title is a good fit. Casap’s mission is to promote the use of technology in education to students and educators around the world. It’s a big task, but Casap comes armed with big ideas. “What we need in education is iteration and innovation,” Casap says. “We need to continually iterate education in pursuit of making it a powerful, effective, and engaging learning experience.” While our nation has relied on an education model that allowed us to achieve tremendous progress over the past 150 years, Casap adds, “What we need to do now is to think about how education supports the economy that we’re facing, which is global, network-based and knowledge-based. We need a globally collaborative system. I believe technology is the catalyst to help us do that.” Casap says he is encouraged by the response he gets whenever he delivers his message to students, teachers and school administrators, as well as private industry leaders.

Phoenix Union is a predominantly Hispanic school district, and many of its students are low income or recent immigrants, factors that Casap says should never be viewed as an impediment. “I don’t believe in reality,” Casap said. “Reality is perception. Saying that we can’t do something because there is segregation or we have to solve poverty first are excuses.… The truth is that all kids have the potential to succeed if we set up the right structures.” The message Casap said he delivers to school administrators and education policymakers across the globe is that “innovation is hard work and it takes hard work to innovate.” It’s work that has to be done, said Casap, because innovation is what today’s world is demanding more and every day.

“I see lots of examples of people getting on board with that idea. I’m starting to see this in a lot of school systems in the country. I’m starting to see the empowerment of teachers and students and superintendents.” For example, Phoenix Union High School District is developing “The Phoenix Coding Academy” that will emphasize teaching programming and computer science. The academy is set to open in a building next door to Central High School in 2016.

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Photos Courtesy of Jaime Casap

In a recent interview with AZEDNEWS.com, Phoenix Union Superintendent Kent P. Scribner said, “We already have coding classes such as game development, web design, mobile app development and traditional application programming at several existing schools. Careers requiring coding and programming are exploding, and our students are underrepresented in the industry. They are the next generation of coders.”

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Phoenix Ranks 3rd In Hispanic Smartphone Penetration % OF HOUSEHOLDS WITH A SMARTPHONE

82%

HISPANIC TOTAL US

91%

DENVER

88%

DALLAS

85%

PHOENIX

85%

HOUSTON

83%

SAN FRANCISCO

83%

SACRAMENTO

83%

CHICAGO

79%

NEW YORK

78%

MIAMI

78%

LOS ANGELES

#3

And Hispanic Smartphone Penetration in Phoenix is Higher than the Phoenix Total

Source: Local Watch Report Quarter 2 2015, The Nielsen Company; Mobile Insights, P13+, FEB2015 vs FEB2014 Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanic Smartphone/Tablet Ownership And Usage

77%

57%

of Phoenix Hispanic HH’s own Smartphones

of Phoenix Hispanic HH’s own Tablets

INDEX- VARIOUS WAYS HISPANICS USE INTERNET/APPS ON SMARTPHONE VS TABLET DOWNLOAD/ WATCH MOVIES

WATCH ONLINE SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE (NETFLIX, ETC)

WATCH VIDEOS (YOUTUBE, ETC)

LISTEN TO RADIO (LOCAL OR INTERNET)

DOWNLOAD/ BUY MUSIC (ITUNES, ETC)

DOWNLOAD/ PLAY GAMES

SOCIAL MEDIA

INSTANT MESSAGING

Smartphone

184

165

136

135

120

118

117

114

Tablet

122

64

101

159

110

83

83

72

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15) Phoenix, Hispanic Adults 18+; Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person; sorted by Smartphone

Courtesy of

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Hispanics Are Super Social!

90

%

of Online Hispanic Adults 18+ are Social Media Users vs. 86% of Non-Hispanics Content shared by Hispanics is

Hispanic Consumers

Share Content

35% more likely

5X

More Often

to be clicked on by others

Than Non-Hispanics Source: Simmons NHCS Winter 2015, Full year, Population Adults 18+; Base: “Online” defined as visited website/search engine in past 30 days; “Social Media User” defined by Simmons as visited social media websites in past 30 days, visited online sharing sites, or engaged in online social media activities (i.e. blogging) in past 30 days.

Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanic Social Media Users

67

AMONG PHOENIX HISPANIC ADULTS 18+

% USE SOCIAL MEDIA APPS

TIME SPENT USING SOCIAL MEDIA PHOENIX HISPANICS % COMPOSITION

PHOENIX NON-HISPANICS % COMPOSITION

HISPANIC INDEX TO TOTAL

< 1 hour

40%

48%

117

1-2 hours

23%

28%

119

3-4 hours

13%

8%

189

5+ hours

12%

4%

272

TIME SPENT/AVG DAY

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1(Feb14-Jan15) Phoenix, Hispanic Adults 18+; Base: Visited Social Media site past month Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person

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Hispanics Actively Use Actively Their Phones ForPhones Apps And Shopping Hispanics Use Their For Apps AndMobile Shopping Media Usage % MOBILE MEDIA USAGE %

60% 54% 39%

App Downloads

36%

Mobile Shopping

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Nielsen, Mobile Insights, Q4 2014. Base: All Smartphone Users 2+

Courtesy of (Univision AZ logo)

Source: Nielsen, Mobile Insights, Q4 2014. Base: All Smartphone Users 2+

Netflix Usage Is Higher Among Hispanics Total US

Hispanics

Netflix (DVD/Streaming)

38%

45%

Netflix Streaming

35%

44%

Hulu Total

16%

16%

Hulu Plus

7%

7%

Basic Hulu

11%

11%

Amazon Prime Instant Video

15%

10%

Source: Nielsen, 2014 SUBSCRIPTION video-on-demand survey Courtesy of

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Tucson Has…

298,000 Hispanic Adults IN THE TUCSON DMA

249,000 Hispanic Adults

THAT ARE ONLINE

236,000 Hispanic Adults

WITH A MOBILE DEVICE

179,000 Hispanic Adults

ON SOCIAL MEDIA

84

%

79% 60%

Source: Scarborough, Tucson, 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15), Hispanics 18+ Courtesy of

For More Information On Southern Arizona, Refer To Datos Tucson 2015 DON’T MISS OUT!

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CASE STUDY

MassMutual MISSION

as reported by OYE! data include the launch of their Spanish

In early 2015, OYE! Business Intelligence partnered with

website in March as well as their partnership with ALPFA in

Fortune 100 financial institution MassMutual to compile 12

July. As of August 2015, MassMutual has experienced an

months of social media data from Hispanic consumers in the

upward trend in Hispanic online mentions with total conver-

financial industry. The goal was to use this data to build the

sation increasing month over month. Inspiring as well, are

best strategy to reach the Hispanic community as well as

OYE!’s findings that positive sentiment has increased consis-

bring more awareness of MassMutual’s extensive financial

tently for MassMutual, up to 60% in July of 2015. Overall,

education efforts among their target market. The plan was

the Hispanic community has responded very well to Mass-

to monitor publicly available online conversations via social

Mutual’s continued efforts and the brand has achieved un-

media in order to listen to what Hispanics were saying about

der 1% negative sentiment every month since measurement

the brand as well as their competitors in the industry.

began in January 2014.

APPROACH

Other valuable insights MassMutual learned through the

OYE! was used to closely monitor all relevant online conver-

data included: •

sations surrounding the MassMutual brand among Hispan-

The financial service industry’s top 5 brands that de-

ics. Among other marketing data the OYE! solution tracked

livered over 75% of share of voice among the US

were the conversation drivers, volume, and sentiment of

Hispanics in 2014 were New York Life, State Farm,

conversations. OYE! analyzed the conversations Hispanic

Allstate, MetLife and Farmers. •

consumers were already saying about the brand and helped

Brands that appeared in the top 5 had dedicated

MassMutual understand the different aspects of where their

campaigns directed at Hispanics such as Ritmo De

most useful audience segments are as well as to create cam-

Cambio from State Farm. •

paigns tailored to the identified audience. A report was

Hispanics tended to use Spanish more frequently

compiled to provide key insights to the MassMutual team on

when they generated their own social media con-

the Hispanic audience and was supported by recommenda-

tent than when responding to content published by

tions on ways to engage the consumers from OYE!.

brands or influencers in English. •

Conversation spiked throughout the year around

RESULTS

Hispanic Awareness Month and during campaigns

Based on the marketing data insights and observations that

designed to deliver Hispanic engagement such as

were found during the online listening process, OYE! was

partners with local causes and non-profits. •

able to make recommendations aimed at improving involve-

The 35-44 age group was the highest engaged

ment between the online Hispanic community and the Mass-

group in the financial services industry. Although,

Mutual brand. By using OYE! insights on a monthly basis as

male conversation was more prevalent at 56%, it

part of their overall strategy, MassMutual has grown their en-

was noted that in younger age groups, Hispanic

gagement with the Hispanic community compared to 2014.

women are more heavily engaged in the conversa-

Efforts that have driven high awareness throughout the year

tion.

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MassMutual Case Study

MassMutual above mentioning their activation with partner, ALPFA and their 2015 convention with Spanish postings.

MassMutual’s progress in the last three months in increasing Hispanic conversation.

For more information, contact Eric Diaz, Nativa Multicultural Communications Co-owner and Co-Founder of OYE! Business Intelligence at 602-277-0224

Through online listening, OYE! was able to identify agency superstars such as MassMutual South Texas in their post above supporting the Latina Leadership Institute through the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

www.thenativa.com www.linkedin.com/in/ediaz33

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Photos Courtesy of Oye!

MassMutual was able to drive Bilingual language for the month of July through their partnership with ALPFA.


PHOENIX, DO YOU KNOW WHO YOUR CUSTOMERS ARE?

American Indian Non-Hispanic 2% Other Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic 2% Black Non-Hispanic 4% 5%

Hispanic 31%

% Population 2015

White Non-Hispanic 56%

The Phoenix Metro area includes the counties of Pinal and Maricopa. The Hispanic population in Arizona continues to grow at historically high rates, more than tripling in the period between 1990 and 2015. In addition, the Asian population in the Phoenix area has shown significant growth of more than 140% between 2000 and 2015 and is forecasted to grow more than 20% through 2019.

Population Across Years

1,800,000 1,600,000

If you are interested in growing your business, you need to be communicating with these high-growth populations in a manner that addresses their cultures and needs directly. The Geoscape Intelligence System (GIS) can help you understand local populations within each of these segments and boost your sales and ROI quickly and easily. For a FREE test drive of the system visit: www.Geoscape.com/testdrive

1,400,000 1,200,000 1,000,000 800,000 600,000 400,000 200,000

For more information, contact Geoscape at 1-888-211-9353

0 2000

2010

2015

2020

Hispanic

817,021

1,235,718

1,389,987

1,543,188

Black Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic

113,185 65,557

193,497 134,415

230,244 172,384

267,065 211,310


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“Univision Local Media-Arizona is delighted to partner with DATOS to supply data that is critical to businesses in Arizona. As the #1 Spanish local media company we realize the importance of quality research and take pride in providing actionable insights that empowers the Arizona business community.” —Roberto Yañez, Vice President and General Manager, Univision Local Media Arizona

U.S. Now Home To Second-Largest Population Of Spanish Speakers In The World, As Advertising Dollars Aimed At Hispanics Grows Rapidly There are now more Spanish speakers in the United States than any other country in the world except Mexico, according to a 2015 study by Instituto Cervantes, a prestigious international think tank.

to Latinos requires a constant, close analysis of the market’s increasingly nuanced data trends. In Phoenix today, for instance, 81 percent of Hispanics speak at least some Spanish at home, according to Nielsen. A Hispanic Scarborough Study released earlier this year, meanwhile, found that 93 percent of Spanish-language television viewers speak Spanish at home while for 79 percent of that same group English is the preferred language outside of the home.

More than 52 million people in the U.S. are either native Spanish speakers or bilingual. That is larger than the population of Spain and Colombia, as well as all other countries in Central and South America. Only Mexico, with 121 million people, has a larger Spanish-speaking population. Instituto Cervantes further estimates that by 2050, the U.S. will be home to 138 million Spanish speakers, the largest number of Spanish speakers on earth.

Plug “New Media” in the equation and the exploding demand for digital video devices and the market’s dynamics grow even more complicated. Among the coveted 18-34 age group, Hispanics are spending more time watching digital video than any other age group among Hispanics. Those in the 18-34 age category spend about 30 percent more time watching digital video than viewers in the 50 to 64 age group.

While it’s important to note that all Spanish speakers in the United States are not of Hispanic origin (millions today are enrolled in Spanish-language classes), Spanish has become the second most spoken language in all but six U.S. states —illustrating the growing presence of Latinos in virtually region of the nation.

Traditional television watching, however, remains by far the biggest draw for Hispanics in any age group. Among 18-34 year olds, Hispanics spend about 35 minutes daily watching digital video devices, but nearly four hours watching video programming on a television screen. Older viewers spend more than five hours a day watching TV. Radio is another strong medium reaching 93% of Hispanics 6 years or older on a weekly basis, which is higher than the national average or total market in Phoenix.

The Nielsen Company reports that a growing proportion of U.S. Hispanics, 58 percent, are now bilingual, even though population growth in the Latino community is coming far more as a result of native births versus immigration. Immigration, has slowed substantially overall since the Great Recession, though the rebound in the economy has fueled a recent uptick in newcomers to the United States. To those worried about the “balkanization” or “cultural segregation” of America, fully 93 percent of Latinos speak at least some English at home, according to Pew Hispanic Research, while 26 percent of Latinos speak only English at home.

Overall, the Hispanic marketplace is quickly growing more lucrative for advertisers. Between 2013 and 2014, according to Advertising Age’s Hispanic Facts Pack, ad spending nationwide aimed at the U.S. Hispanic community grew by 12 percent.

Our evolving language landscape can make navigating the U.S. marketplace tough.

According to a report issued in April by the American Association of Hispanic Advertisers, “Over the past five years, the top 500 advertisers boosted their spending in Hispanic targeted media by 63 percent from $4.3 billion in 2010 to $7.1 billion.”

In Arizona, for instance, the Latino population has nearly tripled in the past 25 years, according to U.S. Census figures. As a result, knowing what language to use when advertising

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The United States now has the second-largest group of Spanish speakers in the world. More than Spain, more than any other Spanish-speaking country in Latin America except Mexico, there are the 52 million people who speak Spanish in the United States. There are nearly 8 million Americans studying the Spanish language. Source: The Instituto Cervantes, 2015. eldiae.es/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/espanol_lengua-viva_20151.pdf

The Most Commonly Spoken Language Other Than English In The United States Is Spanish

Spanish French German Yupik Tagalog

Source: GIZMODO, The Most Common Languages Spoken in the U.S. After English and Spanish, 2014. gizmodo.com/the-most-common-languages-spoken-in-the-u-s-state-by-1575719698

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LANGUAGE & MEDIA CHAPTER 4 Number of Hispanics speaking English AND Spanish is increasing:

SECTION I

Number Of Hispanics Speaking English And Spanish Is Increasing P18-49

P18-49

31%

26%

Even with Hispanic Even with MORE Hispanic growth coming growth coming MORE U.S. births than from U.S.from births immigration, than immigration, per U.S. Census. per U.S. Census.

58%

54%

15%

16%

2004

2014

Only English

Bilingual

Only Spanish

Source: The Nielsen Company, 2010 and 2014 Television Universe Estimates. Based on Language Spoken by the Person (Hispanic Adults 18-49) in the home.

Source: The Nielsen Company, 2010 and 2014 Television Universe Estimates. Based on Language Spoken by the Person (Hispanic Adults 18-49) in the home.

Spanish Language Is Here To Stay. More Than 70% Of Hispanics Will Speak Spanish At Home In 2034 Spanish-­‐Language is  Here  to  Stay More  than  70%  of  Hispanics  will  speak  Spanish  at  home

HISPANICS AGE 5+ SPEAK ANY SPANISH AT HOME

HISPANICS AGE  5+  SPEAK  ANY  SPANISH  AT  HOME

Hispanic %  Share 73.2%

72.4%

72.9%

71.9%

Hispanic (Millions) 36.8

41.4

50.6

45.8

37.6

71.3%

55.4

41.3

30.7

34

9.4

10.7

11.8

13

14

2014

2019

2024

2029

2034

27.4

Speak Only Spanish Home Speak Only Spanish at at Home

Speak Spanish and English at Home Speak Spanish and English at Home

Source: IHS Economics. Hispanic immigration and US Economic Growth, February 2015.

Source: IHS  Economics.  Hispanic   immigration  and  US  Economic  Growth,  February  2015.  

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Ninety-Three Percent OfHispanics U.S. Speak Hispanics Ninety-Three Percent Of U.S. Some Level Of English At Home Speak Some Level Of English At Home Percent of all Hispanics ages 5 and older who speak…

PERCENT OF ALL HISPANICS AGES 5 AND OLDER WHO SPEAK…

26%

93

41%

%

7%

26% English "very well"

English, but less than "very well"

No English

Only English at home

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of 2013 American Community Surveys (1% IPUMS). www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/english-proficiency-on-the-rise-among-latinos/

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of 2013 American Community Surveys (1% IPUMS). http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/english-proficiency-on-the-rise-among-latinos/

Thirty-Nine Percent Of U.S.-born Hispanics Are Bilingual Hispanic Origin

Thirty-Nine Percent Of U.S. Born Hispanics Are Bilingual % OF HISPANIC ADULTS WHO MAINLY USE ENGLISH, SPANISH OR BOTH

Nativity

% of Hispanic adults who mainly use English, Spanish or both English

NATIVITY

All Hispanics Foreign Born

Both

25% 5%

36% 60% 56%

2nd Generation

39%

42%

5%

50%

3rd Generation or higher

8%

76%

Puerto Rican

HISPANIC ORIGIN

38%

35%

U.S. Born

23%

42%

Mexican

41%

26%

Cuban

3%

40%

36%

10%

51%

43%

48%

35%

63%

Source: Pew Research Center 2013 National Survey of Latinos. www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/24/a-majority-of-english-speaking-hispanics-in-the-u-s-are-bilingual/ Source: Pew Research Center 2013 National Survey of Latinos. http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/24/a-majority-of-english-speaking-hispanics-in-the-u-s-are-bilingual/

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1% 16%

34%

13%

Dominican Salvadoran

Spanish


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81% of Hispanics In Phoenix Speak Some Spanish At Home 81% of Hispanics In Phoenix Speak Some Spanish At Home

Phoenix DMA PHOENIX DMA

19% 34%

26% 21%

Only/Mostly Spanish

English/Spanish Equally

Mosly English

English Only

2015 Nielsen Phoenix Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+

2015 Nielsen Phoenix Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+

Courtesy of

Did You Know

However,

SPANISH

ENGLISH

93

79

%

%

Of Spanish-language television viewers in PHOENIX speak Spanish inside the home.

of this group, English is their language of choice outside the home.

Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 (Feb14 – Jan15) , Phoenix DMA, (Base: Hispanic Adults 18+); KTVW/KFPH+/KTAZ M-Su 4a-2a cume audience

Courtesy of

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86% Percent Of Tucson Hispanics Speak Some Spanish At Home 86% of Tucson’s Hispanics Tucson DMA

Speak Some Spanish At Home

TUCSON DMA

14%

40%

31%

15% Only/Mostly Spanish

English/Spanish Equally

Mosly English

English Only

2015 Nielsen Tucson Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+

2015 Nielsen Tucson Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+

Courtesy of

Did You Know

However,

SPANISH

ENGLISH

97

86

%

%

Of Spanish-language television viewers in TUCSON speak Spanish inside the home. Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 (Feb14 – Jan15) , Phoenix DMA, (Base: Hispanic Adults 18+); KTVW/KFPH+/KTAZ M-Su 4a-2a cume audience

of this group, English is their language of choice outside the home. For More Information On Southern Arizona, Refer To Datos Tucson 2015 DON’T MISS OUT!

Courtesy of

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Hispanics Aged 18-34 Spent The Most Time On Digital Video Than Any Other Age Group And Spent The Least Hispanics Aged 18-34 Spent The Most Time On Digital Video Than Any Other Age Group And Spent The Least Amount Of Time In Front Of A TV Screen Amount Of Time In Front Of A TV Screen Hispanic Daily Time Spent on Digital Video and TV Screen by Age and Year HISPANIC DAILY TIME SPENT ON DIGITAL VIDEO AND TV SCREEN BY AGE AND YEAR DIGITAL VIDEO 35 MINUTES 27 MINUTES

TV SCREEN 3 HRS 46 MINUTES

18-34

3 HRS 58 MINUTES

21 MINUTES

4 HRS 0 MINUTES

DIGITAL VIDEO

Q2 2014

26 MINUTES

Q2 2013

15 MINUTES

TV SCREEN

35-49

15 MINUTES

Q2 2012

DIGITAL VIDEO 24 MINUTES 19 MINUTES

Q2 2014

4 HRS 15 MINUTES 4 HRS 21 MINUTES

Q2 2013

4 HRS 30 MINUTES

Q2 2012

TV SCREEN 5 HRS 13 MINUTES

50-64

5 HRS 11 MINUTES

14 MINUTES

5 HRS 39 MINUTES

Source: The Nielsen Company, THE CROSS-PLATFORM REPORT | Q2 2014, p6. Source: The Nielsen Company, THE CROSS-PLATFORM REPORT | Q2 2014, p6. www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2014%20Reports/q2-2014-cross-platform-report-shifts-in-viewing.pdf http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2014%20Reports/q2-2014-cross-platform-report-shifts-in-viewing.pdf

Hispanic Major-Media Ad-Spending In 2014 By Medium GROSS U.S. AD SPENDING DOLLARS IN MILLIONS U.S. ADVERTISING SPENDING IN HISPANIC MEDIA MEDIUM

PERCENT OF TOTAL

2014

2013

% CHANGE

2014

2013

$5,569

$4,769

16.8

58.7%

56.2%

1,386

1,297

6.8

14.6

15.3

252

216

16.9

2.7

2.5

7,207

6,281

14.7

75.9

74.1

Newspaper

790

779

1.4

8.3

9.2

Magazine

331

333

-0.6

3.5

3.9

Other Print

43

40

7.5

0.5

0.5

1,165

1,153

1.0

12.3

13.6

Spot Radio

435

465

-6.5

4.6

5.5

Internet

686

580

18.3

7.2

6.8

$9,493

$8,480

12.0

100.0

100.0

Network TV Spot TV Cable TV Networks Subtotal TV

Subtotal Print

TOTAL Source: AdvertisingAge, Hispanic Fact Pack, 2015.

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15 Largest Spenders in Hispanic Media COMPANIES RANKED BY U.S. MEASURED-MEDIA SPENDING

U.S. MEASURED-MEDIA SPENDING ($ IN THOUSANDS) RANK

MARKETER

1

Procter & Gamble Co.

2

Genomma Lab Internacional

3

Dish Network Corp.

4

McDonald’s Corp.

5

L’Orèal

6

AT&T

7

Deutsche Telekom (T-Mobile)

8

Verizon Communications

9

Guthy-Renker Corp.

10

General Motors Co.

11

Walmart Stores

12

Nissan Motor Co.

13

State Farm Mutual Auto Insurance Co.

14

Mars Inc.

15

Toyota Motor Corp.

2014

$ $ $ $

% CHANGE

371,599 351,961 146,599 130,954

12.0 185.0 51.3 17.6

$ 114,968 $ 109,555 $ 105,145 $ 101,964 $ 99,170 $ 98,567 $ 94,397 $ 92,503 $ 87,035 $ 85,858 $ 83,014

-6.2 -12.2 6.5 43.0 -19.3 7.9 2.4 37.5 -6.4 7.0 1.3

Source: AdvertisingAge, Hispanic Fact Pack, 2015.

GRAN PRODUCTO

Hispanic Language Preferences – Media BY MEDIA TYPE FOR AGES 18 AND UP

READING

WATCHING TV

LISTENING TO RADIO

WHEN ONLINE

38.9% 25.7 14.4 20.5 0.5

33.8% 32.3 20.0 13.4 0.5

31.8% 30.3 18.3 19.4 0.3

52.0% 21.7 11.7 14.1 0.5

RESPONSES BY PERCENT

Only in English Mostly in English, but some in Spanish Mostly in Spanish, but some in English Only in Spanish In some other language

Source: Experian Marketing Services (Experian.com/consumerinsights). Data based on Experian Marketing Services’ Simmons National Hispanic Consumer Study, Winter 2015, for the dates of Feb. 4, 2014, through March 11, 2015. Base: Hispanic adults who indicated a language preference.

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Hispanics In 2014 Spent The Most Time On Traditional TV Per Month And Spent The Least Amount Of Time Using A Multimedia Device MONTHLY TIME SPENT BY MEDIUM USERS 2+ IN HOURS: MINUTES COMPOSITE

BLACK

HISPANIC

ASIAN

Q2 14

Q2 13

Q2 14

Q2 13

Q2 13

Q2 13

Q2 14

Q2 13

142:38

146:37

206:03

206:47

117:58

121:28

83:02

86:37

14:13

12:35

12:54

9:23

9:39

8:45

9:38

9:00

Using a DVD/Blu-Ray Device

5:00

5:10

5:35

6:05

4:38

4:54

3:51

4:20

Using a Game Console

7:24

6:27

8:21

7:22

7:44

7:12

4:35

4:46

Using a Multimedia Device

1:42

N/A

0:55

N/A

1:02

N/A

5:00

N/A

Using the Internet on a Computer

30:07

27:21

33:23

28:37

26:26

22:46

43:54

35:13

Watching Video on Internet

10:35

6:28

13:59

9:00

11:43

8:17

17:14

12:23

Using any App/Web on a Smartphone

43:31

32:48

52:40

38:36

49:09

38:54

42:43

32:48

1:41

1:09

2:30

1:30

2:20

1:45

1:53

1:25

59:19

60:59

61:42

63:22

58:45

60:07

N/A

N/A

On Traditional TV Watching Time-shifted TV

Watching Video on a Smartphone Listening to AM/FM Radio

Source: The Nielsen Company, THE CROSS-PLATFORM REPORT | Q2 2014 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2014%20Reports/q2-2014-cross-platform-report-shifts-in-viewing.pdf

Hispanics Spent The Most Time Using Any App/Web On A Smartphone Between The Ages 25-34 MONTHLY TIME SPENT BY MEDIUM IN HOURS: MINUTES AMONG HISPANICS K 2-11

T 12-17

A 18-24

A 25-34

A 35-49

A 50-64

A 65+

P 2+

106:55

79:09

87:45

106:37

119:54

153:50

217:13

117:58

Watching Time-shifted TV

9:56

6:38

6:37

10:26

10:25

11:18

11:30

9:39

Using a DVD/Blu-Ray Device

7:13

4:27

3:51

4:35

4:25

3:13

2:33

4:38

10:27

18:10

12:51

8:04

3:18

1:07

0:35

7:44

Using a Multimedia Device

1:20

1:19

1:09

1:06

1:04

0:23

0:28

1:02

Using the Internet on a Computer

3:46

6:42

27:49

32:09

37:12

29:47

20:30

26:26

Watching Video on Internet

6:44

6:10

17:19

13:45

11:55

11:54

3:39

11:43

Using any App/Web on a Smartphone

N/A

N/A

49:45

56:08

50:09

32:26

31:33

49:09

Watching Video on a Smartphone

N/A

N/A

3:11

2:33

1:59

0:51

-

2:20

Listening to AM/FM Radio

N/A

37:14

51:27

58:27

66:50

69:21

62:17

58:45

On Traditional TV

Using a Game Console

Source: The Nielsen Company, THE CROSS-PLATFORM REPORT | Q2 2014 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2014%20Reports/q2-2014-cross-platform-report-shifts-in-viewing.pdf

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Phoenix Continues To Rank 9th In Nielsen’s Top 10 Hispanic DMAs For The 2014-2015 Television Season DESIGNATED MARKET AREA (DMA) 1. Los Angeles 2. New York 3. Miami-Ft. Lauderdale 4. Houston 5. Chicago 6. Dallas-Ft. 7. San Antonio 8. San Francisco-Oak-San Jose 9. Phoenix (Prescott) 10. Harlingen-Wslco-Brnsvl-McA

HISPANIC TV HOMES

% OF U.S. TOTAL

1,927,420 1,433,400 732,020 647,700 528,290 525,250 444,430 425,850 373,470 315,520

13.252 9.856 5.033 4.453 3.632 3.611 3.056 2.928 2.568 2.169

Source: The Nielsen Company, 2014 www.tvb.org/media/file/Nielsen_2014-2015_DMA_RANKS_Hispanic.pdf

Phoenix TV Landscape 4 BOOK AVERAGE – ADULTS 18-49 – REGARDLESS OF LANGUAGE TOTAL DAY AVERAGE AUDIENCE

#1

15,000

#6

8,000

#1

15,000

#7

6,000

#3

14,000

#8

5,000

#4

12,000

#8

5,000

#5

10,000

#10

3,000

Source: Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Jul’14/Nov’14/Feb’15/May’15), Adults 18-49, Phoenix DMA. Total Day M-Su 6a-2a.

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Phoenix TV Landscape

of Broadcast Viewing 4 BOOK AVERAGE Share • ADULTS 18-49 • REGARDLESS OF 4 Book Average • Adults 18-49 • Regardless of Language • M-Su 6am to 2am LANGUAGE • M-SU 6AM TO 2AM

All Broadcast

Share of Broadcast Viewing

3%

3%

1% 1% 3%

0%

KTVW+ UNI KFPH+ UMA

0%

0%

KTVW+ UNI KFPH+ UMA

KPNX+ NBC KNXV ABC

5%

6%

4%

4%

KSAZ FOX

15%

5%

Spanish-Language

KPHO CBS KTVK IND

KTAZ TEL

21%

KVPA ETV

KTAZ TEL

8%

28% of All Adult 18-49 Broadcast TV Viewing in Total Week Is to Spanish Language TV Stations

15%

KMOH MFX

KASW CW KUTP IND

53%

KPPX ION

KPDF AZA

KAZT IND

10%

KVPA EST

14%

KMOH MFX

12%

18%

KPDF AZA KPHE IND

28% of All Adult 18-49 Broadcast TV Viewing

Source: Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Jul’14/Nov’14/Feb’15/May’15), AdultsLanguage TV Stations in Total Week Is to Spanish 18-49, Phoenix DMA. Total Day M-Su 6a-2a. Percentages based on Average Impressions. Source: Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Jul’14/Nov’14/Feb’15/May’15), Adults 18-49, Phoenix DMA. Total Day M-Su 6a-2a. Percentages based on Average Impressions. Courtesy of

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

18

Bilingual Adults Choose Spanish-Language TV Over 2X the bilingual ratings of any other TV station!

1.4

Bilingual Adults Choose Spanish-Language TV M-Su 6a-2a – Bilingual Adults 18-49 - Tucson

M-SU 6A-2A – BILINGUAL ADULTS 18-49 - TUCSON

Over 2X the bilingual ratings of any other TV station! ESPAÑOL 0.6

0.6 0.4

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.2

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Source: Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cut back, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Jul’14/Nov’14/Feb’15/May’15), Time Period Data, Adults 18-49,

Phoenix DMA. Bilingual is defined as AdultsView 18-49 Speaking Mostly Spanish, Cut Spanish /back, English EquallyNSI, or Mostly English in the Home. Total M-Su 6a-2a. Top 10 Source: Nielsen, Nielsenstations Local Television Ratings Live+SD, 4Day:Book Average (Jul’14/Nov’14/Feb’15/May’15), Time shown. Period Data, Adults 18-49, Phoenix DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 Speaking Mostly Spanish, Spanish / English Equally or Mostly English in the Home. Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a. Top 10 stations shown.

Courtesy of

Top 20 Spanish TV Advertisers In Phoenix 2014 And Jan-June 2015 YTD TOP ADVERTISERS ON SPANISH TV, 2014

TOP ADVERTISERS ON SPANISH TV, JAN-JUNE 2015

1. Cox Communications

11. Lerner & Rowe

1. Cox Communications

11. Western Dental

2. Century Link

12. American Family Insurance

2. MasterCard

12. U.S. Dept of Health & Human Services

3. Law Offices of Alcock & Associates 13. AutoAmigo

3. Hastings & Hastings Attorney

13. Chevrolet Dealer Association

4. Curacao

14. Midway Nissan

4. Honda Dealer Association

14. Ford Dealer Association

5. U.S. Dept of Transportation

15. MasterCard

5. Nissan Dealer Association

15. Law Offices of Joel W Black

6. Food City

16. Nissan Dealer Association

6. Law Offices of Alcock & Associates

16. Food City

7. Dish Network

17. Girl Scouts of America

7. Century Link

17. Hidden Valley Food Products

8. Mor Furniture For Less

18. Chevrolet Dealer Association

8. Curacao

18. Mor Furniture For Less

9. McDonald’s

19. Tio Rico Auto Financial Services

9. McDonald’s

19. Courtesy Chevrolet

10. Western Dental

20. TitleMax

10. Emergency Chiropractic

20. U.S. Dept of Transportation

Source: Media Monitors, 2014 full year and 2015 YTD (Jan-June 2015), based on # of total spots; among qualifying Spanish stations only (Univision KTVW+, UniMás KFPH+, Telemundo KTAZ, TV Azteca KPDF)

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Phoenix Hispanics Are Very Engaged With Spanish Radio

More Than 2X

Spent With Spanish Radio Phoenix Hispanics Spend 121% More Time Listening to Spanish-Language Radio! TIME SPENT WITH ENGLISH-LANGUAGE RADIO

TIME SPENT WITH SPANISH-LANGUAGE RADIO

% MORE WITH SPANISH-LANGUAGE

3:30

7:45

121%

Source: Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM Jan-June 2015 YTD, Hispanic A18-49, TSL Total Week (Top 5 SL Stations vs. Top 5 EL Stations among A1849)

Courtesy of

Radio Reaches Over 93% Radio Reaches Over 93% Of Phoenix Hispanics OfThan Phoenix Radio Reaches More 9 In Every 10Hispanics Phoenix Hispanic Adults Every Week RADIO REACHES MORE THAN 9 IN EVERY 10 PHOENIX HISPANIC ADULTS EVERY WEEK

94% 93%

93%

93%

93%

92% 91% 90%

A18+

A18-34

A18-49

Total Market

Hispanic

Source: Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM, Jan-June 2015 YTD; Total and Hispanic Adults; Mon-Sun 6a-mid; Weekly Cume Estimates, / % Reach across demos

A Z 102

Courtesy of

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Source: Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM, Jan-June 2015 YTD; Total and Hispanic Adults; Mon-Sun 6a-mid; Weekly Cume Estimates, / % Reach across demos

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Spanish Radio Connects With Phoenix Hispanics SPANISH PREFERRED HISPANICS

BILINGUAL HISPANICS

#1

#1

Regional Mexican

#1

Regional Mexican

76%

#2

60%

#2

Spanish Adult Hits #3

52%

#3

Spanish Contemporary #4

37%

#4

Rhythmic CHR

52%

Regional Mexican

35%

#4

Rhythmic Adult Contemporary

24%

Pop CHR

61%

#3

Spanish Adult Hits

33%

Pop CHR #2

Pop CHR

52%

ENGLISH PREFERRED HISPANICS

37%

Hot Adult Contemporary

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2015 Release 1 (Feb14-Jan15) , Hispanic Adults 18-49 Based on Language Personally Spoken Most Away From Home

31%

Courtesy of

Phoenix Spanish-Language Phoenix Spanish Language Radio Share Of Voice Radio Share Of Voice

16% Non-com

44% *NOTE Univision Radio = KHOT-FM, KOMR-FM, KQMR-FM; Entravision = KLNZ-FM, KVVA/KDVA-FM, KBMB-AM; United Farmworkers = KNAI-FM (Campesina)

40%

Univision Radio

Entravision

Radio Campesina

Source: Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM, Jan-June 2015 YTD, Adults 18-49 / Total Week / Share of Spanish Average Quarter Hour listening by Group Owner

OT-FM, KOMR-FM, KQMR-FM;Entravision= KLNZ-FM, D M; United Farmworkers = KNAI-FM (Campesina)

ATO S

A Z Courtesy 2 of0(Univision 1 5Logo)

103 M, Jan-June 2015 YTD, Adults 18-49 / Total Week / Share of Spanish Average Quarter Hour listening by Group

Courtesy of


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Top 20 Spanish Radio Advertisers In Phoenix 2014 And Jan-June 2015 YTD TOP ADVERTISERS ON SPANISH TV, 2014

TOP ADVERTISERS ON SPANISH TV, JAN-JUNE 2015

1. Cox Communications

11. Lerner & Rowe

1. Cox Communications

11. Western Dental

2. Century Link

12. American Family Insurance

2. MasterCard

12. U.S. Dept of Health & Human Services

3. Law Offices of Alcock & Associates

13. AutoAmigo

3. Hastings & Hastings Attorney

13. Chevrolet Dealer Association

4. Curacao

14. Midway Nissan

4. Honda Dealer Association

14. Ford Dealer Association

5. U.S. Dept of Transportation

15. MasterCard

5. Nissan Dealer Association

15. Law Offices of Joel W Black

6. Food City

16. Nissan Dealer Association

6. Law Offices of Alcock & Associates

16. Food City

7. Dish Network

17. Girl Scouts of America

7. Century Link

17. Hidden Valley Food Products

8. Mor Furniture For Less

18. Chevrolet Dealer Association

8. Curacao

18. Mor Furniture For Less

9. McDonald’s

19. Tio Rico Auto Financial Services

9. McDonald’s

19. Courtesy Chevrolet

10. Western Dental

20. TitleMax

10. Emergency Chiropractic

20. U.S. Dept of Transportation

Source: Media Monitors, 2014 full year and 2015 YTD (Jan-June 2015), based on # of total spots; among qualifying Spanish stations only (KHOT-FM, KOMR-FM, KLNZ-FM, KVVA-FM)

Courtesy of

Spanish Radio Formats These styles are regionalized very much like C&W - and are derived from various parts of Mexico. • Banda • Ranchero • Norteño • Tejano • Grupero • Mariachi • Corridos

Total Market Equivalent:

This format encompasses music from romantic to rock and boasts smooth, danceable beats.

Broad mix of Spanish classic hits from the 60s, 70s, 80s.

• Reggaeton • Spanish AC • Romantic • Ballads • Intl Pop Hits • Spanish Rock

• Mexican Adult Hits • Pop Adult Hits

Total Market Equivalent:

Total Market Equivalent:

Country Music

Rhythmic Contemporary

Adult Hits

Tropical

News/Talk

Hear the Difference

With Cuban and Puerto Rican origins, this format has heavy layers of blaring horns, percussion and exhilarating dance rhythms. • Salsa • Cumbia • Bachata • Merengue • Reggaeton

This format is meant to inform, help and entertain. • News you can use • Talk Shows • Commentary

Hover over the icon below and push play for a sound perspective of the differences by genre.

Projected Percentage Change in Total, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic Buying Power for U.S., 2012-2017 Courtesy of

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NEWSPAPER READERSHIP AMONG PHOENIX HISPANICS

Newspaper Readership Among Phoenix Hispanics 97,882 85,064 83,055

80,078

73,384

67,548 57,588

Tv TV y y Mas Más

Voz La Voz

Total Hispanics

Total Hispanics

Source: 2015 Phoenix Scarborough R1 (Feb 14 – Jan 15)

53,005 50,060

Teleguia en Español Espanol Teleguía en

43,888

Que! Magazine ¡Qué! Magazine

Prensa Prensa Hispana Hispana

Spanish-Preferred Hispanics

Spanish-Preferred Hispanics Courtesy of

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1

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AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC DIRECT • REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING • ARIZONA BUSINESS GAZETTE • AUTOSHOPPER • CARS.COM • HOMEFINDER.COM • CAREERBUILDER.COM • TEMPE/AHWATUKEE REPUBLIC • CHANDLER REPUBLIC • GILBERT REPUBLIC • GLENDALE RPUBLIC • MESA REPUBLIC • NORTHEAST PHOENIX REPUBLIC• PHOENIX REPUBLIC • NORTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • PEORIA REPUBLIC • SCOTTSDALE REPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • SURPRISE REPUBLIC • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC DIRECT • REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING • ARIZONA BUSINESS GAZETTE • AUTOSHOPPER • CARS.COM • HOMEFINDER.COM • CAREERBUILDER.COM • TEMPE/ AHWATUKEE REPUBLIC • CHANDLER REPUBLIC • GILBERT REPUBLIC • GLENDALE REPUBLIC • MESA REPUBLIC • NORTHEAST PHOENIX REPUBLIC • PHOENIX REPUBLIC • NORTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • PEORIA REPUBLIC • SCOTTSDALE REPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • SURPRISE REPUBLIC • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC DIRECT • REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING • ARIZONA BUSINESS GAZETTE • AUTOSHOPPER • CARS.COM • HOMEFINDER.COM • CAREERBUILDER.COM • TEMPE/AHWATUKEE REPUBLIC • CHANDLER REPUBLIC • GILBERT REPUBLIC • GLENDALE REPUBLIC • MESA REPUBLIC • NORTHEAST PHOENIX REPUBLIC • PHOENIX REPUBLIC • NORTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • PEORIA REPUBLIC • SCOTTSDALE REPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • SURPRISE REPUBLIC • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC DIRECT • REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING • ARIZONA BUSINESS GAZETTE • AUTOSHOPPER • CARS.COM • HOMEFINDER.COM • CAREERBUILDER.COM • TEMPE/AHWATUKEE REPUBLIC • CHANDLER REPUBLIC • GILBERT REPUBLIC • GLENDALE REPUBLIC • MESA REPUBLIC • NORTHEAST PHOENIX REPUBLIC• PHOENIX REPUBLIC • NORTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • PEORIA REPUBLIC • SCOTTSDALE REPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • SURPRISE REPUBLIC • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC DIRECT • REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING • ARIZONA BUSINESS GAZETTE • AUTOSHOPPER • CARS.COM • HOMEFINDER.COM • CAREERBUILDER.COM • TEMPE/AHWATUKEE REPUBLIC • CHANDLER REPUBLIC • GILBERT REPUBLIC • GLENDALE REPUBLIC • MESA REPUBLIC • NORTHEAST PHOENIX REPUBLIC • PHOENIX REPUBLIC • NORTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • PEORIA REPUBLIC • SCOTTSDALE REPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • SURPRISE REPUBLIC • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC DIRECT • REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING • ARIZONA BUSINESS GAZETTE • AUTOSHOPPER • CARS.COM • HOMEFINDER.COM • CAREERBUILDER.COM • TEMPE/AHWATUKEE REPUBLIC • CHANDLER REPUBLIC • GILBERT REPUBLIC • GLENDALE REPUBLIC • MESA REPUBLIC • NORTHEAST PHOENIX REPUBLIC • PHOENIX REPUBLIC • NORTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • PEORIA REPUBLIC • SCOTTSDALE REPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • SURPRISE REPUBLIC • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC DIRECT • REPUBLICAZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC CARS.COM • HOMEFINDER.COM • CAREERBUILDER.COM • TEMPE/AHWATUKEE REPUBLIC • CHANDLER REPUBLIC • GILBERT REPUBLIC • GLENDALE RPUBLIC • MESA REPUBLIC • NORTHEAST PHOENIX REPUBLIC• PHOENIX REPUBLIC • NORTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • PEORIA REPUBLIC • SCOTTSDALE REPUBLIC • SOUTHWEST VALLEY REPUBLIC • SURPRISE REPUBLIC • AZCENTRAL.COM • LA VOZ • BUYER’S EDGE • REPUBLIC DIRECT • REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING • ARIZONA BUSINESS

MILLION STRONG

WE ARE WHERE YOUR CUSTOMERS ARE.


Diversity

is our common thread. diverse cultures and people have made arizona the great state it is today and they will continue to shape our future. thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Blue cross Blue shield of arizona is proud to support the arizona hispanic chamber of commerce and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s datos study. Your influence is

141064-15

helping to shape a better arizona.


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“We continue to need thoughtful examinations of our marketplace, such as the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s DATOS: State of the Hispanic Market report, so we can better understand Arizona’s opportunities and vulnerabilities. Thank you to those who put in hundreds of hours to make this publication useful and accessible for our businesses and communities.” —Rich Boals, CEO and president, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Prevalence Of Chronic Disease Among Hispanics Must Be Addressed To Boost State Of U.S. Health It’s said “Disease does not discriminate.”

“More than twice as many Latinos (33%) under age 65 lack health insurance, as compared to Non-Hispanics (14%),” the NCLR study reported. As a result, Hispanics are far less likely to undergo important screenings and preventive health services, which makes it harder to catch diseases in the early stages.

Diabetes, for instance, doesn’t know if a person coping with the chronic disease is a member of a particular race or ethnic group. Still, research shows the nation’s 55 million Hispanics do face higher incidences of certain diseases than other populations. For instance, one-third of U.S. Hispanics, according to 2010 U.S. Census Chronic Disease Survey, reported having been diagnosed with diabetes. Six of 10 Hispanics in that same survey said they had at least one chronic disease and 1 of 5 were coping with more than one.

Federal health officials, meanwhile, say that despite being eligible for health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act many of the nation’s Hispanics have not signed up. The Department of Health and Human Services has boosted spending on outreach to Latinos, but a Newsweek magazine survey in March 2015 found that “25 percent of [Latino] respondents said they had heard or read nothing at all” about the Affordable Care Act. The survey results, according to Newsweek, suggests “there are some fears about being treated unfairly” because of the Hispanic respondents’ ethnicity or immigration status.

In a 2014 study by the National Council of La Raza, “An Inside Look at Chronic Disease and Health Care among Hispanics in the United States,” researchers predicted that “as the Latino community grows [Hispanics could be one-third of the U.S. population by 2060] so will the prevalence of chronic conditions that Hispanics face, such as diabetes, heart disease, asthma, obesity, and related complications. Addressing chronic diseases among Hispanics is imperative to improving the nation’s health and maximizing its resources.”

“One of the most concerning narratives about the state of life in Latino America is the extent to which some are ‘living in the shadows,’” Francisco Pedraza, assistant professor of political science at Texas A&M University and former Fellow of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, told Newsweek. “We found that 1 in 3 Latinos are holding back in some form from full engagement in public life in order to avoid scrutiny of their citizenship status. This includes...making appointments with health care providers.”

The NCLR report issued three major findings: •

There is high prevalence of chronic disease and multiple chronic diseases among Hispanic health center users, which is compounded by the pervasiveness of obesity.

Hispanic health center users often reported inadequate chronic disease management, which can be addressed with improved follow-up care and access to affordable medication.

Respondents reported many barriers to receiving appropriate care, including cost in time and money, immigration status, and language.

On a positive note, there have been some gains made in getting Latinos to sign up for health insurance. The National Latino Health and Immigration Survey conducted by Latino Decisions, a nonpartisan research and polling firm, found “82 percent of Latinos have health insurance – the highest rate of coverage the group has recorded since it began polling in 2008. A previous poll in 2013 by Latino Decisions showed that 23 percent of Latinos lacked health insurance at that time.”

One major reason for the existence of health disparities between Hispanics and Non-Hispanics is that Latinos are the least likely group in the nation to have health insurance.

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Working to Help Others Leads to Extraordinary Results For more than ten years, Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC) and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ) have worked together in an effort to serve Arizona’s Hispanic community. With both companies

deadlines approached to assist as many people as possible.

sharing similar values and a passion for helping others, the two partnered and expanded their outreach at the onset of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2013.

serves.

This partnership addressed a critical need in the community and helped the several thousand people CPLC

At the time, more than half a million Hispanics called Arizona home, many with little to no experience with health insurance. In fact, studies showed that they were more likely than any other population to be uninsured. The ACA created a unique opportunity to change this. Because many uninsured individuals don’t know why it is important to have health insurance or how to buy it, CPLC developed a business plan to become an exclusive agent of BCBSAZ. This allowed CPLC to help individuals understand the value of health insurance and choose a plan that met their needs. To promote this service, CPLC and BCBSAZ developed a multi-media campaign that included radio, direct mail, print, television interviews, telethons and health insurance events.

About Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ), an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, is the largest Arizona-based health insurance company. The not-for-profit company was founded in 1939 and provides health insurance products, services or networks to 1.4 million individuals. With offices in Phoenix, Flagstaff, Tucson and the East Valley, the company employs more than 1,400 Arizonans. Follow BCBSAZ at www.facebook.com/bcbsaz or on Twitter at @bcbsaz to get information on health and wellness as well as a knowledgeable perspective on health insurance reform, and to become a part of what we’re doing in your community.

Complex insurance terms were simplified with easy-to-understand materials and videos created in both English and Spanish, covering topics such as how insurance works, lowcost options, frequently asked questions, steps for buying a health plan and more. In addition, BCBSAZ developed a comprehensive section on their web site (salud.azblue.com) to support the campaign that included an online calculator to help people determine if they qualified for financial assistance from the government. Finally, CPLC provided walk-in assistance at its Phoenix location and extended hours as open enrollment

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Photos Courtesy of BCBSAZ

About Chicanos Por La Causa Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. (CPLC) is a community development corporation (CDC) that provides services in Arizona, Nevada, and New Mexico. Since 1969, CPLC has been changing lives by developing self-sufficiency and instilling empowerment in those we serve. Our focus areas are economic development, education, housing, and social services. CPLC provides a better life through offering business and employment opportunities; ensuring everyone has the solid foundation of an education; providing hope through a pathway of recovery, restoration, and resiliency; and ensuring that a safe, secure, affordable home is available to every individual we serve. Today, we have 48 programs & services, 700 employees, and 60 offices, making CPLC the third-largest Hispanic non-profit in the nation and the number one charity in Arizona. For more information, visit www.CPLC.org


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“Studies Have Found That 84 Percent Of Youth-Targeted Food Advertising On Spanish-Language TV Promotes Food Of Low Nutritional Value.” “Studies Have Found Trends Showing Latinos Often Have Less Access To Safe Places To Play Or Be Active.” “Only One-Third Of Latinos Live Within Walking Distance Of A Park — Compared With Almost Half Of All Whites.” “Latinos Are More Likely To Suffer A Stroke Compared To Other Ethnic Groups. Specifically, Mexican Americans Suffer 43 Percent More From Strokes — The Leading Cause Of Disability And The Third-Leading Cause Of Death — Than Whites.” Source: Hispanic Market Weekly, Vol. 17, Issue 41, October 21, 2013

In Arizona, In 2013, Hispanics Accounted For 35% Of All Motor Vehicle And Other Transport Deaths Among Children And The Highest Number Of These Transport-Related Deaths Were Due To Improper Restraints In Arizona, in 2013, Hispanics accounted for 35% of all motor vehicle and other transport deaths among children

and the highest number of this related deaths wereChildren due to improper Transport-Related Causes oftransport Deaths Among in restraining. Arizona, 2013 Transport Related Causes of Death Among Children in Arizona, 2013

40% 35%

38% 33%

31%

30% 25%

21%

20%

16%

13%

15%

11%

10%

9%

5% 0%

Lack of vehicle Excessive restraint driving speed

Reckless driving

Drugs and/or Alcohol

Driver inexperience

Driver distraction

Lacking helmet

Note: More than oneNote: factor been each Moremight than one have factor might have identified been identified for for each deathdeath Source: Arizona Child Fatality Review Program. Twenty-first Annual Report November 2014

Source: Arizona Child Fatality Review Program. Twenty-first Annual Report November 2014

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Red light running/driver fatigue


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Salud America!

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Research Network to Prevent Obesity Among Latino Children ISSUE BRIEF July 2013

Active Spaces and Latino Kids Introduction Physical activity is important for maintaining a healthy weight, yet Latino children often have limited access to safe places where they can be active. Shared use of “active spaces”—including gyms, athletic fields, and playgrounds—can help increase access to school facilities and other public sites for physical activity among Latino youths. Street-level improvements, such as repairing sidewalks and installing street lights and bike lanes, can help Latino families and children walk and bike more safely to active spaces. Latinos are projected to comprise 35 percent of the U.S. youth population by 2050. Improving access to active spaces in underserved communities may help young Latinos become more physically active and maintain a healthy weight.

The Evidence Latino youth in underserved communities have limited access to active spaces. ■ Studies show that Latino neighborhoods have fewer recreation facilities and parks than White neighborhoods. In one study, 81 percent of Latino neighborhoods did not have a recreational facility, compared with 38 percent of White neighborhoods. ■

In a national survey, fewer Latino (70%) than White (82.5%) respondents described their neighborhoods as having safe places for children to play.

Limited progress has been made to share schools’ active spaces. ■ Fewer schools provided access to their physical activity facilities in 2006 (29%) than did in 2000 (35%), federal data shows.

ABOUT THIS ISSUE BRIEF

This issue brief is based on a research review prepared by Jennifer Swanson, M.E., JS Medical Communications, LLC, and Amelie G. Ramirez, Dr.P.H., and Kipling J. Gallion, M.A., University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The full research review, which includes citations, is available at www.salud-america.org. For more information on Salud America!, visit www.salud-america.org.

Shared use agreements—formal contracts between entities that outline terms and conditions for sharing public spaces for physical activity—have helped increase access to active spaces in some Latino communities. ■ Several Latino communities in California have successfully implemented shared use agreements to improve access to schools, parks, playgrounds, and more. ■

For example, an agreement in the Boyle Heights (94% Latino) and Pico-Union (92% Latino) neighborhoods in Los Angeles brought together community stakeholders and public agencies to increase access to public active spaces.

Concerns about liability, funding, and staffing often prevent administrators from opening active spaces at schools outside school hours. Liability protections and shared use agreements can overcome these barriers. ■ In a survey of public school administrators in underserved communities, 82 percent of respondents said they were somewhat to very concerned about liability associated with injuries on school property outside school hours.

Salud America! is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation with leadership and direction assistance provided by the Institute for Health Promotion Research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

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Salud America!

www.salud-america.org

Governmental rules and shared use agreements can help open school spaces to the public by protecting against liability and promoting shared costs and staffing.

Characteristics of neighborhoods, sidewalks, streets, and buildings may affect how frequently residents walk or bike to recreation and physical activity sites. ■ A study of a Latino-majority region found that unpleasant neighborhood conditions, such as trashed, muddy streets, gangs, bad outdoor odors, dilapidated playgrounds, unleashed dogs, and speeding cars prohibited kids from being active. ■

M A R K E T

More people walk or bike to recreation sites when those sites are closer to home and safer to travel to.

Safe, active travel to active spaces may boost young Latinos’ physical activity. ■ Several Latino communities are adopting “Complete Streets” policies to make neighborhood streets safer for pedestrians and bicyclists. ■

The Safe Routes to School National Partnership provides resources for increasing the safety of neighborhood streets to facilitate walking and bicycling.

A program in a Latino-majority urban area of Chicago created safe, inviting places for residents to be active through an “open streets model,” which closed streets to motorized vehicles and allowed 10,000-plus residents to walk, run, and bike.

Combining data from qualitative surveys and multidimensional instruments, such as the Physical Activity Resource Assessment (PARA), can help to evaluate the characteristics of active spaces and identify issues that impact use of these spaces.

Conclusions and Policy Implications Conclusions ■ Many Latino youth in underserved communities have few options for and inadequate access to active spaces. ■

Several Latino communities have successfully implemented shared use agreements to increase public access to active spaces. These agreements, along with governmental protections, can help overcome liability, costs, and staffing issues.

Street-level improvements have the potential to increase access to active spaces and physical activity levels among Latino youths. Evaluating the characteristics of active spaces can ensure those spaces (and new ones) meet Latinos’ cultural needs.

Policy Implications ■ State and local governments should work with school administrators to address liability and other concerns that prevent access to active spaces at schools outside of school hours in Latino communities. This includes encouraging awareness of current statutes among school administrators and adopting shared use agreements with clear language used to describe the terms, conditions, and covered activities. ■

Local policymakers should get community feedback to strengthen the development of new recreation sites and implementation of street-level improvements.

Local policymakers should create Complete Streets policies for new transportation projects near school recreation facilities and other active spaces to make it easier for residents to walk or bike to those sites.

2 | Active Spaces and Latino Kids

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A better tomorrow begins today. CenturyLink proudly supports the local community. CenturyLink knows a successful future is built on a strong foundation and hard work. Together, we can build a thriving community that prospers.

See how we connect at centurylink.com.

CenturyLink celebrates DATOS and the State of Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hispanic Market. Š 2015 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink, the pathways logo, and the CenturyLink brand sub-graphic are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc.


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Latino Health Disparities Compared to Non-Hispanic Whites: Adults

Asthma

Tuberculosis

As Likely To Have Asthma

As Likely To Have Tuberculosis

X2

X6

Liver Disease

15%

Cervical Cancer

45%

More Likely To Have Liver Disease

More Likely To Be Newly Diagnosed With Cervical Cancer

Obesity

40%

15%

More Likely To Die From Cervical Cancer

More Likely To Be Obese

Diabetes

65%

HIV

More Likely To Be Diabetic

X2.5

As Likely To Be Diagnosed With HIV

55%

More Likely To Have End-Stage Renal Disease

X2.5

As Likely To Die From HIV

45%

More Likely To Die From Diabetes

Source: “Latino Health Disparities Compared to Non-Hispanic Whites.” FamiliesUSA. July 2014. familiesusa.org

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CASE STUDY Skin Cancer Prevention And The Hispanic Community Walter Quan, Jr., MD

The Incidence Of Melanoma Among Hispanics Has Risen By Almost 20 Percent In The Past Two Decades.

Being out in the sun is a reality for many throughout the summer months. The fun of barbeques, swimming and family gatherings should not be hampered by the unnecessary fear of a sun burn or a worry about future skin cancer. Prolonged sun exposure is never recommended, but there a few tips that can be used during fun summer outings. As incidences of skin cancer are increasing in the Hispanic population, prevention is the key. Here are the basic tips for sun safety:

For simplicity, one could imagine human skin as being comprised of three layers: the epidermis, dermis and fat. Cells in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin) called melanocytes produce melanin, the pigment that gives skin and eyes their color. The more melanin the melanocytes produce, the darker the skin pigmentation. The more melanin that a person has means the more a person is provided with a sun protection factor. Environmental factors, such as increased sun exposure in states like Arizona, can contribute to higher incidences of skin cancer regardless of ethnicity, but to protect yourself from the different types of skin cancer, it is necessary for everybody to apply sunscreen any time they are planning to encounter UV rays.

1. Always use a sunscreen with an SPF 15 or higher and make sure to constantly reapply, especially if you are going to be swimming. Evidence of a tan indicates that the radiation received has overcome the protection afforded by the sunscreen. 2. Try to stay inside between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. 3. Cover up as much as possible if you have to be outdoors during the high intensity hours. 4. Watch for moles or marks that are changing in size, color or elevation and reach out to a doctor if you notice those changes.

In my role as a medical oncologist, I am often asked if melanoma is preventable. Only about 10 percent of melanoma runs in families (familial melanoma). Not all cases can be prevented, but there are things you can do to help reduce the chances of getting melanoma, and they all have to do with limiting exposure and protecting against UV rays. Screening is also an important component in identifying melanoma at an early stage. If you follow the ABCDE’s of skin cancer awareness and watch for a change in a pre-existing mole in regards to asymmetry, borders, color, diameter or elevation, and consult a dermatologist, you can potentially discover a treatable melanoma.

One of the most I’m asked most often is, “Am I safer in the sun as long as I have a ‘base tan’?” The answer is wholeheartedly no. A sunburn or tan is actually the way that your skin shows that it is damaged. When a tan fades, it’s your body trying to repair radiation damage from sun. Unfortunately, your body never forgets that damage and so every burn or tan increases your risk for skin cancer. Furthermore, a recent study done at Dartmouth Medical School, showed that indoor tanning can produce 10 to 15 times as much ultraviolet (UV) radiation as the midday sun, and that children and young adults who go for indoor tanning “may be especially vulnerable to developing basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, at a young age.”

At Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA), we believe there isn’t one way to beat cancer—there are hundreds. Our cancer experts are committed to bringing the latest technologies and advanced treatment options to our patients sooner. At the same time, we support you with therapies to reduce side effects, boost your energy level and keep you strong during treatment. Your dedicated team of doctors and other clinicians will take time to understand your unique diagnosis and needs. Then, we’ll work together to develop an integrated cancer treatment plan tailored specifically to you. For more information visit www.cancercenter.com.

Another question that I often receive is, “Do people of color have to worry about skin cancer less?” Having melanin in skin does help protect, but not always. There is more than one type of skin cancer and the tendency to have a different type has been reflected in a person’s ethnicity. Basal cell carcinoma, the most common type of skin cancer, is found predominantly in Caucasians, while squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma has been found in people of all ethnicities.

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Know your ABCDEs

STAY INDOORS!

11 A.M. - 3 P.M. AVOID HIGH RISK HOURS IN THE SUN! At any age: Always

SAFE WITH SUNSCREEN

wear sunscreen and cover up any time of day!

Certain fruits and vegetables contain immune-boosting ingredients and are rich with nutrients. EATING THREE OR FOUR AVOCADOS Citrus fruits contain antioxidants per week can to protect cells from changes that help reduce skin lead to skin cancer. damage. Vitamin A, found in carrots, has been linked to a reduced risk of sunburn, which can reduce Tanned skin is damaged the risk of skin cancer. by the sun’s radiation. People of ALL AGES should limit their may not exposure to the appear until sun’s rays. 30 YEARS after the event.

cancercenter.com • 800-333-CTCA Resource: American Cancer Society

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A Growing Community…

& Opportunity! “Half of Hispanics aged 35+ say they are willing to pay anything when it concerns health. This consumer group is growing dramatically; between 2005 & 2015 Hispanics aged 45-54 will grow by 52%, while those aged 55-64 will grow by 82%.” Source: Hispanic Market Weekly, Vol. 17, Issue 41, October 21, 2013 Courtesy of

U.S. Hispanics Are More Likely To Be Actively Engaged In Their Health U.S. Hispanics Are More Are LikelyMore To BeLikely Activelythan Engaged In Their Health Hispanics the U.S. Population

in General to Be Categorized as an “Image Shapers.”

Hispanics Are More Likely than the U.S. Population in General to Be Categorized as an “Image Shaper.”

“Health and image are allied together for them. Looking good means being healthy. Convenience and healthy choices can— “Health and image are allied together for them. Looking good means being healthy. and do—go together for this group.”

Convenience and healthy choices can—and do—go together for this group.”

25%

156 Index

Above Average Health & Well Being Image Shapers

39%

22%

Total

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Projected Percentage Change in Total, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic Buying Power for U.S., 2012-2017 Courtesy of

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Source: Simmons NCS/NHCS Winter 2015 NHCS Adult Study 12-month (Feb 2014 – Mar 2015); Total U.S.; Base: A18+

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Hispanics Are More Likely To Care For Elderly Hispanics Are Than More Likely To Care For Elderly Relative Than Non-Hispanic Whites Relatives Non-Hispanic Whites 55% of Hispanics help care for their parents or elderly relatives vs. 34% of Non-Hispanic Whites Ways Help Care for Parent or Elderly Relative

WAYS TO HELP CARE FOR PARENTS OR ELDERLY RELATIVES

9%

Choose Their Physician

55%

3% 8%

Choose Their Hospital

Of Hispanics Help Care For Their Parents Or Elderly Relatives Vs.

Choose Their Pharmacy

34%

Choose or Manage Their Health Insurance

Of Non-Hispanic Whites

Hispanic

3% 7% 2% 5% 2%

Non-Hispanic White

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on P16+.

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Courtesy of

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on P16+.

Hispanics Trust And Follow Hispanics TrustDoctor And Recommendations Follow Doctor Recommendations % of Adults Who Strongly Agree % OF ADULTS WHO STRONGLY AGREE

33% 25%

23% 17%

"It's Important to go to the doctor when I'm ill"

Hispanic

I always do what my doctor tells me to do

Non-Hispanic Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Source: Simmons NCS/NHCS Winter 2015 NHCS Adult Study 12-month (Feb 2014 – Mar 2015); Total U.S.; Base: A18+ Source: Simmons NCS/NHCS Winter 2015 NHCS Adult Study 12-month (Feb 2014 – Mar 2015); Total U.S.; Base: A18+

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ASU Researcher Bridging Cultural Gap To Health Care Access At nearly 55 million people, or 17 percent of the total U.S. population, Latinos are now the nation’s largest minority group.

joint initiative of AARP and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation), the Phoenix Chapter of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses created a project designed to educate the Latino community, especially Hispanic women, about the benefits of health insurance and preventive health care.

Yet, out of 3.2 million nurses in the United States, only 3 percent are Hispanic. The serious dearth of Hispanic nurses is a health hazard, according to Dr. Adriana Perez, given that the Latino population is growing by leaps and bounds but remains the least likely in the United States to have health insurance.

“We go to churches. We go to school parent groups and we talk to them about being healthy for themselves and their families. We talk to them about how health insurance works. People who’ve never had health care don’t know what a co-pay is.”

“It’s important to improve those numbers because people may deal with a physician or a specialist, but nurses are the largest health care workforce in the country,” said Perez. “We’re the ones on the front lines. So it’s vitally important to make sure more Latinos study nursing.”

In 2013, the project reached 1,000 Latinas and families with health information. Last year, working in cooperation with NAHN chapters across the country, nearly 7,000 Latinas received training and information about preventive health care practices, thanks to a new grant from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

Originally from Yuma, Arizona, Perez is an Arizona State University assistant professor and current president of the Phoenix Chapter of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN). She first became interested in health care when she was a teen and worked picking tomatoes with older relatives, several of whom suffered a variety of malestares de trabajo, or chronic ailments, like arthritis or high blood pressure, that make physically tasking jobs difficult to bear.

In 2015, Perez said small businesses will be the group’s primary focus. She said Hispanic nurses have already been teaching Hispanic small business owners how to share health related information with their staff and customers. In partnership with the American Heart Association, small businesses are also provided with basic medical equipment, such as blood pressure gauges, and educational materials.

“I saw that they would take blood pressure medicine or other medications, but they didn’t have the information they needed to get better,” said Perez. “I thought surely there was a way to help our community be healthier.”

At a salon called Beauty Performance at the Desert Sky Mall in West Phoenix, for instance, owner Adriana Garcia let customers getting their hair cut know that they can also get their blood pressure checked.

It was as a high school freshman that Perez first considered a career in nursing. A career counselor told her, “I see the work that they (nurses) do and the difference they make. You should be a nurse.” She took his advice. After graduating high school, Perez earned a 2-year nursing degree from Arizona Western College. Soon after, she transferred to Arizona State University, earning her undergraduate degree and Nurse Practitioner degree, and then a doctorate in Nursing and Health Innovation.

The training Garcia received proved to be a lifesaver for Garcia. Perez said Garcia was feeling ill one day and, based on the training she had received, she decided to check her own blood pressure.

Today, Perez is an assistant professor at the ASU College of Nursing and Health Innovation and the only Latina nursing researcher in ASU’s College of Nursing. She teaches courses in “healthy aging” and “culture and health.” Her scholarly work focuses on Hispanic women 50 and older. Also a board certified nurse practitioner, Perez keeps her hands in actual nursing by working part-time at Clinica Medica del Sol, a private practice clinic with offices in Phoenix and Mesa.

Perez’s group also works closely with promotoras—neighborhood volunteers, usually women—who serve as liaisons to health care and social services. There are hundreds of promotoras in Arizona, Perez said. “They are a bridge between the patient and the health care system, and because they are from the community they’re seen as peer leaders and role models.”

Perez said thanks to a grant from AARP State & Communities Office and the Center to Champion Nursing in America (a

Sounds like Perez could be describing herself.

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Photos Courtesy of Adriana Perez

“She noticed she was in the ‘red zone’ and went to the emergency room right away,” Perez said. “The doctors said she was having a small stroke. I feel like we saved a life.”


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“Nearly One In Four Latino Households Are Considered Food Insecure (When Having Consistent Access To Adequate Food Is Limited By Lack Of Money Or Other Resources), Compared With 11 Percent Of White Households.” “Nearly one in four Latino households are considered food insecure (when having consistent access to adequate food is limited by lack of money or other resources), compared with 11 percent of White households.”

Population Living Below the Poverty Line

POPULATION LIVING BELOW THE POVERTY LINE

Latino

White

-11%

-23% Source: “Obesity Prevention in Latino Communities,” The State of Obesity, September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org Source: “Obesity Prevention in Latino Communities.” The State of Obesity. September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org

77% Of Latino Adults Are Overweight More Or Than ¾Obese, Of Latino Adults AreCompared Overweight Or Obese, With Compared With 67.2% Of Whites. 67.2% Of Whites Obese or Overweight Adults

OBESE OR OVERWEIGHT ADULTS

77%

67.2%

Latino

White

Source: “Obesity Prevention in Latino Communities,” The State of Obesity, September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org Source: “Obesity Prevention in Latino Communities.” The State of Obesity. September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org

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Nearly 40% of Latino Children Are Overweight Or Obese, Compared ToOr28.5% OfTo 28.5% White Children Nearly 40% of Latino Children Are Overweight Obese, Compared Of White Children. Obese Children Ages 2 to 19

OBESE CHILDREN AGES 2 TO 19

28.5%

38.9%

White

Latino Source: “Obesity Prevention in Latino Communities,” The State of Obesity, September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org Source: “Obesity Prevention in Latino Communities.” The State of Obesity. September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org

“Latinos Are Disproportionately Affected By Diabetes, With 13.2 Percent Of Latinos Over Age 18 Having Diabetes, Compared With 7.6 Percent Of Whites In The Same Age Group.”

“Latinos are disproportionately affected by diabetes, with 13.2 percent of Latinos over age 18 having diabetes, compared with 7.6 percent of Whites in the same age group.”

Population Over 18 with Diabetes

POPULATION OVER 18 WITH DIABETES

7.6%

13.2%

Latino

White

Source: “Obesity Prevention in Latino Communities,” The State of Obesity, September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org Source: “Obesity Prevention in Latino Communities.” The State of Obesity. September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org

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Arizona Health

Arizona Ranks

Arizona Health

34/51

OVERALL OBESITY Obesity Rate RATE

Arizona Ranks

34/51 among other states on Among Other States obesity

27%

On Obesity

Obesity Source: The State of Obesity in Arizona, The State of Obesity, September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org

Source: The State of Obesity in Arizona. The State of Obesity. September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org

Obesity RatebybyGender, Gender,Age Age, and Ethnicity Obesity Rate and Ethnicity Obesity Rate

OBESITY RATE 40%

33%

35% 30%

30% 27%

34%

27%

26%

25%

23%

22%

65+

White

19%

20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

Male

Female

18-25

26-44

Gender

45-64

Age

Source: The State of Obesity in Arizona, The State of Obesity, September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org Source: The State of Obesity in Arizona. The State of Obesity. September 2014. www.stateofobesity.org

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The Number One Cause Of Death ForOne Latinos DiseaseDisease The Number Cause Is OfCardiovascular Death For Latinos Is Cardiovascular Major Causes of Death for Hispanic Latino MALES Males and MAJOR CAUSES OF DEATH FOR HISPANIC ORor LATINO ANDFemales FEMALES 35% 30%

27%

30%

25%

20%

20%

22%

15%

10%

10%

5%

5% 0%

Cardiovascular Disease

Cancer

4% 4%

Accidents

Diabetes Mellitus

Latino Males

3% 3%

2% 3%

Chronic Respiratory Disease

Influenza/Pneumonia

Latino Females

Source: Statistical Fact Sheet 2013 Update, American Heart Association, 2013. Heart.org

Source: Statistical Fact Sheet 2013 Update. American Heart Association. 2013. Heart.org

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Notes

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10,888

During 2013, Latinos were diagnosed with HIV in the United States and Territories. Source: Latino Commission on AIDS

NATIONAL HIV/AIDS STRATEGY: UPDATED TO 2020

5 Major Changes Since 2010

NATIONAL HIV/AIDS STRATEGY: UPDATED TO 2020 Since the first National HIV/AIDS Strategy was released in 2010, major advances have

5 MAJOR CHANGES SINCE 2010

transformed how we respond to HIV, provided new tools to prevent new infections, and improved access to care. With a vision for the next five years, our National HIV/AIDS Since the first National HIV/AIDS Strategy was released in 2010, major advances have transformed how we respond to HIV, provided new

Strategy been and updated to leverage achievements look ahead tools to prevent has new infections, improved access to care. With these a vision for the next five years, ourand National HIV/AIDS Strategytohas2020. been

updated to leverage these achievements and look ahead to 2020.

Our prevention toolkit has expanded.

The Affordable Care Act HIV testing and has transformed health treatment are care access. recommended. Federal Guidelines now recommend routine HIV screening for people aged

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) A daily pill to prevent HIV. When taken consistently, can reduce the risk of HIV by up to

92

%

Treatment as Prevention The risk of HIV is reduced by

96% in those who have achieved viral suppression (they have very low levels of HIV in the body).

Millions more individuals now have affordable, quality health coverage.

There is no denial of coverage for pre-existing conditions, like HIV. Preventive services are covered without co-pays, including HIV testing.

15 65 TO

Improving HIV Care Continuum outcomes is a priority.

Research is unlocking new knowledge and tools.

President Obama’s HIV Care Continuum Initiative directed Federal departments to increase the number of individuals who are:

• Evidence that starting HIV treatment early lowers the risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses

diagnosed with HIV linked to HIV care

CDC updated recommendations for HIV testing to help labs detect infections earlier. Federal HIV treatment guidelines now recommend antiretroviral therapy for all HIV-infected individuals.

Protections against sex or disability discrimination in health care.

retained in HIV care prescribed HIV treatment virally suppressed (having very low levels of HIV in their body). 87%

• New HIV testing technologies, including new diagnostic tests • New HIV medications with fewer side effects, less frequent dosing, and a lower risk of drug resistance • Continued investigation of long-acting drugs for HIV treatment and prevention, an HIV vaccine, and, ultimately, a cure.

81% 39%

36% 30%

Learn more about the National HIV/AIDS Strategy: Updated to 2020 at AIDS.gov/2020 #HIV2020 Source: National HIV/AIDS Strategy, updated to 2020. AIDS.gov/2020

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Although Hispanic Enrollment In Health Plans Has Increased The Past Couple Of Years, Increasing Enrollment Among Hispanics To Equal The General Population Will Require Targeted Efforts – Health Affairs Blog Although Hispanic  Enrollment  in  Health   Plans   Has   Increased  the  Past   Couple   of  Years,  Increasing   Enrollment   Among   Hispanics  to  Equal  the  General  Population   Will  Require  Targeted  Efforts   – Health  Affair  Blog Shopping   Behavior   Among   Consumers  Eligible   for  Qualified  Health  Plans Shopping Behavior Among Consumers Eligible for Qualified Health Plans Shopped

Enrolled in a plan

78%

39%

Did not shop

Did not enroll

31%

30%

33%

Enrolled in non-ACA individual plan

20%

10%

43% of Hispanics who shopped did not enroll, compared with 26% of the general population

Hispanics were 9 percentage points less likely to shop

Hispanics

20%

58%

69%

22%

Enrolled in ACA plan

18%

Enrolled in non-individual plan

9%

7%

General Population

Hispanics Are More Trusting Of The U.S. Healthcare System

Source: McKinsey’s Center for U.S. Health System Reform Hispanic and National 2015 OEP Surveys

Percent of Hispanic and Non-Hispanics Who Agree with the statement:

Source: McKinsey’s  Center  for  U.S.  Health  S ystem  Reform  Hispanic  and  National  2015  OEP  S urveys

“I trust the U.S. Healthcare System to treat me and my family fairly” Hispanics Are More Trusting Of The U.S. Health care System 28%

Percent of Hispanic and Non-Hispanics Who Agree with the statement: “I trust the U.S. Health Care System to treat me and my family fairly.”

12%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study, based on P16+. (Top 3 Box on 10 Point Scale Where 10 Is Trust Completely) Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on P16+. (Top 3 Box on 10 Point Scale Where 10 Is Trust Completely) Courtesy of

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Phoenix Hispanics Spent

$1.1 Billion

on Health Care in 2014 Source: IHS Global Insight Hispanic Market Monitor 2015, Phoenix DMA Courtesy of

Latinos…Crucial to the ACA’s Success “And Just As Latinos Were Crucial To President Obama’s Reelection In 2012, They Are Now Key To The Implementation Of His Health Law. The Administration Has Made Clear That The Health Law Will Succeed Only If Latinos… Enroll. And It’s Pulling Out All The Stops To Make Sure They Do.” Source: “Health Exchange Outreach Targets Latinos,” NPR, 25 June 2013. NPR.org Courtesy of

Arizonans Continue To Benefit From The Affordable Healthcare Act (ACA) With Over 200,000 New Enrollees Selecting A Health Insurance Plan During The 2015 Open Enrollment Period. Of Those Arizonans Who Selected A Health Plan, And Provided Information On Their Race, 25% Were Hispanic. Arizonans continue  to  benefit  from  the  Affordable  Healthcare  Act  ( ACA)  w ith  over   200,000  new  enrollees  selecting  a  health  insurance  plan   during  the  2015  open   enrollment  period.   Of  those  Arizonans  w ho  selected  a  health  plan,  and  provided   information  on   their  race,  25%  w ere   Hispanic.

2015 Arizona  ACA  Health  Plan  Selection

2015 Arizona ACA Health Plan Selection 1%

6%

4%

American Indian/ Alaska Native Asian

25%

Black Latino Native Hawaiian/ Pacific Islander

62%

0% 2%

Multiracial White

Source: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 2015 Qualified Health Plan Selections in the Health Insurance Marketplace by Race/Ethnicity and County, as of February 22, 2015

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Hispanics Showed Significant Increase In Signing Up For Health Insurance In Phoenix spanics Showed Significant Increase In Signing Up for Health Insurance in Phoenix

ffordable Care Act’s Impact in Phoenix

% Increases Among Each Group Covered by Any Health Insurance vs. Prior Year

% INCREASES AMONG EACH GROUP COVERED BY ANY HEALTH INSURANCE VS. PRIOR YEAR

25%

7%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15) vs. 2014 Release 1 (Mar ‘13 – Feb ‘14), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+ of (Univision Logo) Courtesy Courtesy of

anic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15) vs. 2014 Release 1 (Mar ‘13 – Feb ‘14), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

Hispanics Represented 46% Of Those Who Signed Up For Health Insurance Vs. Last Year In Phoenix Hispanics Represented 46% Of Those Who Signed Up For Health Insurance Versus Last Year In Phoenix

% OF TOTAL ADULTS 18+ WHO SIGNED UP FOR ANY INSURANCE VS. LAST YEAR % of HEALTH Total Adults 18+ Who Signed Up BY ETHNICITY for Any Health Insurance vs. Last Year

INCREASE IN ADULTS 18+ WHO SIGNED UP FOR ANY INSURANCE VS. LAST Increase in HEALTH Adults 18+ Who Signed UpYEAR for

Any Health Insurance vs. Last Year

by Ethnicity

177,762

46%

152,850 54% Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15) vs. 2014 Release 1 (Mar ‘13 – Feb ‘14), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+ Researcher’s Tip: Self-reported consumer survey figures may differ from U.S. Dept of Health & Human Services records due to a variety of reasons including different geographic areas, time frame of data collection, etc. Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15) vs. 2014 Release 1 (Mar ‘13 – Feb ‘14), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

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The Percentage Of Insured Hispanics In Phoenix Has Increased Dramatically In The Past Few Years The Percentage Of Insured Hispanics In Phoenix Has Increased Dramatically In The Past Few Years

PERCENT OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ WITH ANY HEALTH INSURANCE IN PHOENIX Percent of Hispanic Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance in Phoenix

85%

82% 78%

80% 75% 70%

68%

67%

65% 60%

58%

55% 50%

Aug '12 Jan '13

Feb '13 Jul '13

Aug '13 Jan '14

Mar '14 Jul '14

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study, 2013 Release 1 (Current) 2015 Release 1 (Current), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+ Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study, 2013 Release 1 (Current)through through 2015 Release 1 (Current), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

Aug '14 Jan '15

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Courtesy of

Preferences For Health Insurance In Phoenix Differ. However, Blue Cross Blue Shield Is The Preferred Provider Phoenix Hispanic’s Preferences For Health Insurance Differs From Non-Hispanics’. However, for Both and Non-Hispanics Blue Cross Blue Shield is theHispanics preferred insurance for Hispanics and Non-Hispanics Percentage of Insured Phoenix Hispanics and Non-Hispanics by Group/Individual Health Insurance Provider PERCENTAGE OF INSURED PHOENIX HISPANICS AND NON-HISPANICS BY GROUP/INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE PROVIDER

28%

30%

26%

25%

25%

20%

25%

19% 15%

13% 12%

20%

15%

11%

10%

5% 5% 4% 3% Blue Cross Blue Shield

UnitedHealthcare Blue Cross UnitedHealthcare Blue Shield

CIGNA CIGNA

Aetna

Aetna

Health Net Health Net

Non-Hispanic

1% 2%

Humana Humana

5%

0% 0%

State Farm State Farm

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance Researcher’s Tip: State Farm and Aflac are resellers of health Insurance and may be double counted proportionally in actual health

A Z 127

Other provider Other Provider

0%

Hispanic Hispanic

Source: Hispanicproviders’ Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance insurance figures.

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Aflac Aflac

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Courtesy of Courtesy of (Univision Logo)


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Hispanics Use Significantly Less Medicare HispanicsThan use significantly less Medicare than non-Hispanics Non-Hispanics Ranked by Percentage of Hispanics Using Each Type of Health Insurance

RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING EACH TYPE OF HEALTH INSURANCE 38% 34% 31% 25% 19%

17%

17%

15%

15%

10% 1% PPO

Other type

Medicaid, etc.

HMO

Hispanic

Medicare

5%

1%

Military

3%

POS (Point of Service)

Non-Hispanic Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance

Courtesy of

Hispanics Are Visiting Fewer Specialists Than Non-Hispanics With The Exception Hispanics visiting less specialists than Non-Hispanics with the exception of the Obstetrician/Gynecologist Ofare Obstetricians/Gynecologists Ranked by Percentage of Hispanics Using Medical Specialists in the Past 12 Months

RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING MEDICAL SPECIALISTS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS 50% 38%

23%

27% 19%

24%

24% 18%

17% 14%

11%

7%

8%

6%

15%

14% 6%

6% 1%

Dentist

Eye doctor

OB/GYN

Other specialist

Eye examiner

Hispanic

Physical therapist

Cardiologist Chiropractor

Courtesy of (Univision Logo)

Courtesy of

A Z 128

Cosmetic surgeon

Non-Hispanic

Source: HispanicSource: Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+

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Skin doctor

0%

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Top Medical Services Used In Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING MEDICAL SERVICES IN PAST 3 YEARS MEDICAL SERVICE Other Medical Service Hospital Emergency Room Pediatrics Urgent Care Facility (Excluding ER) Maternity Care Any Overnight Stay Procedure Orthopedics Neurology Teeth Whitening, Veneers, Etc. Corrective Eye Surgery Cardiac Care Cancer/Oncology Mental Health

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13

33.0% 31.9% 20.9% 19.1% 15.6% 10.0% 7.3% 7.0% 5.9% 4.2% 4.0% 3.8% 3.6%

#2 #1 #6 #3 #10 #4 #8 #9 #11 #12 #4 #7 #13

32.8% 36.4% 11.2% 26.3% 7.5% 14.5% 8.8% 7.7% 5.2% 5.1% 14.5% 9.3% 4.7%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ Courtesy of

Top 10 Hospitals Used In Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING HOSPITALS IN PAST 3 YEARS HOSPITAL SERVICE St. Joseph Hospital & Medical Center Phoenix Children’s Hospital Other Hospital Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center Phoenix Baptist Hospital Other Banner Health Hospital Maryvale Hospital Maricopa Medical Center Banner Desert Medical Center Banner Thunderbird Medical Center Banner Baywood Medical Center John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12

15.0% 14.3% 12.2% 10.7% 10.6% 8.7% 8.2% 8.1% 8.0% 7.4% 4.8% 4.3%

#9 #18 #1 #8 #11 #4 #22 #20 #3 #2 #6 #5

4.3% 1.6% 17.0% 4.8% 4.0% 6.6% 0.5% 1.3% 6.9% 7.0% 5.2% 6.2%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2015 Release 1 ( Feb ’14 – Jan ‘15), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ Courtesy of

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Tucson Hispanics Spent

$370 Million on Healthcare in 2014

For More Information On Southern Arizona, Refer To Datos Tucson 2015 DON’T MISS OUT!

Source: IHS Global Insight Hispanic Market Monitor 2015, Tucson DMA Courtesy of

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130

BUILDING AN INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC NETWORK

JOIN NOW!

¡INSCRÍBASE HOY! BUILDING AN INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC NETWORK CONSTRUYENDO UNA RED DE ECONOMÍA INTERNACIONAL

CONSTRUYENDO UNA RED DE ECONOMÍA INTERNACIONAL

A FREE business-to-business website that connects businesses across international boundaries to improve freight and trade. • Connect with companies throughout Arizona, Mexico and Canada. • Show others what your business offers and find ways to collaborate. • Search for businesses in the extensive BIEN network.

Una página de internet GRATIS que conecta compañías a través de fronteras internacionales para mejorar la carga y el comercio. • Conéctese con compañías a través de Arizona, México y Canadá. • Muestre lo que ofrece su negocio e identifique maneras de colaborar. • Use la extensa red de BIEN para buscar negocios.

www.CONNECTBIEN.com

For more information, please contact the Maricopa Association of Governments at (602) 254-6300 or connectbien@azmag.gov Para más información por favor ponerse en contacto con la Asociación de Gobiernos de Maricopa al (602) 254-6300 o enviar un email a connectbien@azmag.gov


YO SOY PCH. YoSoyPCH.org

Join us in helping the patients of Phoenix Children’s Hospital The Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation is a proud partner of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce


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Bienvenido a Phoenix Children’s Hospital Phoenix Children’s is one of the largest and most respected children’s hospitals in the nation, providing world-class care in 75 subspecialty fields of pediatric medicine. It’s a privilege to serve our patients and families. We’re proud of what we do. And we’re honored to have the support of individuals and partners in our community who share our vision. More about us: Phoenix Children’s Hospital is ranked in the top 50 pediatric facilities in the country in 9 out of 10 specialty fields of medicine by U.S. News and World Report. In 2014 alone, we treated more than 150,000 patients, provided care during more than 237,000 outpatient visits, saw more than 83,000 children in our Emergency Department and performed more than 16,000 surgeries. Phoenix Children’s Hospital is home to the only Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in Arizona, one of the busiest in the nation with more than 2,500 patients treated in 2014. Nearly 40% of all patients treated at Phoenix Children’s are Hispanic/Latino. Below is the breakdown within each of our Hospital’s Centers of Excellence of the Hispanic population: Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders: 33% (361 patients) •

Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital: 33% (595 cases)

Children’s Heart Center: 29% (257 patients)

Newborn Intensive Care Unit: 45% (230 patients)

Center for Pediatric Orthopedics: 31%

72,901 (40%) total Hispanic patients in 2014

9,195 (13%) Uninsured

47,104 (65%) Underinsured

Phoenix Children’s Hospital provides Language Services to all of our monolingual families. In 2014, Phoenix Children’s provided the following: •

(252 patients) •

718 English to Spanish written translation projects completed

Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center: 39% (996 patients)

Phoenix Children’s Hospital is the largest provider of pediatric health care services to low-income Hispanic children

959 Spanish discharge instructions provided

69,929 Spanish interpreter encounters (staff and telephonic interpreters)

covered 24/7 by staff interpreters

in Arizona:

DATO S

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13,762 Spanish-speaking admissions to the ED

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Photos Courtesy of BCBSAZ


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In addition to caring for children at the hospital and in our

Comprehensive Health Screenings. Vision, hearing,

satellite urgent care centers, Phoenix Children’s is also active

immunization and developmental screenings are

in the community with our injury prevention and community

universally offered as-needed. Vaccinations can be

outreach programs, such as the Crews’n Healthmobile.

administered at fixed-site clinics.

Founded in 2000, Phoenix Children’s Hospital created the

Medical Treatment, including medical examinations

Crews’n Healthmobile, a 38-foot Mobile Medical Unit of-

and wellness care, minor surgical procedures, dis-

fering free primary and preventative health care services to

pensing of medications, testing/treatment for sex-

children and youth victimized by homelessness and those

ually transmitted illness and pregnancy, and mental

at highest risk of becoming homeless. The mission of the

health screening/evaluation and referrals.

Crews’n Healthmobile is to provide hope and holistic healthcare to homeless and at-risk children and youth, birth through

Medical/Community Referrals and Follow-Up. The

24-years-old. Since it took to the streets 15 years ago, the

program has existing partnerships with organiza-

Crews’n Healthmobile has provided services through thou-

tions that serve homeless and impoverished youth.

sands of patient visits. Last year alone, the program provided

Additionally, staff has access to physicians through

care to over 1,700 youth through nearly 9,400 clin-

Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

ical visits. The program offers medical examinations and wellness care, immunizations, medications, testing and treat-

Financial Advocacy. The program provides screen-

ment for sexually transmitted illness and pregnancy, minor

ings for AHCCCS eligibility and assists in complet-

surgical procedures, hearing/vision/developmental screen-

ing the process to receive Medicaid coverage.

ings, health education, subspecialist referrals, and mental health evaluations and referrals.

Health Education. Staff is available to educate youth and families on numerous topics such as

The program has a far-reaching impact resulting from 24

asthma management, healthy nutrition, bullying,

weekly clinics offered through two Mobile Medical Units as

mood disorders and smoking cessation.

well as a fixed-site community clinic at UMOM New Day Centers, the largest homeless shelter for children and families

With the continuous help of existing and new partners,

in Arizona. The program also established an additional fully

sponsors and donors, Phoenix Children’s Hospital is able to

licensed fixed-site clinic at Children First Academy (CFA), a

continue providing medical help to every child in need.

local K-8 grade school where 68% of children are homeless th

and 100% are poverty stricken. Through a team of pediatric physicians, registered nurses or medical assistants and a financial advocate/patient access representative, patients

phoenixchildrensfoundation.org

DATO S

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Photos Courtesy of BCBSAZ

receive:


The power of diversity We understand what it means to embrace diversity and recognize it plays a key role in the success of our economy. By partnering with organizations that promote diversity like the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, we strengthen our communities so we can build a brighter future for Arizona, while celebrating the rich culture of our state. We salute the Chamber on its release of the 2015 DATOS report and all of its efforts to build a vibrant future for our communities.

aps.com


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“DATOS provides us with invaluable insights into one of our most important, and rapidly growing, customer segments. Understanding both current and future demographic trends and unique culture and value differentiators is critical in the development of our future products and services. We place heavy reliance on the data from the DATOS report and appreciate having a reputable team of individuals supporting our growth endeavors.” —Mike Tully, CEO, AAA Arizona

Latinas Now Own More Than Half Of Arizona’s Estimated 123,406 Hispanic-owned Businesses The number of Hispanic-owned businesses in Arizona soared

by only 2 percent from 491,529 to 499,927, while the num-

an astonishing 70 percent from 52,667 to 89,673 between

ber of firms owned by non-minorities actually dipped by 6

2007 and 2012, according to preliminary results from the U.S.

percent from 2007 to 2012. The number of firms owned by

Census Bureau’s 2012 Survey of Business Owners.

non-minorities nationwide decreased overall by 5 percent in that same period.

Perhaps even more impressive, Census data shows that companies owned by Hispanic women skyrocketed by 116 per-

Although growing at a rate phenomenally faster than busi-

cent from 19,367 in 2007 to 41,843 firms in 2012.

nesses overall, Latino-owned firms recorded a dramatic drop in average annual gross receipts. In 2007, U.S. Census figures

DATOS also forecasts, based on the compounded annual

showed Latino-owned firms in Arizona were tallying $155,141

growth rate of Hispanic-owned businesses statewide from

on average in gross annual revenue. In 2012, annual gross

2007 and 2012, that Arizona is now home to an estimated

receipts for Latino-owned businesses totaled $110,332, a 29

123,406 Hispanic companies overall, a majority of which

percent decrease.

(66, 429, or 54 percent) are owned by Hispanic women. (An analysis of existing Census data suggests Latina business own-

Minority-owned firms in Arizona overall recorded annual gross

ers crossed the 50 percent threshold sometime in 2014.)

receipts averaging $144,260 in 2012 compared to annual gross receipts of $166,422 in 2007, a 13 percent drop. Non-

“What the latest Census figures show is that Hispanic- and

minority firms, meanwhile, went from $458,379 to $516,191

minority-owned firms are an ever more vital and growing force

in that same period, a 12.6 percent increase.

in the state’s business community and Hispanic women are leading that charge,” said Monica Villalobos, vice president

There were a total of 3.3 million Hispanic-owned businesses

of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and editor of

nationwide in 2012 that employed 2.5 million people, accord-

this 2015 edition of DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic

ing to the 2012 Survey of Business Owners. The aggregate

Market.

revenue for these firms was $517.4 billion with an annual payroll of $78.7 billion in 2012.

Overall, minority-owned businesses in Arizona grew by 60 percent from 85,227 in 2007 to 136,075 in 2012. By com-

Detailed SBO data is available at www.census.gov/econ/

parison, the total number of all businesses in Arizona grew

sbo/getdata.html

DATO S

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Census Business Builder: Small Business Edition mid 2015, the CensusIndustry Bureau will be releasing a Get SmartIntoolAbout Your to help small business owners get data for the type of business they want to open.

3 Easy Steps

1

Choose the type of business you are interested in opening and a location to start your search.

“Census Business Builder” is a suite of services that provides selected demographic and economic data from the U.S. Census Bureau tailored to specific types of users in a simple to access and use format. This suite currently includes the Small Business Edition and a proposed Chamber of Commerce Edition, but will include other tailored editions in the future.

The Small Business Edition offers prospective business owners selected Census Bureau Statistics to guide their research into opening their new business. This version will feature:

2

Select from economic and demographic data to view in a thematic map to help identify the best location for your business.

• Easy to use, customerfocused, Census data and more, available for free to the public. • Economic and demographic data viewable in a map, report, or table. • Trend charts to identify changes over time for your industry or customer base.

3

Click the map to view a Local Business Profile report for data on customers and competitors for your industry.

Example of report on back

• Ability to compare data to neighboring counties, and comparisons to state and national averages. • Downloadable and printable business reports with countylevel information, dynamically generated from Census Bureau data.

June 2015


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Data Just Released!

In The United States, There Are 3,320,563 Hispanic-owned Firms Employing 2,518,045 People. These Firms Have An Aggregate Revenue Of $517.4 Billion And An Aggregate Annual Payroll of $78.7 Billion. Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Hispanic Firms Are The Fastest Growing In The U.S.!

GROWTH OF OWNED FIRMS BY ETHNICITY IN THE UNITED Growth of Owned Firms by Ethnicity in the United States 2007-2012 STATES 2007-2012

50%

Hispanic Firms Are The Fastest Growing In The U.S.!

47% 41%

40%

30%

27%

25%

20%

10%

0%

-10%

-4% Hispanic

American Indian and Alaska Native

Asian

Black or African American

White

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

The National Growth In Revenue For All Firms Was 12%, Which Is 41 Percentage Points Less Than Revenue In Minority Firms, 36 Points Less than Hispanic Firms’ Growth and 38 Points Less than Hispanic Female Firms’ Growth

The National Growth In Revenue For All Firms Was 12%, That Is 41 Percentage Points Less Than Revenue In Minority Firms, 36 Points Less than Hispanic Firms’ Growth and 38 Points Less than Hispanic Female Firms’ Growth Revenue went from $30,032 billion in 2007 to

$33,537 billion in 2012. This is 12% increase from 2007 to 2012

Receipts, or Value Shipments for Firms the U.S. by Ownership SALES, RECEIPTS OR VALUE OF SHIPMENTSSales, FOR FIRMS INof THE U.S. BYin OWNERSHIP

$1,800

$1,566

$1,600 $1,400 $1,200

Billions

Revenue went from $30,032 billion in 2007 to $33,537 billion in 2012. This is 12% increase from 2007 to 2012.

53% Growth

$1,025

48% Growth

$1,000 $800 $600

$351

$400

$517

$56

$200 $0

50% Growth

Minority Firms

Hispanic Firms

2007

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released AugustSource: 2015 United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

DATO S

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$84

Hispanic Female Firms


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Data Just Released!

In The U.S., Hispanic Female Firms Are Growing At A Rate Of 88%, Which Is 85 Percentage Points In The U.S., Hispanic Female Firms are Growing at a Rate of 88%, that is 85 Percentage Points Higher Than The Rate For All Firms Higher Than The Rate For All Firms Number of Firms in the U.S. by Ownership NUMBER OF FIRMS IN THE U.S. BY OWNERSHIP

2% Growth 30.0

27.1 27.6

25.0

Millions

20.0

38% Growth

15.0 10.0

5.8

43% Growth

8.0

2.3

5.0 -

All firms

Minority Firms

2007

3.3

Hispanic Firms

88% Growth 0.8

1.5

Hispanic Female Firms

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

In The U.S., An Individual Non-Hispanic Firm Made, on Average, $417 K More Than A Hispanic Firm In 2012 Revenue by Individual Firms in the United States, 2012

In The U.S., An Individual Non-Hispanic Firm Made, on Average, $417 K More Than Hispanic Firm In 2012

$700

REVENUE BY INDIVIDUAL FIRMS IN THE UNITED STATES, 2012

$573

$600

Thousands

$500

Note: Revenue is used instead of “sales, receipts or value of shipments” as stated by the United States Census Bureau

$400 $300 $200

$156

$100 $0

Hispanic

Source: United States Census Bureauis Survey, Released August 2015 Note: Revenue used2012; instead of “sales, receipts,

Non-Hispanic

or value of shipments” as stated by the United State Census Bureau

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

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Data Just Released!

In The U.S., Female Hispanic Firms Hired 38% More Employees When In Aggregate, All Firms Lost Or Dismissed 2% Of Their Workforce

In The U.S., Female Hispanic Firms Hired 38% More Employees When In Aggregate, All Firms Lost Or Dismissed 2% Of Their Workforce Number of paid employees for all firms was 117,310 Number of Paid Employees in the United States

NUMBER OF PAID EMPLOYEES IN THE UNITED STATES

9,000

33% Growth 7,722

8,000 7,000 6,000

Thousands

Number of paid employees for all firms was 117.3 million in 2007 and 115.2 million in 2012, a 2% decrease.

5,816

32% Growth

5,000 4,000 3,000

1,908

2,000

2,518

38% Growth 363

1,000 -

Thousands in 2007 and 115,249 Thousands in 2012, a 2% decrease.

Minority Firms

Hispanic Firms

2007

502

Female Hispanic Firms

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

In The U.S., The Annual Payroll For Female Hispanic Firms Grew At A Rate Of 52%, Which Is 43 Percentage Points Higher Than The Rate For All Firms! In The U.S., Annual Payroll For Female Hispanic Firms Grew At Rate Of 52%, That Is 43 Percentage Points Higher Than The Rate For All Firms! Annual Payroll for all firms was $4,823 billion Annual Payroll in the United States

ANNUAL PAYROLL IN THE UNITED STATES

$300

+ 51% $248

$250

$200

Billions

Annual Payroll for all firms was $4.8 Trillion in 2007 and $5.2 Trillion in 2012, a 9% increase.

$5,236 billion in 2012, a 9% increase.

$164

$150

+ 47% $80

$100

$54 $50

+ 52% $9

$0

Minority Firms

Hispanic Firms

2007

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

DATO S

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$14

Female Hispanic Firms

in 2007 and


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Data Just Released!

In The U.s., Wholesale Trade Is The Leading Sector In Revenue In The U.S., Wholesale Trade Is The Leading Sector In Revenue Among Hispanic-owned Firms Among Hispanic-owned Firms A Revenue With A Revenue Of $102 billion in 2012, an increase of 59%With from 2007 Top 10 Sectors in Revenue for Hispanic-Owned Firms in the United States, 2012 Of $102 Billion In 2012, An Increase Of 59% From 2007 TOP 10 SECTORS IN REVENUE FOR HISPANIC-OWNED FIRMS IN THE UNITED STATES 2007 – 2012

$102

$120

$95

$100

$61

$58$57 $36

$34 $21

Wholesale trade

Transportation and warehousing(607)

$30

$22

Retail trade

$20

$31 $22

Manufacturing

2007

$29

Health care and social assistance

Construction

$40

$29 $20

$19

$14

Professional, scientific, Other services (except and technical services public administration)(609)

$60

$18

Administrative and support and waste management and remediation services

Billions

$80

$64

Accommodation and food services

$20

$0

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

In The U.S., The #1 Sector In Number of Firms Among The Hispanic-owned Firms Is Administrative & Support And Waste Management & Remediation Services In The U.S., The #1 Sector In Number of Firms Among The Hispanic-owned Firms Is Administrative & Support & Waste Management & Remediation Services

TopHISPANIC-OWNED 10 Sectors in Number ofFIRMS Hispanic-Owned Firms in the United States, TOP 10 SECTORS IN NUMBER OF IN THE UNITED STATES, 20072012 – 2012

600

555

529

477

500

Thousands

400

349 338

341

313 300

279

235 185

200

100

0

66

101

Accommodation Administrative and food and support and services waste management and remediation services

64

102

Arts, entertainment, and recreation

Construction

Health care and social assistance

2007

257 130 146

Professional, Real estate and Other services scientific, and rental and (except public leasing administration) technical services (605)

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

DATO S

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186

Retail trade

201

244

Transportation and warehousing (603)


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Data Just Released!

In Arizona, There Are 89,673 Hispanic-owned Firms Employing 60,450 People. These Firms Have Revenue Of $9.9 Billion And An Annual Payroll Of $1.6 Billion. Note: Revenue and Annual Payroll are aggregates. Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Hispanic-owned Firms Are The Fastest Growing Firms in Arizona!

80%

Hispanic-owned Firms Are The Fastest Growing In Arizona!

Growth of Owned Firms by Ethnicity in Arizona 2007-2012

GROWTH OF OWNED FIRMS BY ETHNICITY IN ARIZONA 2007 – 2012 70%

70%

57%

60% 50%

38%

40%

31%

30% 20% 10% 0%

-6%

-10%

Hispanic

American Indian and Alaska Native

Asian

Black or African American

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

In Arizona, Female Hispanic Firms Are Growing At A Rate Of 116%, 114 Percentage Points Higher Than The Rate For All Firms! In Arizona, Female Hispanic Firms Are Growing At A Rate Of 116%, 114 Percentage Points Higher Than The Rate For All Firms!

600

500

2% Growth 492

Number of Firms in Arizona

NUMBER OF FIRMS IN ARIZONA

500

Thousands

400

60% Growth

300

200

85

100

0

All Firms

70% Growth

136 53

Minority Firms

2007

90

19

Hispanic Firms

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

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Female Hispanic Firms

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In Arizona, Revenues Of Minority Firms and Female Hispanic Firms Are Growing At A Rate Of 38%, Which Is 37 Percentage Points Higher Than The Revenue For All Firms!

In Arizona, Revenues Of Minority Firms and Female Hispanic Firms Are Growing At A Rate Of 38%, That Is 37 Percentage Points Higher Than The Revenue Of All Firms! Revenue of all firms in Arizona was Revenue of Firms in Arizona $492.6 Billion in 2007 and $497.2 Billion in 2012, an increase of 1%.

REVENUE OF FIRMS IN ARIZONA $25.0

Revenue for all firms in Arizona was $492.6 Billion in 2007 and $497.2 Billion in 2012, an increase of 1%.

38% Growth $19.6

$20.0

$14.2

Billions

$15.0

24% Growth $9.9

$8.0

$10.0

$5.0

$0.0

38% Growth $1.5

Minority Firms

Hispanic Firms

2007

$2.1

Female Hispanic Firms

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Note: Revenue is used instead of “sales, receipts, or value of shipments” as stated by the United State Census Bureau Note: Revenue is used instead of “sales, receipts or value of shipments” as stated by the United State Census Bureau Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

In Arizona, An Individual Non-Hispanic Firm Generated, On Average, $372K More In Arizona, An Individual Non-Hispanic Firm Generated, On Average, $382K More Than A Hispanic Firm In 2012 Revenue by Individual Firms in Arizona, 20 Than A Hispanic Firm In 2012 $600 REVENUE BY INDIVIDUAL FIRMS IN ARIZONA 2012 $500

$482

Note: Revenue is used instead of “sales, receipts or value of shipments” as stated by the United State Census Bureau

Thousands

$400

$300

$200

$110 $100

$0

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Note: Revenue is used instead of “sales, receipts, or value of shipments” as stated by the United State Census Bureau

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Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

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In Arizona, Hispanic Firms Hired 11% More Employees, When in the Aggregate, All Firms Lost In Arizona, Hispanic Firms Hired 11% More Employees, When in the Aggregate, All Firms Lost O Or Dismissed 10% Of Their Workforce Dismissed 10% Of Their Workforce Number of Paid Employees in Arizona

Number of paid employees for a firms was 2,299 Thousands in 2 and 2,067 Thousands in 2012, 10% decrease.

NUMBER OF PAID EMPLOYEES IN ARIZONA + 25% 124

120 100

Thousands

Number of paid employees for all firms was 2.3 Million in 2007 and 2.1 Million in 2012, a 10% decrease.

140

99

+ 11%

80

60

55

60

-9%

40

13

20 -

Minority Firms

Hispanic Firms

2007 Source:August United States Census Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released 2015

12

Female Hispanic Firms

2012

Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

In Arizona, Annual Payroll For Hispanic Firms Grew At A Rate Of 13%, That Is 12 Percentage Points Higher Than The Rate For All Firms! In Arizona, Annual Payroll For Hispanic Firms Grew At A Rate Of 13%, That Is 12 Percentage Points Higher Than The RatePayroll For All Firms! Annual in Arizona

ANNUAL PAYROLL IN ARIZONA 4,000

+ 34% 3,450

3,500

3,000

2,566

+ 13%

2,500

Millions

Annual Payroll for all firms was $86.5 Billion in 2007 and $85.6 Billion in 2012, a 1% decrease.

Annual Payroll for all firms was $86,514 Millions in 2007 and $8 Millions in 2012, a 1% decrease.

2,000

1,442

1,500

1,636

-2%

1,000

341

500

-

Minority Firms

Hispanic Firms

2007

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

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336

Female Hispanic Firms


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In Arizona, Wholesale Trade Is The Leading Sector In In Arizona, WholesaleAmong Trade Is The Leading Sector In Revenue AmongFirms Hispanic-owned A Revenue Of Revenue Hispanic-owned WithFirmsAWith Revenue of $2.1 Billion in 2012, An Increase Of 72% from 2007 Top 10 Sectors in Revenue of Hispanic-Owned Firms in Arizona, 2012 $2.1 Billion In 2012, An Increase Of 72% From 2007 TOP 10 SECTORS IN REVENUE OF HISPANIC-OWNED FIRMS IN ARIZONA 2012

$2,500

$2,072 $1,864

$2,000

$1,338

Millions

$1,500

$837

$1,000

$635

$1,206 $848

$758 $481

$500

$0

$1,249 $1,191

$292

Accommodation Administrative and and food services support and waste management and remediation services

Construction

$427

Health care and social assistance

$386

$471

Manufacturing

2007

$447 $436

$353

Other services (except public administration) (605)

$545

Professional, scientific, and technical services

$428

Retail trade

Transportation and Wholesale trade warehousing (603)

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

In Arizona, The #1 Sector In Number Of Firms Among Hispanic-owned Firms Is The Same As The National Sector

In Arizona, The #1 Sector In Number Of Firms Among Hispanic-owned Firms Is The Same As The National Sector Top 10 Sectors in Number of Hispanic-Owned Firms in Arizona, 2012

TOP 10 SECTORS IN NUMBER OF HISPANIC-OWNED FIRMS IN ARIZONA 2012

20

17

18

15

16

Thousands

14

12

12

10

10

8

7

8

6

5

6 4 2 0

2

3

Accommodation and food services

2 Administrative and support and waste management and remediation services

3

Arts, entertainment, and recreation

7

7 4 4

5

4

5

2 Construction

Health care and social Other services (except Professional, scientific,Real estate and rental assistance public and technical services and leasing administration)(609)

2007

2012

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

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Retail trade

Transportation and warehousing(607)


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1 in 2 Hispanic Firms In The U.S. (and 4 in 5 in Arizona) Are Owned By A Mexican-American! 1 in 2 Hispanic Firms in the U.S. are Owned by a Mexican-American; 4 in 5 in Arizona!

Percentage Share of Hispanic-owned Firms by Nationality, 2012

PERCENTAGE SHARE OF HISPANIC-OWNED FIRMS BY NATIONALITY 2012 Arizona

United States 8%

Note: Hispanicowned firms in the U.S. for this graphic only include Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend.

34%

9%

2% 1%

13%

Cuban Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano

89,193

3,301,154

Other Hispanic, Latino or Spanish

Hispanic-owned Firms in Arizona

Hispanic-owned Firms in the U.S.

Puerto Rican

83%

49% Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Note: Hispanic-Owned firms in the U.S. for this graphic only includes Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend.

In The U.S. (And 81% In Arizona), Mexican-American Firms Generate Almost HALF Of The Revenue Earned By Hispanic Firms! 1 in 2 Hispanic Firms in the U.S. are Owned by a Mexican-American; 4 in 5 in Arizona! In the U.S., Mexican-American Firms Generate Almost HALF of the Revenue Earned by Hispanic Firms; 81% in Arizona!

Note: Revenue is used instead of “sales, receipts or value of shipments” as stated by the United States Census Bureau. Hispanic-owned firms in the U.S. for this graphic only includes Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend.

Share Revenue by BY Nationality ofFirms Hispanic-owned Firms,2012 2012 Percentage Share of Hispanic-owned by Nationality, PERCENTAGEPercentage SHARE OF of REVENUE NATIONALITY OF HISPANIC-OWNED FIRMS 2012

Arizona Arizona

United States United States 6%8%

28%

34%

9% 19%

12% 13%

1% 1% 2% 6% Cuban Cuban Mexican, Mexican Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano American, Chicano Other Hispanic, Latino or Spanish Other Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish Puerto Rican

89,193 $9.8 Billion

$509 Billion 3,301,154

Hispanic-owned of Revenue in Arizona Firms in Arizona

of Revenue in the U.S. Hispanic-owned Firms in the U.S.

83%

49% 47%

Puerto Rican

81%

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Note: Revenue is used instead of “sales, receipts, or value of shipments” as stated by the United State Census Bureau. Note: Hispanic-Owned firms in the U.S. for this graphic only includes Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend. Hispanic-Owned firms in the U.S. for this graphic only includes Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend. Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

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In the U.S., Mexican-American Firms Employ 1 in 2 People Working at Hispanic Firms; 4 in 5 in Arizona! 1 in 2 Hispanic Firms in the U.S. are Owned by a Mexican-American; 4 in 5 in Arizona! In the U.S., Mexican-American Firms Employ 1 in 2 People Working at Hispanic Firms; 4 in 5 in Arizona! PERCENTAGE SHARE OF EMPLOYEES PAID BYofNATIONALITY OF HISPANIC-OWNED FIRMS Percentage Share Hispanic-owned Firms by Nationality, 2012 Percentage Share of Employees Paid by Nationality of Hispanic-owned Firms, 2012 2012

United States

Note: Hispanicowned firms in the U.S. for this graphic only include Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend.

Arizona

7% United States 12%

8%

Arizona 1% 7%

14%

9%

13%

2% 1%

Cuban Cuban

27%

34%

2,474,519 3,301,154

Mexican, Mexican Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano American, Chicano

59,945 89,193

Employees

Other Hispanic, Other Hispanic, Latino or Spanish Latino, or Spanish

Employees Hispanic-owned

Hispanic-owned Firms in the U.S.

Firms in Arizona

Puerto Rican Puerto Rican

83%

55%

49%

79%

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012;Released Released August August 2015 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Note:Hispanic-Owned Hispanic-Owned firms only includes Hispanic firmsfirms owned by the on theonlegend. Note: firms inin the theU.S. U.S.for forthis thisgraphic graphic only includes Hispanic owned by nationalities the nationalities the legend.

In The U.S., Mexican American Firms Pay Almost HALF of the Annual Payroll by Hispanic Firms; 76% in Arizona! 1 in 2 Hispanic Firms in the U.S. are Owned by a Mexican-American; 4 in 5 in Arizona!

PERCENTAGEIn The SHARE OF American ANNUAL PAYROLL NATIONALITY FIRM U.S., Mexican Firms Pay Almost HALF ofBY the Annual Payroll by HispanicOF Firms;HISPANIC-OWNED 76% in Arizona! Percentage Share of Hispanic-owned Firms by Nationality, 2012 2012 Percentage Share of Annual Payroll by Nationality of Hispanic-owned Firm, 2012 United States United States 9%

Note: Hispanicowned firms in the U.S. for this graphic only includes Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend.

8%

27%

34%

15% 9%

14% 13%

$78 Billion 3,301,154

Arizona Arizona 1% 2% 1%

9% Cuban

Cuban

$1.6 Billion 89,193

Annual Payroll Hispanic-owned Firms in the U.S.

Annual Payroll Hispanic-owned Firms in Arizona

Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano Other Hispanic, Other Latino, orHispanic, Spanish Latino or Spanish Puerto Rican Puerto Rican

83% 76%

49% 49% Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, Note: 2012; Released August Hispanic-Owned firms2015 in the U.S. for this graphic only includes Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend. Note: Hispanic-Owned firms in the U.S. for this graphic only includes Hispanic firms owned by the nationalities on the legend.

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Digital Marketing Whiz Started Business With $20 And A Dream The 19th Century author Oscar Wilde said, “Youth is wasted on the young.”

The common thread to success with these sites is “marketing and advertising,” said Elizetxe, who notes that his company has grown from a sole proprietorship to over 40 team members, nearly all of whom work from remote locations. Many of them are contractors.

Granted, Wilde lived in an age long before the advent of the Internet and the likes of Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Google’s Larry Page and Arizona’s Josh Valdez-Elizetxe. Okay, Elizetxe hasn’t quite joined the ranks of global tech titans like Page and Zuckerberg, but give him time…give him time.

As to why he lives and works in Phoenix, Elizetxe said, “I think Arizona’s a fantastic place to do business. I think it’s wrong to think Silicon Valley is the only place to find talented people. The only thing I need is a laptop and great Wi-Fi.”

Elizetxe is the President of Foresold, and founder of Tomi Academy, an online training program for entrepreneurs. A self-described “new wave entrepreneur,” he is best known for his digital marketing expertise. Elizetxe started his first company as a high school freshman with a $20 loan from his parents. He used that money to buy his first domain name, and then began building websites. After graduating valedictorian at Alhambra High School in 2011, Elizetxe went on to study computer information systems at Arizona State University (he was the first in his family to graduate high school and college).

He also likes that Arizona has a talented pool of skilled immigrant workers, said Elizetxe, who are “intellectually hungrier than most people from here” and are not afraid to join a risk-inclined, startup venture. Elizetxe also sets time aside to share his story and his ideas with young people, including Latino and minority youth. “I tell them, ‘Most speakers who talk to you come from outside of your community, but I was literally in the place where you’re sitting.’ ”

He wasted no time finishing his undergraduate degree. No kidding. Taking 20+ credits each semester, while also completing the rigorous requirements of the Barrett Honors College, Elizetxe earned his bachelor’s and graduated summa cum laude in just two years.

He says he is not afraid to get personal when he talks to the students he meets. “If it’s one-on-one, tears come out. Tears come out on both sides,” said Elizetxe. “I love talking to them and I’m just grateful I’m able to inspire.”

“I was running my business from my Barrett dorm room and closing deals between classes,” Elizetxe told the Arizona Republic in a recent feature about ASU-trained entrepreneurs. His parents wanted him to become a doctor. Elizetxe wanted to study business. “In accounting, I would learn things and apply it to my business that evening.” Today, Elizetxe’s various companies generate millions in revenue, though he has yet to seek venture capital investment. He doesn’t have anything against it, he just hasn’t needed it.

Today, Elizetxe says he’s shifted away from developing digital marketing campaigns for other companies to the business of creating online companies. In the past 12 months, he said he and his team have created websites selling products as diverse as garage door parts to gourmet food. Every month, over 10 million people visit the websites in Elizetxe’s portfolio.

To learn more about Elizetxe, visit JoshuaElizetxe.com or TomiAcademy.com.

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Photos Courtesy of Joshua Elizetxe

Elizetxe adds one reason he hasn’t yet solicited venture capital may be because “I came from a house where you don’t talk about venture capital at the kitchen table.”


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From 2002 To 2015, Latina-Owned Businesses In Arizona Have Increased By 73%

From 2002 To 2015, Latina-Owned Businesses In Arizona Have Increased By

TREND INTrend GROWTH WOMEN-OWNED in Growth of OF Women-Owned Businesses, 2002 -BUSINESSES 2015 2002 - 2015 21,400 19,367

12,389

73

%

2002

2007

2015

Source: The State Of Women-Owned Businesses Summary Tables, Source: 2015. The State Of Women-Owned Businesses Summary Tables, 2015. *2015 Estimates *2015 Estimates http://www.womenable.com/content/userfiles/2015_State_of_Women-Owned_Businesses_Report-Summary_Tables.pdf www.womenable.com/content/userfiles/2015_State_of_Women-Owned_Businesses_Report-Summary_Tables.pdf

Arizona Latina-Owned Businesses Had A

94

%

15

Arizona Businesses OF HadLATINA-OWNED A 94% Increase In Sales From 2002 To 2015 SALESLatina-Owned TREND GROWTH BUSINESSES Sales Trend Growth of Latina-Owned Businesses

$1.697,100 Sales ($000)

$1,521,989

$876,158

Increase In Sales From 2002 To 2015 2002

2007

2015

Source: The State Of Women-Owned Businesses Summary Tables, 2015.Source: The State Of Women-Owned Businesses Summary Tables, 2015. *2015 Estimates http://www.womenable.com/content/userfiles/2015_State_of_Women-Owned_Businesses_Report-Summary_Tables.pdf *2015 Estimates www.womenable.com/content/userfiles/2015_State_of_Women-Owned_Businesses_Report-Summary_Tables.pdf

16

Since 2014, The Trend In Net Number of New Latina-Owned Businesses Per Day Is Currently TREND IN NETSurpassing NUMBERPrevious OF NEW YearsLATINA-OWNED Trends

Since 2014, The Trend In Net Number Of New LatinaOwned Businesses Per Day Is Currently Surpassing Previous Years Trends

BUSINESSES PER DAY Trend in Net Number of New Latina-Owned Businesses Per Day

168*

123 105*

1997-2007

2007-2015

Source: The State Of Women-Owned Businesses Summary Tables, 2015.

Estimates Source: The State Of Women-Owned Businesses Summary Tables,*2015 2015. http://www.womenable.com/content/userfiles/2015_State_of_Women-Owned_Businesses_Report-Summary_Tables.pdf *2015 Estimates www.womenable.com/content/userfiles/2015_State_of_Women-Owned_Businesses_Report-Summary_Tables.pdf

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2014-2015

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In 2012, U.S.-born Workers Were Nearly 3x More Likely To Work In A Professional, Management, Business Or Finance Occupation Than Unauthorized Immigrants In 2012, U.S. Born Workers Were Nearly 3x More Likely To Work In a Professional, Management, Business Or Finance Occupation Than Unauthorized Immigrants

U.S.-BORN ANDImmigrant UNAUTHORIZED WORKERS, BY MAJOR OCCUPATION U.S. Born and Unauthorized Workers, IMMIGRANT by Major Occupation, 2012 2012

13%

Professional, Management, Business and Finance

36%

13%

Sales, Office Administrative Support

26%

4%

Farming, Fishing and Forestry

1%

8%

Transportation and Material Moving

6%

14%

Production, Installation and Repair Construction and Extraction

9%

15%

5%

33%

Service 0%

5%

10%

15%

Unauthorized Immigrants

17%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

U.S.-born

Source: Pew Research Center Estimates Based on Augment 2012 American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/share-of-unauthorized-immigrant-workers-in-production-construction-jobs-falls-since-2007/ Source: Pew Research Center Estimates Based on Augment 2012 American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/share-of-unauthorized-immigrant-workers-in-production-construction-jobs-falls-since-2007/

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In The United States, 26% Of Unauthorized Immigrants In The United States, 26% Of Unauthorized Immigrants Work In Farming, Work In Farming, Fishing Or Forestry Fishing Or Forestry Occupations with high shares of unauthorized immigrants, 2012

OCCUPATIONS WITH HIGH SHARES OF UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS 2012 26%

Farming, Fishing and Foresty

17%

Building/Ground Cleaning & Maintenance

14%

Construction and Extraction

11%

Food Preparation & Serving

9%

Production

7%

Transportation and Material Moving

Civilian Labor Force

5%

Source: Pew Research Center Estimates Based on Augment 2012 American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS)

www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/share-of-unauthorized-immigrant-workers-in-production-construction-jobs-falls-since-2007/ Source: Pew Research Center Estimates Based on Augment 2012 American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/share-of-unauthorized-immigrant-workers-in-production-construction-jobs-falls-since-2007/

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Datos Co-Founder Recalls Report’s Creation Gema Duarte Luna The 2015 edition of DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market, published by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, is a more than 300-page annual report featuring the latest research on the growing economic impact of the state’s 2.2 million Latinos.

DATOS breakfast conference—SRP as the presenting sponsor—is expected to draw over 1,000 business and community leaders). “We knew it had to be a quality event if people were going to take DATOS seriously,” she said. “Sandy did the first data presentation, followed by a keynote address by a senior marketing manager from U S WEST and Bank of America was our presenting sponsor.”

Gema Duarte Luna, a former chair of the AZHCC board, remembers when DATOS was just an idea whose time had come. “[In 1996], the Hispanic Chamber was involved in a successful Cinco de Mayo celebration. We also had our big fundraiser in the Black & White gala (which celebrates its 58th anniversary in 2016). We had mixers and other events, but we needed a business-focused signature event,” said Duarte Luna.

At that first DATOS event, Duarte Luna said the Chamber placed a map highlighting the demographic presence of metro-Phoenix Hispanics at each table setting, along with a pocket Spanish-English dictionary. As a consultant for ASU today, Duarte Luna spends most of her time providing support for the César Chávez Leadership Institute, CCLI, and other related programs, which promote the iconic civil rights leader’s belief in social justice and the value of education.

Duarte Luna added, “People back then were always looking for data, datos, about the Hispanic market but it wasn’t very easy to get. This was in the time before people just used the Internet to look everything up.” Now a consultant to Arizona State University, Duarte Luna worked in the early days of DATOS at Bank of America, where she was in charge of multicultural marketing in Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada and El Paso, Texas.

In some ways, Duarte Luna has come full circle, since she was at Bank of America when CCLI was established in 1995, and she was a student at ASU and served as the president of the Hispanic Student Business Association when the first Hispanic Convocation was held in 1984.

“Another reason we needed something like DATOS was so I would have a data-driven answer for my boss when he asked why we were sponsoring the Hispanic Chamber,” Duarte Luna said.

Duarte Luna’s daughter, Ariana, is now a business major at ASU. Her son, Nico, is majoring in engineering at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Her husband, Paul Luna, is the president and CEO of the Helios Education Foundation.

Photos Courtesy of Gema Duarte Luna

The founders of the DATOS report included Duarte Luna, Sandra Ferniza, the AZHCC president and CEO at the time, and Rhonda Carrillo, who also worked at the Chamber, and now works for ASU. Duarte Luna said that with help from Dawn Donohoe, a communications specialist at Bank of America, “Rhonda, Sandy and I would meet at the Bank of America office to plan the event program and lay out the report,” which depended primarily on U.S. Census data. The first DATOS event was held at the Ritz Carlton in Phoenix. About 180 people attended. (This year’s annual

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In 2012, 38% Of Unauthorized Immigrants In Arizona Worked in Service Occupations

The Highest Labor Occupation For Unauthorized Immigrants In Arizona Was Service At 38% In 2012

Percentage of Unauthorized Immigrant Labor Occupations in Arizona, 2012 UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANT LABOR OCCUPATIONS IN ARIZONA IN 2012

38%

15% 8%

Service

Construction

Production

Source: Pew Research Center Estimates Based on Augment 2012 American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS)

20

Source: Pew Research Center Estimateshttp://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/appendix-a-additional-charts-and-tables-4/ Based on Augment 2012 American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/appendix-a-additional-charts-and-tables-4/

Arizona Was Ranked #7 In Terms Of The Largest Share Of Unauthorized Immigrants In The Labor Force In 2012 Arizona Was The 7th State With The Largest Share of Unauthorized Immigrants In The Labor Force in 2012

PERCENTAGE OF UNAUTHORIZED WORKERS STATE Percentage of UnauthorizedIMMIGRANT Immigrants State’s LaborBY Force

10.2

9.4

8.9

8.2 6.9

Nevada

California

Texas

New Jersey

6.2

Florida

Maryland

6

Arizona

5.7

5.6

New York

Georgia

Source: Passel, Jeffrey S. and D’Vera Cohn, 2014. Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project.

Source:www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/testimony-of-jeffrey-s-passel-unauthorized-immigrant-population/ph_2015-03-26_unauthorized-immigrants-testimony-03/ Passel, Jeffrey S. and D’Vera Cohn, 2014. Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project. http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/testimony-of-jeffrey-s-passel-unauthorized-immigrant-population/ph_2015-03-26_unauthorized-immigrants-testimony-03/

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In 2012, Unauthorized Immigrant Men Were 12% More Likely To Work Than U.S.-born Men In The Same Year, U.S.-born Women Were 11% More Likely To Work In 2012, Unauthorized Unauthorized ImmigrantImmigrant Men Were 12%Women More Likely To Work Than U.S. Born Men Than In The Same Year, U.S. Born Women Were 11% More Likely To Work Than Unauthorized Immigrant Women

Share in labor force for ages 18-64, by gender and status, 2012

SHARE IN LABOR FORCE FOR AGES 18-64, BY GENDER AND STATUS, 2012 79% 84%

Men

91%

72% 68%

Women

61%

U.S.-born

Legal Immigrants

Unauthorized Immigrants 22

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulation From Augmented 2012 American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) Source: Pew Research Center Tabulation From Augmented 2012 American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/testimony-of-jeffrey-s-passel-unauthorized-immigrant-population/ www.pewhispanic.org/2015/03/26/testimony-of-jeffrey-s-passel-unauthorized-immigrant-population/

From 2009 To 2013 The Overall Hispanic Unemployment Rate Fell By 3.9% From 2009 To 2013 The Overall Hispanic Unemployment Rate Fell By 3.9% THE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE AMONG HISPANICS FROM 2007 - 2013 The unemployment rate among Hispanics from 2007 - 2013

16.0%

13.8%

14.0%

13.2%

12.7%

11.3%

12.0%

11.8%

10.0% 8.0%

6.8%

6.0%

5.9%

4.0%

5.2%

10.3% 8.8%

9.5%

7.2%

2.0% 0.0%

2007 4Q

2009 4Q

All Hispanics

2011 4Q

U.S.-born Hispanics

2013 4Q

Foreign-born Hispanics

Source: Pew Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. Source:Research Pew ResearchCenter Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. http://www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/latino-jobs-growth-driven-by-u-s-born/ www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/latino-jobs-growth-driven-by-u-s-born/

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From 2007 To 2013, The Hispanic Median Weekly Earnings Stayed Stationary From 2007 To 2013, The Hispanic Median Weekly Earnings Stayed Stationary

MEDIAN WEEKLY EARNING AMONG HISPANICS

Median weekly Earning Amongst Hispanics

$800

$690

$684

$700

$500

$501

$518

2007 4Q

2009 4Q

$400

$557

$640 $570

$495

$500

2011 4Q

2013 4Q

$635

$593

$556

$600

$300 $200 $100 $-

All Hispanics

U.S.-born

Foreign-born

Source: Pewof Research CenterPopulation Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations Current Survey Data. http://www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/latino-jobs-growth-driven-by-u-s-born/ www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/latino-jobs-growth-driven-by-u-s-born/

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In 2013, Hispanics Were 16% Of The Total Labor In The In 2013, Hispanics Were 16%Force Of The Total Labor U.S. Force In The U.S. Labor force of racial and ethnic groups in 2013

2013 LABOR FORCE BY RACIAL AND ETHNIC GROUPS

100,727

White (In Thousands)

24,921

Hispanic

Black

Asian

17,412

8,929

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data.

www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/ Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. http://www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/

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From 2007 To 2013, The Hispanic Labor Force Increased By 15%

From 2007 To 2013, The Hispanic Labor Force Increased By 15%

Hispanic 2007 Q4 HISPANIC labor LABORforce, FORCE, 2007Q4 Q4–– 2013 2013 Q4 24,921 (In Thousands)

24,004 22,887

21,662

2007

2009

2011

2013

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data.

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http://www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/ Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/

In 2013, Hispanics Reached The Highest In 2013, Hispanics Reached The Highest Labor Force And Employment Labor Force And Employment Numbers Since 2007 Number Since 2007

Hispanic labor force and employment trends from 2007 - 2013

HISPANIC LABOR FORCE AND EMPLOYMENT TRENDS FROM 2007 - 2013

21,662

20,360

2007

24,921

24,004

22,887

21,297

19,982

2009

Labor Force

2011

22,739 (In Thousands)

2013

Employment

Source:Pew Pew Research Research Center Tabulations of Current Survey Data. Survey Data. Source: Center Tabulations of Population Current Population www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/ http://www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/

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In 2013, Hispanic Men Accounted Hispanic Men ForEmployed 58% Of Employed Hispanics In The U.S. While Women ForAccounted 58% Of Hispanics In The U.S. AccountedAccounted For 42% While Women For 42% Hispanic men and women employed in 2013

HISPANIC MEN AND WOMEN EMPLOYED IN 2013

13,149

9,590 (In Thousands)

Men

Women

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/

Pew Research Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. ww.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/

Top Employment Industries Top 1010 Employment Industries For Hispanics In 2013 For Hispanics In 2013

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3,212

Wholesale & Retail Trade

2,879

Professional & Other Business Services

2,572

Eating, Drinking & Lodging Services

2,273

Construction

1,857

Hospitals & Other Health Services

1,355

Manufacturing, Durable Goods

1,286

Educational Services

1,116

Finance, Insurance & Real Estate

1,059

Transportation & Warehousing

1,023

Manufacturing, Nondurable Goods

(In Thousands)

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of Current Population Survey Data. http://www.pewhispanic.org/2014/06/19/appendix-b-data-tables-7/

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Cox Business Latina Entrepreneurs Program El Reto Latinas are the new triple threat. That is the lesson taken from secondary research conducted by Cox Communications and its agency partner Torres Multicultural Communications (TMC). There is a new paradigm shift that is evolving – one where Hispanic women everywhere are taking the reigns of their financial futures in their own hands and are playing critical leadership roles at home, at work and in their communities. Latinas make up the single largest minority group among women-owned businesses. According to the 2014 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report, Latina entrepreneurs have an estimated 1,033,100 businesses as of 2014. In addition, Latina-owned businesses generated $71.1 billion in revenue and employed over 400,000 workers. Cox Business, a branch of Cox Communications, was formed in 2000 and it has presence in 17 states with over 300,000 business consumers – from retailers, professional services, and start-up companies to large health care providers, K-12 and higher education, financial institutions and government organizations. It offers leading edge technology solutions such as hosted IP voice lines, data, and video. Cox Business caters to the burgeoning Hispanic market by offering multigenerational Hispanic businesses a wide range of Englishand Spanish-language products and services. Cox is also extremely committed to the Hispanic market and diversity, especially to women. For seven years, Cox has been recognized as the top operator for women by Women in Cable Telecommunications. Cox knows that Latina women are playing a key role in the growth and development of the community and they wanted to recognize professionals who were leaving their mark. Specifically they wanted to develop a turnkey campaign that created awareness for Cox Business services, while positioning Cox Communications as top-of-mind among Latina business owners in Phoenix and Tucson. La Solución Cox Communications, alongside Torres Multicultural Communications, developed a campaign to honor success-

ful Latina entrepreneurs in Phoenix and in Tucson who have made outstanding cultural, social and economic contributions in Arizona. Cox’s approach was to showcase and recognize successful Latina entrepreneurs through an aggressive fourweek campaign called, “Latina Entrepreneur of the Year.” TMC secured numerous partnerships with local Spanish-language TV, print, and online media – who serve as a trusted source in the Latino community – and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Phoenix, which has been part of the state’s business community for over 65 years and has an established reputation of actively promoting small business growth in today’s diversified market, and the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, which is one of the fastestgrowing business organizations in the state. Cox knew that the Hispanic chambers of commerce have broad access to the Latino business community and would help expand the campaign’s reach. The campaign was comprised of 30-second Public Service Announcements (PSAs) in English and Spanish produced by Cox Business featuring each of the four Latina entrepreneur honorees. These PSAs highlighted their business and accomplishments and included logos of its media and chamber partners. The PSAs aired on select Cox English and Spanish channels throughout the four-week campaign, as well as on Azteca America TV. Los Resultados The campaign has obtained remarkable exposure for Cox Business and its Latina honorees. Since the campaign’s inception three years ago, Cox Communications and TMC have secured 5,466,629 impressions for the “Latina Entrepreneur of the Year” campaign in Phoenix and Tucson. During the first year, there were 35 stories placed in Hispanic print, broadcast, online and social media, nearly doubling the intended goal of 14 stories during the four-week period. In all, the team generated outstanding impressions that exposed the general public to the outstanding growth that Latinas have in the business world and the never-ending efforts of Cox Communications’ commitment to its community. Because of the exposure they have received through this campaign, the Latina entrepreneur honorees have seen a drastic growth in their businesses and have also been more recognizable to media and in their communities. In 2014, TMC and Cox won the IABC Copper Quill Award for Communication Management for this very program.

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PAST WINNERS

2013

2014

Beatriz Alatorre De Hong, Owner of Paletas Betty

Stephanie Vasquez, Owner of Fair Trade Café

Julie Gallego-Gonzalez, Founder of Ballet Folklorico

Laura Paredes-Oldaker, CEO of By Your Side Senior Care

Tannya Gaxiola, Owner of Quikhelp

Carlotta Flores, Owner of El Charro Café

Linda Valenzuela, Owner of Mia Cosmetics

Kathy Cano-Murillo, Owner of Craftychica.com

2015 WINNERS

Silvana Salcido Esparza

Candy Ramirez

Owner of Barrio Café & Barrio Urbano

Owner of Candy’s Cakes & More

Lety Garcia

Patricia Schwabe

Owner of Prensa Hispana

Owner of Peach Properties, Penca And Tooley’s Cafe

www.torresmulticultural.com www.cox.com/business

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to achieving entrepreneurial success in new corporate ventures and startups Engaging and informative, Pivot provides entrepreneurs with practical guidance for achieving success in corporate ventures as well as new startups. Based on more than fifteen years of academic research and many more years of experience in business and corporate startups, this book skillfully addresses topics ranging from resources and organizational uncertainties to the scope and scale of new business opportunities. Reveals how to successfully conceptualize new business opportunities, pivot as required to experiment with these opportunities, and accelerate to the marketplace Captures the capabilities needed to quickly build a business by understanding and systematically reducing uncertainties from market landscape and technology to talent and organizational positioning Accompanying digital component includes a world-class strategic innovation methodology in demand from corporations worldwide

PRAIS E FOR P I VOT “This book takes the reader past the clichés and myths about innovation and strikes at the heart of what matters most to make innovation systems work: people, culture, and process. I would recommend this book to those just getting started on their journey, as well as to those already scarred.” —George W. Coulston, VP, Marketing, Kennametal Inc. “As a long-time corporate entrepreneur, I recommend Pivot as a must-read for executives who are building and sustaining a corporate innovation function. The stories in Pivot reveal organizational paradoxes that undermine successful innovation practices yet often go unexamined. Furthermore, Joanne and Remy deliver proven tools for innovators.”

978-1-118-55971-0 • $40.00

—Rich Duncombe, Founder, Innovation Catalyst Group; former VP/GM, New Business Operation, Hewlett-Packard

Available wherever books and e-books are sold.


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EXCERPT FROM PIVOT:

How Top Entrepreneurs Adapt And Change Course To Find Ultimate Success, 2014—p220-221 The Learning Plan is specifically directed at higher-uncertainty

PIVOT STARTUP METHODOLOGY AND LEARNING PLAN

projects, including evolutionary and breakthrough innovation

The Pivot Startup methodology is centered on the assumptions that drive a startup. Its structured approach is aimed at helping entrepreneurs construct knowledge that helps them out of the mist of uncertainty about the startup. It leads to exploring the definition of markets based on the three types of markets the entrepreneur needs to fully understand—the overall market, the addressable market, and the target market. The methodology stresses the importance of experimentation to uncover how the market will react when the startup product or service is fully launched. Testing differences among market group behaviors will point the way about where to target. The call to action asks potential customers to do something or comment on something, which will indicate behavioral alignment with the product and show active interest in the product or service.

ones, as Joanne continues to reinforce. The questions driving learning through experimentation are: How can this move us toward visions of a future world? How does this fit in with sociological and market trends? Incubation and the Learning Plan have different challenges than those of Incubation and The Pivot Startup. They operate at the program level, where an Incubation competence is focusing on a portfolio of projects going through Incubation and reducing uncertainties, and at the project level, where a particular opportunity is subjected to the Learning Plan. While detailing market complexities and market learning is important, experiments providing insight into adjacent markets and market creation are the challenge. How can the venture be leading-edge and deliver on a strategic intent?

Emphasis is placed on getting entrepreneurs to go out into the world and begin understanding the ecosystem in which they may launch their startup.

In The Pivot Startup methodology, if an assumption with an importance of 10 is unable to be validated, then the startup needs to Pivot. However, there are additional considerations, including the strategy signed off on by the board of directors, board of advisers, angels, and/or venture capitalists. Furthermore, since startups are usually lean on resources, they need to consider whether they have the capabilities or resources to redirect. In the case of the corporate entrepreneur, projects can also change course. However, there is an additional complex-

Although the experiments appear to be focused on evaluating the business model, they are much more. Unlike the corporate entrepreneurs, who may have a wealth of information about industries and markets at their fingertips, the entrepreneur generally does not. In Chapters 11 and 12, Remy proposed that an effective and structured way of gaining insight into the value networks and their place in the value chain is to create business experiments in these networks. This structured approach, therefore, does more than just give the entrepreneur insights about the market assumptions; it also helps validate technical, resource, and organization assumptions. How can the startup fit into its ecosystem?

ity when there are several projects in Incubation; a critical assumption not being validated in one project can lead to the project being dropped and cause the Incubation portfolio to redirect its focus onto another project and another corporate entrepreneur. At the project level, if the feedback and reflection on learning do not suggest abandonment, then the team can proceed ahead and Pivot to Propel through Acceleration. On the other hand, the opportunity might not be ready yet, so the team Pivots by recasting or redirecting the project back to Discovery or through more Incubation learning loops first.

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An Executive Summary for Latino Business Owners

In Pursuit of the American Dream 2015 MassMutual Business Owner Perspectives Study

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Long before the term “American Dream” was first coined, people came to the United States perceiving it to be a place offering limitless possibility. Here, they sought to pursue their passions, take advantage of life’s abundant opportunities, and create a vibrant legacy for their families. Today, the United States still holds that allure. Individuals have a vision of improving their quality of life in the Land of Opportunity. Among Latinos, the aspiration to live the American Dream is no different, but their definition of success may be broader, encompassing their ability to care for and support extended families, friends, and their communities. And for Latino business owners, they see their businesses as an extension of themselves, putting even more pressure on themselves to succeed. A 2015 study of Latino business owners conducted by HawkPartners for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual) reveals that they face many challenges in achieving their version of the American Dream. The research shows that Latinos are more likely than the general population to think about planning for their businesses. They also feel a strong sense of responsibility to their families and communities, but tend to lack financial confidence and knowledge. This leads to real concerns among respondents related to their financial situation both at home and in their businesses. A need for financial knowledge and preparation, as well as cultural differences, may be stumbling blocks in the pathway of Latinos fully realizing and protecting their dreams. The majority of those surveyed started their businesses to take control of their lives, follow their dreams, and support their families. Yet many do not have the necessary resources in place to gain that control and secure a healthy financial future for their families. The financial success of Latino-owned businesses, of which there are an estimated 3.2 million in the United States,1 has significant implications for future generations of Latinos and our American economy as a whole. The results within this study are designed to help Latino business owners, as well as their family members, engage in a meaningful dialogue about how to best position their businesses for long-term success and stability. At the same time, Latino business owners need to consider the impact not planning could have on their businesses and on those who matter most. These businesses are vital to the livelihoods of family members, employees, and the community. That’s why the same amount of time should be spent protecting them, as was spent building them.

1

“Hispanic Businesses & Entrepreneurs Drive Growth in the New Economy”, Geoscape and the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 2014

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The line between family and business Latino business owners have an all-encompassing view

• Passing something tangible on to their children

of family harmony and business success. Their extended

• Providing jobs for family members

definition of family often times includes their employees

• Giving back to the community

and the community as a whole, and both are strongly interconnected with their businesses. This wide definition of

The lines between family, community, and business are

family is integral to Latino culture, which means it’s critical

often blurred for Latino business owners. Though they do

for business owners to position their businesses for success.

list professionals, such as their accountant and attorney, as

Doing so is crucial to the business owners’ ability to achieve

among their most trusted advisors, over half turn to their

their dreams for both their business and family lives.

spouses for advice and nearly one-third say their children are among their most trusted advisors. In addition, Latino

Family comes first for Latinos, whose businesses typically

business owners are more likely to have a family member as

support their immediate and extended families. The top

a business partner, typically a spouse or parent.

reasons mentioned in our study for starting a business are consistent with most business owners we surveyed across

With their businesses so closely intertwined with family,

cultures (be your own boss, provide for your family, and

it’s important for Latino business owners to be concerned

have more control). However, more so than other owners,

about protecting their businesses from the unexpected. The

Latino business owners are also motivated by:

good news is they think about how their businesses would

• Following their dreams (they had an idea and needed to follow through)

be affected by a death or disability more often than the general population.

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Moreover, we asked Latino business owners to rate how

the general population. The two issues they think about

frequently they think about seven core business planning

most are keeping key employees loyal and knowing what the

issues and they rated every topic as more top of mind than

business is worth.

Which business planning concerns are most top of mind?

76%

Keeping your key employees loyal to your business

65% 72%

Knowing what your business is worth

53%

How your business would be affected by a possible disability of you, or another owner, or a key employee

45%

Who will take over running the business if you, or another owner, leaves the business, becomes disabled, or dies

45%

65%

62%

How your business would be affected by a possible death of you, or another owner, or a key employee

59% 41%

Transitioning ownership of the company upon your retirement and/or finding a buyer when you are ready to retire

55% 41% 53%

Handling estate taxes that are generated from your business in the event of an owner’s death

28%

 Latino Business Owners  General Population Business Owners

Significant Statistical Difference

As a Latino business owner, if the business falters, it will likely impact other key areas of your life. For example, protecting the business from the unexpected with a buy-sell agreement can help ensure that the business remains in the family for generations to come. Having benefit plans in place to attract and retain key employees will help ensure the business remains a pillar in the community. And having an accurate business valuation will help prepare you for exiting the business, as well as plan for funding retirement and future tax obligations.

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Command of their futures Latino business owners want to command their futures and their ability to achieve the American Dream. For many, this is why they started a business. As a result, they are very hands-on with all aspects of their businesses – in fact they are more likely than the general population to call themselves the CEO of their businesses. They want control of the finances and related decisions, as well as how they spend their time. That being said, the decision making process for Latino business owners is vastly different from the general population. First of all, Latino business owners are significantly more likely to be the sole owners of their businesses. Consequently, that one person in charge typically makes most of the decisions on his/her own, whereas general population business owners are more likely to discuss the decision amongst multiple people. In addition, Latino business owners are more likely to say that they are effective decisions makers.

Decision making process

Effectiveness of decision making

The decision is usually discussed between at least two people prior to a final decision being made

The one person in charge of the area around which the decision needs to be made makes the decision

The person with majority ownership in the company decides

58% The decision making process 72% 71% is effective 69%

58% 71% 36% 23% 6% 6%

72% 69%

36%  Latino 23%Business Owners  General Population Business Owners

 6%

Significant Statistical Difference

6%

5

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With the high level of control exhibited by Latino business

Latino business owners are more likely than the general

owners, they tend to feel more positive than the general

population to say they cannot solve those issues on their own

population about protecting their businesses for the

and want outside expertise. Latino business owners say their

long-term. They are more likely to say business planning

most trusted advisors are their accountant, financial profes-

makes them feel hopeful, proud and excited.

sional and attorney, and the criteria they most often look for

However, the one area where they tend to relinquish control is in terms of addressing the core business planning issues.

in a trusted advisor is having their best interest at heart and having a prior relationship with the individual.

How likely are you to address these issues on your own?

50%

Keeping your key employees loyal to your business

70%

Who will take over running the business if you, or another owner, leaves the business, becomes disabled, or dies

34% 51% 33%

How your business would be affected by a possible disability of you, or another owner, or a key employee

50% 31%

How your business would be affected by a possible death of you, or another owner, or a key employee

42%

Transitioning ownership of the company upon your retirement and/or finding a buyer when you are ready to retire

29% 42% 23%

Knowing what your business is worth

Handling estate taxes that are generated from your business in the event of an owner’s death

29% 18% 18%

 Latino Business Owners  General Population Business Owners

Significant Statistical Difference

A lack of control over your financial future could compromise your dreams as a business owner. There are specific times in the life cycle of a business when it is critical to seek the guidance of trained and experienced professionals, such as when you want to protect the business from the unexpected, plan for retirement, and exit the business. Maintaining control of the future with the help of trusted advisors can empower you with knowledge and help continue your positive emotions about the long-term stability of your business. 6

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Financial knowledge and confidence Latino business owners are more likely than the general population to acknowledge and believe in the importance of financial planning for their businesses. They are also more likely to engage in financial planning for the business and at more frequent intervals (typically every year or every other year). However, there is a disconnect between what Latino business owners recognize as a concern versus actions they’ve taken to solve their issues. Only about half of the Latino business owners we surveyed have any type of succession plan in place. The same percentage has a buy-sell agreement in place for death and even fewer have a buy-sell agreement in place for disability. Their fiscal practices both at work and home reveal a need for greater financial education and planning. There are a number of reasons why Latino

What plans do you currently have in place?

business owners say they haven’t put these plans in place. Consistent with the general population, it is a lack of time, money

55% 54%

An estate plan

A buy-sell agreement in case of the disability of an owner

 Latino Business Owners

plans in place.

49%

A business succession plan, other than a buy-sell agreement

A formal business valuation

mentioned as the reasons for not having

59%

A business asset protection plan

A buy-sell agreement in case of a death of an owner

and perceived need that are most often

Top reasons for not having plans in place

49% 41%

1 | I am so busy with the day-to-day of managing my business, I don’t have time for this

50% 40%

2 | I don’t feel like I need to think about these issues yet

51%

3 | I don’t have a lot of extra money to put towards these issues

40% 43%

4 | Everything has been going so well with the business, I don’t want to mess with things

35%

5 | It is an uncomfortable conversation for me and my family

 General Population Business Owners

Significant Statistical Difference

7

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Retirement is another area of concern. Latino business

compared to the general population. Furthermore, very few

owners are significantly more likely than the general

(7%) plan on liquidating the business.

population to say they plan to retire but haven’t given it much thought, and few (only 12%) say they plan to retire in the next five years. This is not all the surprising given the average age of Latino business owners is younger than their general population counterparts.

Only about half of the business owners we surveyed have some type of qualified retirement savings plan to help fund their retirement. A similar percentage (40%) don’t have any retirement savings plan outside of their businesses and either plan to continue receiving income from the business

When Latino business owners retire, they are significantly

post-retirement or will use the proceeds from the sale of the

more likely to leave the business to a family member and are

business to fund their retirement.

much less likely to sell the business to a key employee as

How do you plan on funding your retirement? 51% 51%

I have invested in a retirement savings plan, such as a 401(k) or IRA

20%

I plan to sell the business and use the money from the sale to retire/or help retire

22%

I plan to retire and keep receiving income from the business, even though I am no longer working for/in the business My spouse has saved enough for retirement for both of us

Other way(s)

I don’t know

20% 17% 5% 5% 1% 3% 3%

 Latino Business Owners

3%

 General Population Business Owners

Significant Statistical Difference

There are pros and cons to all methods of exiting a business. Leaving the business to a family member creates a wonderful legacy, but often times, it’s a non-cash transfer (the family members don’t actually buy out the previous generation) leaving the departing owners financially tied to the business post-retirement. That’s why it’s important to have a diversified retirement income strategy. You’ve worked hard to build a successful business and create a lasting legacy for your family, but it’s important to not have the business be your sole source of income post-retirement. By having assets outside the business to help fund your retirement you avoid placing that financial burden on the next generation, allowing them to effective run the business and invest in its future success. 8

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Planning for the next generation Succession planning does not appear to be a significant

Choosing the right successor is critical to the long-term

concern for Latino business owners, but perhaps it should

success of the business, and successors can’t prepare to take

be. In terms of importance, who will take over the business

over the business if they don’t know they are the successor.

if the owners leaves, dies or becomes disabled and

Here are a few tips for properly preparing an individual for

transitioning ownership or finding a buyer at retirement

taking over the business.

were ranked as two of the three lowest business planning

1 | Encourage gaining experience outside the

concerns (only handling estate taxes was lower).

business – Successor candidates should ideally

This is not surprising considering Latino business owners

spend 3-5 years gaining work experience outside

seem pretty confident in terms of who is next in line to take

the business. This fosters new skills, fresh ideas,

over the business. Eighty percent said they will pass the

self-confidence, as well as an appreciation for

business on to a family member – most often a child. While

the role of leading the business through the

it is encouraging that so many Latino business owners know

next generation. 2 | Develop a successor development plan – This is

whom they plan to pass their business on to, 37% of those individuals said their chosen successor may not even know

a written career path for the successor to follow. It

he/she is the successor.

begins with an assessment of the successor’s current skills and interests and defines what additional experience, education, and training must be achieved.

Does your successor know he/she is the successor?

3 | Coordinate the succession plan with family members and key managers – Have these individuals participate as appropriate in structuring the succession plan and make sure they fully understand

8%

its impact on them. 4 | Recommend utilizing a mentor outside the family/ business – This individual acts as a coach, advisor, and educator. It could be a trusted person within

29% 63%

the industry but not affiliated with the company, a professional career coach, or a professional development group composed of successors from other non-competitive companies.

 Yes  No  Don’t know

9

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Achieve the dream We must come together and create strategies to make sure business owners do not just dream the dream, but have a better chance to achieve it. Helping

Methodology

them protect their families and businesses, gain control of their financial

The research was conducted by

futures, and attain greater financial confidence and knowledge can make

HawkPartners for Massachusetts

living the American Dream a reality for Latino business owners.

Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual) via a 20-minute online

A successful business begins with planning for and building a strong

survey of 307 Latino business owners

financial foundation. The financial professionals at MassMutual work

from January 23 – March 9, 2015.

closely with business owners to understand their situations and goals,

HawkPartners selected all business

then identify solutions to help them work through the obstacles that may

owners with the following

stand in their way to building their financial future. MassMutual has been

screening criteria:

helping customers with their financial needs for over 160 years and has financial strength ratings that are among the highest of any company in the

· Required to have 1-500 employees;

industry.* As a mutual company, we focus on providing long-term value

max of 10% can be sole proprietors

for our policyholders.

and max of 10% can be micro businesses (10 or fewer employees).

Visit massmutual.com/latino today to find a MassMutual financial professional in your area and learn how to take the next step in creating a

· Company must have been in business for at least 1 year; max

solid business strategy and achieving financial wellness. If you are more

of 25% in business for 1-3 years.

comfortable with a financial professional who speaks Spanish, do not hesitate to ask for one when you make your appointment.

· Sales revenue in 2014 must have been a minimum of $100k for sole proprietors and $250k for all others; cap $100k-$250k at 25% for sole proprietors. · Mix of industries represented, outside of government/municipality. The sampling margin of error for this study is +/– 4.6% percentage points when looking at the results for the Latino population. These are at a 90% confidence level.

* Financial strength ratings are as of 6/1/2015: A.M. Best A++; Fitch AA+; Moody’s Aa2; Standard & Poor’s AA+. Ratings are for MassMutual (Springfield, MA 01111) and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Co. and MML Bay State Life Insurance Co. (Enfield, CT 06082). Ratings are subject to change. 10

DATO S

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!

Latinos count

THANK YOU AZHCC FOR CAPTURING THE GROWTH AND POWER OF OUR COMMUNITY!

As a proud member of the AZHCC we look forward to a continuous partnership that promotes the growth of the Hispanic community.

mixed Uniendo comunidades Bridging communities

razafund.org

mixedvoces.com


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“DATOS is an essential tool for the Diocese of Phoenix as we seek to serve the Latino population. The information provided helps us to better understand our demographic population as we develop our pastoral plans.” —Maria R. Chavira, Ph.D., Chancellor, The Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix

Now 30 Percent Of Arizona’s Population, Latinos Will Reach That Mark Nationwide By 2060 The U.S. Latino population could more than double to more

According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and

than 119 million people, or 29 percent of people in the U.S.,

Prevention, 1.68 Hispanic babies were born every minute in

between now and 2060.

the United States in 2013. Put another way, in the time that it took to fly from Phoenix to Las Vegas, 100 Hispanic ba-

That’s a long time from now, but anyone who wants a sneak

bies were born in America—assuming, of course, the typically

peek into our nation’s demographic future only need spend

hour-long flight was not delayed.

time in Arizona. Latinos already make up at least 30 percent of the state’s population and are predicted to be a majority

While immigration remains an important factor in overall

of Arizonans by 2035, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Hispanic population growth, native-born Latinos make up about two-thirds of the U.S. Hispanic community and the rate

Some call this demographic shift the “browning of America.”

of immigration from Mexico and Latin America has decreased.

Steve Martin, a senior researcher at the nonpartisan Urban Institute, describes it this way: “Pretty much the entire United

In 2012, immigration from Mexico reached “net zero,”

States is becoming at least a little less white. Not only are

meaning as many Mexicans immigrated to the United States

white shares decreasing nationwide, but they are decreasing

as left that year. This trend is worth noting because for most of

everywhere—in the Midwest and the Southeast, in big cities

the past 50 years Mexico has accounted for the largest total

and in rural areas, in places where whites are leaving and in

influx of immigrants to the United States.

places where whites are moving to.”

The decrease in Mexican immigration is tied to several

Driving the nation’s seismic demographic shift is the fast-grow-

factors: the poor state of the U.S. economy, stepped up border

ing Latino community, and the primary drivers behind Latino

enforcement, increased deportations, and a steady drop in

population growth are the relative age of Latinos and higher fertility rates.

Mexico’s fertility rates since the 1960s.

Nationally, the median age of Hispanics is 27, compared to

More recently, Mexico has been experiencing robust

37 for Non-Hispanics. The median age of Latinos of Mexican

economic growth, which is convincing more Mexicans to

origin in the U.S. is 25. Latinos not only skew younger, but

build their futures in their homeland. Today, Mexico is the 13th

they have more children than non-Latinos: 2.2 children per

largest economy in the world, on par with Spain, but it is

Hispanic household versus 1.9 for whites.

predicted to be the world’s fifth largest economy by 2050.

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Population Growth By 2060, the U.S. Hispanic population is estimated to reach

119 million, approximately 29% of the U.S.†

29

%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, 2015 www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2015/demo/p25-1143.pdf

Today, 17% Of The Total U.S. Population Is Hispanic Today, 17% Of The Total U.S. Population Hispanic (IN Is THOUSANDS)

**Carmen Please Ref Pg. 147 D2014 For Graphics

318,748

55,410

Total Population

Total Hispanic Origin

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, 2015 Reports, 2015 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2015/demo/p25-1143.pdf https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2015/demo/p25-1143.pdf

DATO S

A Z 172

(In Thousands)

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In 2060, The Hispanic Population Is Projected To Increase By 115% In 2060, The Hispanic Population Is Projected To Increase By 115%

**Carmen Please Ref Pg. 147 D2014 For Graphics

(IN MILLIONS)

119

55

Hispanic Population

2014

2060

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, 2015 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, 2015 www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2015/demo/p25-1143.pdf https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2015/demo/p25-1143.pdf

4

(In millions)

New 2014 Census Hispanic Population Growth Estimate Is Lower Than 2008 projections, But Still HasEstimate Upward Trajectory New 2014 Census Hispanic Population Growth Is Lower Than 2008, But Still Has Upward Trajectory U.S. HISPANIC POPULATION 2015-2060 PROJECTION

U.S. Hispanic Population 2015-2060 Projection 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2014 Census

2040

2045

Source: U.S. Census Bureau population projections, 2000, 2008 and 2014.

A Z 173

2055

2060

2008 Census

Source: U.S. Census Bureau population projections, 2000, 2008 and 2014. www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/ http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/12/16/with-fewer-new-arrivals-census-lowers-hispanic-population-projections-2/

DATO S

2050

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The Hispanic share of the population is expected to increase almost everywhere, especially in the South, by 2030. Hispanic women have had higher birthrates than other ethnic groups, but those rates have come down and might come down more in the future. PERCENT CHANGE BY RACE, 2010-2030 ASSUMES AVERAGE BIRTH, AVERAGE DEATH AND AVERAGE MIGRATION

Source: datatools.urban.org/features/mapping-americas-futures/#feature

An Estimated  11.3  Million  Unauthorized   The Estimated Figure Of 11.3 Millions Unauthorized Immigrants Immigrants  Lived  in  the  U.S.  in  2014 CARMEN   – PDF  i s  attached   to  Pop  email  &  i n  Dropbox   Pop  folder;  RECREATED   CHART  BELOW

Living In The U.S. Has Leveled Off Over The Past 5 Years U.S. UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANT POPULATION LEVELS OFF

U.S. Unauthorized Immigrant Population Levels Off

million

14 12

10.1

10

11.2

11.3

7.9

6.8

8

12.2 11.3

6 4

3.5

2 0

1990

1999

2004

2009

2014

Source: Pew Research Center, FacTank, “Unauthorized immigrant population stable for half a decade,” 7/22/15 Source:  Pew  Research  Center,   FacTank,  “Unauthorized   immigrant  population   stable  for  half  a  decade,”  7/22/15 www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/07/22/unauthorized-immigrant-population-stable-for-half-a-decade/?utm_source=Pew+Research+Center&utm_campaign=c49831806d-Hispanic_ http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-­‐tank/2015/07/22/unauthorized-­‐imm igrant-­‐p opula tion-­‐s table-­‐for-­‐half-­‐a-­‐ newsletter_7_10_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_3e953b9b70-c49831806d-400043297 decade/?utm_source=Pew+Research+Center&utm_campaign= c49831806d-­‐Hispanic_newsle tte r_7_10_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term= 0_3e953b9b70-­‐ c49831806d-­‐400043297

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These 10 Counties Together Account For Almost One-third (30%) Of The U.S. Hispanic Population (In Thousands)

These 10 Counties Together Account For Almost One-third (30%) Of The U.S. Hispanic Population 500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

3,500

4,000

4,500

5,000

4,761

9,889 9,889

1,731

Harris County, TX

4,181 4,181

1,649

Miami-Dade County, FL

2,555 2,555

1,274

Cook County, IL

5,217 5,217

1,163

Maricopa County, AZ

Total

Population Total Population

(IN THOUSANDS)

Los Angeles County, CA

3,880 3,880

Orange County, CA

1,043

Bexar County, TX

1,034

Riverside County, CA

1,032

2,240 2,240

San Bernardino County, CA

1,031

2,065 2,065

San Diego County, CA

1,022

3,140 3,140

3,056 3,056 1,756 1,756

Source: Pew Research Center tabulations of the 2011 American Community Survey (1% IPUMS) Source: Pew Research Center tabulations of the 2011 American Community Survey (1% IPUMS) www.pewhispanic.org/2013/08/29/iii-ranking-latino-populations-in-the-nations-counties/

8

http://www.pewhispanic.org/2013/08/29/iii-ranking-latino-populations-in-the-nations-counties/

Phoenix Ranks As The 5th Fastest Growing Hispanic City th Fastest Hispanic Growing City Phoenix Ranks As The 5 TOP 15 FASTEST GROWING CITIES BY HISPANIC POPULATION Top 15 Fastest Growing Cities 2000-2013 Hispanic Population (2000-2013)

0

20

40

60

80

100

Washington, D.C.

74.3 69.2 67.3 61.0 54.5 48.3 42.7 41.5 % Growth 2000-2013 41.2

Dallas-Ft. Worth, TX Houston, TX Sacramento, CA Phoenix, AZ Denver, CO Fresno-Visalia, CA Miami-Ft. Lauderdale, FL San Diego, CA Harlingen, TX San Antonio, TX Chicago, IL San Francisco, CA New York, NY Los Angeles, CA

29.6 27.2

120

108.1

39.5 39.3 36.7

Source: Nielsen Latino Populations WhereWe We Aren’t Looking, 2013. Source: Nielsen Latino PopulationsAre AreGrowing Growing Fastest Fastest Where Aren’t Looking, 2013. www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2013/latino-populations-are-growing-fastest-where-we-arent-looking.html http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2013/latino-populations-are-growing-fastest-where-we-arent-looking.html

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2 0 1 5

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In 2013, U.S.-born Hispanics InAccounted 2013, Native Born Hispanics Accounted For 65% of Total U.S. Hispanics. For 65% of Hispanics In The U.S. 34,981,280

18,982,955 10,600,760 4,174,320 1980

2013

U.S.-born

Foreign-born

Source: Pew Research Center tabulations of 2013 American Community Survey (1% IPUMS) www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-1980-2013-trends/

Source: Pew Research Center tabulations of 2013 American Community Survey (1% IPUMS) http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-1980-2013-trends/

In 2013, Five Hispanic Countries/Regions Accounted for 84% Of Total U.S. Hispanics

10

In 2013, 64% Of Total U.S. Hispanics Were From Mexico Mexico Represented Over Half Of The U.S. Hispanic Population In 2013

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

2013

Percent

Mexica

34,582,182

64.1%

Puerto Rico

5,121,921

9.5%

Cuba

1,985,959

3.7%

El Salvador

1,975,099

3.7%

Dominican Republic

1,788,050

3.3%

Guatemala

1,304,378

2.4%

Colombia

1,072,946

2.0%

Honduras

790,729

1.5%

Spain

746,215

1.4%

All Other

4,596,756

8.4%

14%

6%

16%

64%

Mexico

Caribbean

Central America

Other Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of 2010 and 2013 American Community Surveys (1% IPUMS) http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-1980-2013-trends/

Source: Pew Research Center tabulations of 2013 American Community Survey (1% IPUMS)

Source: Pew Research Center Tabulations of 2010 and 2013 American Community Surveys (1% IPUMS)

www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-1980-2013/

www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-1980-2013-trends/

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A Z 176

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Hispanics Are 10 Years Younger Than The General Population With A Median Age Of 27 Hispanics Are 10 Years Younger Than The General Population With A Median Age Of 27 Research Tip General U.S. Population Median vs Average: The medianTip Research All Hispanics is the true Median vs. middle Average (or value in a Cubans Mean): The median set of data. isTherefore, the true middle value a set of unlikeinthe Guatemalans data. Therefore, mean, the unlike theis mean, median notmedian skewed is not the Puerto Ricans by outliers skewed by in the data. outliers in the

data.

37 27 40 (Oldest Hispanics) 27

Median Age

27 (Youngest Hispanics)

25

Mexicans

Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2010 ACS (1% IPUMS) and the 2000 Census (5% IPUMS) Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2010 ACS (1% IPUMS) and the 2000 Census (5% IPUMS) www.pewresearch.org/daily-number/median-age-for-hispanics-is-lower-than-median-age-for-total-u-s-population/ http://www.pewresearch.org/daily-number/median-age-for-hispanics-is-lower-than-median-age-for-total-u-s-population/

13

Hispanics Are The Youngest Minority Group Hispanics Are By The Youngest MinorityAge Group By Median Age Years And 12 Years Younger Than Non-Hispanic Median And 12 Younger Whites Than Non-Hispanic Whites 45 40

Median Age of Total U.S. Population 37.2

39 35

35

32

29

30

28

27

25

19

20 15 10 5 0

White, NH

Asian, NH

Black or African American, NH

American Indian Native Hawaiian and Alaska Native, and Other Pacific NH Islander, NH

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 Population & Pew Center, Research Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 Population EstimatesEstimates & Pew Research JulyCenter, 2012 July 2012 http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=bkmk factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=bkmk

DATO S

Two or More Races, NH

14

A Z 177

Hispanic

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Nearly A Third Of Hispanics Are Under Age 15 And Another 30% Are In The Major Change Nearly A Third Of Hispanics Are Under Age 15 AndLife AnotherStage 30% Are In The Major Life Stage Range Change Range 27.8

Under 15

8.5%

15-19

8.7%

20-24

30.5

25-44

18.4%

45-65

65 and Older

6.2%

Source: Pew Pew Research Center Tabulations of 2013 American Community Survey Survey (1% IPUMS) Source: Research Center Tabulations of 2013 American Community (1% IPUMS) www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-1980-2013/ http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/05/12/statistical-portrait-of-hispanics-in-the-united-states-1980-2013/

15

From 1993 To 2012, The Percentage Of Babies Born To Hispanic Mothers Nearly Doubled 16% 1993 22% 2003 30% 2012 Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, 2013

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In The Hour It Takes To Fly From Phoenix To Las Vegas, 100 Hispanic Babies Are Born In The U.S. THE U.S. HISPANIC POPULATION IS GROWING AT A RATE OF…

901,033

75,086

2,422

100

1.68

Per Year

Per Month

Per Day

Per Hour

Per Minute

Source: National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64, No. 1, January 15, 2015 www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf

In 2013, One In 4 Births Were Hispanic In The United States In 2013, One in 4 Births Were Hispanic In The United States 3,003,556

901,033

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: National Statistics Reports, Vol.No. 64, 1, No. 1, January 15, 2015 Source: National Vital Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64, January 15, 2015 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf

18

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Mexican Births Alone Hispanics Are Projected To Increase In Population By Accounted For 60% Of All Over 63 Million By 2060 Hispanic Births In 2013 Mexican Births Alone Accounted For 60% Of All Hispanic Births In 2013 Projected U.S. Population Growth 2010-2060 (Percentage Change)

15% 60%

2060 PROJECTIONS

Total Hispanic Births 901,033

15%

2% 8%

-8%

+42%

White Non-Hispanic

Black

+128%

+115%

Asian

Hispanic

+31% Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban Central and South American Other and Unknown Hispanic

al Statistics Reports, Vol. 64, No. 1, January 15, 2015 Source: National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64, No. 1, January 15, 2015 v/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf

Total

19

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Population Projections, March 2015 www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2015/demo/p25-1143.pdf NOTE: Projections are lower than reported in 2010 through 2050

Hispanics Continue to Represent The Highest Fertility Rates U.S. TOTAL FERTILITY PROJECTIONS

Research Tip Birth rate is how many live births there were in an area per 1000 of the population in a year. Fertility rate is the average number of children born to each woman over the course of her life. Source: U.S. Population Projections: 2012 to 2060, Population Division, U.S. Census, 2013 www.gwu.edu/~forcpgm/Ortman.pdf

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Arizona Was Ranked 5th In Top States For th In 2012 Arizona Was Ranked 5 In Top States For Hispanic Births 2013, Up 6 From 6In Hispanic Births In 2013, UpIn From 2012 th

th

Total Hispanic Births for Top 10 States (2002 – 2013)

TOTAL HISPANIC BIRTHS FOR TOP 10 STATES (2002 – 2013) 2002

238,496 263,061

2013

185,467

178,968 59,206

54,700

51,619

CA

Increase: -9%

TX

4%

54,821

33,885

37,938

33,454

41,022

27,251

24,664

17,821

21,029

17,508

15,064

FL

NY

AZ

IL

NJ

CO

NC

15%

.2%

-11%

-18%

10%

-15%

16%

16,994

16,819 GA

1%

5th Source: National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64, No. 1, 2015 & National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 52, No. 10, 2003. www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf Source: National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64, No. 1, 2015 & National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 52, No. 10, 2003. www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr52/nvsr52_10.pdf http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr52/nvsr52_10.pdf

22

There Were 85,725 Births In Arizona In 2012, 47,055 Of Which Were Minority Births Total Number Of Births In Arizona For 2012 Were 85,725, while Minority Births Accounted For 47,055 HISPANIC BIRTHS FOR 70% OF MINORITY 39% BIRTHS Hispanic Births Accounted for 70% of ACCOUNTED Minority Births and approximately ofAND total births in Arizona. APPROXIMATELY 39% OF TOTAL BIRTHS IN ARIZONA.

33,146

38,670

White, N/H Black Native American Asian Hispanic

3,625 5,569

4,715

Source: Arizona Department of Health Services, 2012 www.azdhs.gov/plan/report/ahs/ahs2012/pdf/1b22.pdf

Source: Arizona Department of Health Services, 2012 http://www.azdhs.gov/plan/report/ahs/ahs2012/pdf/1b22.pdf

23

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In 2014, One-third of Arizona’s Population Wasof Arizona’s Hispanic In 2014, One-third Population Was Hispanic 6,731,484

2,039,640

Total Population

Total Hispanic Population

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, QuickFacts 2015. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, QuickFacts 2015. quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/04000.html http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/04000.html

24

The Hispanic Population In Arizona Grew By 46% In One Decade Compared Hispanics InTo Arizona Grew InIncrease Population By One Decade Compared To The Total A 25% In32% TheIn Total Population 20% Increase Of Total Population 6,392,017 5,130,632

1,895,149 1,295,617

1,261,385 599,532

2000

2010

Total Population

Population Change 2000-2010

Total Number of Hispanics or Latinos

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Summary File 1 and 2010 Census Summary File 1

25

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Summary File 1 and 2010 Census Summary File 1

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107,322

129,473

136,539

201,201

203,030

215,133

389,351

6,554

09,412

Apache County

4,532 67,402

Navajo County

11,805 95,517

Cochise County Coconino County Yuma County

5,133

9,351

M A R K E T

POPULATION

71,934

1,201

3,030

CHAPTER 7

H I S P A N I C

Total Population

9,473

6,539

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

ARIZONA HISPANIC POPULATION IN TOP 10 COUNTIES 2013

1,934

7,322

O F

Hispanics Account For 30% Of The Total Population In Maricopa County

n Please Add Map 14 Pg. 157

Total ulation

S T A T E

996,554

4,009,412

43,891 85,582 18,979 117,560 122,934 78,267

Mohave County

31,470 171,560

Yavapai County

30,119 185,014

Pinal County Pima County

112,912 276,439 355,770 640,784 1,202,824

Maricopa County

2,806,588

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, QuickFacts 2013

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PROFILES

Cultivating Spaces of Opportunity Nic de la Fuente People’s health is tied to the wellness of their community.

and health goes back many years. He worked six years for the Arizona Workers Rights Center in Phoenix, but de la Fuente said prior to that, “I’ve always been around a lot of big gardens. I was in the Peace Corp in Guatemala and I worked in California in the grape fields making sure farm workers were getting paid for their work.”

The overall wellness of a community, meanwhile, depends on a variety of factors: environmental protections, public safety, affordable housing, parks and recreational activities, and education and job opportunities. Nic de la Fuente’s vision of community wellness takes into account all of the above and more, but he knows growing that idea means someone has to plant the first seed.

De la Fuente explains that South Phoenix residents do not have easy access to quality fresh fruit and vegetables, public health facilities and other basic “quality of life” amenities readily available in most other communities. He says the lack of these resources can have a negative influence on health and overall wellness in the area.

That’s the inspiration behind Cultivate South Phoenix, or CUSP, a coalition of grassroots nonprofits in South Phoenix working to develop a new 18-acre community garden. The project, called Spaces of Opportunity, is located at 15th Avenue and Vineyard. Initial funding for the project was provided through a $125,000 grant from St. Luke’s Health Initiative award to CUSP.

“South Phoenix doesn’t have a farmers market, but that may be because there’s a misconception that low income families don’t buy vegetables…People are now working with gardens all over the place and developing farmers markets.”

De la Fuente serves as the initiative’s “convener,” but he is quick to point out that most of the day-to-day work on the project is being done by people who live and work in the neighborhood, including CUSP’s steering committee members and hundreds of other volunteers. All told, de la Fuente said about 20 community-based organizations have signed on to support Cultivate South Phoenix, groups like the Tigermountain Foundation (which already operates several community gardens in South Phoenix), Unlimited Potential, the Cactus Pine Girls Scouts Chapter and the Orchard Community Learning Center.

The 18-acre lot being used to develop the community garden in South Phoenix has been vacant for 20 years. De la Fuente hopes to negotiate a long-term lease on the property and raise several hundred thousand more dollars in grants to expand the project. “The property we’re developing was basically a dump before,” he said. “We surveyed people in the neighborhood and they’re thrilled to see what we’re doing. We haven’t received one negative response from the homes we’ve canvassed.”

De la Fuente works for the world-renowned Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, where he managed an on-site community garden for volunteers and staff. He now directs the Spaces of Opportunity initiative full time. How did the Botanical Gardens get involved in the development of a community garden in South Phoenix?

Community food gardens as a means for build local pride is a nationwide movement. De la Fuente said the DBG and CUSP’s hundreds of volunteers are bringing that movement to South Phoenix.

Photos Courtesy of Nic de la Fuente

“I brought a proposal to them and they climbed on board,” said de la Fuente, who said his bosses at DBG are fully supportive of CUSP’s vision for the South Phoenix project. De la Fuente’s own interest in community gardens, food quality

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POPULATION ­­— ARIZONA

Arizona MARKET SNAPSHOT The Arizona Hispanic population continues to represent a substantial portion of the local population, accounting for close to one-third of Arizona residents. The 2015 statewide Hispanic population exceeds 2 million individuals. Arizona Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. A total of 52% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Arizona Market Snapshot

Aggregate household expenditures among Hispanic (allportion consumer products and categories) exceeds $25 billion The Arizona Hispanic population continueshouseholds to represent a substantial of the local population, accounting for close to one-third of Arizona residents. The 2015 statewide Hispanic population exceeds 2 million individuals. annually, 19% of total. Arizona Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 52% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Aggregate household expenditures among Hispanic households (all consumer products and categories) exceeds $25 billion annually, 19% of total.

% OF POPULATION

POPULATION

HISPANICS REPRESENT THE SECOND-LARGEST

2015 POPULATION

Hispanics Represent the second-largest population group in the POPULATION GROUP IN THE STATE AT CLOSE state at close to one-third of total.

TO ONE-THIRD OF TOTAL.

POPULATION % OF 2015 POPULATION POPULATION

Total

Total

100%

Hispanic

6,796,459

100%

Hispanic

6,796,459

31%

31%55%

2,136,185 3,757,632

55%4%

280,390 3,757,632

White NonHispanic

White Non-Hispanic

Black NonHispanic

Black Non-Hispanic

Asian NonHispanic

3%

Asian Non-Hispanic

American Indian NonHispanic

4%

4% 3%

**Carmen This is pg. **Carmen This is pg.Other NonAmerican IndianDATOSAZ14 Non-Hispanic Hispanic 4% 160 DATOSAZ14 160

Other Non-Hispanic

3% 4%

2,136,185

4% 2%

Hispanic

215,412 280,390

White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic

259,226

215,412

2%

Asian Non-Hispanic American Indian Non-Hispanic

147,614

259,226

2%

Other Non-Hispanic

55%

147,614

**Carmen This is pg. 160 DATOSAZ14;

2%

2,500,000 2,500,000

6% 2%

6%

Population

Population

31%

2,000,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 500,000

500,000

92%

92%

-

2000 2010 2015 2020 2000 2010 2015 2020 Hispanic 1,895,149 1,895,149 2,136,185 2,136,185 2,372,777 1 out2,372,777 of 4 Hispanics in Arizona are Bicultural, Hispanic 1,295,317 1,295,317 Black Non-Hispanic 146,183 239,101 280,390 321,361 ranked as HA3 of the HispanicityTM segments. Black 146,183 239,101 280,390 321,361 **Carmen This is Non-Hispanic pg. Asian Non-Hispanic However,261,133 27% of the Hispanic population fall into the 88,856 170,509 215,412 261,133 Asian Non-Hispanic 88,856 170,509 215,412 160 DATOSAZ14

Puerto Rican All OtherAll Other TM segments. Mexican Puerto HA4 andMexican HA5 Hispancity 1 out of 4 Hispanics in ArizonaRican are Bicultural,

ranked as HA3 of the HispanicityTM segments. However, 27% of the Hispanic population fall into the segments. HA4 and HA5 in Hispancity 1 out of 4 Hispanics ArizonaTMare Bicultural, ranked as HA3

**Carmen This is pg. 160 DATOSAZ14

PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE 2015 V. 2020 Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

of the Hispanicity™ segments. However, 27% of the Hispanic population and HA5 HispancityTM segments. 13% fall into the HA419%

21%Percent Change 2015 v. 2020 Projected 21%

15% 11%

15% 11%

6% 1% Total Population

Hispanic Population

14%

Hispanicity TM

9%

Hispanicity TM

9%

6% 1%

-1%

White Non- Black Non- Asian NonAmerican Other NonHispanic TotalHispanic Indian NonHispanicHispanic White NonBlack Non- Hispanic Asian NonPopulation Population Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic

19%

13%

14%

-1% American Indian NonHispanic

29%

25% HA1

Other NonHispanic

29%

25%

HA2

HA3

HA1

HA4 HA2

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series| 2015 Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

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POPULATION — ARIZONA

Arizona

HISPANIC POPULATION % BY ZIP CODE

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado • English dominant (nearly no Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation

The Density Of The Hispanic Population Is Demonstrated For The State Of Arizona By Zip Code.

• Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult • Many Hispanic cultural practices

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY™ SEGMENTS BY ZIP CODE

HA4: Hispano • Spanish preferred

The Map Shows The Prevalent Hispanicity™ Segments For Zip Codes In Arizona.

(some English) • Immigrant as adult, • in U.S. 10+ years • Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2015

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POPULATION — PHOENIX, AZ

Phoenix, AZ MARKET SNAPSHOT The population in the Phoenix metropolitan area has a strong Hispanic influence accounting for one out of every three residents for a total of close to 1.4 million individuals. Roughly 29% of the 1.4 million Hispanics in Phoenix area fall into Phoenix, AZ the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity™ segments accounting for more than 400,000 individuals. Approximately $17.2 billion is Market Snapshot The population in the Phoenix metropolitan has a strongaccounting Hispanic influence for one spent by Hispanics on household expenditures (all consumer products andarea categories), for a accounting total of 18% of out total of every three residents for a total of close to 1.4 million individuals. Roughly 29% of the 1.4 million household expenditures. Hispanics in Phoenix are fall into the HA4 and HA5 HispanicityTM segments accounting for more than 400,000 individuals. Approximately $17.2 billion is spent by Hispanic s on household expenditures (all consumer products and categories), accounting for a total of 18% of total household expenditures. HISPANICS REPRESENT THE SECOND-LARGEST

POPULATION

% OF POPULATION

2015 POPULATION

31%

1,389,987

POPULATIONGROUP IN THE PHOENIX METROPOLITAN

Hispanics represent the second-largest population AREA AT CLOSE TO ONE-THIRD OF TOTAL. group in the Phoenix metropolitan area at close to one-third of total.

**Carmen This is pg. 162 DATOSAZ14 100% 4,471,779

Total Hispanic White Non-Hispanic

56%

Black Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic **Carmen This is pg.

% OF POPULATION

5% Hispanic

100% 31%

230,244 1,389,987

White NonHispanic

56%

2,500,712

4% Black NonHispanic

**Carmen This is pg. 162 DATOSAZ14 American Indian Non-Hispanic 162 DATOSAZ14

Other Non-Hispanic

2%

4%

American Indian Non-Hispanic

2%

Other NonHispanic

2%

Hispanic

POPULATION

White Non-Hispanic

4,471,779

Black Non-Hispanic

172,384 230,244

5%

Asian NonHispanic

2%

Asian Non-Hispanic American Indian Non-Hispanic

172,384 76,254

Other Non-Hispanic

56%

76,254

102,198 102,198

Population Population

1,800,000 1,800,000 1,600,000 1,600,000 1,400,000 1,400,000 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 800,000 800,000 600,000 600,000 400,000 400,000 200,000 200,000 -

2%

-

2000 2000 Hispanic 817,021 Hispanic 817,021 Black Non-Hispanic 113,185 113,185 Black Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic 65,557 65,557 Asian Non-Hispanic

theofPhoenix metropolitan Overinhalf Hispanics in the Phoenix metropolitan Mexican Puerto Rican All Other Hispanic TM Mexican Puerto Rican All Other Hispanic area fall into the H3 to HA5 Hispanicty Segments area fall into the H3 to HA5 HispanictyTM Segments

Over half of Hispanics in the Phoenix metropolitan area fall into the H3 to HA5 Hispanicty™ Segments

Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020 23% 23% 16%

15%

15% 19%

19%

16%

14%

11%

10%

14% 10%

Hispanicity TM Hispanicity TM

6%

2%

Total

7%

91% 91%

PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE 2015 V. 2020 Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

6%

2% 7%

2010 2015 2020 2010 2015 2020 1,235,718 1,389,987 1,389,987 1,543,188 1,543,188 1,235,718 193,497 230,244 230,244 267,065 267,065 193,497 134,415 172,384 172,384 Over211,310 half211,310 of Hispanics 134,415

**Carmen This is pg. **Carmen This is pg. 162 DATOSAZ14 162 DATOSAZ14

11%

31%

2,500,712 2015

POPULATION Total

4% 2% 2%

5%

Hispanic

White TotalNonHispanic

2%

-1%

28%

-1%

25%

Black Non- White AsianNonNon- Black American Other Non- American Hispanic NonAsian NonHispanic Hispanic Indian Non- Hispanic Hispanic Indian NonHispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic

Other NonHispanic

HA1

HA2

HA3 HA1 HA4 HA2 HA5 HA3

888.211.9353 | E.P.geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P.P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com URL. www.geoscape.com 888.211.9353| | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American American Marketscape DataStream™ SeriesMarketscape 2015 Source: Geoscape American DataStream™ 2015 Source: Geoscape Marketscape DataStream™ SeriesSeries 2015

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POPULATION — PHOENIX, AZ

Phoenix, AZ

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado

HISPANIC POPULATION % ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

• English dominant (nearly no Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation

Over 40% Of The Hispanic Population Is Concentrated Just Southwest Of The Phoenix Metro Area.

• Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult • Many Hispanic cultural practices

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY ™ SEGMENTS ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

HA4: Hispano

This Map Illustrates Zip Codes In Phoenix By The Postal Carrier Routes With The Largest Percentages Of HA4 And HA5 Hispanics.

• Spanish preferred (some English) • Immigrant as adult, • in U.S. 10+ years • Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

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POPULATION — TUCSON, AZ

Tucson, AZ MARKET SNAPSHOT The Hispanic population in Tucson continues to represent a substantial portion of the local population, accounting for more than 37% of Tucson residents. More than 300,000**Carmen HispanicsThis callisTucson home and it is a figure that has been pg. Tucson, AZ increasing and expected to continue to grow in the next 5 years. The Tucson Hispanic population is primarily Bi-cultural accounting 1 out of 3 individuals. However, over 20% of the 164 DATOSAZ14 Market for Snapshot Hispanic population in the Tucson metropolitan area falls into the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity™ segments. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) among Tucson households exceeds billionaccounting annually, with Hispanics accounting for call more than The Hispanic population in Tucson continues to represent a substantial portion of$4.7 the local population, for than 37% of Tucson residents. More than 300,000 Hispanics Tucson home and it is a figure that has been increasing and expected to continue to grow in the next 5 years. The Tucson Hispanic population is primarily Bi-cultural accounting for 1 out of 3 individuals. However, over 20% 1 out of every 5 dollars spent. of the Hispanic population in the Tucson metropolitan area falls into the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity segments. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) among Tucson TM

households exceeds $4.7 billion annually, with Hispanics accounting for more than 1 out of every 5 dollars spent.

POPULATION

% OF POPULATION

2015 POPULATION

100%

1,039,345

Total Hispanic White Non-Hispanic

POPULATION

% OF POPULATION

Total

100%

37%

Hispanic

37%

White Non-Hispanic

53%

Black Non-Hispanic

3%

53%

Black Non-Hispanic

3% Asian Non-Hispanic

**Carmen This is pg. Asian Non-Hispanic 164 DATOSAZ14

3%

American Indian Non-Hispanic **Carmen This is pg.

2%

Other Non-Hispanic

2%

2%

164 DATOSAZ14 Other Non-Hispanic

2015 POPULATION

3%

383,508 1,039,345

3%

2% 2% 37%

383,508

Hispanic

546,738 546,738

White Non-Hispanic

34,704

Black Non-Hispanic

34,704 29,093

3%

American Indian Non-Hispanic

HISPANICS REPRESENT SECOND-LARGEST POPULATION Hispanics THE represent the second-largest population group in the Tucson metropolitan. GROUP IN THE TUCSON METROPOLITAN.

Asian Non-Hispanic

23,036 29,093

Amercain Indian Non-Hispanic Other Non-Hispanic

22,266

23,036

2%

53%

22,266

1% 4%

500,000 450,000

Population

400,000

Population

350,000 300,000

1% 4% 500,000 450,000 400,000 350,000

250,000

300,000

200,000

250,000

150,000 100,000 50,000 -

200,000 150,000 100,000

95%

50,000

2000-

2010

**Carmen This is pg. Hispanic 247,577 Hispanic 164 Black DATOSAZ14 Non-Hispanic

2015

2000

2010

247,577

338,802

338,802

24,045 Black Non-Hispanic

Asian Non-Hispanic 16,595 Asian Non-Hispanic

383,508

31,075 24,045

34,704 31,075

24,592 16,595

29,093 24,592

95%

2020

2020 1 out of 3 of Hispanics in the Tucson metropolitan area 428,975 383,508fall into 428,975 the HA3 HispanictyTM Segment. However, 1 out 38,179 34,704 38,179 of 5 Hispanics fall into the HA4 to HA5 unacculturated 33,521 33,521 29,093 Mexican Puerto Rican other Hispanic Mexican Puerto RicanAllAll other Hispanic segments. 2015

**Carmen This is pg. 164 DATOSAZ14

1 out of 3 of Hispanics in the Tucson metropolitan area fall into the HA3 HispanictyTM Segment. However, 1 out of of 5 Hispanics fall intointhe to HA5 unacculturated 1 out 3 of Hispanics theHA4 Tucson metropolitan area fall into the 8% segments. HA3 Hispanicty™ Segment. However, 1 out of 5 Hispanics fall

Projected Percent Change 20152015 v. 2020 PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE V. 2020 15%

15%

Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

12%

10%

8%

15%

Hispanicity TM

10%

1% 6%

8%

TM 32% Hispanicity

-4% 1%

18%

15%

8%

12%

6%

into the HA4 to HA5 18% unacculturated segments.

-4%

27%

32% 27%

Total

Hispanic

White NonHispanic Total

Black NonHispanic

Asian NonHispanic

American Other NonIndian NonHispanic Hispanic White NonBlack NonAsian NonAmerican

Hispanic

Hispanic

Hispanic

Hispanic

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 |DataStream™ E. geoscape@geoscape.com www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape Series| URL. 2015

Indian NonHispanic

HA1

Other NonHispanic

HA2

HA3 HA1

HA4 HA2

Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

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Tucson, AZ

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado

HISPANIC POPULATION % ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTES

• English dominant (nearly no Spanish)

Most Of The Zip Codes In The Tucson Metro Area Have A Total Population That Is Over 30% Hispanic.

• Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation • Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult • Many Hispanic cultural practices

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY™ SEGMENTS ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

HA4: Hispano The Map Indicates That There Is A Large Concentration Of HA4 And HA5 Hispanics At The Center Of The Tucson Metro.

• Spanish preferred (some English) • Immigrant as adult, • in U.S. 10+ years • Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2015

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POPULATION — FLAGSTAFF, AZ

Flagstaff, AZ MARKET SNAPSHOT The population in Flagstaff has a modest Hispanic influence, accounting for 15% of the metro’s 140,000 residents and is second fast growing population behind Asians. Over half of the Hispanic population in the Flagstaff metropolitan area are Flagstaff, AZ over 10,000 residents. Hispanics in acculturated falling into the HA1 and HA2 Hispanicity™ segments accounting for just Market Snapshot The population in Flagstaff has a modest Hispanic influence, accounting for 15% of the metro’s 140,000 and is second fast growing population Flagstaff spend more than $240 million on household expenditures accounting for roughly 10%residents of total household spending. behind Asians. Over half of the Hispanic population in the Flagstaff metropolitan area are acculturated falling into the HA1 and HA2 Hispanicity TM

segments accounting for just over 10,000 residents. Hispanics in Flagstaff spend more than $240 million on household expenditures accounting for roughly 10% of total household spending.

HISPANICS REPRESENT THIRD-LARGEST POPULATION Hispanics representTHE the third-largest population in the Flagstaff metropolitan area. GROUPgroup IN THE FLAGSTAFF METROPOLITAN AREA.

% OF**Carmen This is2015 pg. 166 DATOSAZ14 POPULATION POPULATION

POPULATION

Total

100%

143,710

Hispanic

15%

21,834

White Non-Hispanic

54%

78,296

Black Non-Hispanic

1%

POPULATION

Asian Non-Hispanic

2015 POPULATION

Total

100%

143,710

Hispanic

15%

White NonHispanic

54%

Black NonHispanic

1%

Asian NonHispanic

2%

American Indian Non-Hispanic

25%

Other NonHispanic

3%

25%

**Carmen This is pg. 166 DATOSAZ14 Other 166 Non-Hispanic DATOSAZ14

3%

15%

25%

% OF POPULATION

2%

American IndianThis Non-Hispanic **Carmen is pg.

3%

Hispanic White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic

1,581 21,834

Asian Non-Hispanic

2%

78,296

2,283

American Indian Non-Hispanic

1%

1,581

Other Non-Hispanic

2,283

36,094 36,094

54%

3,622

3,622

30,000

1% 5%

1%

30,000

5%

Population Population

25,000

25,000

20,000 20,000 15,000 15,000 10,000 10,000 5,000 5,000 -

-

Hispanic

HispanicThis is pg. **Carmen Black Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic 166 Asian DATOSAZ14 Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic

2000

2010

2015

12,728

18,166

21,834

26,279

1,150

1,495

1,581

1,716

895

1,787

2,283

2000

2010

12,728

18,166

1,150

1,495

895

2015

21,834

1,787

**Carmen This is pg. 166 DATOSAZ14

1,581 2,283

2020

2,857

93% 93% Close to 50% of Hispanics in the Flagstaff metropolitan area fall into the HA1 and TM Segment. HA2Puerto Hispanicty . Hispanic Mexican Rican All other ClosePuerto to 50% ofRican HispanicsAll in the Flagstaff Mexican other Hispanic

2020 26,279 1,716 2,857

metropolitan area fall into the HA1 and HA2 HispanictyTM Segment..

Close to 50% of Hispanics in the Flagstaff metropolitan area 9%the HA1 and HA2 Hispanicty™ Segment. fall into

Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020 PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE 2015 V. 2020 Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

25%

25%

20% 20%

9%

8% 9% 9%

Hispanic

Total

White NonHispanic

Hispanic

Black NonHispanic

White Non-

Asian NonHispanic Hispanic

23%

15%

Hispanicity TM

Hispanicity TM

9%

8%

Black Non-

American Hispanic Indian NonHispanic

23%

12%

15%

2% Total

9%

12%

2% Asian NonAmerican Other Non-Indian NonHispanic Hispanic Hispanic

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

31% Other Non-

Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

DATO S

A Z 192

26%

Hispanic

HA1

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

26%

31%

HA2

HA1

HA2

HA3

HA3

HA4

2 0 1 5

HA4

HA5

HA5


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Flagstaff, AZ

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado

HISPANIC POPULATION % ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

• English dominant (nearly no Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation

The Zip Codes With The Largest Percentage Of Hispanics Are Just Northwest Of The Flagstaff Metropolitan Area.

• Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult • Many Hispanic cultural practices

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY™ SEGMENTS ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

HA4: Hispano This Map Shows Zip Codes In The Metro Area By Postal Carrier Routes With The Largest Percentages Of HA4 And HA5 Hispanics.

• Spanish preferred (some English) • Immigrant as adult, • in U.S. 10+ years • Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

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A Z 193

2 0 1 5


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POPULATION — ­­ YUMA, AZ

Yuma, AZ MARKET SNAPSHOT Roughly 6 out of 10 residents in the Yuma Metropolitan area are Hispanic presence, accounting for over 130,000 individuals. The Hispanic population is projected to increase by over 14,000 individuals or 11% by 2020. Yuma Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 1 out of 3 Hispanics in the Yuma metropolitan area fall into the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicity™ AZ segments. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products andYuma, categories) among Yuma’s Hispanics exceeds Market Snapshot Roughly 6 out of 10 residents in the Yuma Metropolitan area are Hispanic presence, accounting for over 130,000 individuals. The Hispanic population is projected to increase $1.3billion annually, or 45% of total by households. over 14,000 individuals or 11% by 2020. Yuma Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 1 out of 3 Hispanics in the Yuma metropolitan area fall into the HA4 and HA5 HispanicityTM segments. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) among Yuma’s Hispanics exceeds $1.3 billion annually, or 45% of total households.

HISPANICS REPRESENT THE LARGEST POPULATION GROUP IN THE YUMA METROPOLITAN AREA.

% OF 2015 **Carmen ThisPOPULATION is pg. POPULATION

POPULATION

168 DATOSAZ14

Total

100%

207,527

Hispanic

63%

131,256

White Non-Hispanic

32%

65,915

Black Non-Hispanic

2% Total

POPULATION

100%

Hispanic

Asian Non-Hispanic **Carmen This is pg. 168 DATOSAZ14

63%

White Non1% Hispanic

32%

Black NonHispanic

2%

Asian NonHispanic

1%

American Indian **Carmen Non-HispanicThis is pg. 1% 168 DATOSAZ14 Other Non-Hispanic

% OF POPULATION

American Indian 1% Non-Hispanic Other NonHispanic

2%

1% 1%

1%

Hispanic

32%

White Non-Hispanic

2015 POPULATION

Black Non-Hispanic

3,154 207,527

Asian Non-Hispanic

131,256

65,915 2,428

American Indian Non-Hispanic Other Non-Hispanic

3,154

1,862 2,428

1%

1,862 2,912

1%

2,912

63%

1%

160,000 140,000

120,000

60,000

60,000

40,000

40,000

20,000

20,000

100,000

100,000

80,000

-

80,000

-

2000

80,774 Black Non-Hispanic

**Carmen This is pg.Asian Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic 3,136 168 DATOSAZ14 Asian Non-Hispanic 1,362

97% 97%

2000

2010

2015

2020

80,774

116,912

131,256

145,377

2010

Hispanic

Hispanic

2015

116,912 3,136

2020

131,256 3,169

3,169 1,362

3,154 2,041

2,041

145,377 3,088 3,154 3,088 2,428

2,428

**Carmen This is pg. 168 DATOSAZ14

2,805

2,805

Close to 30% of Hispanics in Rican the YumaAll other Hispanic Mexican Puerto metropolitan area fall Puerto into the HA4 and HA5 Mexican Rican All other Hispanic TM Hispanicty CloseSegment. to 30% of Hispanics in the Yuma metropolitan area fall into the HA4 and HA5 HispanictyTM Segment.

Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

PROJECTED PERCENT CHANGE 2015 V. 2020 Projected Percent Change 2015 v. 2020

16%

16%

5%

9%

5%

Hispanicity TM

16%

-2% -6%

15%

9%

11%

Hispanic

Close to 30% of Hispanics in the Yuma metropolitan area fall into the HA4 and HA5 Hispanicty™ Segment. 16% 15%

16%

11%

Total

2%

140,000

Population

Population

120,000

1%

160,000

2%

-2% -6%

-8%

Hispanic Black Non- Other AsianNonNonWhite Non-Total Black NonAsianWhite Non-Non- American Hispanic Indian Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic NonHispanic Hispanic

26% -8%

American Indian NonHispanic

Hispanicity TM

16%

Other NonHispanic

HA1

27%

26%

HA2

HA1 HA3

HA2 HA4

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015 Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015 Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2015

DATO S

A Z 194

27%

2 0 1 5

HA3 HA5 HA4

HA5


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Yuma, AZ

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado

HISPANIC POPULATION % ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

• English dominant (nearly no Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 3rd+ generation

Most Of The Zip Codes In The Yuma Metro Area Have Total Populations That Are Over 47% Hispanic.

• Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina • English preferred (some Spanish) • Born in U.S.; 2nd generation • Some Hispanic cultural practices • often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural • Bilingual (equal or nearly) • Immigrant as child or young adult • Many Hispanic cultural practices

HA4 AND HA5 HISPANICITY™ SEGMENTS ZIP CODES BY CARRIER ROUTE

HA4: Hispano This Map Shows The Zip Codes In The Metro Area By The Postal Carrier Route With The Largest Percentage Of HA4 And HA5 Hispanics.

• Spanish preferred (some English) • Immigrant as adult, • in U.S. 10+ years • Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana • Spanish dominant (nearly no English) • Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) • Primarily Hispanic cultural practices • Identify with home country more so than U.S.

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2015

DATO S

A Z 195

2 0 1 5


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“The success and vitality of Arizona’s economy is intricately tied to the quality education and college attainment of our rapidly growing Latino community. ASU is committed to helping Arizona lead the nation in Latino education, and a tool like DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market aids meaningfully in our effort.” —Michael M. Crow, President, Arizona State University

By 2020, Hispanics Will Be Majority Of All School Children In Arizona If present trends continue, more than 50 percent of Arizona’s public school students will be Hispanic by 2020.

panic students grew by about 26 percent to 465,000, while white student enrollment overall decreased. The percentage of Native American students decreased slightly during this period as well, while the percentage of Black and Asian students remained about the same.

To some, this fact speaks to the looming challenges of educating an increasingly Hispanic student population. To others, the trend foreshadows an opportunity in the making.

Hispanic student population trends in the public school systems generally mirror the rapid population growth occurring among the state’s total Hispanic population. The number of Hispanics in Arizona in 2000 was nearly 1.3 million and grew to nearly 1.9 million in 2010—a 46 percent increase.

Either way, experts say Arizona’s education policy cannot be formulated without giving consideration to how it could be shaped by the state’s Hispanic students. About 45 percent of the state’s public school students today are Hispanic. With the proportion of the state’s Hispanic student population increasing at a rate of about 1 to 1.5 percent annually, Hispanics could reach majority status by 2020. Already, there are more minority students, about 57 percent, than white students in the state’s public schools.

Because today’s students are tomorrow’s workforce, policy leaders must consider how that will impact the Arizona economy. Consider that while slightly more than 30 percent of the state’s total population today is Hispanic, 44 percent of Arizona children 5 or younger are Hispanic.

Latino students are driving the growth of Arizona’s minority student population. Between 2003 and 2012, the number of His-

“The demographics show that, largely, the younger population coming up — in other words our future workforce — is Latino,”

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“Helios Education Foundation is focused on creating opportunities for individuals to succeed in postsecondary education. Based on the changing demographics of Arizona, we know that our student success efforts must include a focus on the Latino population to ensure a vibrant future for our state’s economy. We are proud to partner with the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and appreciate their leadership in elevating Latino issues and providing the DATOS report to help all sectors of our community understand and meet the needs of Arizona’s fastest growing population segment.” —Vince Roig, Founding Chairman, Helios Education Foundation

“In looking at the future of the state of Arizona, it is clear that a change in our state’s demographic and economic structure is on the horizon. As Latinos become the largest and fastestgrowing population in both the state and the nation, we need to reframe our understanding of what Latinos mean to our economic prosperity. The data provided by the DATOS report continues to solidify and shed light on the reality that in order to secure Arizona’s economic future, our collective efforts must include strategies that improve Latino student success and close the degree completion gap that exists in our state. It is time to take bold and decisive action.” —Paul Luna, President and CEO, Helios Education Foundation

said Joseph Garcia, director of the Latino Public Policy Center at ASU’s Morrison Institute for Public Policy. In his interview with the Cronkite News Service shortly after the release of the 2012 Census estimates, Garcia explained why it’s vital that Arizona leaders address existing education achievement gaps between Hispanics and whites. “If we do not close the Latino education gap we are going to wind up with a workforce that is largely...ill-equipped to be able to compete economically with other states and regions, and even internationally.”

To Garcia’s point, while modest but steady gains have been made in reducing high school dropout rates among Hispanics and a growing percentage of Hispanics are enrolling in college, a substantial education gap persists. In 2012, according to Pew Hispanic Research, “Hispanics accounted for just 9 percent of young adults (ages 25 to 29) with bachelor’s degrees,” while 69 percent of young adults with bachelor’s degrees were white.

DATO S

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2 0 1 5


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In 2024, Hispanics Enrolled In U.S. Public Elementary And Secondary Schools Are Projected To Account For 29% Of Total Students Enrolled In 2024, Hispanics Enrolled In U.S. Public Elementary And Secondary Schools Are Projected Account For 29% Of TotalENROLLED StudentsINEnrolled PERCENTAGEToDISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS PUBLIC ELEMENTARY Percentage Distribution of Students Enrolled in Public Elementary and AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS Secondary Schools

59% 51%

Public Schoo

l

46%

24%

29%

18%

17% 16% 15%

4% 5% 6% White

Black

Hispanic

2002

2012

Asian/ Pacific Islander

2024

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

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NOTES

Notes

DATO S

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2 0 1 5

1% 1% 1% American Indian/ Alaska Native


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Hispanics In The U.S. Represent Significant Enrollment In Public Schools PreK-8’ 2022, Hispanics Enrolled FOR In Pre-K Through 8thINGrades In Public Will Have ACTUAL By AND PROJECTED NUMBERS ENROLLMENT GRADES PREK–8School IN PUBLIC ELEMENTARY 30% Since 2011 AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS,Increased BY RACE/ETHNICITY: FALL 1997 THROUGH FALL 2022 Enrollment in Grades PreK-8 in Public Schools (000) 20,123 17,655 16,939

11,098 8,560 5,980

5,838

5,469 5,788

2,106 1,348 1,743 White

Black

Hispanic

2000 Source: U.S. Department of Education, Projections of Education Statistics to Projections 2022 Source: U.S. Department of Education, nces.ed.gov/pubs2014/2014051.pdf

2011

Asian/ Pacific Islander

397

384

382

American Indian/ Alaska Native

2022

of Education Statistics to 2022

By 2022, Hispanics Enrolled In 9th – 12th Grades In Public School Will Have Increased 43% Since 2011 By 2022, Hispanics Enrolled In 9 – 12 Grades In Public School Will Have Increased 43% Since th

th

2011

Enrollment in Grades 9-12 in Public Schools SCHOOLS ENROLLMENT IN GRADES 9-12 IN PUBLIC (000) 8,750 7,948 7,042

4,566 3,201 2,119

2,357 2,163

1,894 601

White

Black

Hispanic

2000 Source: U.S. Department of Education, Projections of Education Statistics to 2022 nces.ed.gov/pubs2014/2014051.pdf Source: U.S. Department of Education, Projections

2011

769

905

Asian/ Pacific Islander

2022

of Education Statistics to 2022

DATO S

A Z 199

2 0 1 5

153

163

136

American Indian/ Alaska Native


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Between 1990 and 2014, the size of the white-Hispanic gap in attainment of a high school diploma or its equivalent narrowed from 32 to 21 percentage points

Compared To The 2009-2010 School Year, There Will Be 64% More Hispanic Public High School Graduates In 2022-2023

In Comparison To The 2009-2010 School Year, There Will Be 64% More Hispanic Public High School Graduates In 2022-23 Public High School Graduates (in thousands)

1,895 1,782 1,601

PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES (IN THOUSANDS)

902

336

White

478

551

410

298

Black

208 127 170

Hispanic

2000-2001

26

Asian/ Pacific Islander

2009-2010

34

25

American Indian/ Alaska Native

2022-2023

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Projections of Education Statistics to 2022

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Projections of Education Statistics to 2022

The Percentage Distribution Of Hispanic Students Enrolled Percentage Distribution Hispanic Students Enrolled In Public ElementaryFrom And In PublicTheElementary AndOfSecondary Schools Varied 41% Secondary Schools Varied From 41% In The West Compared To Only 11% In The Midwest In The West To Only 11% In The Midwest Percentage Distribution of Students Enrolled in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS ENROLLED IN PUBLIC ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS 68% 59% 46% 39%

41% 24% 15%14% 5%

White

Black

Northeast

24% 18% 11%

7%

Hispanic

Midwest

3% 3%

9%

Asian/ Pacific Islander

South

West

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

DATO S

A Z 200

2 0 1 5

0% 1% 1% 2% American Indian/ Alaska Native


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CASE STUDY

An Initiative of Helios Education Foundation and Yuma Union High School District With increasing demands on the 21st-century workforce, all students should graduate from high school prepared to enter college or start a career. Improving the skills required to succeed is a major challenge in the United States. According to the nonprofit organization Achieve (2012), about 11 percent of freshmen entering two- and four-year postsecondary institutions require remediation in reading, 14 percent in writing, and 22 percent in math. Similarly, a recent national readiness report by American College Testing (ACT) showed that 28 percent of students who took the ACT college entrance examination failed to meet any of ACT’s four college readiness benchmarks while only 25 percent of graduates met all four of the benchmarks. These numbers are alarming when connected with 21st-century workforce reports that show technological changes and increased competition will require a workforce with strong cognitive skills and problemsolving abilities. To address these challenges, Helios Education Foundation began to take steps to identify a new comprehensive, highschool reform initiative focused on preparing students for future success. Through this work, a partnership with Yuma Union High School District was formed and an initiative

called Ready Now Yuma was developed. This initiative provides students with a rigorous, high expectations curriculum within a college-going environment. The end goal is to increase the number of students entering and succeeding in postsecondary education. The four overarching objectives of Ready Now Yuma are as follows: 1. Implement a whole-district, whole-school performancebased and aligned instructional system (Cambridge International Curriculum and Examinations). 2. Embed routine practice of data-driven decision making in support of RNY at the district, campus, department, classroom and individual student levels. 3. Support every YUHSD student in graduating college and career ready through targeted academic support and advising, as well as the development of college awareness and skills. 4. Communicate consistently and intentionally, engaging all stakeholders, to embed the expectation of college and career readiness for every Yuma student through cultural change within YUHSD high schools and the communities they serve.

“Ready Now Yuma represents a cultural shift in the way we prepare students to compete and succeed in a global economy,” said Vince Roig, Founding Chairman of Helios Education Foundation. “Every YUHSD student, regardless of past academic performance or post-high school aspirations, will now receive a world-class education which prepares them for every future opportunity and puts them on-par with their national and international peers.”

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An Initiative of Helios Education Foundation and Yuma Union High School District

“Helios’ leadership and investment in Ready Now Yuma will profoundly impact our students, YUHSD and the Yuma community overall,” commented Toni Badone, superintendent of Yuma Union High School District. “Our goal is to equip every student with the skills and knowledge they will need to succeed in college, career and life. By doing so, we will demonstrate that Yuma is a viable business environment with a stable and talented workforce pipeline.”

5. As a foundation focused on creating opportunities for success in postsecondary education, Helios is committed to the success of all students. However, the Foundation also has a particular emphasis on traditionally underserved communities including low-income, firstgeneration, minority and rural students. Yuma, Arizona is located in the southwestern corner of Arizona and is bordered by California and Mexico. It is considered an “urban-isolated” community as it is located three hours from both Phoenix, Arizona and San Diego, California. Of the more than 200,000 residents, twenty one percent of Yuma residents live below the federal poverty line. Yuma Union High School District (YUHSD) has five comprehensive high schools and one alternative high school and serves three K-8 partner districts and two private schools. Of the roughly 11,000 students, 80 percent are Hispanic, 16 percent are Caucasian, two percent are African-American, and another two percent are Native American or Asian. Just over 68 percent of the students are classified as receiving free and reduced lunch. These demographics, along with strong leadership and a commitment to high expectations, made YUHSD a natural partner for Helios on this initiative.

ing, collaborative work, instruction and systemness. Under this theory, a primary goal of the initiative is to change the culture of the schools to reflect a high-expectations mentality for all students. These expectations are encapsulated in the goals of the district, which include having every YUHSD student graduate and be prepared to succeed in college and career, embedding a college-going culture within each school, and increasing the number of students entering and succeeding in postsecondary education. What makes Ready Now Yuma unique, is that it is making a world-class education available to every student regardless of past academic performance or post-high school aspirations. This initiative is helping students maximize their full potential and is preparing them for success in college and career through a framework built on the idea that every student should be challenged, supported and prepared.

YUHSD’s approach to preparing all students for college and career calls for a systemic change in the way districts and schools operate. Ready Now Yuma seeks to achieve wholesystem reform by concentrating its efforts on capacity build-

DATO S

To learn more about Ready Now Yuma, please visit www.Helios.org.

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In 2014, Hispanic Males Were 7% More Likely Than Hispanic Females Between The Ages Of 18-24 To Not Complete High School

Percentage of 18to 24-year-olds Who Have Not Completed High School: 2014 In 2014, Hispanic Males Were 7 Percentage Points More Likely Than Hispanic Females Between The Ages Of 18-24 To Not Complete High School

PERCENTAGE OF 18- TO 24-YEAR-OLDS WHO HAVE NOT COMPLETED HIGH SCHOOL: 2014 16%

American Indian/ Alaska Native

9%

Asian

20%

11% 21%

Hispanic

Black

28% 29%

20% 12%

White

16%

Female

Male

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

From 2000 To 2014, There Was An 18 Percentage Points Decrease In Hispanic Males Between The Ages 18-24 Did Not Complete High School From 2000 To 2014, There Was An 18% Decrease In Hispanic MalesOf Between The Ages OfThat 18-24 That Did Not Complete High School

Percentage of Male 18- to 24-year-olds Who Have Not Completed High School: 2000 and 2014

PERCENTAGE OF MALE 18- TO 24-YEAR-OLDS WHO HAVE NOT COMPLETED HIGH SCHOOL: 2000 AND 2014 20%

American Indian/ Alaska Native

11%

Asian

35%

20% 28%

Hispanic

46%

20%

Black

16%

White

33%

20%

2014

2000

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Between The Ages 16-24, Hispanics Born Outside The U.S. Are 15% More Likely To Dropout Than Hispanics Born In

The U.S. Between The Ages 16-24, Born Outside The U.S. Are 15 DropoutHispanics Rates of 16- through 24-year-olds Percentage Points More Likely To Dropout Than Hispanics Born In The U.S.

DROPOUT RATES OF 16- THROUGH 24-YEAR-OLDS 24% 20%

5% 4% White

8%

12% 12%

9%

7%

5%

2% 3%

Black

Hispanic

Born in the U.S.

Asian

Pacific Islander

Born Outside the U.S.

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

DATO S

A Z

203

2 0 1 5

American Indian/ Alaska Native


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There Will Be A 27% Increase In Hispanic Enrollment Of U.S. Residents In All Postsecondary There Will Be A 27% Increase In Hispanic Enrollment Of U.S. Residents In All Postsecondary Degree-Granting Institutions From 2011-2022 Degree-granting Institutions From 2011-2022 Enrollment of U.S. Residents in All Postsecondary Degree-granting Institutions (in thousands)

ENROLLMENT OF U.S. RESIDENTS IN ALL POSTSECONDARY DEGREE-GRANTING INSTITUTIONS (IN THOUSANDS) 13,492 12,666

COLLEGE

10,463

3,940 3,135

3,757 2,953

1,730

White

1,462

Black

1,400 978 1,311

Hispanic

2000

Asian/ Pacific Islander

2011

151 190 190 American Indian/ Alaska Native

2022

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Projections of Education Statistics to 2022 Source: U.S. Department of Education, Projections of Education Statistics to 2022

In 2013, Hispanic Females Between The Ages Of 18-24 Were 10 Percentage Points More Likely Than Hispanic Males To Be Enrolled In 2- Or 4-Year Colleges In 2013, Hispanic Females The Ages Of 18-24 WereIN 10% Than Hispanic Males To Be Enrolled PERCENTAGE OF 18TO Between 24-YEAR-OLDS ENROLLED 2- More AND Likely 4-YEAR COLLEGES: 2013 In A 2-and 4-Year College

Percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds Enrolled in 2- and 4-year colleges: 2013

64%

COLLEGE

60%

45% 38% 31%

41%

39%

38% 29%

19%

White

Black

Hispanic

Male

Asian

Female

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

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American Indian/ Alaska Native


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In 2013, Hispanic Males Between The Ages Of 18-24 Were 11 Percentage Points More Likely To Enroll In AHispanic 2- Or 4-Year Compared 2000 In 2013, Males Between The Ages Of College 18-24 Were 11% More Likely To Enroll In Ato 2-and 4-Year College Compared to 2000

Percentage of Male 18- to 24-year-olds Enrolled in 2- and 4-year Colleges: 2000 and 2013

PERCENTAGE OF MALE 18- TO 24-YEAR-OLDS ENROLLED IN 2- AND 4-YEAR COLLEGES: 2000 AND 2013 59%

36% 38%

31%

64%

29%

25%

19%

18%

White

Black

13%

Hispanic

2000

Asian

American Indian/ Alaska Native

2013

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Hispanic Females Between The Age Of 25-29 Were 6 Percentage Points More Likely Than Their Hispanic Male Counterparts To Complete A Bachelor’s Degree Or Higher In 2013 Hispanic Females Between The Age Of 25-29 Were 6% More Likely Than Their Hispanic Male Counterparts To Complete A Bachelor’s Degree Or Higher In 2013 Percentage of 25- to 29-year-olds Who Have Completed a Bachelor's or

2013 PERCENTAGE OF 25- TO 29-YEAR-OLDS WHO Higher HAVEDegree: COMPLETED A BACHELOR’S OR HIGHER DEGREE: 2013

64% 55% 44% 37% 23%

19%

17%

White

13%

Black

Hispanic

Male

Female

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

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Asian


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Among Hispanics Over 25, There Is A Significant Gap Between Those Who Have Completed A High School Degree Or Higher Compared To Those Who Actually Obtained A Higher Degree Among Hispanics Over 25, There Is A Significant Gap Between Those Who Have Completed A High School Degree Or Higher Compared To Those Who Actually Obtained A Higher Degree Percentage of Persons 25 and Over Years Old and Educational Attainment: 2013 PERCENTAGE OF PERSONS 25 AND OVER YEARS OLD AND EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: 2013 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

All Hispanics

Mexican

Puerto Rican

Cuban

Dominican

Salvadoran Other Central American

Total, high school or higher

High school only

Associate's degree

Bachelor's or higher degree

South American

Other Hispanic

Some college, no degree

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Digest of Education Statistics, 2013 Source: U.S. Department of Education, Digest of Education Statistics, 2013

In 2013, Twenty-Three Percent Of Hispanics Who Were 25 Years Of Age Or Older And Held a Bachelor’s Degree Or In 2013, Twenty-Three Percent Of Hispanics Who Were 25 Years Of Age Or Older And Held a Bachelor’s Degree Or Higher Were Majored in Business/Management Higher Majored in Business/Management Persons Age 25 and over Who Hold a Bachelor's or Higher Degree PERSONS AGE 25 AND OVER WHO HOLD A BACHELOR’S OR HIGHER DEGREE

30% 25% 20% 15% 10%

White

Black

Hispanic

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Digest of Education Statistics 2013

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Digest of Education Statistics 2013

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Social Sciences/Hisotry

Psychology

Pre-professional

Philosophy/Religion/The ology

Other Fields

Natual Sciences

Mathematics/Statistics

Liberal Arts/Humanities

Health Sciences

Foreign Languages

English/Literature

Engineering

Education

Computer and Information Sciences

Communications

Business/Management

Art/Architecture

0%

Agriculture/Forestry

5%


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Of All Hispanics Enrolled in 2-Year And 4-Year Colleges, Twenty-Four Percent Attend Private For Private 2-Year Institutions Percentage Distribution of U.S. Resident Undergrad Enrollment

Of All Hispanics Enrolled in 2-Year And 4-Year Colleges, TwentyFour Percent Attend Private For-profit 2-Year Institutions PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF U.S. RESIDENT UNDERGRAD ENROLLMENT 40%

2-year

PrivateFor-private For-profit Private

28% 49%

28%

Private Nonprofit 54% 48%

4-year

22%

30%

15%

67%

13%

Private Nonprofit 62%

12%

Public White

Black

Hispanic

Asian

Pacific Islander

4%

13%

15%

Public

PrivateFor-private For-profit Private

4%

24%

American Indian/ Alaska Native

0%

6%

0%

3%

1%

6%

0%

7%

0%

10% 15%

1%

Two or More Races

1% 3% 2% 2% 1% 3% 1% 3% 1% 3% 1% 3%

Series8

Private For-profit Institution: Private Nonprofit Institution: Public School or Institution: An institution in which the individual(s) or agency in control receives compensation other than wages, rent, or other expenses for the assumption of risk (e.g., proprietary schools).

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

An institution in which the individual(s) or agency in control receives no compensation other than wages, rent, or other expenses for the assumption of risk. These include both independent nonprofit institutions and those affiliated with a religious organization.

A school or institution controlled and operated by publicly elected or appointed officials and deriving its primary support from public funds.

Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education 2015

Hispanic-serving Institutions 2013-2014

1.6 M

60%

409

Latino Undergraduate Enrollment

Institutions

Of Latino Undergraduates

Representation

Sector

Location

Sector Sector

31% 31%

46%

12%

46%

Of Higher Education Institutions

21

20%20% 3%

3%

2-YR Public

2-YR Public

2-YR Private

2-YR Private

203 203

4-YR Public

4-YR Private

4-YR Public

2032-YEAR 2-YEAR

4-YR Private

206 206

206

2-YEAR 2-YEAR

Source: Excelencia In Education Analysis Using U.S. Department of Education, NCES, IPEDS, 2013-14 Fall Institutional Characteristics And Enrollment Surveys.

2-YEAR

States & Puerto Rico

2-YEAR

Source: Excelencia In Education Analysis Using U.S. Department of Education, NCES, IPEDS, 2013-14 Fall Institutional Characteristics And Enrollment Surveys.

Source: Excelencia In Education Analysis Using U.S. Department of Education, NCES, IPEDS, 2013-14 Fall Institutional Characteristics And Enrollment Surveys.

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Revered Community Activist Says AZ Legislature’s Priority No. 1 Must Be Education AZHCF President Rosie Lopez Education is the single most important issue facing the 2016 session of the Arizona Legislature. That’s the unfettered view of long-time community activist, Rosie Lopez, president of the Arizona Hispanic Community Forum (AHCF). “Education should be at the very top of the agenda because everything else is affected by education,” said Lopez, a former teacher and education administrator. “It doesn’t matter if it’s the economy, business, the environment, immigration or health care, without a strong educational foundation our community will suffer.” Founded in 1987, the AHCF has been speaking out about education policy and how it affects Hispanics as long as the group has existed, said Lopez. The AHCF was a vocal critic of imposing “English-only” policies and ending bilingual education in the state, and the group was a party to the successful lawsuit that led to the creation of single-member districts in the Phoenix Union High School District in 1990, opening the door for greater diversity on the PUHSD board of trustees. The group also has promoted Latino voter engagement and opposed the wave of anti-immigrant legislation passed by the State Legislature over the past decade.

derfunded and that Hispanics and other minority students are suffering disproportionately. Whether the issue is larger class sizes, the elimination of all-day kindergarten, deteriorating buildings or low teacher pay, it is predominantly Latino schools that are being hit the hardest, said Lopez, even though Hispanics are the fastest growing population

At the current rate of growth, the population of Hispanic students in Arizona’s schools will be a majority by 2020, according to this 2015 edition of DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market. By 2040, Hispanics are predicted

“The funding issue is the main thing,” said Lopez, who contends that public education in Arizona is woefully un-

to be a majority of the state’s overall population.

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Photos Courtesy of Rosie Lopez

in Arizona.

Lopez said a range of recent developments convinced the group’s leadership that education, now more than ever, needs to be at the top of AHCF’s agenda and a top priority for the State Legislature.


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Revered Community Activist Says Az Legislature’s Priority No. 1 Must Be Education AZHCF President Rosie Lopez Lopez said the main goal of the conference was to “formulate a Latino education policy” report to present to the following list of education influencers in Arizona, including Governor Doug Ducey, State Legislators, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Diane Douglas and a wide range of public policymakers across the state. Lopez said the AHCF will publish its “Latino Education Policy Agenda” in November. The report will feature recommendations made by dozens of conference participants and parents. (A separate parent conference is scheduled for Oct. 17 at Roosevelt School District’s Wellness Center.) Recommendations gathered from the parent conference will also be included in the report. She said a copy of the report will be delivered to each member of the Legislature and also posted on the group’s website at www.azhcf.com. Lopez added her group also has been working closely with the Latino Caucus in the State Legislature. She said the current chair, Sen. Catherine Miranda, and incoming chair, Rep. Juan Mendez, have agreed, along with other lawmakers, to author legislation based on the AHCF’s recommendations. “We are aware the challenges and hurdles are great and that policymakers are sometimes not willing to invest in education, but our voices need to be heard until our policies are enacted,” said Lopez. To prepare to present its views on education policy during

The AZHCF is an all-volunteer organization. The group’s executive board includes Lopez, Esther Duran Lumm, Constantino Lopez, Linda Brown, Greg Mares and Irene Chavez.

the upcoming legislative session (which begins in January 2016), AHCF hosted an all-day conference in June and invited a who’s who of education experts from Arizona and across the nation to discuss the impact of local, state and Among the day’s presenters: Dr. Eugene Garcia of Arizona

To learn more about the organization, visit azhcf.com or email rosie@azhcf.com.

State University; Dr. Ileana Reyes of the University of Arizona; Dr. Laura Rendón of the University of Texas, San Antonio, and Salvador Gabaldón, former director of Culturally Relevant Education, Tucson Unified School District.

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Photos Courtesy of Rosie Lopez

federal education policy on the state’s Latino community.


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Courtesy of AMEPAC, 2013

The Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center (AMEPAC) is a policy center of the Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education. Through studies, AMEPAC’s mission is to stimulate constructive statewide discussion and debate about improving Arizona minority students’ early awareness, access, and achievement throughout the educational attainment process. Our vision is that all Arizona students succeed in higher education as a result of quality research that shapes policy on critical issues.

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2013

Arizona in Transformation

Milem Bryan Sesate Montaño

https://highered.az.gov/sites/default/files/AMEPAC%20MSPR%202013%20-%20Final.pdf

Minority Students Are The Majority In Arizona Schools And Their Representation Is Increasing At A Rapid Rate. Hispanics Are ByStudents Far The Largest Group In Arizona Schools. Minority Are The Majority InMinority Arizona Schools And Their Representation Is Increasing At A Rapid Rate. Hispanics Are By Far The Largest Minority Group In Arizona Schools.

P-12 ENROLLMENT TREND 1997-2012 – BY MINORITY STATUS P-12 Enrollment Trend 1997-2012 – By Minority Status 60.0%

55.0%

50.0%

45.0%

40.0%

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

White

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

All Minority

Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012) Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012)

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2010

2011

2012


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While Nearly 57 Percent Of Students Enrolled In Arizona Schools Were White In 1997, Their Representation Decreased To 43 Percent In 2012. The Large Majority Of Students Of Color In Arizona Schools Are Hispanic. Their Proportional Representation Increased From 30.1 Percent In 1997 To 43.6 While 57 Percent Of Students Enrolled In Arizona Schools Were White In 1997, Their Percent In Nearly 2012. In Fact, Hispanics Surpassed Whites As Representation The Largest Decreased To 43 Percent In 2012. The Large Majority Of Students Of Color In Arizona Schools Are Hispanics. Their Proportional Group Representation Increased FromIn 30.1P-12 Percent InClassrooms 1997 To 43.6 Percent In In Fact, Hispanics Enrolled In2012. 2012. Surpassed Whites As The Largest Group Enrolled In P-12 Classrooms In 2012.

P-12 EnrollmentTREND Trend 1997-2012 By Race/Ethnicity P-12 ENROLLMENT 1997-2012––Proportions PROPORTIONS BY RACE/ETHNICITY 60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Asian American

2003

2004

2005

Indian

2006

Black

2007

2008

Hispanic

2009

2010

2011

2012

White

Source:Source: ArizonaArizona Department of Education (2012) (2012) Department of Education

Hispanics Showed The Largest Numerical Gain In Enrollments Between 2004 (368,804) And 2012 (465,084), An Increase Of 26.1% Hispanics Showed The Largest Numerical Gain In Enrollments Between 2004 (368,804) And 2012 (465,084), An Increase Of 26.1%

P-12 ENROLLMENT TREND 2004-2012 – TOTAL COUNTS BY RACE/ETHNICITY P-12 Enrollment Trend 2004-2012 – Total Counts By Race/Ethnicity

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

100,000

0

2004

2005

Asian

2006

2007

2008

American Indian

2009

Black

2010

Hispanic

2011

2012

White

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2013

Arizona in Transformation

Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012) Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012) Milem Bryan Sesate Montaño

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The Consequences Of Students Not Passing AIMS Tests Make It Difficult, If Not Impossible, For Them To Enroll In The Courses That They Need To Become Eligible For Admission To One Of The State’s Universities Because They Must Enroll In Classes That Prepare Them To Retake The AIMS Test To Meet High School Graduation Requirements.

Less Than Half of Hispanic Students ‘Meets’ Or ‘Exceeds’ AIMS Science Scores Less Than Half of Hispanic Students ‘Meets’ Or ‘Exceeds’ AIMS Science Scores 2011 Arizona AIMS Science Scores Proportions Within Race/Ethnicity

2011 ARIZONA AIMS SCIENCE SCORES PROPORTIONS WITHIN RACE/ETHNICITY 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Asian

American Indian

Black

Falls Far Below

Hispanic

Approaches

White

Meets

Unknown Race

Exceeds

Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012)

Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012)

Less Than Half of Hispanic Students ‘Meets’ Or ‘Exceeds’ AIMS Writing Scores Less Than Half of Hispanic Students ‘Meets’ Or ‘Exceeds’ AIMS Writing Scores 2011 Arizona AIMS Writing Scores Proportions Within Race/Ethnicity

2011 ARIZONA AIMS WRITING SCORES PROPORTIONS WITHIN RACE/ETHNICITY 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Asian

American Indian

Falls Far Below

Black

Hispanic

Approaches

White

Meets

Unknown Race

Exceeds

Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012)

Footnote: All Arizona public school students in grades 3 through 8 and in grade 10 are required to take Arizona’s Instrument to Measure Standards (AIMS) tests. AIMS tests assess students in four content areas: writing, reading, mathematics, and science. The reading and mathematics tests are administered in all grades. The writing test is administered in grades 5, 6, 7, and 10. The science test is administered in grades 4, 8, and 10. In order to graduate from an Arizona public high school, a student must meet the AIMS high school graduation requirement. The most common way to meet this requirement is to pass the writing, reading, and mathematics content areas of the AIMS high school test. Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012)

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2013

Arizona in Transformation

Milem Bryan Sesate Montaño

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Teachers Of Color Are Dramatically Underrepresented In Arizona Classrooms As Whites Make Up More Than 80 Percent Of The Teacher Workforce In Schools With Predominantly Minority Student Populations Teachers of color are dramatically underrepresented in Arizona classrooms as Whites make up more than 80 percent of the teacher workforce in schools with predominantly minority student populations

ARIZONA P-12 TEACHERS 2002-2011

Arizona P-12PROPORTIONS Teachers 2002-2011 Proportions By Race/Ethnicity BY RACE/ETHNICITY 100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

2002

2003

2004

Asian

2005

2006

American Indian

2007

Black

2008

2009

Hispanic

2010

2011

White

Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012) Source: Arizona Department of Education (2012)

There Is A Significant Gap In Mean Composite SAT Scores Between White And Asian Pacific American Students And Hispanic, Black, And American Indian Students In Arizona. The Trend Lines In These Scores Tend To Be Relatively Flat For All Groups Except Asian Pacific Americans As Their Scores Have Increased By 32 Points Over The Last 10 Years. There Is A Significant Gap In Mean Composite SAT Scores Between White And Asian Pacific American Students And Hispanic, Black, And American Indian Students In Arizona. The Trend Lines In These Scores Tend To Be Relatively Flat For All Groups Except Asian Pacific Americans As Their ScoresCOMPOSITE Have Increased By 32 SCORES Points Over 2001-2011 The Last 10 Years. ARIZONA MEAN SAT Arizona Mean Composite SAT Scores 2001-2011 BY RACE/ETHNICITY By Race/Ethnicity

1150

1100

1050

1000

950

900

2001

2002

2003

American Indian

2004

Asian

2005

Black

2006

Hispanic

2007

White

2008

2009

Multiracial

2010

2011

No Response

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2013

Arizona in Transformation

Source: College Board (2011) Source: College Board (2011)

Milem Bryan Sesate Montaño

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Postsecondary Education

• In 2010, 481,260 students (undergraduate, graduate and professional) were enrolled in postsecondary institutions in Arizona. The largest number were enrolled in public two-year colleges, followed by public four-year institutions.

aduates

Arizona Undergraduates Enrollments By Race/Ethnicity • The distribution of2010 undergraduate enrollments mirrors the breakdown of enrollments by sector. White students had the largest representation Enrollments By Race/Ethnicity Within Sector at each type of institution, with Hispanics and American Indians comprising a larger proportion of students at private, for-profit two-year colleges and Asian Pacific Americans most represented at state public 100% universities.

W

• The majority of all American Indian, Asian Pacific American, and Hispanic students are enrolled at two-year institutions. 80%

2010 Arizona Undergraduates Enrollments By Race/Ethnicity Within Sector 2010 ARIZONA UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENTS BY RACE/ETHNICITY WITHIN SECTOR 100%

60%

80%

40%

60%

40%

20% 20%

0%

fit 4-Year

0%

Public Public 4-Year

American Indian

4-Year Not-For-Profit 4-Year Public 2-Year For-Profit For-Profit 4-Year2-Year Not-For-Profit 4-Year For-Profit 4-Year

Asian

Black

Hispanic

White

2 or More Races

For-ProfitAmerican 4-Year Indian Public 2-Year Asian Black

Hispanic White 2 or More Races Unknown Race Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010)

Unknown Race

Public 2-Y

Non-Resident Aliens

For-Profit 2-Year 2 or More Races Hispanic White

Non-Resident Aliens

Unknown

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2013

Arizona in Transformation

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010)

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010)

on Statistics (2010)

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Milem Bryan Sesate Montaño


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Between 1991 And 2010, The Proportion Of Associate’s Degrees Awarded To White Students Decreased, While The Proportion Between 1991 And 2010, The Proportion Of Associate’s Degrees Awarded To White Students Decreased, While The Proportion AwardedTo To Hispanics Reached 20% For The First Time In 2000For And Has HeldFirst At This Level Ever In Since2000 Awarded Hispanics Reached 20% The Time Arizona Associate’s Degree 1991-2010 Race/Ethnicity And Has HeldByAt This Level Ever Since ARIZONA ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE 1991-2010 BY RACE/ETHNICITY 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

1991

1992

1993

American Indian

1994

1995

Black

1996

Asian

1997

1998

Hispanic

1999

2000

2001

White

2002

2003

2004

2005

Race/Ethnicity Unknown

2006

Multicultural

2007

2008

2009

2010

Non-Resident Alien

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010)

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010)

The Proportion Of Whites Receiving Bachelor’s Degrees Decreased From 82 Percent To 66 Percent. The Proportion Of Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded To Hispanics Doubled From 7 Percent In 1991 To 14 The Proportion Of Whites Receiving Bachelor’s Degrees Decreased From 82 Percent To 66 Percent. The Proportion Of Bachelor’s Degrees Percent Awarded To Hispanics Doubled From 7 Percent Black In 1991 To And 14 Percent In 2010, While Black And American Indian Students In 2010, While American Indian Students Held Held Steady At 3 Percent And 1 Percent, Respectively Arizona Bachelor’s Degree 1991-2010 Steady At 3 Percent And By1Race/Ethnicity Percent, Respectively ARIZONA BACHELOR’S DEGREE 1991-2010 BY RACE/ETHNICITY 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

1991

1992

1993

American Indian

1994

Black

1995

1996

Asian

1997

1998

Hispanic

1999

White

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Race/Ethnicity Unknown

2005

2006

2007

Multicultural

2008

2009

2010

Non-Resident Alien

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2013

Arizona in Transformation

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010) Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010) Milem Bryan Sesate Montaño

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While Hispanic And American Indian Graduate Students Have A Higher Proportion Of Enrollment At Public Universities, Asian Pacific Americans Have A Higher Percentage Of Enrollment At Not-For-Profit Institutions.

Arizona Minority Student Progress Report

2013

Arizona in Transformation

Milem Bryan Sesate Montaño

At Public Institutions, Most Master’s Degrees Were Awarded To White Students, Followed By International Students, Hispanics, Asian Pacific Americans, Blacks, And American Indians. At Private, Not-For-Profit Institutions, The Proportion Of Master’s Degrees Awarded To International Students Was Substantially Higher, But The Proportion Awarded To Hispanics And American Indians Was Lower. At Private, For-Profit Institutions, Blacks Received Proportionately More Master’s Degrees Than At Any Other Type Of Institution.

At public institutions, most master’s degrees were awarded to White students, followed by international students, Hispanics, Asian Pacific Americans, Blacks, and American Indians. At private, not-for-profit institutions, the proportion of master’s degrees awarded to international students was substantially higher, but the proportion awarded to Hispanics and American Indians was lower. At private, for-profit institutions, Blacks received proportionately master’sMASTER’S degrees than at any other type of institution 2010more ARIZONA DEGREE

BY RACE/ETHNICITY 2010 Arizona Master’s Degree By Race/Ethnicity

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Public 4-Year

Non-Profit 4-Year

For-Profit 4-Year

American Indian

Asian

Black

Hispanic

White

Multicultural

Unknown Race

Non-Resident Alien

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010) Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2010)

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MIND Research Institute Located near Phoenix, Palomino Intermediate serves about 470 fourth through sixth graders, 99% of whom qualify for free or reduced-price lunch and many who come from transitory families. Principal Jenny Robles, looking for an innovative solution to improve her students’ math skills, turned to the game-based learning program called ST Math. In their first year using ST Math, the school’s fourth graders experienced an 8 percentile point growth in math proficiencies on Arizona’s statewide AIMS test. In the same period the rest of the school district saw just 3-percentile-point growth among its fourth graders. Created by the nonprofit MIND Research Institute, ST Math presents math concepts through graphically rich animation minus the language and symbols. Students are ushered through the program by an adorable penguin named JiJi, challenging and encouraging them along the way. Once students understand the math concepts visually abstract symbols and language are gradually introduced. This method fosters

deeper conceptual understanding and removes the potential confusion imposed by unnecessary words and symbols, especially for English-language learners. “JiJi has been a great success for us and staff have embraced the program, working hard to keep their classes progressing and raising their expectations for their students,” said Robles. ST Math allows students to work at their own pace and gives every student the opportunity to experience success, while providing real-time reporting for teachers who can immediately adjust their instruction to suit the needs of the students. At Palomino, the school’s instructional coach tracks ST Math data and works with teachers to place students in groups for core instruction time based upon skill level and their area of struggle. For example, students who are struggling with fractions would be in one group while those struggling with integers would be in another. The results at Palomino, says Robles, have been astounding.

Grade-level Growth in State Math Test Proficiency Change for new, fully implemented grades in average percentage of students Proficient or better. 11.4

10.7 11.2

3.8

3.3

1.3

4.8

(28)

3.9

3.6

0.0 (33)

(12)

Las Vegas2 (43)

5.4

6.3

(20)

(87)

Seattle1†

1.1

-1.1 (30)

Colorado Springs2*

(15)

(68)

(31)

Minneapolis2*

(118)

(6)

(23)

Chicago2*

Iowa1*

12.9

(20)

Silicon Valley1* 4.6

(24)

(6)

New York2 7.5 19 1.3 (177) (129)

California1* 5.2

(33)

6.4 -0.7

Angeles2*

11.5

-0.9

8.3 2.5 (123)

1.4 (88)

Orange County2*

(33)

3.4

Arizona2

62,011 ST Math Students 1 one year ST Math use 2 two years ST Math use * p < .05 † Advanced/Commended (n) = number of schools

Copyright © 2015 MIND Research Institute. All rights reserved.

MS-GN-112-150212

ST Math

4.2

4.4

4.2

(15)

(9)

Virginia1†

0.7 (21)

Schools without ST Math had similar baseline scores to schools with ST Math.

No ST Math

4.1

11.9

(22)

(28)

(9)

Dallas1

(53)

(8)

(115)

Houston1†

(26)

Florida1*

A neuroscience and education social benefit organization

mindresearch.org

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888.751.5443 info@mindresearch.org

Images Courtesy of Mind Research Insittute

Los

(88)

(17)

Washington, D.C.2*


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MIND Research Institute

The success at Palomino has brought national attention. In September 2013, Executive Director Alejandra Ceja and Jaqueline Cortez-Wang of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics visited Palomino seeking to learn from the school’s innovative methods. Public-Private Partnerships Palomino is one of 14 Arizona schools that piloted ST Math thanks to a grant from Cisco. Both Palomino and another school in the pilot program have been honored by the Arizona Department of Education for their focus on innovative education methods, including their use of ST Math. As a social benefit organization, MIND Research Institute’s mission is to ensure that all students are mathematically equipped to solve the world’s most challenging problems. MIND does this through its unique visual learning software ST Math in classrooms, and through hands-on, family-friendly math experiences that extend beyond the classroom. As a social benefit organization, its shareholders are stakeholders: schools, educators, students, parents, donors, employees, corporate and nonprofit partners and the community at large. The dividends MIND pays out are improved math proficiency, increased perseverance and self-confidence, and a love of math and learning. APS Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Arizona Public Service, recently joined MIND’s supporters to improve math skills in Arizona and give all students, regardless of language proficiency or learning challenges, the tools to succeed in math.

a direct effect on their academic performance, which often results in lower proficiency scores and increased risk of dropping out of school over their non-ELL peers. MIND Research Institute’s programs helped the predominately Latino and ELL elementary student population in Santa Ana, California, effectively close the achievement gap in math. Of the 28,000 students at 36 elementary schools in Santa Ana, more than 90% are Latino and 60% are ELL students. Over the course of several years using MIND’s ST Math, students increased their math proficiency from 35% to 67% – the state average. MIND continues to expand at scale nationally with the goal of leveling the playing field and helping every child achieve their full potential. MIND’s flagship ST Math program has repeatedly shown to help schools double or triple their growth in math proficiency. Today, more than 800,000 students in 40 states use the program. Beyond the Classroom Buoyed by the success of its classroom programs and driven by its aspiration to reach every student, MIND Research Institute has launched a MathMINDs movement to shift the cultural perception of math from being scary and frustrating to exciting and essential. To do this, MathMINDs engages the community and students in hands-on mathematical experiences outside of the classroom. Through events including Family Math Night, Math Fair and Game-a-thon, MathMINDs empowers students to become future innovators who will solve the world’s most challenging problems.

Leveling the Playing Field Research shows that early math skills are the number one predictor of later academic success, including high school graduation rates and college matriculation. Early math skills outweigh early reading skills and attention in predicting later success (Duncan, et al. 2007). MIND’s ST Math program is particularly effective for English language learners. According to a study done by the University of Chicago in 2012, English-language lerner (ELL) students face the challenge of learning a new language while also attempting to master curriculum content. This has

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“Kids love it. They cannot wait to get into the computer labs, before school even, to start working with JiJi.”


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Hispanics Enrolled At Maricopa Community Colleges Accounted For One-Fourth Of All Students In Fall 2014 Hispanics Enrolled At Maricopa Community Colleges Accounted For One-Fourth Of All Students Enrolled In Fall 2014

MCCCD STUDENT PROFILE FALL MCCCD Student Profile Fall 2014*2014* - Ethnicity - ETHNICITY 3%

5% 8%

10%

Total Enrollment 128,212

48%

26%

Native American

Asian/PI

Black

Other

Hispanic

White

*Sum Of Colleges *Sum Of Colleges Source:Community Maricopa Community Colleges, As by Presented by Hidalgo EdmundoofHidalgo of March CPLC on Source: Maricopa Colleges, As Presented Edmundo CPLC on 5, March 2015.5, 2015.

More Than Half Of Hispanics Enrolled At Maricopa Community Colleges Were Women In FY 2013-2014 Latino Demographics at MCCCD for FY 2013-2014

More Than Half Of Hispanics Enrolled At Maricopa Community Colleges Were Women In FY 2013-2014

LATINO DEMOGRAPHICS AT MCCCD FOR FY 2013-2014

1% 24%

42% 57%

76% Female Latino Male Latino Unspecified

Latino Students Non-Latino Students Source: Maricopa Community Colleges, As Presented by Edmundo Hidalgo of CPLC on March 5, 2015.

Source: Maricopa Community Colleges, As Presented by Edmundo Hidalgo of CPLC on March 5, 2015.

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From FY2010-11 To FY2013-14 Hispanic Student Enrollment at Maricopa Community Colleges Increased By 4.6% From FY2010-11 To FY2013-14 Hispanic Student Enrollment at Maricopa Community Colleges Increased By 4.6%

Hispanic Student EnrollmentFOR For FY2010-11 Through FY2013-14 and Fall 2014* AND FALL 2014* MCCCD HISPANICMCCCD STUDENT ENROLLMENT FY2010-11 THROUGH FY2013-14

46,409

45,617

44,777

44,376

34,739

FY2010-11

FY2011-12

FY2012-13

FY2013-14

Fall 2014

*Unduplicated totals, each student is student countedisonly onceonly per once year within MCCCD. *Unduplicated totals, each counted per year within MCCCD. Source: MCCCD Of Office Institutional Effectiveness, June 2015June 2015 Source: Office MCCCD Of Institutional Effectiveness,

Over The Past Four Years, Hispanic Students Transferring From MCCCD Increased More Than 26% MCCCD STUDENTS TRANSFERRING TO AN ARIZONA PUBLIC UNIVERSITY WITH 12 OR MORE CREDITS FROM MCCCD

Over The Past Four Years, Hispanic Students Transferring From MCCCD Increased More Than 26% MCCCD Students Transferring to an Arizona Public University with 12 or More Credits from MCCCD

1,266

FY2010-11

1,598

1,373

1,309

FY2011-12

Hispanics

7,411

7,089

6,935

6,765

FY2012-13

All Students

Source: Office MCCCD Of Institutional Effectiveness, Source: MCCCD Of Office Institutional Effectiveness, June 2015June 2015

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In FY2013-14 Awards Conferred To Hispanics Accounted For 23% Of Total In Maricopa Community Colleges In FY2013-14 Awards Conferred To Hispanics Accounted For 23% Of Total Awards Conferred In Maricopa Community Colleges MCCCD Degrees and Certificates Conferred to Hispanics Students and All Students

MCCCD DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES CONFERRED TO HISPANICS STUDENTS AND ALL STUDENTS FY2013-14

26,860

6,141

FY2012-13

24,449

5,320

FY2011-12

23,947

4,911

FY2010-11

21,396

4,397 All Students

Hispanic

Source: MCCCD Office Of Institutional Effectiveness, June 2015

Arizona State University Had The Highest Latino Student

Arizona State University Had The Highest Latino Enrollment For State Universities For Fall 2013 Student Enrollment For State Universities For Fall 2013

Source: MCCCD Office Of Institutional Effectiveness, June 2015

Latino Student Undergraduate Enrollment in AZ State Universities and MCCCD* - Fall 2013

LATINO STUDENT UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT IN AZ STATE UNIVERSITIES AND MCCCD* - FALL 2013 33,164

MCCCD

7,714

UA

NAU

4,256 12,445

ASU

*Reported enrollment for MCCCD is “sum of colleges” because some students attend more than one MCCCD college. Source: For University Enrollment IS IPEDS Data Center Using Provisional Release Data For Fall 2013 & Maricopa Community Colleges, As Presented by Edmundo Hidalgo of CPLC on March 5, 2015. *Reported enrollment for MCCCD is “sum of colleges” because some students attend more than one MCCCD college. Source: For University Enrollment IS IPEDS Data Center Using Provisional Release Data For Fall 2013 & Maricopa Community Colleges, As Presented by Edmundo Hidalgo of CPLC Over 70% Of Latinos Attended MCCD To Either Transfer To A University Or To Enter/Advance In A Job Market on March 5, 2015.

Over 70% Of Latinos Attended MCCCD To Either Transfer To A University Or To Enter/Advance In Job Market Reason for Attending MCCCD Latino Students FY 2013-2014

REASON FOR ATTENDING MCCCD LATINO STUDENTS FY 2013-2014 40%

Transfer to University

32%

Enter/Advance in Job Market

15%

Personal Interest

9%

High School Dual-Enrollment/Concurrent

3%

Meet University Requirement Undeclared

1%

Source: Maricopa Community Colleges, As Presented by Edmundo Hidalgo of CPLC on March 5, 2015.

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Miguel Lopez Miguel Lopez knows what it means to struggle. In his senior year in high school, newly arrived from Mexico, he struggled to learn English and found himself attending North High School some days from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. to keep up with his studies and graduate on time. At Phoenix College, “I started out not understanding half of what the teachers were saying in class,” said Lopez. Two years later, Miguel graduated as the school’s valedictorian. As a transfer student at Arizona State University, he briefly flirted with quitting the prestigious Barrett Honors College because he worried he couldn’t keep up with his colleagues. He stuck with it and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting. Today, as he begins work on a Master of Accountancy degree at the W.P. Carey School of Business, Miguel knows it will not be easy, but through it all he thinks about the life’s lessons he learned from his father. “He worked very hard, all of his life,” said Lopez, “but he never talked about giving up. He would always get up in the morning with a positive attitude. Even with the recession, he always got up and went out to look for work. He taught me to have that same attitude.”

“My father starting getting sick in my second year (at ASU). He went to a lot of doctors who told him a lot of different things. They said he had diabetes, or heart disease, or maybe it was his liver.” Miguel’s mother was always by his father’s side at the hospital. “Since my dad was admitted into the hospital, my mother was always at the hospital keeping him company. She did not want to leave him alone. Seeing my mother taking care of my father with such devotion touched my heart.” In the end, his father died of heart failure, leaving Miguel to support the entire family. “It was very hard,” said Miguel. “My father was always very encouraging to me. I told him so many times I was worried school wasn’t right for me. He would say, ‘You keep going and do the best you can. If you fail, the worst thing that can happen is you try again.” Miguel still has the encouragement of his mother, who is very proud of her son. As for the year to come? “I know I’ll make it. I’m sure of it.”

A U.S. citizen since 2001, Miguel didn’t come to live in Arizona until 2010, shortly before the passage of the state’s notorious anti-immigrant legislation, Senate Bill 2010. Fearing what SB 1070 could mean for friends and family who were undocumented, Miguel said, “I had second thoughts about living here.” It was at Phoenix College, said Miguel, where he “fell into accounting” and found his calling. “That’s where I first knew I could do anything I set my mind to.”

Photos Courtesy of Miguel Lopez

A recipient of the Arizona Board of Regents’ “All Arizona” scholarship, Miguel enrolled in Arizona State University in 2013 with a full tuition waiver. Thanks to other scholarships, including a $5,000 award in 2014 from the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation, he completed his undergraduate degree debt free. He’s also had paid internships with the Hispanic Chamber and with KPMG, one of the world’s most successful accounting firms, where he’s already been promised a job upon graduation. He recently returned from a paid internship with KPMG in Kuala Lumpur. Despite his scholastic success, Miguel’s final year at ASU was marked by tragedy.

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In Phoenix, A Higher Percentage Of Hispanic Students Over 3 Years Old Are Enrolled In Kindergarten, Elementary School, And High School

In Phoenix, Hispanics Have A Higher Percentage Of Students Over 3 Years Old Enrolled In Kindergarten, Elementary School, And High School

POPULATION 3 YEARS ANDand OVER SCHOOL : PHOENIX Population 3 years overENROLLED enrolled in IN school : Phoenix 51.10% 44.60%

22.10%

24.90%

23.10% 14.40%

4.20%

3.20%

6.00%

Nursery school, preschool

6.40%

Kindergarten

Elementary school (grades 1-8)

White 2013

High school (grades 912)

Hispanic 2013

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey

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In Phoenix, Thirty Of Hispanics Had Earned Some College Credit To A Graduate Degree In Phoenix, Thirty Of Hispanics Had Earned Some College Credit To A Graduate Degree

POPULATION 25 YEARS AND OVER Population 25 years and over : Phoenix PHOENIX

42.10%

27.80%

31.10%

24.10%

21.30%

16.50%

18.40% 9.90% 6.30% 2.50%

Less than high school diploma

High school graduate (includes equivalency)

Some college or associate's degree

White 2013

Bachelor's degree

Hispanic 2013

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey

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In Tucson, A Higher Percentage Of Hispanic Students Over 3 Years Old Are Enrolled In Kindergarten, Elementary School And High School But Only Half That Of Whites At College Level In Tucson, Hispanics Have A Higher Percentage Of Students Over 3 Years Old Enrolled In Kindergarten, Elementary School, And High School But Only Half That Of Whites At College Level

POPULATION 3 YEARS AND OVER ENROLLED IN SCHOOL Population 3 years and over enrolled in school: Tucson TUCSON 45.40%

41.80%

32.50% 23.60%

22.60%

18.30%

3.50%

3.20%

5.10%

3.80%

Nursery school, preschool

Kindergarten

Elementary school (grades 1-8)

White 2013

High school (grades 912)

College or graduate school

Hispanic 2013

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey

In 2013, Nearly 70% Of The Hispanic Population In Phoenix Over 25 Earned At Least A High School Degree Compared To 88% Of Whites In 2013, Forty-Two Percent Of The Hispanic Population Tucson Over 25 Earned POPULATION 25In YEARS AND OVERA High School Degree Or Higher

Population 25 years and over : Tucson TUCSON 36.10% 31.30%

30.10%

27.80% 23.10% 16.70%

12.70%

11.50% 7.50% 3.30%

Less than high school diploma

High school graduate (includes equivalency)

Some college or associate's degree

White 2013

Bachelor's degree

Hispanic 2013

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey

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In The Tucson Unified School District (TUSD), Mexican-American Students Accounted Over 60% Of Total Students For The 2014-15 School Year

In The Tucson Unified School District (TUSD), Mexican-American Students Accounted For Over In The Tucson Unified School District (TUSD), Mexican-American Students Accounted Over 60% Of Total Students For The 2014-15 60% Of Total StudentsSchool ForYearThe 2014-15 56.2 School Year 52.2

63.6

44.2

42.5 42.5

34.4

44.2

56.2

52.2

29

34.4

6.7

2.5 4 4

2.5 1999-2000

6.7

Mexican American Mexican American

2.8 4.5

2004-2005

African American African American

21.2

7.6

7.6 2.8 4.5 2009-2010

6.7 2.7 4.1 2004-2005

1999-2000

21.2

29

6.7

2.7 4.1

63.6

4 2.1 3.7 4 2.1 3.7

2009-2010

European American European American

Native American

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Asian American

Asian American

Source: As Presented By The Arizona Hispanic Community Forum On June 4, 2015, Titled Ethics Studies In Arizona: Culturally Relevant Education.

Titled Ethics Studies In Arizona: Culturally Relevant Education.

5.5

2014-2015

Native American

Source: As Presented By The Arizona Hispanic Community Forum On June 4, 2015, Source: As Presented By The Culturally Arizona Hispanic Community Forum On June 4, 2015, Titled Ethics Studies In Arizona: Relevant Education.

5.5

Multiracial

Multiracial

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In 1818, Thomas Jefferson observed that the objects of education are “To give to every citizen the information he needs for the transaction of his own business; To enable him to calculate for himself, and to express and preserve his ideas, his contracts and accounts, in writing; To improve by reading, his morals and faculties; To understand his duties to his neighbors and country, and to discharge with competence the functions confided to him by either; To know his rights . . . . And, in general, to observe with intelligence and faithfulness all the social relations under which he shall be placed.”10

EXCERPT FROM

Designing The New American University, 2015—p54-64 A College Degree and Access to the Middle Class

an outcome of education and especially college: “The earn-

“A social chasm is opening up between those in educated

ings gap between college and high school graduates has

society and those in noneducated society,” writes David

more than doubled in the United States over the past three

Brooks.

decades.”119

117

At stake is access to the middle class—or bet-

ter, according to Carnevale and colleagues: “While it is true that the middle class is declining, a more accurate por-

However one parses the estimates of earnings differentials

trayal of the American class dynamic would be to say that

for the educated, the gist is unequivocal. The Department

the middle class is dispersing into two opposing streams

of Treasury reports that median weekly earnings for bac-

of upwardly mobile college-haves and downwardly mobile

calaureate degree holders in 2011 were 64 percent higher

college-have-nots.” Higher education represents our best

than for high school graduates: “Recent evidence suggests

hope for the advancement of both individuals and the col-

that the earnings differential observed today is higher than

lective. And indeed, the consequences of stagnation and

it has ever been since 1915, which is also the earliest year

decline in educational attainment are considerable, both

for which there are estimates of the college wage gap.”

for the individual and society. As the Carnevale report puts

The report gives evidence of the rate of growth of the earn-

it: “The implications of this shift represent a sea change

ings gap, or “skill premium”: “In 1980, a college graduate

in American society. Essentially, postsecondary education

earned 50 percent more than a high school graduate; by

or training has become the threshold requirement for ac-

2008, college graduates earned nearly twice as much as

cess to middle-class status and earnings in good times or in

those with only a high school diploma.” Differentials for

bad. It is no longer the preferred pathway to middle-class

those with advanced and professional degrees increase

jobs—it is, increasingly, the only pathway.”

David Autor

correspondingly, with recipients of master’s degrees in

points out that roughly two-thirds of the growth in the wage

2011 earning almost double and those with professional

premium in the United States between 1980 and 2005 is

degrees more than two and a half times what high school

118

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Excerpt from Designing The New American University, 2015, p54-64 graduates earn (figure 10).120 More than a decade ago,

the comparable rate for those who had only a high school

the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that baccalaureate de-

diploma was 7.6 percent (figure 11).123 “The unemploy-

gree holders earn $1.2 million more over the projected

ment rate for individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree

course of their working lives than high school graduates.

has consistently been about half the unemployment rate for

For recipients of doctoral degrees, the estimate is $3.4

high school graduates,” according to the College Board

million, and for those with professional degrees, $4.4 mil-

(figure 12).124

lion.121 “Moreover,” the Treasury report elaborates, “the earnings differential underestimates the economic benefits

Although the array of correlates of educational attainment

of higher education since college-educated workers are less

begins with its intrinsic value to the individual, the list of

likely to be unemployed and more likely to have jobs that

collateral returns to society is impressive. Well-informed

provide additional nonwage compensation (e.g., paid va-

citizens advance the democratic process and enrich their

cation, employer-provided health insurance).”

And even

communities and states. A more educated workforce gen-

during the current “jobless recovery,” educational attain-

erates greater tax revenues and influences quality-of-place

ment correlates with higher rates of employment. According

decision making.125 According to economist Enrico Moretti,

to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in September 2013, the

an increase in the percentage of college-educated workers

unemployment rate for those aged 25 and older who held

in a local workforce raises the predicted wages of the entire

baccalaureate degrees or higher was 3.7 percent, while

workforce, even those who do not have a college degree.

122

Taxes Paid Professional Degree (2%)

$36,200

$8,600

Some College, No Degree (17%)

$40,400

$29,000

$6,400

$0

$44,800

$32,900

$7,500

Less than a High School Diploma (7%) $4,100

$56,500

$45,100

$11,400

Associate Degree (11%)

$70,000

$55,200

$14,800

Bachelor's Degree (25%)

$91,000

$70,700

$20,300

Master's Degree (10%)

$102,200

$78,800

$23,400

Doctoral Degree (2%)

High School Diploma (27%)

After-Tax Earnings

$21,000

$20,000

$35,400

$25,100

$40,000

$60,000

$80,000

$100,000

$120,000

MEDIAN EARNINGS Figure 10. Median earnings and tax payments of full-time year-round workers ages 25 and older, by education level, 2011. Source: College Board, Education Pays, 2013, figure 1.1. The original caption clarifies that the dark segment in each bar represents estimated average federal, state, and local taxes paid at respective income levels. The figures specified parenthetically represent the percentage of full-time workers at each level of educational attainment. Adapted with permission of the authors.

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SECTION II

Unemployment EDUCATION CHAPTER 8 Rate  by  Educational  Attainment

Excerpt from Designing The New American University, 2015, p54-64 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Jan-10

May-10

Sep-10

Jan-11

May-11

Sep-11

Jan-12

May-12

Sep-12

Jan-13

May-13

Sep-13

Jan-14

May-14

Sep-14

Jan-15

Employment is  more  stable  for  people  with  a  Bachelor’s  degree  or  higher  education Rates  Among  no I ndividuals   25  and  Older  by  Education   evel,   Less than a high school diploma Unemployment   High school graduates, college Ages   Some college or associate Ldegree 1992-­‐2012,   Selected  Years

Bachelor's degree and higher

Source: Unemployment Rate by Educational Attainment, April 2015. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Source: Unemployment  R ate  by  Educational  Attainment,  April  2015.  B ureau  of  Labor   Statistics 16.0% 14.0% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0% 2.0% 0.0%

1992

1997

Less than a High School Diploma

2002

High School Diploma

2007

2010

Some College, No Degree

Associate Degree

2012

Bachelor's Degree or Higher

Figure 12. Unemployment rates among individuals ages 25 and older, by education level, 1992–2012. Source: College Board, Education Pays, 2013: Figure 2.1. Adapted with permission of the authors.

Source: College  B oard,  Education Pays,  2013

The rise in wages is greater for those with less education,

are more than twice as likely to do voluntary work. They

meaning that high school graduates or even dropouts bene-

are much more likely to give blood.”127

fit more from the spillover related to a highly educated workforce than college graduates.126 In addition to increased

Nearly two-thirds of the jobs coming online during the next

opportunities for more meaningful employment, higher edu-

decade will require at least some college education, ac-

cation influences lifestyle choices that correlate with better

cording to Carnevale and colleagues, and one-third will

health and greater civic participation. David Brooks offers

require a bachelor’s degree.128 More and more knowledge

the following succinct compendium of the behavioral differ-

inputs are increasingly required to perform almost any job

ences and social norms between the two strata: “Divorce

in the ever more complex global knowledge economy, and

rates for college grads are plummeting, but . . . the divorce

American research universities are the principal source of

rate for high school grads is now twice as high as that of

the advanced education that produces a skilled workforce.

college grads . . . . High school grads are twice as likely to

The economic success of individuals that is an outcome of

smoke as college grads. They are much less likely to exer-

educational attainment contributes to broad prosperity; in

cise. College grads are nearly twice as likely to vote. They

fact, it is the main driver. Without it, coming generations in

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Excerpt from Designing The New American University, 2015, p54-64 the United States and nations of Western Europe face a re-

research universities constructed on the foundations of pri-

duction in quality of life, something unheard of in the past.

vate fortunes in the late nineteenth century.130 For liberal

As a nation, we are at a critical juncture, as expressed

arts colleges and major research universities alike, these

in the following formulation from a report of the National

institutions constitute a prototype that to a remarkable ex-

Academies:

tent remains impervious to change, aloof from social needs, and, ironically, inaccessible to the majority of Americans

Without a renewed effort to bolster the foundations of

with the talent and ability to learn and compete at this

our competitiveness, we can expect to lose our privi-

level. Rather than extrapolate from or replicate historical

leged position . . . . We owe our current prosperity,

models representative of the gold standard, Arizona State

security, and good health to the investments of past

University has sought to reconstitute itself as the founda-

generations, and we are obliged to renew those com-

tional prototype for the New American University model—

mitments in education, research, and innovation poli-

an institution predicated on accessibility to an academic

cies to ensure that the American people continue to

platform underpinned by discovery and knowledge produc-

benefit from the remarkable opportunities provided by

tion, inclusiveness to a broad demographic representative

the rapid development of the global economy and its

of the socioeconomic diversity of the region and nation,

not inconsiderable underpinning in science and tech-

and, through its breadth of functionality, maximization of

nology.

societal impact.131

129

The effort to spur the competitiveness of our nation depends

The institutional vision statement sets out the basic tenets of

on a highly educated citizenry, which assumes accessibility

the reconceptualization, which are at once egalitarian in

for sufficient numbers to the sort of education provided by

terms of accessibility yet express competitive intent regard-

research-grade institutions. Public disinvestment in higher

ing the intensity of discovery and knowledge production

education is only part of the problem. The dilemma must

leading to outcomes commensurate to the needs of society:

in part be construed as a consequence of inherent limita-

“To establish ASU as the model for a New American Uni-

tions in the effectiveness of these institutions, and especially

versity, measured not by those whom we exclude, but rather

their lack of scalability. It is incumbent on public research

by those whom we include and how they succeed; pursu-

universities, which serve socioeconomically disadvantaged

ing research and discovery that benefits the public good;

and historically underrepresented students in greater num-

assuming major responsibility for the economic, social, and

bers but also advance the economic competitiveness of our

cultural vitality and health and well-being of the communi-

nation through their platforms of integrated teaching and

ty.” ASU seeks to provide broad accessibility to a milieu of

research, to scale their enterprises to promote accessibil-

world-class research and scholarship to a diverse and het-

ity to milieus of discovery and knowledge production to

erogeneous student body that includes a significant propor-

a demographic representative of the socioeconomic and

tion of students from socioeconomically differentiated and

intellectual diversity of our nation.

historically underrepresented backgrounds, including firstgeneration college applicants. While America’s leading

A Design Process for a New American University

universities, both public and private, have become increas-

Most colleges and universities in the United States define

ingly exclusive, the approach adopted by ASU has been

themselves in relation to the set of elite institutions that com-

to expand the capacity of the institution to meet enrollment

prise the putative gold standard in American higher edu-

demand to provide unmatched educational opportunities to

cation, which we delineated at the outset of this chapter:

the many gifted and creative students who do not conform

the Ivies, the great land-grant universities, and the major

to a standard academic profile, as well as to offer access

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Excerpt from Designing The New American University, 2015, p54-64 to students who demonstrate every potential to succeed but

The charter statement for the reconceptualized institution

lack the financial means to pursue a four-year undergradu-

reads as follows:

ate education at a research university. The model connects academically qualified students from a broad demographic swathe to an academic platform of unrivaled knowledge

Arizona State University is a comprehensive public research university, measured not by whom it excludes, but by whom it includes and how they succeed; advancing research and discovery of public value; and assuming fundamental responsibility for the economic, social, cultural, and overall health of the communities it serves.

production commensurate with the scale of enrollment demand. No less essential are the institution’s mission and goals, which reflect the intent of the nation’s youngest major research institution and one of the largest universities governed by a single administration to redefine its terms of engagement. The university’s four major objectives are to demonstrate leadership in academic excellence and accessibility; to establish national standing in academic quality and impact of colleges and schools in every field; to establish ASU as a global center for interdisciplinary research, discovery, and development by 2020; and to enhance local impact and social embeddedness. The objectives specified correspond to the outputs of the most highly selective public universities and must be evaluated within the context of their accomplishment by a large public university com-

The formulation expresses the commitment of the academic

mitted to drawing from the broader talent pool of socioeconomic diversity.

community to serve the state and nation as a prototype for

These overarching institutional goals are advanced by a

that provides accessibility to an academic platform un-

set of eight interrelated “design aspirations,” which may

derpinned by discovery and a pedagogical foundation of

be understood to represent ideals for institutional culture

knowledge production to a student body representative of

a New American University—a model for an institution

as well as strategic approaches to the accomplishment of

the socioeconomic and intellectual diversity of our society;

goals and objectives. More general guidelines than pre-

a research enterprise committed to discovery, creativity,

cepts, these formulations may appear merely rhetorical but

and innovation commensurate with the scale, pace, and

were intended to inspire creativity, spark innovation, and

complexity of the challenges that confront society; public

foster institutional individuation. The design aspirations

service to advance the common good, including the quality

have been variously formulated and in one iteration call for

of life and standard of living of the diverse communities of

the university to respond to its cultural, socioeconomic, and

the metropolitan region and state, as well as nationally and

physical setting; become a force for societal transformation;

internationally; and collaborative engagement construed

pursue a culture of academic enterprise and knowledge en-

globally to spur innovation across academia, business and

trepreneurship; conduct use-inspired research; focus on the

industry, and government. The university seeks the success

individual in a milieu of intellectual and cultural diversity; transcend disciplinary limitations in pursuit of intellectual

of each student regardless of socioeconomic background

fusion (transdisciplinarity); embed the university socially,

and assumes responsibility for contributing to and being

thereby advancing social enterprise development through

held accountable for the economic, social, and cultural

direct engagement; and advance global engagement.

health and well-being of the community….

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Latino Student Success

the largest, fastest-growing population group in the “ As state and nation, Latino children and students are our

future. We must put a stake in the ground to ensure that we are addressing the changing face of education. Itʼs time to take bold and decisive action.

— Paul J. Luna

Understanding the demographic, economic, and social impact of Latinos in Arizona illuminates how the choice between prosperity and peril is before us. Arizonaʼs economic future is best solidified by closing the Latino postsecondary completion gap and preparing the largest proportion of our population to be competitive in a global economy. Total population

White population

Hispanic or Latino population

A S S O C I AT E ’ S D E G R E E & H I G H E R *

President and CEO, Helios Education Foundation

35% 37 %

16%

Visit: Helios.org/LSS to learn more about Latino Student Success and view a presentation by Dr. Michael Crow entitled, “Arizonaʼs Economic Imperative: Leading the Nation in Latino Student Success”

Helios.org

* Data from the US Census Bureau, using the 2011-2013 American Community Survey 3-year estimate data (http://www.census.gov/acs/


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A Model for Innovation, Excellence and Accessibility ASU Preparatory Academy ASU Preparatory Academy (ASU Prep) is an innovative, open-enrollment, K-12 charter school serving more than 2,000 students in two principal locations: East Valley on the ASU Polytechnic campus and downtown Phoenix. Each location provides an elementary, middle and high school experience for students. ASU Preparatory schools are publicly funded, free to attend, and accept all students, space permitting. ASU Prep’s mission is to empower every student to complete college, excel in a global society and contribute to their communities. In partnership with Arizona State University, ASU Prep prepares Arizona students for success with personalized attention in a university-embedded academic program that allows students to advance as they are ready to complete more rigorous subject matter, including university courses for credit while still in high school. ASU Prep students in downtown Phoenix and the Polytechnic campus receive the same curriculum, are held to the same expectations and have achieved incredible results in recordsetting time, proving students from all socioeconomic backgrounds can achieve. Students are taught civic responsibility and work on projects that address societal issues across all grades. ASU Prep high school graduation requirements meet or exceed university entrance requirements. In May 2015, ASU Prep graduated its inaugural class of seniors realizing a 98 percent four-year graduation rate, a 76 percent fouryear university acceptance rate, with students earning more than $2 million in scholarships. One-hundred (100) percent of ASU Prep graduates are presently enrolled in a post-secondary opportunity. ASU Preparatory Academy – Phoenix The downtown location opened in 2009 and presently serves 1,200 students in grades Pre-K through 12. The student population is non-white majority, mostly Latino; and made up of 10 percent special needs and 76 percent low-income as defined by federal free and reduced lunch standards. Prior to the 2009-2010 school year, this site was an underperforming middle school that was ultimately closed and offered to external providers that were interested in “turning around” the school. Arizona State University (ASU) accepted the challenge to open a charter school that would not only serve these middle school students but expand the program to serve all elementary grades initially, and added pre-school and high school grades in 2011. In just four years, the students at ASU Prep Phoenix increased their reading and math performance by an average of 24 percent and continue to excel and improve upon prior achievement levels, closing the achievement gap and surpassing state gains.

augment teaching and learning. Besides ASU’s faculty and research, the ASU Prep-Phoenix school community also enjoys strong connections with the Phoenix Children’s Museum, the Phoenix Symphony, and the Arizona Science Center, to name a few. Students benefit from these types of partnerships by working on projects that connect their school learning to improving community experiences and outcomes, whether it is supporting the homeless or sitting on a community board to provide input on city improvement projects. ASU Preparatory Academy – Polytechnic The Polytechnic campus opened in 2008, 2 miles north of ASU’s Polytechnic campus. Presently it serves 900 students in grades Pre-K through 12 and physically resides on ASU’s Polytechnic campus, fully integrated with the university community. The student population is a white majority, although increasingly diversifying, and is comprised of 13 percent special needs students. ASU Prep Polytechnic has consistently surpassed average state achievement levels by 20 percent in reading and 28 percent in math. ASU Prep Polytechnic high school is among the top performing high schools in the state as measured by the Arizona Department of Education and has been recognized as a top high school by the Phoenix Business Journal and the Arizona Charter Schools Association. Students at this campus are integrated with the college environment, taking courses in college labs and classrooms and using the university student union and recreational facilities. Several students work hand-and-glove with university faculty on applied projects, which not only helps accelerate coursetaking in math, science and English/language arts, but also helps establish a strong STEM pipeline of future graduates and ultimately science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals. Arizona State University measures its success not by those it excludes, but by those it includes, and how they succeed. ASU Prep is an example of ASU’s commitment to access, aligning a student’s educational experience from the point they enter through college completion. By demonstrating that students from all socioeconomic backgrounds can succeed at the highest level, and sharing college preparatory-going strategies that result in increased levels of college attainment, these efforts will resonate and impact public education not just locally, but statewide and nationally.

Additionally, this campus is located in the urban core of Phoenix, which is also home to several community resourcasuprep.asu.edu/ es that provide students and faculty with rich resources to At ASU Preparatory Academy, an innovative K-12 charter school, our mission is to empower every student to complete college, excel in a global society and contribute to their communities.

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A Model for Innovation, Excellence and Accessibility ASU Preparatory Academy

At ASU Preparatory Academy, an innovative K-12 charter school, our mission is to empower every student to complete college, excel in a global society and contribute to their communities. Class of 2015 at-a-glance: First graduating class at ASU Prep.

100%

98% 98% four-year graduation rate

76%

100% admitted to post-secondary study/ military service

76% admitted into a four-year university

72% of students accepted to ASU (15% of students accepted to ASU were accepted to Barrett, The Honors College)

ASU Prep Academy Phoenix Performance 2010–14 improved achievement levels across all grades

72%

23%

24%

in Reading

in Math

3.7% overall average growth in state

3.6% overall average growth in state

Two Locations – Downtown Phoenix Mesa (Polytechnic)

Nearly 2,000 students enrolled Downtown Phoenix campus (76% Free-and-Reduced Lunch)

• Phoenix Elementary (K-5) • Phoenix Middle School (6-8)

ASU Prep Academy Polytechnic Performance 2010–14

20% in Reading

ASU Prep maintains a rigorous curriculum focused on: • Internationally acclaimed Cambridge Curriculum • Personalized student instruction • Critical thinking and project-based learning • Annual “Capstone” thesis-venture projects

28% in Math

Polytechnic campus • Polytechnic Elementary (K-6) • Polytechnic STEM Academy (7-8) • Polytechnic High School (9-12)

ASU Prep Class of 2015 students earned more than $2 million in scholarships.

Accolades • ASU Prep Polytechnic High School was named one of the top 3 charter schools – Phoenix Business Journal (2015)

• Opportunities to take ASU courses for college credit

• Top Charter Program Based on Academic Achievement – National Charter School Association

• Technology integration

• National Football League Super Bowl Legacy School – Phoenix

• STEM Academy, including FIRST Robotics, Honeywell, NASA and Siemens partnerships.

• “Investing in Innovation” (i3) grant recipient - $3 million over 5 years – U.S. Department of Education

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Images Courtesy of ASU

outpaces the state on average across all grades by

• Phoenix High School (9-12)


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Hispanic Education Insights ABOUT OYE!

of 500 general market conversations were analyzed as well to provide comparisons between ethnicity. All data was pulled between June 15th –and July 15th of 2015.

OYE! is a tool designed to bring a deeper understanding of the Hispanic consumer to brands through analysis of social conversation. OYE! not only identifies U.S. Hispanic conversation, but also analyzes the discussion based in Spanish, English or Spanglish. OYE! then derives meaning from that conversation to deliver insights on overall Hispanic use of social media as well as insights into Hispanic demographics and psychographics.

SUMMARY

Latinos express themselves primarily in English (95% of education posts) but it is not hard to see their Latino heritage through their ability to switch back and forth between English and Spanish showing off their Hispanic roots. The most popular topic found on this report was Graduation, likely due to the time span in which the data was analyzed. The topics of Major selection as well as Studying were the next most discussed.

DATA GATHERED

OYE! is a social data analysis tool. Samples of conversation on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are pulled according to the privacy and security settings on those platforms. The data reviewed is both independently generated user content as well as comments about and replies to brand/ organization content. A large sample size of data is pulled from the full universe of data available to provide statistically relevant samples of the conversation.

Instagram was the tool of choice for Hispanics on social media, with 89% of all mentions coming from this channel. Topics such as Graduation and Studying were quite popular on this forum while choice of Major was a topic most often found on Twitter.

ALL FINDINGS

IDENTIFYING HISPANICS

1. The top 3 universities mentioned by Arizona Hispanics were ASU (38%), UOP (16%) and UA (14%) with over 68% of the total conversation volume.

While the use of the Spanish language in social media is a significant indicator that someone may be Hispanic, it is not the only identifier. Other factors are leveraged to identify Hispanics: name, images, location, following (who they follow as well as who follows them) all contribute to classifying a social profile as Hispanic. OYE! has created a proprietary technology to analyze and weight these factors to determine the likelihood the creator of a given piece of content is Hispanic.

2. The topic of Graduation was the most discussed among Hispanics with 74% of all mentions and drove 59% positive sentiment. Non-Hispanics drew 70% positive sentiment for the same topic. Hispanics were found to be congratulating their family member or friend 78% of the time and expressed how thankful they were themselves to be graduating 17% of the time. Non-Hispanics however congratulated their friends/family 36% of the time and 48% were thankful for their own graduation in their post.

CONFIDENTIALITY

OYE! leverages data that is available publicly either via purchase from 3rd party vendors and/or directly from the social platforms. OYE! does not violate any individual user’s privacy at the time of data collection. All conclusions about any individual’s race, gender, language preferences, etc. is kept secure and is not shared with any 3rd party or client.

3. Of the remaining topics not including Graduation, 47% of all Hispanic conversation in the Southwest pertained to Majors, with Engineering being the most discussed. Engineering mentions owned 54% of all Majors conversation. By contrast, only 28% of the general market conversation mentioned Majors, the largest driver being mentions of a Management degree (55%).

SAMPLE SIZE

This report covers over 3,000 verified Hispanic conversations about the topic of education stemming from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). A sample

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Hispanic Education Insights 4. Specifically looking at Arizona mentions of ASU, Hispanic conversation about Majors was over 18% of total conversation. This compared to NonHispanics who mentioned Majors 17% of the time. Both were driven by mentions of the Communications degree.

tures showing his pride in attending the Ivy League school. https://instagram.com/p/4fn952ARse/ 10. A popular topic for Hispanics in the Southwest was mentions of transferring from a college to a university. 4% of all conversation (not counting graduation) pertained to Transfers which was nearly identical to general market mentions for the same topic. The top school for Hispanic transfer discussion was ASU (56%) while NAU was the most mentioned in the general market sample with over 90%.

5. Hispanic education conversations in the Southwest region were mostly found to be in English, dominating 95% of the total conversation. It was interesting to note that 4% of all mentions were Bilingual, meaning there was at least 1 word found in both Spanish and English in each post. The remaining 1% of education mentions were in Spanish. Arizona specifically had 93% conversation in English, 4% Bilingual and 2% in Spanish.

11. The majority of Southwest Hispanic conversation came from Instagram with 89% of total volume from this channel. Driving mentions were Graduation pictures (82% of Instagram). Twitter was the second leading channel with 8% of all mentions, led by discussion of Majors (24%). Finally, 3% of volume were Facebook postings driven by sharing Articles (24%) related to universities.

6. The top schools that drove Anticipation, or excitement for attending a certain school, among the Arizona Hispanic community were ASU with 52%, UA with 24% and 14% for UOP. Non-Hispanic mentions of top schools that drove Anticipation mentions were UA and NAU with 31% each, UOP with 23%, and 15% for ASU. Example posts: https://twitter.com/RodrickkJAbeyta/statuses/610921040835772416 https://twitter.com/B_raddeBorde/statuses/617157999912722432

12. Bilingual mentions in the Southwest were mostly powered by Graduations, with that topic driving 89% of all Spanglish posts. These mentions most often contained an English statement, followed by numerous hashtags of which several were written in Spanish such as: #graduacion or #orgullo. Example: https://instagram.com/p/463F2Nho_N/

7. Overall, Hispanic conversation in the Southwest had very little negative sentiment (3%), compared to 12% for Non-Hispanics. Specific to Arizona, ASU had 30% positive conversation with mentions of school experiences like joining Greek life and anticipation to attend the school. UOP drove the highest Hispanic negative sentiment with 47% and ASU delivered 11% negative sentiment, both mostly influenced by mentions of negatives stereotypes the schools are associated with respectively. With Non-Hispanics, a similar trend occurred with UOP generating 47% negative mentions, and 7% negative for ASU.

13. For Hispanics in the Southwest, out of the top 10 posts with over 300 Likes, 9 of them pertained to Graduation. Only one discussed another topic, which was Studying. Graduation: https://instagram.com/ p/4CYCKIvGR0/ Studying: https://instagram.com/p/3-gvCdytVH/ 14. Student Loans made up just 2% of the total Southwest Hispanic conversation (not counting Graduation), 15% of that being positive sentiment influenced by mentions by users of paying off their loans. Non-Hispanics mentioned Student Loans slightly more often with 3% of the total conversation, 13% of that being positive sentiment mentioning current news articles.

8. It was found that 5% of UAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total conversation included mentions of UA creating a center for Mexican Studies in collaboration with The National Autonomous University of Mexico. There were no mentions of this topic from the general market.

15. Hispanics in the Southwest were found to snap photos to show off their study habits. Of these mentions, 5% of the time they were studying for exams. 10% of those mentions were Bilingual with hashtags such as #educatedlatina or #mujerconpoder. https:// instagram.com/p/5KWpH0QHap/

9. Of Arizona conversation, Harvard was the top school mentioned outside of Arizona powered by an individual on Instagram posting multiple pic-

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Arizona State University Was The Highest Mentioned University In Social Media Arizona State University Was The Highest Mentioned University In Social Media By Arizona Hispanics Top 5 Universities Mentioned by Arizona Hispanics By Arizona Hispanics TOP 5 UNIVERSITIES MENTIONED BY ARIZONA HISPANICS 38.1%

Arizona State University

15.7%

University of Phoenix

14.4%

University of Arizona

7.3%

Northern Arizona University

7.1%

Thunderbird

17.3%

Other

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

Courtesy of

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample.

Arizona State University Hispanics Top Conversation Driver Was About Majors At 17%, In Comparison To The General Market Top Conversation Driver Which Was About News Articles at 32%

Arizona State University Hispanics Top Conversation Driver Was About Majors At 17%, In Comparison To The General Market Top Conversation Driver Which Was About News Articles at 32%

Arizona Arizona State University Top 5 State University Drivers Arizona Hispanics Top 5 Drivers - Arizona Hispanics

Arizona State University Arizona State University Top 5 Top Drivers – General 5 Drivers – GeneralMarket Market

17.24%

32% 13.79%

8.28%

17%

8.28%

13%

6.21%

Majors

Transfers

Articles

Experience Scholarships

Articles

Majors

Admissions

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

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10%

Jobs

8%

Profiles

Courtesy of


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EDUCATION

Engineering Was The Most Discussed Major By Hispanics In The Southwest, While Management Was The Most Discussed Engineering Was The Most Discussed Major By Hispanics In The Southwest, While Management Was The Most Major Discussed By The Market MajorGeneral By The General Market Major Top 5 Drivers Major Top 5Hispanic Drivers – Southwest

Major Top 5 Drivers Major Top 5 Drivers – Southwest General Market – Southwest General Market

– Southwest Hispanics

49.4%

55.1%

18.6% 7.3% Engineering

Biology

5.8%

Business

Accounting

8.8%

4.0% Management

Communications and Media

4.4%

4.4%

3.7%

Law

American Indian Studies

Business

Communications

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

Courtesy of

%, Hispanic Education Conversations In The Southwest Region Were Found To Be In English LANGUAGE USED IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION

95

Language Used InBYThe Southwest Hispanics To Discuss Education HISPANICS TO Region DISCUSSBy EDUCATION

3.7%

1.6%

At

Hispanic Education Conversations In The Southwest Region Were Found To Be In English

94.8%

English

Spanglish

%

Spanish

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

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Arizona Hispanics Specifically Had 93%IN OfARIZONA EducationBY Related Conversations In English LANGUAGE USED HISPANICS

DISCUSS EDUCATION Language Used InTO Arizona By Hispanics To Discuss Education

Arizona Hispanics Specifically Had

2.2%

4.3%

93

%

Of Education Related Conversations In English

93.5%

English

Spanglish

Spanish

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

Courtesy of

Over Half Of Arizona Hispanics University Anticipation Was Driven By Arizona State University, Over Half Of Arizona Hispanics University Anticipation Was Driven By Arizona State University, In In Comparison To The General Market at 15% Comparison To The General Market at 15% Top Schools That DroveANTICIPATION Anticipation InINArizona TOP SCHOOLS THAT DROVE ARIZONA 52.4%

Arizona State University

15.4% 23.8%

University of Arizona

30.8% 14.3%

University of Phoenix

Northern Arizona University

23.1% 4.8% 30.8% Hispanic

General Market

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

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Overall, Hispanic Conversation In The Southwest Had Very Little Negative Sentiment (3%), Overall, Hispanic Conversation In The Southwest Had Very Little Negative Sentiment (3%), Compared For Non-Hispanics Compared ToTo12% 12% For Non-Hispanics Sentiment About Higher Education In The Southwest Region

SENTIMENT ABOUT HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION

50.7%

46.3%

44.9%

43.6%

11.5% 3.0% Positive

Neutral

Hispanic

Negative

General Market

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

Courtesy of

Mentions In The Southwest Were Mostly Powered By Graduation, With That Topic Driving 89% Of All Spanglish Posts Bilingual Mentions in the Regions REGION BILINGUAL MENTIONS IN Southwest THE SOUTHWEST

2.52%

Bilingual Mentions In The Southwest Were Mostly Powered By Graduation, With That Topic Driving

0.84%

7.56%

89

%

89.08%

Of All Spanglish Posts Graduation

Studying

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

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10% of Studying Mentions In Social Media In TheIN Southwest Region Were In Spanglish LANGUAGE USED By BYHispanics HISPANICS THE SOUTHWEST Language Used by Hispanics in the Southwest Region Mentioning REGION MENTIONING STUDYING Studying

%

4.7% 10.5%

of Studying Mentions In Social Media By Hispanics In The Southwest Region Were In Spanglish

84.9%

English

Spanglish

Spanish

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

Courtesy of

Southwest Region Hispanics Had A 15% Positive Sentiment About Student Loans, In Comparison Southwest Region Hispanics Had A 15% Positive Sentiment About Student Loans, In Comparison To 13% Of To 13% Of The General The General Market Market Student Loans Sentiment in the Southwest Region STUDENT LOANS SENTIMENT IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION 86.7% 76.92%

15.38% 13.3%

7.69% 0%

Neutral

Positive

Hispanic

Negative

General Market

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

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Graduation Was The Most Discussed Topic Among Hispanics Graduation Was The Most Discussed Among Hispanics With 74% Of59% All Mentions And Drove 59% Positive Sentiment, While NonWith 74% Of Topic All Mentions And Drove Positive Sentiment, Hispanics Drew 70% Positive Sentiment For The Same Topic While Non-Hispanics Drew 70% Positive Sentiment For The Same Topic Graduation Sentiment GRADUATION SENTIMENT

69.7% 58.8%

39.7% 27.3%

1.5% Positive

Neutral

Hispanic

3.0%

Negative

General Market

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

Courtesy of

Hispanics Congratulated Their Friends/Family 78% Of The Time, Non-Hispanics Congratulated Hispanics Congratulated TheirWhile Friends/Family 78% Of The Time, While Non-Hispanics Congratulated TheirTheir Friends/Family 36% Of The Time Friends/Family 36% Of The Time Graduation – Congratulating Their Family Member Of Friend And Thankful For Own Graduation GRADUATION – CONGRATULATING THEIR FAMILY MEMBER OR FRIEND AND THANKFUL FOR OWN GRADUATION 77.8% Congratulations

48.5%

16.9% Thankful

36.4% Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

Hispanic

General Market

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CONSUMER EDUCATION CHAPTER 8 DEMOGRAPHICS The Majority Of Southwest Hispanic Education Conversations Came From Instagram With 89% Of Total Volum Channel Media Channels Used By Hispanics In The Southwest Region

MEDIA CHANNELS USED BY HISPANICS IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION

The Majority Of Southwest Hispanic Education Conversations Came From Instagram With 89% Of Total Volume From This Channel

3.1%

8.2%

88.7%

Facebook

Instagram

Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT).

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Twitter Courtesy of


Our Vision To make America stronger by empowering Latino entrepreneurs to grow large businesses through entrepreneurship research, education, and

networks. Our ultimate goal is to grow the American economy by doubling the

SLEI Database & Research. SLEI has built the largest database of Latino Owned Businesses (LOBs) in the USA, with close to 1.4 million records and the largest known panel with 2,400 Latino business owners.The research program is a series of studies studying, among other topics, the characteristics of successful Latino entrepreneurs, key dimensions of the Latino entrepreneurial process, and characteristics of the ecosystem unique to Latino entrepreneurs. Our First Annual Survey of LOBs was conducted by Dr. Doug Rivers, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political science at Stanford University.

SLEI Fellows Program. The Fellowship program is an investment in Latino business owners to improve their ability to scale their business through an immersive 6-week program that provides education, networks, mentorship, and access to capital. 80 Fellows are chosen from a large pool of applicants from the 10 highest LOB density regions around the USA.

Engagement. This nationwide program has been developed to unlock the potential of Latino networks through the creation of an online entrepreneur engagement platform where Latino entrepreneurs, mentors, and capital providers can engage.

1Â 650 666 0079 3430 West Bayshore Road, Suite 104, Palo Alto, CA 94303 latinoei.org slei.us

Remy Arteaga Executive Director, SLEI


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Emerging Business Leaders Initiative The Challenge The intrinsic links between Arizona’s education system and its economic destiny are tied in large part to a major, ongoing cultural and demographic shift driven by the state’s fastgrowing Latino population (slated to reach majority status in the next generation). Today, more than 50 percent of state’s public school students in K-8 and the largest group of the Arizona’s high school graduates are Latino.

In an oft-cited, highly respected study, “Dropped,” the Morrison Institute for Public Policy at ASU concluded the overall economic success of Arizona may depend on the ability of our state’s policy leaders to address the persistent educational achievement gap between Latino and non-Latino students.

Emerging Business Leaders Initiative

AZHCC SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS STUDY ABROAD

COLLEGE SUCCESS ARIZONA SERVICES

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Emerging Business Leaders Initiative A Model Partnership The success of Arizona’s workforce depends on how ready it is to meet the challenges of an economy in which 64 percent of the jobs nationwide by 2020 will require a college degree or career certificate after high school. Fixing this problem requires leadership and participation from all segments of the community and the willingness and capacity to partner in new and innovative ways.

Addressing today’s growing, real-world workforce conditions is the inspiration behind the Emerging Business Leaders Initiative (EBLI), a groundbreaking, model partnership between the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (AZHCC), Helios Education Foundation (Helios); Arizona Community Foundation (ACF); Arizona Public Service (APS); and College Success Arizona (CSA).

What makes the partnership unique is its complete, wraparound approach to education, career preparedness and workforce development. • How the EBLI Partnership Works • The Helios Education Foundation has provided a $150,000 financial contribution to fund post-secondary scholarships. • Arizona Public Service provided a $250,000 contribution to fund the Ed and Verma Pastor Scholarship Fund to support students pursuing STEM degrees. • The Arizona Community Foundation, applying its advanced technological platform, manages, invests and administers HEF’s and APS’s generous contributions as part of the existing ACF-AZHCC Foundation Scholarship Fund partnership. • The AZHCC Foundation directs the recruitment and selection of EBLI $5,000 scholarship recipients, and then provides them with internship opportunities at the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and with corporate partners and small business members. • College Success Arizona provides a wide range of vital support services to help ensure EBLI Scholars succeed in their pursuit of higher education. Among CSA’s services are orientation and coaching sessions, hands-on training and workshops, financial

aid advice, peer counseling, graduation and academic schedule planning, and networking and connectivity to on-campus resources, all designed to provide EBLI Scholars with a vital support system along the way. According to CSA, “It is paramount that students not only go to college, but succeed once they are there.” EBLI Scholars sign an oath pledging their commitment to complete their education and do what they can to assist others like them in the future. EBLI Scholars will be tracked after graduation and recruited to mentor incoming EBLI scholars as part of its pay-it-forward experience. The AZHCC Foundation partners with the Telemundo Phoenix Hispanic Business Salute in an annual luncheon ceremony recognizing small business leaders and AZHCC business scholarship recipients. In 2014, more than $36,000 in scholarships was presented to deserving students at the Hispanic Business Salute luncheon. The pipeline of high schoolers interested in pursuing higher education is cultivated via the AZHCC’s sponsorship of the Youth Entrepreneurs Academy, known as YEA!, which trains students to create their own small businesses and encourages them to pursue higher education.

EBLI Goals The primary goal of the Emerging Business Leaders Initiative is to improve the quality of the state’s workforce by providing qualified, low-income Latino students with scholarships that make it possible for them to acquire a post-secondary education at an Arizona university or community college. EBLI’s holistic approach helps ensure that participating Latino students achieve their long-term educational and professional goals. The initiative is based on the fact-based philosophy that a student’s success during and after college depends on far more than simple monetary support. Once graduated, EBLI Scholars can benefit from real-world links to professional employment networks, such as those provided by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s business membership base and exposure to best practices that prepare students for future careers.

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Emerging Business Leaders Initiative Addendums I. EBLI Scholar’s Oath As a recipient of an Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Emerging Leaders Scholarship, I _________________ _______________ pledge to: • • • •

• •

II. EBLI Internship Academy As part of the Emerging Business Leaders Initiative, the AZHCC Internship Academy serves as a gateway from higher education to professional careers. Our goal is to create successful professionals by exposing students to bestpractices in the business world.

Pursue my career and live my life with honesty and integrity Respect the rights and dignity of all people Balance my personal and professional growth Work in support of prosperous, sustainable and compassionate communities for the benefit of all people Serve as a role model for the next generation of emerging business and community leaders Collaborate with fellow leaders to support the betterment of our society

I make this pledge in the spirit of paying forward the help I have received in pursuit of my professional and personal advancement.

Objectives Provide undergraduate and graduate students with a high-level understanding of and exposure to best practices in a business culture. Prepare students for career choice selection and increase their competitiveness upon entry into the workforce. Develop a new professional talent pool from which corporate partners and members will recruit.

M1 - Shadow M2 - Model M3 - Visit

In month 1, participants will be introduced to business by functional verticals through ‘shadowing’ managers i.e. Director, Member Programs

M4 - Manage M5 - Change M6 - Direct

Upon return from corporate visit, intern will design strategy to implement and ‘manage’ best practice into AZHCC organizational culture

Provides an opportunity to select a specialty area and ‘model’ leadership in one vertical Interns will ‘visit’ with one corporate partner of choice for four to six weeks to learn one effective best practice

Students will benchmark ‘change’ and determine key performance indicators Seasoned interns will train new interns either directly (Jan-Jun) or through directional business tools (Jun-Nov) - PAY IT FORWARD!

Interning at the AZHCC has been one of the most professionally rewarding experiences in my career. At the chamber, I was exposed to many different business functions including business development, finance, event planning, information systems, and marketing. Thanks to my experience at the chamber, I am confident to say that I have a clear idea of the operations required to make a business succeed. The work culture at the chamber is family oriented. Since the moment I became an intern, I was treated not only as a new member of the team but as a new member of the AZHCC family. I encourage young professionals to intern at the AZHCC. — Miguel Lopez, ASU Graduate

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breakthrough resource TheThe breakthrough resource for for entire career journey youryour entire career journey The Phoenix Career Guidance combines The Phoenix Career Guidance System™System™ combines cutting-edge tools withcareer expertcontent career content to cutting-edge tools with expert to you get where want —ait’s like a help youhelp get where you wantyou to be — to it’sbe like personalized GPS for your career. personalized GPS for your career.

Try itattoday at phoenix.edu. Try it today phoenix.edu.

© 2015 University of Phoenix, Inc. All rights reserved | CC-4491 © 2015 University of Phoenix, Inc. All rights reserved | CC-4491

U.S. Hispanics And Asians Will Drive The Largest Growth Notes Of Buying Power For Single Minorities 2013-2018

NOTES

NOTES 1/2 Page horizontal PDF 1/2 Page horizontal PDF

Projected Percentage Change in Total, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic Buying Power for U.S., 2012-2017

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OUTPUT AT 100%

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PROJECT NUMBER CC-4491 PROJECT NAME El Paso Career Fair Half Page - Ad PROJECT NAME El Paso Career Fair Half Page - Ad CONSUMER NOTES CHAPTER 8 DEMOGRAPHICS TRIM APS Yes No MARCOM n/a TRIM n/a APS Yes No MARCOM LIVE 7.25″w x 4.25″h AUDIENCE National ART DIRECTOR LIVE 7.25″w x 4.25″h AUDIENCE National ART DIRECTOR BLEED n/a Regional PROJECT MGR BLEED n/a Regional PROJECT MGR COLORS 15% K Coated, K COPYWRITER COLORS 15% K Coated, K COPYWRITER PROOFREADER PROOFREADER PRINT PROD PROD Origin, United States, Projected Change in Buying Power, By Race andPRINT Hispanic STUDIO cz STUDIO cz

OUTPUT AT 100%

PROJECT NUMBER Source: Hispanic Market Weekly, Vol. 17, Issue 41, October 21, 2013CC-4491


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Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA!) Phoenix Championed by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation, the Young Entrepreneur’s Academy (YEA!) Phoenix ) program is helping to create the next generation of educated, motivated, and successful business owners. The after-school, seven-month program prepares a specially selected cohort of local high school students to plan, pitch and launch real business enterprises. Founded in 2004 at the University of Rochester with support from the Kauffman Foundation, YEA! serves thousands of students nationwide every year. In 2011, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation became a national sponsor to help celebrate the spirit of enterprise among tomorrow’s future leaders. Nationally, there are over 94 YEA! programs with plans to expand to over 114 sites by 2016.

During the 2014/2015 YEA! Phoenix academic year, 18 students were selected based on an application, essay answers, transcripts, recommendation letters and a personal interview. All 18 students accepted were Latino and 16 of them considered low-income and qualified for scholarships to enroll in YEA!. The students meet on the campus of Phoenix College.

lence in communication as they prepare to pitch their business ideas to a panel of live investors, “Shark Tank” style. During the time they are in preparation for their turn to pitch, they are also introduced to and connected with successful local CEOs and guest speakers who broaden their perspectives and bring the wisdom and experience of real world application into the classroom.

Creating the Next Generation of Leaders The YEA! Program is dedicated to connecting the next generation of entrepreneurs and the business community they will one day lead. The students work through the process of exploring business ideas and solutions to social problems in their community to develop their own business idea. These ideas are then put into reality through the development of a thorough business plan with the assistance of dedicated community business mentors. The student business owners further develop skills of personal presentation and excel-

At the pitch competition, students have only six minutes to present their business information and persuade the panel of judges to grant them their requested seed money. This is done on a stage, in front of a large presentation screen and a full audience of 100 to 150 people. The experience has a lifelong, confidence-building effect on our students.

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Image Courtesy of Young Entrepreneurs Academy

The YEA! Phoenix program is the first and only YEA! program in Arizona. It is managed by Lynda Bishop, MPC, CEC, an experienced business owner, leadership development expert and mentor, who originally launched the YEA! Phoenix program in Arizona in 2012.


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Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA!) Phoenix fashion figures with their outfits. In addition, Alexis has a passion for business and has been accepted to ASU to study Business Management in Fall 2015. Partnering for the Future For the past twelve years, across the country, YEA! students have been leading their peer groups in paving the way to success. In a climate of national concern over educational outcomes, 100 percent of YEA! students have graduated from High School on time and ninety-nine percent of academy graduates enroll in college. YEA! students across the nation have been awarded millions of dollars in scholarships as a result of their involvement in YEA! Nationally, forty-nine percent of YEA! students are female and 56% of students are under-represented minorities. In the Phoenix class last year, 68% of students were female and 100% of them were under-represented minorities.

Beyond the Pitch Upon receiving seed money, the students shift gears and prepare for a public tradeshow event where they try their hand at promoting their new business and marketing in the real world. It is at this time that the students also register their businesses with the Secretary of State’s office, open checking accounts and prepare to turn their efforts into profits. Thirteen students graduated and nine businesses were registered with the Secretary of State from the 2014/2015 cohort: Twice As Nice Apparel, Paw Planners, Tech Recon, Success!, Build Your Fit, Sweet Events, Friendz Online, First Impressions and La Lavande Réve. Websites are currently being completed by the students with the assistance of program partner, NewTek – The Small Business Authority. Graduation is an exciting event to cap out the year, but it doesn’t end there. Each student moves out of our program with a registered, funded, profitable business and an impressive and growing business community network. The experience the students have and create in this program serves as a strong influence on college entrance and scholarship applications to keep them moving toward a bigger, brighter, bolder future. The top business created by the 2014/2015 cohort, Twice As Nice Apparel, was selected by the panel of investors which included Google, Sam’s Club and InfusionSoft. Alexis Loaiza is the CEO of Twice As Nice Apparel, which creates custom, reversible fashionable clothing for young women, 15 -25. Loaiza is passionate about creating unique and affordable clothing for young women who do not want to sacrifice style while on a budget. As a senior, she attends the Fashion Design Program of Metro Tech High School. She enjoys sewing and altering clothing as well as drawing

For more information, contact Lynda Bishop at lynda@yeaphx.org or 623-215-6587.

www.yeaphx.org www.yeausa.org Facebook/YEAPHX

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Photo Courtesy of Young Entrepreneurs Academy

With this kind of success at hand, YEA! has grabbed the attention of many great partners eager to create a stronger future for Arizona. The Arizona Community Foundation (ACF) stepped up as the premier partner of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in 2015 to ensure that the YEA! Phoenix program stays in Arizona and continues to grow. Along with 49 generous volunteers who gave their time and expertise, the students of YEA! Phoenix also received encouragement and financial support from strong local community partners such as Sam’s Club, Southwest Airlines, Google, Infusionsoft, Nielsen, MS Awareness, CKS Advisors, ACF Latina Giving Circle Fund, Orchard Medical Consulting, Splash Marketing, Dress for Success, Streetcar Mercantile, The Arizona Diamondbacks, Dream Dinners, Walmart, Kolbe Corp and Univision.


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“I congratulate the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce on the release of its 19th Annual DATOS report. At United Way, we want to achieve the aspirations we all share: a good education for our kids, a roof over our heads and the stability of financial independence. DATOS provides us with the tools and insights to help build a stronger community for us all to raise our families and to do business.” —Merl Waschler, President and CEO, Valley of the Sun United Way

Hit Hard By Recession, Hispanics Poised To Be Half Of New Homeowners Between 2010 And 2020 Traditionally, the “American Dream” has included homeownership.

a harder time of coming up with the needed down payment to purchase a home because of overall lower income earnings. Making matters worse, several state and federal investigations

Still, for too many American Latinos owning a home remains a dream unfulfilled.

in recent years have uncovered discriminatory loan practices aimed at Hispanics by the major banking institutions.

While it’s true that a growing number of Hispanics now own their homes, the rate of Hispanic homeownership nationwide continues to lag the general population and has even dropped in recent years.

At the same time, the market potential of Hispanic homeownership remains strong because the Latino population overall is continuing to grow at a very rapid pace. While the rate of homeownership among Hispanics has re-

In 2000, 46 percent of Hispanic households in the United States were homeowners. In 2014, that figure dropped slightly to 45.5 percent, according to the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals (NAHREP). The rate of Hispanic homeownership nationally peaked at nearly 50 percent in 2008 and 2009 just before the crash in the economy.

cently decreased, the Hispanic population, which stands at about 17 percent of the nation’s total population, is predicted to account for 40 to 50 percent of all new households between now and 2020. Largely because of this fast population growth, a 2014 study by the Urban Institute predicted Latinos will account for 55.5 percent of new homeowners between

“Hispanics were hit especially hard by the financial crisis and housing crash, and the outlook for home ownership is uncertain,” said Louise Keely, president of The Demand Institute, a non-profit, non-partisan group that researches consumer trends.

2010 and 2020. Other signs of the Hispanic population’s potential for homeownership, according to NAHREP: an increase in the average Hispanic family incomes and the overall boom in Hispanic purchasing power, which is expected to grow nationally from

One major barrier to Hispanic homeownership is a lack of access to credit. In a 2015 NAHREP survey of the 100 top Latino real estate agents in the nation, 60 percent of the respondents said the “top barrier” to Hispanic homeownership is a lack of access to credit. While the tightening credit market for aspiring home purchasers has impacted the entire market, it has had a disproportionately negative affect on Hispanics, a population

$1.5 trillion this year to nearly $2 trillion in 2020. In Arizona, meanwhile, Hispanic homeownership is thriving. In 2013, among Hispanics statewide, about 64 percent of Latino households were owner-occupied and 36 percent were renter occupied. Nationwide, only 47 percent of Hispanic households were owner-occupied and 53 percent were renteroccupied.

that was harder hit by the Great Recession but has always had

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In 14 Years, Hispanic Home Ownership Experienced Year In 14 Years, Hispanic Ownership Experienced Over YearAt Growth Except Of 2 Over YearHome Growth Except 2YearYears Height Recession Years At Height Of Recession HISPANIC OWNED HH (000)

Hispanic Owned HH (000) 8,000

YEAR 6,810 6,668 6,756

7,000

5,852

6,000

6,095

6,321 6,303 6,319 6,253 6,196

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

5,448 5,172 4,912

5,000

4,497 4,242

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

0

RATE OF HOMEOWNERSHIP PERCENT

2000

2003

2006

2009

2012

NUMBER OF HISPANIC OWNER HOUSEHOLDS UNITS IN THOUSANDS

ANNUAL CHANGE IN THE NUMBER OF HISPANIC OWNER HOUSEHOLDS

2001

47.3%

2002

47.0%

2003

46.7%

47.3%

4,497

+255

47.0%

4,912

+425

2004

48.1%

46.7%

5,172

+260

2005

49.5%

48.1%

5,448

+276

2006

49.7%

49.5%

5,852

+404

2007

49.7%

49.7%

6,095

+243

2008

49.1%

49.7%

6,303

+208

2009

48.4%

49.1%

6,319

+16

2010

47.5%

48.4%

6,253

-63

2011

46.9%

47.5%

6,196

-56

2012

46.1% 46.1% 45.4%

46.9%

6,321

+125

2013

46.1%

6,668

+347

2014

46.1%

6,756

+88

45.4%

6,810

+54

Hispanics Have A Strong Enthusiasm For Homeownership • “Nearly half of Hispanic renters (48 percent) say now is a good time to buy a home.” • “Of those who did make home purchases in 2014, Millennials represented the largest group with 32% of all buyers. Hispanics account for more than one in five Millennials.” Source: NAHREP State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2014 nahrep.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership

254

46.0%

4,242

Report, 2014 https://www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report

A Z

2000

46.0%

Source: NAHREP State of Hispanic Report, Source:Homeownership NAHREP State of2014 Hispanic Homeownership www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report

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In 2014, The Number Of Hispanic Households Grew By 320,000 Accounting For In 2014, The Number Of Hispanic Households Grew By 320,000 Accounting For 40% Of Total U.S. Household Growth 40% Of Total U.S. Household Growth TOTAL Total U.S. U.S.HOUSEHOLD HouseholdGROWTH Growth

40%

60%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: NAHREP State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2014 Source: NAHREP State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2014 http://www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report

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Hispanics Continue To Surpass The National Percentage Growth Of Owner Households In The U.S. Hispanics Continue To Surpass The National Percentage Growth Of Owner Households In The U.S. 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0% 2.0% 0.0% -2.0%

2001

2002

2003

2004

All

2005

2006

2007

2008

Hispanic

2009

2010

2011

A Z 255

2013

2014

Non-Hispanic

Source: US Census Bureau, Homeownership Data, Fourth Quarter 2014 www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report Source: US Census Bureau, Homeownership Data, Fourth Quarter 2014 http://www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report

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Hispanic Homeownership Growth Depends On: • • • • • •

Consistent access to reasonably priced, low down payment mortgages An increase in affordable housing inventory Improved access to homebuyer education and counseling Balanced consumer protection laws Public policy that favors homeownership outcomes A more diverse and culturally competent housing workforce

Source: NAHREP State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2014 www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report

The Hispanic Average Annual Increase Rate Is Approximately 12 Times Greater Than The Non-Hispanic Rate The Hispanic Average Annual Increase Rate Is Approximately 12 Times Greater Than The Non-Hispanic Rate Growth In Owner-OccupieZd Units in the U.S.

Average Annual Increase

AVERAGE ANNUAL INCREASE

Growth In OwnerOccupied Units in the U.S.

3.5%

0.3% Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

Source: NAHREP State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2014 Source: NAHREP State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2014 https://www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report

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Two-Thirds Of Hispanics State That They Would Likely Buy A Home Rather Than Rent Family Is The Main Motivator To Purchase A House For 93% Of Those Hispanics

Two-Thirds Of Hispanics State That They Would Likely Buy A Home Rather Than Rent

93%

Family Is The Main Motivator To Purchase A House For 93% Of Those Hispanics

86% 84%

Family

Community Engagement

Wealth & Investment

Source: NAHREP State of Homeownership Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2014 Source: NAHREP State of Hispanic Report, 2014 https://www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report www.scribd.com/doc/259940689/2014-State-of-Hispanic-Homeownership-Report

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Owner-Occupied Arizona Hispanic Households Surpass National Figures Owner-Occupied Arizona Hispanic Households Surpass National Figures Tenure for Hispanic Households U.S. and Arizona, 2013 TENURE FOR for HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS

53.2%

FOR U.S. AND ARIZONA, 2013

52.5%

47.5%

46.8%

United States

Arizona

Owner Occupied

Renter Occupied

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2009-2013 5-Year American Community Survey

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2009-2013 5-Year American Community Survey factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_5YR_B25003I&prodType=table http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_5YR_B25003I&prodType=table

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U.S. Hispanic Owner-Occupied Households In Arizona Slightly Outweigh Renter-Occupied Homes U.S.OWN Hispanic Owner-Occupied Households In Arizona Slightly Outweigh TO Renter-Occupied Homes VS. RENT FOR ALL HOUSEHOLDS COMPARED HOUSEHOLDS

WITH HISPANIC LATINO HOUSEHOLDERS Tenure for All Households ComparedOR to Households with Hispanic or Latino 2013 Householders, 2013 Owner Occupied

65%

64%

63%

53% 47%

53% 47%

Hispanic

United States

Total

63%

37%

Hispanic

Total

Arizona

Hispanic

Source: Census Bureau, 5-Year 2009-2013 5-Year American Community Survey Source: U.S. CensusU.S. Bureau, 2009-2013 American Community Survey*MSA = Metropolitan Statistical Area *MSA = Metropolitan Statistical Area factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table

257

Total

Hispanic

Tucson MSA

10

http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table

A Z

46% 37%

Phoenix-MesaGlendale MSA

DATO S

54%

49%51%

36%

35%

Total

Renter Occupied

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Growth In Home Purchases PHOENIX DMA

LIFE-CHANGING SITUATIONS STIMULATE HOME PURCHASES

Hispanics Are Key For Future Home Ownership Growth In Phoenix

Hispanic Represent

39

%

Of All New Homeowners Added To The Phoenix DMA 2015-2020 Source: Geoscape. American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System (GIS) “The data herein contained will be used exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any other use must be explicitly licensed from Geoscape”

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HISPANIC OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING UNITS PROJECTED GROWTH 2015-2020

In the Next 5 Years, Phoenix Will Add More Than

28,200 Hispanic Homeowners

Source: Geoscape. American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System (GIS) “The data herein contained will be used exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any other use must be explicitly licensed from Geoscape”

Hispanic Homeownership In Phoenix Will Grow At More Than TripleThe Rate Of Non-Hispanic Homeownership Source: Geoscape. American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System (GIS) “The data herein contained will be used exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any other use must be explicitly licensed from Geoscape”

Homeownership Projected Growth 2015-2020 Homeownership Projected Growth 2015-2020

14.3%

4.3%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Geoscape. American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System (GIS) “The data herein contained

Source: American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence Systemuse (GIS)must “The data herein contained will befrom used exclusively for advertising /media will beGeoscape. used exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any other be explicitly licensed Geoscape” decisions related to Univision. Any other use must be explicitly licensed from Geoscape”

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Growth In Home Purchases TUCSON DMA

Source: Geoscape. American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System (GIS) “The data herein contained will be used exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any other use must be explicitly licensed from Geoscape”

Hispanics Are Key For Future Home Ownership Growth in Tucson

Representing

51.1

%

Of All New Homeowners Added To The Tucson DMA Between 2015-2020 Source: Geoscape. American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System (GIS) “The data herein contained will be used exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any other use must be explicitly licensed from Geoscape”

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HISPANIC OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING UNITS PROJECTED GROWTH 2015-2020

In the Next 5 Years, Tucson Will Add More Than

9,500 Hispanic Homeowners

Source: Geoscape. American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System (GIS) “The data herein contained will be used exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any other use must be explicitly licensed from Geoscape”

Hispanic Homeownership In Tucson Will Grow At Triple The Rate Of Non-Hispanic Homeownership Hispanic Homeownership In Tucson Will Grow At Triple The Rate Of Non-Hispanic Homeownership

HOMEOWNERSHIP PROJECTED GROWTH 2015-2020

Homeownership Projected Growth 2015-2020 12.5%

4.1%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Geoscape. American Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System (GIS) “The data herein contained

Source: Marketscape DataStream 2015 Series. Produced by the Geoscape ® Intelligence System “The herein contained willfrom be used exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any will Geoscape. be used American exclusively for advertising /media decisions related to Univision. Any other use(GIS) must bedata explicitly licensed Geoscape” other use must be explicitly licensed from Geoscape”

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Communities are like families

When everyone comes together, wonderful things can happen. This event is the result of a lot of hard work by many talented people. The spirit of community is alive and well, right here and now. DATOS, you represent the heart and soul of true community.

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Five Years Later, Arizona Still Struggling To Heal Scars Of SB 1070 The 2014 “State of the Latino Family” nationwide survey by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation asked 1,000 respondents: “Where do you think Latinos encounter racism the most?”

charges for failing to implement a judge’s plan to prevent his deputies from racially profiling Latinos. President Obama’s effort to provide legal status for about 6 million more undocumented immigrants drew a lawsuit from 26 Republican attorneys general. Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich has challenged a federal court ruling that allows young undocumented immigrants awarded a temporary reprieve from deportation by presidential executive order to acquire driver’s licenses. Brnovich, a Republican elected last fall, has also appealed a state court ruling allowing the same category of undocumented immigrants involved in the federal driver’s license case to pay in-state tuition at public colleges and universities as long as they can show proof of residency in the state.

While most people might have provided an answer like “on the job” or “at school” or “in encounters with police,” the single largest group of survey participants, 21 percent, offered this unsolicited response: “Arizona.” While the great majority of people who live here, including Latinos, are unlikely to characterize Arizona as blatantly racist, it would be disingenuous at best to deny that the fallout of Gov. Jan Brewer’s decision in 2010 to sign Senate Bill 1070 into law was that it painted the state as “the new Alabama”—an unflattering reference to that state’s scarred legacy of racism against African Americans and other minorities.

The immigration debate has again become a hot topic in the presidential campaign.

At the time of its passage, SB 1070 was considered the toughest, state-based legislative effort to crackdown on illegal immigration in the nation, though, ironically, Alabama quickly passed an even tougher immigration bill. In the years since, proponents of Arizona’s anti-immigrant agenda have faced major setbacks. Nearly every major provision of SB 1070 was overturned in the federal courts. Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who is running for reelection, and his deputies were found guilty of racially profiling Latinos during traffic stops. The author of SB 1070 in the Arizona Legislature, then Sen. President Russell Pearce, was recalled from office, and then defeated in his bid for reelection. Gov. Brewer, who left office in January, was replaced by Gov. Doug Ducey, who is working to rebuild economic ties with Mexico, home to most of Arizona’s immigrant population.

GOP candidate Donald Trump, a billionaire businessman from New York, has labeled undocumented immigrants from Mexico “rapists” and called for the mass deportation of the nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants, while pledging to let “the good ones” back into the United States. Trump’s comments about Mexicans drew strong condemnation from fellow Republicans, Jeff Flake and John McCain, Arizona’s U.S. Senators, while a campaign stop in the state by Trump managed to draw about 4,500 ardent supporters to the Phoenix Convention Center. Sheriff Arpaio, despite his trouble with the courts, introduced Trump, and former Sen. Pearce applauded the billionaire’s speech from the front row during the rally. Outside of the convention center, hundreds of protesters chanted “Dump Trump” and labeled his comments about Mexican immigrants as openly racist, while a national survey conducted soon after the rally found Mr. Trump leading in the race for the GOP presidential nomination.

Despite these developments, immigration remains a controversial topic in the state, primarily because the question of how to address the presence of the nation’s 11.5 million undocumented immigrants—about 350,000 live in Arizona—remains unresolved. The U.S. Senate passed a far-reaching immigration bill with bipartisan support in 2013, but efforts to put together companion legislation in the House were killed by Tea Party Republicans.

Responding to another question in the 2014 Kellogg Foundation survey of Latino families, 73 percent of the participants said “anti-Latino” and “anti-immigrant” attitudes had either stayed “about the same” or were “getting worse” in the previous five years.

High-profile court cases have also kept immigration in the media spotlight.

The Kellogg survey was conducted long before Mr. Trump announced his bid for the presidency.

At the federal level, Sheriff Arpaio has faced contempt of court

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“Arizona Is Where Hispanics Encounter Racism The Most” According To A 2014 National “ARIZONA Is Where Hispanics Encounter Racism The Most” Kellogg Foundation Survey Of Hispanics According To A 2014 National Kellogg Foundation Survey Of Hispanics 21%

Arizona

18%

Work

8%

Other Specific States

5%

Everywhere Store/Restaurant/Social Setting

4%

Law Enforcement / Police

4%

Other

3%

Professional and Public Services

3%

School

3%

NOTE: The question was open ended “Where do you think Latinos encounter racism the most?” ‘Arizona ‘ was the top answer and it was not solicited via multiple choice.

2%

Media

Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf

https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf 2 not NOTE: The question was open ended - “Where do you think Latinos encounter racism the most?” ‘Arizona ‘ was the top answer and it was solicited via multiple choice.

More Latinos Believe That Latino Discrimination Is Getting Worse From What It Was Five Years Ago More Latinos Believe That Latino Discrimination Is Getting Worse From What It Was Five Years Ago

DO YOU BELIEVE THE COUNTRY IS GETTING BETTER, WORSE, OR ABOUT SAME AS IT WAS FIVE YEARS AGO IN…..

Do you believe the country is getting better, worse, or about same as it was five years ago in…..

Latino Discrimination Affordable Housing Crime/Violence Respect/Dignity

36

22

34

25

43

26 32

28

Education

37

Jobs

37

Equal Opportunity Health Care

27 37

40

23 47

29 Better

Worse

Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf

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Thirty-Seven Percent Of Hispanics Believe Local Police, Border Patrol, And Other Law Enforcement Authorities Thirty-Seven Percent Of Hispanics Believe Local Police, Border Patrol, And Other Law Enforcement Usually Treat Hispanics Unfairly Authorities Usually Treat Hispanics Unfairly 28% 37%

26% Usually Treated Unfairly

9%

Don’t Know

Usually Treated Fairly

Sometimes Treated Fairly

Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014

Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf

4

Only 22% Of Total Hispanics Surveyed Believe Anti-Latino And Anti-Immigrant Attitudes Have Improved Only 22% Of Total Hispanics Surveyed Believe Anti-Latino And Anti-Immigrant Attitudes Have Improved In The Past In The Past Five Years And 36% Think It Is Getting Worse Five Years And 36% Think It Is Getting Worse 37%

33%

36%

39%

22%

23%

Total

U.S. Citizen

38%

37%

27%

35%

34%

21%

23%

22%

22%

LPR

Undoc

Foreign Born

2nd Gen

50%

27%

Getting Better

43%

Getting Worse

A Z 265

37%

30% 3rd Gen

32%

46%

20% 4th+ Gen

About Same

WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014),(MOE N=1000 (MOE +/3.1%), 2014 Source: WKKFSource: State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 +/- 3.1%), 2014 https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf

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Immigration/Deportation Is A Significant Concern Parents Of K-2 Students Are Most Concerned About Immigration Than Any Other Issue To Hispanics Across All Educational Levels In Your Own Words, What Issue Concerns You The Most? nd

17%

Women

in your own words, What Issue Concerns You The Most?

13% 25%

Men Parents K-2nd

19%

H.S. or Less

19%

Some College College Grad +

13% 13%

10%

22%

11%

16%

13%

23%

5%

10%

15%

22%

Jobs/Economy

12%

7%

10%

12%

8%

6%

Immigration/Deportation

12% Violence/Crime

Education

Little(2014), More Than 1/3 Of +/Hispanics Are Either Very Satisfied Or Somewhat Satisfied With The Federal Government’s Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family N=1000 (MOE 3.1%), 2014 s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf Performance On Immigration Policy.

Only 7% Of Hispanics Are Either Very Dissatisfaction Satisfied is NOT limited to recent immigrants: Satisfied With • 56% of 3+ Gen U.S. Citizens • 59% of 2 Gen Citizens The Federal • 55% of English Dominant Government’s Performance On Immigration Policy

Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf

25%

6

32% Not At All Satisfied DK Very Satisfied

nd

Somewhat Satisfied Not Very Satisfied 8%

28% 7%

Dissatisfaction is NOT limited to recent immigrants:

56% 59% 55%

of 3+ Gen U.S. Citizens

Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014

of 2nd Gen Citizen

7

of English Dominant

s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf

Sixty-One Percent Of Hispanics Indicate They Know Someone Who Is An Undocumented Immigrant In The U.S. Hispanics were asked, “Do you personally know someone who??? Sixty-One Percent Of Hispanics Indicate They Know Someone Who Is An Undocumented Immigrant In The U.S.

LAWFUL PERMANENT RESIDENT FLOW BY REGION

Hispanics

were asked, Do you personally know someone who...

61%

Is an Undocumented Immigrant

Faced Detention or Deportation For Immigration Reasons

33%

Yes

36%

65%

No

Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf Source: WKKF State Of The Latino Family (2014), N=1000 (MOE +/- 3.1%), 2014 https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1357155/wkkf-state-of-latino-family-2014.pdf

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Legal Immigration Statistics IMMIGRATION CHAPTER 10

990,553 People Were Granted Lawful Permanent Residence In The United States In 2013.

Legal Immigration Statistics

Origin of New Lawful Permanent Residents 28%

32%

990,553 People Were Granted Lawful Permanent Residence In The United States In 2013.

40% North America

Asia

Other Regions

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Annual Flow Report, U.S. Lawful permanent Residents: 2013, 2014 www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_fr_2013.pdf

ce: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Annual Flow Report, U.S. Lawful permanent Residents: 2013, 2014 //www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_fr_2013.pdf

Mexico Is The Leading Country Of Origin For New Lawful Permanent Residents Mexico Is The Leading Country Of Origin For New Lawful Permanent Residents

TOP COUNTRIES OF BIRTH

Top Countries of Birth

13%

6%

6%

5% 4%

Mexico

India

Philippines

Source: U.S. Department Homeland Security, Annual Flow Residents: Report, U.S. Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security,ofAnnual Flow Report, U.S. Lawful permanent 2013,Lawful 2014 www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_fr_2013.pdf http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_fr_2013.pdf

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Dominican Republic

China

permanent Residents: 2013, 2014

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California Is The State With The Greatest Share Of New Lawful Residents

California Is The State With The Greatest Share Of New Lawful Residents

Top U.S. States where New Lawful Residents Settle TOP U.S. STATES WHERE NEW LAWFUL RESIDENTS SETTLE

19%

14% 10%

9% 5%

California

New York

Florida

Texas

New Jersey

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Annual Flow Report, U.S. Lawful permanent Residents: 2013, 2014 www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_fr_2013.pdf

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Annual Flow Report, U.S. Lawful permanent Residents: 2013, 2014 http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_fr_2013.pdf

11

Mexico Is The Leading Country Of Birth For New Naturalized U.S. Citizens

Mexico Is The Leading Country Of Births For New Naturalized U.S. Citizens A total of 779,929 people become naturalized U.S. citizens

COUNTRIES BIRTH NEWNaturalized NATURALIZED U.S. CITIZENS Top TOP Countries of OF Birth forFOR New U.S. Citizens

13%

A Total Of

779,929

People Become Naturalized U.S. Citizens 6%

6%

5% 4%

Mexico

India

Philippines

Dominican Republic

Source:U.S. U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Annual Flow Report, U.S. Naturalizations: 2013, 2014 U.S. Naturalizations: 2013 , 2014 Source: Department of Homeland Security, Annual Flow Report, www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_natz_fr_2013.pdf http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_natz_fr_2013.pdf

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From 2010-2013, Hispanic Naturalized From 2010-2013, Hispanic Naturalized U.S. Citizenship Increased By 12% U.S. Citizenship Increased By 12% Hispanic Citizenship (in thousands) HISPANIC CITIZENSHIP (IN THOUSANDS)

31,940

34,994

13,276 12,822 6,171

5,524 Native

Naturalized U.S. Citizen

2010

Not U.S. Citizen

2013

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 & 2013 American Community Surveys 1-Year

The Share Of Mexican-Born Immigrants Has Continuously Grown Since 1850, With Slight Declines After 2010

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 & 2013 American Community Surveys 1-Year

Source: MPI Data Hub

YEAR

MEXICAN BORN

TOTAL IMMIGRANTS

MEXICAN BORN AS A SHARE OF ALL IMMIGRANTS

1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2011 2012 2013

13,300 27,500 42,400 68,400 77,900 103,400 221,900 486,400 641,500 357,800 451,400 575,900 759,700 2,199,200 4,298,000 9,177,500 11,711,100 11,672,600 11,563,400 11,585,000

2,244,600 4,138,700 5,567,200 6,679,900 9,249,500 10,341,300 13,515,900 13,920,700 14,204,100 11,494,100 11,454,900 9,738,100 9,619,300 14,079,900 19,767,300 31,107,900 39,955,700 40,377,800 40,824,600 41,348,000

0.6% 0.7% 0.8% 1.0% 0.8% 1.0% 1.6% 3.5% 4.5% 3.1% 3.9% 5.9% 7.9% 15.6% 21.7% 29.5% 29.3% 28.9% 28.3% 28.0%

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Hispanic Population Born Outside The U.S. Has Decreased By Approximately

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

IMMIGRATION

Hispanic Population Born Outside The U.S. Has Decreased By Approximately 90% Since 2000

% OF HISPANIC POPULATION BORN OUTSIDE THE U.S. % of Hispanic Population Born Outside the U.S. 62%

32%

90%

6% Entered before 2000

Since 2000

Entered 2000 to 2009

Entered 2010 or later

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey 1-Year, 201

15

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey 1-Year, 2014

From 2010 To 2013, Naturalized U.S. Citizenship In Phoenix Increased By Nearly 22%

From 2010 To 2013, Naturalized U.S. Citizenship Phoenix Citizenship (in thousands) In Phoenix Increased By Nearly 22% 414

PHOENIX CITIZENSHIP (IN THOUSANDS)

363

172 45

37 Native

Foreign born; naturalized U.S. citizen

Hispanic 2010 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 & 2013 American Community Surveys 1-Year

166

Foreign born; not a U.S. citizen

Hispanic 2013

Since 2000, One-Third Of Hispanics In Phoenix Were Born Outside The U.S. Phoenix Population Born Outside the U.S.

16

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 & 2013 PHOENIX AmericanPOPULATION Community Surveys 1-Year THE U.S. BORN OUTSIDE

Since 2000, One-Third Of Hispanics In Phoenix Were Born Outside The U.S.

36.80%

33.40%

29.80%

Entered before 1990

Entered 1990 to 1999

Entered 2000 or later

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey 1-Year, 2014

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey 1-Year, 2014

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From 2010 To 2013 Native Hispanic Citizenship From 2010 ToIn 2013 Native Hispanic Citizenship By In Tucson Tucson Increased 5%Increased By 5% Tucson Citizenship (in thousands)

TUCSON CITIZENSHIP (IN THOUSANDS)

166

158

36 19

18 Native

37

Foreign born; naturalized U.S. citizen

Hispanic 2010

Foreign born; not a U.S. citizen

Hispanic 2013

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 & 2013 American Community Surveys 1-Year

18

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 & 2013 American Community Surveys 1-Year

In The Past 2.5 Decades, Tucson Population Born Outside The U.S. Has Decreased By 31% In The Past 2.5 Decades, Tucson Population Born Outside The U.S. Has Decreased By 31% Tucson Population Born Outside the U.S. THE U.S. TUCSON POPULATION BORN OUTSIDE 47.40%

32.70%

19.90%

Entered before 1990

Entered 1990 to 1999

Source: U.S. Community Census Survey Bureau, 2013 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American 1-Year, 2014

Entered 2000 or later

American Community Survey 1-Year, 2014

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Size Of The Lawful Permanent Resident Population In U.S. Size of the Lawful Permanent Resident Population

13,300

13,070

13,140

8,790

8,770

8,530

4,540

4,530

2011

Total

4,350

2012

Eligible to Naturalize

2013

Not Eligible to Naturalize

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_pe_2013.pdf

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_pe_2013.pdf

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Country Of Birth Of Lawful Permanent Resident Population: 2013 In U.S. Country of Birth of Lawful Permanent Resident Population: 2013

25.0%

Mexico

China, People's Republic

Philippines

India

Dominican Republic

30.3% 5.0% 3.6% 4.4%

Total Number of Lawful Permanent Residents

3.9% 4.1%

13,140,000

2.8%

Total Number of Lawful Permanent Residents Eligible to Naturalize

8,790,000

3.7% 3.4%

Lawful Permanent Residents

Lawful Permanent Residents Eligible to Naturalize

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_pe_2013.pdf

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_pe_2013.pdf

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Arizona, Lawful Permanent Resident Population: 2013 Arizona, Residence of Lawful Permanent Resident Population: 2013 250,000

180,000

Lawful Permanent Residents

Lawful Permanent Residents Eligible to Naturalize

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_pe_2013.pdf

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_lpr_pe_2013.pdf

22

In 2016, Foreign-born Hispanics Are Projected To Decrease By 7.5 Percentage Points In 2015, The Percentage Of Foreign Born Hispanics Is Projected To Decrease By 7.5%

PERCENT OF FOREIGN-BORN BY RACE/ETHNICITY PROJECTIONS 2015 - 2060 Percent of foreign born by race/ethnicity projections 2015 - 2060

66.0% 55.4%

RESEARCHER’S TIP: A percentage change is a difference divided by some base number, while a percentage _point_ change is a simple addition or subtraction.

34.9% 27.4% 18.8% 13.5%

16.5% 8.9%

Asian

Hispanic

4.1%

Black

2015

8.1%

White

All

2060

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 Populations Projections Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 Populations Projections http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/09/u-s-immigrantwww.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/09/u-s-immigrant-population-projected-to-rise-even-as-share-falls-among-hispanics-asians/ population-projected-to-rise-even-as-share-falls-among-hispanics-asians/

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Seventy-One Percent Of Americans Support A Path To Legal Status For Undocumented Immigrants Seventy-Two Seventy-Two Percent PercentOf OfAmericans Americans Support SupportPath Path ToToLegal Legal Status StatusFor ForUndocumented UndocumentedImmigrants Immigrants InInThe TheUnited UnitedStates States Undocumented UndocumentedImmigrants Immigrantsininthe theU.S. U.S.who whomeet meetcertain certainrequirements… requirements…

UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS IN THE U.S. WHO MEET CERTAIN REQUIREMENTS…

2% 2%

71% 71%

27% 27%

Should ShouldNot NotBe BeAllowed AllowedTo ToStay Stay

DK DK

Should ShouldHave HaveAAWay WayTo ToStay StayLegally Legally

Source: Pew Research Center, U.S.U.S. Politics & Policy, 2015. Source: Source:Pew Pew Research Research Center, Center, U.S.Politics Politics &&Policy, Policy,2015. 2015. www.people-press.org/2015/06/04/broad-public-support-for-legal-status-for-undocumented-immigrants/ http://www.people-press.org/2015/06/04/broad-public-support-for-legal-status-for-undocumented-immigrants/ http://www.people-press.org/2015/06/04/broad-public-support-for-legal-status-for-undocumented-immigrants/

2424

From 2007 To 2012, Mexican Unauthorized Immigrant Population Declined By 14% From 2007 To 2012, Mexican Unauthorized Immigrant Population Declined By 14%

(In Millions)

6.9

7 6.8 6.6 6.4

6.4

6.3

6.2

6.2

5.9

6 5.8 5.6 5.4

2005

2007

2009

2011

Pew Research Center, For Estimates For 2005-2012 Based OnAmerican Augmented American Community Survey Data Public From Use Integrated Public Use(IPUMS) Source:Source: Pew Research Center, Estimates 2005-2012 Based On Augmented Community Survey Data From Integrated Microdata Series Microdata Series (IPUMS) www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/07/15/what-we-know-about-illegal-immigration-from-mexico/ http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/07/15/what-we-know-about-illegal-immigration-from-mexico/

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In 2012, Arizona Had The Second Highest Share Of Unauthorized Mexican Immigrants

In 2012, Arizona Had The Second Highest Share Of Unauthorized Mexican Immigrants Mexican among state’sUNAUTHORIZED unauthorized immigrants % MEXICAN%AMONG EACHeach STATE’S IMMIGRANTS

89%

New Mexico

84%

Arizona

83%

Idaho

82%

Wyoming

78%

Colorado Oklahoma

76%

Wisconsin

76%

Kansas

75%

Oregon

75%

Texas

75%

Source: Pew Research Center, Estimates For 2012 Based on Augmented American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series.

www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/07/15/what-we-know-about-illegal-immigration-from-mexico/ Source: Pew Research Center, Estimates For 2012 Based on Augmented American Community Survey Data From Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/07/15/what-we-know-about-illegal-immigration-from-mexico/

The annual income of unauthorized immigrants would be 15.1 percent higher within five years if they were granted legal status. Immigration reform that includes a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants in five years would increase the earnings of all American workers by $618 billion over the next decade. If the undocumented immigrants in our nation were granted legal status today and citizenship in five years, the 10-year cumulative increase in U.S. gross domestic product, or GDP, would be $1.1 trillion. If undocumented immigrants acquired legal status today and citizenship in five years, the economy would add an average of 159,000 new jobs per year, and formerly unauthorized workers would pay an additional $144 billion in federal, state, and local taxes over a 10-year period. Center for American Progress, The Facts on Immigration Today, 2014. cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/ImmigrationFacts-brief-10.23.pdf

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From 2012 To March 2015 Mexico DACA ORIGIN REQUESTS Had An 82% Approval Rate From 2012 To March 2015

TOTAL DACA REQUESTS ACCEPTED/APPROVED TO Approval DATE: Rate Mexico DACA Origin Requests Had An 82% 2012-2015 (MARCH 31) PER COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

What Is DACA? Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Total DACA Requests Accepted/Approved to Date: 2012-2015 (March 31) Per Country of Orig

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that certain people who came to the United States as children and meet several guidelines may request consideration of deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal. They are also eligible for work authorization. Deferred action is a use of prosecutorial discretion to defer removal action against an individual for a certain period of time. Deferred action does not provide lawful status. 

What Is DACA? Deferred Action fo Arrivals. On June 15, 2012 Secretary of Home announced that ce who came to the U as children and m guidelines may req consideration of d for a period of two subject to renewal also eligible for w authorization. Defe a use of prosecuto to defer removal a an individual for a period of time. De does not provide l

851,476

Mexico

702,043 42,162 33,846

El Salvador

Guatemala

28,118 22,054

Honduras

26,989 20,892 14,490 13,015

South Korea

Accepted to Date

Approved to Date

Source: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Biometrics Capture Systems, CIS Consolidated Operational Repository (CISCOR), April 2015. http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Naturalization%20Data/I821d_performancedata_fy2015_qtr2.pdf

Source: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Biometrics Capture Systems, CIS Consolidated Operational Repository (CISCOR), April 2015. www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Naturalization%20Data/I821d_performancedata_fy2015_qtr2.pdf

In 2014, DACA RENEWAL REQUESTS Had A 19% Approval Rate In Comparison To 2015, 93% Approval Rate

In 2014, DACA Renewal Request Had A 19% Approval Rate In Comparison To 2015, 93% Approval Rate Total DACA Renewal Requests Received/Approved to Date: 2012-2015 (March 31)

TOTAL DACA RENEWAL REQUESTS RECEIVED/APPROVED TO DATE: 2012-2015 (MARCH 31)

239,334

221,398

116,471

22,474 2014

2015

Requests Accepted

Requests Approved

Source: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Biometrics Capture Systems, CIS Consolidated Operational Repository (CISCOR), April 2015.

Source: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Biometrics Capture Systems, CIS Consolidated Operational Repository (CISCOR), April 2015. www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Naturalization%20Data/I821d_performancedata_fy2015_qtr2.pdf http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Naturalization%20Data/I821d_performancedata_fy2015_qtr2.pdf

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Arizona Is The 5th Highest State With DACA Requests Accepted And Approved Arizona Is The 5thThat HighestAre State With DACA Requests That Are Accepted And Approved Top States For DACA Requests Accepted/Approved to Date: 2012-2015 (March 31)

TOP STATES FOR DACA REQUESTS ACCEPTED/APPROVED TO DATE: 2012-2015 (MARCH 31) 315,327

California

261,395 180,957 151,499

Texas

Illinois

New York

Arizona

62,503 47,819 55,728 45,207 40,474 34,177 Accepted to Date

Approved to Date

Source: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Biometrics Systems, CIS Consolidated Operational (CISCOR), April 2015. From Capture 2014-2015, Arizona The 5 th Largest Share OfRepository DACA Renewals Approved Source: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Biometrics Capture Systems, CIS Consolidated Operational Repository (CISCOR),Had April 2015. 30 www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Naturalization%20Data/I821d_performancedata_fy2015_qtr2.pdf http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Naturalization%20Data/I821d_performancedata_fy2015_qtr2.pdf DACA Renewals Approved to Date: 2012-2015 (March 31) Per State

From 2014-2015, Arizona Had The 5th Largest Share Of DACA Renewals Approved

67,263

DACA RENEWALS APPROVED TO DATE: 2012-2015 (MARCH 31) PER STATE

44,297

12,713

California

Texas

11,248

Illinois

New York

9,982

Arizona

Source: Department of Homeland Security, U.S.Biometrics Citizenship and Immigration Services, Biometrics Capture CIS Consolidated Operational Operational RepositoryRepository (CISCOR), April 2015. Source: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Capture Systems, CIS Systems, Consolidated (CISCOR), April 2015. http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Naturalization%20Data/I821d_performancedata_fy2015_qtr2.pdf www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Naturalization%20Data/I821d_performancedata_fy2015_qtr2.pdf

31

The Majority Of Hispanics Approve Obama’s Program For Unauthorized Immigrants Brought As Children

The Majority Of Hispanics Approve Obama’s Program For Unauthorized Immigrants Brought As Children

Percent Saying They….

PERCENT SAYING THEY…. U.S.

63

33

General Po pul atio n

89

9

Al l H is panic s

Hispanics by Nativity

F o reign-bo rn

Registered Voters

85

13

Nativ e-bo rn

93

5

86

12 Disapprove

Approve

Source: Pew Hispanic Center, 2012 National Survey of Latinos; Pew Research Center For The People & The Press, July 2012. www.pewhispanic.org/2012/10/11/latinos-and-immigration-policy/ Source: Pew Hispanic Center, 2012 National Survey of Latinos; Pew Research Center For The People & The Press, July 2012. http://www.pewhispanic.org/2012/10/11/latinos-and-immigration-policy/

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Higher Immigration is Associated with Lower Crime Rates

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

IMMIGRATION

• Between 1990 and 2013, the foreign-born share of the U.S. population grew from 7.9 percent to 13.1 percent and the number of unauthorized immigrants more than tripled from 3.5 million to 11.2 million. • During the same period, FBI data indicate that the violent crime rate declined 48 percent—which included falling rates of aggravated assault, robbery, rape and murder. Likewise, the property crime rate fell 41 percent, including declining rates of motor vehicle theft, larceny/robbery, and burglary.

American Immigration Council, The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States, July 2015 immigrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/docs/the_criminalization_of_immigration_in_the_united_states_final.pdf

Immigrants Are Less Likely Than The Native-born To Be Behind Bars • According to an original analysis of data from the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS conducted by the authors of this report, roughly 1.6 percent of immigrant males age 18-39 are incarcerated, compared to 3.3 percent of the native-born. This disparity in incarceration rates has existed for decades, as evidenced by data from the 1980, 1990 and 2000 decennial censuses. In each of those years, the incarceration rates of the native-born were anywhere from two to five times higher than that of immigrants. • The 2010 Census data reveals that incarceration rates among the young, less- educated Mexican, Salvadoran, and Guatemalan men who make up the bulk of the unauthorized population are significantly lower than the incarceration rate among native-born young men without a high-school diploma. In 2010, less-educated native-born men age 18-39 had an incarceration rate of 10.7 percent—more than triple the 2.8 percent rate among foreign-born Mexican men, and five times greater than the 1.7 percent rate among foreign-born Salvadoran and Guatemalan men. American Immigration Council, The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States, July 2015 immigrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/docs/the_criminalization_of_immigration_in_the_united_states_final.pdf

Immigrants Are Less Likely Than The Native-born To Engage In Criminal Behavior

• A variety of different studies using different methodologies have found that immigrants are less likely than the native-born to engage in either violent or nonviolent “antisocial” behaviors; that immigrants are less likely than the native-born to be repeat offenders among “high risk” adolescents; and that immigrant youth who were students in U.S. middle and high schools in the mid-1990s and are now young adults have among the lowest delinquency rates of all young people.

American Immigration Council, The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States, July 2015 immigrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/docs/the_criminalization_of_immigration_in_the_united_states_final.pdf

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Immigration

Myths Busted COMMON MYTHS ABOUT IMMIGRATION DEBUNKED

#1 Myth MOST IMMIGRANTS ARE HERE ILLEGALLY

40.2

FACT

# 1 - Most immigrants are here legally

Million 40.2 Immigrants in U.S. million

28%

immigrants

72%

in U.S. 4% 68%

Of immigrants are 72% in the U.S. legally.

of immigrants are in the U.S. legally

undocumented legal temporary workers citizens or legal residents

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration MythsSource: Busted Infographic Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

#2 - Immigrants take jobs away from Americans

FACT

Immigrants at all increased job opportunities in the long run.skill levels actually

#2 Myth

Immigrant labor is complementary to native labor, resulting in limited competition in the short-run and

Monthly Business Formation 400 350 300 Rate (per 100,000)

IMMIGRANTS TAKE JOBS AWAY FROM AMERICANS

250 200 150 100 50 0

Immigrants

U.S. Born

create job opportunities. create job opportunities. Immigrants at all skill levels actually

Immigrants are 30% more likely U.S.Immigrants are than 30% more likely than U.S.-born citizens to form new born citizens to form businesses. new businesses.

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

Immigrant labor is complementary to native labor, resulting in limited competition in the short-run and increased job opportunities in the long run. Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

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drain resources without contributing economica CHAPTER 10 #3 – ImmigrantsIMMIGRATION 5 Fastest Growing Metro Areas

#3 Myth

% Change in Immigrant Share of Labor Force

140%

13%

Atlanta

IMMIGRANTS DRAIN RESOURCES WITHOUT CONTRIBUTING ECONOMICALLY OR PAYING TAXES

% Economic Growth

12%

Phoenix

10%

Denver

98% 91%

13%

Houston

9%

Portland

99%

89%

5 Slowest Growing Metro Areas 4%

Detroit Pittsburg Cleveland

23%

1% 2%

25% 29%

7%

L.A. St. Louis

13%

2%

37%

FACT

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

Immigrants have played a central role in the cycle of

economic rebirth of American cities. Taxes paid by both legal and undocumented immigrants exceed the costs of the services these immigrants utilize. Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic.

#4 Myth IMMIGRATING TO THE U.S. FOR WORK IS EASY

FACTS 1% of immigrants

received employmentbased visas in 2009.

1.28 million

estimated flow of immigrants into the U.S. in 2009.

There are only

14,000

employment-based visas allocated annually.

5,000

Only employmentbased visas are for low-skilled positions despite the high demand for these workers.

Visas for employment-based immigration have numerical caps, require immigrants to fit specific qualifications that demonstrate “extraordinary ability” and require employers to complete a lengthy verification process to ensure no U.S. worker is available for the position. Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic.

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# 5 10 – ImmigrantsIMMIGRATION increase crime. CHAPTER

#5 Myth IMMIGRANTS INCREASE CRIME

• Men (vast U.S. popu are n are 1

Incarceration rate, California, 2000 (highest population of immigrants, undocumented and legal) Native-born

tim mo lik

4.5% Immigrant

From 1994 to 2005 Nationally

0.7%

in pr immi

FACTS The undocumented population doubled while the rate of violent crime declined by

Men age 18-39 (vast majority ofproperty U.S. prison that are nativecrime ratepopulation) fell by 26.4%. born are 11 times more likely to be in prison than immigrants.

34.2

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

The undocumented population doubled while the rate of violent crime declined by 34.2% and the property crime rate fell by 26.4%. Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic.

#6 – All migrants choose to leave their home countries and do no integrate into the American culture

FACT

#6 Myth

ALL MIGRANTS % CHOOSE TO LEAVE THEIR HOME COUNTRIES AND DO NOT More than 90% INTEGRATE INTO of the90% children of children recent of than of the THE AMERICANMore immigrants speak recent immigrants speak English regardless of the country of English regardless of origin CULTURE

90

Many migrants,

such as refugees The rate of citizenship amo and asylum seekers, are by 2 forcedgrew from to their home countries because of conflict or Many migrants, such as ref religious and/or asylum seekers, are forced political home countries because of persecution. religious and/or political p

56%

the country of origin.

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

The rate of citizenship among Latinos grew to

56% by 2008.

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic.

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#7 Myth IMMIGRANTS FREQUENTLY BRING THEIR EXTENDED RELATIVES WITH THEM

#7 – Immigrants frequently bring their extended relatives FACT with them Wait time for family visas, as of May 2012 Wait Time For Family Visas, As Of May 2012

Wait Time forFOR Family Visas WAIT TIME FAMILY VISAS Legal Permanent Residents LEGAL PERMANENT RESIDENTS

Wait Time Family WAIT TIMEfor FOR FAMILYVisas VISAS U.S.Citizens CITIZENS U.S. 35 30

30

25

25

Years

Years

20 15 10

20 15 10

5 0

5 Spouses, Unmarried, Children Under 21, Parents

Unmarried, Children 21 and Older

Minimum

Married, Children 21 and Older

0

Brothers and Sisters Sisters Brother and

Spouses or Children Under 21

Minimum

Maximum

Unmarried, Children 21 and Under

Maximum

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

FACTS

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

#8 Myth UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS HAVE CHILDREN IN THE U.S. TO AVOID DEPORTATIONS

The parents of

5,100 children

In the first six months of 2011, the federal government deported

(Conservative estimate)

citizen children.

in foster care are in detention or have been deported.

In the next five years,

15,000 more children will be

in the same situation.

more than 46,000 mothers and fathers of U.S.

In FY2011, the U.S. deported a total of

397,000 people.

Source: Lutheran Immigration and Refuge Services, Immigration Myths Busted Infographic

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885421_AZ_Hisp_Chamber_AD_v2outline.indd 1

7/31/15 1:57 PM


Investing in the community is not merely our responsibility. It is our promise. BMO Harris Bank applauds the great work of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

BMO Harris Bank速 and BMO Harris速 are trade names used by BMO Harris Bank N.A. Member FDIC

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“Any business leader or government agency needs trustworthy and up to date information to make critical decisions based on facts. The DATOS report from the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is the best source of detailed decision making data pertaining to the Hispanic community in Arizona there is. Because of the impact that Hispanics represent in our State, this is no longer data for a niche market, but data for the reality of our overall market as is.” —David Farca, President of the Board of Directors, Arizona-Mexico Trade Commission

“The Consulate General of México in Phoenix commends the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s valuable efforts in recognizing through DATOS the importance of the Arizona-Mexico trade relationship and the growing economic, social and cultural contributions of the Mexican community to the state of Arizona. Mexico is Arizona’s single largest trading partner. Arizona exports over $8.6 billion to Mexico per year, and imports $7.4 billion. It’s time for Arizona to benefit from its geographic proximity to México and boost interactions to promote economic development and growth” —Embajador Roberto Rodríguez Hernández, Cónsul General de México en Phoenix, Arizona

Amid Growing National Tension On Immigration, Az Working To Mend Ties With Mexico On June 17, 2015, Gov. Doug Ducey, flanked by a diverse array of Arizona business leaders, traveled to Mexico City as part of a highly-anticipated initiative to mend strained relations with our state’s leading international trading partner.

On the economic front, Arizona-Mexico trade topped $16 billion in 2014, and cross-border commerce is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years. (Mexico was the United States’ third-largest trading partner with $507 billion in total importexport trade in 2013, according to the office of the U.S. Trade Representative.)

Ducey had gone there to deliver the message that Arizona was “Open for Business” and ready to make a fresh start.

Future economic ties between Arizona and Mexico look promising. While the Arizona economy is steadily rebounding from the Great Recession and the U.S. economy has begun to show signs of a strong recovery, Mexico’s economy has been booming. It’s now the world’s 13th-largest economy, on par with Spain, and it is projected to be the fifth-largest economy in the world by 2050.

“The trip was a big step in making sure Mexico understood that Arizona’s business community, including its growing Hispanic business interests, realizes how vital our cross-border partnership is to the future prosperity of our respective constituencies,” said Gonzalo A. de la Melena, Jr., President and CEO of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, who was among the 50 or so business leaders who accompanied the governor. “We need to do better than we have in the past and I believe the governor’s trip to Mexico was a big step in the right direction.”

Mexican visitors to Arizona are expected to pump about $2.9 billion annually into the state’s economy by 2016 and account for about 160,000 jobs statewide, according to the Economic and Business Research Center. Mexican immigrants in Arizona also contribute substantially to the $50 billion in total annual consumer spending by the state’s 2.1 million Latinos.

Mexico’s top business and political leaders were also ready to move past the tensions created by the immigration-related controversies of the past decade and to trumpet the importance of reaffirming its longstanding historical, cultural and economic ties to Arizona. On the cultural and historical front, Arizona used to be part of Mexican and today the vast majority of Arizona Latinos, who now make up 30 percent of the state’s population are of Mexican origin.

According to the U.S. Census, the products Arizona exports to Mexico represent a wide range of industries. Arizona’s leading exports come from aeronautics related industries, but also include copper ore, electronics, natural gas and artificial surgical implants. On the import side, Mexico sends us processors and electronics, fruits and vegetables, turbojet and gas turbine parts and refined copper.

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• Mexico is a growing world market, as well as Arizona’s most important trading partner. • In 2013, trade generated between Arizona and Mexico exceeded $14 billion. • Mexico is the world’s 14th-largest economy, and is projected by Goldman Sachs to be the fifth-largest by 2050. • Arizona’s trade office in Mexico will assist Arizona companies in successfully entering the Mexican market and attract new companies and investments that will contribute to the state’s economy to create high-wage jobs. • Mayor LeVault of Youngtown, AZ notes that Mexican travelers add about $2.7 billion per year to the Arizona economy, resulting in about 160,000 jobs.

Trade With Mexico Facts

Source: Magazine, Improved Safety, Reduced Congestion, Vol. 19: No. 4, 2015. www.azmag.gov/Documents/Magazine-NOV2014-Web.pdf From 2008 To 2013, Arizona Merchandise Exports To Mexico Increased By 20%

From 2008 To 2013, Arizona Merchandise Exports To Mexico Increased By

U.S. BORDERU.S.STATES’ MERCHANDISE EXPORTS TO MEXICO Border States’ Merchandise Exports to Mexico, 2008-2013 2008-2013 $100.90 (In Billions)

$62.00

$23.90 $20.40

20%

$5.90 $7.00 CA

$0.38 $0.08

AZ

NM

2008

TX

2013

Source: U.S. Department Of Commerce http://www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/Border_Economy_Transition_Wilson_Lee

3

_0.pdf Source: U.S. Department Of Commerce www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/Border_Economy_Transition_Wilson_Lee_0.pdf

U.S. Exports To Mexico Had The Highest Export Growth From 2009 To 2013

U.S. EXPORT GROWTH TO ITS TOP FIVE MARKETS U.S. Export Growth to its top five markets, 2009-2013 2009-2013

U.S. Exports To Mexico Had The Highest Export Growth From 2009 To 2013

80%

75.3% 75.0%

70% 60% 50%

47.3%

40% 30%

27.4%

20% 10% 0%

3.6% 2009

Mexico

2010

China

2011

Canada

2012

Japan

Source: Author’s calculations. Data From United States International Trade Commission, p81, 2014. Source: Author’s calculations. Data From United States International Trade Commission, p81, 2014. www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/Border_Economy_Transition_Wilson_Lee_0.pdf http://www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/Border_Economy_Transition_Wilson_Lee_0.pdf

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“Growing industries along the border, including energy, biosciences and aerospace manufacturing, are putting a greater premium on high-skilled workers and are forcing companies to make investments decision based less on the availability of cheap labor and more on the availability of high skills…Creating, attracting and retaining the right talent at the border remains a challenge.” —Ruth Soberanes, North American Research Partnership

“Growing industries along the border, including energy, biosciences and aerospace manufacturing, are putting a greater premium on highskilled workers and are forcing companies to make investment decision based less on the availability of cheap labor and more on the availability of high skills…Creating, attracting and retaining the right talent at the border remains a challenge.”

BORDER STATE RATES (SEPT. 2011-SEPT. Border UNEMPLOYMENT State Unemployment Rates (Sept. 2011-Sept. 2014)2014) 14 12

Percent

10 8 6 4 2 0

Sep-11

Sep-12

CA

Sep-13

AZ

NM

Sep-14

TX

Source: Bureau Of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department Of Labor, 2014.

Source: Bureau Of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department Of Labor, 2014. www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/Border_Economy_Transition_Wilson_Lee_0.pdf http://www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/Border_Economy_Transition_Wilson_Lee_ 0.pdf

5

From 2011 To 2014 Mexico Imports Increased By Nearly 12% Year-End Mexico Imports From 2011-2014

YEAR-END MEXICO IMPORTS FROM 2011-2014

From 2011 To 2014 Mexico Imports To The U.S. Increased By Nearly

294,157 (In Millions of Dollars)

277,594

12%

280,529

262,874

2011

2012

2013

Source:2015 U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/imports/c2010.html www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/imports/c2010.html

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From 2011 To 2014 Mexico Exports Increased By 21% Year-End Mexico Exports From 2011-2014

From 2011 To 2014 U.S. Exports To Mexico Exports Increased By

YEAR-END MEXICO EXPORTS FROM 2011-2014

215,907

198,289

240,326

226,079

(In Millions of Dollars)

21%

2011

2012

2013

2014

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/exports/c2010.html

7

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/exports/c2010.html

From 2011 – 2014 NAFTA With Mexico Consumption Increased By Almost 11% From 2011 – 2014 NAFTA With Mexico Consumption Increased By Almost 11%

NAFTA WITH MEXICO (CONSUMPTION) 2011 - 2014 NAFTA with Mexico (Consumption) 2011 - 2014

181,515 (In Millions of Dollars)

171,421 168,591 163,817

2011

2012

2013

2014

Source: Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign U.S. Census Bureau, ForeignTrade, Trade, 2015 2015 https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c0005.html www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c0005.html

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The Top 5 Imports From Mexico To U.S. In 2014 Totaled More Than $127 Billion The Top 5 Imports From Mexico In 2014 Totaled Over $127 Billion

U.S. IMPORTS BY PRODUCT FROM MEXICO 2014 U.S. Imports by Products From Mexico 2014

Other Parts And Accessories Of Vehicles

39

Crude Oil

(In Billions of Dollars)

27.7 27

Trucks, Buses, And Special Purpose Vehicles

21

Passenger Cars, New And Used Computers

12.7

Electric Apparatus

12.6 12.1

Televisions And Video Equipment

11.5

Telecommunications Equipment

9.3

Engines And Engine Parts (Carburetors, Pistons, Rings, And Valves)

6.8

Industrial Machines, Other

Source: U.S. Census Trade, 2015 Source: U.S.Bureau, CensusForeign Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/imports/c2010.html https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/imports/c2010.html

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The Top 10 U.S. Products Exported To Mexico In 2014 Totaled More Than $108 Billion The Top 10 U.S. Exports Products To Mexico In 2014 Totaled Over $108 Billion U.S. Exports by Products To Mexico 2014

U.S. EXPORTS BY PRODUCT TO MEXICO 2014 19.5

Other Parts And Accessories Of Vehicles

14.9

Electric Apparatus

(In Billions of Dollars)

14.6

Computer Accessories

14.3

Petroleum Products, Other

8.4

Plastic Materials Engines And Engine Parts (Carburetors, Pistons, Rings, And Valves)

8.0

Other Industrial Supplies

7.9

Minimum Value Shipments

7.0

Industrial Machines, Other

6.9

Semiconductors

6.8

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/exports/c2010.html https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/exports/c2010.html

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Based On 2014 Dollar Value, Mexico Was TheBasedTop Export Destination From Arizona On 2014 Dollar Value, Mexico Was The Top Export Destination From Arizona Top U.S. Exports (Origin of Movement) from Arizona

TOP U.S. EXPORTS (ORIGIN OF MOVEMENT) FROM ARIZONA

8,623

Mexico

(In Millions of Dollars)

2,254

Canada

1,101

United Kingdom

1,019

China

753

Germany

Source: CensusBureau, Bureau, Foreign Trade, Source: U.S. U.S. Census Foreign Trade, 2015 2015 www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html

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From 2011 To 2014, The Arizona To Mexico Exports Dollar Value Increased By Approximately 43% From 2011 To 2014, The Arizona To Mexico Exports Dollar Value Increased By Approximately 43% Arizona to Mexico Exports From 2011-2014 Based on Dollar Value

ARIZONA TO MEXICO EXPORTS FROM 2011-2014 BASED ON DOLLAR VALUE 8,623 (In Millions of Dollars)

7,068 6,045

2011

6,291

2012

2013

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html

2014

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In 2014, Civilian Aircraft, Engines And Parts Accounted For Nearly 11% Of Total Share In 2014, Civilian Aircraft, Engines, And Parts Accounted For Nearly By 11% OfArizona Total Share Products Exported By Arizona Products Exported Top 10 Arizona Export Products Based on 2014 Dollar Value

TOP 10 ARIZONA EXPORT PRODUCTS BASED ON 2014 DOLLAR VALUE 2,226

Civilian Aircraft, Engines, And Parts

2,178

Copper Ores And Concentrates

878

Processors And Controllers, Electronic Integ

(In Millions of Dollars)

749

Electronic Integrated Circuits, Nesoi

$2,226

629

Natural Gas, Gaseous Bomb Mines Ot Ammntion Projctions Etc And Par

413

Pt F Elect Appr F Elect Circt; F Elct Contrl

401

Millions of Dollars

345

Semicndctr Dvice Ex Photosensitive/Photovolta

271

Mach For Recp/Convr/Trans/Regn Of Voice/Image

233

Artificial Joints & Parts & Accessories Thero

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/az.html

13

In 2014, Mexico More Than Doubled The Second Arizona Import Country (China) And Quadrupled The Third Highest Arizona Import Country (Canada) In Dollar Value In 2014, Mexico More Than Doubled The Second Arizona Import Country (China) And Quadrupled The Third Highest Arizona Import Country (Canada) In Dollar Value Top 5 Arizona Import Countries Based on 2014 Dollar Value

TOP 5 ARIZONA IMPORT COUNTRIES BASED ON 2014 DOLLAR VALUE 7,305

Mexico

(In Millions of Dollars)

2,708

China

1,561

Canada

Japan

Malaysia

Mexico $7,305

1,025

Millions of Dollars

898

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/imports/az.html https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/imports/az.html

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From 2011 To 2014, Arizona Imports From Mexico On Average Increased By 6% Yearly From 2011 To 2014, Arizona Imports From Mexico On Average Increased By 6.2% Yearly

ARIZONA IMPORTS MEXICO VALUE 2011-2014 Arizona ImportsFROM From Mexico BasedBASED on DollarON ValueDOLLAR 2011-2014 7,305 (In Millions of Dollars)

7,037 6,753

6,167

2011

2012

2013

2014

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015

www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/imports/az.html Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/imports/az.html

15

The Top 10 U.S. Imports To Arizona Accounted For Nearly 25% Of Total Share Imports The Top 10 U.S. Imports To Arizona Accounted For Nearly 25% Of Total Share Imports 10 U.S. Imports to Arizona Based on 2014 TOP 10 U.S. Top IMPORTS TO ARIZONA BASED ON Dollar 2014Value DOLLAR VALUE

897

Processors And Controllers, Electronic Integ

840

Airplane & Ot A/C, Unladen Weight > 15,000 Kg

523

Tomatoes, Fresh Or Chilled Machines For Man. Semicondutor Devices/Elec I

463

Fruits Of Genus Capsicum Or Pimenta, Fresh/Ch

462

(In Millions of Dollars)

400

Insulated Wiring Sets For Vehicles Ships Airc

343

Turbojet And Turboproller Parts Refined Copper Cathodes And Sections Of Catho

313

Gas Turbine Parts Nesoi

309 290

Elect Plugs & Sockets F Voltage Not Over 1000

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade, 2015 www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/imports/az.html https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/state/data/imports/az.html

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Nafta For The Rest Of Us LET’S MAKE TRADE WORK FOR AS MANY OF US AS POSSIBLE North America’s trillion-plus dollars in annual NAFTA trade is a powerful economic force. Yet this trade can be tremendously controversial as well. This is because large firms in North America often benefit from NAFTA trade in far more visible ways than “the rest of us.” Predictably, debates on globalization, trade and income inequality become emotional and divisive rather than rational, inclusive, and strategic. Yet as we struggle to add well-paying jobs to our economy and diversify our economic options, numerous communities, businesses and individuals need and want to take greater advantage of the benefits of expanding North American trade. So, who are we talking about and what is holding “the rest of us” back?

• Border communities facilitate well over a trillion dollars in trade annually yet struggle with congested ports of entry, persistent poverty and increasing global competition. • Small- and medium-sized enterprises employ more workers than any other sector, yet only 1% of U.S. firms actually export and many are left out of the global value chain. • Institutions such as cross-border collaboratives, economic development organizations and others are the “connective tissue” of North America yet struggle for survival. • Tourists from the United States, Mexico and Canada comprise the three nations’ largest tourism markets yet battle with ports of entry congestion and a disappointing welcome. • Students are our future human capital and are key to our future economic development, yet North American student exchange is severely underdeveloped. • Consumers have enjoyed expanded choice in some areas due to NAFTA but still suffer from trade protectionism, monopolies and a wide array of policies that limit choice. • Wage earners struggle with wage stagnation and shrinking benefits when the global economy clearly is calling for added value rather than a race to the bottom on compensation. What We Will Do About It The North American Research Partnership has launched a new initiative called “NAFTA for the Rest of Us” which focuses on analyzing and developing both policies and actions needed to expand economic opportunity for a broad range of entities and individuals. The initiative will feature

• Advising and implementation of North American strategy for “the rest of us:” communities, small- and medium-sized enterprises, non-profits and others; • Reports, policy briefs, blog posts, a social media focus and stakeholder surveys on “NAFTA • for the Rest of Us” core issue areas; • Video interviews with subject matter experts as well as members of the abovementioned groups: small business owners, elected officials, tourists and students; and • Events focused on bringing attention to policy issues affecting these groups (including webinars and teleconferences). In an age of intensifying anxiety over economic inequality, globalization and related issues, we need to work to broaden the benefits of trade to build a real “NAFTA for the Rest of Us.” For more information on how you can participate in or support this initiative, contact Erik Lee, Executive Director, North American Research Partnership, tel. 858.449.3798, erik@naresearchpartnership.org.

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Mexican Visitor Expenditures In Arizona Are Projected To Reach $2.9 Billion In 2016 MEXICAN VISITOR EXPENDITURE ESTIMATES FOR 2013 AND PROJECTIONS FOR 2014-2016 MEXICAN VISITORS

2007-2008

2013

2014

2015

2016

ESTIMATED VISITORS

24,040

17,460

19,340

20,880

22,550

ESTIMATED PARTIES

13,690

9,480

9,960

10,470

11,030

ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES

2,688,670

2,260,630

2,455,410

2,670,260

2,907,340

Source: Economic and Business Research Center, Extending the Border Zone to the Entire State of Arizona, 2015 www.azmag.gov/Documents/EDC_2015-05-11_Extending-the-Border-Zone-to-the-Entire-State-of-Arizona.pdf

Exports Support Jobs for American Workers

g value of U.S. goods and services exports in 2014 U.S. Jobs Supported By Exports In 2014 Increased Exports Support Jobs for American Workers Since 2009 d by goods exports from Arizona in 2014

• $2.34 Trillion, Record-setting value of U.S. goods and services exports in 2014

• 93,354, U.S. jobs supported by goods exports from Arizona in 2014

U.S. JOBS SUPPORTED BY EXPORTS IN 2014 INCREASED BY 18% SINCE 2009

11.7

9.9

(In Millions) 2009

2014

Source: Office of Trade and Economic Analysis, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 2015 www.trade.gov/mas/ian/statereports/states/az.pdf

International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of

ates/az.pdf

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Arizona’s Metropolitan Exports in 2013 METRO AREA

TOTAL MERCHANDISE EXPORTS

SHARE OF STATE EXPORTS

PHOENIX-MESA-SCOTTSDALE TUCSON YUMA SIERRA VISTA-DOUGLAS FLAGSTAFF

$11.5 BILLION $2.6 BILLION $460 MILLION $418 MILLION $254 MILLION

65.7% 14.8% 2.6% 2.4% 1.5%

Source: Office of Trade and Economic Analysis, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 2015 www.trade.gov/mas/ian/statereports/states/az.pdf

7,488

Exports Sustain Companies Exported Arizona From Arizona Businesses Exports Sustain Arizona Businesses Exports Sustain Arizona Businesses in 2013

7,488From Companies 7,488 Companies Exported ArizonaExported in 2013 From Arizona in 2013

29%

88%

88%

SMALL-MEDIUM ENTERPRISE SHARE OF ARIZONA EXPORTERS (<500 EMPLOYEES)

SMALL-MEDIUM ENTERPRISE SHARE OF ARIZONA’S TOTAL MERCHANDISE EXPORTS IN 2013

Medium Enterprise Share of Arizona Exporters Small-Medium Enterprise Share of Arizona ExportersEnterprise Small-Medium Share of Arizona’s TotalShare of Arizona Small-Medium Enterprise Source: Office of Trade and Economic Analysis, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 2015 www.trade.gov/mas/ian/statereports/states/az.pdf (<500 Employees) (<500 Employees) Merchandise Exports inMerchandise 2013 Exports in 2013

e of Trade and Economic Analysis, International Administration, U.S. Department Commerce, 2015 Source: Office of Trade and Trade Economic Analysis, International TradeofAdministration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 2015 trade.gov/mas/ian/statereports/states/az.pdf http://www.trade.gov/mas/ian/statereports/states/az.pdf

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Notes

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International Employers In Arizona By Size And Country Of Origin International Employers by Size and Country of Origin Page

APACHE

COCONINO

MOHAVE

Kingman

NAVAJO

$ e " !

Flagstaff

$ e " !

Sedona Lake Havasu City

Prescott

$ c " ! YAVAPAI

Payson

MARICOPA

Phoenix

$" a " ! ! $ a $ a " ! Maricopa

$ a " !

Gila Bend Yuma

GILA

$ c " !

LA PAZ

Florence

$ a " !

$ ` " !

PINAL

$ ` " !

YUMA

GRAHAM

$ a " ! Tucson

PIMA COCHISE Top Countries by Employment

Number of Employees

CANADA (18,272)

Unknown

GERMANY (9,749)

1 - 25

UNITED KINGDOM (8,358)

26 - 100

$ d " !

JAPAN (6,573) FRANCE (6,119)

While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this information, the Maricopa Association of Governments makes no warranty, expressed or implied, as to its accuracy and expressly disclaims liability for the accuracy thereof.

101 - 250

MEXICO (6,056) OTHER (30,019)

SANTA CRUZ

Source: Dun & Bradstreet 2015

More than 250

0

10

County Boundary

20

40

60

80 Miles

Date: August 2015

Esri, HERE, DeLorme, MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS I:\Projects\Employer\Analysis\Foreign_owned_2015\ForeignAnalysis\ForeignStateEmps.mxd user community

Indian Community Source: Maricopa Association of Governments

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EXCERPT FROM:

Extending the Border Zone to the Entire State of Arizona:

Estimated Expenditures and Economic Impact Simulations, 2013–2016 Alberta H. Charney, Ph.D. Alan Hoogasian, M.A., M.S

Report Submitted to: Maricopa Association of Governments

March 12, 2015 Economic and Business Research Center Eller College of Management University of Arizona Tucson Arizona 85721 0108

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Excerpt from Extending the Border Zone to the Entire State of Arizona: Estimated Expenditures and Economic Impact Simulations, 2013–2016 Executive Summary •

Every year, thousands of frequent, low-risk, shortterm visitors travel from Mexico into Arizona to conduct business, visit with family and friends, or shop at local stores—spending billions of dollars. Although these visitors have been pre-cleared through thorough background checks for frequent travel into the U.S., their U.S.-issued border crossing cards (BCCs) limit their travel in Arizona to 75 miles entering through Arizona’s land ports of entry—allowing visitors to travel about as far as the city of Tucson, with the exception of a 25-mile limit for visitors entering through the San Luis port of entry (Yuma region).

A resolution of support to extend the border zone from its current 75-mile zone to the entire state and to streamline the Mexican visa process at the land ports of entry is currently being supported by regional planning agencies1 throughout Arizona, including the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG), as well as the Intertribal Council of Arizona and the city of Nogales, Arizona. Extending the zone for the BCC requires an administrative action by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The supporters of the proposal questioned what could happen if these legal visitors could bring their tourism dollars into all of Arizona, where they could go to shopping centers, attend Spring Training baseball games, or travel all the way up to Flagstaff or the Grand Canyon where they could spend more dollars.

state of Arizona. Since the late 1970s, the University of Arizona (UA) has conducted four extensive research studies that assess direct spending by Mexican visitors and estimate their total economic impact on Arizona. The last Mexican visitors study prior to this study was conducted in 2007-2008. This report outlines calculations of baseline expenditures of Mexican visitors to Arizona from 2013 to 2016, and provides “what if” scenarios of the effect of extending the border zone statewide. The “what if” scenarios include 1) An increase in all border crossers2 by three percent; 2) an increase in passenger crossers3 by three percent; and 3) increases of five percent, 10 percent and 15 percent in the number of Mexican travelers4 traveling north of the existing border zone. The UA utilized IMPLAN, a nationally recognized impact analysis model to estimate the economic impacts related to these scenarios.

The analysis used data and detailed characteristics of Mexican visitors and their spending obtained in a 2007-2008 Mexican visitors study conducted by the UA for the Arizona Office of Tourism. The first task was to build a model based on the 2007-08 survey to accurately estimate travel parties5 and expenditures, by port of entry and by destinationcounty; as a result, initial 2013 estimates of expenditures, by port of entry, and by destination-county, were made.

It can be reasonably assumed that spending increased in proportion to increases in per capita income6 in Mexico; Short-term trends were used to “project” border crossers for 2014 – 2016, by port of entry by mode, based on the growth rates in passenger crossers numbers from their trough to current levels for each port of entry.

In 2015, MAG requested that the UA conduct an economic impact analysis of Mexican spending resulting from extending the border zone to the entire

Central Arizona Governments (CAG), Flagstaff Metropolitan Planning Organization (FMPO), Pima Association of Governments (PAG), Southeastern Arizona Governments Organization (SEAGO), Western Arizona Council of Governments (WACOG) and Yuma Metropolitan Planning Organization (YMPO). 2 Refers to data provided by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection of all non-U.S. Citizens (representing Mexican citizens) crossing legally into Arizona through its southern ports of entry either by foot, in personal-owned vehicles, in buses, train, or in small private aircrafts. The percentage of non‐U.S. Citizens to total (U.S. and non‐U.S. Citizens) border crossings is assumed unchanged since the 2008 study. Arizona’s southern ports of entry include Douglas, Lukeville, Naco, Nogales (international airport, and Mariposa and DeConcini gateways), San Luis (commercial and passenger gateways), Sasabe, and Lukeville. 3 Mexican citizens crossing legally into Arizona through its six land ports of entry in personal-owned vehicles, and buses. 4 Mexican citizens crossing legally into Arizona through its air and land ports of entry. 5 Group of people traveling together on a trip under a single or pooled budget. Example is a family of two parents and three children. 6 Measured as annual compounded average growth in per capita Mexican Gross Domestic Product (1.74 percent), a proxy for income growth in Mexico. 1

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Excerpt from Extending the Border Zone to the Entire State of Arizona: Estimated Expenditures and Economic Impact Simulations, 2013–2016 •

Total 2013 border crossers to Arizona are 27.4 percent below the 2007-08 levels. Strong recent trends in passenger crossers, particularly through the ports of San Luis and Nogales, result in a projected average annual compounded growth rate for border crossers of almost 9 percent between 2013 and 2016.

U.S. State Department’s consulates and embassies in Mexico in fiscal year 2013 were for BCCs7.

The total number of travel parties fell by almost 31 percent between 2007-08 and 2013, more than the reduction in all border crossers. This is because the number of pedestrian crossers fell dramatically, particularly in Nogales, and pedestrians have a smaller travel party size. Therefore, the 44 percent fall in pedestrian crossers translates into a decrease in travel parties that is larger than the decrease in total border crossers. Annual spending of Mexican visitors to Arizona declined to $2.257 billion in 2013 – approximately $431 million lower than the 2007–2008 levels, due to the recession and effects of heightened travel and border security measures. Based on a 9 percent projected annual increase in passenger crossers and the small assumed 1.74 percent annual increase in per party expenditures, estimated total expenditures grew 6.9 percent annually from 2013 to 2016. The total direct and indirect jobs impact of these estimated expenditures were 23,076 in 2013, and 25,064, 27257, and 29,677 in 2014–2016. The projected baseline expenditures for 2014, 2015 and 2016 were used to assess the economic impacts of the “what if” scenarios of extending the border zone statewide.

The proposed change would allow pre-cleared Mexican visitors holding a BCC, which currently acts as a visa document, to travel beyond Tucson without having to fill out an additional paper I–94 form and provide flexibility to spend their tourist dollars throughout Arizona, invigorating tourismsensitive economies in both rural and urban regions of the state. Analysis of border crossings during the 1999 border zone extension in Arizona from 25mile to 75-mile indicates an increase of under 3.9 percent in border crossings between 1998 and 1999 (year prior to the extension) compared to between 1999 and 2000 (the year following the change).

The most recent border zone expansion occurred in 2013 in the state of New Mexico, which extended its border zone from 25 miles to 55 miles. Analysis of border crossings right after the extension indicates crossings (including through the El Paso port of entry) were 4.2 percent higher during the year after the border expansion than the year prior to the border expansion.

Three “what if” scenarios were run: an increase in all border crossers by 3 percent; an increase in passenger crossers by 3 percent; and increases of 5 percent, 10 percent and 15 percent in the number of Mexican visitors traveling to the north of the existing border zone.

Overall this report concludes that extending the border zone to the entire state of Arizona could:

Extending the border zone will affect more than 1 million Mexican visitors who have been issued a BCC over the last 10 years in Nogales and Hermosillo, the two closest cities to Arizona located in the state of Sonora. This group represents a significantly large population who could positively impact Arizona’s economy. Nearly 1.5 million of the 1.7 million visa applications adjudicated at the

Generate up to $181 million in additional estimated spending and 2,179 additional jobs in 20168 Bring the total projected spending of Mexican visitors to Arizona to nearly $3.1 billion and a total jobs impact of 31,856. These numbers are expected to move with the Mexican economy.

U.S. State Department Hearing on Border Security – 2013. Based on a scenario of a three percent increase in border crossings resulting from the positive message the extension would send, and a 15 percent increase in passenger crossings who decide to travel north of the 75-mile border zone due to the extension 7 8

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Excerpt from Extending the Border Zone to the Entire State of Arizona: Estimated Expenditures and Economic Impact Simulations, 2013–2016

Summary Table: Total Effects Of Potential Spending By Mexican Visitors Due To Proposed Border Zone Extension BASELINE IMPACTS OF 2016 PROJECTIONS OF MEXICAN VISITORS SPENDING Spending baseline projections Expected jobs created from baseline spending

2,907,340,000 29,677

ADDITIONAL SPENDING BY MEXICAN VISITORS DUE TO PROPOSED BORDER ZONE EXPANSION - BEST CASE SCENARIO, 2016

75,350,000 105,870,000 181,220,00

A 3 percent increase in total border crossers A 15 percent increase in passenger crossers traveling farther north Total potential spending

JOBS EFFECTS OF ADDITIONAL SPENDING

769 1,410 2,179

A 3 percent increase in total border crossers A 15 percent increase in passenger crossers traveling farther north Total Jobs effect

TOTAL EFFECT OF POTENTIAL SPENDING BY MEXICAN VISITORS DUE TO PROPOSED BORDER ZONE EXTENSION, 2016 Spending - baseline projections and additional spending Expected jobs created from baseline projections and additional spending

3,088,560,000 31,856

U.S. State Department Hearing on Border Security – 2013. Based on a scenario of a three percent increase in border crossings resulting from the positive message the extension would send, and a 15 percent increase in passenger crossings who decide to travel north of the 75-mile border zone due to the extension 7 8

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MILLENNIALS MAINSTREAMING MESSAGING

“We appreciate and commend the Arizona Hispanic Chamber for publishing its 19th annual DATOS report. Accurate, reliable data is essential to more deeply understanding our diverse communities’ strengths and assets as well as their needs and vulnerabilities. As a statewide philanthropy, we support innovative new ideas and culturally competent programs that bring positive, lasting change where it’s needed most. Having access to this data and confronting indisputable facts allows us to better understand and serve a critically important and rapidly growing part of our population, inspire sound policy options, and organize our funding and initiatives in ways that are responsive to the needs of our diverse state.” —Steve Seleznow, President & CEO, Arizona Community Foundation

U.S. Hispanic Market Growing Less ‘Niche’ And More ‘Mainstream’ In an era when the nation’s top 500 advertisers are spending more than $7.1 billion a year on media targeted at the Hispanic market, grasping the nature and nuances of the country’s largest minority group is more important than ever.

Spanish-language usage tied to their generation or country of origin. According to Elizabeth Ellers, executive vice president of Corporate Research at Univision, marketers too often fail to understand that “language use and acculturation are not synonymous, and the process of acculturation is fluid.”

There are 55 million Latinos in the United States, accounting for 17 percent the nation’s population and nearly half of U.S. growth since 2010.

Acculturation is what results when two different cultures come into contact, Ellers writes. That interaction is also multidimensional, she adds, and depends on whether the different groups are comparatively young or old, native or foreign-born, single or married and so forth.

According to Advertising Age Magazine, which recently published its annual Hispanic Fact Pack: “More than 25 percent of the U.S. population under the age of 10 is Hispanic, and so are more than 20 percent of millennials.” The magazine adds, “Hispanics continue to be more digital than their non-Hispanic counterparts…playing video games and accessing the internet on a tablet or phone.”

“Language is just one of a number of dimensions on which Hispanics, and other ethnic groups, adapt to the prevailing U.S. culture,” says Ellers, who cites Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s comment: “Although I am an American, love my country and could achieve its opportunity of succeeding at anything I worked for, I also have a Latina soul and heart, with the magic that carries.”

In short, Hispanics are real players in today’s consumer market and their relative youth foreshadow their growing influence. Reaching this fast-changing Hispanic market requires clear and authentic marketing campaigns, say experts. Long gone are the days when a company’s advertising arm could simply translate English ads into Spanish and expect to reach and resonate with Hispanic consumers.

Steve Barrett of PRWeek magazine insists that. “Demographics and purchasing power make this diverse population [Hispanics] more than a niche to advertisers.”

“Often, when translated into Spanish, an American message turns offensive, silly or meaningless,” says Mayté Sera Weitzman, a Houston public relations consultant who was born in Mexico to Cuban parents, raised in the United States is and married to an Argentinian.

In 2015, the spending power of the Hispanic market will reach $1.5 trillion, a figure roughly equivalent to the gross domestic product of Spain. Meanwhile, there are now more Spanish speakers in the United States than in any country on earth, except Mexico.

For example, the highly successful U.S. ad campaign, “Got Milk”, translated into “Are you lactating?” to Mexican audiences.

“Latinos are no longer a subset of the market: they are a significant player in their own right,” said Barrett. “Connecting with Hispanic audiences is critical for all brands if they want to grow over the next decade.”

Latino audiences expect advertising to focus on Hispanic cultural values and an understanding of the differences in

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You Know You’re A Diverse Millennial If… Even more diverse than millennials are the youngest Americans: those younger than 5 years old. In 2014, this group became majorityminority for the first time, with 50.2 percent being part of a minority race or ethnic group.

• You were born between 1982 and 2000 • You are one of the 83.1 million that makes up ¼ of the U.S. population • You are a part of the 44% of minorities that make up the U.S. millennial population

Source: U.S. Census, 6/25/15

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D-Backs Give Back With Play Ball Uniform Program Over the last five years, organized youth baseball and softball leagues in Arizona have declined at an alarming rate. Sadly, leagues in economically depressed areas are the first to succumb to the financial crisis. To better understand the situation, the D-backs met with representatives from 25 youth leagues to assess participation, financials, and volunteer leadership. Through the process, the Arizona Diamondbacks learned that player uniforms are a primary expense for each league - creating a financial burden that is often hard to afford. Immediately, the D-backs team began to assess the possibility of funding D-backs uniforms for the most at-risks leagues. Although the preliminary decision was simple, the D-backs decided to address the needs of as many leagues as pos-

to host teams for D-backs games and serve as a team liaison

sible – accepting an astounding 62 leagues into the program

for the league throughout the season. Even more important

in 2015. To keep baseball and softball alive and assist fi-

is ensuring youth leagues, developing our future players, are

nancially strapped youth leagues from across Arizona, more

sustainable. Nearly half of the 62 leagues were identified as

than 30,000 baseball and softball players and coaches

financially unstable.

started the 2015 season wearing their very own D-backs uniforms provided by the Arizona Diamondbacks Founda-

The D-backs Give Back Play Ball Uniform Program proved

tion. The uniform donation was such a boost to local leagues

to be the answer in reducing league uniform costs. Leagues

that many leagues experienced increased interest and en-

were able to re-allocate funds to make field improvements,

rollment - due to the excitement of the big league D-backs

create self-sustaining snack bars and reduce registration

uniforms.

In a few cases league leadership even chose to

fees – resulting in a 20 percent increase in participation. In

pass on savings and decrease league enrollment fees to at-

addition, the D-backs encouraged league collaboration on

tract new families.

best practices in reducing costs, recruiting volunteer leadership, marketing to families, and collecting used equipment

Simply stated, the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation has

for leagues unable to buy new equipment. The total impact

saved 62 youth baseball and softball leagues the cost of

of the Program is estimated at a reduced cost to leagues of

jerseys and hats.

over $750,000.

In 2015, an investment of $750,000

more than 30,000 D-backs baseball and softball uniforms

The investment resulted in urban league’s being saved from

to players and coaches in 62 different leagues. Fry’s Food

collapse. The quality uniforms, in 68 different color combina-

Stores, Tide, and Western Refining assisted the Arizona Dia-

tions, inspire T-ball kids to high school athletes to feel like

mondbacks Foundation with $300,000 in charitable support

their “Big League Dream” is in reach while increasing fan

to cover the costs of the statewide initiative. To further de-

affinity and D-backs game attendance through group sales.

velop relationships with the leagues and ensure success of

Due to financial need and popular demand, the program will

the program, D-backs executives, staff, and alumni attended

expand in 2016 reaching 40,000 kids and coaches in 75

Opening Ceremonies, while D-backs personnel volunteered

leagues from across Arizona.

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Photos Courtesy of D-backs

covered the cost to manufacture, warehouse, and distribute


healthcare reform, and high unemployment. This evolving landscape has shaped the way that this segment views the world around them. In this first wave of research we wanted to gain a deeper influence T H understanding E S T A T on E how O Fthese A challenges R I Z O N A ’ S the H worldview I S P A Nof IHispanic C M Millennials, A R K E T and how these perceptions are different from those of older Hispanic segments as well as their inTroduCTion non-Hispanic counterparts. By diving into the mindset of Hispanic Millennials, brands will be SECTION III SEGMENTATION CHAPTER 12 MILLENNIALS able to gain a deeper understanding on how to message them and engage with them in a more culturally and psychographically relevant way. This first wave of research dives into the background following topics with respect to Hispanic Millennials: •

Perception on the direction of the U.S.

Beliefs in the American Dream

Definitions of success

Contribution to the household

The Hispanic Millennial Project (HMP) is a joint research study developed by cross-cultural advertising agency Sensis and leading market research firm ThinkNow Research. The study aims to develop a better understanding of Hispanic Millennials living in the United States and dig deeper into segmentation, points of tension, and differences between U.S.-born vs. foreign-born Hispanic Millennials. The study and research will be conducted and released in waves in 2014 and early 2015, where each wave will focus on a different topic relevant to this segment.

objectives

Key findings

The Hispanic Millennial Project will provide insights into critical questions regarding Hispanic Millennials, including: •

How Hispanic Millennials differ from “mainstream” Millennials

• the How U.S. Hispanic Millennials are from other Millennials Hispanic cohorts They are more satisfied with the direction of compared todifferent non-Hispanic •

The digital behavior and motivations of Hispanic Millennials

An introduction of potential Hispanic Millennial segments

They are more driven by the “American Dream” compared to non-Hispanic Millennials

Hispanic Millennials are more invested in higher education than non-Hispanic Millennials Despite their foreign-born heritage, foreign-born Hispanic Millennials want to fit into the mainstream demographic Trends

Millennials are contributing to the Hispanic Millennials Hispanic make up the second largest Hispanic cohort living in themore United States. In 2013, Hispanic Millennials accounted for 25% of all Hispanics. They also account for a sizeable proportion of all Millennials. Out of all Millennials living in the United States, 21% were identified as being Hispanic.

household expenses compared to non-Hispanic Millennials

Hispanic Millennials are more attracted to owning their own business than non-Hispanic Millennials 2013 Hispanic population by Generation

Z (Hispanic) Wave Generation 1: Introducing Hispanic Millennials 33%

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

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25%

Generation Y (Hispanic millennials)

Hispanic Millennials identified Apple as the brand that was most associated with success 20%

Generation X (Hispanic)

17%

Baby Boomers (Hispanic)

Walmart was4% seen as the brand that did the best job of communicating with Hispanic Millennials

Silent Generation (Hispanic) (Hispanic) Greatest Generation

0%

Source: Geoscape, 2013-2018 State Hispanic Gen Y population American Marketscape DataStream™ 2013 Series

demographic Trends

Hispanic Millennials now make up the majority of Millennials in key DMA’s.

Hispanic Millennials make up the second largest Hispanic cohort living in the United States. In 2013, Hispanic Millennials accounted for 25% of all Hispanics. They also account for a sizeable proportion of all Millennials. Out of all Millennials living in the United States, 21% / 8 were identified as being Hispanic.

% Hispanic Millennial/Total dMA Millennial Population

nic Millennial project 50%

58%

50%

41% 28%

93%

25%

32%

31%

33%

58% 32%

2013 Hispanic population by Generation 35% 18%

33%

Generation Z (Hispanic)

14%

25%

Harlingen-Weslaco-Brownsville-McAllen

Generation Y (Hispanic millennials)

Source: Geoscape, 2013-2018 State Hispanic Gen Y population American Marketscape DataStream™ 2013 Series

20%

Generation X (Hispanic)

17%

Baby Boomers (Hispanic) Silent Generation (Hispanic)

4%

(Hispanic) Greatest Generation

0%

Source: Geoscape, 2013-2018 State Hispanic Gen Y population American Marketscape DataStream™ 2013 Series

Hispanic Millennials now make up the majority of Millennials in key DMA’s.

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

% Hispanic Millennial/Total dMA Millennial Population

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

93%

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50%

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Wave 2: Hispanic Millennials and Healthcare By diving into the mindset of Hispanic Millennials on the topic of health, health-related brands will be able to gain a deeper understanding of how to message to them and engage with them in a 1: culturally relevant way. The second wave of research dives into the following topics with WAVE INTRODUCING HISPANIC MILLENNIALS Hispanic Millennials in the U.S. have come of age respect to Hispanic Millennials: Key THeMes & insigHTs facing the effects of the Great Recession, the war on terror, major health-

care reform, and high unemployment rates. At the same time, Hispanics have become more influential in terms of wealth, educational attainment, and politics. The first wave of the Hispanic Millennial Project analyzes how these changes have transformed Hispanic Millennials’ world• Attitudes about health and wellness views and compares their attitudes to those of non-Hispanic Millennials. Understanding these nuances can allow brands to better message Hispanics and to engage with this growing audience on a • Beliefs about diet and exercise Hispanic more culturally relevant level. Millennials are More optimistic

• Adoption of Hispanic health-related Millennialstechnology are more positive about the direction of the United States compared toMILLENNIALS non-Hispanic Millennials and older Hispanics WAVE 2: HISPANIC AND • Healthcare insurance knowledge HEALTHCARE and enrollment

The second wave of the Hispanic Millennial Project focuses onhas healthcare. analyzes Hispanics’ attitude on toward Despite the hardships that this generation faced, the Itoutlook of Hispanic Millennials the health, well• Attitudes Affordable Care ness, nutrition, andtowards exercise. The study alsoStates dives intoAct Hispanic Millienials’ perceptions of health-related health directionthe of the United remains optimistic. When asked, “How satisfied are you withtechnology, the insurance, and the Affordable Care Act. This wave reveals that Hispanic Millennials are at the forefront of the health tech direction that the U.S. is going in?”, 63% of Hispanic Millennials indicated that they were either “craze” across the nation, but that their cultural views on health still nuanced, while still rooted in traditions from older Hispanic “Very Satisfied” or “Somewhat Satisfied” with the current direction of the U.S. This is noticeably generations. different from the response of non-Hispanic Millennials, where only 39% indicated that they were either “Very Satisfied” or “Somewhat Satisfied” with the current direction of the country.

KEY FINDINGS

How satisfied are you with the direction that the U.S. is going in?

RESULTS OF TOP 2 compared BOX: Completely Agree/Somewhat Agree They rate their overall health more positively to non-Hispanic Millennials.

69% They define health as having a good diet, feeling good, and exercising. 63%

60%

57%

They report lower levels of stress compared to non-Hispanic Millennials. 39%

41%

Diabetes is the illness that they are most concerned about getting in the future. Hispanic Millenials

nonHispanic

Hispanic Millenials

Hispanic Millenials

Millenials exercise and U.s. Born Foreign Born They maintain their health through having a proper diet.

Hispanic 35-64 U.s. Born

Hispanic 35-64 Foreign Born

They consult both their doctor and the Internet when seeking health-related information or advice. Compared to non-Hispanic Millennials, they are more likely to resist seeing a doctor unless it’s absolutely necessary. When they consult a doctor, they are more likely to get a second opinion compared to non-Hispanic Millennials. They have adopted technology into their health maintenance. H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

Compared to non-Hispanic Millennials, they are more in favor of the Affordable Care Act.

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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WAVE 3: HISPANIC MILLENNIALS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

In the third wave, the Hispanic Project examines Hispanics’ perceptions of financial services during the “too big to Key THeMes &Millennial insigHTs fail” era.Overall, the Hispanic Millennial is pragmatic when it comes to finances—perhaps largely in Althoughresponse a significant percentage Hispanic Millennials earn below U.S. median household they are selfto having come of of age during a recessionary periodtheand due to cultural normsincome, of being supporting, proactive savers, and often contribute significantly to overall household incomes. stable providers for family. Below are the emerging themes and key insights pertaining to financial The study challenges misperceptions aboutthat howHispanic Hispanics handle finances, and reveals that this group is pragmatic with services that support the finding Millennials are responsible financially: money. Overall, this wave analyzes how cultural norms,the effects of the Great Recession and technology affect the way HisHispanic Millennials are More optimistic panic Millennials approach finances and relationships with banks. Hispanic Millennials are more positive about the direction of the United States compared to non-Hispanic Millennials and older Hispanics

Despite the hardships that this generation has faced, the outlook of Hispanic Millennials on the direction of the United States remains optimistic. When asked, “How satisfied are you with the direction that the U.S. is going in?”, 63% of Hispanic Millennials indicated that they were either “Very Satisfied” or “Somewhat Satisfied” with the current direction of the U.S. This is noticeably different from the response of non-Hispanic Millennials, where only 39% indicated that they were either “Very Satisfied” or “Somewhat Satisfied” with the current direction of the country.

How satisfied are you with the direction that the U.S. is going in? RESULTS OF TOP 2 BOX: Completely Agree/Somewhat Agree

69%

63%

60%

57% 41%

39%

Hispanic Millenials

nonHispanic Millenials

Hispanic Millenials U.s. Born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Hispanic 35-64 U.s. Born

Hispanic 35-64 Foreign Born

WAVE 4: FOOD, BEVERAGE AND ALCOHOL

The fourth wave of the Hispanic Millennial Project focuses on Millennial attitudes, behaviors and preferences for Food, Beverages and Alcohol. Among the key findings, we learn that although Hispanic Millennials are less likely to conduct research or use coupons, they are actively involved in grocery shopping. Leveraging the insights found in our research, we have identified a list of five important H i s p aimplications n i c M i l l e n nfor i a l marketers. project /9 The study looks not only at deep cultural roots, but also at how we define ourselves, socialize and how we share our most meaningful experiences. This wave confirms some traditional beliefs that align with the general market, but also exposes some unexpected conflicts within this crucial segment of the total market.

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Key THeMes & insigHTs

Hispanic Millennials are More optimistic Hispanic Millennials are more positive about the direction of the United States compared to non-Hispanic Millennials and older Hispanics Despite the hardships that this generation has faced, the outlook of Hispanic Millennials on the direction of the United States remains optimistic. When asked, “How satisfied are you with the direction that the U.S. is going in?”, 63% of Hispanic Millennials indicated that they were either “Very Satisfied” or “Somewhat Satisfied” with the current direction of the U.S. This is noticeably different from the response of non-Hispanic Millennials, where only 39% indicated that they were either “Very Satisfied” or “Somewhat Satisfied” with the current direction of the country.

How satisfied are you with the direction that the U.S. is going in? RESULTS OF TOP 2 BOX: Completely Agree/Somewhat Agree

69%

63%

60%

57% 41%

39%

Hispanic Millenials

nonHispanic Millenials

Hispanic Millenials U.s. Born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Hispanic 35-64 U.s. Born

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

Hispanic 35-64 Foreign Born

/9

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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The Hidden Millennial segment: foreign-born Hispanic Millennials This little known segment differs in numerous ways from their U.S. born counterparts Most research fails to separate foreign-born and U.S. born Hispanic Millennials, and very little research has been published comparing the two groups. This is surprising, considering that foreign-born Hispanic Millennials make up between 42% and 44% of the total Hispanic Millennial population. While foreign-born Hispanic Millennials share some similarities with their U.S. born counterparts, our research provides a first glimpse into what is a separate and distinct segment. Despite their foreign-born heritage, foreign-born Hispanic Millennials (FBHM) want to fit into the mainstream. This is a group of Hispanic Millennials that challenges the popular belief that younger Hispanics want to “stand out” from the American mainstream culture. When compared to U.S.-born Hispanics, FBHM agree significantly more with the statement “I want to fit into the mainstream.”

i want to fit into the mainstream 56% 40%

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Hispanic Millenials US Born

Non-Hispanic Millenials

30%

Hispanic Millenials

55%

Hispanic 35 – 64 Foreign Born

46%

Hispanic 35 – 64 US Born

49%

Also, unlike U.S. born Hispanic Millennials, a strong majority of foreign-born Hispanic Millennials (62%) indicate that religion plays a big part in their lives. They have much more traditional views on marriage (56% indicate marriage should be between a man and a woman) and drugs (only 43% think marijuana should be legalized).

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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U.S. BORN HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

FOREIGN-BORN HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

Religion plays a big part in my life

44%

62%

Marriage should b/w man & woman

37 %

56%

Marijuana should be legalized

53%

43%

Want to fit in with mainstream

46%

56%

Being happy with yourself, regardless of what you have

46%

34%

Being passionate about what you do for a living

34%

24%

Having children

37 %

13 %

Making a difference in peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives

26%

37 %

Being wealthy

23%

13 %

Owning a home

49%

62%

Getting an advanced degree

39%

50%

Graduating from 4-year college

35%

50%

Being able to travel to nice places

37 %

26%

Meaning of American Dream

Strong Indicators of Success

Surprisingly, foreign-born Hispanic Millennials are less likely to associate being wealthy, having children, and being passionate about what you do for a living as their definition of the American Dream, which differs markedly with their U.S. born counterparts. FBHM see success as defined by owning a home and less as being able to travel to nice places. Most interestingly, FBHM are driving the emphasis on education among Hispanic Millennials, with 50% viewing graduating from college and getting an advanced degree as part of their American Dream.

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Heightened importance of Higher education Hispanic Millennials are more invested in higher education than non-Hispanic Millennials Hispanic Millennials place heightened value on higher education. When asked if graduating from a four-year college is a future goal, 46% of Hispanic Millennials indicated that it was a goal compared to only 31% of non-Hispanic Millennials. This trend continues when looking at obtaining an advanced degree (Master’s or PhD), where 45% of Hispanic Millennials indicated that this was a goal compared to 33% of non-Hispanic Millennials. The importance of higher education increases when looking at foreign-born Hispanic Millennials, where 51% indicated that graduating from a four-year college was a goal and 57% indicated that they would like to earn an advanced degree (Master’s or PhD).

Future Goal: Getting an advanced degree (Master’s or phD)

Future Goal: Graduate from a 4-year college

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

24%

24%

Hispanic 35 – 64 Foreign Born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Hispanic Millenials US Born

Non-Hispanic Millenials

17%

Hispanic Millenials

Hispanic 35 – 64 US Born

22%

40%

Hispanic 35 – 64 US Born

33%

Hispanic 35 – 64 Foreign Born

44%

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Non-Hispanic Millenials

Hispanic Millenials

31%

Hispanic Millenials US Born

46%

57% 45%

51%

/ 12

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Hispanic Millennials Continue To believe in and be driven by The “american dream” Hispanic Millennials are more driven by the “American Dream” compared to nonHispanic Millennials Hispanic Millennials still believe in and strive for the “American Dream.” When asked how much they agree with the statement, “The ‘American Dream’ is something I believe in,” 71% indicated that they either “Completely Agree” or “Somewhat Agree” with this statement and 67% indicated that it is something that they strive for. This contrasts with non-Hispanic Millennials, where only 55% indicated that they believe in the “American Dream” and only 54% stated that it is something they strive for.

The “american dream” is something i believe in RESULTS OF TOP 2 BOX: Completely Agree/Somewhat Agree

73%

71%

65%

70%

68%

55%

Hispanic Millenials

NonHispanic Millenials

Hispanic Millenials U.S. born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign born

Hispanic 35-64 U.S. born

Hispanic 35-64 Foreign born

The “american dream” is something i strive for RESULTS OF TOP 2 BOX: Completely Agree/Somewhat Agree

67%

69%

66%

64%

60%

54%

VV

Hispanic Millenials

NonHispanic Millenials

Hispanic Millenials U.S. born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign born

Hispanic 35-64 U.S. born

Hispanic 35-64 Foreign born

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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There is also a difference in how the two segments define the “American Dream.” When asked to define what the “American Dream” means to them, 52% of Hispanic Millennials defined it as being financially comfortable, whereas 53% of non-Hispanic Millennials defined it as owning a home.

Hispanic Millennials

Non-Hispanic Millennials

Hispanic Millennials US Born

Hispanic Millennials Foreign Born

Being Financially comfortable

52%

48%

55%

46%

owning a home

48%

53%

50%

43%

Being able to take care of/provide for my family

46%

52%

47%

44%

Being happy with yourself, regardless of what you have done

43%

47%

46%

34%

Having a respectable job

38%

31%

38%

39%

Being passionate about/enjoying what you do for a living

31%

32%

34%

24%

Having children

31%

35%

37%

13%

Making a difference in people’s lives

29%

26%

26%

37%

Being married

29%

35%

36%

12%

owning a business

24%

11%

22%

31%

Being able to travel to nice places

23%

17%

25%

17%

Graduating from a 4-year college

22%

16%

24%

18%

Having a certain salary

22%

14%

22%

23%

Being wealthy/rich

20%

15%

23%

13%

owning a nice/expensive car

15%

13%

17%

11%

Getting an advanced degree (Masters or phD)

14%

7%

13%

16%

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e cWhite t does not include African-Americans, Asians and other ethnic groups *Non-Hispanic

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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success Through The lens of Hispanic Millennials A detailed view into what “Real Success” looks like for Hispanic Millennials vs. Non-Hispanic Millennials Owning a Home - When it comes to distinguishing what the real indicators of success are for Hispanic Millennials, the white picket fence resonates for this segment. When asked what are some of the strongest indicators of success, Hispanic Millennials were more likely to agree versus non-Hispanics that owning a home was a top indicator of success. Higher Education - There is also a significant difference when it comes to the importance of higher education. 42% of Hispanic Millennials vs. 23% of non-Hispanic Millennials believed that getting an advanced degree was a strong indicator of success. Owning a Business - The value placed on owning a business sets Hispanic Millennials apart from their non-Hispanic cohorts: 47% of Hispanic Millennials see owning a business as an indicator of success versus 23% of non-Hispanic Millennials.

HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

HISPANIC 35+

Owning a home

53%

42%

Having a respectable job

49%

38%

Owning a business

47%

23%

Getting an advanced degree

42%

23%

Graduating from 4-year college

39%

25%

Reasons they won’t get a 4-year degree (Too many other things to worry about)

41%

30%

Plan on getting a graduate degree

84%

57%

Living with parents/family permanent (Move out in the next year)

24%

8%

Living with parents/family permanent (Move out in the next 2–4 years)

38%

50%

Do you contribute to HH’s finances?

22%

9%

Strong Indicators of Success

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Hispanic Millennials less likely to live with Parents and Have Plans to stay Non-Hispanic Millennials are slightly more likely to live with their parents compared to Hispanic Millennials. When asked, “Do you rent or own the place where you currently live?” 20% of nonHispanic Millennials specified that they lived with their parents compared to 17% of Hispanic Millennials. Non-Hispanic Millennials also indicate that they are planning to reside with their parents for a longer period of time. When asked if their living arrangement was a temporary or permanent situation, only 8% of non-Hispanic Millennials specified that they would be moving out in the next year compared to 24% of Hispanic Millennials. Majority of non-Hispanic Millennials indicated that they would be moving out in the next two to four years.

Do you rent or own the place where you currently live? 50% 40%

46%

42%

30%

Hispanic Millenials

38% 32%

20% 17%

10%

20%

NonHispanic Millenials

0% Rent

Own

Live with my parents/family

Live in dormitory/at school

Other

Is this a temporary or permanent situation? 60% 50%

50%

Hispanic Millenials

40% 38%

30% 20%

24%

10%

12%

8%

0%

Temporary, will move out in the next year

20%

15% 5%

Temporary, will move out in the next 2 to 4 years

Temporary, will move out 5 or more years from now

18%

9%

Permanent

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

NonHispanic Millenials

Not sure

/ 16

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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re-evaluating the decision Maker in The Hispanic Household Hispanic Millennials are contributing more to the household expenses compared to non-Hispanic Millennials For those Hispanic Millennials that do live with their parents, they are bigger financial contributors to household expenses than their non-Hispanic counterparts. When surveyed, 30% of Hispanic Millennials reported that they contribute either half or the majority of their finances to household expenses compared to only 9% of non-Hispanic Millennials. In contrast, 30% of non-Hispanic Millennials reported that they do not contribute at all financially to household expenses.

Hispanic Millennials Contribution to Household

I dont contribute financially

30%

14%

33%

I contribute minimally

I pay less than half of the household expenses (including rent/mortgage)

NonHispanic Millenials

27% 14%

I pay for about half of the household cost (including rent/mortgage) I pay for all or the majority of the household cost (including rent/mortgage)

43%

Hispanic Millenials

9% 22%

0 8%

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Hispanic Millennials: entrepreneurial at Heart Hispanic Millennials are more attracted to owning a business than non-Hispanic Millennials Hispanic Millennials perceive owning a business as a strong indicator of success and as a future goal. When asked if “Owning your business” was an indicator of success, 47% of Hispanic Millennials indicated that it was a strong indicator, with 48% noting that it was a future goal. This is in stark contrast to non-Hispanic Millennials, where only 23% specified that owning a business was a strong indicator and 61% stated that it was not a future goal for them. When comparing U.S.-born Hispanic Millennials to foreign-born Hispanic Millennials, foreign-born Hispanic Millennials are even more entrepreneurially focused. When surveyed, 54% of foreign-born Hispanic Millennials stated that it was a strong indicator of success and 57% specified that it was a future goal for them.

40%

57%

44% 31%

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Hispanic Millenials US Born

Hispanic Millenials

Hispanic 35 – 64 Foreign Born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Hispanic Millenials US Born

Non-Hispanic Millenials

45% 29%

26%

23%

Hispanic Millenials

48%

Hispanic 35 – 64 Foreign Born

54%

Non-Hispanic Millenials

45%

Hispanic 35 – 64 US Born

47%

Future Goal: owning a business

Hispanic 35 – 64 US Born

indicator of success: owning a business

/ 18

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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brands THaT resonaTe WiTH HisPaniC Millennials

apple Most associated with success Among Hispanic Millennials, Apple was the brand that was most associated with success. When asked, “Which brands or companies do you associate with “success,” 28% of Hispanic Millennials chose Apple, followed by Microsoft at 13%.

Hispanic Millenials 28%

93%

14%

Lexus

Toyota

Starbucks

Pepsi

18%

Adidas

35%

32%

BMW

33%

8%

Target

Walmart

9%

Sony

10%

Samsung

Coke

10%

Nike

Microsoft

Apple

10%

58%

Google

58% 13%

Wal-Mart best Communicates with Hispanic Millennials Walmart was seen as the brand that did the best job of communicating with Hispanic Millennials. When asked, “Which brands do you feel does a good job of relating and/or communicating to someone like yourself?” 43% chose Walmart, followed by Apple at 40%. Which brands below do you feel do a good job of relating and/or communicating to someone like yourself?

Hispanic Millenials

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

Kia

1% Other

Volkswagon

Nokia

Corona

Budweiser

Reebok

HP

Adidas

Honda

Verizon

LG

Pepsi

Starbuck’s

Toyota

Nike

Sony

Microsoft

Target

Samsung

Coca-Cola

Apple

Walmart

43% 40% 40% 38% 36% 35% 33% 31% 30% 30% 29% 26% 23% 22% 21% 20% 17% 15% 14% 11% 10% 9%

/ 19

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Product Quality and Trust Most important brand drivers for Hispanic Millennials Hispanic Millennials consider the quality of the products and the trust for the products/brands as the two most important drivers of brand affinity, followed by product/brand likeability. Why do you feel these brands do a good job of relating and/or communicating to someone like yourself?

Hispanic Millenials They give back to the community

3%

They have great value/price

7%

They have creative marketing They have good service

5%

They target people like me They have quality They have variety They are good products/awesome

11% 10%

4% 2%

They are popular They are good companies It is the brand I use

21%

7% 6%

I trust the product/brand

10% 21%

I like the product/brand

20%

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

/20

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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HisPaniC Millennial PoinTs of Tension

One of the most important ways to establish a deeper understanding of Hispanic Millennials is to comprehend the points of tension characterizing their lives. As marketers, we know points of tension provide powerful opportunities to communicate and connect with consumers. Among the defining characteristics we see in Hispanic Millennials are the numerous and deep cultural and psychographic points of tension they face. Because they live in two cultures, caught between very different generations, they face constant cultural tensions involving decisions related to family, career, food, language, faith and definitions of community. The Hispanic Millennial Project research identified a number of points of tension, including the following key areas. Fitting In/Standing Out Hispanic Millennials struggle with the need to fit in with mainstream culture, while trying to maintain their cultural identity. When asked how much they agree with the statement, “I want to fit in with the mainstream,” 49% of Hispanic Millennials indicated that they either agree completely or somewhat with this statement.

I want to fit in with the mainstream 56% 49%

Hispanic Millenials

46%

Hispanic Millenials U.s. Born

55% 40%

Hispanic Millenials foreign Born

Hispanic 35-64 U.s. Born

Hispanic 35-64 foreign Born

Yet when asked if they want to stand out as Latinos, 67% agreed with this statement.

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Yet when asked if they want to stand out as Latinos, 67% agreed with this statement.

I want to stand out as a latino 72% 67%

70%

65% 43%

Hispanic Millenials

Hispanic 35-64 U.S. born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign born

Hispanic Millenials U.S. born

Hispanic 35-64 Foreign born

being latino 47% of Hispanic Millennials indicate that they feel close or somewhat close to their culture, while 67% of them state that they want to stand out as a Latino. This gap is biggest among U.S.-born Hispanic Millennials, where only 41% indicate they are close to their Latino culture, yet 65% of them want to stand out as Latino. This indicates there is a gap between where they are and want to be in terms of their Latino cultural identity.

Hispanic Millennials

U.S. born Hispanic Millennials

Foreign- born Hispanic Millennials

I feel much/somewhat closer to latino culture

47%

41%

61%

I want to stand out as a latino

67%

65%

72%

(Agree Completely/Somewhat)

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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role of religion The role that religion plays in the lives of U.S.-born Hispanic Millennials is changing when compared to other Hispanic segments. When asked how much they agree with the statement, “Religion plays a big part in my life,” 44% of U.S.-born Hispanic Millennials indicated that they either agree completely or somewhat with this statement. This differs significantly with the attitudes of older Hispanics generations their parents belong to, where 57% of Hispanics 35+ specified that they see religion playing a big part in their lives. The difference is even more distinct when compared to foreign-born Hispanic Millennials.

religion plays a big part in my life

Hispanic 35 – 64 US Born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Hispanic Millenials US Born

Non-Hispanic Millenials

Hispanic Millenials

41%

57%

44%

53%

Hispanic 35 – 64 Foreign Born

62% 49%

However, 58% of Hispanic Millennials consider themselves to be more spiritual than religious, even compared to non-Hispanic Millennials.

Wealth Wealth is a source of tension for foreign-born Hispanic Millennials. Wealth isn’t part of the American dream, even though they are less likely to see non-material happiness as their American Dream. FBHM’s state that being wealthy is not part of their American Dream (87%), yet don’t separate happiness from material possessions (66%). There is a cognitive point of tension here around how much importance they place on wealth in defining happiness.

Meaning of American Dream

U.S. BORN HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

FOREIGN-BORN HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

Being happy with yourself, regardless of what you have

46%

34%

Being passionate about what you do for a living

34%

24%

Having children

37%

13%

Making a difference in people’s lives

26%

37%

Being wealthy

23 %

13%

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

/ 23

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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iMPliCaTions for MarKeTers

For marketers evaluating the new data included in this first wave of the Hispanic Millennial Project, it is important to begin to put insights into action. As a starting point, we have developed the following list of key implications for marketers to consider as a result of our new research.

avoid Millennial generalizations The results of the Hispanic Millennial Project highlight the significant differences that exist between different Millennial segments, particularly U.S.-born Hispanics (11% of all Millennials), Foreign-born Hispanics (9.2% of all Millennials) and non-Hispanic Millennials (79% of all Millennials). There is a tendency among marketers to apply broad generalizations about Millennials when developing programs that target them. The Hispanic Millennial Report provides a strong case to dig deeper when targeting Millennials, including Hispanic Millennials.

approach foreign-born Hispanic Millennials differently than u.s.-born Counterparts Marketers need to think differently about U.S.-born and foreign-born Hispanic Millennials. Although they share many key similarities, their differences are profound. An effective Hispanic marketer should take the time to understand the differences between these two distinct Hispanic Millennial segments.

recognize and leverage the differences between u.s.-born and foreign-born Hispanic Millennials In many categories, foreign-born Hispanic Millennials are the best target audience. In other categories, U.S.-born Hispanic Millennials represent the biggest opportunity. How you message and engage them most effectively is likely to be different.

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Tap into Hispanic Millennials’ entrepreneurial spirit Hispanic Millennials’ strong orientation towards starting and owning businesses represents a powerful insight for marketers to tap into. They are a more attractive target than non-Hispanic millennials for B2B and small business-serving organizations, such as financial services, software, and technology companies. For luxury and other affluent brands, they are a key future customer, as they are likely to start their own successful businesses in the next few years. Their entrepreneurial spirit also represents a potentially powerful insight to tap into for all marketers. Hispanic Millennials value independence, are likely to be risk takers, and will respond positively to messages that highlight these qualities. For government and civic leaders trying to spur entrepreneurship, Hispanic Millennials represent a fertile opportunity to spur small business growth.

The Millennial Hispanic Head-of-Household? The concept of the multi-generational Hispanic household is nothing new. Yet the norm in Hispanic marketing is to assume that these multi-generational Hispanic households are made up parents, children and grandchildren, and that the Hispanic female head-of-household (aka the Hispanic mom) is the primary decision-maker for most purchases. Yet in new multi-generational Hispanic households where Millennials still live with their parents, 30% are paying half or more of the household expenses, making them the de-facto financial heads-of-household.

spanish-language Media is Key to reaching foreign-born Hispanic Millennials Hispanic Millennials, particularly those that are U.S. born, are most likely to indicate they consume media equally in English and Spanish (approximately 40%). Even among U.S.-born Hispanic Millennials, only 40% indicate they consume English media mostly or exclusively.

in what language do you normally consume media such as tV, radio, internet and magazines / newspapers? 50%

Spanish only

Spanish mostly

40%

Spanish and English equally

30%

English mostly

20%

English only

10% 0%

Hispanic Millenials

Hispanic Millenials US Born

Hispanic Millenials Foreign Born

Hispanic 36 – 64 US Born

Hispanic 36 – 64 Foreign Born

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

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Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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Spanish media is part of the media consumption for the majority of Hispanic Millennials, regardless of place of birth. Spanish media, therefore, provides a cost-effective means of targeting Hispanic Millennials, even when they consume the majority of their media in English.

opportunity for automakers 44% of Hispanic Millennials indicate that owning a nice car is a future goal, in sharp contrast to only 36% of non-Hispanic Millennials. U.S.-born Hispanic Millennials are most likely to see owning a nice or expensive car as a future goal, with male U.S.-born Hispanic Millennials showing the strongest proclivity towards owning a nice/expensive car. Almost half of non-Hispanic Millennials do not consider owning a nice or expensive car to be a future goal.

Hispanic Millennials

Non-Hispanic Millennials

US Born Hispanic Millennials

Male US Born Hispanic Millennials

is a Future Goal

44%

36%

46%

49%

is not a Goal for Me

29%

45%

27%

20%

owning a Nice / Expensive Car:

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

/ 26

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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CoMParing HisPaniC Millennials

To better understand Hispanic Millennials, it is important to compare them with other segments in order to identify nuances in their behaviors and viewpoints. By understanding these nuances, marketers will be able to tailor their messaging so it is more relevant to this segment.

Hispanic Millennials vs. 35+ Hispanics When comparing Hispanic Millennials to their older Hispanic counterparts, some noticeable differences arise between segments. Overall, Hispanic Millennials are more satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their futures. They also show more interest in obtaining a higher education and owning a business.

HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

HISPANIC 35+

Satisfaction with where they are currently in life

61 %

Quality of life is much / somewhat better off than parents

65%

55%

Extremely Optimistic / Optimistic about future

70%

49%

Religion plays a big part in my life

49%

56%

Saving money is easy for me

55%

42%

Marriage should b/w man & woman

43%

55%

Marijuana should be legalized

50%

39%

I want to stand out as a Latino

67%

52%

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

47%

/ 27

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

HISPANIC 35+

Owning a business

47%

31%

Getting an advanced degree

42%

24%

Graduating from 4-year college

39%

24%

Being happy with yourself, regardless of what you have

43%

32%

Reasons they won’t get a 4 year degree (Too many other things to worry about)

41 %

31%

Reasons they won’t get a 4 year degree (I don’t feel like I need a college degree)

14 %

25%

Plan on getting a graduate degree

84%

58%

I feel closer / somewhat closer to Latino culture

47%

30%

Strong Indicators of Success

Future Goals

Hispanic Millennials vs. non-Hispanic Millennials Overall, Hispanic Millennials have a more optimistic outlook on their lives and with the direction that the U.S. is taking, compared to non-Hispanic Millennials. They also show more support for the “American Dream” and indicate that it is something they strive for.

HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

NON-HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

Satisfaction with Direction of US

63%

39%

Satisfaction with where they are currently in life

61 %

50%

Quality of life is much / somewhat better off than parents

65%

43%

Extremely Optimistic / Optimistic about future

70%

52%

Heritage is very important to them

78%

59%

Believe in the American Dream

71 %

55%

Strive for American Dream

67%

54%

Getting ahead, even if having to sacrifice what they enjoy

65%

42%

More spiritual than religious

58%

48%

Want to fit in with mainstream

49%

30%

‘Owning a business’ is the meaning of American Dream

25%

11 %

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

/ 28

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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NON-HISPANIC MILLENIALS

tOwning your own business

48%

29%

Owning a business is not a goal for me

34%

57%

Graduation from 4-year college

46%

31%

Getting an advanced degree

45%

33%

Owning nice car not a goal

29%

45%

Having children

47%

36%

Having a respectable job is not a goal for me

9%

23%

Being wealthy is not a goal for me

35%

48%

Walmart

43%

32%

Sony

33%

24%

HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

HISPANIC 35+

Owning a home

53%

42%

Having a respectable job

49%

38%

Owning a business

47%

23%

Getting an advanced degree

42%

23%

Graduating from 4-year college

Future Goals

Brands that do a good job of communicating with people like me

Strong Indicators of Success

39%

25%

Reasons they won’t get a 4-year degree (Too many other things to worry about)

41%

30%

Plan on getting a graduate degree

84%

57%

Living with parents/family permanent (Move out in the next year)

24%

8%

Living with parents/family permanent (Move out in the next 2–4 years)

38%

50%

Do you contribute to HH’s finances?

22%

9%

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

/ 29

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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u.s.-born Hispanic Millennials vs. foreign-born Hispanic Millennials Foreign-born Hispanic Millennials are more aspirational when compared to their U.S.-born counterparts. When it comes to future goals, foreign-born Hispanic Millennials place more emphasis on higher education and on obtaining a respectable job. Also, foreign-born Millennials indicate a stronger desire to fit in with the mainstream compared to their U.S.born counterparts.

U.S. BORN HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

FOREIGN-BORN HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

Religion plays a big part in my life

44%

62%

Marriage should b/w man & woman

37 %

56%

Marijuana should be legalized

53%

43%

Want to fit in with mainstream

46%

56%

Being happy with yourself, regardless of what you have

46%

34%

Being passionate about what you do for a living

34%

24%

Having children

37 %

13 %

Making a difference in peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives

26%

37 %

Being wealthy

23%

13 %

Owning a home

49%

62%

Getting an advanced degree

39%

50%

Graduating from 4-year college

35%

50%

Being able to travel to nice places

37 %

26%

Meaning of American Dream

Strong Indicators of Success

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

/30

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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U.S. BORN HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

FOREIGN-BORN HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

Financially comfortable

61 %

77 %

Owning a home

54%

70%

Having a respectable job

46%

63%

Getting an advanced degree

40%

57 %

Being able to take care of your family

46%

63%

Owning a business

45%

57 %

Accomplished having children

44%

55%

Being wealthy is not a goal for me

35%

48%

Apple

44%

29%

Target

38%

29%

Brands associated with success (Coke)

8 %

18 %

Reasons they won’t get a 4-year degree (Not sure what career I’d like to pursue)

29%

8 %

College Education (Not necessary, but can help)

38%

25%

I feel closer / somewhat closer to Latino culture

41 %

61 %

Future Goals

Brands that do a good job of communicating with people like me

H i s pa n i c M i l l e n n i a l p r o j e c t

/ 31

Source: www.hispanicmillennialproject.com/

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POWERED BY MILLENNIALS Hispanic marketing, media, agencies and demographics

Santamaria as its first multicultural lead in late 2013; Ad Age honored her as one of the 2014 Women to Watch. Liz Sarachek Blacker, Terra’s chief revenue officer, is joining CC Media Holdings’ Clear Channel Media and Entertainment as exec VP of Hispanic strategy and sales effective August 2014. Research shows that Hispanics over index on technology, and their use of smartphones makes that clear: Hispanics are more likely to download apps, chat, stream video, listen to music and play games than non-Hispanics (Page 34). U.S. Hispanic agencies’ revenue grew by 5.7% in 2013 to $597 million. In the 50 largest U.S. Hispanic agencies ranking, LatinWorks took the top slot for the first time, following a steady rise from No. 16 a decade ago to No. 3 in last year’s report. Lopez Negrete Communications, the biggest independent, also moved up two slots, to No. 2. Agencies are still jumping into the Hispanic market. Sapient Corp.’s SapientNitro acquired La Comunidad in December 2013. Interpublic Group of Cos.’ Deutsch last year started a Hispanic practice called DLAtino. In agency honors, Alma was named Multicultural Agency of the Year, with Lopez Negrete Communications and Conill as runnersup. LatinWorks won a spot on Ad Age’s Agency A-List. The Hispanic media-buying market is still divided between full-service Hispanic shops with their own media departments and Hispanic units within specialist media agencies (Page 42). The specialist agencies now fill the top six slots and get the efficiency of using general-market staff and resources for basic work while relying on leaner multicultural groups to add that expertise.

BUOYED BY MARKETERS’ growing interest in Hispanic millennials as consumers and trendsetters, the Hispanic media market continues to outpace overall growth in media spending. In 2013, U.S. Hispanic media spending rose by 8.1% to $8.3 billion, way ahead of the overall increase of just 0.9% in U.S. measured-media spending (Page 6). The top 50 Hispanic marketers were even more enthusiastic, boosting their total Hispanic media spending by 14.2%, led by No. 1 marketer Procter & Gamble Co., up 36% (Page 8). AT&T, at No. 2, and L’Oréal, No. 4, increased their spending by 26% and 38%, respectively. The 2014 World Cup gave marketers an opportunity to drill down in their Hispanic efforts. Kraft Foods Group’s “Flavor of the Championship” program used its social-media monitoring hub to suggest appropriate recipes for World Cup viewing parties. J.C. Penney Co. focused its World Cup effort on Latinas and liked the results so well that Grupo Gallegos’ Spanish-language ads ran on English-language networks, too—in Spanish. Univision’s own World Cup exposure—viewership was up 34% over the 2010 tournament— came at a good time as the private-equity investor group that bought Univision in 2007 for $13.7 billion is believed to be shopping the Spanish-language media giant around for up to $20 billion. The next two World Cups, though, will air on Spanish-language network Telemundo, part of Comcast Corp.’s NBC Universal, which handles Hispanic across all its platforms through the Hispanic Enterprises and Content division. Media and technology companies continue to create new Hispanic roles. Twitter hired Nuria

RESEARCH SHOWS THAT HISPANICS OVER INDEX ON TECHNOLOGY

— LAUREL WENTZ

JULY 28, 2014 • 3

ADVERTISING AGE

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Acculturation Is Not A One-Way Street July 14, 2011

By Elizabeth Ellers “We want to target acculturated Hispanics.” “Our general market campaign already reaches acculturated Hispanics.” “Spanish language advertising won’t be needed when Hispanics become acculturated.”  These are some of the common challenges to Spanish language media and Spanish language advertising, yet they represent a fundamental misunderstanding of the acculturation process among American Hispanics. Language use and acculturation are not synonymous, and the process of acculturation is fluid. Acculturation – the result of contact between two different cultures – is not a binary characteristic like gender or employment.  In fact, with many variations, acculturation is multidimensional. Individuals engage in the process of acculturation in different ways depending on whether they are native- or foreign-born, their age, who they marry, their geographic location, their employment and many other factors. Language is just one of a number of dimensions on which Hispanics, and other ethnic groups, adapt to the prevailing U.S. culture. This spectrum includes food, entertainment, political engagement, leisure activities, fashion and values/mores. Focusing on the growing use of the English language by HispanicAmericans presumes that acculturation and English language fluency are the same, when they are not. Our research is full of examples of a sort of “a-la-carte acculturation” in which Hispanics are quickly and eagerly adopting some aspects of mainstream American culture while holding on tightly to aspects of the Hispanic culture. Yankelovich MONITOR has found that 80% of Hispanics agree that “Immigrants to this country should be prepared to adapt to the American way of life” yet 87% also agree that they “Feel need to preserve my own cultural traditions.” Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor perhaps expressed it best, in an interview before being appointed to the Court: “Although I am an American, love my country and could achieve its opportunity of succeeding at anything I worked for, I also have a Latina soul and heart, with the magic that carries.” Marketers such as Kraft (click here to read Kraft’s “What We’ve Learned About ‘Acculturation’” viewpoint published in MediaPost) have found that understanding how Hispanic consumers interact with their brands is the first step in capitalizing on this growth opportunity. A few illustrations of this dynamic in everyday life: Walmart stocks its Hispanic Supercenters with both dried beans

in bulk and Welch’s squeezable grape jelly, because Walmart has learned that Hispanic moms are shopping for family meals in which she values traditional foods and also shopping for her children who have acquired a taste for PB&J at school. According to The Associated Press-Univision Poll conducted in 2010 by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, 41% of Hispanic-Americans observe Semana Santa (Holy Week) while 75% celebrate the Fourth of July. Two of the most popular foods among Hispanic-Americans are beans and rice AND macaroni and cheese. One in five Hispanic-American men watched both the Super Bowl AND the World Cup tournament in 2010, again demonstrating that adopting some aspects of non-Hispanic American culture is not done at the expense of retaining an important part of Hispanic popular culture. Hispanics are as likely to eat peppers (54%) as they are to eat pickles (53%), and almost as likely to eat bagels (53%) as tortillas (66%). We also see examples of “neo-acculturation,” in which Hispanics experiment with some aspects of American culture, trying them on for size, so to speak, but then returning to their roots. Marriage and parenthood is often a trigger, when HispanicAmericans re-assert the importance of carrying on their language, values, cultures and traditions to the next generation. Language use is itself conditional and is more accurately a reflection of a bi-cultural way of living than of the process of acculturation. Bilingual Hispanics (and most Hispanic-Americans have some fluency in both English and Spanish) switch between languages by setting and context. They may conduct business in English, listen to music on a Spanish-language radio station, attend a movie in English, worship in Spanish, and so forth. The explosion in technology over the last two decades has made it easier for Hispanic-Americans to retain their use of Spanish and their connection to their country-of-origin through email, online newspapers, internet phone calls and video. Maintaining the use of Spanish is natural and organic and provides a rich tie to the Latin culture. Most of the more than 50 million Hispanic-Americans move fluidly between two cultures, adopting American values AND retaining an emotional connection with the Latin culture through language and content that they connect with.  Spanish-language media supports that emotional connection, which explains its continuing to have extraordinary power and reach.

corporate.univision.com/2011/07/acculturation-is-not-a-one-way-street/

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Hispanic Consumers Become The Mainstream November 10, 2014

by Steve Barrett, PRWeek McDonald’s Spanish-language “Cancha” spot put soccer in the spotlight. Demographics and purchasing power make this diverse population more than a niche to advertisers

According to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates from July 1 last year, there are approximately 54 million Hispanics living in the United States, roughly 17 percent of the U.S. population. This means Hispanics are the largest ethnic or race minority in America. But in truth, “minority” is the wrong term to use. In fact, in the 2014/15 school year, it is non-Hispanic white children that are a minority for the first time. According to research firm Nielsen, Hispanics in the U.S. have a current spending power of $1.4 trillion. These facts were forcefully brought home to me when I saw a presentation at the Hispanic PR Association’s recent Power of Integration event by Tom Maney, EVP of ad sales at Fox Hispanic Media, which owns Fox Deportes, MundoFox, Nat Geo Mundo, and Fox Life. Of course, this is not one homogeneous group: the Hispanic population is made up of numerous subgroups, all with different characteristics and consumer behaviors. U.S.-born Hispanics are the most significant group, making up 64 percent of the total and generally younger than their foreign-born Hispanic counterparts. Their median age is 18, compared to 40 for foreign-born Hispanics and 42 for NonHispanics. Their household size is smaller and they earn more: Nielsen notes that 52 percent of U.S.-born Hispanics earn at least $50,000 a year. This is a burgeoning middle class and an attractive target audience for brands. They’re buying cars for the first time, moving into new homes, furnishing those homes, and spending on consumer goods. The Hispanic market is the most important segment for sales growth in the new vehicle sector: people buying a car for the first time. Other categories ripe for growth among Hispanics include credit cards, financial services, travel, technology, and online retail. The Hispanic media landscape has grown exponentially, fueled by TV stations such as Telemundo, Univision and Fox. It’s also a very connected market: 79 percent of Hispanics own a smartphone, 10 percent more than Non-Hispanics. They are more likely to spend time on their devices before they make purchase decisions as well as during shopping. But many brands seem to have been slow to realize the opportunities in this fast-growing sector. Fox’s Maney noted that

the top 500 advertisers in the US account for 80% of ad dollar spend, but only 216 of those companies advertise in Spanish language media. There are 557 advertisers in the Spanish-language market, representing 1,515 brands, compared to 4,700 advertisers in the general market, and 11,000 brands. So there is a vast swathe of brands that are not currently engaging with this opportunity. It’s not just about language either. Nielsen says Latinos shift seamlessly between Spanish and English: Thirty-five percent of Hispanic homes now speak both languages in the home, up 87 percent from 2013 – only 22 percent speak one language. So marketers need to communicate to this audience in both languages. Maney says communication needs to be nuanced. It is no longer acceptable to dub an English language ad into Spanish – communication has to be sensitive to overall Hispanic sensibilities and the individual sensibilities of sub-groups within it. He identifies Ford, Kraft, and Procter & Gamble among the brands that really get it and customize their creative accordingly. He also says that relying on a total market strategy to engage Hispanics is not going to work either, due to the lack of real insight into the Hispanic market. Hispanic marketing has to be fully integrated in the holistic overall strategy. Maney is mainly talking about advertising, and of course he would love to grow the size of the advertising market to make more money for Fox. But his observations resonate just as much with PR and social media. Anecdotally, and astonishingly, he still comes across marketers who think “these people” are not their consumers. But they clearly are. The highest percentage of 24-year-olds in the US is Hispanic – this is the future middle class of the US. In markets such as Los Angeles, the general market is the Hispanic market. In New York City, one in three people are Hispanic. At some point, general market strategies will become Hispanic market strategies. Latinos are no longer a subset of the market: they are a significant player in their own right. Connecting with Hispanic audiences is critical for all brands if they want to grow over the next decade. This article first appeared on prweek.com.

Read more at www.campaignlive.com/article/hispanic-consumers-become-mainstream/1321223#WgitQQksMXt018Yv.99

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Retail Dive Hispanic Marketing Moves Into The Mainstream March 11, 2015

by Ian P. Murphy The power and potential of the more than 54 million-17% of the U.S. population-Hispanic consumers in the U.S. can’t be denied. The group’s consumer spending reached $1.4 trillion in 2014 year, and that figure is ticking up by $100 billion every year.

market, according to Nielsen (www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2014/engaging-the-evolving-hispanic-consumers.html), and 35% of all Hispanics living in the United States now speak English and Spanish in the home.

But the real news is that while U.S. Hispanics are proud of their heritage, they are assimilating fast. Hispanics born in the U.S. account for nearly two-thirds (64%) of the Hispanic

The number is even greater for native-born Hispanics younger than 18 years-old: According to Pew, 80% of this market speak only English at home.

STATISTICAL PORTRAIT OF THE FOREIGN-BORN POPULATION IN THE UNITED STATES, 2012

Language Spoken at Home and English Speaking Ability by Age and Region of Birth: 2012

ALL NATIVE-BORN ALL FOREIGN-BORN Mexico South and East Asia Caribbean Central America South America Middle East All other TOTAL

YOUNGER THAN 18

18 AND OLDER

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ONLY ENGLISH AT HOME

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ONLY ENGLISH AT HOME

ONLY ENGLISH SPOKEN AT HOME

ENGLISH SPOKEN VERY WELL

ENGLISH SPOKEN LESS THAN VERY WEL

TOTAL

ONLY ENGLISH SPOKEN AT HOME

ENGLISH SPOKEN VERY WELL

ENGLISH SPOKEN LESS THAN VERY WEL

TOTAL

41,418,780

8,220,573

1,854,116

51,493,469

184,743,468

445,047

1,258,759

623,101

2,326,907

5,794,053

14,509,726

2,861,066

202,114,260

12,732,407

19,641,123

38,167,583

14,797

490,913

205,298

711,008

378,882

2,629,287

7,725,598

10,733,767

160,371

257,024

172,221

48,136

87,398

67,410

589,616

961,500

4,141,400

4,669,826

9,772,726

202,944

1,174,660

909,629

1,574,138

3,658,427

29,321

89,336

19,321

100,809

49,981

168,638

184,539

770,622

2,034,126

2,989,287

27,939

148,069

397,930

982,448

1,191,790

2,572,168

11,203

66,109

25,863

103,175

166,383

695,663

594,110

1,456,156

161,898

167,170

74,389

403,457

2,530,159

2,603,358

1,851,535

6,985,052

41,863,827

9,479,332

2,477,217

53,820,376

190,537,521

27,242,133

22,502,189

240,281,843

80.4%

16.0%

3.6%

100.0%

91.4%

7.2%

1.4%

100.0%

19.1%

54.1%

26.8%

100.0%

15.2%

33.4%

51.5%

100.0%

PERCENT DISTRIBUTION

ALL NATIVE-BORN ALL FOREIGN-BORN Mexico South and East Asia Caribbean Central America South America Middle East All other TOTAL

2.1%

69.0%

28.9%

100.0%

3.5%

24.5%

72.0%

100.0%

27.2%

43.6%

29.2%

100.0%

9.8%

42.4%

47.8%

100.0%

23.7%

43.1%

33.2%

100.0%

32.1%

24.9%

43.0%

100.0%

17.4%

53.0%

29.6%

100.0%

6.2%

25.8%

68.0%

100.0%

13.0%

68.1%

18.9%

100.0%

15.5%

38.2%

46.3%

100.0%

10.9%

64.1%

25.1%

100.0%

11.4%

47.8%

40.8%

100.0%

40.1%

41.4%

18.4%

100.0%

36.2%

37.3%

26.5%

100.0%

77.8%

17.6%

4.6%

100.0%

79.3%

11.3%

9.4%

100.0%

Source: Pew Research Center www.retaildive.com/news/hispanic-marketing-moves-into-the-mainstream/373722/

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Retail Dive Hispanic Marketing Moves Into The Mainstream

JCPenney English-Language Campaign Impact on Past-Month Shopping

With this rapidly expanding consumer group going somewhat untouched, retailers looking to tap into the market are taking their messages into the mainstream. Playing off expanding acculturation Target’s latest campaign (www.retaildive.com/news/ target-to-launch-campaign-appealing-to-hispanic-consumers/370994/), “Sin Traducci6n” (“Without Translation”) illustrates this shift, depicting Latino cultural traditions that may have no direct translation into English, but continue in the new country.

JCPENNEY STRONGER IMPACT JCPenney ads have  aADS  stronger  HAVE impact  on  A Hispanic  than  on   the  general   market ON HISPANIC THAN ON THE GENERAL MARKET Impact on General Market 50%

Its first television spot, “Arrullo” (“Lullaby”), depicts a Latina mother putting her baby to sleep with a classic Spanish-language record before issuing the tagline voiceover, “There will always be a part of you that simply doesn’t translate,” in English. “We thought it’d be really interesting to recognize this dual world that she lives in,” Rick Gomez, Target’s senior vice president of brand and category marketing, told Ad Age (adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/target-seeks-deepen-relationship-hispanics/297405/). “She’s going back and forth between her Hispanic traditions and her American culture.” Target, the nation’s No. 3 retailer (gaia.adage.com/images/bin/pdf/Hispanic_Fact_Pack_2014_web_rev0730.pdf) in terms of Hispanic ad spend, is running the campaign on Spanish-language Univision and Telemundo, as well as the bilingual Nuvo cable net. It is also appearing on Englishlanguage networks such as USA, and during shows such as Modern Family, which features Latino-American star Sofia Vergara.

45%

45%

40%

40%

+14 Any JCPenney Ads

35% 30%

+13 Any JCPenney Ads

35% 30%

25%

25%

+7 No JCPenney Ads

20% 15%

20%

+1 No JCPenney Ads

15%

10%

10%

Strong Impact (+7)

5% 0%

Impact on Hispanic Market 50%

May-13

5%

Dec-13

No JCPenney Ads

Strong Impact (+12)

0%

May-13

Any JCPenney Ads

No JCPenney Ads

Dec-13

Any JCPenney Ads

Source: Quirk’s Marketing Research Review (www.quirks.com/articles/2014/20140806.aspx)

Source: Quirk's  Marketing   Research  Review.  www.quirks.com/articles/2014/20140806.aspx  

Penney’s actually dissolved its Hispanic-only marketing group last year in favor of a strategy that integrates such messaging into all aspects of its marketing efforts. And Wal-Mart, No. 1 in spend with $92.1 million in 2014, says it is taking multicultural budgets out of their silos (hispanicad.com/ blog/news-article/had/marketing/wal-mart-multiculturaldollars-destroy-silo) in favor of a company wide, full-market approach.

Taking messaging out of the silo

There’s still a place for Spanish-only ads and placements, of course. But as more and more U.S. Hispanics grow up speaking both Spanish and English, the lines between demographic groups will blur, and the U.S. Hispanic market will become a quintessentially all-American one.

While the campaign is the first to feature such a seamless blend of cultural cues for dissemination across media outlets, other big retailers are increasingly integrating their Hispanic messaging into mainstream efforts. J.C. Penney’s 2013 general-market holiday campaign, for example, featured a multicultural group of carolers singing about holiday deals; in one execution, they used Feliz Navidad.

“Acculturation is actually quite fluid,” Jeri Smith wrote last year in a Quirk’s Marketing Research report (www.quirks. com/articles/2014/20140806.aspx). “While some individuals never acculturate, many Latinos do, over time, move up along the acculturation spectrum. The consumption of general-market media plays an important role in this process.”

According to a study examining this campaign’s impact on 2013 holiday season shopping behavior, lift among Hispanics was 11 points, compared to a seven-point lift among general-market consumers.

“Assume that many within your Hispanic target will engage with your general-market campaign,” she wrote. “As such, make it inclusive of Hispanic lifestyles, needs and references.”

Left Image Source: Target YouTube Page (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSPtajOTbro)

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Engaging Latinos Via Social Media: Mainstream Brands Say “Hola” There is no question that Hispanics use social media, but is it true that they lead the nation in social media engagement? According to The Social Graf, and many other reputable online sources the evidence keeps piling up. U.S. Hispanics lead the general population in social media use—by the way, Hispanics also lead in mobile and e-commerce adoption. This explains why so many brands across multiple industries are being bullish when it comes to reaching Latinos via digital channels. Brands like AT&T introduced #BetweenTwoWorlds, focused on reaching young acculturated Hispanics and Honda with “#Un Buen Fit.” So how is the Food & Beverage industry faring in the love for Latinos and digital marketing? Well, let’s take a closer look. Dunkin Donuts goes bilingual - introduced its Latino Twitter page in June 2014 looking to reach the brand’s Spanish speakers. They also launched @DunkinLatino and use the hashtag #MiDunkinEsTuDunkin. In addition, they are the first national coffee house to make its website and Facebook page available in Spanish and English. McDonalds early to market - as far back as 2011, they introduced their own Spanish Twitter campaign. @MeEncanta, now with over 16,000 followers is a Spanish-based account, engaging with Hispanics through sports, music and education. Their most recent post focused on their coffee. Here’s a closer look at two of our favorites Pizza Hut betting their growth on Hispanics - Pizza Hut recently launched its largest ever advertising campaign called “The Flavor of Now.” The campaign is considered an important part of a complete overhaul of the brand experience, however, the most notable shift is the introduction of a Spanish language version of the website. Over 40 percent of Pizza Hut’s business is driven by online users—by introducing a Hispanic focused website, Pizza Hut is betting its growth on Hispanics. On the social front, Pizza Hut’s Facebook page currently is among the most liked pages in the food industry with over 19,170,000 likes and counting. It will be interesting to see if they channel this social presence with their Hispanic audience

as Denny’s, our next example, is doing. Denny’s speaks Español - This past summer, Denny’s launched its own Latino page on Facebook. The company’s vice president of marketing, John Dillon, expresses how Denny’s—which is known as “America’s Diner”—recognized an imperative in catering to America’s true cultural makeup. To build better engagement with the Hispanic population, Dillon says Denny’s saw a need to create targeted content as opposed to pushing general market ideas. We see this as the future of brand marketing—speaking to Hispanics in their native language and using social strategies to build a personal connection. Denny’s is likely relying on key data toward this end—for example, in the U.S. alone, 68 percent of Hispanics use some kind of social network, compared to only 58% of Non-Hispanics.  To parallel its online efforts to build community with Hispanics, Denny’s has also begun introducing simple Hispanic influences and infusions into the menu such as chorizo and chipotle. Pizza Hut, on the other hand, introduced new ethnic ingredients including Thailand’s Sriracha sauce and Latino flavors like jalapeños and Peruvian cherry peppers. This shift shouldn’t go unnoticed—as noted in our “Hispanics are the next Baby Boomer” blog, leveraging the right products—products that resonate culturally and appeal to the entire Hispanic family—is a sure way to build consumer loyalty.  It’s clear that Hispanics are a powerhouse consumer group - and as the Hispanic population spreads across the nation, extending their reach as they vigorously incorporate into new communities, it’s important that foodservice segments actively respond to their presence. One of the best ways for brands to do that is capitalizing on digital platforms and inviting Hispanics to be a part of what they have to offer. Check out our blog about how Ethnic concepts are leading the industry and influencing menus across the United States to continue learning about the Hispanic market. Contact us if you would like to learn more about MIC Food and our diverse line of natural Latin-Caribbean products.

Source: www.micfood.com/blog/engaging-latinos-via-social-media-mainstream-brands-say-hola/

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Key Findings Show Hispanic Americans Spend More Time Online Shopping, More Frequently Use Mobile Devices And Engage In Multi-Screening Activities. Irvine, Calif., March 11, 2015

PRNewswire

Hispanic Americans are leading the adoption of smartphones

is greatest in the smartphone category, with Hispanic audiences

and tablets as media devices, according to research conducted

reporting they find ads useful and relevant at more than double

by Specific Media, a Viant company and SMG Multicultural.

the rate of Non-Hispanics (36 percent compared to 17 percent

The research examines how Hispanic Americans – the second

of Non-Hispanics).

largest and fastest growing ethnic group in the U.S. today – use Hispanic Americans multimedia-task while watching TV and

the Internet, smartphones, tablets and TV in their daily lives.

engage more across platforms with programming and ads. Hispanic Americans are foreshadowing the future of media

Findings show that Hispanic audiences are not only more likely

in the U.S., and for advertisers and marketers seeking to tap

to engage in other digital activity while watching TV, but they

into the increasing spending power and cultural impact of this

are also twice as likely to engage with a brand based upon TV

growing audience segment, digital media is the key. Hispanic

ad characteristics.

Americans spend more time online and are more receptive to Facebook is the most popular online site across the board for

advertisements in general than non-Hispanic Americans.

Hispanic and non-Hispanic audiences. Amazon gains the highAdditional research findings from Specific Media

est amount of unique visitors by English-preferred Hispanics, and

and SMG Multicultural include:

YouTube has the highest amount of unique visitors by Spanish-

Hispanic Americans spend more time shopping online and

preferred Hispanics. Bing is the favored search engine choice

online in general. Research shows Hispanic Americans spent

for Hispanics, however Non-Hispanics prefer to use Google.

83 percent more time on the Internet than non-Hispanic Americans, and they also spend nearly four times as long shopping

“This research comes at an important time in the industry when

online via websites or apps.

marketers are tasked with reaching highly targeted audiences across a wider variety of channels, specifically in the smart-

Hispanic Americans are leading the adoption of smartphones

phone and tablet categories,” said Jon Schulz, Chief Marketing

and tablets as media devices. Hispanic Americans spend a

Officer at Viant, Specific Media’s parent company. “Our find-

greater amount of time engaged in online activities on their

ings prove that there are many different consumer profiles, each

smartphones (26 percent compared to 20 percent of Non-

multi-tasking simultaneously between TV, online channels and

Hispanics) and tablets (16 percent compared to 13 percent of

apps, presenting new opportunities for marketers. The Hispanic

Non-Hispanics), while non-Hispanic Americans spend a greater

American audience is a unique one in that they are leading the

amount of time engaged in online activities on their desktops

market in mobile engagement.”

(67 percent compared to 59 percent of Hispanics). Hispanic are also more likely to perform purchase-related activities on

“It will be increasingly meaningful for marketers to consider

their mobile devices.

Hispanic users as they develop online and app-centric calls to action,” saidMarla Skiko, EVP, Director of Digital Innovation,

Hispanic Americans are more favorably pre-disposed to ad-

SMG Multicultural. “There is no longer a general market, and

vertising in general. Across all three digital platforms – desktop,

it is imperative for marketers to take a targeted and custom ap-

smartphones and tablets – Hispanics are far more likely to find

proach, one that goes outside traditional media and embraces

ads useful, relevant, influential and informative. This discrepancy

multicultural consumers across every platform.”

Source: www.viantinc.com/specific-media-and-smg-multicultural-study-reveals-hispanic-americans-point-the-direction-of-mainstream-media/

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Five Company Mishaps In Spanish Language Last edited on 12/28/2014

Target Latino Interview with Sandra Bravo TL: Can you give us examples of company mishaps when it

Comcast ads speak about family, kids and parents and time

comes to the Spanish language, which ones come to mind?

for friends.

Sandra: Hewlett Packard caused some controversy in Argentina when they introduced their products in that market. Their logo

TL: What’s the difference between translation and transcre-

bears only the initials “HP”, and to an Argentine, it translates into

ation?

the abbreviation for “Son of a #@%#”

Sandra: In marketing and advertising, words do not just have meaning within a particular linguistic context but rather within

Have you heard of the Mazda Laputa (the streetwalker, to put it

a specific culture. Translating words from one language to an-

mildly) or the Nissan Moco (mucus) or the Mitsubishi Pajero (this

other, as good as the translation may be, would not do much

one is too strong to translate in a public medium) later renamed

for your marketing materials. What you actually need is to have

Montero? Do you wonder why these names are culturally of-

them transcreated. So, what is transcreation?

fensive in Spanish? If you are still in doubt, ask your best Latino friend…

It is a creative process where a person uses the original text and

Ignoring culturally appropriate contexts can get your company into some trouble. For example, some Muslim countries banned Pokemon in 2001 because cards apparently contained some “Zionist” symbols. Or Google, that received a complaint from the Government of Taiwan when the map engine identified the country as a “province of China.”

creates a bicultural and bilingual version in a target language. For example, a company wants to sell medical equipment in Latin America. What would be the main advantages for them to have their brochures transcreated in Spanish? •

The products and services provided by the company would be clearly and easily communicated to the intended market

TL: Can you tell me when companies have done it right and why?

had been originally created in that market, therefore, they

Sandra: One of the many reasons why I love to bank at Wash-

would be more ready to accept the products

ington Mutual is the way they reach at the Hispanic community. It is not just the fact that they have tellers who are bilingual. Most importantly, the translation of their marketing materials clearly

written, by the way!

Transcreation, like copy writing, persuades a consumer to buy a product or use a service.

reflects the Latino culture. It is about diversity. It is about communicating with clients in their own language – and very well

The consumers would perceive the brochures as if they

TL: How does your company differ from the others? What makes you unique?

Another company that has embraced diversity is Comcast. The

Sandra:

dynamic and upbeat style of their promotional flyers in Spanish, for example, is very eye-catching. Comcast has found out a

Our company is owned and operated by translators who

way to reach the Latino market. Why? Because they understand

have a direct knowledge of the business by working with

it is not just getting the language right, but rather the culture.

clients in different industries and fields.

Source: hispanic-marketing.com/5-company-mishaps-in-spanish-language-by-sandra-bravo/

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Five Company Mishaps In Spanish Language •

All our translators are native speakers, they have been certi-

conduct a brainstorming session with your provider and discuss

fied and they pursue continuing education.

some important points:

We establish long-term working relationships with our cli-

1. What the corporate culture is;

ents. For this reason, we are able to understand their needs and meet their expectations. •

2. What the expected results of their marketing campaign are; and last, but not least,

Our translators, our Project Manager and the end-client

3. What the target audience/market is. For example, launch-

work together as a team. There is a constant and direct

ing a marketing campaign in Spanish in Mexico will sig-

flow of communication during a particular assignment, e.g.

nificantly vary from another one in Colombia because both

to consult terminology with the company.

the language regionalisms and the cultures are different.

We do not choose randomly a translator for a particular

If you want your transcreation to be accurate and successful,

project. If our client is a bank, we will assign it to a transla-

your company will need to clarify any jargons that the market-

tor who has experience in and is aware of the financial

ing department may use, or some specific business concepts. In

and banking terminology.

order for your provider to get it right, they need to understand your needs and expectation.

We have established a quality assurance procedure. We never accept any rush or large project or any assignment

I believe that the worst nightmare for any linguist is when a client

outside of our areas of expertise that may compromise the

calls and says: “By the way, I asked my customer representative

quality of the final product. For example, one day we re-

Jose who is from Mexico to review your translation. He says it

ceived a call from a company that was interested in trans-

has some errors.” So my reply is: “Great! If Jose is an expert in

lating 85,000 words for the next day. We politely refused

the Spanish language, maybe you should get him to organize

the offer. We explained to them that the only way we might

your translation department.”

be able to finish the project in time would be to assign it to many different translators. However, the reviewer would

Jose may speak Spanish well but, does he have the technical

not have any time to create a glossary, coordinate and

writing skills to do the translation? Is he sufficiently bicultural to

edit the entire work in such short period of time. Since the

work on a transcreation? And the answer is: “No, stick to what

final results would be less than acceptable for our quality

you know!” The final results would be as bad as if I started work-

standards, we preferred to not take the assignment.

ing as a lawyer just because I know enough legal terminology. I have lost count of how many times I have ended editing or re-

TL: What advice would you give companies looking for tran-

doing a translation done by someone bilingual in a company. I

screation services to avoid these company mishaps?

have spent so many hours dealing with those awkward, obscure

Sandra: Transcreation is a creative process that requires a

and confusing texts that are neither Spanish nor Spanglish… I

constant interaction between a company and their language

wonder what they are. Maybe we need to coin a new name for

service provider. Before the start of the project, it is advisable to

that kind of language…

Source: hispanic-marketing.com/5-company-mishaps-in-spanish-language-by-sandra-bravo/

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Hispanic Marketing: Mistakes To Avoid When Targeting The Hispanic Consumer

MISTAKE #1 “SIMPLY TRANSLATING AN ENGLISH MESSAGE INTO SPANISH” “Often, when translated into Spanish, an American message turns offensive, silly or meaningless” —Mayté Sera Weitzman, Houston PR consultant Mexico-born to Cuban parents, raised in the U.S. and married to an Argentinian

Courtesy of

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American Dairy Association’s “Got Milk?” campaign was so successful in the U.S., they decided to expand into Mexico.

“Are You Lactating?”

In the late ’80s, Braniff Airlines planned to expand their ad campaign “Fly in Leather” (Vuela en Cuero) into Mexico.

“Fly Naked”

Courtesy of

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Embarazar

“It won’t leak in your pocket and embarrass you…” “It won’t leak in your pocket and make you pregnant”

To Embarrass

In the 70s, Chevrolet wanted to market their Nova model to Hispanics, but there was one problem...

NOVA literally translates to “no go” or “does not go”

Source: Luis Garcia, San Antonio based specialist on the Hispanic market and integrated strategies Courtesy of

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Tips For Advertising Authentically, Not Offensively

Focus On Hispanic Values and Cultural Awareness

• Family importance, traditions and lifestyles

Research Your Market

• Contact trusted Hispanic Marketing experts and research firms, invest in focus groups, etc…

• Language/cultural preferences depending on country of origin

Courtesy of

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CASE STUDY

Barrios Bellos Valley Toyota Dealers Association Presented by the Valley Toyota Dealers Association and

the Archives of Pediatrics revealed that parents who keep

Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC), Barrios Bellos neighbor-

their children indoors to avoid the hazards of a dangerous

hood cleanup program is an ongoing Valley tradition that

neighborhood are setting up their kids for another kind of

brings together hundreds of volunteers and the support of

trouble—obesity.

other local companies and organizations to help strengthen neighborhoods that have a high Latino population through-

Throughout the years, the organizations have held rallies

out the Valley, generally focusing on South or West Phoenix.

at schools to gain volunteers and truly make a difference throughout these often poverty-stricken neighborhoods.

Recognizing the need to create a program that promotes clean neighborhoods as a key component of maintaining

Barrios Bellos further strengthens Toyota’s commitment to

communities safe and healthy, this one-of a kind beautifica-

improve education, safety and the environment by support-

tion program was developed by the Valley Toyota Dealers

ing non-profits that align with their overall goals of contrib-

in 2007 through early-on collaboration with Chicanos Por

uting to the communities they live and work within.

La Causa and significant support from the City of Phoenix. The Valley Toyota Dealers also give a check each year as Barrios Bellos is a positive first step in helping to create safe

a continued effort to improve Hispanic communities in the

and healthy neighborhoods throughout the Valley. Safety

Valley, and have donated a Toyota Tundra as the service

of a neighborhood is an important indicator of the overall

vehicle for the project.

economic and social health of its residents. Signs of neglect and disrepair, such as graffiti, abandoned cars, and street litter, send a message of indifference among neighborhood residents to others.

Photos Courtesy of Barrios Bellos

Research also has shown that people living in run-down, noisy neighborhoods are three times more likely to develop physical disabilities than residents of cleaner, better-maintained neighborhoods. And a study published in

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WE SELL CARS.

BUT YOU REALLY

MOVE PEOPLE.

HONORED TO SUPPORT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER AND THE LOCAL COMMUNITY.

VALLEY TOYOTA DEALERS AUTONATION

AVONDALE

BELL ROAD

2020 W. Bell Road Phoenix 602-863-0600

1250 S. Gilbert Road Chandler 480-898-6000

1550 E. Camelback Road Phoenix 602-264-2841

EARNHARDT

LARRY MILLER

RIGHT

RIVERVIEW

SURPRISE

I-10 and Elliot Road Tempe 480-598-0000

6136 E. Auto Loop Avenue Mesa 480-807-9700

10005 W. Papago Freeway Avondale 623-936-7700

8633 W. Bell Road Peoria 623-876-3400

7701 E. Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd. Scottsdale 480-778-2200

BIG TWO

202 and Dobson Road Mesa 480-655-4400

ValleyToyotaDealers.com

CAMELBACK

303 and Waddell Road Surprise 623-312-3100


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RESOURCES DATOS Arizona Resources 2015 • DATOS Arizona Resources 2015 • AAA Arizona • Advertising Age • AIDS.gov • American Express • American Heart Association • American Immigration Council • Arizona Community Forum • Arizona Department of Health Services • Arizona Diamondbacks • Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce • Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center (AMEPAC) • Arizona State University • Arizona State University Morrison Institute For Public Policy

• Arizona State University L. William Seidman Research Institute

• eMarketer • Experian • Families USA

• Arizona State University Thunderbird School of

• Gallup

Global Management

• Geoscape

• Blue Cross Blue Shield

• Gizmodo

of Arizona • Bureau of Labor Statistics • Campaign US • Cancer Treatment Centers of America

• Helios Education Foundation • Hispanic Millennial Project • IHS Global Insight • Instituto Cervantes • Institute for Health Promotion

• Center for American

Research at The University

Progress • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

• JMIR Publications

• The College Board

• Keller Fay Group

• College Success Arizona

• Cox Communications

• International Trade Administration

• Chicanos Por La Causa

• Community Commons

of Texas

• Latin Post • Latino Commission on AIDS • Lutheran Immigration and

• Crain Communications

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RESOURCES

• Macerich

• Phoenix Children’s Hospital

• Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG)

• McKinsey & Company • Media Monitors • MIC Food • Migration Policy Institute (MPI) • MIND Research Institute • Mintel • National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals (NAHREP)

Portal

Raceway

Community College District

Insurance Company

• Statista - The Statistics

• Phoenix International

• Maricopa County

• Massachusetts Mutual Life

• The State of Obesity

• Toyota and Barrios Bellos

• Phoenix Suns

• U.S. Census Bureau

• Pivot by Arteaga/Hyland

• U.S. Department of

LLP

• U.S. Department of Education

• Prudential Research

• U.S. Department

• R.L. Polk & Company

of Homeland Security

• Republic Media

• Univision/Univision

• Resurgent Republic

Arizona

• RetailDIVE

• Urban Institute

• The Roman Catholic

• Valley Metro

Diocese of Phoenix

• Valley of the Sun United Way

• Salt River Project (SRP)

• Nielsen

• Scarborough Research

• North American Research

• Selig Center for Economic

Partnership (NARP) • National Public Radio (NRP) • OYE! Business Intelligence • Partnership for a New American Economy • Pew Research Center

Commerce

• PricewaterhouseCoopers

• Vantage West Credit Union

Growth, University of

• VIANT

Georgia

• WestGroup Research

• Simmons National

• The W. K. Kellogg

Consumer Survey

Foundation

• St. Luke’s Health Initiatives

• Yankelovich

• State of Arizona - Voter

• Young Entrepreneurs Academy

Registration Data

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DATOS 2015

THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

P R E S E N T I N G

S I L V E R

M E D I A

S P O N S O R S

S P O N S O R

S P O N S O R S

Effective 09/11/15

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NOTES

RESOURCES

Notes

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“Know YOUR Customer” Customers, Clients, Constituents, Stakeholders... whatever you call them, knowing who they are and what they want

is critical to your success.

At WestGroup, we’ve been helping organizations connect with customers for over fifty years, regardless of who they are, where they live, or which language they prefer.

Give us a call or visit our

website for more information on how we can help YOU stay in touch.

602.707.0050 | westgroupresearch.com


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ÂĄ Gracias ! The Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix supports the

Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

in its efforts to strengthen our diverse, vibrant and faith-filled communities.

Most Rev. Thomas J. Olmsted

Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix

Most Rev. Eduardo A. Nevares

Auxiliary Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix

Committed to Faith, Family and Education

Š2015 JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Building Stronger Communities

We proudly support the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.


DATOS 2015

THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

LOS AMIGOS PARTNERS P L A T I N O

O R O

P L A T A

B R O N C E

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Datos AZ15 Book  

The Growing Economic Influence Of Arizona Latinos. In this year’s report, we show that the state’s Hispanic consumers will spend about $40.3...

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