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THE MOST INFLUENTIAL WOMEN IN ARIZONA BUSINESS

LAWDAN SHOJAEE

CEO Axosoft As the CEO of Axosoft, Shojaee has become one of the few women in the Valley to lead a technology company.

BEST DECISION: “I decided to not used my doctorate in physical therapy in the conventional, be a PT way. I ended up using all my training and knowledge in bedside manners to create great teams.” SURPRISING FACT: “I got my private pilots license at age 18. I took my now husband for a flight as a semi-new pilot and I was always taught by my instructor to speak my thoughts out loud. When we came in for the approach I said, ‘Oh no, I don’t think we are going to make it.’ … It scared him straight into marrying me.”

SHERYL A. SWEENEY

Shareholder Ryley Carlock & Applewhite Sweeney joined Ryley Carlock & Applewhite in 1984 and has served in various management capacities during her career. She practices energy, water, environmental, electric utility and special taxing districts law. BEST DECISION: “It is rarely a single, momentous decision that

results in success. It is a lifetime of decisions, guided by core philosophies – get an education, work hard, be honest, be kind. And always have a dog.” SURPRISING FACT: “I own my family farm in Kansas. I can talk soybean yields

and wheat prices with the best of them.”

SALLY A. TAYLOR

CEO KeatsConnelly In 2016, Taylor became CEO of KeatsConnelly. With nearly $7 million in revenues, KeatsConnelly is the largest cross-border wealth management firm in North America that specializes in helping Canadians and Americans realize their dreams of a cross-border lifestyle. Taylor, who didn’t finish her first college degree until age 35, is the immediate pastpresident of Soroptimist International of Phoenix and appointed member of the Arizona College Savings Plan Program Oversight Committee. BEST DECISION: “Making the decision to not give up seeking excellence in myself and others, and keep pushing myself to succeed when the going got tough.” SURPRISING FACT: “I used to race motorcyles.”

AMY VAN DYKEN-ROUEN

Olympic gold medalist and founder of Amy’s Army Van Dyken-Rouen earned six Olympic gold medals in swimming. After being paralyzed in an ATV accident, she created Amy’s Army, a spinal-cord injury foundation, and has become a medical research advocate. BEST DECISION: “Being open, honest and VERY raw in my speeches was a key decision I made early on. I think it allows people to really connect with my feelings at every step of my career and since my accident. No reason to sugarcoat anything.” SURPRISING FACT: “I’m actually a huge homebody. I love cuddling with my dog, Kuma, and just hanging around my house. Traveling is nice, and a part of my job, but being at home is where I’m the happiest.”

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AB | July - August 2017

AzBusiness magazine July/August 2017  

Don’t miss reading about this year’s class of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. This issue spotlights the people and associati...

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