AzBusiness magazine January/February 2015

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Connect » Guide » Inspire

january // february 2015

Game Changer Super Bowl could provide an economic boost that lasts long after the final whistle

$4.95

Jay Parry, CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

Arizona Corporate Counsel Awards 47

Industry Leaders of Arizona 63

GPEC 105

AzLTA 129


RE

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business advice

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Julia Baker has aker] had her ups and downs getting to she remembers the the Baker gives some details of every bittersweet battle. top of the luxury chocolate heap, entrepreneurial and How did she get business advice: where she is today?

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Ask yourself, “How much am I willing to sacrifice so I can achieve that dream?”

Baker says she relinquished all material things—a car, house and furniture—early on to fund and Julia Baker Creations. start

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Sometimes you have to do something you don’t want to do.

“You have to have an open mind and first, I didn’t want be flexible. At to make cakes. But the recession hit and stores were closing—I had to make cakes. became the premier I Valley cake maker ally had one cake order for $50,000.” and eventu-

vitality

change, Wayne bona fides’

The fresh ideas that Rainey and others were hatching swept through the downtown district like wildfire. “It happened literally in weeks,” Rainey says. “It was a sea change for Phoenix, the first time I think we ever felt we had a cultural walking district. It went from 10 or 15 people doing First Friday Artwalk, to what it is today—thousands of people coming down on a regular basis to enjoy the downtown area. It changed people’s perception of the city—entirely.” Roosevelt Row, or RoRo as the arts zone is called, is today a flourishing cultural oasis in the city’s urban core, a desirable stop on the Valley Metro light rail system where residents and visitors alike regularly flock to enjoy a fully walkable creative district with a national reputation for arts and cultural events, award-winning restaurants, galleries, boutiques and live music. “It’s changed the energy of this city,” Rainey says, “and brought a refreshing sense of promise to the downtown.” Bruce farr

Today, she oversees Julia Baker Creations, a chocolate and custom cake operation that includes a retail store at the Biltmore Fashion Park in Phoenix, an online storefront and a production facility in Scottsdale. There, the master confectioner develops all recipes for her decadent cakes and sweets, which include truffles and hand-cut artisan chocolates that range in flavors from dark ganache to passion fruit and French caramel.

A Chocolate Star is Born She counts one-named celebrities like Bono and Oprah as customers, which has earned her the nickname “chocolatier to the stars.” And then there’s the Cooking Channel TV show “Sweet Julia” that showcases her culinary expertise to the cable masses. While she’s experiencing celebrity chef status now, her rise in the dessert industry has been 14 “hard” years in the making, according to Baker. After pursuing undergraduate studies in applied statistics at North Carolina State and then graduate work from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, she set off on a corporate career working as a data software consultant that took her around the world at age 22. While Baker’s mother was a great cook and she ROOSEVELT ROW ARTS DISTRICT has fond memories of food experiences growing up Also known as RoRo, this creative district in in Cincinnati, it was Baker’s globetrotting ways that downtown Phoenix is known for its arts and cultural exposed events, restaurants, galleries and boutiques. Here are her to a taste for the finer things in life. just a few stops along the way: “I would buy the Zagat’s Guide and then pick three top restaurants to go to in every city I visited,” she says. ”It was an escape. I learned about food and wine and fell in love with the industry.” 1 MonOrchid 2 Modified Arts 3 FilmBar 4 MADE Art Boutique 5 five15 arts

➺ First Fridays. Down-

➺ Art Detour. A two-day

town Phoenix’s signature art event includes art gallery tours, compelling exhibits, live entertainment and local vendors. Monthly.

event featuring studio tours, pop-up galleries and exhibits, bike and walking tours, kids activities and local food trucks. Spring 2015.

➺ Third Fridays. Like its older sibling, Third Fridays is focused more on the arts-focused crowd, including collectors and art aficionados. Monthly.

➺ Art d’Core Gala. Annual formal affair filled with music, dancing, food and drink, as well as a virtual tour of downtown art spaces. Spring 2015.

Realize when good is good enough.

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Be disciplined

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Baker was a competitive swimmer in her youth—a trait that has kept her focused getting to the finish on line regardless of hurdles. “It takes an incredible amount of strength and go back to the to get up fight when you are knocked down, but you have to have stamina to get the job done.”

Student of the Classics

Realizing that her true passion was cooking— not numbers—at age 30, Baker enrolled in the Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, taking notes in French phonetically since she didn’t speak the language. By the time she graduated, she was first in her class, achieving the highest honors in both pastry and cuisine—a fait accompli rarely achieved by a student at the prestigious culinary school. Her academic accomplishments led to an internship at Lasserre Restaurant under chef Jean-Louis Nomicus where she honed her classic French cooking techniques. After living in Paris, Baker followed her thenboyfriend to Scottsdale in 2004. Despite her worldclass education, she didn’t have much of a culinary direction until a neighbor sampled her petit fours and insisted Baker should sell them. That led to a an introduction to chefs Beau MacMillan and Chuck Wiley at the Sanctuary Resort, and an immediate dessert order of 400 for an event the following Saturday night. “I had no idea what I was doing,” she says. By 2006, Baker had a fledgling catering business and her warehouse in Scottsdale. She then opened her first retail chocolate boutique, which has since closed, at the Montelucia Resort. “I’m happy to have landed here in the Valley,” Baker says of her Southwestern base. “It’s a great place to grow my business and it is an environment that embraces delicious food.”

Julia Baker has built her culinary empire from a small catering business to include an upscale chocolate boutique, cookbooks, a cooking show and plans for additional stores and a cocoa factory.

i wanted to show…what ’s it’s like to eat fresh chocolate in a boutique setting…being transported to another part of the world

« Roosevelt St »

For more of downtown’s art scene, check out these events:

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“It’s hard to give ‘perfect’ like Martha up control. I want to be Stewart, too, but to learn to let go you have and give yourself a break. I write a score sheet and then remind what I’ve done.” myself

Passion for Cooking Baker is serious about cooking, but is equally interested in making it accessible to everyone. “Sweet Julia” is a vehicle for her to deconstruct classic cooking techniques and teach non-chefs to prepare otherwise intimidating recipes. Her high-likeability factor, combined with an authentically sweet and easy-going disposition, make Baker a natural TV chef. “This isn’t rocket science,” she says. “I want viewers to know how to be successful bakers or make an exquisite dinner.” As the founder, CEO and executive chef of Julia Baker Creations, her momentum is fast moving. She’s just completed two cooking books and is in the middle of a company rebrand, including a redesign of her signature red hat box. Besides launching another line of chocolate bars and a snack assortment called Sweet Essentials, she’s slated to open additional locations of her flagship Biltmore chocolate store/wine bar. A second one will launch in Dallas in October, then in Beverly Hills, as well as Atlanta, New York City and possibly Singapore. Plus, she’s in negotiations to buy a cocoa factory in Ghana. “I wanted to show the those in the Valley what’s it’s like to eat fresh chocolate in a boutique setting, as if they are being transported to another part of the world,” Baker explains of the luxe concept that serves her natural and preservative-free chocolates, specialty cakes, wine and champagne. “It’s similar to a European dessert experience. It mirrors a restaurant dessert service rather than something from the shelf.”

The Exact Recipe Baker attributes her success as a culinary artist to sweat equity, but also her early training as a statistician and having a head for numbers. “The difference between cooks and chefs is math. As a chef you have to understand food costs and know how to increase or reduce ingredients based on percentages. Especially when you are baking and making chocolates, you have to be precise to the gram. It’s scientific,” she explains. Baker’s analytical skills also have served her well as a business owner and TV chef. “I’m still a statistician, trying to analyze and figure out the probability if a certain product or if a TV show recipe will work, or what day of the week a customer will buy something.” Rather than stirring up ingredients, Baker now spends the bulk of her time managing her explosive brand including 47 employees. And she remains on a path of sweet self-discovery. “I embrace food and live for it. I’m constantly learning. I get up in the morning and think about what I want for lunch. I visit every good restaurant. I taste every flavor and then think of it in terms of sweet,” she says. But don’t expect any cheese or curry to show up in Baker’s original chocolate confections. “I want to be different, but classic—and do them well.”

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Table Of Contents Next generation of business leaders will shape the future

6 Up Front 10 Generation Next > Banking > CEOs > Entrepreneurs > Healthcare > Law > Marketing > Real Estate > Technology > Women > Impact players

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34 Wealth

Management

47 AZ Corporate

Council Awards

63 Industry

Leaders of Arizona

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89 Hiring the Military

105 Greater Phoenix Economic Council

129 Az Lodging &

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This is one of my favorite issues of Az Business because we get to showcase many of the organizations and leaders that are creating a vibrant economy in Arizona. » This issue contains our annual Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) supplement, which highlights the incredible work the organization is doing to attract and grow businesses in Arizona. » The Arizona Lodging & Tourism Association (AzLTA) supplement talks about how the amazing upcoming events — the Super Bowl, College Football Championship Game, Final Four — will impact not only Arizona’s tourism industry, but our state’s economy for years to come. » The Industry Leaders of Arizona awards — which spotlights aerospace and defense, commercial and residential service contractors, food and beverage, healthcare support services and software/data support companies in 2015 — showcases some of the best companies in the state. » Generation Next, which features 40 of Arizona’s most innovative and creative business leaders younger than 40, gives us a glimpse into ways they are changing Arizona today and ways they will change the world in the future. As a one-time young business leader who didn’t have to worry about social media marketing or the cloud when I launched my professional career, it’s refreshing to meet the young women and men who will build and create things that we have yet to imagine. Enjoy the first issue of 2015.

Tourism

Az Business on the Go: azBIGmedia.com 2

AB | January-February 2015

Michael Gossie Editor in chief michael.gossie@azbigmedia.com


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AB | January-February 2015

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Startups take the spotlight in ACA’s Arizona Innovation Challenge

President and CEO: Michael Atkinson Publisher: Cheryl Green Vice president of operations: Audrey Webb

Since this is the issue of Az Business in which we profile the next generation of business leaders, it’s only fitting that we also spotlight some of the businesses that will lead Arizona’s economy into the future. The Arizona Commerce Authority has announced 25 semifinalists for its Arizona Innovation Challenge, a bi-annual business plan competition that awards $3 million annually to the state’s most innovative startups and earlystage companies. “Arizona’s engagement with early-stage companies through its suite of targeted programs continues to spur growth, technology commercialization and capital investment within Arizona’s innovation ecosystem,” said Sandra Watson, president and CEO, Arizona Commerce Authority. “With more than 1,200 applications received for the AIC since 2011, the program continues to be among the many opportunities available to innovators which have made Arizona a top hub for entrepreneurial activity and startup success.” The 25 Arizona Innovation Challenge semifinalists include: • Adosia, LLC, IT software, Tempe • Allbound, IT software, Scottsdale • Cactus Semiconductor, advanced manufacturing, Chandler • CampusLogic, IT software, Gilbert • Crowd Mics, IT software, Mesa • Dermspectra, LLC, bio and life sciences, Tucson • Energy Conservation Management, cleantech/renewable energy, Scottsdale • EZ Dump Commercial, advanced manufacturing, Phoenix • HiringSolved, IT software, Chandler • Iris PR Management, IT software, Phoenix • Iron Horse Diagnostics, Inc., bio and life sciences, Scottsdale • MWI Laboratories, advanced materials, Tempe • Next Alternative, Inc., cleantech/renewable energy, Chandler • Numa Tactical Eyewear, advanced materials, Phoenix • NuvOx Pharma, bio and life sciences, Tucson • Park Genius, IT software, Tucson • PoG Technologies, LLC, cleantech/renewable energy, Peoria • Pure Chat, IT software, Scottsdale • RightBio Metrics, bio and life sciences, Scottsdale • Salutaris Medical Devices, Inc., bio and life sciences, Tucson • Sentinel Internet Systems, IT software, Phoenix • Smart Service Desk, IT software, Chandler • Spotlight Software, IT software, Peoria • Universal Bio Mining, bio and life sciences, Tucson • Zero Shock Seating, advanced manufacturing, Chandler

EDITORIAL Editor in chief: Michael Gossie Editor: Amanda Ventura Interns: Clarissa Cooper, Brittany Dierken, Alisa Stone

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AZRE | Arizona Commercial Real Estate Directors of sales: Jeff Craig, Steve Koslowski

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ART Art director: Mike Mertes Graphic designer: Shavon Thompson Photo intern: Robin Sendele

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DIGITAL MEDIA Web developer: Eric Shepperd Digital coordinator: Ashley Incardone Director of digital sales: Mark Blum

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MARKETING/EVENTS Manager: Angela Vaughn Marketing coordinator: Lorin Parkhurst OFFICE Special projects manager: Sara Fregapane Executive assistant: Mayra Rivera Database solutions manager: Cindy Johnson Az BUSINESS MAGAZINE Senior account manager: David Harken Account managers: Ann McSherry | Shannon Spigelman AZ BUSINESS LEADERS Director of sales: Mark Blum RANKING ARIZONA Director of sales: Sheri King EXPERIENCE ARIZONA | Play Ball Director of sales: Carla Baran AZ BIG MEDIA HOME SHOWS SCOTTSDALE HOME & TRAVEL SHOW Exhibit directors: Kerri Blumsack | Tina Robinson

Az Business magazine is published bi-monthly by AZ BIG Media, 3101 N. Central Ave. Suite 1070, Phoenix, Arizona 85012, (602) 277-6045. The publisher accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Submissions will not be returned unless accompanied by a SASE. Single copy price $4.95. Bulk rates available. Copyright 2015 by AZ BIG Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication can be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from AZ BIG Media.


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Thanks to you, we’re on the road to hit the 100 million dollar mark in charitable giving after

this year’s Waste Management Phoenix Open. Thank you Arizona golf fans. The Thunderbirds and Thunderbirds Charities couldn’t have done it without you.

JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1ST, 2015 | TPC SCOTTSDALE | WMPHOENIXOPEN.COM

AB | January-February 2015

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UP FRONT Big shots

On the eve of the ‘greatest show on grass,’ Arizona business leaders reveal golf-related items that top their bucket lists By MICHAEL GOSSIE

Keith Maio

Mark S. Bosco

Beau Lane

Karen McConnell

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he Waste Management Phoenix Open — the “greatest show on grass” — and its crazed fans will take over TPC of Scottsdale from Jan. 29 to Feb. 1. It might surprise you to know that many of the state’s best and brightest business minds, who were all featured in the 2015 edition of Az Business Leaders, have golf-related fantasies on their bucket lists.

Keith Maio President and CEO, National Bank of Arizona: “Playing a good round of golf at

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want to play golf at either St. Andrews or Augusta National.”

© Jack Barry

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Ronald Guziak President and CEO, Sun Health: “Playing a

To read more bucket list items and fun facts about best and brightest business leaders in Arizona, get a copy of the 2015 edition of Az Business Leaders at azbigmedia.com.

George Slessman CEO and product architect, IO: “I want to

Ronald Guziak

“Learning to golf, getting good enough to enjoy it and learning to love it is on my bucket list. My children and husband are all great golfers and enjoy the game ... It would be a great way to enjoy the outdoors and spend time with my family.”

Beau Lane CEO, LaneTerralever: “I hope to play golf

played a round of golf at the Old Course in St. Andrews, which was something I always wanted to do.”

play a foursome in the Pebble Beach ProAm with my brothers and Bill Murray. Why? It would make for a great story.”

Dennis Leong President and CEO, Casino Arizona/ Talking Stick Resort: “With its storied

golfing history, and for someone who enjoys the game of golf as much as I do, it could not get any better for me than to tee it up at Augusta National.”

Brian Mueller

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Pamela Overton Shareholder, Greenberg Traurig:

round of golf with Arnold Palmer would be No. 1 on my bucket list. He was my childhood golfing idol and still is. It will never happen, but I can dream.”

with my grandson (born Christmas Eve 2013) at Pebble Beach someday.”

Pamela Overton

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oldest son Jesse as he wins the Masters.”

Karen C. McConnell Partner, Ballard Spahr LLP: “I recently

G I B Z A Dennis Leong

Brian Mueller President and CEO, Grand Canyon University: “I would love to follow my

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St. Andrews is No. 1 on my bucket list.”

Mark S. Bosco Shareholder, Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.: “I

George Slessman

Golf Club. To play a course where the best of the best carve out a place for themselves in golf history would be a dream come true.”

Jack Barry President and CEO, Arizona region, Enterprise Bank & Trust: “I’ve always

wanted to play the Augusta National


Don’t miss this event...mark your calendar!

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DINNER & AWARDS RECEPTION

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Camelback Inn Resort Wednesday, February 4, 2015 6p.m.-8 p.m. 5402 E. Lincoln Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85253

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Join us for a special evening of networking with Arizona’s top business leaders. Industry leaders of Arizona celebrates the top entities in five key industries that are based in Arizona.

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Aerospace & Defense Commercial & Residential Service Contractors Food & Beverage (non-hospitality) Healthcare Support Services Software/Data Support

RSVP to events@azbigmedia.com or call 602.277.6045

AB | January-February 2015

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UP FRONT Bank shot

Martuscelli proves a step back can sometimes be a giant leap forward By KALEIGH SHUFELDT

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ary Martuscelli, president of U.S. Bank Private Client Reserve, never believed she would be working for a bank. She actually stumbled into the industry. Martuscelli’s first job out of college was as the employees’ activity coordinator in the human resources department for National Bank of Detroit. She was responsible for setting up employee discount programs, sports teams, health and fitness plans and speakers. From there, Martuscelli moved through the ranks, working and gaining experience in every area until she became president of Human Resources. “Sometimes your career isn’t always going to be straight up,” Martuscelli said. From president of human resources, she took a “huge step backwards” and became a credit analyst on the banking side of the business. “I’d never have the job that I have today if I hadn’t taken two or three steps backwards.” Over the years, Martuscelli has worked at the National Bank of Detroit, Bank One, J.P. Morgan Chase and, now, at U.S. Bank. She has done large corporate lending, middle market lending and small business lending; she has managed commercial banking in the west; started specialized industry lending at Bank One; managed private banking and was the president of J.P. Morgan Chase in Arizona. Martuscelli said she loves helping large corporations and small businesses. “The biggest thing is being able to make a difference in people’s lives.” It helps businesses grow and in turn strengthens the community. And for Martuscelli it is all about community. “The banks tend to be leaders in the community,” Martuscelli said. “If there’s a major project in town, its going to usually be one of the large banks stepping up to contribute to the community.” Martuscelli said U.S. Bank encourages employees to give back and become involved in their local region. “You can really build great leadership skills by getting involved in things. You learn how to work as a team.”

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Expect IT salaries to rise in 2015 Robert Half Technology’s 2015 Salary Guides show that starting salaries for IT positions will increase by 5.7 percent over the course of 2015. Trends in mobile, security and big data are the major drivers for IT hiring in 2015. When it comes to hiring in Arizona, Robert Half’s research shows the fastest-growing IT industries are healthcare, construction, manufacturing, real estate and technology. The IT positions that are most in demand are net developer, database developer, network engineer, systems administrator and Java developer. 8

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PHOTO BY SHAVON ROSE, AZ BIG MEDIA

MARY MARTUSCELLI: “Always own your destiny,” said the president of U.S. Bank Private Client Reserve. “For me, ultimately, I really want to make a difference out there. I want to make a difference in the community. I want to make a difference at U.S. Bank. I want to make a difference with my family.”

Getting a hair up on the competition Despite encouraging news, the job market remains competitive with many recent grads and others still looking for work. Wahl Clippers teamed up with Opinion Research Corporation to help today’s job seekers find their edge. The company’s research determined what to wear to get hired and what to wear to get a raise. Hairstyle for success: The classic side part is not only one of today’s most popular hairstyles for men, but research shows it’s also the style most likely to get you paid. Nearly one in three guys sporting this style earn more than $100,00 a year. Hairstyles to get you hired: College grads looking to get a hair up on their competition may want to remember these words — shorter is better. According to the research, shorter styles such as the crew cut or easy cut along with the peaked style performed the best (60 percent success rate) for those who were seeking and found employment within the past two years.


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next Generation

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F o r t y A r iz o na b u s ine s s lea d e r s un d e r F o r t y

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Building the next generation of innovators

Over the course of the next 21 pages, ‘Generation Next’ profiles business leaders under age 40 who are making an impact in Arizona. But what do we need to do to build the leaders of the future?

he average Millennial sends 67 text messages per day – one every 15 minutes of his and her waking lives. The next generation is inherently tech savvy because they have spent their whole lives around tech. It is easy to imagine that our future will be an unprecedented avalanche of innovation as these digital natives grow into their roles developing tomorrow’s technology. But there is a difference between understanding technology and being an innovator of it. While the number of text messages sent by teenagers continues to climb, America’s educational readiness has been falling. In 2013, only 36 percent of high school graduates were prepared for college-level science classes. Education in science, mathematics and technology disciplines remains crucial. It is impossible to be a technology innovator without the strong fundamentals of a STEM education. Tomorrow’s biotech leaders need access to strong biology, mathematics and engineering curriculums today. Tomorrow’s software wizards are enrolled in computer science classes right now. As important as those fundamentals are, we must remember

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that innovation tends to occur at the fringes between disciplines. Driverless cars occur at the intersection of automotive and computing engineering. Augmented reality innovators require an understanding of human psychology in addition to expertise in engineering and computer science. It is not enough to simply educate our youth in STEM disciplines. We must encourage their spirit of innovation by inviting them Steven G. Zylstra to explore the powerful results of Technology intertwining specializations. It can be difficult to foster interdisciplinary interconnectedness in the classroom. Because innovation occurs on new frontiers, tomorrow’s developments will occur at crossroads we haven’t yet imagined. How can we ask educators to write a curriculum to cover a convergence still undreamed of?


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We need to encourage today’s youth to participate in experiential learning activities held outside the classroom. By providing them with hands-on educational projects, activities, and seminars, we can organically introduce young people to the power of lateral thinking and cross-curricular synergy. While we cannot predict what skill sets will overlap to produce tomorrow’s epicenter of innovation, we can make sure the next generation is practiced at looking for it. The Arizona SciTech Festival is a great example of a program that gets this right. The festival features events from an impressive variety of fields, from coding to manufacturing polymers to directing videos. By enabling young people to engage in a wide swath of activities, we can help inspire tomorrow’s visionaries who will make the quantum-leap discoveries that occur at the interface between different disciplines. But as proud as I am of the SciTech Festival as a Foundational Partner, it’s just a start. Businesses, academic institutions and technology innovators need to keep coming together to advance STEM education. We must invite today’s youth to participate in programs that encourage interdisciplinary overlap and engage multiple skill sets simultaneously. Leaders of all stripes can collaborate to encourage young people to practice making new connections. We know great things happen when you get bioscience and business together, and when materials manufacturers and

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industrial designers inspire one another. We need to get that message out to young people. Outreach to youth can have a significant impact. Young people consider environmental responsibility to be of paramount importance. My own children would react with horror to the idea of dumping chemical runoff into a river, yet that practice was routine only two generations ago. The environmental movement of the ‘60s and ‘70s had a big impact on teachers, who brought conservation messaging into their classrooms. We can see the results: Contentiousness about sustainability isn’t just widespread but viscerally important to today’s youth. Imagine the impact we can have on the technology leaders of tomorrow if we invite teachers to support STEM education with the same enthusiasm with which they support environmental awareness. Imagine those teaching efforts being backed up by business and technology leaders coming together to create extracurricular spaces where young people could employ the toolsets from many disciplines at once. Tomorrow’s leaders will be blazing trails along frontiers we haven’t even imagined. Let’s get them excited about exploring.

Steven G. Zylstra is president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council.

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next banking Generation

Banking on youth

BMO Harris’ president says his age may give him a competitive advantage By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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teven Zandpour, the 38-year-old Arizona regional president for BMO Harris Bank, thought he had a sure-fire career blueprint to follow. “My cousin was in banking while I was in college and his goal was to ultimately own a business,” Zandpour said. “He told me that he was learning a lot about what banks look for from businesses and he found that business to be invaluable.” The year before Zandpour graduated from college, his cousin achieved his goal of owning his own business, using what he learned in banking to buy one of his client’s business. “Hearing him tell me how he learned all this information made me want to go into banking,” Zandpour said. “I thought I would follow a similar path and own my own business, but the banking industry has become home to me and I cannot see myself doing anything else.” Since taking his current position in October, colleagues say Zandpour’s energy has been contagious. While the Chicago native bring 15 years of industry experience to the position, he says his youth is what he hopes will help him build BMO’s brand in Arizona. “I am every bank’s target market,” Zandpour said. “I have two young kids. I’m purchasing a new home. I’m starting my financial plan for retirement. I’m well employed. Since I’m the client we’re trying to attract, I know what’s important to the consumers.” He also said Arizona’s youth — as a state and as an evolving economy — attracted him to the state. “In Chicago, banking is more of a process,” Zandpour said. “In Arizona, I see more opportunities for partnerships because of the entrepreneurial spirit in Phoenix and all the small business growth. It’s more like we’re holding hands through this and we’re going to grow the business together. I really love that aspect of it.”

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STEVEN ZANDPOUR: “The economic health of Arizona is definitely improving and the long-term outlook is positive,” said the Arizona regional president for BMO Harris Bank. “This positive outlook, combined with our solid business plan, provides us a great opportunity for growth.”

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Nathan Erickson, 36

Chief investment officer Miller Russell Associates miller-russell.com

Erickson’s success at Miller Russell Associates can be directly attributed to not only his talent, but also to his ability to bring the firm’s values to life. He is constantly identifying innovative solutions and strategies to best serve its clients, and keeps the firm’s reputation as a trusted fiduciary at the forefront of every opportunity he presents.

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Philip Kim, 39 Vice president, retirement benefits director of Arizona and New Mexico AXA Advisors

Reine Yazbeck Young, 36

Southwest axaadvisorssouthwest.com

Vice president and business banking manager Wells Fargo Bank wellsfargo.com

In 2013, Kim became the first advisor within AXA Advisors to be awarded the RICP® (Retirement Income Certified Planner) designation by the American College. Kim leads the AXA Achievement Community Scholarship program, which helped grant nearly $50,000 in local scholarships to high school seniors in Arizona in 2014.

Young manages Wells Fargo’s nonprofit banking division, overseeing a team of 11 professionals who manage banking relationships for more than 500 community leading organizations across Arizona. She is the recipient of multiple Wells Fargo awards and accolades and is deeply involved in the community, including her efforts in support of war heroes and military families.


TASTEFUL, in every sense.

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A MAno r o f TAsTe.

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next CEOs Generation

Seeds of success

Klein creates incubator to help other young entrepreneurs realize their dreams By LAUREN WONG

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ntrepreneurs move fast in all directions and for Courtney Klein, it’s no different. From presenting to boards to attending festivals to competing in triathlons to being a fulltime CEO, Klein is entrepreneurial in all facets of life. A few years ago, Klein was spending endless nights and weekends at local coffee shops talking to college students about how to launch businesses until it dawned on her, “Why am I not doing this full time?” Now she runs the No. 1 incubator for social entrepreneurs in Arizona as the CEO and co-founder of SEED SPOT. At SEED SPOT, things operate differently than a typical 9-5 job. Interns don’t make coffee runs or get saddled with menial tasks — they sit side-by-side with the CEO. What Klein has built at SEED SPOT goes far beyond a success story. She has built a community centered on making an impact. “I love working with entrepreneurs and supporting them from the idea stage of just a concept all the way to demo day when they validate everything about their company,” she said. Born in Mesa and raised by a mother with extremely high expectations, Klein was destined to do something big, but she didn’t always think it would be with nonprofits. In her first year at Arizona State University, Klein attended the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication as a broadcast journalism student with dreams of being the next Katie Couric.

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COURTNEY KLEIN: As co-founder and CEO of SEED SPOT, Klein has created a culture and environment that is unique and empowering for entrepreneurs in the Phoenix community.

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Things changed after an international volunteer program sparked an interest in starting a nonprofit. Her college advisor laughed and said many students have this dream, but few actually achieve it. Despite the discouraging advice, Klein switched her major to nonprofit leadership and management and earned $1,000 in seed money from ASU that she used to launch Youth Reaction Corps, which empowered students to solve problems they saw in the world. Klein helped grow the organization, now New Global Citizens, into a sustainable nonprofit that reaches more than 14 states and 33 countries. After leaving New Global Citizens, Klein took a position as the director of strategic planning and development for GPEC before co-founding SEED SPOT in 2012. The accelerator program takes ventures through the process of starting a company from providing access to capital opportunities to creating a personalized business plan. “I realized how critical it was to have a network of people that believed in me and championed my ideas, so I looked for a way to connect other entrepreneurs, mentors, peers, community advisors

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Josh Becker, 27

CEO Impele Consulting Group impele.com Becker leads Phoenix-based Impele, the market leader in custom-tailored consulting solutions for clients looking to expand or enter their businesses into sub-Saharan Africa. Becker, who lived in Africa for 19 years, has led the company to grow into locations in the U.S. and South Africa, and has established local experts in countries across Africa.

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Ryan Hibbert, 38 CEO Riot Hospitality Group riothg.com

As CEO of Riot Hospitality Group, Hibbert has left his mark on the Arizona and Chicago restaurant and bar scene with concepts such as El Hefe (Scottdale, Tempe and downtown Chicago); Dierks Bentley’s Whiskey Row (Scottsdale with two new locations currently in development); and a new healthy lifestyle restaurant concept slated to open in Scottsdale late this year.

Matt McGuire, 36

President and CEO Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center cancercenter.com/western McGuire committed to changing the face of cancer care at a very young age when his grandmother was diagnosed with breast cancer. McGuire’s vision for CTCA is to remain on the leading edge of clinical research, advancement in precision medicine, genomic tumor testing and to ensure a cancer diagnosis of the future is less fearful and more hopeful.


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next entrepreneurs Generation

Conscientious capitalism

Manufacturing incubator hopes to build companies that make a difference By ETHAN FICHT

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PHOTO BY ROBIN SENDELE, AZ BIG MEDIA t 30 years old, Phoenix entrepreneur Kyle KYLE McINTOSH: MAC6 seeks McIntosh leads a business that works to businesses with great growth reduce environmental impacts, create potential, with hopes to “actually long-term jobs, foster creativity, and above all, create change in the world eliminate extreme poverty and build better in positive directions,” said McIntosh. communities. McIntosh believes that his company’s goals for generating social change can be accomplished by utilizing one thing — capitalism — the very same business strategy that is infamous for pushing companies to neglect social responsibility. MAC6, the manufacturing incubator McIntosh co-founded in Tempe, aims to “take the power of a for-profit system and make real change in the world,” he said. “We want to help early stage companies grow with a conscious capitalism model.” Studies show that conscientious companies greatly outperform the S&P 500 average, said McIntosh. Although they may make decisions that negatively affect their shareholders in the short-term, McIntosh said that socially conscious companies yield long-term profits. Costco, in McIntosh’s eyes, exemplifies the type of business model MAC6 hopes to instill in its “incubees,” or the various small businesses the incubator helps grow. Employees at Costco are paid on average $21 per hour, resulting in higher employee satisfaction and retention. Because of this commitment to its employees, Costco saves money by reducing the need to seek out new employees and experiences an increase in shareholder confidence, ultimately benefiting long-term investors. “We decided that was going to become the lens that we look through essentially for all the companies we wanted to work with,” said McIntosh. Although they market themselves as a business “incubator,” McIntosh said that MAC6’s business model is more akin to a business “accelerator.” MAC6 looks for businesses in which to invest and guide, beginning with a company that has already achieved “living profitability” with the potential of $20 million in annual revenue in five years. McIntosh, utilizes his previous marketing experience and business education from the University of Arizona when working with the incubees to solve issues. “Telling the stories of these companies and why people should care about for-profit companies and why it should be OK to have a love relationship with a company — because these companies are doing amazing things in the world — is extremely important to me,” McIntosh said.

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Aaron Klusman, 34

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Klusman founded Neighborhood Concepts, a collection of lifestyle brands that includes his original concepts, Zoyo Neighborhood Yogurt, and Modern Grove Neighborhood Eatery & Market. Since its inception in 2009, Zoyo has grown to 14 locations in five states and $4 million in revenue. He is also a partner in Arizona’s largest Dunkin’ Donuts franchise group, First Cup.

Mario Martinez II, 30

Founder MRTNZ Ventures mrtnz.vc Martinez is an investor, advisor and board member for early stage ventures. He built 360 Vantage into a global leader and then sold it to IMS Health, which went on to deliver one of the largest IPOs of 2014. As the 2015 Chair of Invest Southwest, Martinez is sharing his time and talents to help Arizona tech companies connect with the capital resources they need to succeed.

Hart Shafer, 38

Entrepreneur and product development coach TheraSpecs theraspecs.com Shafer created TheraSpecs — therapeutictinted eyewear — for his wife after discovering light often triggered her chronic migraine, which she has battled for more than 20 years. Today TheraSpecs is providing relief to adults and children around the world who suffer from light-enduced headache pain, fatigue, eyestrain, anxiety, and countless other symptoms.


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next healthcare Generation

Filling the gap

Valley dentist develops method for treating dental emergencies By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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rian Harris grew up around dentistry. “My dad would take my brothers and I to work with him during the summer,” Harris said. “We would get paid $2 per hour to unpack boxes, clean the lab, make stone models of teeth, etc. I realize now after having my own kids, he really did it so we wouldn’t drive my mom crazy at home fighting all summer.” But just because he followed his father into dentistry, it doesn’t mean Harris hasn’t paved an innovative path of his own. “After returning from a dental mission trip in the Dominican Republic, I found myself sitting in an urgent care facility on a Saturday night with pneumonia,” Harris recalled. “Within 20 minutes, I had been seen by a great doctor and friendly staff and was back at home in my bed wondering why dentistry didn’t have anything this convenient.” After he got home, Harris conducted a nationwide search and realized that not only did dental urgent care centers not exist, but patients with dental emergencies were actually filling emergency room waiting rooms and costing hospitals millions of dollars annually. “I knew it was time to make access to dental care more

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DR. BRIAN HARRIS: “After 10 years of changing my patients’ lives with cosmetic dentistry, I now get to create smiles by getting people healthy and out of pain,” said the co-founder of OnCall Dental Urgent Care. “It’s the best of both worlds.”

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Rapali Drewek, 39

Pediatric pulmonologist and medical director of the sleep clinic Phoenix Children’s Hospital phoenixchildrens.org Since starting the sleep clinic at Phoenix Children’s in 2007, Drewek has almost tripled the size. Drewek, who is looking to potentially create a telemedicine program for sleep, is currently engaged in research sleep apnea in obese children affects their lung function.

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available to the general public,” Harris said. “Two weeks, later OnCall Dental Urgent Care was born. Harris said his goal for creating OnCall is to reduce the increasing number of dental emergencies seen in emergency rooms and traditional urgent care centers by giving patients a permanent fix for their dental issues. “I think eventually this concept is going to change the way dentistry is practiced all over the globe,” Harris said. “I see the vision to truly affect the lives of people by keeping them healthy and out of pain and it has given me a new way to look at my profession. My goal is to continue to expand into other areas. I am determined to make good dentistry available to everyone whenever they want it.” After opening the first OnCall Dental Urgent Care in Glendale in July, Harris has added offices in Tempe and Mesa.

Jake Golich, 30

Diego F. Mastroeni, Ph.D., 36

Administrator Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital tempestlukeshospital.com

Researcher Banner Sun Health Research Institute bannerhealth.com

Golich oversees operations of the 87-bed hospital along with its employees. He is responsible for all internal and external relations for the state-of-the-art hospital, including physician and staff engagement, strategic planning and partnerships and community involvement. He’ll also manage the future remodel and expansion plans for the hospital.

Mastroeni’s current research is examining genetic changes within the brain regions affected early in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Results could shed new light on the genetic basis of glial dysfunction in dementia. It could also lead to more targeted therapies for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.


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next law Generation

A dream realized

Gust Rosenfeld attorney achieves goal she established as a child By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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t was pop culture that shaped Nicholle Harris’ destiny. “I was watching ‘L.A. Law’ when I was about 8 years old — it was my favorite TV show — and I told my mom, ‘I want to be a lawyer,’ and she said, ‘OK,’” the 38-year-old recalled. “I thought I wanted to go into criminal law, but I’m doing something completely different from that now.” Harris is now an associate at Gust Rosenfeld, practicing in the area of public law, providing general legal services to municipalities across the state. Her focus includes municipal law in matters relating to the operations of municipalities, including drafting ordinances, resolutions, administrative procedures and policies. But Harris’ road to success wasn’t easy. She was raised in a single-parent, low-income, AfricanAmerican household in the West Valley and is the first member of her family to graduate from college. “Even though my mom and dad weren’t college graduates, they always told me I could do anything,” Harris said. “They pushed me and they wanted better for me. They directed me in that path and I had great mentors and counselors. There was never any doubt in my mind that I would go to college and become a lawyer.” After getting a business degree from the University of Arizona, Harris worked for an advertising agency in Los Angeles before realizing that she couldn’t let go of her childhood dream and decided to go back to law school. Now, she serves on Gust Rosenfeld’s diversity and recruiting committees and on the Executive Council of the State Bar of Arizona Public Lawyers Section. “I’m driven when I set my mind to something,” Harris said. “You always run into obstacles along the way, but I had a goal and even though I took some time off, this has always been my dream.”

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NICHOLLE HARRIS: “The county had programs where they took students who were interested in the legal profession to the Capitol and we got to hear from judges and attorney,” the Gust Rosenfeld associate said. “I was only 10 or 11 at the time, but that was really influential.”

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James Goodnow, 33 Director Fennemore Craig fclaw.com

Goodnow, a Harvard Law graduate, practices in the area of plaintiff’s personal injury and wrongful death litigation. The ABA Journal — the official publication of the American Bar Association — named him one of “America’s Techiest Lawyers.” Apple selected him as the first lawyer to be featured in one of its global commercials and it also ran a profile piece on the innovative ways Goodnow has used technology in law.

W. Scott Jenkins, Jr., 38 Shareholder Ryley Carlock & Applewhite rcalaw.com

Jenkins serves as practice group leader for the firm’s Bankruptcy and Lending Group. For 10 years, he has served on the board of directors for Junior Achievement of Arizona. He was selected to participate in Valley Leadership’s Leadership Institute Class XXXI, honored as an Arizona Foundation for Legal Services & Education’s Top 50 Pro Bono Attorney and awarded Junior Achievement of Arizona’s The Champion of Hope Award.

Laura Rogal, 32 Associate Jaburg Wilk jaburgwilk.com

Outside of practicing law at Jaburg Wilk, Rogal chairs the executive council for the E-commerce and Technology Section for the State Bar of Arizona, was a graduate of Scottsdale Leadership Class XXIII, is the Southwest Region chair for women’s officials for U.S. Lacrosse, officiates lacrosse games for the Arizona Girls Lacrosse Association and Western Women’s Lacrosse League and was named a 2012 and 2013 Southwest Super Lawyers Rising Star.


“The Institute session was exactly what I needed to help me succeed in my current role and to help me achieve the next step in my career.” Dan Forry

Operations Manager Cardinal Health

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G I services B Z leadership A © institute Photo by: Tom Corey. McCord Hall, W. P. Carey School of Business

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March 30 - April 1, 2015

W. P. Carey School of Business Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

The 29th Annual Services Leadership Institute will bring together leading academicians along with seasoned business leaders to show you how to apply a proven process for service quality in your organization. The Institute, held on ASU’s Tempe Campus, is as close as you can get to a real MBA experience without committing to a full-time program. Real professors delivering real course content in a real academic environment. You will identify key improvement points to make the greatest impact on delivering what your customers really expect and what they need to remain loyal.

For more information and to register, visit wpcarey.asu.edu/institute Exclusively for readers of AZ Business Magazine: Use code “AZBiz” and SAVE 15% AB | January-February 2015

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next marketing Generation

Culture shock

Marketing innovator says a multicultural approach can boost your bottom line By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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ark Suarez spent a decade doing marketing work for companies like McDonald’s, AAA. Rubio’s Fresh Mexican Grill and the Arizona Office of Tourism. While the 35-year-old worked on both general campaigns and campaigns targeted at the Hispanic market, he saw the need for a company that specialized in multicultural marketing and advertising. “I think folks have tried to create a multicultural division or had a token person who oversees that segment of the marketplace,” Suarez said, “but the fact is that you need to build it out and have capabilities that are culturally relevant.” To fill that void, Suarez teamed up with Bill Lavidge of The Lavidge Company to create Mosaic Multicultural, a full-service multicultural marketing agency based in Phoenix that provides multicultural advertising, interactive, public relations and marketing services. “I looked at this as an opportunity to grow my own business in a multicultural market that makes a lot of sense,” Suarez said. “One of the keys that differentiates us is that most folks think of multicultural as a Spanish-language agency. We are more than that. The reality is that we are a multicultural market and multicultural society and we help our customers position their businesses for the long term.” As a third-generation Puerto Rican who grew up in a diverse neighborhood in Michigan, Suarez knows the multicultural market inside and out.

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MARK SUAREZ: “I think many business leaders look at multicultural as just Spanish language and that becomes a point of resistance,” said the principal and managing director of Mosaic Multicultural. “Your Hispanic consumer does speak English. They are bilingual and bicultural. A lot of business leaders don’t know what they don’t know.”

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Andrea Aker, 31

Founder and president Aker Ink akerink.com Aker has run her independent PR and marketing practice for more than six years. She works with top companies in the Valley and possesses a very diverse skill set. She is a former board member and currently active with PRSA, a current class member of Scottsdale Leadership and a new member of Social Venture Partners.

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“My friends and I called ourselves the United Nations,” Suarez said. “There were African-Americans, Arabic, Puerto Ricans, Caucasians. If you look around at the Phoenix market today, we all really do live in a multicultural society.” Suarez said the face of the market is only going to change. “When you look at the next 10 years, almost 60 percent of the growth in Phoenix is going to come from the Hispanic market,” he said “However your business is doing today, you’re not going to be doing as well 10 years from now if you don’t embrace the new marketplace and learn who tomorrow’s consumers will be.” Suarez said companies like McDonald’s and AAA and the telecommunications and automotive industries have improved their bottom lines by embracing the multicultural approach. Other industries, he said, need to catch up. “Industries like healthcare are still trying to find their footprint,” Suarez said. “They are embracing it, but embracing it and acting on it are two different things. They have recognized the need is there, but it’s the ‘how?’ that gives them trouble. That’s where Mosaic fits it.”

Brian Colling, 33

President and CEO Colling Media, LLC collingmedia.com Peers in the advertising industry say Collings’ entrepreneurial philosophy and solutions-based orientation ensure value-add to any advertising campaign. He seeks solutions where others would not even consider exploring, drives his team to focus on exceeding customer expectations and plays an active role in almost every advertising campaign, strategy and media buying at Colling Media.

Darren Wilson, 38 Partner bluemedia bluemedia.com

Wilson is a local entrepreneur with an almost unheard of three-for-three success rate. He is partner at bluemedia, one of the nation’s most successful large format printing companies; co-founder of Blind Society, a branding and marketing agency; and cofounder of Cultivator Content Labs, a video production company. He accomplished all this while dealing with thyroid cancer.


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next real estate Generation

The fabric of life

Young Phoenix Realtor and entrepreneur launches charitable fashion brand By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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t was a mission trip to Mexico that made Josh Zuniga’s very busy life even more hectic. “It was a very humbling experience that makes you appreciate what you do have,” said the 24-year-old Realtor at Bloom Tree Realty and sales and marketing representative for RLI Surety. “It really hit home for me. I asked myself, ‘How is it about these people who live a very meager existence as able to live life and love life like they do?’” When Zuniga returned home, he realized he learned a lesson and brought home a message that he wanted to spread. To help spread that message, Zuniga launched a lifestyle apparel line called LVLF, which is short for “Live Life, Love Life.” “I want to create a movement that encourages people to see the beauty and the good in all nuances of life,” Zuniga said. “This brand will allow them to do just that.” Zuniga is the creative visionary behind the innovative urban designs that include logo-adorned T-shirts and hip accessories like wayfarers and tube socks. But beyond the fashion, Zuniga wants LVLF to raise global awareness for appreciating the notion that “life is a gift.” “What better billboard could we have for that message than clothing that people wear every day, everywhere?” he said. Just as he hopes the clothing line spreads his message of hope, Zuniga is also spreading the wealth with a portion of all the fashion line’s proceeds going back to help the community. The first nonprofit that LVLF chose to support is the Care Fund, Arizona’s only foundation that grants mortgage or rent support to families with seriously ill or injured children. “Giving back through the clothing line is just the underlying effect of me loving all people,” Zuniga said. “Having that appreciation for life and being able to communicate that and helping other people is a very satisfying feeling.”

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JOSH ZUNIGA: “I’ve always been a fan of fashion and always thought I had a good fashion sense,” said the creator of Valley-based LVLF, “but I never thought I would start an apparel brand.”

Kai Neighbors, 35

Erich

Reichenberger,

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Realtor Private Client Group, Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty privateclientgroupagents.com

Vice president and Maricopa County area manager Pioneer Title Agency pioneertitleagency.com

The single mother of four children brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to her team at Russ Lyon. Real estate success may be part Neighbors’ DNA, since her father is a successful builder and developer. Colleague say Neighbors’ technical skills give her an advantage in today’s high-tech real estate world.

Reichenberger is among the highest ranking officials at Pioneer, Arizona’s largest title agency, and the highest ranking company leader in the entire state under age 40. A local, family-owned business, Reichenberger has helped Pioneer to grow to more than 400 employees and 50 offices in more than 35 cities across Arizona.

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Dan Richards, 38

Partner Deco Communities decocommunities. com DECO is currently in development of more than $130 million in residential real estate in Arizona and colleagues say Richards is the engineering, financial and architecture brains of the operation. Richards began his real estate development career at a civil engineering firm. He joined Starpointe/Deco Communities as project manager in 2003 and was invited to be a partner in 2010.


technology Binding him with science

SciTech Festival’s executive director plants seeds of innovation in Arizona

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cience advocate. Executive director of Arizona SciTech Festival. Assistant research professor at Arizona State University and University of Arizona chemistry and biochemistry departments. Married with four children. All those accomplishments are listed on Jeremy Babendure’s impressive resume. Most impressive is how Babendure established the SciTech Festival in 2012 and had helped build a statewide celebration of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The festival returns in February. “I wanted to have an impact on the community and have the ability to do something that was meaningful,” the 35-year-old said. After finding his passion for science in high school, Babendure received a Flinn Foundation Scholarship, which covered all four years of tuition, room and board and is an incentive for Arizona’s brightest students to remain in state for college. Babendure got his undergrad degree in chemistry and biochemistry at Arizona State University and his Ph.D. in biomedical sciences at University of California San Diego. “As an undergrad, I made a sensor that detects how DNA folds around histones,” Babendure said. “It’s just kind of like a fun puzzle.” After graduate school, Babendure helped launch the ScienceBridge program at UCSD, which created a pathway to bring hands-on science to students, teachers and the general public. Finding grants and helping start the San Diego science festival was a key part of the program. The experience gave Babendure and idea. “Well Arizona is my home,” he thought. “Why can’t I help Arizona families and kids?” Babendure used the experience he gained in San Diego to drive the Arizona SciTech Festival, which now has 18 regional initiatives, nearly 700 events and 65 sponsors. “Our hope is to promote a culture of innovation in Arizona,” Babendure said. “People see sports as an important thing, so how do we get then to see science and technology the same way? It doesn’t exist unless people do events, unless people really own it and create a collective effort to make it happen.”

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JEREMY BABENDURE: “I think I’m a little bit neurotic,” said the executive director of Arizona SciTech Festival. “I’m always thinking, ‘Was my day spent effectively?’ ‘Have I done the most I could during my day.’”

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Gabriel Hyams, 38 President Pinnacle Transplant Technologies pinnacletransplant.com

Pinnacle Transplant is the second human tissue bank Hyams has started. In only three short years, the company has expanded to a 25,000-square-foot facility in Phoenix and employs more than 50 people. Pinnacle is experiencing such rapid growth that it will employ 65 to 70 associates by the end of the year.

Anna Malin, Ph.D, 31 Program manager Medtronic medtronic.com

Malin is a high-tech professional who is recognized for her leadership skills and influence within Medtronic. She has handled simultaneous complex projects with future reaching solutions and is known for tenacious execution. She holds six patents, is active in the Society of Women Engineers and actively mentors through challenges and looks to contribute in leadership capacities.

RJ Muller, 38

Community relations manager Cox Communications cox.com Colleagues say Muller epitomizes the “servant leader” by merging his desire to build community personally, while at the same time leading community relations initiatives at Cox. His leadership in the Cox volunteer program has increased volunteerism at Cox by 95 percent. “For me, each day is an accomplishment when you help make a difference in the community,” Muller said. AB | January-February 2015

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30 years of BIG news, BIG deals & BIG events

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next Women in business Generation

Fit for success

Renner’s sweat equity pays off with Orangetheory Fitness By BRITTANY DIERKEN

L PHOTO BY ROBIN SENDELE, AZ BIG MEDIA

BECKY RENNER: The area developer of Orangetheory Fitness and her husband decided to give back by taking a trip led by Return Hope International and opening a water well in the slums of Africa.

Tanya Gagnon, 38

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G I B Z A Youching (Sandy) Stiffler, 35

President Vicinity Health Inc. vicinityhealth.com In early 2014, Chris Stiffler was developing a new medical device to help patients with Asthma. When he tragically lost his life in an asthma attack, his wife Sandy, a young mother of two, stepped up and is continuing his work, building both a company and a legacy for Chris.

Allison Vasconcellos, 31

Vice president of marketing, branding and communications Excellence Headquarters, management company for The CORE Institute thecoreinstitute.com In 2013, Vasconcellos was named a finalist for Marketer of the Year by Business Marketing Association of Phoenix in the large-size business category for marketing excellence. She has earned some of the highest awards available within The CORE Institute, including the Chairman’s and Firefly Awards.

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Principal, founder and branding strategist Miss Details Design missdetails.com Gagnon is an entrepreneur, a mentor, a role model and a thought leader in the field of graphic design and branding. She has produced creative, innovative and cutting edge design for clients such as Kona Grill, Ling & Louie’s Asian Bar and Grill, American Solar, Arizona Tech Council, Banner Health and many others.

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ooking back at her college bio, Becky Renner recollects writing, “I want to run a fitness facility with my husband.” Renner’s enthusiasm for the world of fitness gave her the determination needed to reach her dream career as an area developer of Orangetheory Fitness. Renner married her college sweetheart, Travis Renner, and had four children. Travis worked in sales at a local gym and Renner owned a daycare service as she raised her children, but the couple wanted more. In 2012, Renner founded a fitness studio based on group personal training and she made the decision to buy the Arizona area of Orangetheory Fitness. At first, business was slow and the process was stalled until her first location at Dana Park in Mesa was opened. “We had literally, absolutely nothing in the beginning of this,” she said. “We had four kids, no job, no money, and making maybe $400 a month. We had nothing. What I learned was you just have to keep working, even when you know two years down the road there’s a light at the end of the tunnel.” Renner’s hardwork and commitment kicked into high gear as she and her husband sold all 24 Orangetheory licenses within six months. “As area developers, we find people who want to invest and start their own Orangetheory Fitness studios (in Arizona),” she said. “You take the concept and you open it up.” By the end of 2014, Renner had overseen the opening of 14 locations in Gilbert, Mesa, Chandler and Leawood, Kansas. “Our goal is to really help people lose weight, get in shape, enjoy their workouts, and hopefully fight obesity,” Renner said. “Highest on my priority list are the things I love. I love fitness, I love my family, and I love being an owner and being in the business world.”


Happy New year! to all of our readers and partners

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30 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE

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2014

RESERVE THE DATE!

APRIL 9, 2015 | 6:00 – 8:00pm Dinner Reception Az Business Magazine is proud to host the 8th Annual Health Care Leadership Awards this April. We’ll honor the individuals and organizations that have made strides in helping Arizonans receive better health care.

Register at azBIGmedia.com For information on sponsorships, please email: events@azBIGmedia.com or call 602-277-6045. AB | January-February 2015

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next Impact players Generation

A true go-getter

GoDaddy’s director of community outreach helps company make a difference By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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oming out of college at ASU, Tyler Butler was already a ground breaker. “I was one of the first employees of College Times, a publication serving campuses in the Phoenix area and was eager to work in publishing on the marketing and advertising side of the business,” the 36-year-old said. After the College Times, Butler worked for several nonprofits and Microsoft before landing in her current position as director of community outreach for GoDaddy. “I’m responsible for leading GoDaddy’s corporate social responsibility model,” Butler said. “As the leader of GoDaddy’s global philanthropic efforts, I have the pleasure of showcasing GoDaddy’s commitment to making a difference in communities throughout the world.” Some of Butler’s key accomplishments include the creation and launch of an employee volunteer program with dedicated paid time off for volunteerism; “dollars for doers” to empower employees to earn support for their charities of choice; cause marketing campaigns to highlight GoDaddy’s charity efforts through events such as the NASCAR All-Star Race; and advocacy and engagement campaigns that enable every GoDaddy team member the opportunity to pay it forward. “I have the unique opportunity to drive positive change in many communities globally while working with a world-class team at GoDaddy and many amazing nonprofits and companies,” Butler said. So after making such an impact at such a young age, what gives Butler the most pride? “I’m extremely proud of the work that was done through my Valley Leadership class,” she said. “Working in conjunction with the Phoenix Center for the Arts, we created and launched Art4All, a mobile arts program that delivers arts programming to youth in under-served communities. GoDaddy was the first sponsor of this project, which was recognized as the winning project for Valley Leadership Class 35.”

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Isaac Gabriel, 38 Partner Quarles & Brady LLP quarles.com

As much a leader in the community as in the courtroom, Gabriel has served as a pro bono attorney with the Arizona Justice Project since 2007 and as an advisory board member with the Arizona State University Art Museum since 2009. Through Quarles Cares, he also donates his time with team members as a volunteer at Capitol Elementary School in Phoenix.

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PHOTO BY SHAVON ROSE, AZ BIG MEDIA

TYLER BUTLER: “Coming out of college, I assumed my career would focus on media and marketing,” she said. “It was this experience, coupled with my roles working in nonprofit that ultimately led me to find my passion, working as a leader in the community relations realm.”

Ryan Naylor, 30 Founder and CEO localwork.com

With nearly 10 years of experience in sales, internet marketing, management and human resources, Naylor founded Phoenix-based LocalWork. com in 2009. His inspiration for developing this small business was to support the local economy by reducing unemployment rates, connecting businesses with viable employees and helping change the way employers and employees measure the value of a positive workplace culture.

Aly Saxe, 36

Founder Iris PR Software and Ubiquity Public Relations ubiquitypublicrelations.com As Founder and CEO of Ubiquity PR, Saxe has orchestrated award-winning PR campaigns since 2007. Most recently, she launched Iris PR Software, a first-of-its-kind cloud-based software for the PR industry. Iris helps PR professionals to better manage and execute on their client’s campaigns and effectively report and track results.


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Come celebrate as we honor all 2014 Ranking Arizona companies.

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Cocktail Party April 4, 2015 5:30 – 7:30 pm The Venue Scottsdale

Call for Sponsorships and Tables 602-277-6045 or visit azBIGmedia.com

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dining

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Sumo Maya takes Mexican and Asian fusion to a whole new level of deliciousness By MICHAEL GOSSIE

n an age where we work in hybrid jobs and drive hybrid cars, it’s only fitting that restaurateurs are creating hybrid cuisines. But just like some families battle at the dinner table, blending cuisines can sometimes cause a mealtime eruption. Thankfully, the minds behind Sumo Maya in Scottsdale have done a delicious job deconstructing traditional Mexican and Japanese dishes and reimagining them to make them their own. The fact that 33-year-old owner German Osio — who is also the mastermind behind Local Bistro and Central Bistro — has been able to combine an amazing Mexican-Asian fusion menu in an atmosphere that is part party, part bar and part sit-down restaurant that might just be the most hip place to eat and drink in Scottsdale. The greatest thing about Sumo Maya may be that everything is served tapas style, which gives diners an opportunity to sample a wide variety of dishes and flavors. Each plate is small, so the perfect formula would be to order about two dishes per person to share with the group. But on a recent visit, we decided to throw that formula out the window and embrace full-on gluttony ... and my belly will be forever grateful for indulging in that deadly sin at Sumo Maya. Since we tried virtually every dish on the menu, I can truthfully support the statement that everything on the menu brings a heaping helping of deliciousness. But if I have to make some recommendations, here are the five dishes that are must-try menu items: It would be tough to find a better starter in the Valley than Sumo Maya’s Pomegranate Guacamole ($11). The Passionfruit ($10) — which combines Montelobos mezcal, passionfruit, cucumber, fresh lime, and ginger beer — is the perfect blend of sweetness and smokiness without being too fruity. The dynamic flavors of the Kimchee Fried Rice ($11) is the perfect complement to every other dish on Sumo Maya’s menu. The Suzuki Roll ($12) — spicy tuna, avocado, masago arare and chipotle aioli — is the quintessential example of how Sumo Maya has created the perfect fusion of Mexican and Asian cuisines. As we prepared to order, we asked our excellent server what the most popular dish on the menu was and she told us that there are many nights Sumo Maya runs out of the Miso Chilean Sea Bass ($24) and we quickly learned why. Served on skewers and cooked over a woodburning grill, the miso-marinated sea bass is prepared so exquisitely that each mouth-watering bite is like heaven. This is an absolutely must-try, but arrive early so you don’t miss out. Sumo Maya does fusion as well as it can be done. The care that the staff puts into the flavors of each dish is astounding. I didn’t even mention Charred Edamame, Korean Beef Tacos or Al Pastor Tacos, which are all amazing. If you’re looking for a unique culinary experience to share with friends or business associates in a fun, colorful and inviting atmosphere, Sumo Maya is well worth the visit.

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Sumo Maya Where: 6560 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale Information: 480-397-9520 or sumomaya.com Dinner hours: 5-11 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 5 p.m.midnight Fridays and Saturdays; 5-9 p.m. Sundays. Other hours: Lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; brunch 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; bar is open until 11 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays and midnight Fridays and Saturdays.


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Fresh Seafood... Featuring the Valley’s largest selection of fresh fish and seafood • Live Maine lobster, Alaskan King Crab and Yakimono Hawaiian Ahi are just some of the delicacies that make the Salt Cellar Restaurant so popular • Maryland crab cakes, shrimp San Remo on artichoke pasta as well as charcoal broiled fish and Cajun-style blackened seafood are additional menu items you’ll want to try • Quiet, cozy and intimate, the Salt Cellar is a favorite for those who appreciate fine seafood • Don’t miss our popular twin happy hours

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2015 Wealth management guide

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id your boss play Santa Claus with bonus checks at the holiday party this year? CNN Money recently reported that 91 percent of businesses have variable compensation programs — salaries or hourly wages that combine with bonuses or commissions, many occurring at year end. This holiday season, many Arizonans received hefty end-of-year bonuses, some amounting to 10 to 40 Keith Klein percent of base pay. Wealth management Since bonuses are considered regular income by the IRS, a strategic plan for these funds (beyond purchasing extravagant holiday gifts) can help you reduce your tax burden, break free of a debt cycle, and set yourself up for prosperity in 2015. My basic strategy, if you have this pay structure, has four points: • Budget so that you can meet all of your obligations on 80 percent of your after-tax base salary. • Use the remaining 20 percent for creating a reserve, investing and saving for retirement. • Make sure that all of your employee benefits are optimized, including health insurance, life insurance, long-term care insurance, medical savings accounts and flexible benefits. • If your employer has a 401(k) plan, make sure that you are putting enough money into the plan to receive any matched funds. If you are not doing this, you are throwing away free money. Once you have the commission or bonus check, there are two different strategies I recommend for my clients to take, depending on their debt level.

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If you do not have significant debt (other than mortgage debt): Take the after-tax component of your bonus or commission check and divide it by two. Half, you may spend — have fun, you earned it. The other half, you save. The spending could be the extra vacation that you take during the year or put away for the rainy day fund, a home remodel or new appliances. The goal of saving every dollar that you make in a bonus is probably not realistic and can wear you down mentally, so go ahead, live a little. If you have debt: First, pay yourself. Make sure that at least 20 percent of the after-tax portion of each bonus or commission check goes into savings. This is an excellent way to create strong habits that will pay off in the long term and perhaps prevent you from getting into debt in the future. If you do not have a reserve already, you should create one that is safe, liquid, easy to get to, minimizes taxes and doesn’t have penalties when you do have an emergency need for the funds. Next, I recommend knocking out as many small debts as possible early in the process. There is a psychological advantage of starting with smaller debts and paying them off, as opposed to larger debts, even if the larger debts may have higher interest rates. (This may warrant reconsideration if a large debt has an interest rate of more than eight or nine percent). The sense of accomplishment of paying off the smaller amounts can help buoy you through the process of paying off the larger debts. Then, next year, when the boss puts on the red suit, you’ll be planning your next trip to the Bahamas.

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Keith Klein is principal and owner at Phoenix-based Turning Pointe Wealth Management.

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2015 Wealth management guide

Gregg Balderrama CFA, CAIA Portfolio manager Mutual of Omaha Bank Wealth Management mutualofomahabank.com

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alderrama’s responsibilities include working with high net worth clients to develop investment strategies and structure portfolios to achieve their investment objectives. Balderrama earned his B.S. in finance and accounting from the University of Arizona. He also holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (CAIA) designations.

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2015 trend to watch: “Federal Reserve and International Central Bank policy will continue to have the biggest impact on market conditions and wealth management in general in 2015. The direction of interest rates, currencies and the stock market will all be a function of this.” Advice for 2015: “Just like all complex systems, your financial health needs to be re-evaluated and managed over time to achieve your goals. In any year – not just 2015 – you should work with trusted advisors you can learn from, who have your best interests in mind and who make your life easier.” Best Arizona investment: “It sounds cliché, but you really must first figure out how much risk you want to take and then invest in a company or industry you fully understand. If you don’t have the time to become an expert in the area you want to invest in, you should invest with someone you trust who does.”

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CEO and managing partner Miller Russell Associates miller-russell.com

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ecognized multiple years as a Barron’s top independent financial advisor, Feldman possesses extensive credentials in the wealth management industry with more than 25 years of experience. His roles have included supervising a wide range of client relationships, including multi-generational family groups, high net worth individuals, corporate executives and institutions. Previously, Feldman was the senior partner of integration for GenSpring Family Offices, where he advised ultra-high net worth clients in the United States.

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2015 trend to watch: “The continued introduction to the marketplace of investment vehicles that allow all clients to more effectively diversify their portfolios from the possibility, or likelihood, of rising interest rates and falling equity markets. Also, as income tax rates continue to rise, the use of tax deferral strategies for investment income will allow clients to retain more of their investment earnings.” Advice for 2015: “Building wealth requires the development of a strategic plan that takes into consideration all assets, liabilities, income and expenses. These financial concepts can be aligned and reconciled with one’s goals and objectives. This process must be continually repeated.” Best Arizona investment: “I am quite bullish on the Arizona economy and feel confident that our state will begin attracting even more quality companies and increase incentives for entrepreneurs to take risks. The Arizona quality of life is extremely high and is the reason Miller Russell Associates can retain such excellent talent.”

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2015 Wealth management guide

Dillan Micus Divisional executive vice president AXA Advisors Southwest axaadvisorssouthwest.com

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icus leads more than 150 professionals across the Southwest and innovated both the firm’s successful “Firm of Firms” platform and its Retirement Income Distribution Strategy process, which helps identify, address and organize the various factors of retirement planning. Under Micus, the branch earned AXA’s President’s Trophy six times and has grown from $4 million to $18 million a year in overall sales revenue.

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2015 trend to watch: “The industry is facing a seismic shift. There are record numbers of people entering retirement years and/or moving toward the transfer of their wealth. Education – both educating associates to effectively assist with the distribution and transfer of wealth, and educating the aging population itself – is critical and hopefully a trend that positively impacts our industry in 2015 and beyond.”

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Advice for 2015: “One can elect to save 10 percent of his/her income for retirement and continue to do so for the next 40 years. But, why not consider increasing the percentage as one’s salary increases? Increasing one’s percentage little by little along the way can have an exponentially positive impact at retirement and beyond.” Best Arizona investment: “Personally, I support any financial services business that invests in its people and their continuing education as we help Baby Boomers move toward retirement and eventually the transfer of wealth in the history of our state – and nation.”

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AZ BIG MEDIA CARES

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to participate in Az Business Magazine’s “Corporate Angels”

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For the 5th consecutive year, Az Business Magazine is featuring its salute to nonprofits and charitable organizations with Corporate Angels. This year, we are growing Corporate Angels into a two-part series.

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In addition, we are incorporating another element called AZ Big Media Cares, which gives you 10,000 more reasons to participate.. What are the 10,000 reasons? Each nonprofit featured in Corporate Angels will also be entered into a special drawing. From those entrants, one will be randomly selected to receive a check from AZ Big Media for $10,000. Odds are good that your favorite nonprofit could be the lucky winner.

Proud Partner: Cheryl Green

Publisher

For more information, contact January-February 2015 AZ BIG Media at 602.277.6045 | 3101 N Central Ave., Ste 1070 • Phoenix, AZ 85012AB| | azBIGmedia.com

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2015 Wealth management guide

Ashley Ober

Managing director, Greater Phoenix and Scottsdale BMO Private Bank bmoprivatebank.com

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ber oversees a team of professionals dedicated to providing high net worth individuals, families and organizations, with a full range of wealth services as part of an overall personal wealth management strategy. He joined BMO in 2010 and has 29 years of experience in financial services, 24 of those in the Phoenix and Scottsdale markets.

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2015 trend to watch: “The most significant impact on wealth management in 2015 will be the increased importance and need for holistic financial planning. Far too often we see people who do not have a long-term game plan or road map for their financial lives. To a large degree, in today’s information age, investment management and banking have been commoditized. Financial planning is very personal and customized to each person’s or families’ needs and priorities. As our population ages and the next generation inherits a tremendous amount of wealth, financial planning will have a significant impact on wealth management in the future.”

Advice for 2015: “Make sure you have a financial plan and roadmap for your future financial life. Once you have a longterm plan in place that is customized to you and your family, you have a foundation in place to build upon. The plan should include an investment strategy that is consistent with your long-term goals and objectives. A holistic, disciplined approach is the key to future financial success.” Best Arizona investment: “Although it is not publicly traded at this time, I would invest my own money in Infusionsoft, which provides the only all-in-one sales and marketing software built just for small businesses. The company has a strong business model with a recurring revenue stream. The company is well capitalized and they provide a service and product that small business cannot afford to replicate.”

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2015 Wealth management guide

Curtis L. Smith Wealth advisor Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. wealthmanagementaz.com

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mith is currently a wealth advisor with Raymond James overseeing locations in Arizona and Nebraska since 2009. Smith served as a financial consultant for Wells Fargo’s Wealth Management Group from 2006 to 2009 and began his career in the securities industry at Morgan Stanley’s Private Client Group in 2004.

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2015 trend to watch: “One of the most impactful trends to be aware of is the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy and the effect on interest rates and inflation in the future. This has a direct correlation on economic expansion, real-estate values and bond price valuations. It’s also important to monitor geopolitical uncertainties, the U.S. Labor Market data and corporate profitability.”

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Advice for 2015: “First, start by creating a balance sheet and an income and expense summary. This allows you to take a holistic view of your net worth and identifies any additional income available for investment opportunities. Second, define clear goals and objectives while considering appropriate methods to fund each goal (401k, IRA, Roth IRA, investment account, real estate, etc.). Finally, it’s important to evaluate other areas of your overall plan to ensure they are coordinated with your accumulation goals such as tax, insurance, estate and charitable giving strategies.

Best Arizona investment: “Swift Transportation. They are a leader in the trucking industry, operating more than 18,000 tractors with more than 35 terminals nationwide. Swift has annual revenues of more than $4 billion per year and strong earnings outlook and profitability forecasts. In addition to company financials and forecasts, the trucking industry is predicted to have strong growth and demand in the future which should have positive impacts for Swift Transportation as well.”

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GET WHAT YOU DESERVE! 18th

ANNUAL EDITION

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Edwin Bull President

Burch & cracchiolo 702 E. Osborn Rd., #200 Phoenix, 85014 602.274.7611 bcattorneys.com

Years with company: 34 Years in industry: 34 responsibilities: Practices law in areas of land use, real estate and zoning Toughest challenge: As president of the firm, balancing administrative demands, client representation, family and self takes focus. Time management, the right staff, delegation and tireless passion for what I do is a successful formula for me. Professional accomplishment: Helping to develop our Valley into one of the most prosperous business hubs and best places to live in the country. Bucket list: To live long enough to understand why some people oppose zoning approval for certain retailers and then happily shop there. If I ever understand this I will die a happy man!

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2015 Wealth management guide

Dale Walters CEO KeatsConnelly keatsconnelly.com

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alters is a partner and CEO of KeatsConnelly, the largest cross-border wealth management firm in North America that specializes in helping Canadians and Americans realize their dreams of a cross-border lifestyle. Walters was twice named one of the top financial advisors in the U.S. by Mutual Fund Magazine.

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2015 trend to watch: “The most significant trend is the increasing complexity of the tax system and the cost of complying. The Affordable Care Act has many complicated and confusing rules that must be followed and many of those are related to tax credits; these rules apply to individuals and companies. The other tax-related tax complexity has to do with Net Investment Income Tax.”

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Advice for 2015: “The obvious answer is to say save more. While this is true, I will say watch your expenses. Specifically, people are spending more for financial products than they should. When investing, use ETFs (exchange-traded funds), index funds, etc. The management fees on these investments are a fraction of the average mutual fund fee. When it comes to mutual funds, the adage, ‘you get what you pay for’ is not true.” Best Arizona investment: “If you own your own company, I would recommend investing in yourself. Otherwise, I would not suggest that you invest in individual securities because 1) there is no diversification, and 2) there is no evidence that anyone can do it better than buying an index, after expenses. I recommend buying one of the ETFs or index funds I talked about earlier.”

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CONGRATULATIONS to the arizona4 corporate 1 0 counsel 2 A of the year I D award E M winners G

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The State Bar of Arizona and the In-House Counsel Committee are proud to be the Presenting Partner of the ACC Awards Program.


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2015 Finalists

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ffective corporate counsel has never been more important than it is in today’s new economy. Az Business magazine is recognizing the important and vital role that in-house counsel plays in the success of a business with the Arizona Corporate Counsel Awards (ACC Awards). The 21 finalists and winners will be honored January 15 during a ceremony and dinner at the Camelback Inn in Scottsdale. Over the next several pages, you can meet the finalists, in alphabetical order:

Arizona State University legal department asu.edu

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Senior vice president, general counsel, secretary Banner Health bannerhealth.com

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Led by Senior Vice President and General Counsel José Cárdenas, the Office of General Counsel (OGC) team advises ASU on a broad range of legal issues to minimize legal risks and costs and to ensure legal compliance by the university enterprise. From constructing millions of square feet in additional research space, issuing more than $1 billion in new bonds over the last 10 years, converting more than 4,500 non-academic staff to at-will status without any claims, developing significant real estate projects to generate new revenue to support university activities, establishing international research and teaching partnerships, to creating the Starbucks College Achievement Plan, OGC attorneys advance the core values of the institution in novel and effective ways.

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David Bixby

Bixby joined Banner (then Samaritan Health System) in 1998 as senior vice president, general counsel and secretary. From 1981 to 1998, he was with Lewis and Roca LLP, in Phoenix, as an associate and partner, he specialized in corporate mergers and acquisitions, finance and health care law. Bixby received his Bachelor of Arts degree in history and literature from Harvard University, a Bachelor of Arts (honors) in history from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and his law degree from Yale Law School. He is a member of the Arizona Bar, the American Health Lawyers Association and the American Corporate Counsel Association.

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Kelleen Brennan Vice president and assistant general counsel – corporate compliance Universal Technical Institute uti.edu

Brennan balances her roles as a mother, attorney and volunteer masterfully. She is responsible for corporate compliance for UTI. She directs the team of UTI employees who are responsible for compliance with licensing and accreditation. She is also often called upon to assist with general business issues and regularly counsels senior management and the board of directors on business and compliance issues. Brennan has been the treasurer and board member for the Arizona Chapter of ACC for three years. She has focused on working to keep members engaged and to keep the organization’s focus on providing meaningful and relevant programs for the members.


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2015 Finalists

Fr anc Del Fosse General counsel Insys insysrx.com

Del Fosse joined Insys from private practice, where he regularly advised public company boards, management and in-house counsel on the critical issues affecting their businesses. In addition, as a transactional attorney, he specialized in corporate and project financing, compliance with federal securities laws and mergers and acquisitions advisement. Immediately prior to joining Insys, Del Fosse was a partner at the law firm of Snell & Wilmer from 2001 to 2005. He is a graduate of the Columbia University School of Law and earned an undergraduate degree from Arizona State University. He is a member of the State Bar of California and Arizona.

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Senior vice president, general counsel and secretary Henkel Consumer Goods Inc. henkelna.com

Former chief legal counsel and compliance officer Arizona Summit Law School azsummitlaw.edu

Henkel is the name behind brands including Dial soaps and Right Guard antiperspirants. Gazaway is a former corporate and securities attorney for Snell & Wilmer (1998-2003) and a 1992 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. He graduated in 1998 from the University of Iowa law school. While working with Gazaway, other attorneys are impressed not only with his professional demeanor and practical approach, but with his passion for the company and the pride he takes in the company’s accomplishments. Both Gazaway and Dial value community involvement, opening their headquarters for a United Way tour.

Iussa was the chief legal officer for the law school and the nonprofit Phoenix Law Foundation. She was responsible for all legal affairs and regulatory compliance for a large student population and staff, including human resources and claims brought by students and staff, federal funding, regulatory disclosure compliance, state regulatory and corporate filings and compliance, contract drafting and negotiation, ethics and government affairs. In addition to her legal work, Iussa helped lead the school’s business development initiatives, a position that was created for Iussa because of her expertise in business operations compliance and collaboration.

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2015 Finalists

JDA Software legal department jda.com

Led by Chief Legal Officer Martin Felli, the JDA’s legal team has grown from approximately 10 to 24 associates in the last six months to better support the company’s strategic initiatives. The legal department has focused its efforts on building the team from Arizona-based legal talent. The team’s proactive, high-engagement business model aligns to the company’s guiding principles and leaves a lasting impression that JDA is a company people want to do business with. With a focus on improved communications, employee engagement, streamlined corporate governance processes and proactive client-centered internal training and awareness initiatives on a wide range of compliance matters, the team embraces the company’s mission to “plan to deliver” in all aspects of its work.

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John T. Jozwick

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Rider Levett Bucknall hired Jozwick by contract in 2002 for a temporary assignment. He was tasked with analyzing claims made by subcontractors in a major waste water treatment plant project. Shortly after, and as word spread with clients about his expertise in analyzing construction disputes, forensic claims, and construction defects, Jozwick was offered a full-time role with Rider Levett Bucknall. Under his direction, the company’s claims department grew from one temporary contractor to five full-time employees. In addition to serving as the company’s general counsel, Jozwick has played a major role in developing advisory services into a significantly profitable service.

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Alan Kelly

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Kelly has been an in-house lawyer at Scottsdale Lincoln Healthcare Network for the past nine years. By creating an efficient and modern legal department, Kelly has been able to provide advice to everyone from executives to operational employees. His continued innovation led him to improve the SLHN Risk Management Department so that it can effectively manage all of the complex risk that a $1 billion company is faced with. Kelly’s strong leadership is as highly valued as his skills as an innovator. Jonathan Wallach, one of Kelly’s employees, said, “Alan has been a true mentor who actively promotes initiative in all people who work for him.”


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2015 Finalists

David B. Mulvihill

Vice president and general counsel Make-A-Wish Foundation of America wish.org Mulvihill is general counsel of the Make-AWish, a national nonprofit organization with 74 chapters that grant the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions. A substantial portion of Mulvihill’s time is spent protecting the Make-A-Wish name and trademarks from infringement by soundalike organizations and others. In connection with these efforts, he has worked closely with various state charity officials, as well as with the U.S. Senate Finance Committee and the Federal Trade Commission. Prior to joining Make-A-Wish, Mulvihill was a partner in a firm in Pittsburgh, where his practice focused on commercial litigation.

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Wendy Neal

Vice president and chief legal officer Arcadia Biosciences arcadiabio.com Neal has more than 15 years experience in intellectual property and business law. She is skilled in developing and implementing worldwide intellectual property protection and enforcement strategies, negotiating technology-driven business transactions, strategic counseling in the development of patent and trademark portfolios, and related multinational prosecution. Prior to joining Arcadia Biosciences, Neal provided legal counsel to Arcadia as a partner in the Intellectual Property & Technology group at Snell & Wilmer. There she worked with a wide variety of industry clients, from Fortune 100 companies to small start-ups, to develop and implement creative business strategies to maximize the value of their intellectual property assets.

Senior vice president, legal affairs and general counsel Phoenix Children’s Hospital phoenixchildrens.org

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Neuberger is responsible for managing the legal environment at Phoenix Children’s. This includes providing legal guidance, developing hospital-wide policies and procedures, counseling the hospital on business transactions, and managing complex contractual relationships. She also is involved in the legal aspects of medical staff privileging and credentialing, risk management, patientrelated matters, regulatory compliance and privacy, clinical research and employment law. She is also credited with developing and implementing a code of ethics, and improving the relationship between the legal and human resources departments. Neuberger came to Phoenix Children’s in 2007 with more than 20 years of experience in healthcare law.

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At the time Orson joined Apollo, there were a number of significant pending legal matters, including a Section 10(b) (5) class action lawsuit. In response to these matters and other challenges, the Apollo general counsel’s office, under Orson’s direction, updated and adapted the company’s disclosure controls and procedures to reflect the far more complex business organization that Apollo had become in the years prior to her arrival. These policies and procedures led to enhanced public disclosure practices that we believe have been emulated by other leading proprietary education companies. Orson is credited with effectively creating order out of disorder.


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of Central Arizona

UCP of Central Arizona assists individuals with disabilities and their families. Those served have disabilities including cerebral palsy, autism, Down syndrome, developmental delays, and learning disabilities.

You can support UCP and the thousands of families they serve every year through the Arizona Charitable Tax Credit. Arizona taxpayers may be eligible for an Arizona income tax credit of up to $400 for married taxpayers and up to $200 for single taxpayers when they make a donation to UCP, a qualifying charitable organization. Visit www.UCPofCentralAZ.org to learn more. AB | January-February 2015 1802 West Parkside Lane - Phoenix, AZ - 85027 - 602-943-5472

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2015 Finalists

Michael Reagan

Executive vice president and general counsel K ahala Corpor ation kahalamgmt.com During his 15-year tenure with Kahala, Reagan has overseen all legal and real estate affairs for the company and its 14 restaurant brands — which include Cold Stone Creamery, America’s Taco Shop, Blimpie, Taco Time, Great Steak & Potato and Samurai Sam’s. He is part of an executive team that, during the past eight years has grown Kahala from 80 outlets to more than 3,000; raised nearly $200 million in private transactions; identified, negotiated and completed nearly $200 million in acquisitions. Reagan personally handled all due diligence and other legal aspects of each transaction and helped integrate the acquired companies into Kahala and its uniform franchising and operating platform.

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Michael Rissman

Executive vice president, general counsel and corporate secretary Republic Services republicservices.com

General counsel and secretary Gr and Canyon University gcu.edu

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Roberts has been serving as GCU’s senior vice president and general counsel since May 2012 and as its secretary since July 2012. From August 2003 to May 2012, Roberts was employed by iGo, Inc., a publicly traded developer of electronics accessories, where he served as general counsel and secretary since May 2005. From September 1998 to August 2003, Roberts was an attorney with the law firm of Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Roberts received a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration and a Juris Doctorate from the University of Kansas.

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Rissman was named to his current position in August 2009. Prior to that, he served as acting general counsel and corporate secretary from March 2009. Rissman joined Allied as vice president and deputy general counsel in July 2007 and continued in the same positions at Republic after it merged with Allied in December 2008. Prior to joining Allied, Rissman was a partner at Mayer Brown LLP in Chicago. Rissman was at Mayer Brown from 1990 until coming to Allied in 2007. Rissman earned his JD from The University of Chicago School of Law and his undergraduate degree from Harvard University.

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scottsdalelincoln.org

Colleagues say Senior Vice President and General Counsel Alan Kelly has championed the concept of a well run, efficient, thoroughly modern legal Department at Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network. Under Kelly’s leadership, the SLHN corporate compliance program grew and flourished. The legal team has also been responsible for upgrading the SLHN Risk Management Department into an entity that can effectively manage the risk complexities of a $1 billion company. Kelly is personally responsible for creating the SLHN Captive, which is well suited to manage SLHN’s malpractice claims. Kelly oversees the use of all external counsel and actively promotes initiative in all people who work with him.


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Deliver Results. (Check) © Congratulations... to the JDA Legal Team for its recognition in the Arizona Corporate Counsel Awards. Effective, empowered, and excellent only begin to describe a team that embraces JDA’s mission of “plan to deliver” in all aspects of its work.

jda.com +1.800.479.7382 14400 N. 87th Street Scottsdale, AZ 85260-3649

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2015 Finalists

K aren Stein General counsel IO io.com

Stein oversees all legal and risk management functions of the company. She holds a Juris Doctorate, with honors, from Emory University, an MBA from Loyola University with a concentration in finance, and a Bachelor of Science degree in business from the University of Maryland, where she graduated magna cum laude. She has practiced law since 1994, focusing on business transactions, licensing, and intellectual property. Before joining IO, Stein practiced at the Troutman Sanders law firm in Atlanta and served as the assistant general counsel for the PGA Tour for 10 years.

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Jason Steiner Corporate counsel Insight Enterprises insight.com

In less than two years, Steiner has proved himself to be a valuable contributor to the Legal Department at Insight, working on contracts, supporting internal investigations throughout North America, litigating smaller claims himself, supporting litigation involving restrictive covenants with former employees, becoming proficient in the field of eDiscovery and developing the necessary labor and employment knowledge to be a front-line resource for the HR department. Steiner has a “can do” attitude, a willingness to learn new areas and the drive and tenacity to see tasks through to completion. Steiner graduated from ASU with a B.S. in finance (2009) and a J.D. (2012) from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law.

Division general counsel Rur al/Metro rmetro.com

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Jenny Holsman Tetreault

From June-December of 2013, Holsman Tetreault served as the sole in-house counsel — in partnership with an outside general counsel. In this capacity, she drafted company policies related to the role of its in-house counsel, helped strategize and implement a new approach to the role and use of outside counsel, reduced legal department expenses and helped to build a legal team dedicated to innovation. She implemented a centralization program to bring legal work to the corporate office, including FCC licenses, vehicle titles, business associate agreements, customer and vendor contracting, risk management and litigation oversight, and both compliance and regulatory licensing, resulting in the legal department becoming a profit center.

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Senior counsel litigation Petsmart petsmart.com After living in Chicago for more than 30 years and after 13 years of private practice, Woodie moved her family to Phoenix for an opportunity to join PetSmart’s in-house legal team. She applies her critical thinking and strong litigation skills to handle a broad spectrum of litigation, including wage and hour class actions, patent litigation, personal injury and commercial claims. Colleagues say Woodie never forgets the human aspect of litigation and strives to incorporate compassion along with a strong desire to achieve the best possible legal outcome. In her short time at PetSmart, the number of general litigation claims have decreased to an all-time low.


David Bixby is the best.*

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BannerHealth.com • /BannerHealth

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To be defined within the jurisdiction of Arizona. “Best” is to be used only when congratulating a formal title, specifically, the Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Banner Health. In this particular case, the opinion of the jury shall not cross the congratulatory parameters outside of the 2015 Arizona Corporate Counsel Awards. For further questions, please refer to David Bixby. AB | January-February 2015

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Congratulations!

Jason B. Steiner Corporate Counsel

on being named a finalist for an Arizona Corporate Counsel Award

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COMING NEXT ISSUE • The hospitality industry boosts Arizona’s economy • Meet the state’s most innovative minority business leaders • Who are the finalists for the Healthcare Leadership Awards? • How creativity translates into business success

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• Profiles of Arizona’s top lawyers

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The best counsel comes from understanding what makes your business tick. At Quarles & Brady, we want to understand our clients’ goals and challenges from top to bottom, inside and out. We know that in order to provide excellent client service, we must walk in your shoes, and see the world through your eyes. This dedication and investment in our clients’ business is what sets Quarles & Brady apart from other law f irms: we provide a true partnership, in every sense of the word.

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RECOGNITION OF EXCELLENCE

Congratulations

Bravo. Well done.

to all of the finalists in the 2015 Arizona Corporate Counsel Award event.

PERKINS COIE congratulates the honorees of the 2015 Arizona Corporate Counsel Awards and shares their commitment to the excellence and innovation that defines great companies.

We look forward to seeing you on

January 15, 2015 at the

for the award program!

G I B Z A CONGRATULATIONS

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PerkinsCoie.com Perkins Coie LLP ATTORNEY ADVERTISING

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Camelback Inn Resort

30 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE

Carmen Neuberger General Counsel at Phoenix Children’s Hospital

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AND ALL THIS YEAR’S HONOREES

Phoenix Children’s provides the most comprehensive

Your employees and their families deserve the best care.

pediatric care in the Southwest. With our deep expertise

Make sure your health plan includes Phoenix Children’s

in more than 75 pediatric specialties, including Barrow

Hospital and PCCN, its network of physicians, so the best is

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programs in cancer, orthopaedics, trauma cardiac services and precision medicine, Phoenix Children’s Hospital is leading the way, breaking new ground in pediatric research and treatment.

1919 E Thomas Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | PhoenixChildrens.org

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2015 B u s i n e s s e s i n f i v e k e y s ec to r s r ecog n i z e d

for leadership and innovation

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z Business magazine is proud to present the Industry Leaders of Arizona (ILoA) Awards, which recognize the contributions and impact of Arizona-based companies on both the economy of Arizona and in the communities they serve. The 30 finalists for this year’s ILoA Awards are profiled on the following pages. Winners will be recognized at the awards dinner that will be held Wednesday, February 4 at Camelback Inn Resort.


Leadership: Bob La Loggia, CEO; Debbie James, CFO Address: 15300 N. 90th St., #100, Scottsdale Website: appointment-plus.com

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What it does: AppointmentPlus is

a web-based scheduling software that empowers businesses through configurable online calendars, reminder management, online payment processing and plug-in integration.

How it leads: Scheduling problems

cost companies more than $150 billion annually. AppointmentPlus’ software eliminates this problem by offering an easy-to-use platform for online scheduling. AppointmentPlus can take a small company from using paper appointment books to the increased accuracy of online booking. Departments within larger companies can use AppointmentPlus for scheduling trucks at distribution centers or scheduling job candidate screenings.

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Avella Specialty Pharmacy Leadership: Rebecca M. Shanahan, CEO; Prem Goyal, CFO Address: 1606 W. Whispering Wind Dr., Phoenix Website: avella.com What it does: Avella is a national

specialty pharmacy offering breakthrough medications, clinical excellence and support to individuals with complex healthcare issues.

How it leads: Avella offers more than just innovative specialty medications. Its clinicians and staff members provide guidance that helps individuals manage complex health conditions like cancer, hepatitis, HIV, infertility and others. Avella partners with prescribing physicians to serve as a valuable member of a patient’s healthcare team. Avella complements these efforts with the latest technology, including mobile health tools that offer convenience to its patients.

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Benson Systems Leadership: Shawn Benson, CEO; James Spiel, CFO Address: 2065 W. Obispo Ave., #101, Gilbert Website: bensonsys.com What it does: Benson Systems’ mission

is to be a single-source provider of vital facilities services and system integration and installation, including security systems, fire alarms, air conditioning systems, electrical, plumbing and more.

How it leads: Earlier this year,

Benson created a fund-raising arm of Benson Systems called the Benson Charities Foundation. Focusing on his passion of youth development and health and wellness, CEO Shawn Benson funnels his personal and company community efforts into the foundation so that he can more effectively support causes that are important to him and his family.


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Exodyne Enghouse Interactive Leadership: Christoph Mosing, CEO; Doug Bryson, CFO Address: 2095 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., #110, Phoenix Website: enghouseinteractive.com What it does: Enghouse Interactive is a

global leader in providing contact center solutions that deliver differentiated customer experiences and maximize the value of every customer interaction.

How it leads: Enghouse is steadfast in

both its commitment to and investment in making the Phoenix community its headquarters. Unlike many technology companies, Enghouse boasts an incredibly strong balance sheet and consistent year-over-year growth. Second quarter revenue in 2014, for example, was $55 million, an increase of 23 percent over revenue of $44.5 million in the second quarter in 2013.

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Leadership: Ralph Rockow, CEO; Julie Rossignol, CFO Address: 8433 N. Black Canyon Hwy., #200, Phoenix Website: exodyne.com

FacilitySource

What it does: Dynamic Science, Inc.

Leadership: Bill Hayden, CEO; Richard Montero, CFO Address: 3600 E. University Dr., #C1550, Phoenix Website: facilitysource.com

How it leads: DSI was established to

What it does: Since 2001, FacilitySource

(DSI), a subsidiary of Exodyne, has provided defense-related services since 1942 in aviation, test and evaluation, and research and development.

assist in a crash injury research project at Cornell University. DSI is known for its longevity, innovative track record, consistency and variety of areas of expertise. The Air National Guard chose DSI to provide air traffic control and navigational aid maintenance services at seven locations throughout the U.S. DSI also expanded into train, bus, and motorcycle investigations.

has provided high-quality alternatives to traditional facility support solutions to multi-location retailers, restaurants and other enterprises.

How it leads: FacilitySource is a leader in the facility management industry because of its unique perspective on integrated facility management. To deliver on this vision, FacilitySource employs industry-leading solution components that help its clients operate their facilities in best-in-class fashion. These differentiated solutions include FacilitySource’s applied business intelligence, elite network of service providers, its industry leading software platform — fmPilot — and its transaction center.


Lots of advisors suit up, show up and keep up. But how many know when to speak up?

Team McGladrey Golfer Zach Johnson and his caddie, Damon Green.

Power comes from being understood.® A strong strategic partner should know you and your organization well enough to know when to step up with insights, suggestions and fresh ideas. And when you trust the advice you’re getting, you know your next move is the right move. This is the power of being understood. This is McGladrey. Experience the power. Go to www.mcgladrey.com. For more information, contact Bryan Zall, Office Managing Partner – Phoenix at bryan.zall@mcgladrey.com or call 602-636-6032.

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McGladrey LLP is the U.S. member firm of RSM International, a global network of independent accounting, tax and consulting firms. MCG-1213TB


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We are Big orange All the juice you need to run your business.

Thank you for recognizing faciliTySource aS one of arizona’S induSTry leaderS. We are honored To Be a ParT of your coMMuniTy.

World leader in faciliTy ManageMenT

800.896.9000 | www.facilitysource.com

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GPS Insight Leadership: Robert Donat, CEO; Wayne Holder, CFO Address: 19001 N. Scottsdale Rd., #400, Scottsdale Website: gpsinisght.com What it does: GPS Insight is a leading

GPS tracking software provider for commercial and government fleets. How it leads: GPS Insight innovates most in its technology and is typically the first to bring new capabilities to the GPS tracking space. The way in which it innovates most, however, is by continuously working with customers and prospects to hear about what they require. By pairing its technology with user requirements, GPS Insight brings its product continuously to the next level, while satisfying existing and future customers.

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InEight Leadership: Bill Ponseti, CEO; Jason Trueblood, CFO Address: 9977 N. 90th St., #200, Scottsdale Website: ineight.com What it does: InEight’s technology solutions help companies design, estimate, control and connect all aspects of their capital and maintenance projects, from the back office to the job site. How it leads: In May 2014, the company introduced the InEight name, which represents the vision to empower customers with an innate ability to more effectively manage their capital and maintenance projects from start to finish. More than 500 companies now use InEight products, including some of the largest companies in the engineering, construction, operations, mining, oil and gas and utilities industries.

Inventure Foods Leadership: Terry McDaniel, CEO; Steve Weinberger, CFO Address: 5415 E. High St., Phoenix Website: inventurefoods.com What it does: Inventure Foods is a

sales and marketing company that focuses on healthy and natural snacks and frozen foods. Its brands include company-owned brands Boulder Canyon, Poore Brothers, Rader Farms, Fresh Frozen Foods and license brands including Jamba, Seattle’s Best Coffee, TGI Friday’s, Nathan’s Famous and Vidalia Brands snacks. How it leads: As a smaller food company, Inventure’s ability to develop unique product concepts that are brought to the market quickly has enable it to compete against some of the industry giants.


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Isagenix International, LLC Leadership: Kevin Adams, CEO; Darren Fujii, CFO Address: 2225 S. Price Rd., Chandler Website: isagenix.com What it does: Isagenix offers health-

and-wellness solutions that provide real results, a compelling business opportunity and a global vision of helping people achieve their dreams — physically and financially. How it leads: Isagenix is a worldclass leader in the network marketing industry, offering solutions to transform lives in four key areas: weight loss, energy and performance, healthy aging and wealth creation. With cumulative sales of more than $2.5 billion, the company is undeniably one of the most successful in the industry.

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Maverick Healthcare JDA Software Group, Inc. Leadership: Bal Dail, chairman and CEO; Marc Levine, CFO

Address: 14400 N. 87th St., Scottsdale Website: jda.com What it does: JDA Software is a leader

in global supply chain management, offering a broad portfolio of integrated planning and execution solutions and services to help firms manage the entire supply chain through any channel. How it leads: A powerful cloud delivery platform enables JDA customers to achieve and maintain long-term value from their software investments. From rapid deployment to ongoing optimization services, JDA Cloud customers benefit from the synthesis of technology, support, system management, and industry and solution expertise.

Leadership: Robert Fahlman, CEO; Jeff Reynolds, CFO Address: 4601 E. Hilton Ave., Phoenix Website: preferredhomecare.com What it does: Maverick provides

multiple value-based in-home services. How it leads: In December 1997, Preferred Homecare started as a small company with 27 employees and nine branch locations in Arizona and set a course to grow organically. Preferred Homecare also set forth a plan to grow through acquisitions and purchased Park InfusionCare in Texas in 2007; Centura, a hospital-based durable medical equipment company, in 2010; and LifeCare Solutions, a home healthcare provider in 2011. The company now has nearly 2,000 employees in more than 60 locations.


FLEET & ASSET TRACKING SOFTWARE

GPS Insight works with businesses that have fleets of vehicles and other mobile assets to solve your unique business challenges through increased revenue, reduced costs, and reduced risk. • Reduce Fuel Costs

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• Stay on Top of Maintenance

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TAKE FULL CONTROL OF YOUR FLEET GPSINSIGHT.COM | 866-477-4321 AB | January-February 2015

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OneNeck IT Solutions Leadership: Phil LaForge, CEO; Clint Harder, chief technology officer and general manager of managed hosting and cloud services Address: 5301 N. Pima Rd., #100, Scottsdale Website: oneneck.com

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What it does: OneNeck delivers

tailored, end-to-end enterprise-class IT solutions, including everything from engineering and managing IT infrastructure to enterprise resource planning (ERP) application management, managed services, cloud services and Tier 3 data centers.

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How it leads: An ERP system isn’t just

a software application. It is a platform upon which businesses are run and OneNeck is the leading ERP managed hosting provider for mid-market companies.

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Option 1 Healthcare Solutions Leadership: Rick Winterich, CEO; Al Charlesworth, CFO Address: 2460 E. Germann Rd., #18, Chandler Website: option1nutrition.com What it does: Option 1 is a tube feeding

and medical nutrition provider that combines outstanding care, clinical expertise and a wide variety of products to support its patients.

How it leads: Option 1 has developed

a program that is much more than simply delivering supplies. Option 1 has studied and strived to create a program that outperforms other enteral therapy providers in both patient care and cost savings. Its model is focused on the patient’s needs rather than business convenience or internal cost savings.

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Parchment Leadership: Matthew Pittinsky, CEO; Robert Colletti, CFO Address: 6263 N. Scottsdale Rd., #330, Scottsdale Website: parchment.com What it does: Parchment is an education technology company that makes it easier to request, verify and share educational and professional credentials electronically.

How it leads: Parchment’s advanced technology platform takes people’s transcripts, degrees, licenses and certifications and helps turn them into realized opportunities. Parchment is changing what has become an archaic process of credentials management. Parchment’s challenge is trying to educate students, professionals and organizations on how the company can save them time and help them with their goals by managing their credentials quickly and securely online.


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We are dedicated to offering the highest quality health and wellness solutions that provide real results, a compelling business opportunity, and a global vision for helping people achieve their dreams — physically and financially. Isagenix offers Solutions to Transform Lives™ and provides systems for weight loss, energy and performance, healthy aging, and wealth creation. Isagenix products are distributed through an independent network of associates in the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico, Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, Mexico, Singapore, Malaysia, Colombia, and Vietnam. The company’s vision is to impact world health and free people from physical and financial pain. Isagenix, established in 2002, is a privately owned company with headquarters in Chandler, Ariz., and is a member of the Direct Selling Association. For more information, visit Isagenix.com. AB | January-February 2015 79


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Paul Johnson Drywall

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Parker and Sons

Leadership: Paul E. Kelly, CEO; Erika Doyle, controller Address: 3636 E. Anne St., Phoenix Website: parkerandsons.com

What it does: Parker and Sons, celebrating its 40th year in business, is a leader in the HVAC and plumbing industry. How it leads: At the heart of its success is Parker and Sons’ value system, which it calls its SPIRIT values — Service, Performance, Integrity, Respect, Innovation and Teamwork. The leaders of Parker and Sons say the company’s success is driven by team members who not only care, but care enough to do the right thing and go the extra mile. 80

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Leadership: Cole Johnson, CEO; Bernd Linzbach, controller Address: 1720 W. Parkside Lane, Phoenix Website: pauljohnsondrywall.com What it does: Paul Johnson Drywall

is a family-owned drywall contractor that provides services to single-family, multi-family and commercial projects throughout the Southwest.

How it leads: Earlier this year, the company implemented a classification initiative in conjunction with the Department of Labor and reclassified 1,325 workers as W-2 employees and hired another 627 W-2 employees. PJD and the Department of Labor collaborated to develop and implement the construction-industry-focused effort, which addresses classification and overtime issue of traditionally piece-rate trades by providing industry best practices.

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Phoenix Heliparts Leadership: Tina Cannon, president; Andy Guiterrez, controller and director of HR Address: 3130 N. Oakland, #110, Mesa Website: phoenixheliparts.com

What it does: Phoenix Heliparts is a female-owned helicopter maintenance, repair and overhaul facility which specializes in custom modifications and integration. How it leads: Since the company was

founded in Cannon’s garage less than 12 years ago, Phoenix Heliparts has become a prime contractor for the U.S. Department of State, Boeing, the U.S. Army and the South Korean army. Phoenix Heliparts has received awards from the U.S. Department of State for superior performance and a supplier excellence award from Boeing.


The true honor for us is seeing our customers succeed.

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JDA Software is proud to be a finalist for the Industry Leaders of Arizona Awards. Our true honor, though, lies in our rich heritage of helping our customers succeed in today’s demanding, consumer-driven marketplace. For 30 years we’ve provided game-changing solutions that span the entire supply chain, empowering companies to achieve more by optimizing costs, increasing revenue and reducing time to value. Learn how we can help you deliver at jda.com

+1.800.479.7382 14400 N. 87th Street Scottsdale, AZ 85260-3649

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Plexus Worldwide Leadership: Tarl Robinson, CEO; Stephen Howard, CFO Address: 15649 N. Greenway Hayden Loop, Scottsdale Website: plexusworldwide.com

committed to providing its ambassadors with life-changing products and a unique and rewarding business opportunity, opening the door to personal and financial success.

How it leads: The Plexus Plan may

soon be considered the standard in its industry for sustainable, secure income and growth for distributors. The balance is clear – everything Plexus does, from the compensation plan to its product line to the people its hires, must be both good for the company and good for the ambassadors.

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What it does: Plexus Worldwide is

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Robertson Fuel Systems, LLC Leadership: Tom Harrison, CEO; Barry Sullivan, CFO Address: 800 W. Carver Rd., Tempe Website: robbietanks.com What it does: Robertson Fuel Systems designs and manufactures crashworthy and ballistically self-sealing fuel systems for helicopters and ground combat vehicles for U.S. and international customers.

How it leads: Robertson is the acknowledged world leader in fuel containment and ballistic tolerance, having designed, manufactured and fielded more than 4,500 crash-worthy, ballistically self-sealing primary and auxiliary fuel systems for rotary and fixed-winged aircraft and ground combat vehicles since 1976. Robertson systems self-seal against ballistic threats ranging from 7.62mm and .50 caliber Armor Piercing (AP) straight and tumbled projectiles to 23mm High Explosive Incendiary (HEI) and meet/exceed military crash-worthy requirements.

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Simpleview Leadership: Ryan George, CEO; Scott Meredith, CFO Address: 7458 N. La Cholla Blvd., Tucson Website: simpleviewinc.com What it does: Simpleview offers integrated products and services, including the industry’s most advanced customer relationship management (CRM) and content management system (CMS) platforms, dynamic websites, SEO and interactive marketing. How it leads: Simpleview provides a

comprehensive cloud-based technology platform which connects Destination Marketing Organizations (DMOs) around the world to travelers, meeting planners, and local businesses. Simpleview is able to exemplify their core competency of helping DMOs attract travelers and drive economic impact through a streamlined sales and marketing process.


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Sonora Quest Laboratories/Laboratory Sciences of Arizona

What it does: Sonora Quest

Laboratories provides award-winning diagnostic testing and information services to physicians, hospitals, managed care organizations and patients throughout Arizona.

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How it leads: Sonora Quest Laboratories

has more than 2,700 employees statewide and performs more than 75,000 diagnostic tests per day, including the latest and most innovative testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers, to name a few. The company is the only healthcare company ever to receive our state’s highest quality award, the Arizona Governor’s Award for Quality.

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Leadership: Dave Dexter, CEO; David Lutich, CFO Address: 1255 W. Washington St., Tempe Website: sonoraquest.com

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Sprouts Farmers Market Leadership: Doug Sanders, CEO; Amin Maredia, CFO Address: 11811 N. Tatum Blvd., #2400, Phoenix Website: sprouts.com What it does: Sprouts is a healthy

grocery store committed to healthy living that offers fresh, natural and organic foods at great prices.

How it leads: Recently named one of the Top 5 supermarket chains by Consumer Reports and headquartered in Phoenix, Sprouts employs more than 15,000 team members and operates more than 175 stores in 10 states. Central to Sprouts’ identity is a genuine commitment to responsible retailing, which includes constructing and operating its farmers markets in a way that reduces energy use.

StandardAero Leadership: Russell Ford, CEO; Mike Scott, CFO Address: 1524 W. 14th St., #110, Tempe Website: standardaero.com What it does: StandardAero is one of the world’s largest independent providers of aviation services including engine, component and airframe maintenance, repair and overhaul, interior completions and paint.

How it leads: StandardAero has multiple strengths that serve as competitive advantages and provide the company with a unique value proposition. Greatest among these is the breadth of services among complementary aviation markets. StandardAero is able to serve a diverse array of aviation markets as a “tip-to-tail” service provider and authorized MRO service center among the top engine original equipment manufacturers.


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Congratulations to all the nominees for the 2015 Industry Leaders of Arizona Awards. Your leadership is what keeps Arizona moving forward.

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1-888-456-4560 www.SunstateEquip.com

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SunRenu Solar

What it does: SunRenu Solar provides installation and contracting services with industry leading solar solutions that accelerate the rate of return on solar investments.

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How it leads: SunRenu was named to

Solar Power World magazine’s list of the “Top 400 Solar Contractors in America,” landing at No. 197. Specializing in mid-market commercial solar installation and finance, SunRenu has seen exponential growth in a market sector that is shrinking. SunRenu’s growth pattern shows it will grow from $6 million in revenue in 2014 to $10 million in 2015.

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Leadership: John McDonnell, CEO; Christy McDonnel, controller Address: 4300 N. Miller Rd., #130, Scottsdale Website: sunrenu.com

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Sunstate Equipment Leadership: Chris Watts, president and COO; Garth Price, CFO Address: 5552 E. Washington St., Phoenix Website: sunstateequip.com What it does: Sunstate provides top-

quality rental equipment and tools to its customers so they can get the job done safely and efficiently.

How it leads: With the trend toward

users outsourcing their construction equipment rentals, Sunstate has successfully navigated the changing face of the industry for more than 30 years. The company is defined by its core values: people, integrity, safety, challenge, empowerment, teamwork and fun. Sunstate’s leadership believes that if they take care of their employees, the employees will take care of their customers.

Universal Avionics Systems Corporation Leadership: Paul DeHerrera, CEO; Michael Delgado, CFO Address: 3260 E. Universal Way, Tucson Website: uasc.com What it does: Universal Avionics is a

leading manufacturer of avionics systems used worldwide on aircraft types from helicopters to corporate turbine aircraft and commercial airliners.

How it leads: Universal Avionics

credits much of its success in growing the company to its involvement in the community. Most of the company’s initial hiring for its manufacturing workforce was done through a unique program developed in partnership with Pima Community College, Pima County, the City of Tucson, the Pima County Workforce Investment Board and others.


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Taking an aircraft support business from a home-based startup to an aerospace industry powerhouse isn’t easy. Defined by hard work and perseverance, Phoenix Heliparts is committed to building our business and our community. It’s a privilege to give back to those who continue to give so much to us. Right here in Arizona.

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The World Leader in Survivable Fuel Systems Providing 30 years of reliable and trusted service.

TrustBenson.com

At Benson Systems, we are committed to being the trusted provider of vital facility and system integration services while also being a leader in the communities where we live and work. WITH ONE CALL, WE CAN DO IT ALL:

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480.892.8688 TrustBenson.com C-12 ROC166993 | L-67 ROC166994 | K-11 ROC147120 K-16 ROC213233 | K-39 ROC280147 | K-37 ROC275785

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VIP Sponsors:

Media Sponsors: 30 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE


H i r i n g the M i l i t a r y

S p ec i al A d v e r t i s i n g S ec t i o n

Arizona’s award-winning companies

look to hire military veterans

On behalf of

BestCompaniesAZ®, Waste Management Phoenix Open and Birdies for the Brave®, we are excited to launch an inaugural event to benefit our highly skilled military men and women, matching job seekers with the most distinguished corporations of Arizona. “The BestCompaniesAZ® Military Career Event” will take place January 26, 2015 in Scottsdale, in conjunction with the special activities surrounding Denise Gredler the Waste Management Phoenix Open. BestCompaniesAZ At BestCompaniesAZ, we believe the dedication these courageous heroes have demonstrated in service to our country should be rewarded with the opportunity to be employed by some of the best companies Arizona has to offer. We have partnered with more than 30 award-winning companies that recognize the value our veterans bring to the workplace and are committed to hiring Arizona’s military talent. In the weeks leading up to this event, we are offering online career resources and coaching workshops to better acquaint job seekers with the individual workplace cultures and open positions of each hiring partner. Moreover, our mission and hope, in sponsoring this event, is to call on the generosity of our community and employers to pull out all stops in providing our event attendees with every advantage to ease their career transition from military to civilian life. On January 26th — event day — there will be complimentary workshops for job seekers on “Developing your Personal Brand,” followed by a second workshop at noon on “Using Social Media in a Job Search.” At 2 p.m., doors open

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to the career fair, kicking off the celebration with a welcome from BestCompaniesAZ, Waste Management and Birdies for the Brave. Starting at 2:30, with half hour rotations, a stellar line-up of military-friendly companies will make presentations, followed by panel discussions and Q&A. Attendance to this Best Company Military Career Event is offered to veterans and their spouses entirely free of charge. Advance registration is required. Event details, featured companies and registration can be found at bestcompaniesaz.com. All companies hiring have earned prestigious state and national workplace awards, such as Arizona’s Most Admired Companies, CareerBuilder’s Top Companies to Work for in Arizona, Arizona’s Best Companies to Watch, FORTUNE 100 Best Companies to Work For® in America, FORTUNE Most Admired Companies, Military Times Best for Vets Employers, US Veterans Magazine’s Best of the Best, and most hold numerous industry distinctions. It is with great pride that we offer this new event to our community, in hopes that it will continue to flourish in the years ahead. It’s just smart business to hire our service men and women. Their talent, skills, discipline and sense of duty have earned them the right not only to occupy a place in our hearts, but also a place of pride with our very best Arizona companies.

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“ I found the career of my dreams at a great company.” BCAz_728x90banner3.indd 1

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Denise Gredler is the founder and CEO of BestCompaniesAZ, LLC, an organizational consulting and marketing firm dedicated to identifying, developing and promoting great workplaces in Arizona and throughout the United States.

GET CONNECTED 2/13/13 10:20 PM


Serving proudly with humankindness. 4 1 0 Dignity Health is a VIP Sponsor of the 2015 Best Companies Military Career Event. We are proud to be recognized as a military-friendly company and honored to be a part of this event. With a growing network of hospitals throughout Arizona, California and Nevada, Dignity Health is one of the nation’s leading hospital networks. We invite you to join us as we work to inspire a stronger, safer and healthier world.

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Military Career Event Agenda January 26, 2015

Pre-Event 10:00 am

Employer Registration

11:00 am

Boot Camp Workshops for Military Job Seekers featuring Career Connectors – Jessica Pierce Tips on how to transition into a civilian career with a Best Company! • 11:00 – 11:45 - Workshop 1 • Noon – 12:45 – Workshop 2

Noon

Boot Camp Workshop for Hiring Companies Tips on how to interview military job seekers to uncover transferable skill

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Job Seeker Registration and Career Networking Begins

2:00 pm

Welcome and Introductions

2:30 pm

Healthcare VIP Sponsor – Dignity Health Arizona

3:00 pm

Finance (Investment, Banking & Insurance) VIP Sponsor - Charles Schwab

3:30 pm

Call Centers (Credit Card/Service Industry) VIP Sponsor – Synchrony Financial

4:00 pm

Hospitality, Retail and Diversified Services VIP Sponsor - Starbucks

4:30 pm

Technology & Innovation - VIP Sponsor - TBD

5:00 pm

Career Networking

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VIP Group:

Gold Group:

Silver Group:

Partners:

30 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE

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Tips to prepare for

BestCompaniesAZ career event By DENISE GREDLER

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very job seeker wants to find the perfect job, almost as much as every corporation wants to find the perfect candidate. At BestCompaniesAZ, our goal is to make that process easier by helping the best companies find the best candidates. We’ve conducted a great deal of research in this field, and have some tips and pointers to give job seekers every advantage for a successful outcome.

1. Know your strengths and transferable skills What makes you unique within the context of the job you are seeking? Are you creative? Systematic? Visionary? Organized? Flexible? Perfectionist? Identify your transferable skills from your military job to a civilian career. For help in this area, we recommend two career partners with extensive resources for job seekers: • Careerconnectors.org is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization dedicated to connecting professionals in career transition to hiring companies and quality resources. Visit events Jan. 7 and Jan. 15 to brush up on your networking skills and learn about their resources. • Ivetx.com – Provides free resources to translate your military skills, experience and training to career opportunities that align with your capabilities. Visit www. ivetx.com – and learn all the ways they can support your job search.

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4. Develop your “personal pitch” and share your stories With limited time at a career event you only have just a few minutes to “wow” the recruiter with your personal story and why you’d be a great fit for them. When employers ask about you, deliver a personal pitch that tells the employer in 30 – 60 seconds the following points: • Your background and who you are • What are you passionate about (tie this in with the company mission, vision and values) • What value can you provide (your past experiences in that field)

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2. Research the hiring companies

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Interestingly, while technical skills and experience certainly count high on the list of any employer, companies often place an even higher value on hiring candidates with the right personality to blend well with their corporate culture. Start by reviewing the company profile online atBestCompaniesAZ. com/companies. If you like what you see, we have additional resources on our website to help you identify companies that best align with your values and interests.

3. Review the career openings in advance and build your resume Know the types of jobs that fit your skills, abilities and interests. The DISC assessment and Ivetx tools will help you uncover transferable skills that will strengthen your resume and LinkedIn profile. Apply online prior to the event if you find a potential match. Although most hiring companies will not be able to collect resumes on site, we still encourage you to bring a supply with you to the event, and come prepared to collect business cards and take notes.

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5. Manage your online brand

“Google” yourself to see what comes up on the first few pages. Be aware of your online presence, because hiring companies are checking you out before they meet you in person. Make sure your LinkedIn profile is fully developed and expand your contacts through groups that connect to your field. Recruiters and employers are using social media sites to fill their positions. Make it easy for them to find you.

6. Expand your network – talk to friends and family Award-winning companies receive thousands of resumes, but if someone comes referred by a friend or family member, they often go to the top of the list.

7. Prepare and practice Practice telling your personal story to your family and friends. Create mock interview questions and review scenarios for each company of interest. From company websites you can explore company culture by watching videos, reviewing Facebook and Twitter channels, learning more about the leadership team and current press releases. Your military experience is a tremendous asset. The companies hiring at the BestCompaniesAZ Career Military Event recognize this, and have chosen to participate because they value the skills and experience veterans like you bring to the workplace. Please visit our website, bestcompaniesaz.com, to see the many resources we have available to our job seekers free of charge. We wish you success at this event and salute you for your service to our country.


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Engage with a community that supports, develops and promotes our men and women in uniform. Text “SYF95” to 90206 for more information or apply online at www.SynchronyCareers.com

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Engage with us.

Explore our call center jobs at SynchronyCareers.com EOE, M/F/D/V

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From

front line to bottom line Hiring military veterans can add competitive edge to Arizona’s businesses

DZBIG By CHERYL HURD

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uring his military career, Capt. Eric Engquist negotiated mortar attacks, roadside bombs, ambushes and rocket grenades in the Iraqi desert, employing strategic planning and problem solving skills under extreme pressure. After eight years as an Army infantry officer, Engquist left the military to join corporate America, bringing those skills with him. Today he is the assistant vice president for military transitions at USAA, a company that has been advising and hiring service members for more than 92 years. Engquist helps veterans entering the workforce recognize the skills they have that may give businesses a competitive edge. “If companies are looking to hire veterans, it is important to understand the value that veterans potentially bring to an organization and that actually hiring veterans is not to be looked at as charity. It makes good business sense,” Engquist explains. He sites a recent study by the Corporate Leadership Council that says on average, veterans are 4 percent more productive and have 3 percent higher retention rates than their peers who don’t have prior military service. “When you think about the increased productivity and the increased retention—provided that you have a good cultural fit and you onboard and retain employees well—it will impact the bottom line,” Engquist says.

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H i r i n g the M i l i t a r y Valuable skill set “Veterans are adept at embracing change and operating in nebulous environments. They are very team oriented and they are results driven,” Engquist says. “All of those demonstrate to companies that hire veterans and have good hiring programs that they make good employees.” Retired Air Force Lt. Col. John McGarrity is the executive director for talent programs delivery with USAA. He says veterans have a tremendous amount of talent. “I think sometimes people focus on the technical skill they bring to the table but there is a lot there beyond technical expertise. They have been trained to lead. They have been given missions and directives and have been told to execute on those and when they encounter an obstacle they know how to work around that.” McGarrity explains that service members have the ability to adjust to new situations and can easily learn the nuances within an organization. “Also military members are great risk managers,” he says. “They know how to walk into an organization and identify those areas that need to be strengthened.” A recent survey by the University of Phoenix highlights more skills gained in the military that include: responsibility, teamwork, ability to work under pressure, ability to follow instructions, leadership, problem solving, accountability, ability to focus on tasks, communication skills, critical thinking, technical skills, analytical skills and cultural awareness. But even with this valuable skillset, the survey shows that, although the unemployment rate of military personnel is declining, many veterans may be underemployed. According to the survey, 61 percent of past service members who have held civilian jobs say they have previously been or currently are in jobs beneath their skill sets, with nearly three-quarters saying they accepted a position because they needed a job.

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Companies take action

Some companies recognize the value in service members and have programs in place to hire and retain them. GoDaddy, a leading technology provider dedicated to small businesses, embraces a culture that supports veterans and appreciates their service to country. “GoDaddy has a robust population of veterans across every function of our company,” says Elizabeth Driscoll, vice president of public relations. That includes the company’s founder, Bob Parsons, a decorated veteran, who was honored with the Combat Action Ribbon, the Vietnam Gallantry Cross and Purple Heart for his service with the United States Marine Corps in Vietnam. The company’s resource program, GoDaddy Veterans, is dedicated to creating a welcoming community for service members and their families, promoting career and skill development, and building a recruiting pipeline across all service branches and rank. USAA focuses on attracting, developing and retaining veteran talent. Twenty four percent of USAA’s workforce is comprised of veterans or spouses of military service members and the company has set a goal of 30 percent for new hires. “We have a program called VetNet comprised of former service members and spouses of service members,” Engquist says. “They maintain social networking among like experience individuals, mentor and support one another, and provide visibility and education for employees who don’t have military experience.”

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Military Career and Job Fair presented by BestCompaniesAZ, Waste Management Phoenix Open, and Birdies for the Brave

What: With more than 30 of Arizona’s best awardwinning companies recruiting on site, this event will showcase companies that have earned awards such as Fortune Magazine’s 100 Best Companies to Work for in America,

Fortune Most Admired Companies, “Military Friendly” awards, Arizona’s Most Admired Companies, Careerbuilder Top Companies to Work for in Arizona and Best Places to Work in the Valley, to name a few.

When:

Monday, Jan. 26, 1 p.m.-5 p.m.

Where:

Monterra at WestWorld of

Scottsdale, 16601 N, Pima Rd., Scottsdale

Information:

bestcompaniesaz.com


Serve with us. Our commitent is to hire at least 10,000 veterans and military spouses over the next 5 years.

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H i r i n g the M i l i t a r y Hiring heroes Kim Morton, senior manager of media relations for Hiring Our Heroes, a program of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, says some businesses in the Phoenix area, such as TriWest Healthcare, Waste Management, Allied Waste, Republic Services and University of Phoenix are recognized by the chamber as being proactive in veteran hires. “Our strongest partner and recruiter in the area is the University of Phoenix,” Morton says. “Their support allowed us to expand our employment workshop and resume review offerings. We’re now able to offer full and free workshops and one-on-one resume review at virtually every Hiring Our Heroes event due to the University of Phoenix. Their military division also recruits at our events across the country.” In addition to recruiting events, Hiring Our Heroes has online resources for veterans seeking employment at uschamberfoundation.org/hiring-our-heroes as well as tips for employers to build or improve upon their veteran hiring program at employerroadmap.com. Hiring our Heroes recently partnered with USAA and the Disney Institute to host a symposium to educate businesses about the advantages of hiring veterans as Corporate America faces an influx of veterans seeking meaningful employment. “We are in the midst of the largest drawdown in the history of our U.S. military,” Engquist explains. “Between now and

2017 we will see our services shrink to pre-World War II size. About 1.5 million active duty service members and national guardsmen and reservists will be leaving the force and joining corporate America. They are joining an existing 2.8 million service members that are post 9/11 veterans and half of those are the ages 25-34.” No private company can meet the needs of these veterans by itself, McGarrity says. “There’s not any company out there that’s going to be able to hire 100,000 veterans. It’s something that we can do together as a body of companies. We can band together and help share best practices, what’s working in our local areas and share that information across companies.” “These men and women, these veterans, have sacrificed a lot for our country,” McGarrity says. “If we can help in any small way to get one more veteran hired ... then we have done something to reward them. We have thanked them for their service. It really becomes about doing the right thing.” And doing the right thing is what fuels Engquist’s passion for helping others transition. “I’m just like anyone else facing the separation,” Engquist says. So he continues his mission to better arm those service members so they can have a smoother transition, be better financially positioned and better prepared to demonstrate why they are an excellent candidate for a career in corporate America.

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G I B Z A Elizabeth Driscoll

Eric Engquist

John McGarrity

“These men and women, these veterans, have sacrificed a lot for our country...”

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G I B Z Best practices A to hire and retain military © With earned distinction as a top workplace and valuable employer for military, Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. understands what it takes to hire and retain veteran employees. Ryan Kosowsky, managing director of talent acquisition, shares some of the company’s best practices:

Develop a networking group of mentors who understand the company and the experiences of service members. Provide training for hiring managers to understand the culture, translate skills and supervise service members. Mirror values and ethics of service.

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Host seminars to keep the lines of communication open.

Recognize accomplishments of employees and management advocating for them. Create a welcoming environment that includes celebrating military holidays.

Kosowsky suggests companies join a larger coalition with members who have experience in successful hiring of service members and are often open to sharing best practices. “In the talent that exists today, you have to go after the veteran population,” he explains, “and if you are not, you are missing out.”

Ryan Kosowsky


GoDaddyCareers.com

Meet BestCompaniesAZ Military Career Event Partners...

WE WANT YOU

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Supporting and hiring our nation’s military veterans.

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GCU iVetX Canyon State Career Connectors Careerbuilder Jobing Talent Radio Vets on Media Local Work ASU

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Bringing together business, non-profits, government and faith-based organizations to connect Real People with Real Careers

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Network of growth Expansions and emergence of technology companies reflect an exploding industry in Arizona

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on Hawley is the quintessential product of Silicon Valley. He went to college at the University of California, Berkeley, became a serial entrepreneur and founded and developed many successful technology companies in the San Francisco Bay area. So why is he doing business in Arizona? “Arizona is infinitely more business friendly,” said the founder, chairman and CEO of Scottsdale-based Innovative Green Technologies, which creates environmentally friendly products that reduce emissions and save users money. “Favorable tax rates make it less costly to do business in Arizona compared with California, which makes Arizona attractive to newer companies that have to watch their pennies. Arizona is also blessed with Arizona State University and the University of Arizona, which supply a constant stream of high-quality young talent, which is a great resource.” Hawley isn’t alone. The recently expansions of Zenefits and Weebly into the Valley and the emergence of Valley-based WebPT and Infusionsoft as technology powerhouses reflect an exploding technology sector in Phoenix that is transforming the state’s economy. “The technology ecosystem in Arizona has never been more robust and these recent business attractions are going to become more commonplace,” says Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “One of the vital attractions for startups in the Silicon Desert as compared with Silicon Valley is the drastically lower cost of living, especially in the area of housing. The word is getting out about Arizona.”

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GPEC Home-grown talent Valley economic developers are doing more than using lower tax rates and the promise of eternal sunshine to convince tech companies to relocate here, the state is also helping to build home-grown success stories. A great example is WebPT, which launched its cloud-based physical therapy software in 2008 and has evolved from startup into one the fastest-growing software companies in Arizona, creating more than 200 jobs in Phoenix. “There are great incentive programs available to businesses looking to grow,” says Brad Jannenga, co-founder, chairman, president and chief technology officer at WebPT. “The Angel Tax Credit program offered by the state is a great opportunity for investors to have peace of mind when backing startups because they know they can take a tax break when doing so. This was a major win for us when we went out for our Series A round back in 2010. Investors were lining up around the block, partly because of the early stage success we had, but also largely because of the Angel Tax Credit.” The successes of emerging companies like WebPT are driving the robust growth of Arizona’s technology sector, says Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) from 2005 until press time. “What we’ve done on the policy side was working with the legislature and governor so they understand that even though the headlines belong to Apple and Intel and companies like that, it’s the hundreds if not thousands of small and medium techbased enterprises that have the chance to be the next GoDaddy,” Broome says. “Maybe you get lucky and you get a Google or a Microsoft or maybe an Infusionsoft becomes a Microsoft. Having the ability to get those small companies to go to scale and having the economic development programs and policies in place to help them are where we’ve been most helpful.” Jannenga credits organizations like GPEC for helping the technology sector grow by tirelessly looking at new ways to diversify the economy and working closely with Arizona’s universities to produce the next wave of talent needed to feed the workforce demands of the technology sector. But Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton put it simply: “WebPT is a game-changer, not only in terms of showing the growth in the tech sector in Phoenix, but growth in the warehouse district in downtown Phoenix.”

emerging technology sector and what it means to the state’s economic future has been helpful to WebPT and other early stage companies. “I think when people began to recognize that we couldn’t rely on the traditional engines that had previously fueled our growth — tourism and migration from colder climates chief among them — to provide the type of jobs we need, it caused a basic shift in how progressive leaders thought about the future,” says Don Pierson, CEO of SpotlightSales, which developed a tech-based sales performance optimization tool.

Where do we grow from here? With the foundation for building a successful technology sector in place, Pierson says he has seen tremendous growth in the software industry and expects that growth to continue. “I think biofuels are really interesting,” he says, “and I’m always amazed by what comes out of the biotech area.” Greg Head, chief marketing officer at Infusionsoft, agrees with Pierson that Arizona is quickly becoming a center for software businesses. “Right now, there are thousands of entrepreneurs incubating new innovations, hundreds of software businesses growing and employing more people and several bigger software companies like GoDaddy, LifeLock, Infusionsoft and WebPT that are growing fast,” Head says. “The Arizona software community is growing up quickly.” Experts agree that diversifying Arizona’s tech sectors will power its growth. Zylstra expects aerospace and defense and semiconductor and electronics to continue to be strong, “but IT, especially software and data centers, healthcare, bioscience and alternative energy will help lead us into the future,” he says. “We need to have all tech industries thriving in Arizona,” says Mike Auger, CEO and founder of PikFly, a technology-driven same-day delivery network for local businesses. “A focus in one area puts us into a corner. Semiconductors have been great for our state, but that is really what we are known for — we need to be known for all types of tech.”

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Laying the foundation

Experts say Arizona has actually done a number of things well to build a business environment that fosters innovation and an entrepreneurial spirit. “The state has emphasized economic development through the support of key economic development groups like GPEC and the Arizona Commerce Authority,” says Jacque Westling, partner at Quarles & Brady in Phoenix. “(Arizona) has created and maintained some key tax incentives, such as the Refundable Research and Development Credit and the Angel Investment Tax Credit Program, promoted tech transfer from the universities and supported emerging areas of strength such as biotechnology, data centers, energy and other areas.” Zylstra says having facilities with ready-to-go infrastructure in desirable hot spots such as downtown Phoenix and downtown Scottsdale has been a major part in attracting and growing technology companies in the Valley. “Knowledge workers like the type of amenities available in these locations,” he says. “When you add Arizona’s ample workforce, low taxes and low cost of doing business, the foundation is very strong.” Jannenga says the state’s deep awareness of the 110

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Arizona’s shortcomings While Arizona’s growth in the technology arena is impressive, the state must tackle one major issue to maintain that positive trajectory. “I spend more of my time as mayor in economic development recruiting and retention than I do anything else,” Stanton says. “The reality is this: the companies are concerned about workforce development. Do we have the pipeline of employees they are going to need as their companies grow?” Jannenga agrees that Arizona needs to invest heavily in all levels of education and diversify our skilled workforce.

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Brad Jannenga

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GPEC “The places where we’re falling short is we’re not delivering the engineering talent necessary for the tech sector to really take off,” Broome says. “We need to make a big move on the production of engineers and make a big move on the production of information communication technology people.” Broome says that big move can come from community colleges, higher education and specialty certification programs that are putting students through six-month boot camps and producing a qualified workers. He cites the Maricopa Corporate College as a unique training program that is developing and delivering customized workforces. “You’re going to see continued movement in creating new educational options and a huge infusion of these intermediate training strategies to build the technology sector,” Broome says. Creating a viable workforce to feed the needs of the industry is a must to maintain the state’s robust growth and quality of life, experts say. “We either grow the tech sector of the economy or we will fail,” Broome says bluntly. “That’s how important it is. It’s where the wages are. It’s where the high-end people are. It’s the part of the economy that is most sustainable. If you’re not building a

tech sector, you’re relying on your current industries to remain relevant and we know from history that just doesn’t happen.” Broome says the Valley has learned from companies like Motorola and General Motors that mature companies in mature industries contract and fade away. It forces the business community to continually recycle its economic strategy around new industries. “From my perspective, you’re looking at a make-it-or-breakit situation,” Broome says. “The reason the economy is so sluggish is because it’s waiting for consumption. It’s waiting for government spending and it’s waiting for retail spending and it’s waiting for construction and home buying. When your economy can only recover on that basis, you’re going to continue to have ebbs and flows and dips and falls. Even a place like San Francisco, which has a very difficult business climate because it’s expensive to the point of being unimaginable, its net yearto-year economic growth is much more robust than Phoenix and the rest of the country because its economy is built around talent, innovation and the high-tech sector. If we do a good job and build that out better, there’s no reason why Phoenix can’t be the most exciting community in the United States.”

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Here is what industry experts say Arizona needs to do to keep growing its technology sector: Mike Auger » CEO and founder of PikFly: “We need continued involvement by the government and cities to encourage relocation of business to Arizona. We also need to continue to build a thriving investment community. History has proven that if the money is here, the businesses will come.”

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Alan Chambless » Vice President of customer success, Weebly: “Continuing to invest in technology infrastructure companies like Centurylink will help to drive other tech companies to the area. Keeping a strong investment and emphasis on local education will also help to fuel growth of the workforce in the IT sector and make the area that much more appealing to tech companies in the future.”

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Greg Head » Chief marketing officer, Infusionsoft: “The ball is already rolling with all the entrepreneurial activity happening now, so we need to continue support our entrepreneurial community by creating an environment where more startups can succeed and grow big ... We could do more to acknowledge the success that is already happening here to overcome our outdated reputation that Phoenix isn’t a software town.”

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Don Pierson » CEO, SpotlightSales: “Primarily, stay the course. The Arizona Angel Investment Tax Credit has been especially helpful in helping startups attract capital. That needs to continue. And organizations like GPEC and the Arizona Commerce Authority need to continue to be funded so they can be aggressive and progressive on behalf of the Arizona tech industries.”

Jacque Westling » Partner, Quarles & Brady: “One of the most critical things Arizona can do is to continue to support and grow its home-grown companies. Developing a group of serial successful entrepreneurs and celebrating our local successes will continue to foster outside investment capital for our local companies and help create a desirable environment to encourage companies outside our state to come here.” Steven G. Zylstra » President and CEO, Arizona Technology Council: “One area we still need to improve is in the area of capital availability. Arizona lags behind our competitors in terms of access to capital. That’s why extending the Angel Investment Tax Credit Program and creating a venture capital fund for early-stage technology companies is so vitally important.”


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Taking advantage of Arizona’s generous R&D tax credit

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By JOSE TEZANOS, PETER HENDERSON and TOM SANGER, MOSS ADAMS LLP

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esearch and development (R&D) tax credits are available to companies that bear the financial risk of developing new or improved products or processes. And claiming them can be lucrative, since they offset a company’s tax liability, making more cash available to invest in ongoing projects. Companies that perform qualified R&D and meet certain requirements can claim a 20 percent tax credit at the federal level, and many states offer their own R&D tax credit, usually at a rate of five to 10 percent. But both federal and state levels considered, Arizona takes the cake, offering companies that perform R&D the most generous tax credit rate in the nation at 24 percent. Furthermore, it offers this benefit in the form of a refundable credit to qualifying businesses.

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Why refundable matters

In some cases companies may not be able to use the full amount of the credit Arizona awards them. This could be because they’re operating at a loss or because the amount they’re awarded exceeds their Arizona tax liability. With the refundable credit option, qualifying businesses may elect to receive the excess in the form of an immediate cash payment rather than carry it forward to offset a future liability. The refundable opportunity is limited to companies with fewer than 150 full-time-equivalent employees; the nonrefundable credit has no such limit.

depleted by the end of February. It’s uncertain how quickly this reserve will go for the 2014 tax year. Eligible refundable credit applicants must obtain preapproval by submitting an application prior to filing their tax return, and a full R&D credit calculation needs to be submitted with this application. You’ll need to begin an R&D study immediately to allow for its timely completion and submission.

Who can claim the credit? Both the refundable and nonrefundable Arizona credits are available to individuals, companies, and all types of passthrough entities, such as S corporations. You may be surprised to learn that the tax definition of R&D is quite expansive: A wide range of businesses can qualify for the credit, from companies in the food and beverage, apparel, and agriculture industries to those involved in construction, manufacturing, and energy production. Don’t let the common misconception that R&D tax credits are limited to large high-tech companies keep you from taking advantage of this lucrative opportunity.

Next steps

Act quickly

Whether you’re interested in pursuing the refundable or nonrefundable Arizona credit, consult a team dedicated to understanding the technical requirements of the R&D credit— including Arizona’s particular requirements — to help you navigate the process.

While Arizona places no annual cap on nonrefundable R&D credit claims, the total amount of refunded payments allowed each year is limited to $5 million, so timing is critical if your company hopes to claim the refundable credit. Funds are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis until the $5 million is exhausted. For the 2013 tax year, the refundable option was

Jose Tezanos is senior manager, Peter Henderson is manager and Tom Sanger is partner at Moss Adams LLP.

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Nation’s best economic development group creates an environment for innovation By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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The Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) has built quite a reputation.

Its recent successes range from luring Zenefits, a cloud-based human resources technology company that will create more that 1,300 full-time jobs, to Tractor Supply Company, a rural lifestyle retail store chain whose new distribution center will bring more than 250 jobs. “We just got named the No. 1 economic development organization in the country and we want to continue that level of excellence,” said Barry Broome, president and CEO of GPEC from 2005 until press time. “In the last six months, two GPEC employees were named CEOs — one in Detroit and one in Portland — and two were named to “40 under 40” nationally. I want to maintain our reputation as being a razor-sharp and talentbased organization.” GPEC’s success caught the attention of Site Selection magazine, which honored the economic development group with its Best to Invest Top U.S. Group award. Broome sat down with Az Business to talk about the impact GPEC has on Arizona’s economy.

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What effect will the Super Bowl have on economic development? It’s amazing what happens when the Super Bowl is in town. It changes the entire momentum of the community. All eyes are put on the market. It helps us tremendously from a brand and reputation standpoint. People get to see the beauty of the Greater Phoenix region. It’s the only venue that we know of where we are guaranteed to get CEOs there. The chairman of the board of a Fortune 500 company will always accept your invitation to the Super Bowl.

How does GPEC hope to benefit from the Super Bowl? I hope business leaders who visit get a better understanding of the market and that increases our buzz. We’re still striving to be considered more sophisticated. A lot of CEOs consider us an upgrade from Las Vegas, but we are a lot more dynamic than an upgrade from Las Vegas. People have to come and experience the community to realize its strengths. Hopefully, we will get enough deals to pay for the community’s investment in hosting the Super Bowl.

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...I’m looking forward to seeing Arizona’s spectacular beauty broadcast to a worldwide audience. How can the Super Bowl change Arizona’s branding? When I came to Phoenix 10 years ago, it had a great brand. It was unknown, but the brand was, “This place is fun and very interesting.” One of the things that really hurt us in the immigration debate is people didn’t see us as a fun place anymore. We were unfairly portrayed in a lot of ways during that debate. What the Super Bowl will remind people is that this is one heck of a destination. Quality of life. Regional assets. You can enjoy 75-degree weather at the W in Scottsdale and ski in Flagstaff two hours later. The coverage of the Super Bowl always features great backdrops and I’m looking forward to seeing Arizona’s spectacular beauty broadcast to a worldwide audience.

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families have lost opportunities here. We are the people that are supposed to keep that flame bright for families, knowing that jobs are coming and jobs are prevalent and they will have access to opportunities here that they don’t have elsewhere.

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How will recent efforts to boost trade with Mexico impact our economy?

The relationship between Arizona and Mexico is very favorable and positive. A significant portion of our community descends from Mexico, so a trade relationship is going to normalize the friendships and relationships and correct the attitudes toward Mexico when people realize it’s the fastestgrowing Latin American economy. It’s pretty good to have a country like Mexico next door. Imagine if Mexico was Iran, Iraq or Syria, then we’d have a real border security problem. The business sectors that are going to see the greatest impact from our efforts in Mexico are conventions and tourism and foods and services. Ultimately, you’ll see things like energy and technology through engineering. Mexico has done a great job leveraging its energy position for a new market and they’ve done a great job producing talent.

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What are GPEC’s primary goals for the next three years? We’ve done a lot of positive things for the community, but we haven’t demonstrated enough from a leadership standpoint to be transformative. We’ve made major moves, but I don’t think we’ve transformed the community and I hope we can do that in the next year or two.

Why is being transformative so important to GPEC? We talk about being the last line of defense for our families. When an employer doesn’t work here or if we lose an opportunity, AB | January-February 2015

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Bank on it GPEC helps Metro Phoenix excel in job growth for financial services sector By CHERYL HURD

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hile Phoenix may not be the next financial capital of the world, the area is on track to continue its reign as the nation’s leader in job growth for the financial services industry, with thousands of new jobs added in 2014 and more expected in years to come. Bankers, brokers, lenders and other industry leaders are supported by a growing network of IT and back office positions that are fueling this growth. “Phoenix is likely to end up 2014 ranked again as the fastest growing large metro area for finance jobs,” says Lee McPheters, research professor of economics in the W.P. Carey School of Business at ASU. McPheters, the director of the school’s JPMorgan Chase Economic Outlook Center that specializes in economic forecasts for Arizona and the Western states, says, using data available through October from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014 is shaping up to be another topranking year for Phoenix. “So far this year, finance and insurance jobs are up 3.89 percent over the same 10 months in 2013,” McPheters says. “Jobs are up 4,680 and, for the first 10 months of the year, finance and insurance averaged 125,030 jobs in the metro Phoenix area.” In 2013, McPheters explains, the Phoenix metro area added 8,450 new jobs in finance, which includes all forms of banking, loan companies, mortgage companies, insurance, stockbrokers, real estate and rental agencies. Phoenix ranked No. 1 on rate of growth of new finance jobs among all metro areas that have more than 1 million workers at 5.6 percent. Phoenix also ranked first for jobs in finance added in 2013.

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A robust industry

Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) from 2005 until press time, explains what is driving this growth. “We’ve seen a reset since the Wall Street crash. There was a new normal. There was a big correction in the head counts and the body counts. People started to revisit where they make those investments and Phoenix got rated as the No. 2 place for pulling jobs out of Wall Street. They asked themselves, ‘Why are we on Wall Street when we can be in Phoenix?’

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GPEC

Jack Barry

Barry Broome

James Lundy

Arizona appeal

Lee McPheters

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“The financial services sector requires a skill set that we are very strong in, “ Broome continues. “We may be attracting new advanced financial services like Northern Trust and Silicon Valley Bank, but we’ve been a strong financial services sector for a good 25 or 30 years. Now that the market is selfcorrecting, paying more attention to costs and being more careful about how it uses money and operates, our market is rising as an interesting place for them to do business.” There’s an abundance of financial services talent in the Greater Phoenix region, anchored by the presence of American Express, Charles Schwab, Discover Card, Chase, Wells Fargo and Bank of America, for example, Broome says. He goes on to explain how GPEC is helping the finance industry grow in Arizona. “Our major objectives industry-wide are financial services and our most prominent geographic area is the Bay Area. We hit San Francisco the hardest and we focus on financial services as a business platform and we’ve done really well with both. “Northern Trust is going to bring 1,000 jobs to Arizona, paying an average of more than $100,000 a year. Zenefits is going to bring 2,000 jobs. Even though I wouldn’t classify State Farm as financial services, I would put insurance in the line of financial services and State Farm could go to 8,000 jobs in Tempe.” Some financial services businesses that added to the job growth in 2014 include: • Zenefits – 800 phase one jobs • Asurion – 800 phase one jobs • Progressive Leasing – 500 jobs • Edward Jones (workforce expansion/hiring) – 500 jobs • Regional Acceptance Corp. – 300 phase one jobs • Springleaf – 200 jobs • Wells Fargo (workforce expansion/hiring) – 200 jobs • AllState Insurance – 75 jobs • CreditSafe – 69 phase one jobs • LearnVest – 30 phase one jobs In recent months, Progressive Leasing, a Utah-based financial services vendor for retailers and merchants, announced it was moving into the area, expecting to add 500 jobs by the end of 2015. Zenefits, the free, cloud-based human resources technology company based in California, continues to add jobs. These and other new businesses add to the thriving financial industry. James Lundy, founding president and CEO of Alliance Bank of Arizona, started with 25 employees in 2003. Today, he says Alliance Bank of Arizona, an affiliate of Western Alliance Bank, is the largest state bank headquartered in Arizona with 500 of its 1,200 employees in the state. Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., has been in the Valley for decades. With 3,400 employees, the Phoenix area is the company’s highest density employment location in the nation, says Ryan Kosowsky, managing director of talent acquisition. “Phoenix has a lot to offer like many other great cities,” Kosowsky says. “You have a great, educated workforce. You’ve got a business-friendly climate. The cost of living is good. There are a lot of attractive things in the Valley that could bring business, specifically financial services here.” Broome explains why the Valley of the Sun has an appeal that continues to attract new employers. “We enjoy a pro-business climate being in the mountain west time zone, providing ease of access to other major cities with

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GPEC numerous non-stop flights departing regularly from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, a Top 10 airport nationally. Our infrastructure system offers a robust fiber and telecommunications backbone, along with a reliable power grid, making the Greater Phoenix market attractive for nerve centers of companies. In addition, companies here or those looking to move their operations here to the Greater Phoenix market find a great operating cost environment for scalable headquarters and back office operations, with low corporate and payroll taxes.” Broome also pointed to the large talent pool, courtesy of strong university programs at Arizona State University and Grand Canyon University that produce a pipeline of business school talent.

Future in finance

Lundy, who is also past chairman of the board of directors at GPEC, gave credit to the universities and community colleges for adding talent to the employee pool, but says more focus is needed on education as we move forward. “We are developing a lot of job growth in back office support area. Those are good jobs. Those are $45,000 to $100,000 a year jobs ... When we are No. 1 for job growth, that’s a good thing, but you have to look at the quality of those jobs. That’s going to be a challenge for us as we go forward,” Lundy says.

“Phoenix has a lot of things that attract people to this area, but if we are going to compete over the next generation we need to focus primarily on education in post secondary and K-12 because that is the fundamental building block to produce a smarter workforce and to be able to engage in higher value productivity.” Jack Barry, president of Enterprise Bank & Trust Arizona Region, a commercially focused institution that has been growing in Arizona since 2009, recently participated in a roundtable discussion of industry leaders. There, industry leaders echoed Lundy’s comments about the need to improve Arizona’s educational system. The state’s low educational ranking on a national level, Barry says, acts as a deterrent to attracting businesses. He called on the state’s political leaders to come up with a plan to help improve that. He also says, moving forward, that Arizona’s economy needs to diversify. “We need to wean ourselves from the dependence on real estate,” he says. Statistics analyzed by McPheters show that construction is actually losing jobs, which is unusual for Arizona and manufacturing will be flat for 2014, with no new jobs at all. The two strongest growth industries in Arizona at this time are healthcare and finance.

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AzLTA capitalizes on Arizona’s ability to host mega events to boost the tourism industry and the state’s economy By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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Why did the AzLTA decide to get political in 2014? We have been involved in previous elections, but on a much smaller scale. I think we’ve seen over the past several years the importance of getting involved and, obviously, this was a big election. With the direction of our board, we looked at it and said, “This is a time we need to get involved,” and that’s what we did.

How did AzLTA’s political role look? We looked for candidates who were supportive of tourism. We looked at issues. While we didn’t endorse candidates, we did do (political action committee) PAC dollars and we donated $12,000 in PAC funds. We designated tourism champions instead of endorsements and made sure our industry knew who was supportive of tourism. We decided that it was worth the risk you take sometimes when you get involved in elections. 132

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ebbie Johnson thought she was just coming for a race at Phoenix International Raceway when she visited Arizona in April of 1986. “I was living in Wyoming at the time,” recalls the president and CEO of the Arizona Lodging & Tourism Association (AzLTA). “We flew back into Denver to drive up to Wyoming and got stuck because it was snowing so hard the roads were closed. I decided right then and there that I was moving and moved to Arizona the following year.” Now, as leader of the leading public policy advocate for Arizona’s lodging and tourism industry, Johnson hopes to keep other visitors coming back to the Grand Canyon state. Az Business talked tourism with the woman who played a key role in the state’s ability to land hosting duties for this year’s Super Bowl, the 2016 College Football Championship Game and the 2017 Final Four.

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Why was getting political in November more important than in previous elections? We have seen some issues come up over the past few years and realized that we had not done as good a job as we could educating elected officials about the value of tourism. That was on us, so we really wanted to take that role and educate those people who are going to be the leaders of our state about the value and importance of tourism so they have a better understanding. I think we also educated our members so they understand that elected officials have hundreds of issues on their desks every year. For us it’s intuitive, but they don’t work in tourism, so it’s our job to make sure they are informed. The quality of life here is great because of the tourism industry, even from a residential standpoint. Letting elected officials know about the dollars the tourism industry brings, the jobs that it brings and the economic impact is important.

How did you balance getting more political without burning any bridges? We were careful. We met with virtually every candidate and got their thoughts and opinions on tourism. From our standpoint, we felt like we had done everything we could to educate them and it was worth the time, effort and the responsibility from the PAC funds to make sure we were recommending the right people as tourism champions and PAC dollar recipients.

In the next three years, Arizona will host the three biggest events in sports. What is Arizona doing right to keep landing these mega events? The organizations that schedule these events look at Phoenix as a great model. Phoenix is only the second city in history to host these three mega events back to back to back. The other city was New Orleans. It goes to show the collaboration we have as a tourism community, but as a business community and with the cities.

What is the winning formula you’re using in pitch meetings? One of the sales pitches we used for the Final Four was saying, “Look at all these events that we’ve successfully hosted. We deserve a chance to host a Final Four and we’re going to show you how to do it.” They really took to that. They looked at the things we did right with past events. When they were here for the Final Four site visit, there was not one thing the tourism community, business community, stadium could have done better. We rolled out the red carpet and showed them our hospitality, our leadership, our collaborative efforts and they were really impressed. It’s all the cities coming together to show the benefit of hosting events in Arizona. They want the fans and the athletes to have good experience and we give them a great experience. We have such a diverse offering in terms of activities and amenities and things to do — spring training, golf, Sedona, a trip to the Grand Canyon, we’ve now become a food and wine destination. We’ve proven that they’re going to have fun here.

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How did the elections go for the tourism industry?

All in all, we were pretty happy. There are always some unknowns, but we feel there is strong leadership in the governor’s office. We’ve got some legislators who understand our industry and will be there when we need them to listen. It’s all about building relationships and about us understanding them and them understanding us. Hopefully, when a tourism issue crosses their desks now, they will reach out because they’ve met us and heard of us and that’s something that we didn’t have before.

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What do political leaders need to know about how their actions impact your industry? They need to realize that tourism impacts all business. We have a $2.9 billion tax revenue impact. That’s a lot of money. So the decisions they make not only affect the tourism industry, but ancillary businesses like home builders, realtors, car sales and other services.

How do these mega eventS impact economic development? Their first step in getting a business to move here is getting their leadership to visit here. Any time we can talk about Arizona as a place to visit and as a place to do business, that media perception of Arizona as a positive, wonderful place to work and live and visit is tremendous. The economic development groups know that the business leaders need to come here first to see what we have to offer. If we put on the best face we can, people want to come back not just to visit, but to live and work.

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The quality of life here is great because of the tourism industry, even from a residential standpoint. AB | January-February 2015

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Women on top Female leaders rise up to make hospitality one of Arizona’s biggest economic engines By MICHAEL GOSSIE

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t might surprise people to know that tourism generates more money for Arizona than aerospace, agriculture, microelectronics and mining. And leading that $20-billion-a-year economic juggernaut are a bunch of women. Debbie Johnson is president and CEO of the Arizona Lodging & Tourism Association, Sherry Henry is executive director of the Arizona Office of Tourism and Jay Parry is CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. In addition, women lead three of the state most important and influential convention and visitors bureaus — Rachel Sacco in Scottsdale, Heidi Hansen in Flagstaff and Lorraine Pino in Glendale. On top of that, Cristin Barr of the Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain is president of the Arizona Sunbelt Chapter of Meeting Professionals International; and Lynn Casebere, director of Catering at The Clubhouse at Tonto Verde, is president of the Hospitality Sales & Marketing Association International Arizona Chapter.

“HSMAI’s leaders have broken through the glass ceiling,” Casebere says. “There are 30 chapters in the Americas Region and 24 of them have female presidents, which is something to be proud of.” Casebere expects to see even more women take leadership roles in the hospitality industry because female enrollment is increasing in hospitality schools around the country. “We have a lot of strong female leaders in our state and think the tourism industry falls in line with what else is going on in our state,” Johnson says. “Arizona has some great examples of strong female leaders on both the political and business arenas. I think the tourism industry emulates that.” But how did it happen? How did women come to dominate what was once a male-dominated industry in Arizona? “Tourism offers a variety of tremendous opportunities such as flexibility, rapid career growth, continuing education opportunities and community involvement, all of which make this industry attractive for women,” Henry says.

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“Because of the career range of this industry, there are myriad opportunities for upward mobility. Most of the women in today’s tourism leadership began their careers either at an entry level position or in mid-level management. It was their dedication, passion, collaborative skills and the genuine focus on the customers’ needs, both externally and internally, that brought these women into leadership roles.” Pino said one thing that has helped women get a leg up in the industry has been education. Seeing the value of tourism as one of the state’s biggest revenue generators, many Arizona colleges now offer degrees in hospitality, opening the door for stronger career opportunities. “What the tourism industry really offers is transferable skills,” Johnson says. “If you’re willing to work hard, learn all aspects of the industry, you will be able to use those accumulated skills as you work your way up the ladder.” Despite the differences between the genders, industry leaders says the qualities that make women effective leaders are not unlike the characteristics that make many men effective leaders. “If you’re passionate about what this industry means to Arizona and want to see it succeed, then you’ll be an effective leader within it,” Henry says. “Women do have the added bonus of being nurturers by nature. Tourism is an industry where we take care of guests, offer industry comforts and provide the

ultimate travel experience. It’s very similar to what women already do for families and friends, so this industry seems to be a very natural fit for many women.” The professional growth opportunities, as well as the flexibility of the industry that contributes to work-life balance, makes this industry a solid career path for women, Henry says. Additionally, there is essentially a place in the hierarchy for every skill set available, which is also very appealing for women. “The anecdotal stories about someone starting their career as a room attendant and working their way up to general manager are true,” Henry says. “Even my own story begins with me starting out as a carhop and working my way up to becoming the director of the Arizona Office of Tourism. If you have the passion for the industry there are virtually no limitations to what you can achieve.” As tourism continues to be an economic engine for Arizona, today’s leaders say there will be event more opportunities for women to take on leadership roles in the industry. “We are fortunate to have dedicated tourism leaders work together to deliver the passionate and caring spirit of the hospitality industry,” Pino says. “The women who have risen to key positions have set the bar and also opened doors for the next generation.”

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Heidi Hansen

Sherry Henry Debbie Johnson Lorraine Pino

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g e y t a r t s W in ning foundation for an e h t s y a l e CEO y MICH A EL GOS SIE Super Bowl Host Committe ng after the game B lo economic impact that lasts

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PHOTO BY SHAVON ROSE, AZ BIG MEDIA


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arly in the planning process for the 2015 Super Bowl, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee CEO Jay Parry was giving a presentation to Greater Phoenix Leadership and she referred to some of national perceptions of Arizona as “misperceptions.” “An individual walked up to me after the presentation and said, ‘You did a great job, but just one point of clarification,’” Parry recounts. “‘Those are not misperceptions, those are reality.’ That was a good point. Some of those things are real, but there are so many positives about Arizona that offset the negatives.” Parry, who was an executive with the Phoenix Suns and WNBA champion Mercury before taking her role with the Super Bowl committee, says that when the eyes of the world turn to Arizona for the Super Bowl on Feb. 1, it will be the perfect time to showcase the progressive and innovative nature of Arizona. Az Business caught up with Parry near the future home of Super Bowl Central to talk strategy before the big game.

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working on all the community events and buildup in 2012. We know that to make this a big success for Arizona and have the positive impact that we want, it takes getting the whole community involved and excited. We have a volunteer board of directors of 20 Arizona leaders and they’ve been instrumental in creating meetings and introductions to corporate leaders here. Trying to make all those stakeholders a part of the process has been our goal and it’s gotten everyone excited about the event.

How does being CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee differ from running a professional sports team?

What has been your biggest challenge as CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee?

There is so much positive excitement about Arizona hosting the Super Bowl. People want to be supportive and they want it to be a big success for Arizona, so everyone wants to be involved. Channeling all that interest and excitement and figuring out a way to put it to the best use to make the event amazing has been a challenge.

Why do you think this Super Bowl is generating so much more buzz locally than when Arizona last hosted the game in 2008? We’ve really worked to build that buzz. We got the bid in 2011 and started

Getting a Super Bowl is such a competitive process. For us to be selected to host again after seven short years is a testament to Arizona. The investment in the infrastructure in downtown Phoenix — from the light rail to the remodeled Convention Center to the extra restaurants that have been added to CityScape to the 3,000 hotel rooms in downtown Phoenix — is really what’s different for 2015. When we hosted the NFL in 2013, we walked through downtown Phoenix and ended up at the Hotel Palomar Phoenix on the pool deck. We looked out over Phoenix and the head of events turned to me and said, “This is a completely different place than it was in 2008.” That was a major win for us because they realized how much was done, and not just in Phoenix, but in Mesa and Tempe and Scottsdale and all the neighboring communities.

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There are a lot of similarities. But what I’ve learned is that there is nothing as big as the Super Bowl. It goes way beyond football. I attended the Super Bowl when Arizona hosted it in 1996 and in 2008, but when I got off the plane for the Super Bowl in 2013 in New Orleans, I said to myself, “This is so much bigger than I remember it being.” What I’ve realized is that there is a different dynamic from year to year. While some of the things stay the same, each host community brings its own stamp of personality to the event. Arizona’s hospitality industry is tailor made to host mega events and Arizona has become such an expert at it that we have a nice platform to work from. It just gets bigger and bigger.

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How has the Valley’s ability to host a Super Bowl changed since we last hosted the game in 2008?

How has adding the Pro Bowl to the mix impacted the planning process for the Super Bowl? What we’ve been able to do is take the infrastructure and the planning for the Super Bowl and back it up a week. There is so much overlap with parking and transportation and aviation and volunteers that it really made sense to have it span the whole week. Hosting the Pro Bowl is just another amazing coup for our state and a feather in our cap. When you take the perfect trifecta of the Pro Bowl, Waste Management Phoenix Open and the Super Bowl, all eyes from around the world will be on Arizona.

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How will your efforts to make the 2015 Super Bowl a regional experience impact the visitor? We want to make sure the entire Valley and the state gets to show its unique personality. Each of our communities is unique. From a visitor’s standpoint, the big difference will be Super Bowl Central, which will be located in downtown Phoenix. What the NFL learned from Indianapolis three years ago was the idea of a fan campus, where it’s the epicenter of activity. It has a lot of merit for visitors and they really enjoyed that, so the NFL built on that and we adopted that idea and created Super Bowl Central, which will be the biggest thing that Arizona has ever seen with its 12-block campus. Fans can migrate there and experience free family-friendly fun for the week leading up to the game, and then also have spokes throughout the Valley where they can enjoy other activities.

How do you think that super week — the Pro Bowl, Phoenix Open and Super Bowl — will impact Arizona’s tourism industry? The total will be bigger than anything AB | January-February 2015

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by the numbers $500 million:

The estimated economic impact on Arizona from Super Bowl XLIX.

$30 million:

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee’s fundraising goal, in which a minimum of $2 million will be given back to the community through nonprofit grants.

1 million:

The number of people who are expected to visit Super Bowl Central, a new addition to Arizona’s line-up of Super Bowl activities.

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The number of visitors from all walks of life that will come to the state to be part of Super Bowl XLIX.

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The number of media personnel from across the globe who are expected to cover Super Bowl XLIX.

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The number of Arizona small businesses that have been accepted into the Business Connect Program, which provides an increase in opportunities for local small businesses to conduct Super Bowl business to fuel Arizona’s economic engine.

12:

The number of city blocks in downtown Phoenix that will become Super Bowl Central, the hub of fan, sponsor, media and NFL activities for Super Bowl XLIX.

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A z LTA we’ve seen in Arizona before. The economic impact for the Super Bowl alone is estimated at more than $500 million. The Thunderbirds have measured the economic impact of the Waste Management Phoenix Open at more than $200 million. You add in the Pro Bowl on top of that and we don’t have a best guess yet, but you’re talking almost threequarters of a billion dollars in economic impact for just that week. But what I get most excited about is the seeds that we are planting that week with all the exposure, all the media, all the visitors. It’s an enormous commercial for Arizona.

Leading the drive

How do you hope business leaders and economic development leaders take advantage of Arizona’s role as host of the 2015 Super Bowl?

Here are the members of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee’s Board of Directors for Super Bowl XLIX: • Board Chair David Rousseau, president, SRP • Brad Anderson, executive vice president,

There is a lot of intention around capturing and growing that economic impact. We have a couple programs that the host committee leads. One is our CEO Forum, where we invite CEOs from outside of Arizona to come to Arizona for the weekend of the Super Bowl. We’ve created a three-day curriculum for them to meet local CEOs, learn why we are a probusiness environment and give the reason to relocate their business or expand their business in Arizona. We hope that builds more of an emotional connection with Arizona so they have real reasons and proof points why Arizona is different. The focus on economic development has been spearheaded by (Arizona Cardinals President) Michael Bidwill and (Salt River Project President) David Rousseau. Both of them have long-standing commitments and have demonstrated ongoing business leadership in various local forums and organizations to build the Arizona business community. So capitalizing on this with Super Bowl XLIX was a natural extension.

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What accomplishment as CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee gives you the most pride?

We want it to be the best Super Bowl yet. By doing that, it will keep us in that regular rotation for hosting future Super Bowls and mega events, which is a lasting legacy from an economic development standpoint. Introducing the world to Arizona and demonstrating what our brand really is — progressive, youthful, energetic, committed to business — and telling that story on behalf of Arizona and creating a positive brand image would be a fantastic legacy for all of us.

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brokerage office services, CB Richard Ellis Michael Bidwill - president, Arizona Cardinals Jose Cardenas - senior vice president and general council, Arizona State University David Farca - president, ToH Design Studio Jim Grogan - chief operating officer, International Capital Investment Company Michael Haenel - executive vice president, Cassidy Turley Mike Kennedy - partner, Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A. (chairman, Super Bowl XLII Host Committee in 2008) Dan Lewis - senior vice president, Sovereign Finance Jeffrey Lowe - president, MidFirst Bank Mary Martuscelli - regional president for the private client reserve, U.S. Bank Andrew McCain - vice president and CFO, Hensley Beverage Company Patrick McGinley- vice president of property management, Vestar Steve Moore - president and CEO, Greater Phoenix CVB Jodi Noble - partner, Deloitte Jay Parry - president and CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Earl Petznick Jr. - president and CEO, Northside Hay Company Ken Van Winkle - managing partner, Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP KJ Wagner - president and CEO, Willis of Arizona, Inc. David Watson - co-founder and managing partner, mybody and president and managing partner, Revolution Tea John Zidich - CEO, Republic Media, publisher, The Arizona Republic

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