Page 1

Defining Desert Living

Architecturally Unique Homes®

POND HOUSE A Cave Creek Retreat

BUILDING BEADLE

VOLUME II 2014

Arizona’s Modernist

HELLO MIDTOWN

Lisa Sette Gallery


Architecturally Unique Homes

azarchitecture.com

Copyright 2014 azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson all rights reserved.

480.425.9300


IN HIS OWN WORDS

Editor’s Note: We are especially proud to share this issue of Defining Desert Living with you. Inside you’ll find a powerhouse of ideas, art and architecture that we feel share the unique perspective of our region. Join us as we explore a beautiful and elegant desert home in the most unlikely of desert settings, look back and forward with innovative adaptive re-use projects, highlight high desert viticulture and remember those who have contributed to our architectural heritage. Scott Jarson, Editor

Our mission is to elevate the local discussion of architecture and design. We hope to inspire innovation and encourage the expression of ideas so in this, like every issue, we share great architecture, local design and craft, unique regional

EDITOR / PUBLISHER

travel, new products and commentary; always with a desert perspective.

Debbie Jarson Scott Jarson

There is a rich desert history here of unique architecture, exemplary art, design

CONTRIBUTORS

hope that you’ll continue to opt-in for more and to be part of the conversation.

Taylor Costello Andrew Jarson ART DIRECTION

ps:studios inc. PRINTER

and craft. This magazine is our way of celebrating this narrative with you. We Our business is Architectural Real Estate: We are devoted to architecture and design...but it’s also our passion. We hope you’ll call on us...just to share a bit of history or to learn more about a particular place, area, or home. If we can be

Ben Franklin Press

of service, our door is always open.

COVER IMAGE

It’s all part of what we call Defining Desert Living!

Jones Residence Architect: HK Associates Photography: Bill Timmerman

Scott Jarson

ADVERTISING

info@azarchitecture.com

azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson members are proud supporters of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building READ THE CURRENT ISSUE

Conservancy, The Arizona State University Art Museum and Phoenix Art Museum Contemporary Forum.

ONLINE AT azarchitecture.com

Reproduction in whole or in part of any text, photograph or illustration strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher does not assume responsibility for unsolicited submissions. Publisher assumes no liability for the information contained herein; all statements are the sole opinions of the contributors and/or advertisers.

Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


ARCHITECT: Jones Studio, Scorpion House PHOTOGRAPHY: Bill Timmerman


IN THIS ISSUE ON THE SHELF

6

THE POND HOUSE

8

Coveted Books & Products

A Cave Creek Retreat

DEFINING THE GREAT DESERT CITY

18

BUILDING BEADLE

20

JAMES A. GRESHAM

22

HELLO MIDTOWN

24

BOLLINGER ATELIER

30

ARIZONA WINE COUNTRY

32

MOUNTAIN VIEW ESTATES & EAST

34

FOOD BANK

36

GLENN MURCUTT

39

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

40

GIFT GUIDE

42

COMMUNITY

44

ELDORADO

48

A Desert Island

Arizona’s Modernist

Tucson Architect

Lisa Sette Gallery

Featured Designer

Arizona Vineyards

Valley Neighborhoods

Valley Restaurants

ASU Art Museum

An International Look at Modern Architecture

Trinkets & Treasures

Changing Hands and The Newton

On The Boards

Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


In the midst of our Valley there are cool, irrigated citrus groves in the shadow of Camelback Mountain, along with pockets of Spanish revival, adobe, and midcentury modern ranch homes. There are forests of giant saguaros in the foothills to the north, an area that is known for cutting-edge architecture, and rows of majestic date palms lining streets of historic homes in central Phoenix. All of this makes for a rich, urban landscape that includes modern in-fill architecture, loft projects and stunning high-rise towers. All coexisting within the dramatic backdrop of our unique Sonoran Desert. azarchitecture understands the contrasts and architectural nuances that set unique homes apart. From Frank Lloyd Wright to Case Study, Eames to Al Beadle, azarchitecture speaks the language of modern architecture.

4


Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


ON THE SHELF

Coveted Books & Products

HEX SWING

It presents a new appearance of time. Its long, flexible hands create a smooth and soft flow, resembling a dance — they rise and wilt, turn and bend.

The hexagonally-shaped seat is made from sustainably-sourced Black Locust wood, one of the most durable and beautifully-figured native hardwoods in the United States.

The name of Hans J. Wegner (1914 –2007) is inseparable from his unrivaled chairs, which have helped Danish design achieve international recognition.

studiove.com

thenewamityworkshop.com

amazon.com

WA

SUPERLIGHT RETHINKING HOW OUR HOMES IMPACT THE EARTH

KOO KOO

LET TERBOX

Designed and manufactured in Australia, Koo Koo is a stylized bird-shaped letterbox that brings some much needed life to the urban streetscape.

TREE SWING

THE ESSENCE OF JAPANESE DESIGN

shop.thecoolhunter.net

Explore the enduring beauty of Japanese design through some 250 objects, ranging from bento boxes, calligraphy brushes, the iconic Kikkoman soy sauce bottle, and a modern‐day kimono designed by Issey Miyake.

phaidon.com

artbook.com

COMMUTER

EATING WITH THE CHEFS

BRAUN

Eating with the Chefs documents the daily meal shared by chefs and front-of -house staff at eighteen top restaurants including Noma, Le Chateaubriand and The French Laundry.

Iconic German brand Braun returns with a collection of watches inspired by the classic designs of the original Braun design team.

BIKE R ACK

With the Commuter Bike Rack, your bike shines as the work of art and technology that it is.

urbanspaceinteriors.com

6

HANS J. WEGNER

LITHE CLOCK

phaidon.com

From the desert landscape of Arizona to the urban jungle of Tokyo, from rural China to mountainous Chile, this book brings new solutions for architects and designers everywhere.

BN0142 (WHITE/BLUE)

dezeenwatchstore.com


ARCHITECT: Debartolo Architects

BICYCLEHAUS.COM

7113 E 1st Ave, Scottsdale, AZ 85251  |  480.994.4287  |  Open 7 days a week


WILL BRUDER

THE POND CAVE CREEK, ARIZONA 8


HOUSE BY S C OT T J A R S O N

ISSUE 2014


IMBEDDED IN A DRAMATIC ROCK OUTCROP Water in the desert always creates an oasis. An oasis draws plants and

Will Bruder 

animals to it as iron to a magnet. So it’s not surprising this was the draw

Will Bruder Architects Phoenix, AZ

that led the owners of the Pond House to create a balance for busy city lives. The mystery of the Pond House starts with the land.

For 40 years Will Bruder has explored

And what a place. At the top of Cave Creek, where geology and

inventive

exciting

happenstance create a unique ecosystem that is quintessential Arizona,

architectural solutions in response to

and

contextually

at once both dry and wet, there is an eternal promise of spring. Arizona

site opportunities and the user’s needs.

roughly translates to “place of many springs,” so it could not be more fitting.

Through his creative use of materials and light, Will is renowned for his ability to

The Pond House sits at the blurred line between desert and riparian. A

raise the ordinary to the extraordinary.

natural swimming hole that at times feeds a raging river, at other times a

Self-trained as an architect, Will has a

still pond, and in the driest of times, a remembrance of water.

Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in sculpture from

Wisconsin-

Imbedded in a dramatic and ancient rock outcrop overlooking a natural

Milwaukee. He supplemented his studio

the

University

of

stream that’s fed by the Cottonwood Creek watershed, the location called

art education with further study of structural

for a sensitive approach and a bold decision. Instead of committing to a

engineering, philosophy, art history and

full scale home typical of most projects, the owners chose architect Will

urban planning. He followed this with

Bruder to create a modestly scaled sanctuary that encases their everyday

architectural apprenticeship under Paolo

needs with luxury, while eschewing the need to oversize the place. The

Soleri and Gunnar Birkerts. Opening his

home would become about site, location and detail, not about mere

first Arizona studio in 1974, Will continues

size. A weekend retreat that could welcome a year’s stay: a calm idyll of

to lead and mentor students of design

scenic contemplation where the noise of urban materialism would retreat

from his firm in downtown Phoenix. He

into the hushed flow of water and the rustle of cottonwood leaves.

has led work for over 500 commissions, received prestigious national awards,

Bruder masterfully positioned the home to nestle against the site, but

and has lectured and been published all

disappear from view. The approach is purposely obscured, following a

over the world.

winding dirt path. What’s visible of the home is restrained: a sculptural

10


12

THE WATER QUIETLY FLOWS DOWN A NATURAL FLAGSTONE STAIR.


a metaphorical canyon formed by the wall of steel and the curving sloped stone wall of the house. The tension between the opposing curved arcs forms a funnel into the home’s entry foyer.

ISSUE 2014


wall and line that emerges from the earth. Fractal elements

Walk down a few steps as you are drawn to the glow of

and natural materials make it look at once ancient and

east light beyond and suddenly you are released into the

modern: an upthrust of the earth, natural decay of stone or

main living space with its elysian views. Carefully crafted

structure. The sloped coursing of the home’s stonewall elicits

to comfort, the architect selected materials, textures and

a sense of mythical ruins of past cultures...a chameleon.

volume to give this space its warmth and scale. Large sliding glass doors, a see-through hearth and spacious

A footpath guides you to the entry and the courtyard; a

cantilevered concrete living deck help dissolve the line

metaphorical canyon that offers the first glimpse of water,

between inside and out. Beyond this zone, through another

flowing invitingly from the cast concrete basin and defining

compression of space and stone, lay the master suite which

the entry court. The water quietly flows down a natural

connects to the landscape through generous glass and

flagstone stair. A narrow slot of colored glass guides you to

operable vent panels.

the door like a welcome mat of light, and invites you into the shadow-play of the foyer.

Bruder left nothing to chance. Creating an intimate environment that functions as a unit requires a level of

Compressing and entering the house through a sculptural

connectivity between form, function and visuals that are

steel door, the reflections from the luminous red resin light slot

not often pursued in larger homes. Interiors, fabrics and art

directs you along a compressed entry, sunken in the desert

are seamlessly integrated with the architecture and the site.

to shoulder height, with a frame of stone, textured concrete,

Selectively placed windows of glass and colored translucent

steel and wood, and offering visual hints of the undisturbed

resins frame unexpected vistas and perspectives. Will Bruder

Spur Cross Ranch Conservation Area to the north from

likens this to “The architectural equivalent to living in a

strategically placed windows.

camera,” he said. “With the multiple apertures and lenses, the design and placement allow the owners to view their world as artists, from many different points of view.”

14


Exploring the site reveals the structure. Viewed from the pond

Camelback Mountain and the Papago Buttes many miles

below, the house appears to be part of, and yet float gently

south in the Valley. It’s this rock that creates both “narrows”

above, the unique geology of its setting. Deep overhangs

of the stream and the barrier to the underground aquifer

embrace the home in a definitive gesture of shelter. The

allowing water to come to the surface, and evaporate slowly

cantilevered concrete deck floats over the boulders lining

on the wet surface of the rock above. This is how water is

the pond and the deep reveal underneath instantly reminds

revealed in the desert.

the occupants of the history of the site, with a shadow similar to a bank-side cut that can be seen on almost any stream

The owners have created, with Bruder, a lasting sentiment.

or arroyo.

An ode to joie de vivre, a physical reminder to live in the moment, to enjoy the simplest of pleasures. Surrounded by

And the house is anchored...literally. During construction the

calm, natural beauty and the most natural palette of material,

geology of the pond was revealed. Footings were dug only

the very human scale of this home says “stay.”

to find solid rock. What forms the pond is an ancient and massive rock boulder; the same stuff that forms the head of

Defining Desert Living

PHOTOGRAPHY: Bill Timmerman

ISSUE 2014


ON THE MARKET

Property Listings  |  azarchitecture.com

CANYON HILLSIDE

PINNACLE PEAK MODERN

UNEQUALED VIEWS—TIMELESS LUXURY

HISTORIC AL BEADLE

This hillside view home by Designer Clyde Rousseau lies in a beautiful box-canyon surrounded by Mountain Preserve between the Biltmore Area and PV. A definitive example of eco-sensitive design that combines historic elegance and modern details.

This Modern home was designed by Architect Alfred Newman Beadle and offers interiors by Elizabeth Rosensteel Designs. This remarkable home offers 4 bedrooms, office/den and two-bedroom guest suite on a 5-acre view lot.

Price: $3,200,000

Price: $2,295,000

WRIGHT INSPIRED

PARADISE VALLEY

TALIESIN DESIGN

MID-CENTURY

Based on a Wright design, this stunning home was designed by Taliesin Fellow John Rattenbury. Lovingly restored, it commands the hill, connecting the curvilinear spaces to the views and sky.

This inspired piece of architecture is nothing less than a work of art. The house is anchored to the gently sloping site on an exposed aggregate base, while soaring ceilings frame the views of Camelback Mountain.

Price: $1,695,000

Price: $1,450,000

Architecturally Unique Homes

®


TRADITIONAL ESTATE

MCCORMICK RANCH

MEDITERR ANEAN MASTERPIECE

MODERN SCOTTSDALE

This Scottsdale home features historic Mediterranean details befitting any bespoke luxury home. Lasting quality abounds with stone detailing, luxury finishes and gated lot. The gourmet kitchen would impress any chef.

This showcase in Scottsdale features first-class interiors second to none! Sophisticated details make every day special: soaring ceilings, exposed wood, glass, concrete and steel in a contemporary setting.

Price: $3,350,000

Price: $1,495,000

ELDORADO ON 1ST

PINNACLE RIDGE MODERN

WORLD CL ASS LIVING

L AS SENDAS VIEW LOT

Designed by Architect Will Bruder and located in the heart of Scottsdale’s Arts District, Eldorado on 1st offers a new paradigm of Urban Luxury. Seven attached homes each with their own private garage, personal elevator and roof patio. Reserve now.

This architectural masterwork features exceptional finishes, commanding views and custom materials: custom honed block, zinc-finish metals, aluminum and glass. The setting includes country club amenities minutes from a championship golf course.

Target priced from $1,600,000

Price: $1,150,000

azarchitecture.com  480.425.9300 3707 N. Marshall Way #5 | Scottsdale, AZ 85251

All figures and measurements approximate: subject to error, omissions, withdrawal, prior sale and approval of purchase by owner. Copyright 2014 azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson all rights reserved.


DEFINING THE GREAT DESERT CITY BY S C O T T J A R S O N

Recently, I was asked to talk about

The Great Desert City is a destination.

inhabit a climate such as ours in

what defines the Great Desert City.

It is a beacon. It calls to the traveller. It

large numbers? Paolo Soleri thought

For any desert dweller, it’s a heady

is the place in-between. It is unique in

and planned about how to live in

topic. Arizona sits in one of the most

the environment. It is a place of shelter.

the desert. His concepts illustrated

interesting deserts in the world, and

The Great Desert City is an island.

that with density, comes the ability

it should offer an urban experience

It is a livable place alone in the vast

to share. “Core Urbanism” saves the

that is as unique as the environment.

sea. This is symbolic physically and

desert for all of us to enjoy.

Phoenix, a powerhouse in land mass

culturally as well.

and people, is poised to define the

Desert Cities must be more connective

urban experience for the region.

Let’s consider these new definitions and

than other areas. The traditional

This leads us to explore the idea of

put them into action. These become

roadway has to be supplemented. If

“greatness.”

essential elements in creating the 21st

we add density to the core, then the

century desert place.

core becomes a more walkable place.

The Great Desert City is an oasis – a

However enhanced, we must embrace

respite. A cool pause. It’s a place of

Desert Cities must share resources.

water and shade; it offers relative cool

Example? Our canals are shared.

weather in the summer and warmth in

Past desert dwellers shared resources.

Desert Cities must acknowledge the

the winter night.

Ancient

indicate

climate. Air conditioning rules our

communal assets. How else do you

desert world. We need to promote

Hohokam

ruins

this for our successful future.

PHOTOGRAPHY: ABOVE Jarson collection

18


natural environments that allow us a

remain geographically orphaned from

We have many opportunities for

respite from the heat and sun, yet still

other areas. As any island dweller will

change. We can reconsider location

make the the outdoors a destination in

tell you, if we treat everything we bring

and define a New Desert City, an

the summer.

into this place, by rail, truck, canal, car

urban core within the boundaries of

and airplane, as a precious resource,

the current one. We can define the

Desert Cities must run on the sun. Given

we would both reduce waste and

place we live in by designing and

the relatively obtainable and ever-

create solutions unique to our location.

building for the region. We can define

reducing cost of photo-voltaic panels,

our materiality, promote and celebrate

each and every desert building should

Finally, A Desert City should look like

lasting “desert” materials. We have

offer some level of solar generation.

one. It’s well past time that we begin to

no authentic regionalism so let’s make

Germany leads the U.S. in solar

reassert our own unique regionalism.

authentic architecture and materials

generation yet it has about as much

We have the local talent, and we have

our local signature.

sun as Alaska. Embracing residential

a strong visual basis. There remains a

solar can a be signature moment for

rich history in our Valley of architecture

What we have is very unique. We

Arizona.

and design. Whatever we decide we

are at the beginning of a new cycle

want to look like, we need to walk our

of growth and change not only in

own path.

Phoenix, but in all of Arizona. We

Desert Cities should be self sufficient. Again,

the

island.

We

should

cannot wait for others to green light

promote locally produced and locally

There are coming opportunities that

our creativity. Local leaders and

appropriate materials. We should start

will allow us to define our own desert

residents must be the ambassadors of

closing the loop on water and design

cities, and create and build onto it a

change to ensure the future of this very

and act as if everything we use on

sense of place that is truly great. As

special land.

our “island” costs 25% more. Because

a community we can use our voice

frankly, it already does. Inappropriate

to define a good portion of what will

We may well be living in THE Great

materials come at a cost. Shipping it in

influence the outcome of our future.

Desert City. It’s our time to embrace

by truck is the least of it.

We are very close to having the

it.

breakthrough moment if only we can

As it is, we are a cultural island of

elevate the conversation.

beauty and solace. Like an Island, we PHOTOGRAPHY: Soleri– © Timothy Hursley

Defining Defining Desert Desert Living Living

ISSUE 2014


Schupak Residence

Healy/Fearnow

BUILDING BEADLE ALFRED NEWMAN BEADLE B Y 20

S C OT T J A R S O N


Beadle House #7

Anderson House

ALFRED NEWMAN BEADLE IS ONE OF THE MOST RECOGNIZED NAMES IN ARIZONA ARCHITECTURE. APPRECIATION FOR THE WORKS OF “ARIZONA’S MODERNIST” ONLY GROWS. WE TALKED TO SOME OWNERS TO GET AN INSIDE PERSPECTIVE: Schupak Residence: “Al had a free hand to design the

Beadle House #7: “The house had changes and additions

home,” says Lenore Schupak. “We were new to the desert

that we stripped back to original,” the owner recalls. “No

and had preconceptions that clashed with his ideals. “A

original plans existed so we became forensic architects,

few of our suggestions rubbed him wrong.” Time adds

pealing off layers to make judgment calls based on

perspective: “I wish that we could have communicated

materials.” It didn’t stop there. “We had Mrs. Beadle over

better as the house has been more than a home to us.”

and based on her ideas, we changed some things already restored just to get it right!”

Healy/Fearnow: Working with Beadle was a once-in-alifetime opportunity. “Al was overseeing a new home being

Anderson House: “White tile was specific to the house.

built nearby and we became his field office. We came

I wanted to replace what a prior owner had partially

home from work one day to a penciled post-it note on our

removed. I found the manufacturer in Italy but the tile was

refrigerator in Al’s handwriting, “Owe you one beer,” with

no longer produced,” says the owner. “The warehouse

an “X” over the “one” and an editorial comment above

found some old stock. I bought it all! After replacing what I

reading, “Two — had a friend over.”

needed I still have a lifetime supply!” With a Beadle house, better safe than sorry.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Scott Jarson

ISSUE 2014


JAMES A. GRESHAM

1928–2014

Tucson architect Jim Gresham was ambidextrous

His modern sensibilities mixed well with the desert,

in more ways than one. He’s known for designing

his designs often reflected the sparce yet organized

clean, modern structures while not afraid to integrate

nature of the place. His excellence was continually

techniques of the past.

recognized with acclaim and awards.

Gresham was born in Indianapolis, Indiana and like

Throughout his life, he continued to travel, absorbing the

many, his indoctrination as a lifelong architect began

details of his travel. This can be seen in the design of the

early, influenced by the clean, stark layouts of Frank

University of Arizona Integrated Learning Center, which

Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe. He

he considered his greatest accomplishment, integrating

studied with Bruce Goff at the University of Oklahoma,

meshed Indian stepwells into the descending entrance.

receiving his degree in 1953. Jim was one of Tucson’s most significant architects who, Soon after, he received a Rome Prize from the American

among a handful, strove to bring modernism to the

Academy. Italy influenced him. His style grew leaner

desert. He practiced architecture within the framework

with age when he followed the Italian architect Ernesto

of history, even when it wasn’t popular for a “modernist”

Roger’s edict to “Simplify, Simplify!”. Relocating to

to do so. That was Gresham; known for his modern

Tucson in 1956, he soon established himself.

buildings infused with old and new, a presence that continues to be felt in Arizona. PHOTOGRAPHY: courtesy Arizona Daily Star

22


OBJECTS fashion

•

live your style

discoveries

marketplace at lincoln & scottsdale 6560 N. Scottsdale Rd. Ste 125 Scottsdale 85253 contact@objectsaz.com objectsaz.com 480-878-5343


HELLO MIDTOWN! BY M E G A N B AT E S

In advance guard of the summer solstice, the June 14 opening of Lisa Sette Gallery’s new location in Midtown Phoenix celebrated the desert metropolis as a unique civilization unto itself: singularly beautiful, culturally fertile, and heading toward an urban renaissance. 24


Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


Lisa Sette opened the doors to her expanded new space

and the central corridor in ways that are altering the area’s

on East Catalina Drive in the local art scene’s dry season,

cultural topography. Throughout the neighborhood, mid-

yet the event was a Midsummer baptism of sorts. The show’s

century-era, single-family homes and newer urban lofts push

turnout was robust despite the heat; guests lined up not

up against the city’s commercial and corporate concerns,

only as devotees of Lisa Sette Gallery, which can be relied

creating ideal conditions for an integrated urban community.

upon to present surprising, experimental new art from both

Unique cultural and mercantile spaces once relegated to far-

regional and international artists, but to catch a glimpse of

flung suburbs, as well as forward-thinking business ventures

its impressive new home—a renovated 1979 Al Beadle

and startups, are finding a home in Midtown. An early

structure, taut and square, that emerges from the rocky earth

adopter was P.S. Studios, founded by Lisa Sette’s husband

like a glowing Modernist gem.

Peter Shikany, and is housed in the sister site of the East Catalina Drive building.

“Hello Midtown!”—the title of the gallery’s June exhibition, served as both a succinct greeting to the new neighborhood

Announcing the move, Lisa Sette remarked, “After 28

and a nod to the changing nature of the central city, of

remarkable years in Scottsdale, we’re moving to a location

which the entrance of Lisa Sette Gallery is a signal event. A

that reflects the important artistic, cultural and geographic

block and a half from the gallery, the five-year-old METRO

growth of the city’s urban core.”

light rail line has begun to connect Phoenix’s satellite cities

26


The entrance of Lisa Sette Gallery announces Midtown as a

Grounded in the moral framework of Bauhaus, and finding

true urban center, replete with a venerable cultural institution

a muse in minimalist, material-conscious Modernism as

that challenges and redefines the meaning of life in the

exemplified by Mies van der Rohe, Beadle’s work defined

desert metropolis. And the low-lying Beadle structure that

the mid-century city as it came into its own, generating nearly

houses the gallery’s expanded exhibition and event spaces,

two hundred structures across the Valley and creating an

perfectly encapsulates this project, bringing to bear the city’s

aesthetic and philosophical template for humans flourishing

sophisticated design history and inherently radical aesthetic.

in the harsh desert.

This is a place of extremes—travelling west from Scottsdale to

Defining Desert Living publisher and Architectural Realtor ®

Phoenix, the sprawling suburban paradise of the Scottsdale

Scott Jarson remarks, “Beadle took the paradigm of Miesian

Country Club gives way abruptly to contemporary glass

Modernism and made it his own, interjected with a subtle

high-rises along Central Avenue. And yet the transition from

and refined acknowledgement of the climate and materials

lowlands to stark verticality is a feature of the desert itself, and

appropriate for the desert. And he shared that vision with us

in the architecture of Al Beadle, the unique aesthetic qualities

in his designs. Supremely rational, they exude an order of

of the desert found an articulate modernist advocate.

calm against the chaos of both nature and the City.”

Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


Primarily below-ground, yet conveying a distinct, stylized

detachment—visitors gravitate toward this hidden, dream-like

profile against the earth from which it rises, the Lisa Sette

center, which is illuminated by a thrilling slice of concentrated

Gallery building on East Catalina Drive epitomizes this

sunlight from an overhead skylight. Wesley James likens

fecund connection between the desert and the human,

the interior of the gallery to “a within-the-earth condition…

nature and culture. Sette collaborated with Wesley James

setting the stage of moving down into the earth, leaving the

of StarkJames architecture, to revive the building—intended

mundane world behind.”

as an office space—with a series of careful renovations, including an opened interior that preserves Beadle’s original

Lisa Sette Gallery’s new space has it both ways: delineating

steel-beam ceiling. Sometimes called “Beadle Boxes,” the

and protecting an inner territory of experimentation and

architect’s buildings could be severe; Sette and James added

artistic exploration, while establishing a cultural structure and

massive fabric scrim structured around the gallery’s exterior.

center for Midtown Phoenix, and claiming an architectural

The scrim protects the building from the sun in addition to

classic that defines the urban desert. In its expansion and

serving as both an acknowledgement of the transcendent

move to the Beadle building on East Catalina Drive, the

simplicity of its form, and a method for softening the building’s

gallery follows a complex, contemporary trajectory toward

hard edges.

the transcendent and the supremely centered, geographically defined and aesthetically advanced.

The new Lisa Sette Gallery space includes a jewel-like central alcove that somehow evokes a sense of other worldly

28

PHOTOGRAPHY: High Res Media


FEATURED DESIGNER

TOM BOLLINGER

For the last 15 years Tom has owned and operated Bollinger Atelier, a highly specialized Contemporary art, casting and fabrication studio which produces his work and that of artists such as Tom Sachs, Tom Otterness, Thomas Houseago, Donald Baechler, and the Louise Bourgeois Foundation, among others. Prior to acquiring the Arizona business, Tom was General Manager of the nationally recognized Art Foundry, Talix in Beacon, New York and Shidoni in Santa Fe, New Mexico. During the last 30 years Tom has also been a prolific studio artist, producing large scale works sold through galleries and commission work for municipalities and private collectors.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Davin Lavikka

30


TOM BOLLINGER SPIRAL, 2014 Bronze, Acrylic, Steel 78” H x 33” W x 30”D

Production services Bollinger Atelier

Studio@TomBollingersculpture.com

TomBollingersculpture.com


ARIZONA WINE COUNTRY BY S C O T T J A R S O N

For decades, vineyards in Arizona meant one thing...Table Grapes. While we love a nice Perlette, there’s more to grapes than the Thompson Seedless. The new crop of Arizona wine vineyards are out to prove just that. Put simply, the new crop of vineyards and wineries north and south of Phoenix reveal clusters of unique micro-climates that compliment some of the best wine grape varieties. It’s home to not only beautiful vineyards with a wealth of varietals, but also a serious region where fine Arizona wines are produced.

32


Arizona has three major growing

Association for maps and events at

The Sonoita/Elgin area is the only

regions, all in the high desert. The

www.arizonawine.org.

designated AVA (American Viticultural

first producing region was in southern

Area) in the state. Nutrient-rich soil

Arizona in the Sonoita/Elgin area.

All of the Arizona regions that seem

and an altitude of 4,500 to 5,000 ft.

The Willcox area in Cochise County

especially suited to winemaking are

above sea level make this area south

was the second to come on-line with

easily explored as a weekend or day

of Tucson an ideal place for providing

significant crops. The Verde Valley

trip. Here’s the top three at a glance:

rich crops. This wine is so good, it has

is our third and newest commercial

been served at the White House.

region for growing wine grapes.

The Verde Valley counts numerous

Arizona vineyards’ elevations range

vineyards clustered about an hour south

Sonoita’s Dos Cabezas winery makes

between 3,800 ft. to almost 6,000

of Flagstaff. Smooth red mountains

a fine dry “pink” wine which we can’t

ft., allowing for nice hot days and

flank thin strips of forest and determine

recommend highly enough. Located in

cool nights during the grape growing

the wineries’ flavors: a mineralized,

the heart of Sonoita, open Thursday

season.

acidic soil that produces grapes with

through Sunday, 10:30 – 4:30. Dos

traditional and distinct flavors. They

Cabezas WineWorks Tasting Room is

You’ll also find wine-grape growing

are host to nine tasting rooms so you

located at 3248 Highway 82.

scattered around the state in other

can easily create your own unique trip.

areas such as Tombstone, Benson,

One stop is the Pillsbury Tasting Room

Payson and Portal and the up-

in Cottonwood, located at 1012 N.

and-coming

Main Street. It’s open most days from

out

the

Skull

Arizona

Valley. Wine

3 HOURS SOUTH OF PHX

Check Growers

11– 6 (www.pillsburywine.com).

Located in Southeastern Arizona, the Willcox area produces the highest quantity of grapes in Arizona. With abundant nearby natural beauty and a ton of rich history, Willcox will surprise you. While there, check out the Keeling Schaefer Vineyards’ Willcox Tasting Room. Located in the historic 1917 Willcox Bank and Trust building. Open Wednesday through Sunday, 11–5, at 154 N. Railroad Avenue.

PHOTOGRAPHY: courtesy of the Arizona Office of Tourism

Defining Defining Desert Desert Living Living

ISSUE 2014


VALLEY NEIGHBORHOODS

TALIESIN LEGACY:

MOUNTAIN VIEW ESTATES/MOUNTAIN VIEW EAST–TALIESIN ARCHITECTS BY S C O T T J A R S O N

34


“I adhere to Frank Lloyd Wright’s principle of organic architecture, which is an architecture that is natural and appropriate to the site, budget and climate,” says Taliesin Fellow, John Rattenbury. Rattenbury was lead architect for two of the most

coined as “lonely works of art.” So when he was

unique subdivisions of homes in Arizona: Mountain

able to introduce E. Russell Riggs to the firm, he was

View Estates and Mountain View East. An apprentice

delighted.

of Frank Lloyd Wright, he’s dedicated his life to architecture. He’s an accomplished man, but one of

“What excites me to this day,” Vernon recalls, “is that

his most enduring legacies may be the one he’s not

with Riggs we developed two distinct delivery systems

often recognized for.

for the homes. We could create a truly custom design, or the buyer could select from one of the unique

In the 1970’s, developer and contractor E. Russell

custom designs we developed.” This system made

Riggs acquired 40 acres in Paradise Valley near

obtaining an architectural home easy.

Tatum Boulevard and Mountain View Road. Riggs was introduced to Taliesin Architects, who he

There were at least five distinct elevations and as

commissioned to design a luxury subdivision there:

many different floorplans. Both subdivisions paid

Mountain View Estates.

great attention to avoid duplication of the elevations, and each home was assigned a unique color scheme

A housing development designed by Frank Lloyd

so the homes would look appropriate, yet individual,

Wright apprentices is going to be special. “I learned

next to each other.

from Frank Lloyd Wright that the design of the home should reflect the place where you build it,”

The move to Scottsdale and McCormick Ranch for

Rattenbury says. “We applied this principle, making

Mountain View East brought challenges: smaller lots

sure that each home was appropriate for its site and

and lower prices. Swaback recalls, “The detailing

gave special attention to how the community fit within

was still superb but pricey in comparison to average

its context.”

McCormick Ranch houses.” Today, it’s just those details that keep homes desirable. Mountain View

Taliesin Architects wasn’t only concerned with the

Estates and Mountain View East are two of only a

design of each individual home, but also the way

handful of subdivision homes designed by Taliesin

the homes worked together as a cohesive subdivision.

Architects.

“We were very concerned with adjacencies so that everything would be compatible,” said Arnold Roy,

Certainly

Architect and senior fellow at Taliesin West.

Swaback’s passion and commitment to affordable

these

homes

reflect

Rattenbury

and

architecture that can be shared and enjoyed by many Architect Vernon Swaback FAIA of Swaback Partners

instead of just a privileged few. Instead of being

worked extensively on the designs with Rattenbury

singular “lonely works of art” these homes remain a

during his time at Taliesin Architects. Back then,

hidden treasure, beloved and enjoyed by many.

Swaback was often found working on what he PHOTOGRAPHY: © Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


Valley Restaurants

FOOD BANK

PHOTOGRAPHY: Scott Jarson

IMAGE: ASU/AED Library

CHESTNUT | FINE FOODS AND PROVISIONS  FO R M E R LY

Western Savings and Loan  4350 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix, AZ 85018

Before Chestnut Fine Food and Provisions found

and her sister/business partner Marissa Hochman

it, this former bank had become another innocuous

repurposed it with new life as a restaurant and

building whose past use seemed to elude everyone.

marketplace; now hard to miss with a prominent yellow

Even architecture aficionados might have missed this

and black color scheme.

endangered design by none other than Case Study Architect, Cal Straub.

Chestnut Fine Food and Provisions is dedicated to locally sourced food and products like pastries,

In a former life, this Western Savings and Loan building

Matador Coffee and even space for Camelback

housed impressive architectural features that opened

Florists. “People always say, ‘you are competitors

to great acclaim in 1974. It concealed a massive

with this person,’ yet we’re all different and provide

square skylight at the center and a commanding view

something unique,” Steele said. “It’s all about

of the street.

supporting each other.”

“It had become a blank space you drove right by,”

chestnutlanefinefoods.com

Kirsten Steele, one half of the partnership, said. Steele

36


PHOTOGRAPHY: Scott Jarson

IMAGE: ASU/AED Library

FEDERAL PIZZA  FO R M E R LY

First Federal Savings  5210 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85012

When Upward Projects plans a new eatery, first they

Some artifacts were easy to renovate, like the dome

acquire the location, then they choose the cuisine. For

streetlights, and others not so much, such as the 1-inch

Federal Pizza, it started the other way around.

steel underneath the old bank vault. “We later found out that they inlaid that spot with steel to prevent people

At the time, they occupied three restaurant spaces

from tunneling up under the vault,” managing partner

within about 500 feet of each other (now they have

Lauren Bailey said.

five). They surveyed neighbors who said they wanted a pizza place with a drive-thru.

federalpizza.com

The First Federal Savings Building was just that. Visions of customers wrapped around the drive-thru, waiting for an order of wood-fired pizza, proved too great to ignore. It also helped that the 1969 Al Beadle building was a cool, mid-century structure.

Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


Valley Restaurants

FOOD BANK

PHOTOGRAPHY: Scott Jarson

THE VIG | UPTOWN  FO R M E R LY

Arizona Bank  6015 N. 16th St., Phoenix, AZ

It doesn’t take much convincing to persuade someone

receded bowls of plaster molding, emerald-glazed

that The Vig Uptown was once a bank. Mentally squint

tiles and stained glass miraculously survived numerous

and one can easily picture where the tellers made

renovations. “We saw many buildings where they’ve

transactions or slipped into the adjoining vault.

been updated to death, covering beautiful architectural elements with drywall and dropped ceilings, obscuring

This is what attracted Tucker Woodbury and business

the architect’s vision,” Woodbury said.

partner Jim Riley to the former Arizona Bank location designed by Ralph Haver in 1962. Besides some

But with help from CircleWest Architects, liberating

dated décor from neglected decades of occupancy,

this location meant bringing the bank full circle. Once

the tilt-wall construction of the property made it

designed to draw local customers to its location, the

malleable enough for the partners to fulfill their vision

repurposed building now brings people back to enjoy

for a second Vig location.

this upscale neighborhood tavern.

When they first saw the building, most of Haver’s

thevig.us

vision had been plastered over. Period pieces, like

38


THE GLENN MURCUTT EXHIBITION AND STUDIO

ASU ART MUSEUM

The Design School, in collaboration with the Arizona State University Art Museum and members of the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects, have developed a very special exhibition of the work of Australian architect Glenn Murcutt that will display here. Pritzker Prize Laureate Murcutt is world-renowned and noted for a body of work which subtly draws inspiration from the environmental conditions surrounding his designs. The exhibition provides an ideal vehicle to introduce Valley residents to the work of this world-renowned architect, widely recognized for his ability to design projects notable for their response to challenges of climate, culture and communities. The brainchild of The Design School Director Craig Barton, the exhibition was organized as a unique collaborative initiative between The Design School and the ASU Art Museum. Architects and faculty members, in collaboration with the Museum’s senior curator Heather Lineberry, will lead an inter-disciplinary graduate studio which will design and install the exhibit in the ASU Art Museum. Accompanying the exhibit, The Australian Architecture Foundation has assembled a package of Murcutt’s work that includes drawings, renderings, photographs and models of a variety of projects that highlight Murcutt’s special genius for designing projects derived from a keen observation of natural conditions (Murcutt was designing “sustainably” long before the term became fashionable). The exhibition opens in January and runs through early April. “This is a tremendous opportunity for our students to design an exhibition which will help the public better understand the importance of Murcutt’s work to our community,” Barton said. PHOTOGRAPHY: Anthony Browell; courtesy Architecture Foundation Australia

Defining Desert Living

azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson are proud sponsors of this exhibit.

ISSUE 2014


GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

International Architecture

SOUTH KOREA The orientation of the building was determined by the desire to make the most of views toward the lake and a nearby river, while the sloping shape maximizes the surface area that is exposed to southern sunlight. Leaning House / Architect: Praud / Photography: Kyungsub Shin

STOCKHOLM It is clad in corrugated iron and resembles a cube with some of its corners cut off. The design of the 110-square-meter house aims to optimize internal space, with a series of angled surfaces defining different living areas. The house was built using a prefabricated modular frame of laminated plywood, reducing the total cost of the project to 170,000 euros. Happycheap House Architect: Tommy Carlsson Photography: Michael Perlmutter

40

AUSTRALIA This timber-clad house along Australia’s scenic Great Ocean Road has been raised above the ground to capture the best views of the ocean and provide shaded outdoor space beneath.

FRANCE Solid panels, perforated screens and recessed balconies create a patchwork of varying transparency on this tower that rises up from one side of a mixed-use development in Nantes, France.

Ocean Road House Architect: Aidan Halloran, ITN architects Photography: Aidan Halloran, ITN Architects

Social Housing Architect: Antonini Darmon Architectes Photography: Alexandre Wasilewski


CHILE The Rambla house’s interior spaces were designed so there is continuity and a direct connection between indoor spaces and outdoor spaces, while protecting the main spaces from harsh, local coastal climate, characterized by strong south winds and excessive sun exposure from the west. Rambla House / Architect: Land Arquitectos / Photography: Sergio Pirrone

SAN FRANCISCO Nestled into the hillside, the long, solid plinth contains the private rooms of the house. Atop this plinth sits a transparent living and dining pavilion that opens up completely for access to the outdoor decks, pool patio and expansive views to Mount Tamalpais and the bay. Turner House Architect: Jensen Architects Photography: Mariko Reed

Defining Desert Living

AUSTRALIA With excellent views to the north and south and a conscious motivation to avoid the east/west outlooks, this project evolved as a series of interconnected and robustly finished containers. Torquay House Architect: Wolveridge Architects Photography: Derek Swalwell

CHILE Mas Fernandez architectos created the holiday home “Casa Tunquen” in Chile. The house is based on a grid of pillars of 3.50 x 3.50 meters that end up embracing the house, creating a terrace and a small central space. The structure is dedicated to the amazing view which becomes part of the external structure of the house. Casa Tunquen Architect: Mas Fernandez Arquitectos Photography: Nico Saieh

ISSUE 2014


GIFT GUIDE

Trinkets & Treasures

3

1

4

5

2 1 BEES

DEGLON MEETING KNIFE SET 3

6 DEPEDI

Handmade in Brooklyn using raw honey from the Hudson Valley and a combination of chili peppers.

KNEES

Crafted from high-quality stainless steel, this ingenious knife set is made to fit together.

uncrate.com

uncrate.com

The weight of the dish and its rubber base prevents it from slipping. The bowls have a rounded bottom, which means that picking them up from the floor and adding food or water is easy.

2 WOOD

SPICY HONEY

CUPS

4 MEMOBOTTLE

Roly wood cups are produced by Unomatudo and designed by Mute. Roly Wood Cup is made from Castor Aralia wood coated with urethane.

Available in three sizes — letter, A4 and A5 — these bottles are designed to fit in your bag alongside your books, laptops and tablets.

monosquare.com

uncrate.com

5 EQUIL

SMARTPEN

SmartPen syncs your actual writing to text on your iPhone/iPad.

myequil.com

42

DIAMOND

PET DISH

shop.thecoolhunter.net 7 DODECAHEDRON VASE

A glass dodecahedron planter brings back the spirit of Buckminster Fuller.

scoreandsolder.com


8 13

6 11

14

9

10

7

12

8 TAGLIAPIZZA PIZ Z A CUT TER

11 MODERN

A single ribbon of steel curves around to create a tab that accommodates your thumb’s pressure. It also keeps the wheel elevated off the table to avoid a mess.

The modern peg board is a perfect accessory to hang your keys, sunglasses, or anything you need to find in a hurry.

fitzsu.com 9 MINIPRESSO

PEG BOARD

shop.humancraftd.com 12 WINE2GO

The Minipresso is a portable, handpowered espresso machine that lets you brew shots wherever you may be.

Reusable, flexible, foldable wine bottle that is perfect for taking your favorite wine along with you when hiking, at concerts, the beach or on outdoor adventures.

uncrate.com

blessthisstuff.com

15 13 PIPE

CANDLE HOLDER

From tabletop to tree trunk, to door frame or post beam, drive these tea light holders into any solid surface for an illuminating experience.

aplusrstore.com 14 PICNIC

CORKSCREW

Jakob Wagner has designed an ingenious, small picnic corkscrew that fits easily in your pocket.

emmohome.com

10 KOOSTIK ORIGINAL

15 WAKE-UP

The passive solid wood acoustic amplifier allows you to increase the volume of your iPhone 2– 4 times without power.

Phillips wake-up light utilizes light and sound to gradually wake you up, all in a beautiful contemporary design.

shop.coolmaterial.com

amazon.com

Defining Desert Living

LIGHT

ISSUE 2014


THE NEWTON REBORN

Changing Hands and The Newton

SHINING BRIGHT IN THE COMMUNITY

BY TAY L O R C O S T E L L O

Like the proverbial bird of which Phoenix is named after,

your hair stand up,” Perez said. “We’re walking in the

the restaurant that started as The Newton was reborn

back one day, all huddled together and [Southern Rail

as The Newton.

chef] Justin Beckett turned around, flashlight on his face, and said, ‘Does this remind you of The Blair Witch

Once a social spot for decades of customers, the

Project?’”

English-inspired restaurant sat vacant for almost a decade. It seemed destined to join hundreds of the

After original owner Jay Newton’s death in 2006, no

Valley’s vanishing architectural history.

one knew what to do with this behemoth 18,000 sq. ft. space. A plan to adaptively reuse the building by Venue

Whenever Venue Projects co-partner Lorenzo Perez

Projects using the existing structure was halted by the

visited it, he described the building as “frozen in time.”

two million dollar price tag.

The restaurant opened as The Newton in 1961 and

44

later “Beefeaters,” the restaurant’s atmosphere was a

Time and neglect expedited its decay, and the listing

quintessential lounge vibe, dark with little natural sunlight.

price was knocked down, allowing them to obtain the

Dark and decaying, “It was a creepy place that made

building and begin stripping and mending the structure.


CHANGING HANDS PHOENIX AND FIRST DRAFT BOOK BAR 300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix, AZ 85013 602.274.0067 | thenewtonphx.com Mon –Sat: 9 am –10 pm | Sun: 9 am –8 pm

THE BRIGHT FUTURE OF THE NEWTON IS CLEARLY INTACT, WHERE HAPPY PATRONS REACH FOR A NOVEL AND A PINT, COURTESY OF CHANGING HANDS BOOKSTORE AND FIRST DRAFT BOOK BAR.

With a new design by Architect John Douglas, the

removed the husk of the Beefeater’s signage, but

building began a new life. Once clubby and confined,

didn’t throw it away. To mark what once was, the

the new space infers nothing but openness. “Instead

project’s partners laid the sign upon the entrance of

of being a one-liner where you show up to eat and

the bookstore and etched the outline into the concrete.

shop, we thought, ‘How fun would it be if we’re entertaining, educating, and getting people together

That sign still evokes memories for many Phoenicians.

for a communal experience?’” Perez said.

But now instead of beef and bourbon, the bright future of The Newton is clearly intact, where happy patrons

Not much exists from the old interior — the iconic yet

will reach for a novel and a pint instead, courtesy of

dated dark-stained wood walls are all gone. However,

Changing Hands Bookstore and First Draft Book Bar.

by the same edict, the new structure includes subtle

In a time when it’s a big deal to see a bookstore open,

reminders of the former building’s identity. For instance,

it’s equally a big deal to see an old Phoenix landmark

Perez’s co-partner John Kitchell planed old redwood

repurposed. Here’s to the new Newton...We say

into new surfaces, from the bar to the doors. Before

cheers to that!

The Newton opened in May, construction workers PHOTOGRAPHY: Andrew Pielage

Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


ON THE MARKET

Property Listings  |  azarchitecture.com

PAR ADISE VALLEY TERRITORIAL

ADOBE SPANISH COLONIAL

The warmth and spirit of Santa Fe highlight this beautiful Pueblo/ Territorial home. Lovingly crafted and expanded with 4 bedrooms, separate guest house and view deck. Great schools and convenient PV location.

This historic 1929 Adobe Spanish Colonial revival home offers incredible history and pride of ownership. Designed by Architect H.H. Green, thick adobe walls define a home where originality and condition reign proud.

Price: $999,000

Price: $1,030,000

ARCADIA CR AFTSMAN

PAR ADISE VALLEY — AL BEADLE ARCHITECT

This elegant home features fantastic views of Camelback Mountain. Built with great expertise, this home has been beautifully renovated and designed to maximize natural beauty.

Price: $1,745,000

Mid-century Case Study Modernist Al Beadle designed this home in 1956. Known as Beadle House #7, the current owners have lovingly and painstakingly renovated while retaining all the irreplaceable details.

MARION ESTATES MODERN

CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN MODERN R ANCH

This updated Mid-century Modern Ranch combines great architecture with location, location, location! Renovated to perfection, the backyard sports a magnificent pool with superb Camelback Mountain views.

This superlative Mid-century Modern Ranch home in the shadow of Camelback Mountain offers the best of today plus inspired landscape designed by Steve Martino ASLA. Arcadia meets Camelback in this desirable location!

Price: $785,000

Price: $1,199,000

Price: $775,000

Architecturally Unique Homes

®


LIGHT R AIL CENTR AL URBAN

PHOENIX MODERN — AL BEADLE

High-efficiency meets eco-modern in this new Contemporary home! From finished concrete floors to the steel roof, this timeless design offers new construction and a short walk to the Light Rail.

This early Al Beadle is a ranch-inspired home on a 3/4 acre irrigated lot. An estate sale, it offers vaulted interiors, concrete block details, copper roof and amazing history.

Price: $389,900

Price: $599,900

THE “APHRODISIAC” LOFTS

PHOENIX COUNTRY CLUB AREA MODERN

Designed by Modernist Architect Miles Stahm and featured in a 1965 Playboy magazine, these five, one-bedroom condos offer double volume space, loft bedrooms, orb fireplace, conversation pit and lava rock wall.

“Mezzo” by Will Bruder Architect offers amazing architecture and select materials that make this design world-class. Expressive detailing combined with a PCC area location for a hip, urban vibe.

Price: $525,000

Price: $285,000

MARLEN GROVE — R ALPH HAVER

MIDTOWN — CORONADO COMMONS

This home sports recent updates including updated kitchen and baths, Euro-style cabinets and concrete floors. The corner lot offers easy access and office potential. A super buy for Mid-century!

New construction: 20 urban townhomes with a succinctly modern feel, each offering 2 or 3 bedrooms, 1730 –2150 SF plans, and 2-car attached garage. Now reserving!

Price: $275,000

Target Priced From: $399,900

azarchitecture.com  480.425.9300 3707 N. Marshall Way #5 | Scottsdale, AZ 85251

All figures and measurements approximate: subject to error, omissions, withdrawal, prior sale and approval of purchase by owner. Copyright 2014 azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson all rights reserved.


ON THE BOARDS

Eldorado

ELDORADO ON 1ST WILL BRUDER ARCHITECT BY S C OT T J A R S O N

RENDERING: Christoph Kaiser

The mission for Eldorado on 1st was simple: deliver

blackened copper and perforated metal screens. The

the finest urban home possible. Designed by Architect

homes are sized between 3,200 – 3,600SF+-. Details

Will Bruder and located in the heart of Scottsdale’s

include custom exterior resin panels, select wood

Downtown Urban Arts District, Eldorado on 1st offers

and stone flooring and bulthaup European kitchens

a new paradigm of Urban Luxury Living conceived to

as standard. A public art element will be included on

offer an unmatched set of criteria. Eldorado on 1st offers

the site. Target pricing ranges from $1.6M and top out

seven attached homes with an urban connection to all

under $2M.

downtown Scottsdale has to offer. The developers gave these homes a stringent checklist Located in one of the most “walkable” locations in

that included superior design, outstanding materials,

the Valley, each home is a luxurious, fully-featured

total

townhouse-style condominium offering cutting-edge

complete functionality, superb location, personal safety,

architecture, three and optional four-bedroom plans,

and confident security. Nothing was left to chance and

four stories with roof deck, private two-car garage and

everything has been thought of.

privacy,

generous

size,

convenient

layout,

a personal, private elevator to each level of the home. Community features include a pool and spa, and eco-

Eldorado on 1st is reserving now, with construction

features include application to construct under the City

scheduled for completion in late summer. For complete

of Scottsdale Green Building Program.

details including floorplans, visit azarchitecture.com or contact Scott Jarson for a personal presentation.

The building will utilize custom concrete block, blue-

48


KNOWLEDGE & EXPERIENCE azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson is the only Real Estate firm in Arizona that specializes in the sales and marketing of Architecturally Unique Homes.© Since 1990, Scott & Debbie Jarson, have stood by their original mission to celebrate and honor design & architecture. They remain devoted to adding value to architect-designed properties and are committed to celebrating, encouraging and promoting good design. Over the many years, azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson have been defining desert living by searching out homes from modern to historic, that add enjoyment and harmony to our clients’ lives. A keen aesthetic sense and a deep appreciation for the Valley’s rare and diverse architecture define their commitment to marketing unique properties like no other firm. azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson remains deeply committed to historic preservation and are proud EcoBroker ® Affliates. Whether you are buying, selling, or are just an enthusiast of architecture, remember to contact azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson — the Valley’s true expert in Architecturally Unique Homes.© Meet our team or contact us to learn more about how we can help you.

azarchitecture.com

480.425.9300

Copyright 2014 azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson all rights reserved.

Defining Desert Living

ISSUE 2014


Architecturally Unique Homes

®

azarchitecture.com  480.425.9300 3707 N. Marshall Way #5 | Scottsdale, AZ 85251

THE CONSTRUCTION ZONE, LTD. Private Residence If your home is currently listed this is not a solicitation. Copyright 2014 azarchitecture/Jarson & Jarson all rights reserved.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Bill Timmerman

Defining Desert Living Volume II 2014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you