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DUKE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING


CONTENTS Introduction 02 Phase One 03 Phase Two 06 Floor Plans 07 Phase Three 12 Floor Plans 13 Highlights 18 Completed Vision 19 Space Allocation 22


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Introduction The Duke University School of Nursing has been long admired for its celebrated programs and its community of distinguished scholars and clinicians. Since its inception in 1931, the school has created generations of nurse leaders, researchers, and educators. In this time, the school’s evolution has given rise to many outstanding programs, important research, and needed service to the global community. As a reflection of this unprecedented growth and reputation, the School of Nursing’s ranking in graduate programs has soared from No.27 in the country in 2001 to No.1 in 2018.

2. E  lizabeth C. Clipp Research Building (Existing) 3. Hanes House 4. Trent Drive Hall 5. D  uke Health Facility Planning, Design, & Construction

8. Hospital South 9. Duke Clinic 10. Duke Cancer Center 11. Duke Medicine Pavilion 12. Trent Semans Center for Health Education 13. Duke University Hospital 14. Duke Children’s Hospital

6. Duke Circle Parking Deck

15. Duke Hospital Bed Towers

7. Sarah P. Duke Gardens

16. Duke Eye Center

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1. T  he School of Nursing, Pearson Building

Specifically under the leadership of Dean Mary Champagne, the School of Nursing began a period of growth with a new sense of direction and purpose. This meteoric rise required a commensurate increase in space to adequately serve the school’s vision. A primary motive for the initial Phase One project was to unite the school’s programs and space, previously spread across campus, into one new facility located within the Duke University Medical Campus and sharing space with the existing Elizabeth C. Clipp Research Building (1973).


PHASE ONE

A New Era

In 2001, Ayers Saint Gross was awarded the commission to design the new facility, realizing the school’s vision to create an iconic identity that exemplified its transformation and exciting potential. Completed in 2005, the Christine Siegler Pearson Building is situated on a beautifully wooded twoacre site at the heart of the thriving and ever-growing Medical Campus. The presenting facade on the main medical campus quadrangle signifies both the importance of the nursing profession in healthcare and the growing status of nursing within the Duke community. The building’s architectural vocabulary recalls the roots of collegiate Gothic vernacular of Duke’s historic campus, reinterpreted in a contemporary expression.

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The Pearson Building was organized on the site in an L-shaped, allowing for the preservation and enhancement of the surrounding wooded area. This purposeful configuration and layout provided an immediate impact for the school and its image; it also allowed for an easy expansion to accommodate future growth. A corner entry tower anchors the threshold to the Medical Campus. Clad in Duke stone and limestone, emblems identify the School of Nursing and the Medical Campus, grounding it in its place and time.

Perhaps the most distinctive and prominent aspect of the building is the commons; a “living room” where students and faculty come together to collaborate, share experiences, socialize, and study. This twostory glass structure engages a carefully landscaped forest and purposefully blurs the distinction between inside and outside. An outdoor terrace extends the “living” space into the courtyard, which has a mix of mature trees and planted landscape. The wood structure of the commons recalls the traditional Duke gothic architectural brand, its warmth relating to the landscape. Designed as an oasis, the commons has become the heart of the school and is a destination location within the Medical Campus. As the distinguishing characteristic and the most recognizable space, the commons is intrinsic to the school’s brand. Inside, the building accommodates the latest in nursing education. The lower floor houses instructional spaces including an auditorium, a case study room, and several flat floor flexible classrooms. Clinical learning spaces are consolidated on the second floor, and include skills labs and a simulation suite. Faculty and senior administration are located on the second and top floors.


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Adding to Its Success

During the programming and design of Phase One, it was apparent that the projected growth and success of the school would eventually necessitate an addition. Only five years after its opening of the first phase, the School of Nursing’s enrollment, curricular offerings, and research outperformed the 15-year projections, more than doubling the size of its faculty and student body in less than a decade. The adjacent Clipp Research Building was insufficient to meet the school’s needs, requiring the school to find more space elsewhere on campus to grow. In 2011, Ayers Saint Gross earned another commission, this time to expand the school’s presence with an addition to the original building. Under the leadership of Dean Catherine Gilliss, new spaces were added to increase student success, complement existing programs, and support new programs and curricular offerings.

The addition of another leg to the L-shaped original building created a U-shaped composition, further surrounding the landscaped wooded garden. Using the architectural vocabulary established in the original building, the addition seamlessly bonds new to ‘old.’ Learning spaces were designed to be flexible and adaptable, incorporating the latest active learning pedagogies with integration of state-of-the-art technologies. Clinical learning spaces were expanded, providing new skills simulation and a virtual hospital. Breakout rooms with formal and informal study spaces offer students more opportunities for meeting and collaboration.

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PHASE TWO


Legend Circulation Classroom Conference Room Lounges / Breakout Miscellaneous Office Student Study / Meeting Room Support

Learning Environments • Tiered auditorium (150 seat) • Tiered case-study classroom (86 seat) • Problem Based (Active learning) Classroom (96 seat) • Flat Floor Classrooms (2 @ 40, 1 @ 30) • Seminar Rooms (5)

Student Support Spaces • • • • • •

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Commons (with food service, seating 100) Quiet Study Room (30 seat) Student Lounge Group Study Rooms Genius Bar® (IT Support) Student Services

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First Floor Plan The main entry level contains the highest-profile and most vibrant social spaces in the building. Positioned as a nexus of activity between the two wings of the building, the commons blends seamlessly with the landscaped garden and patio. The structure evokes Duke’s collegiate Gothic heritage in a warm and creative manner. The shape, feel, and expression of the commons embodies the esprit de corps of the school and provides space for students, faculty, and staff to come together in a stimulating, vibrant atmosphere within the Medical Campus. The commons is central to the School of Nursing, and it serves as a destination for faculty, students, and staff.

In addition to the commons, this floor houses many prominent and highly trafficked spaces such as an auditorium, flat floor flexible classrooms, a problembased classroom, and the admissions department. Student support functions are located on this level as well, including a reading room, the IT department, and an IT help desk modeled after Apple’s famous Genius Bar ® concept.


Legend Circulation Office Student Lab Support

Learning Environments •M  ultipurpose Classroom (30 seats) • Seminar Room

Clinical Learning Environments • • • • • •

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Skills Labs (3) Assessment Lab Simulation: High-Fidelity OR / L&D (5) Task Training Lab Virtual Hospital / Nurse Station Debriefing Room (2)

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The second floor houses the Center for Nursing Discovery. The CND is dedicated to clinical learning and includes studio lab environments and immersive high fidelity simulation experiences with human patient simulators. These spaces hone students’ critical thinking skills, bringing together classroom and practical experiences. The dedicated task training room is used for formal classes and also provides students space to practice their skills during off hours. The second floor includes offices for faculty, staff conference areas, and office support areas.

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Second Floor Plan


Legend Circulation Conference Room Lounges / Breakout Miscellaneous Office Specialty Classroom Support

Faculty & Administrative •F  aculty and Staff Private Offices (76) • Conference and Meeting Rooms (4) • Support Spaces (workrooms, kitchenettes, etc.) • Boardroom • Doctoral Work Space • Classroom Technology Support (video recording) • Faculty Lounge

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Third Floor Plan

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With most of the first and second floor dedicated to students and instructional space, the third floor houses mostly administrative, faculty, and doctoral work areas. This floor also contains faculty support spaces, conference rooms, the faculty lounge, and the main boardroom.


Legend Circulation Conference Room Lounges / Breakout Office Support

Faculty & Administrative •D  ean’s Suite (reception, office, conference) • Senior Executive Offices • Faculty Offices • Conference Rooms

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Fourth Floor Plan

The adjacent Clipp Research Building, which once independently served as the School of Nursing, constitutes most of the school’s research centers, institutes, and initiatives. The school has sought space

elsewhere on campus to fulfill the growing needs of their successful research enterprise. The planned Phase Three building to replace Clipp, will consolidate these functions as an addition to the Pearson Building.

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The top floor, constructed during the second phase of expansion, is dedicated to the senior administration for the School of Nursing. It includes executive offices and the Dean’s suite (reception, Dean’s office, conference room, and private terrace).


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PHASE ONE

PHASE THREE

A New Horizon

In 2016, the Department of Physical Therapy and the School of Medicine (Orthopaedics) sought to expand onto the Medical Campus. In the spirit of interdisciplinary collaboration, a site next to the School of Nursing’s Pearson Building was identified as the proposed site for this expansion that required the razing of the Clipp Research Building and relocation of the nursing spaces within. The School of Nursing was looking to expand for a third time within fifteen years, and since the completion of the second building expansion in 2012 had acquired more space off site to meet their growing demand. Under the guidance of Dean Marion Broome this project was instrumental

1. T  he School of Nursing, Pearson Building 2. Duke Health Interprofessional Education Center 3. Hanes House 4. Trent Drive Hall 5. D  uke Health Facility Planning, Design, & Construction

in bringing all the nursing spaces back onto campus under the nursing umbrella. As an integral part of the Medical Campus, the School of Nursing had leveraged use of the Standardized Patient (SP) suite in the School of Medicine for simulation training. With two bustling programs sharing resources, timing and availability had compromised the School of Nursing’s use of the facility. To solve this scheduling and growth issue, a dedicated SP suite for the School of Nursing was desperately needed. All combined, these factors generated 32,000 NASF of new space for the School of Nursing, or roughly half of the space, in the new Duke Health Interprofessional Education Center.

8. Hospital South 9. Duke Clinic 10. Duke Cancer Center 11. Duke Medicine Pavilion 12. Trent Semans Center for Health Education 13. Duke University Hospital 14. Duke Children’s Hospital

6. Duke Circle Parking Deck

15. Duke Hospital Bed Towers

7. Sarah P. Duke Gardens

16. Duke Eye Center

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PHASE THREE

PHASE TWO


Legend Circulation Classroom Lounges / Breakout Office Student Lab Student Study / Meeting Room Support

Learning Environments •T  iered Collaborative Classroom (150 seat) • Active Learning Classroom (108 seat)

Clinical Learning • Occupational Therapy Skills Lab

Student Support

PEARSON

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Commons Student Lounge Genius Bar® (IT support) Admissions Suite

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First Floor Plan

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The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program is on parallel tracks with the School of Nursing, both boasting high rankings, numerous academic accolades, and world-class faculty. The expansion of Pearson was a great opportunity for the DPT to have a front door on campus while implementing the department’s mission of ­team-based learning and interprofessional connections with colleagues throughout Duke. Programmatically, the first level of the Duke Health Interprofessional Education Center accommodates most of the DPT’s academic and student-centric functions. The public commons concourse of the first floor connects two major access points to the building from Trent Drive on the east and the Medical Campus on the west, and is heavily traversed. Two key instructional spaces are located on this public commons: the 150seat collaborative tiered classroom and the 108-seat

active-learning classroom (ALC). The use of large overhead doors on the ALC increases the adaptability of the public space with the intent to host school-wide events that previously had to be held off site. Similar to the Pearson Building, the exterior landscape is seamlessly integrated with the interior environment with several doors opening to the “Garden in Motion,” the concept for the landscape design to showcase the intrinsic kinetic nature of physical therapy and orthopaedic surgery. In addition to the Physical Therapy core courses, the building enables the program to add an Occupational Therapy (OT) major to the curriculum. The Occupational Therapy Skills Lab serves as this program’s primary clinical learning lab. The student lounge and several student meeting rooms constitute the balance of the area of Level 1.


Legend Circulation Office Student Lab Classroom Student Space Support

Clinical Learning •P  T Skills Lab • OT Classroom • Health Innovation Lab (5,200 NASF) - Robotics Lab - Reception - Group prebrief / queuing area - Exam rooms (7) - Ante room: charting / observation / private debrief (7) - Group debrief room - Actor prep / lounge / changing - Operations manager office - Laundry - Equipment storage

PEARSON

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Faculty • • • •

Offices Work Room Conference Breakroom

Second Floor Plan compromise the fidelity of the simulated clinical exams. It is purposefully located at the base of the Duke Health Interprofessional Education Center’s bridge connection which serves as the primary access point for the School of Nursing students and faculty. Beyond the HIL is the large skills environment for the Physical Therapy as well as the OT classroom. The second floor also includes offices, support, and conference areas for the DPT faculty.

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The second floor houses the extension of the School of Nursing’s Center for Nursing Discovery. The new lab space was envisioned as an incubator where learners and clinicians can engage to develop and test innovations in health technology and care delivery, thus named the Health Innovation Lab (HIL). It is comprised of a highly visible Robotics Lab and a robust Standardized Patient Suite that is designed so that students and actors each have dedicated spaces and entrances to avoid any potential run-ins that would


Legend Circulation Classroom Conference Room Miscellaneous Office Student Space Support

Learning Environments • Active Learning Classroom (96 seat) • IPE / Wellness Flex Lab

Student Spaces • Testing / Data Coding • Treadmill Workstations

Faculty & Administrative PEARSON

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 tudent Services Suite S Faculty & Staff Offices Work Room Conference Breakroom

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Third Floor Plan The School of Nursing’s need for another active learning classroom to function similarly to the one in Pearson is located here, again at the base of the building’s bridge connection. The large 96-seat classroom is intended for daily instructional space and accommodates the program’s on-campus intensives, the three days per semester when all MSN students in APRN majors (distance-based learners) gather for required on-campus coursework, facilitating face-to-face interactions, simulation, and hands-on activities. Operable partitions can be deployed to create intimate classrooms for smaller groups during these sessions. This design approach has allowed the School of Nursing flexibility to accommodate a wide spectrum of curricular requirements without the need to build extra space.

Across the hall is the Interprofessional Education (IPE) suite which is dedicated to student meeting and lab space, and provides resources for advanced studies, research, and wellness. The third floor also includes student services, testing accommodations, offices, support, and conference areas for School of Nursing faculty.


Legend Circulation Conference Room Miscellaneous Office Research & PhD Student Space Support

Research & PhD • • • • •

PhD Suite (40 seat) Stats Lab Conference Huddle Rooms Research Subject Meeting Space Phlebotomy

Faculty & Administrative

PEARSON

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Executive, Faculty & Staff Offices Research Project Staff Work Room Conference Breakroom

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Fourth Floor Plan

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The School of Nursing’s Research and PhD residents occupy most of the fourth floor. Several conference rooms are located here to host meetings for research subjects, facilitate stats lab group work sessions, and for general PhD huddle space and support. All meeting rooms use the campus-wide digital reservation system so both faculty and students can reserve these spaces. The fourth floor also includes executive offices, support, and conference areas.


Legend Circulation Conference Room Miscellaneous Office Support

Administrative and Faculty Space • • • • • •

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Fifth Floor Plan

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The fifth floor is the new home for the School of Medicine’s Orthopaedics department executive and faculty office suite. The Doctor of Physical Therapy chief and program directors are co-located to share resources and define the new spirit of IPE collaboration.

 rthopaedics Executive Suite O Executive Board Room Faculty & Staff Offices Work Room Conference Breakroom


School of Nursing Highlights 2001-2019

2018 #1 School of Nursing

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS

(U.S. News & World Report)

2017

2 010 2 009

#4 School of Nursing #3 Online Programs

Faculty totals 56

(U.S. News & World Report)

DNP expands to admit 40 students

2 002

2 006

2 008

ABSN implemented to address national nursing shortage

New PhD program

New DNP program admits 25 students

2016 #6 School of Nursing #5 Online Programs

(U.S. News & World Report)

2 013 #2 Graduate Program in Nursing

(graduateprograms.com)

2 011 #7 School of Nursing

(U.S. News & World Report)

2 013

2010

2 001 #27 School of Nursing

#15 School of Nursing

(American Assembly for Men in Nursing)

(National League for Nursing)

(National League for Nursing)

(U.S. News & World Report)

(U.S. News & World Report)

2 004 Center for Nursing Research (CNR) reaches 23rd in NIH research funding

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Second designation as National Center of Excellence

2012

2015

CNR reaches 10th in NIH research funding

CNR reaches 9th in NIH research funding

2 016 CNR reaches 4th in NIH research funding

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

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2005

2012

DUSoN / ASG Expansion Study

New Facility Ground Breaking

Ground Breaking 45,000 sf addition providing for: - rising enrollment - growth of research portfolio - academic programs - innovative partnerships, locally & globally

2002

2004

2005

Phase One Programming

Design

Construction

2011

2012

Phase Construction Two Programming

2016 Phase Three Programming

PHYSICAL EXPANSION

2019

2019 18 School of Nursing

2 007 #5 among private programs

First designation as National Center of Excellence

#1 Best Nursing School for Men

Occupancy Aug 2019


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Duke Health Interprofessional Education Center


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Space Allocation

PHASES ONE, TWO, AND THREE

9%

18%

RESEARCH SPACE

CLASSROOMS

7,925 NASF

16,104 NASF

15% 8%

LAB SPACE

14,052 NASF

90,687 NASF

STUDENT SPACES

7,494 NASF

50% OFFICE SPACES

45,112 NASF

Acknowledgments DUKE UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Tallman Trask III, PhD, Executive Vice President and Treasurer

Mary T. Champagne, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor of Nursing and Medicine, and Former Dean of the School of Nursing

Monte Brown, MD, Vice President for Administration, Duke University Health System, and Associate Dean of Veteran Affairs, Duke University School of Medicine

Catherine L. Gilliss, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor of Nursing and Medicine, and Former Dean of the School of Nursing

Gregory Warwick, AIA, Duke University Architect

Marion E. Broome, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of the School of Nursing and Vice Chancellor for Nursing Affairs

Shawn Subasic, Director, Duke Health Facilities Planning, Design, and Construction

David Bowersox, MBA, Associate Dean, Finance and Administration

Robin Thomas, Executive Director, Engineering and Operations, Duke University Health System

Barbara Turner, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor of Nursing and Chair of the Health of Women, Children, and Families Divison

Kevin Gainey, Project Manager, Duke Health Facilities Planning, Design, and Construction

Margory A. Molloy, PhD, DNP, RN, CNE, CHSE, Assistant Professor of Nursing and Director of the Center for Nursing Discovery

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Earl Purdue, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Principal Ayers Saint Gross 410.347.8500 epurdue@asg-architects.com Laura Hall, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP Senior Associate Ayers Saint Gross 410.347.8500 lhall@asg-architects.com

The success of the School of Nursing would not be possible without the dedication of and innumerable contributions from the institution’s leadership, faculty, and staff. We thank them for their efforts.


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Duke University School of Nursing  

The Duke University School of Nursing has been long admired for its celebrated programs and its community of distinguished scholars and clin...

Duke University School of Nursing  

The Duke University School of Nursing has been long admired for its celebrated programs and its community of distinguished scholars and clin...