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LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

A Collection of Project Case Studies Reflecting our Commitment to Sustainable Architecture + Design

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN SOLUTIONS AYERS SAINT GROSS


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN SOLUTIONS AYERS SAINT GROSS

OUR APPROACH

WHAT IS LEEDÂŽ?

CASE STUDIES

Ayers Saint Gross applies a high level of commitment to environmentally design all of our work. We are driven by the belief that high-quality built environments can be realized without depleting our natural resources. All of our projects endeavor to facilitate our clients mission, respect the history and context of the environments within which we work, and to provide a humanfriendly and efficient working and living space.

LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and is a rating system developed by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) to measure building sustainability. LEED promotes a sustainable approach in five key areas: Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy Performance, Materials Selection, and Indoor Environmental Quality.

These case studies highlight the variety of sustainable design features used in each of Ayers Saint Gross’ LEED certified projects. They include general information about each job, credit category specific data, along with totals achieved in various key areas.


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Turman Residence Hall Emory University SILVER CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY SCOTT CHESTER

SS: Site 7/14

MR: Materials 7/13

A Previously developed site, the project scored points by meeting development density requirements, providing bicycle storage and changing rooms, providing public transportation access, providing no new parking, providing stormwater quality management, and providing an energy star rated roof.

The construction manager diverted 78% of the construction waste away from landfills, over 22% of materials used was manufactured using recycled materials, 56% of the wood used was FSC Certified, and over 32% of materials were extracted, harvested, or recovered within 500 miles of the project site.

WE: Water 2/5

IEQ: Indoor 8/15

By providing water-saving fixtures, potable water use was reduced by over 46%, gaining the project 2 points in the water category and an additional point for innovation and design.

The project committed to improved air quality and occupant comfort by providing increased ventilation, implementing an IAQ management plan during construction, providing lowemitting materials, providing thermal comfort controls, to increase thermal comfort, and providing views to almost 100% of the spaces.

EA: Energy 5/17 Credit was earned for optimizing energy performance over 25% and performing enhanced commissioning.

ID: Innovation 4/5 The project achieved exemplary performance in water use reduction, instituted a green housekeeping program for the building, implemented a green education program along with numerous team members active on the project being LEED Accredited Professionals.

25%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

46%

WATER USE REDUCTION

78%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

56%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

32%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

22%

RECYCLED CONTENT

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded: April 2008


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Visitors Center & Smith Education Center Thomas Jefferson Foundation GOLD CERTIFIED IMAGE BY ALAN KARCHMER

SS: Site 8/14

MR: Materials 5/13

A Previously developed site, the project scored points by providing bicycle storage and changing rooms, preferred parking for low-emitting, fuel efficient vehicles, and car/van pools, restoring native plantings, maximizing open space, providing stormwater quality management, and designing to reduce light pollution.

The construction manager diverted 82% of the construction waste away from landfills, over 18% of materials used was manufactured using recycled materials, and over 20% of materials were extracted, harvested, or recovered within 500 miles of the project site, which earned the project an innovation and design credit.

WE: Water 4/5

IEQ: Indoor 13/15

An efficient irrigation system was provided, along with on-site sewerage conveyance, and by providing watersaving fixtures, potable water use was reduced by over 42%, gaining the project 4 points in the water category and an additional 2 points for innovation and design.

The project committed to improved air quality and occupant comfort by monitoring carbon dioxide, implementing an IAQ management plan both during construction and prior to occupancy, providing low-emitting materials, controlling pollutants within the building, providing lighting and thermal comfort controls, and providing views to over 90% of the spaces.

EA: Energy 8/17 Credit was earned for optimizing energy performance by 28%, performing enhanced commissioning, and managing the refrigerants utilized on the job.

ID: Innovation 5/5 The project achieved exemplary performance in wastewater management, water use reduction, the use of regional materials, and maximize open space, along with numerous team members active on the project being LEED Accredited Professionals.

28%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

42%

WATER USE REDUCTION

82%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

40%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

12%

RECYCLED CONTENT

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded: August 2009


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

School of Nursing Duke University SILVER CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY CHRIS HILDRETH

SS: Site 11/14

MR: Materials 5/13

A previously developed site, the project scored points by meeting development density requirements, providing public transportation access, providing bicycle storage and changing rooms, providing alternative fuel refueling stations and no new parking, limiting Site disturbances, maximizing open space, providing stormwater quantity and quality management, and landscaping to reduce heat islands.

The construction manager diverted over 71% of the construction waste away from landfills, over 18% of materials used was manufactured using recycled materials, over 52% of the wood used was FSC Certified, and over 63% of materials were extracted, harvested, or recovered within 500 miles of the project site, which earned the project an innovation and design credit.

IEQ: Indoor 8/15

WE: Water 4/5 By providing no irrigation system and water-saving fixtures, potable water use was reduced by over 35%.

EA: Energy 2/17 Credit was earned for performing enhanced commissioning, and managing the refrigerants utilized on the job.

The project committed to improved air quality and occupant comfort by monitoring carbon dioxide, implementing an IAQ management plan both during construction and prior to occupancy, providing low-emitting materials, controlling pollutants within the building, and providing lighting and thermal comfort controls.

ID: Innovation 3/5 The project achieved exemplary performance in the use of regional materials and instituted a green housekeeping program for the building, along with numerous team members active on the project being LEED Accredited Professionals.

35%

WATER USE REDUCTION

71%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

52%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

63%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

18%

RECYCLED CONTENT

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.1 / Awarded: August 2008


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

TETC Building Salisbury University SILVER CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY ROBERT CREAMER

SS: Site 10/14

MR: Materials 4/13

A previously developed site, project scored points by meeting development density requirements, providing public transportion access, providing bicycle storage and changing rooms, preferred parking for low-emitting, fuel efficient vehicles, and car/ van pools, maximizing open space, providing stormwater quantity and quality management, and landscaping to reduce heat islands.

The construction manager diverted over 71% of the construction waste away from landfills, over 20% of materials used was manufactured using recycled materials, and over 10% of materials were extracted, harvested, or recovered within 500 miles of the project site.

WE: Water 2/5 By providing water-saving fixtures, potable water use was reduced by over 31%.

EA: Energy 5/17 Credit was earned for optimizing energy performance by 14.8%, performing enhanced commissioning, managing the refrigerants utilized on the job and providing 35% of annual electrical consumption using renewable energy providers.

IEQ: Indoor 8/15 The project committed to improved air quality and occupant comfort by implementing an IAQ management plan prior to occupancy, providing low-emitting materials, controlling pollutants within the building, providing lighting controls, increasing thermal comfort and surveying occupants about thermal issues.

ID: Innovation 4/5 The project instituted a green housekeeping program for the building, implemented a green education program, implemented an integrated pest management system, along with numerous team members active on the project being LEED Accredited Professionals.

15%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

31%

WATER USE REDUCTION

71%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

10%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

20%

RECYCLED CONTENT

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded: September 2009


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Iota Residence Complex Eckerd College CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY CHRIS HILDRETH

SS: Site 9/14

MR: Materials 4/13

A Previously developed site, the project scored points by meeting development density requirements, providing bicycle storage and changing rooms and no new parking, restoring native plantings, maximizing open space, providing storm water quantity and quality management, landscaping to reduce heat islands, and designing to reduce light pollution.

The Construction Manager diverted over 50% of the construction waste away from landfills, over 10% of materials used was manufactured using recycled materials, and over 32% of materials were extracted, harvested, or recovered within 500 miles of the project site, which earned the project an innovation and design credit.

WE: Water 2/5 By providing an efficient irrigation system that uses only captured rainwater and recycled waste water, the project gained 2 points in Water Efficiency.

EA: Energy 2/17 Credit was earned for performing Enhanced Commissioning, and managing the refrigerants utilized on the job.

IEQ: Indoor 8/15 The project committed to improved air quality and occupant comfort by providing increased ventilation, implementing an IAQ management plan during construction, providing lowemitting materials, providing thermal comfort controls to increase thermal comfort, and providing Daylight to 75% of spaces and views to over 90% of the spaces.

50%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

32%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

10%

RECYCLED CONTENT

ID: Innovation 5/5 The project achieve exemplary performance in the use of regional materials, instituted a Green Housekeeping program for the building, implemented a “shared yellow bicycle program,�implemented a green education program, along with numerous team members active on the project being LEED Accredited Professionals.

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded: March 2009


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Biopark Building One University of Maryland Baltimore SILVER CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY CHRIS HILDRETH

SS: Site 8/15

MR: Materials 6/12

Developed in Baltimore, Maryland, Biopark Building One earned credits for its site connectivity and alternative transportation access. The medical office building is situated in an urban area with many community resources within a half-mile radius. The site design manages the quantity of stormwater leaving the site and minimizes the heat island effect.

By using certified woods and local building materials with recycled content, Biopark Building One helped minimize the environmental impacts of construction.  The construction manager also diverted more than 50% of construction wastes from the landfill.

WE: Water 2/5

The design maximizes daylighting of interior spaces and provides views to the exterior to create comfortable and productive work environments.  The project also incorporated the use of low-emitting materials to minimize exposure to indoor air contaminants.

Water efficient landscaping using no potable water in irrigation earned the project two points in this category.

EA: Energy 3/16 The project submeters the tenant spaces, allowing occupants to independently monitor their own energy consumption.  Enhanced refrigerant management and verification of the base building energy systems also adds to this project’s approach to decreasing energy use.

28%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

32%

RECYCLED CONTENT

IEQ: Indoor 7/13

ID: Innovation 3/5 The project team included LEED accredited professionals to help shepherd the project through a successful sustainable design and LEED documentation process.  The team also garnered recognition for exemplary use of recycled and regional materials.

LEED Certification: Core & Shell Pilot / Awarded: June 2007


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Few Evans Hall Emory University GOLD CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY ROBERT CREAMER

SS: Site 11/14

MR: Materials 7/13

Redeveloping a brownfield site for this project as well as building on a dense, well-connected site with access to alternative transportation and providing bicycle storage allowed Few Evans Hall to achieve the majority of LEED’s site credits.  The design also maximizes open space and manages stormwater quantity and quality while minimizing the heat island effect.

Using a combination of materials with recycled content and locally-sourced materials helped the project succeed in this category.  Diverting construction waste from landfills also decreased the project’s environmental impact.  

WE: Water 5/5 The project responds to regional water concerns by using water efficient landscaping, using an innovative wastewater treatment strategy, and reducing water use with efficient fixtures.

IEQ: Indoor 9/15 The project implemented an IAQ management plan during construction and provides increased ventilation during occupancy.  Using low-emitting materials and addressing thermal comfort through design, controls, and post-occupancy verification creates a superior indoor environment for occupants.

22%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

56%

WATER USE REDUCTION

77%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

ID: Innovation 5/5

EA: Energy 5/17 Enhanced commissioning and rightsized systems paired with a design crafted for energy efficiency allows the project to decrease energy costs by 22%.

Few Evans Hall’s innovative sustainability strategies include a sophisticated education and outreach program and a green housekeeping plan.  The design also exceeds water use reduction and wastewater treatment requirements.

LEED Certification: NV Version 2.2 / Awarded: September 2010


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Recreation Fields Building Northern Arizona University SILVER CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY CHRIS HILDRETH

SS: Site 8/14

MR: Materials 6/13

The Recreation Fields Buildings is built on a site with public transportation access and the design provides preferred parking for lowemitting/fuel-efficient vehicles while maximizing open space and controlling stormwater quality.  The project also minimizes its impact on the heat island effect by using highly reflective materials.

The majority of the project’s woodbased building materials were sourced from FSC-certified forests and the design specified many regional materials as well as many materials with high percentages of recycled content.  Construction waste was also diverted from landfills.

WE: Water 5/5

Air contaminants were kept to a minimum in the project by employing an aggressive IAQ management plan both during construction and before occupancy.  Low-emitting adhesives, sealants, paints, and coatings used throughout the project minimize occupant exposure to toxins during occupancy.  Sophisticated lighting and thermal comfort controls provide an adaptable indoor environment while ample daylight and views allow occupants to connect to the outdoors.

Responding to the desert climate, the design reduces resource consumption through water efficient fixtures and water efficient landscaping.   The design notably uses no potable water in sewage conveyance.

EA: Energy 4/17 The project uses no refrigerants and is designed to reduce energy use.

IEQ: Indoor 8/15

26%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

66%

WATER USE REDUCTION

84%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

35%

RECYCLED CONTENT

42%

ID: Innovation 5/5

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

Exceeding benchmarks for sourcing regional materials, minimizing heat islands, managing waste water, and reducing water consumption are hallmarks of this project’s sustainability strategies.  The project team also included a LEED accredited professional.

70%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded: September 2010


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Thames Street Wharf Office Building Harbor Point Development GOLD CERTIFIED IMAGE BY CHRIS HILDRETH

SS: Site 7/15

MR: Materials 6/12

A previously developed brownfield site, the project met development density requirements and provides public transportation access, while minimizing parking capacity.  An Energy Star-rated roof minimizes heat islands and the lighting scheme reduces light pollution. Tenants are also given design and construction guidelines.

The construction manager minimized construction’s impact by diverting most of the construction waste from landfills.  The design specified many recycled materials as well as many products and materials extracted, harvested, or recovered within 500 miles of the project site.

WE: Water 2/5

The project committed to improved air quality and occupant comfort by monitoring carbon dioxide levels, increasing ventilation, implementing an IAQ management plan during construction and using low-emitting materials.  Providing thermal comfort controls as well as daylight and views to most of the regularly occupied spaces creates a healthful indoor environment.

IEQ: Indoor 7/13

Using water-saving fixtures decreased potable water use by 42%, allowing the project to earn an innovation point for surpassing current water use reduction benchmarks.  In addition, the landscape design requires no irrigation system.

EA: Energy 3/16 Credit was earned by optimizing energy performance and purchasing green power.

ID: Innovation 3/5 The project achieved exemplary performance in water use reduction and committed to green operations including a green planning plan, a green power purchasing agreement, and an integrated pest management plan.  In addition, numerous LEED Accredited Professional were a part of the design team.

22%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

42%

REDUCTION IN WATER USE

94%

SPACES WITH ACCESS TO VIEWS

90%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

18%

RECYCLED CONTENT

20%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

LEED Certification: Core & Shell Version 2.2 / Awarded: March 2011


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Carey School of Business Johns Hopkins University SILVER CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY ROBERT CREAMER

SS: Site 17/21

MR: Materials 3/14

Developed in the dense, urban environment of Baltimore, Maryland, Carey School of Business has access to many community amenities in a half-mile walking radius as well as a variety of public transportation options.

The construction manager minimized construction’s environmental impact by diverting 70% of construction wastes from landfills.  The project also uses materials with recycled content.

WE: Water 11/11 Water-efficient fixtures throughout the design decrease potable water consumption.

Managing indoor air quality during construction and using low-emitting materials throughout the project creates a healthy indoor environment for occupants.

EA: Energy 14/23

ID: Innovation 2/6

High-efficiency lighting paired with Energy Star-rated equipment and sophisticated lighting controls allow the project to decrease energy use.  Carey School of Business additionally includes sub-metering equipment that lets tenants independently monitor their energy use.  The owner also committed to a green power purchasing plan.

In addition to an exemplary performance point in water use reduction, Carey School of Business included LEED Accredited Professionals on the design team.

IEQ: Indoor 5/17

15%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

55%

WATER USE REDUCTION

82%

ENERGY STAR-RATED EQUIPMENT

70%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

20%

RECYCLED CONTENT

LEED Certification: Commercial Interiors / Awarded: April 2012


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Alderman Road Housing University of Virginia SILVER CERTIFIED

IMAGE BY CHRIS HILDRETH

SS: Site 8/14

MR: Materials 5/13

Alderman Road Housing earned site credits for developing a brownfield in a dense, well-connected community.  The site has access to public transportation and the design provides no new parking, maximizes open space, manages the quality of storm water, and minimizes hardscape impacts on the heat island effect.

The project earned points in the materials category by diverting construction waste from landfills, using materials with recycled content, and using regional materials.

WE: Water 4/5 Designing water efficient landscaping and reducing water consumption inside the building allowed the project to earn four of the five water points.

EA: Energy 4/17 A sophisticated design supplemented by enhanced commissioning of the building’s energy systems and enhanced refrigerant management help Alderman Road Housing use less energy in operations.

IEQ: Indoor 10/15 The project provides a superior indoor environment for occupants by using low-emitting adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, carpet systems, composite wood, and agrifiber products.  Controllable light and thermal systems that were verified in a post-occupancy study as well as an indoor air quality management plan that was implemented during construction add to the building’s performance.

15%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

37%

WATER USE REDUCTION

14%

RECYCLED CONTENT

25%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

ID: Innovation 5/5 The project exceeds open space requirements and includes a green cleaning plan, a green building education program, and a campus-wide recycling program.  A LEED accredited professional was also a member of the team.

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded: January 2012


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Oxford Road Building Emory University GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 10/14

MR: Materials 7/13

Developed on the edge of Emory University’s campus, Oxford Road addresses site sustainability concerns by managing storm water quantity and quality and mitigating heat island impacts. The project is designed to maximize open space and provides users walkable access to community amenities and public transportation. The site also provides storage, changing, and shower infrastructure for bicyclists.

This project uses many regionally produced products and materials with high percentages of recycled content. In addition, FSC certified woods were used for more than half the wood-based building materials in the project. The majority of construction waste was diverted from landfills.

WE: Water 4/5 Capturing onsite rainwater to fuel high-efficiency landscape irrigation systems successfully reduces this project’s water use. Inside the building, dual flush toilets and lowflow faucets also contribute to water efficiency.

IEQ: Indoor 8/15 Oxford Road minimizes indoor air pollutants by using low-emitting adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, and carpet systems. Individualized lighting controls and verifying thermal comfort with buildings users postoccupancy ensure users experience a high-quality indoor environment.

ID: Innovation 5/5

EA: Energy 5/17 Energy use is minimized at Oxford Road through a high-performance building envelope that includes high efficiency glazing, reduced interior lighting power density, and occupancy sensors.

Exemplary performance in water use reduction, construction waste management, and mitigating the heat island effect from non-roof sources showcase this project’s sustainability innovations. The project also employs a green housekeeping program.

26%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

46%

WATER USE REDUCTION

96%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

27%

RECYCLED CONTENT

38%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

56%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded: April 2013


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Longstreet-Means Residence Hall Emory University GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 10/14

MR: Materials 7/13

Longstreet Means Hall addresses transportation by providing bicycle storage and changing rooms and integrating into a walkable urban context that provides community services and walkable access to public transportation. The project manages both its storm water quantity and quality and mitigates its heat island effect with highly reflective materials and open grid pavement.

The project was successful in this category by using recycled and regional materials as well as FSC certified wood. The contractor also diverted most construction waste from landfills.

WE: Water 5/5 Water is of special concern in Atlanta so it was a priority for this project to earn all available points in LEED’s Water Efficiency credit category. The project not only uses water efficient landscaping and reduces indoor water use, but also uses no potable water to convey sewage through the plumbing system.

EA: Energy 3/17 To improve energy efficiency, Longstreet Means Hall employs an improved thermal envelope, efficient interior lighting paired with occupancy sensors, and variable air volume air handling units. Energy systems were commissioned to ensure proper performance post-occupancy.

IEQ: Indoor 11/15

19%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

48%

REDUCTION IN WATER USE

An indoor air quality management plan that included both construction and pre-occupancy procedures helped this project achieve points. Specified products and materials minimized indoor air’s concentrations of volatile organic compounds. The project team also designed a controllable thermal system and verified its effectiveness with buildings users after occupancy.

93%

ID: Innovation 5/5

RECYCLED CONTENT

The project’s exemplary performance in achieving its water efficiency goals earned the project two points in design innovations. The project also implemented a public education program and green housekeeping practices.

34%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

31%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

85%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded : August 2012


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Health Sciences Building Howard Community College GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 21/26

MR: Materials 7/14

Located in Howard County, Maryland, the Health Sciences Building is located near community amenities and dense residential areas. Public transportation serving the site and preferred parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles encourage alternative means of transit to the college campus. Maximized open space preserves the site character and manages the quality of stormwater runoff.

The project manages its waste stream by diverting construction waste from landfills and using recycled, regionally sourced materials wherever practicable. Certified woods used in the project ensure future generations will be able to access forestry products.

WE: Water 6/10 Indoor potable water use is reduced through the use of low-flow toilets, urinals, bathroom faucets, showers, and kitchen sinks. Water efficient landscaping systems outside the building further reduce potable water use.

EA: Energy 13/35 Efficient HVAC equipment and a superior building envelope allow the project to minimize energy use which is offset by green power purchases. Commissioning the building systems ensures they operate according to the owner’s requirements and tune equipment performance.

IEQ: Indoor 11/14 High quality indoor air is provided by managing air quality during construction and before occupancy, monitoring outdoor air delivery, and using low-emitting materials. Controllability of lighting and thermal comfort systems allow building occupants to adjust indoor conditions to their unique needs.

24%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

44%

WATER USE REDUCTION

67% SITE OPEN SPACE PRESERVED

ID: Innovation 5/6 The Health Sciences Building’s exemplary achievement in preserving open space and energy performance earned the project two innovation points.

RP: Regional Priority 2/4 Addressing the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area’s major challenges with transportation and stormwater management earned this project two regional priority credits.

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Anticipated : Fall 2013


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Hamilton Holmes Hall Emory University GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 21/26

MR: Materials 5/14

Hamilton Holmes Hall is located on Emory University’s Atlanta, Georgia campus with access to many community amenities and public transportation. The project provides bicycle storage and changing rooms and minimizes parking to encourage alternate transportation. The site also maximizes open space, manages storm-water quality and quantity and mitigates the heat island effect.

The environmental impacts of construction were minimized by recycling most construction wastes. Products installed in the project include significant percentages of recycled content and most of the project’s wood-based building materials are FSC certified.

IEQ: Indoor 12/15

WE: Water 8/10 Efficient landscape irrigation reduces potable water use for irrigation by 54%. Low-flow fixtures throughout the building minimize water consumption and reduce the amount of potable water used for sewage conveyance.

EA: Energy 6/35 Efficient HVAC and lighting systems and a high-performance building envelope help this project minimize energy use. Comprehensive commissioning of the building systems ensure the owner’s requirements were met. During operation, whole-building energy and water data will be shared through the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

Low-emitting materials and products were installed during construction and outdoor air delivery is monitored during occupancy. The thermal comfort system provides occupants a high level of individual control.

ID: Innovation 5/6 The design achieved exemplary performance credits for innovative wastewater technologies, water use reduction, and a reduction in the heat island effect. Students learn about the sustainable features of their residence hall via an educational outreach program.

19%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

42%

WATER USE REDUCTION

79%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

23%

RECYCLED CONTENT

87%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

RP: Regional Priority 4/4 Because of Atlanta’s unique regional sustainability issues, the project earned additional credits for addressing issues of public transportation access, stormwater management, water use, and thermal comfort design issues.

LEED Certification: LEED NC v2009 / Awarded: July 2013


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

O’Brien Hall University of Rochester GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 24/26 To encourage alternate transportation, the project is sited in a well-connected community with access to public transportation. O’Brien Hall also provides bicycle storage and changing rooms as well as preferred parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles. The site design maximizes open space and mitigates the heat island effect.

WE: Water 8/10 Native landscaping minimizes the need for permanent irrigation and lowflow fixtures throughout the interior minimize water use.

EA: Energy 10/35 A high-performance building envelope and high-efficiency LED lighting help the project minimize energy use. Refrigerants selected for the HVAC equipment minimize ozone depletion and global warming potential.

MR: Materials 6/14 During construction, debris was diverted from landfills and many of the products used to build the project included recycled content or were regionally sourced.

IEQ: Indoor 8/15 To ensure low-levels of indoor air contaminants, air quality management began during construction. Lowemitting adhesives, sealants, paints, and coatings are installed throughout and indoor chemical and pollutant sources are controlled. Lighting and thermal systems offer control for individual preferences and most spaces include views to the exterior.

26%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

53%

REDUCTION IN WATER USE

92%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

32%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

ID: Innovation 5/6 This project earned exemplary performance credits for pollutant source control, water use reduction, and including products with recycled content. The lighting design minimized mercury in lamps and the project team included a LEED Accredited Professional.

LEED Certification: LEED NC v2009 / Awarded : March 2013


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Education Center Smithsonian Institution and George Mason University GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 7/14

MR: Materials 6/13

Developed on a brownfield site in Front Royal, Virginia, this project provides no new parking. The site design strategy restores habitat for native species and maximizes open space while the installed hardscape materials are highly reflective or open grid to mitigate the heat island effect.

Most construction wastes were diverted from the landfill and many of the products used in new construction were locally sourced or included recycled content.

WE: Water 4/5 High efficiency water closets and urinals and low-flow lavatory faucets and kitchen sinks minimize indoor water use. No permanent irrigation system was provided for the native landscaping.

EA: Energy 8/17 An effective building envelope, reduced interior and exterior lighting power, and geothermal energy for space heating and cooling help the education center decrease its fossil fuel use. Enhanced commissioning ensures that the building systems meet the owner’s requirements and enhanced refrigerant management decreases the project’s global warming and ozone depletion potential. The project sources its energy from green power sources.

IEQ: Indoor 10/15 Indoor air quality was managed during construction and before occupancy. To further ensure the quality of indoor air, low emitting adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, carpet systems, and composite wood products were installed throughout. During design, controllable lighting and thermal comfort systems were provided for building users. After occupancy, these users were surveyed to verify appropriate performance of these systems.

ID: Innovation 5/5 Careful design consideration earned the project exemplary performance credits in maximizing open space, minimizing the heat island effect, and reducing water use. During operation, the building will also use green housekeeping techniques.

26%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

41%

WATER USE REDUCTION

86%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

20%

RECYCLED CONTENT

25%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded : August 2013


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Shannon House University of Virginia, UVA GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 18/26

MR: Materials 6/14

Located at the University of Virginia, Shannon House is well connected to the campus community and provides residents walkable access to many community services. The site is within one quarter mile of six bus lines, encouraging visitors to use public transportation. The site is also designed to maximize open space and control the quality of stormwater runoff.

Products selected for Shannon House prioritized recycled and regional materials and during construction the vast majority of construction waste was diverted from landfills. FSC certified wood products were used for much of the project’s wood-based building materials.

WE: Water 8/10 To conserve water outside the building, no permanent irrigation system was provided for landscaping. Low-flow fixtures inside the building minimize water consumption.

EA: Energy 10/35 Efficient equipment, lighting, and a high-performance building envelope help Shannon House converse energy. The building systems were commissioned as part of an intensive process to insure compliance with the owner’s performance requirements and refrigerants that could contribute to ozone depletion have been minimized.

IEQ: Indoor 10/15 Low-emitting materials and products were installed during construction. Any remaining construction contaminants were removed via filtration. Occupancy sensors measure indoor air quality and occupants have individual control over the indoor temperature for various spaces.

ID: Innovation 6/6 Shannon House earned exemplary performance credits for maximizing open space, minimizing water use, and providing access to public transportation. The project also implemented a comprehensive waste management strategy for occupancy and a public education component.

RP: Regional Priority 3/4 Addressing site selection, parking capacity, and water efficiency issues that are critical to the University of Virginia’s regional sustainability challenges allowed this project to successfully earn four credits in this category.

23%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

45%

WATER USE REDUCTION

89%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

14%

RECYCLED CONTENT

22%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

71%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

LEED Certification: LEED NC v2009 / Awarded : October 2013


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Undergraduate Academic Center Texas State University SILVER CERTIFIED

SS: Site 10/14

MR: Materials 7/13

Well-connected to community amenities and public transportation in San Marcos, Texas, the Undergraduate Academic Center provides no new parking and maximizes open space while managing stormwater quantity and quality. The design mitigates the heat island effect by using highly reflective roof and hardscape materials.

Most debris was diverted from landfills during construction and where possible project materials were locally sourced or included recycled content. Forest Stewardship Council certified wood was used for the majority of the project’s wood products.

WE: Water 3/5 The landscaping irrigation system uses only captured rainwater to minimize water use. Low-flow water closets, urinal, lavatory faucets, showers, and sinks decrease water use inside the buildings.

EA: Energy 4/17 To optimize energy performance, the project employs an improved thermal envelope, reduced interior lighting power density, and district heating and cooling strategies. The energy systems were commissioned to ensure compliance with the owner’s project requirements and refrigerants have been chosen to minimize contributions to ozone depletion and global warming.

IEQ: Indoor 8/15 Indoor air quality management began during construction. The installation of low-emitting adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, and carpet systems means fewer VOCs will off-gas into the indoor environment during occupancy. The lighting system allows many occupants to adjust lighting to suit their individual needs and a thermal comfort survey was administered to ensure the building’s design provides appropriate temperature control to users.

ID: Innovation 4/5 The project earned exemplary performance for maximizing space, and achieved the pilot credit for walkable streets. In addition, the project team included a LEED Accredited Professional and the lighting design minimizes the need for mercury in lamps.

30%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

31%

WATER USE REDUCTION

87%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

21%

RECYCLED CONTENT

29%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

56%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

LEED Certification: LEED NC v2009 / Awarded : December 2013


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

DC Office Ayers Saint Gross GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 19/21

IEQ: Indoor 13/17

Located within a LEED-certified Core and Shell project, the tenant fit out of Ayers Saint Gross’ Washington, DC office benefits from alternative transportation options such as Metro bus and Metro rail. The building also has bicycle storage and changing rooms.

Featuring floor-to-ceiling glass, this beautifully day lit space provides views to the exterior from nearly all occupied spaces. Indoor air quality was managed during construction via appropriate air filtration. Air quality testing was completed prior to occupancy and low-emitting materials are installed throughout.

WE: Water 6/11 In addition to the low-flow office kitchen faucet, this tenant fit-out takes advantage of efficient lavatories and water closets in the base building.

EA: Energy 12/37 Efficient light fixtures and ENERGY STAR-rated equipment help the project conserve energy. The office has also signed an off-site renewable energy purchase agreement to ensure that clean power is used during occupancy.

MR: Materials 4/14 The contractor diverted over 96% of construction waste from landfill. Ayers Saint Gross also has a long-term lease agreement to this space and reused a significant percentage of existing furniture and furnishings from the previous office space.

ID: Innovation 5/6 Selecting a site that provides exemplary public transportation opportunities earned this project an innovation credit. The project has also implemented a public outreach program to share its sustainability story with the public and the team included multiple LEED Accredited Professionals.

31%

REDUCTION IN WATER USE

47%

REDUCTION IN LIGHTING POWER DENSITY

96%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

31%

MATERIALS REUSED

RP: Regional Priority 2/4 Controllable lighting systems and well-designed thermal comfort systems earned this project two regional priority credits.

LEED Certification: LEED-CI v2009 / Awarded : January 2014


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington The Mount Vernon Ladies Association

GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 8/14

MR: Materials 4/13

Developed near the Mount Vernon Estate to facilitate scholarship about George Washington, Colonial America, and the Revolutionary Era, this project’s site design restores habitat using native plant species. On-site bioretention basins prevent downstream erosion, reduce postdevelopment storm water runoff, and remove suspended solids before returning storm water to natural waterways. The site is accessible by public transportation and provides dedicated spaces for carpools and fuel efficient vehicles.

The project used many regional materials to decrease the embodied energy in transiting goods to the construction site and most construction wastes were diverted from landfills.

IEQ: Indoor 11/15

The design reduced potable water consumption for irrigation systems and specified low-flow fixtures.

Given the historically significant contents of the building, managing indoor air quality and lighting were significant for this project. Indoor air quality management began during construction and continues through occupancy via outdoor air delivery monitoring. Low-emitting materials were used throughout the project and most regularly occupied spaces have access to daylight and views as well as individualized lighting controls to allow occupants to control their environment.

EA: Energy 10/17

ID: Innovation 5/5

The building optimizes energy use via an improved thermal envelope, high efficiency glazing, reduced interior lighting power density, occupancy and daylight sensors, energy recovery technologies, and commissioned building systems. The client also purchased renewable energy certificates to off-set 70% of the building’s electrical energy use.

The project earned credits in this category for exemplary water efficiency as well as innovative strategies for managing landscape pests, erosion, and landscape elements. Establishing strict standards for Tree Preservation on site contributed to exemplary open space preservation while reflecting the arboricultural efforts of “George Washington - the landowner and farmer.”

WE: Water 3/5

35%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

41%

WATER USE REDUCTION

80%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

21%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

80%

SPACES WITH ACCESS TO DAYLIGHT

91%

SPACES WITH ACCESS TO VIEWS

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded : March 2014


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

John and Frances Angelos Law Center University of Baltimore PLATINUM CERTIFIED

SS: Site 10/14

MR: Materials 7/13

This project’s dense urban location is well-connected to city services and public transportation while the site design maximizes open space and controls the quantity of storm water runoff while mitigating the heat island effect using multi-level green roofs.

Diverting construction waste from landfills and using recycled and regional materials minimize the impact of this project’s construction. Additionally, over 80% of the wood based building materials are FSC certified wood products.

WE: Water 5/5

IEQ: Indoor 13/15

Low-flow fixtures and waterless urinals significantly reduce potable water use. Coupled with rainwater reuse for flushing water closets and urinals, potable water use was also minimized for sewage conveyance. The landscape design requires no permanent irrigation system.

Indoor air quality is maintained via outdoor air delivery monitoring, increased ventilation, pollutant source control, and the use of low-emitting materials. The controllability of thermal comfort and lighting systems allow occupants to adjust indoor conditions while views in the majority of spaces allow users to connect to the city.

EA: Energy 14/17 An innovative building envelope, highefficiency equipment, and daylighting allow this project to minimize energy consumption and gain all of LEED’s available points for optimizing energy performance. The project used enhanced commissioning to assure this high level of performance can be maintained during occupancy and HVAC refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming are minimized.

ID: Innovation 5/5 The project is innovative because of its exemplary performance in water use reduction and public transportation access. A green cleaning program to be implemented during occupancy also demonstrates the client’s ongoing sustainability commitment.

43%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

57%

WATER USE REDUCTION

43%

STORMWATER RUNOFF REDUCTION

77%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

46%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

96%

SPACES WITH ACCESS TO VIEWS

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded: March 2014


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Bressler Building 7th Floor Renovation University of Maryland - Baltimore SILVER CERTIFIED

SS: Site 14/21

IEQ: Indoor 10/17

This research lab renovation reconfigures existing lab space in a dense, well-connected downtown neighborhood to meet evolving needs. The site is accessible by public transportation and has no dedicated parking.

To preserve the quality of the lab spaces, indoor air quality management began during construction and included installation of many low-emitting materials. The space has increased ventilation and outdoor air delivery is monitored during occupancy. Individualized lighting controls allow researchers to meet the unique needs of their work.

WE: Water 8/11 Low flow fixtures reduce potable water consumption in this facility.

EA: Energy 11/37 Minimizing lighting power density helps this project achieve energy efficiency while commissioning building systems for these labs ensure that the owner’s program requirements are met during occupancy. The owner has signed a green power purchase agreement to provide the spaces with clean energy.

ID: Innovation 4/6 Because of this space’s use as a research lab, the project pursued an innovation credit in fume hood commissioning as these systems are a significant impact on the project’s energy use and have particular owner’s requirements. The project also provides exemplary access to public transportation and diverted an extraordinary amount of construction waste.

RP: Regional Priority 2/4

MR: Materials 8/14 Installed materials prioritized the use of regional materials, Forest Stewardship Council certified wood, and materials that include significant recycled content. Ninety-six percent of construction wastes generated were diverted from landfills.

This project earned regional priority credits for controllable lighting systems and thermal comfort design.

15%

REDUCTION IN LIGHTING POWER DENSITY

35%

WATER USE REDUCTION

96%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

26%

RECYCLED CONTENT

93%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

22%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

LEED Certification: LEED-CI v2009 / Awarded: May 2014


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Milken School of Public Health George Washington University PLATINUM CERTIFIED

SS: Site 25/26

MR: Materials 4/14

This project takes advantage of its urban location by connecting to community services by public transportation and providing bicycle storage and changing rooms. The site design manages storm water quality and quantity, maximizes open space, and provides no new parking. Roofing includes both highly reflective materials and green roof areas to mitigate the urban heat island effect.

During construction most of the construction wastes were diverted from landfill. In addition, products and materials using regional and recycled content were prioritized for installation.

WE: Water 10/10 Landscaping for this site requires no permanent irrigation system. Potable water use for sewage conveyance has been reduced by 141% through the use of low-flow fixtures and a rainwater collection system used for toilet flushing.

EA: Energy 24/35 The project optimizes energy performance via a thermally resistant building envelope and efficient, commissioned mechanical systems. Refrigerants specified for the project minimize contributions to ozone depletion and climate change and the owner has signed a green power purchase agreement to serve most of the building’s energy needs from renewable sources.

IEQ: Indoor 12/15 Indoor air quality began being managed during construction. Low-emitting materials were installed throughout the project and outdoor air delivery is monitored during occupancy. Individualized controls for lighting and thermal comfort allow building users to customize the building to their unique needs.

ID: Innovation 6/6 This project earned innovation credits for providing exemplary access to public transportation, maximizing open space, and treating wastewater. The project also implemented a public education program and green housekeeping strategies.

47%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

40%

REDUCTION IN WATER USE

85%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

20%

RECYCLED CONTENT

21%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

RP: Regional Priority 4/4 By addressing habitat restoration, storm water quantity management, wastewater management, and energy optimization, this project earned four regional priority credits.

LEED Certification: LEED NC v2009 / Awarded : June 2014


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

College of Business and Economics Radford University GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 8/14

MR: Materials 4/13

Located in Radford, Virginia, the project provides pedestrian access to at least ten basic services and public transportation. The site design includes more square feet of dedicated open space that the building footprint and 6% of available parking is signed for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles. The project scope also included asbestos abatement.

The contractor diverted most wastes from landfill to minimize the negative impacts of construction while product selections favored regional materials and FSC-certified woods.

IEQ: Indoor 11/15

No permanent irrigation system was installed and indoor potable water use consumption was reduced through water-efficient fixtures.

Occupants benefit from controllable lighting and thermal comfort systems that allow individualized control. The project also provides good indoor air quality thanks to an IAQ Managemet Plan during contruction, a flush-out prior to occupancy, installation of lowemitting materials, and CO2 monitoring during occupancy.

EA: Energy 9/17

ID: Innovation 5/5

The project’s energy saving strategies include a high performance building envelope, reduced interior lighting power density, occupancy sensors, energy recovery units, demand control ventilation, and heat recovery chillers. The project also selected refrigerants that will minimize or eliminate compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming.

The project’s exemplary performance in reducing potable water use and maximizing open space earned credits in this category. A green housekeeping plan is also in place to maintain the building.

WE: Water 4/5

27%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

42%

WATER USE REDUCTION

82%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

70%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

26%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

LEED Certification: NC Version 2.2 / Awarded : August 2014


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Jefferson Suites University of North Carolina Greensboro SILVER CERTIFIED

SS: Site 15/26

MR: Materials 6/14

Sited on a previously developed parcel, Jefferson Suites provides access to community services and public transportation. No new parking is provided as part of the development and highly reflective roofing materials minimize the heat island effect.

The project favored regional materials as well as those with recycled content. The contractor diverted most construction wastes from landfill to minimize the negative environmental impacts of development.

IEQ: Indoor 9/15

WE: Water 6/10 No permanent irrigation system serves the landscaping and low-flow fixtures decrease the project’s potable water demands.

EA: Energy 13/35 The project’s high performance building envelope, reduced interior and exterior lighting power density, occupancy sensors, high efficiency chillers and condensing boilers, energy recovery systems, split systems, and VAV air-handlers help the project realize energy savings. The commissioning process and refrigerant management enhance the project’s performance which has a robust measurement and verification plan.

The project has a healthful indoor air quality thanks to an air quality management plan that started during construction. Low-emitting materials were installed throughout and walkoff mats limit the number of particulates tracked in fro outdoors. Increased ventilation rates also preserve high indoor air quality. Controllable lighting and thermal comfort systems allow occupants individualized control.

ID: Innovation 3/6 Beyond providing exemplary access to public transportation, the project team included LEED Accredited Professionals on the design team and uses a green cleaning policy in operation.

22%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

34%

WATER USE REDUCTION

87%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

38%

RECYCLED CONTENT

65%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

RP: Regional Priority 3/3 This project responds to regional concerns by providing transportation access and managing its construction wastes. The project also meets ASHRAE Standard 55 – 2004 for thermal comfort.

LEED Certification: LEED 2009 / Awarded : December 2012


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Eleonore Raoul Hall Emory University GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 19/26

MR: Materials 7/14

This project benefits from an urban setting with walkable access to at least 10 basic services and public transportation and provides bicycle storage and changing facilities. Landscaping strategies manage stormwater quantity and quality. All of the parking associated with this project is located beneath a green roof which also mitigates the heat island effect.

An incredible 97% of construction wastes were diverted from landfill. The project also preferred products with recycled content, regional materials, and FSC-certified wood.

IEQ: Indoor 11/15

The irrigation system for this project reduces water use by 26.22% compared to a baseline irrigation system. Indoor water use also reduces potable water consumption through low-flow fixtures.

The indoor environment has high air quality thanks to an IAQ Management Plan during construction, installation of low-emitting materials, and CO2 monitoring during occupancy. The project’s walkoff mats also keep particulates from being tracked in by building visitors and service areas are exhausted from the building. A robust thermal comfort system and access to views also contribute to a quality indoor environment.

EA: Energy 9/35

ID: Innovation 5/6

Energy savings are realized by an improved thermal envelope, high efficiency glazing, reduced interior lighting power density, occupancy sensors, reduced water usage, and a district energy system. The project also uses no CFC-based refrigerants and is committed to sharing whole-building energy and water use data through ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager.

The project’s innovative strategies for potable water use reduction and mitigating the heat island effect earned the project innovation credits.

WE: Water 8/10

RP: Regional Priority 4/4 Located in Atlanta, Georgia, this project responds to regional concerns for public transportation access, stormwater quantity control, potable water use reduction, and thermal comfort in indoor environments.

22%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

44%

WATER USE REDUCTION

97%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

23%

RECYCLED CONTENT

28%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

97%

SPACES WITH ACCESS TO DAYLIGHT

LEED Certification: LEED 2009 / Awarded : January 2015


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Maryland House Travel Plaza Maryland State Highway Dept. SILVER CERTIFIED

SS: Site 10/26

MR: Materials 6/14

This redevelopment of an existing travel plaza on I-95 provided ample opportunity to green a car-centric site. The project provides more square feet of vegetated open space than the building footprint and uses landscape features to improve stormwater quality and minimize stormwater runoff. High SRI roofing materials minimize the heat island effect.

Project construction favored recycled and regional materials in addition to FSC-certified wood. The contractor also diverted most construction wastes from landfill.

WE: Water 8/10 The project provides efficient restroom facilities to travelers using lowflow fixtures and metered faucets. Additionally, the landscaping requires no permanently installed irrigation system.

EA: Energy 12/35 The design and construction included a robust commissioning process to ensure the efficient systems used to control indoor temperature and humidity would meet the owner’s requirements. This equipment conserves energy and is monitored by sensors to ensure optimal performance during occupancy. The project’s energy needs are served by green power.

IEQ: Indoor 10/15 The construction process managed indoor contaminants throughout construction by following an Indoor Air Quality Management Plan and using low-emitting materials throughout. Most of the regularly occupied spaces have access to daylight and views.

ID: Innovation 6/6 The travel plaza operations and maintenance team is committed to maintaining the building with environmentally preferable housekeeping products and education the millions of visitors to the project each year.

26%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

40%

WATER USE REDUCTION

80%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

25%

RECYCLED CONTENT

23%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

84%

SPACES WITH ACCESS TO DAYLIGHT

LEED Certification: LEED 2009 / Awarded : July 2015


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Chesapeake House Travel Plaza Maryland State Highway Dept. SILVER CERTIFIED

SS: Site 7/26

MR: Materials 5/14

Redeveloping this contaminated site into the Chesapeake House Travel Plaza provided the opportunity to manage stormwater quantity and quality on a dominantly car-centric project. This site maximizes open space and uses high SRI roofing materials minimize the heat island effect.

Construction included FSC-certified wood, regional, and recycled materials. The contractor diverted most construction wastes from landfills to minimize the negative environmental impacts of construction.

IEQ: Indoor 13/15

The project serves travelers’ restroom needs using low-flow fixtures and metered faucets. The landscaping requires no irrigation system.

Access to daylight and views in regularly occupied spaces coupled with controllable lighting systems and low-emitting materials create a high performance indoor environment for the project’s staff and millions of annual visitors to the project.

EA: Energy 13/35

ID: Innovation 5/6

The project saves energy using efficient HVAC systems and a high performance thermal envelope and uses non CFC-based refrigerants to minimize o-zone depletion and greenhouse gas potential. Project energy needs are served by green power.

The travel plaza operations and maintenance team uses environmentally preferable housekeeping products and educate occupants and visitors with permanently installed signage that highlight the building’s green features.

WE: Water 8/10

27%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

45%

WATER USE REDUCTION

76%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

20%

RECYCLED CONTENT

82%

SPACES WITH ACCESS TO DAYLIGHT

90%

SPACES WITH ACCESS TO VIEWS

LEED Certification: LEED 2009 / Awarded : May 2015


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

School of Nursing Addition Duke University SILVER CERTIFIED

SS: Site 19/26

MR: Materials 6/14

This addition to the Duke University School of Nursing provided additional academic spaces for a growing program in a well-connected community that provides at least 10 basic services within a ½ mile walking radius. The project also has access to public transportation and provides facilities for bicycle storage and changing. The site design controls both the quality and quantity of stormwater runoff and the roofing materials mitigate the heat island effect.

The project favored regional materials as well as those with recycled content. Most construction wastes were also diverted from landfills.

WE: Water 7/10 The project conserves water through low-flow fixtures and uses no permanent irrigation system to maintain landscaping.

IEQ: Indoor 10/15 To provide good indoor air quality, the project employed an IAQ Management Plan during construction that included a full building flushout before occupancy. Low-emitting materials were installed throughout and the project also includes CO2 sensors to monitor the outdoor air supply to maintain a quality indoor environment during occupancy.

ID: Innovation 4/6

EA: Energy 5/35 No CFC-based refrigerants were used in the project’s efficient HVAC systems. Coupled with the project’s high performance building envelope, the project uses 13% less energy than baseline. The project uses green power to meet its energy consumption needs.

Exemplary use of green power and access to public transportation earned this project innovation credits. The project also employs a green cleaning program and included multiple LEED APs on the project team.

39%

WATER USE REDUCTION

76%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

33%

REGIONAL MATERIALS USED

27%

RECYCLED CONTENT

RP: Regional Priority 3/4 The project achieved three of four possible regional priority credits by addressing local needs to develop along transportation corridors, manage stormwater quantities, and provide good thermal comfort in indoor environments.

LEED Certification: LEED 2009 / Awarded : January 2015


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Lile-Maupin and TuttleDunnington Houses University of Virginia SILVER CERTIFIED

SS: Site 18/26

MR: Materials 5/14

Located in Charlottesville, Virginia these residence halls are located in a walkable community with access to public transportation. The project provides no new parking but provides vegetated green space greater than the footprint of the building. The site design also manages stormwater quality and 76% of hardscape surfaces have an SRI greater than 29.

The project used products with recycled content and regional materials in addition to diverting most of its construction wastes from landfill. The project also used FSC-certified woods.

WE: Water 8/10 Water efficient fixtures reduce potable water use in this project by 46%. The supporting landscape includes no permanent irrigation system.

EA: Energy 6/35 An improved thermal envelope, high efficiency glazing, reduced interior lighting power density, occupancy sensors, and energy recovery ventilation help this project save energy. No CFC-based refrigerants are used in cooling equipment or fire suppression systems.

15%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

46%

WATER USE REDUCTION

IEQ: Indoor 10/15 The project managed air quality by using an IAQ Management Plan during construction, installing low-emitting materials, and using CO2 monitors. Controllable lighting and thermal comfort systems further personalize occupant comfort. Over 90% of regularly occupied spaces have access to exterior views.

ID: Innovation 6/6 In addition to exemplary achievement in maximizing open space, reducing water use, and providing public transportation access, the project notably includes a waste management plan for occupancy that will divert over 40% of wastes from landfill. The project also will educate occupants and the public about its green features.

85%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

12%

RECYCLED CONTENT

18%

REGIONAL MATERIALS

69%

FSC CERTIFIED WOOD

RP: Regional Priority 3/4 The project responds to regional concerns to develop on previously developed lands, minimize parking, and decrease potable water use for irrigation.

LEED Certification: LEED 2009 / Awarded : June 2014


LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

Center for Communications and Information Technology Frostburg State University GOLD CERTIFIED

SS: Site 11/14

MR: Materials 6/13

The CCIT benefits from a well-connected campus environment that provides access to at least 10 basic services and public transportation. On-site bicycle storage spaces and changing facilities as well as preferred parking for low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehicles and carpools promote alternative modes of transportation. The site design maximizes vegetated open space and manages stormwater quality while hardscape and roofing material selections minimize the heat island effect.

The contractor diverted most construction wastes from landfill to minimize construction’s environmental impacts. Specifications also favored products with recycled content and regional sourcing.

WE: Water 4/5 Potable water demands are minimized via low-flow fixtures throughout the project and no permanent irrigation system to support landscaping.

EA: Energy 8/17 The project employs energy-efficiency measures such as a high performance building envelope, reduced interior lighting power density, and a high efficiency condensing boiler to realize energy savings. Refrigerants were selected that minimize the potential for ozone depletion and global warming.

IEQ: Indoor 11/15 Individualized controls for lighting and thermal comfort provide occupants the opportunity to adjust the indoor environment to their unique needs. Low-emitting materials were installed throughout to ensure good indoor air quality and outdoor air delivery is monitored.

ID: Innovation 2/5 The project’s exemplary minimization of potable water use and inclusion of a LEED Accredited Professional earned the project innovation points.

29%

ENERGY USE REDUCTION

42%

WATER USE REDUCTION

86%

CONSTRUCTION WASTE DIVERTED

25%

RECYCLED CONTENT

21%

REGIONAL MATERIALS

LEED Certification: LEED 2009 / Awarded : August 2015


Sustainable Design Solutions