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Newsletter

ISSN 1821-6064

Newsletter of the Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro Tanzania

Volume 1, Issue Number 1: June 2013

Sokoine University of Agriculture. Reaching OutSIDE Stakeholders and the General Public

Inside

The Chancellor of SUA , Hon, Al Noor Kassum, presenting a gift to Vice President of the United Republic of Tanazania His Excellence Dr.Mohamed Gharib Bilal who delivered the 13th Sokoine Memorial Lecture on 16th November, 2012 at the Solomon Mahlangu Campus Freedom Square.

3

Sua Hosts the 2013 National Tree Planting Event

6

5

Carbon Monitoring Centre to be Established at Sua

13

Sua Confers First Award for Distinguished Contribution in Agriculture Notable Achievements in Research and Outreach Under The Sua-Norad Frame June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

1


BACKGROUND Sokoine University was established in July 1984nby the Parliamentary Act No.6 of the same year; which was repealed by the Universities act No. 7 of 2005 from which SUA Charter was granted in 2007. The University was created from the former Falcuty of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Science of the University of Dar Es Salaam. It is situated 3.0 KM from the centre of Morogoro Municipality, which is about 200 KM west of Dar Es Salaam. The Universty is currently made up of four campuses and one constituent college. The Campuses are: the main Campus and Solomon Mahlagu Campus in Morogoro; the Olmotonyi Campus in Arusha region and the Mazumba Campus in Lushoto, Tanga region. The constituent college is the MoshiUniversity College of Cooperative and Business Studies (MUCCoBS), located in Moshi Municipality, Kilimanjaro region

Vision To become a Centre of Excellence in Agriculture and allied Sciences.

Mission To Promote development through training, research and delivery of services to the public and private sector.

Core values Core Values include academic excellence, intergrity, freedom, effectiveness, efficiency, participatory management, social responsibility, ethical standards and continued learning, equity and social justice P.O.Box 3000, Morogoro—Tanzania. • Tel +255 232603511 • Fax +255 232604388 Email: sua@suanet.ac.tz • Website: www.suanet.ac.tz


Contents Newsletter

iSSn 1821-6064

newsletter of the Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro tanzania

volume 1, issue number 1: June 2013

Sokoine UniverSity of AgricUltUre. reAching oUtSiDe StAkeholDerS AnD the generAl PUblic

Inside

The Chancellor of SUA , Hon, Al Noor Kassum, presenting a gift to Vice President of the United Republic of Tanazania His Excellence Dr.Mohamed Gharib Bilal who delivered the 13th Sokoine Memorial Lecture on 16th November, 2012 at the Solomon Mahlangu Campus Freedom Square.

3

Sua Hosts the 2013 National Tree Planting Event

5

Sua Confers First award for Distinguished Contribution in agriculture

Sua Confers First award for Distinguished Contribution in agriculture

6

Notable achievements in Research and Outreach under The Sua-NORaD Frame

13

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

1

7

Newsletter

3

Sokoine University of Agriculture Reaching OutSIDE Stakeholders and the General Public

Volume, Issue Number, June 2013, ISSN 1821- 6064

Members of Editorial TEAM

14

Mr. M. Ngeti Mr. K. A. Msagati Ms. G.L. Sambala Typesetting by Ms G.L. Sambala Design & layout by Arnold Njuki

Pg 1

Contents

Pg 2

Editorial Comment

Pg

2013 National Tree Planting Event

Pg 6

Award for Distinguished Contributionin

in Agriculture

Pg

7

Sokoine Memorial Lecture

Pg

8

Various Appointments

Pg 10 SUA Staff Appointed as Executives of Nelson

Acknowledgement The editorial team extends its appreciation to all those who kindly contributed articles. Published by

3

Pg 20

Sokoine university of agriculture (SUA)

Mandela Institute

10 Matters from the Council

Pg 10 New Research Projects Pg 10 New Memoranda of Understanding

P.O. Box 3000, Morogoro—Tanzania. Tel +255 232603511 Fax +255 232604388 Email: sua@suanet.ac.tz Website: www.suanet.ac.tz

Pg 11

Sua Celebrates Workers Day in Style

Pg 12

Construction of World Bank Supported

buildings Nears Completion

Disclaimer

Pg

Options expressed by authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of the University Management. This newsletter is published bi-annually . One issue will be published in June and the other in December

13

Research Achievements Under

SUA-NORAD Programmes

24

Pg

23

Humour Department

Pg

24

Events in Pictures

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

1


EDITORIAL commentS

from THE EditorS’ DESK the University has realized big achievement as portrayed by the modest growth in number of admitted students for various degree and none degree programmes.

W

elcome again to this bi annual edition of the SUA newsletter, which provides information on issues that had happened at Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA). This edition covers important events that took place over the past six months at SUA. The peace and

tranquility that prevailed at the University for the period covered by this newsletter have enabled SUA to conduct its business smoothly. The harmonious environment paved the way for SUA to undertake various activities and training successfully as evidenced by the information contained in this newsletter edition. Tribute should go to all staff members, students and stakeholders who stood firmly in ensuring that all planned activities were fully undertaken regardless of various challenges they faced. As we produce this newsletter, the University has realized big achievement as portrayed by the modest growth in number of admitted students for various degree and none degree programmes. Also increasing number of graduates and infrastructure development is testimony for the achievement realized to mention just a few. This edition has not however covered all that transpired during the period in question. Nevertheless, it provides highlights on important issues that are considered of interest to SUA community and stakeholders. In view of this, any shortfalls regarding the articles and presentation should be considered as a challenge for future better production of the newsletter.

Central Administration - SUA

The editorial team extends its sincere thanks to all who contributed towards production of this edition and looking forward to continued support for future SUA Newsletters’ production. The team wishes you good and enjoyable reading. EDITORIAL Committee

2

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013


NATIONAL TREE PLANTING

Sua Hosts the 2013 National Tree Planting Event

The Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, Mrs. Maimuna Tarishi (centre) preparing a tree for planting during the 2013 National Tree Planting event at SUA

T

he Sokoine University of

Mrs.

Agriculture (SUA) this year

presented the Minister’s speech.

was

privileged

to

host

the 2013 National Annual

Tree planning event, on the 3rd April, 2013 near Mindu Dam located at the Morogoro Municipality. This colorful event was officiated by the Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism Hon. Khamis S. Kagasheki (MP), who was represented by the Permanent Secretary for the Ministry

The Minister pointed out that many economic activities such as bee keeping taking place around forests have significant contribution in poverty eradication.

Maimuna

Tarishi

who

also

Reiterating on the importance of trees, the Minister pointed out that many economic activities such as bee keeping taking place around forests have significant contribution in poverty eradication. However, Hon. Kagasheki identified some

of

the

challenges

as

unsustainable harvesting of forests, bush fires, invasion of reserved forests ...page 4 June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

3


NATIONAL TREE PLANTING

SUA community members and other stakeholders participating in the National Tree Planting Event at SUA

...from page 3

The SUA Vice Chancellor, Professor Gerald C. Monela told the audience that tree planting at SUA is a continuing activity, taking place yearly with an intention to conserve nature

for cultivation, destructive livestock

Professor

keeping,

Monela

informed

environmental

audience that, tree planting at SUA

habitat and illegal mining activities

started in 1997 and until the year

around forests.

2012, a total of 525, 372 tree seedlings

unfriendly

of various species have been planted Earlier in his welcome remarks, the

in the SUA land and the planted area

SUA Vice Chancellor, Professor Gerald

accounted for 270 hectares. This

C. Monela told the audience that tree

year, the target was to plant 22,300

planting at SUA is on going activity,

seedlings around Mindu Dam and

taking place yearly with an intention

Lugala in Morogoro Municipality.

to conserve nature and prevent environmental destruction, facilitate

Professor

education and research activities,

Morogoro Regional Administration

protection of SUA boundaries and

for earmarking SUA to host the event.

providing examples of good forests

Morogoro region was earmarked by

to

the Government to host the national

communities

University.

surrounding

the

Monela

thanked

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013

the

tree planting event and the region decided to hold the event at SUA.

4

the


CARBON MONITORING

Carbon Monitoring Centre to be Established At Sua

T

he

United

Republic

of

Tanzania and the Royal Government have

of

Key activities of NCMC will include:•

national

Norway

commissioned

Development

and

updating

baseline

database

using National Forest Resources

a

study to establish a project titled

Monitoring

National Carbon Monitoring Centre

(NAFORMA) data;

(NCMC)

for

Reduced

Emissions

The Government of United Republic of Tanzania through the Vice President’s Office has selected Sokoine University of Agriculture to host the centre. The centre will be based at the Faculty of Forestry and Nature Conservation.

and

Assessment

Development and maintenance

from Deforestation and Degradation

of the carbon database to

(REDD+) and other carbon sources.

coordinate

all

carbon

data

management. The Government of United Republic of Tanzania through the Vice President’s

Development and improvement

Office has selected Sokoine University

of approved carbon assessment

of Agriculture to host the centre. The

methods;

centre will be based at the Faculty of

Forestry and Nature Conservation.

Training of foresters on these methods;

Undertaking training sessions,

information dissemination and publications directed to focal communities, institutions and projects implementing MRV; •

Analysis of data for verification purposes;

Submission of the results to the Government REDD+ Scheme and national stakeholders;

Facilitate

international

reporting

such

as

national

communications to UNFCCC focal point •

Reporting

financial

flows

between communities and the national

level

and

reporting

on livelihood safeguards and impacts.

Main building of Faculty of Forestry and Nature Conservation where the National Carbon Monitoring Centre will be hosted

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

5


agriculture award

Sua Confers First Award for Distinguished Contribution in Agriculture

S

okoine

of

The award was conferred to Mr Ngeze

first

by the Chancellor of SUA Hon. Al

time conferred a special

Noor Kassum at the 28th Graduation

Agriculture

University for

the

award to Mr. Pius B, Ngeze

Ceremony held at Solomon Mahlangu

in recognition of his distinguished

Campus on 23rd November 2012. Mr.

contribution in the field of Agriculture.

Ngeze is a retired agricultural officer

Speaking after receiving the award Mr. Ngeze extended his sincere thanks to SUA for recognizing his contribution to the society and the nation at large. Narrating Mr. Ngeze’s profile before conferring the award, the Deputy Vice Chancellor

(Academic),

Professor

Peter Gillah said the awardee among other things authored a total of 57 booklets in English and Kiswahili languages

addressing

issues

of

agriculture in the country. Professor Gillah said a team of experts evaluated the booklets and were found to have significant contribution to farmers. Mr. Pius B. Ngeze (in black suit) receiving an award for distinguished contribution in agriculture from the SUA Chancellor Hon. Al Noor Kassum, during the 28th Graduation Ceremony

Speaking after receiving the award Mr. Ngeze extended his sincere thanks to SUA for recognizing his contribution to the society and the nation at large. During the colorful 28th Graduation Ceremony, the Chancellor of SUA also awarded 1,565 bachelor degrees, 194 master and PhD degrees, and 111 certificates and diplomas, summed up to a total of 1870 graduates.

Mr. Ngeze (centre) flanked by his family members displaying the awards presented to him

6

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013


SOKOINE memorial lecture

Potentiality of The Late Edward Moringe Sokoine

The Vice President of the United Republic of Tanzania H.E. Dr. Mohamed Gharib Bilal (right), delivering the 13th Sokoine Memorial Lecture organized by SUA on 16th November, 2012 at the Freedom Square, Solomon Mahlangu Campus in Morogoro.

Edward Moringe Sokoine stood firmly for good governance and defense of the national interest, issues that created confidence on him and trust among the people

T

he the

Vice-President United

Tanzania

His

Republic

of of

Excellence

Dr. Mohamed Gharib BIlal

officiated the 13th Sokoine Memorial Lecture held on 16th November, 2012 at the Solomon Mahlangu Campus, Mazimbu in Morogoro and delivered a keynote address on the potentiality of the late Edward Moringe Sokoine,

the former Prime Minister of United Republic of Tanzania Highlighting the potentials of the Late Premier, the Vice President said during his lifetime and leadership, Hon.

Edward

Moringe

Sokoine

stood firmly for good governance and defense of the national interest, issues that created confidence on him and trust among the people

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

7


SOKOINE memorial lecture CONTINUES

D

Those Sokoine was very hard working as he could work for more than two days without sleeping, but also that was not the reason for people to cry for him, because even the devil is intelligent and working hard day and night. What made people to cry for Sokoine was his kindness, politeness and the way he loved people. Sokoine was not arrogant and not jealousy. Those potentials enabled him to utilize his talents for the benefit of the people, Mwalimu Nyerere said.

r. Bilal quoted Mwalimu Nyerere as saying Edward Moringe intelligent,

Sokoine but

he

was was

not liked by the people because of that, people had confidence in him because he was always working in the interest of the nation. Also Mwalimu was quoted as saying that the late Sokoine was very hard working as he could work for more than two days without sleeping, but also that was not the reason for people to cry for him, because even the devil is intelligent and working hard day and night. He said that what made people to cry for Sokoine was his kindness, politeness and the way he loved people. Sokoine was not arrogant and not jealousy. Those potentials enabled him to utilize his talents for the benefit of the people, Mwalimu Nyerere said. In his concluding remarks, Dr. Bilal

The late Hon. Edward Moringe Sokoine

that the country has implemented all that the late Sokoine started, but it was important for the Government to assess how much the country is following footsteps of the fallen hero. The former Premier died on 12th April, 1984 in a car accident at Dakawa in Morogoro while travelling to Dar Es Salaam after attending a parliament session in Dodoma.

admitted that it was difficult to say

VARIOUS APPOINTMENTS Mr. Luhanjo New Chairman of The Sua Council

T

Hon. Mr. Philemon Luhanjo

8

he President of the United

requirement of the SUA Charter, 2007.

Republic

His

Mr. Luhanjo is a retired Chief Secretary

Excellence, Dr. Jakaya Mrisho

and his appointment followed end of

Kikwete

appointed

term of office for the former Chairman of

Honorable Mr. Philemon Luhanjo as

the SUA Council Ambassador Nicholas

the Chairman of the Council of Sokoine

A. Kuhanga who served in that capacity

University

for four consecutive terms of four years

of

of

Tanzania,

has

Agriculture

for

four

years effective 22nd April, 2013. The appointment was in fulfillment of the

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013

each.


APPOINTMENTS CONTINUE

In another development, the Vice Chancellor of SUA, Professor Gerald Monela appointed some staff to head various institutes as follows:

Dr. Carolyne Nombo

Dr. Lazaro Busagala

Dr. Vedasto. G. Ndibalema

as

(ii) Dr. Lazaro Busagala as the

(iii) Dr. Vedasto G. Ndibalema as

the

Acting Director of the SUA

the Head of Department of

Development Studies Institute

(i) Dr. the

Carolyne Acting

I.

Nombo

Director

of

Computer Centre in the place

Wildlife

following the appointment of the

of the Director of the Centre Dr.

Faculty of Forestry and Nature

Management

former Director of the Institute,

Wenceslaus Ballegu.

Conservation. Dr. Ndibalema’s

Dr. Johnson Mbwambo as the

appointment

Assistant

appointment

Director

of

Higher

in

followed of

the

the

the former

Education in the Ministry of

head, Professor Alexander N.

Education

Songorwa as the Director of

and

Vocational

the Wildlife Department in the

Training.

Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism. (iv) Mrs Monica A. Kagya, Principal Bee Keeping Officer in the

leadership quote

Department of Forestry and Bee keeping of the Ministry of Natural

A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves. - Lao Tzu

Resources and Tourism, as the Chairperson of the SUA Training Forest Management Committee for the second term.

Mrs. Monica Kagya

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

9


APPOINTMENTS CONTINUE

TWO SUA STAFF APPOINTED EXECUTIVES OF NELSON MANDELA INSTITUTE.

T

he Vice President of the United Republic of Tanzania, His Excellence Dr. Mohamed Gharib

Bilal has appointed two SUA

senior academic members of staff as

executives of the Nelson Mandela Institute of Science and Technology (NMIST) for the period of four years. They are; (i) Professor Angelo M.M. Mtambo of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine as the Deputy Vice Chancellor( Academic, Research and Innovation) (ii) Professor Lughano J.M. Kusiluka as the

Prof. Madundo Mtambo

Deputy Vice Chancellor (Planning, Finance

Prof. Lughano J.M. Kusiluka

and Administration).

MATTERS FROM THE COUNCIL

U

ltimately, the position of Chief Administrative officer that was vacant for a long time has been filled. This follows the appointment of Mr. George H. Mhagama by the Council of Sokoine University of Agriculture to fill the position effective 21st January, 2012. Before

his appointment, Mr Mhagama was serving as the Principal Administrative Officer. He holds a Master Degree in Human Resource Planning and Development from GGS Indraprastha University of India. Mr. George H. Mhagama

New Research Projects

T

hree

new

(ii) Nutrition

Assessment

and

Surveillance funded by USAID and

projects

have

been introduced at Sokoine

(iii) Validation

of

Taenia

Slium

Agriculture.

Diagnostic Test in Eastern and

Reporting the development

Central Africa. The project will be

to the 128th SUA Council meeting

funded by ASARECA. The new

on 28th March, 2013, the SUA Vice

projects are in addition to more

Chancellor, Professor Gerald Monela

than 130 others which are already

mentioned the projects as:-

in place at the University.

University

of

New Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) The 128th SUA Council meeting received

information

memoranda entered

of

between

about

new

understanding the

University

and the Zanzibar Higher Education Loans Board which pave the way for regulating loans for students from Zanzibar. Also SUA signed MOU with Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA)

(i) Safe Water for Food (SONAFO)

which among other things will provide

supported by DANIDA

opportunity to pursue field practical training with TANAPA.

10

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013


may day celebrations

SUA CELEBRATES MAY DAY IN STYLE

T

he SUA RAAWU branch hosted a grand Get Together for its members to celebrate Workers Day popularly known as May Day at the Bwalo la Umwema Hall in Morogoro Municipality where

the Vice Chancellor Prof. Gerald Monela served as official guest. During the event, the Vice Chancellor exchanged views with staff regarding various issues and aim of improving efficiency at the University. RAAWU members wanted to know when outstanding staff financial claims

SUA RAAWU members marching during the 2013 May Day celebrations in Mvomero District, where May Day was held at regional level

would be settled, un-procedural payment system which was ignoring the first in first serve principle, rude answers given to some employees while following up staff issues and inadequate use of SUA resources for income generation. In response, the Vice Chancellor explained that followup of all issues has been made and claims submitted to the Government which had promised to incorporate them into the 2013/2014 budget. Various initiatives are continuing to promote internal revenue at SUA as the way of addressing the problem of inadequate budget from the government subvention.

Regarding income

generation efforts Professor Monela said that various initiatives are underway including plans to rent out some of the loss making entities The Vice Chancellor cited Vuyisile Furniture Factory, Grain Silos and feed mills as some of the entities to be

Regarding income generation efforts Professor Monela said that various initiatives were underway including plans to rent out some of the loss making entities

rented out for income generation. The University also plans to carry out a joint venture with “UTT” to construct business centers for renting to various stakeholders and generation of income. A loan from CRDB Bank is another initiative. Currently; SUA is renting some buildings and some business kiosks at the Main and Solomom Mahlangu campuses. The Vice Chancellor further said that the SUA’s Planning Office was in the process of analyzing and recommending to the Management on the alternative use of the former University farm facilities at main campus which have been shifted to Solomon Mahlangu Campus. The Planning Office is also verifying boundaries of the Morning Side so as to invite an investor to develop it. Professor Monela

also

promised

to

follow-up

the issues raised and prompt action against any proved violation of ethics and code of conduct. During the colorful ceremony, Professor Monela awarded SUA certificates and cash to best and innovative SUA workers. The May Day celebrations were held at Dakawa in Mvomero District at regional level

and

the

Morogoro

Regional

Commissioner Hon. Joel Nkaya Bendera The SUA Vice Chancellor receiving presents from the RAAWU members

was the Guest of Honor

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

11


CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD BANK SUPPORTED BUILDINGS NEARS COMPLETION

A section of new Food Science Laboratory building

The vertical extension of Zoology Lab at the Faculty of Forestry and Nature Conservation has been completed and the building has been handed over to Management.

T

he

construction

of

three

Department of Food Science and

buildings funded by the World

Technology Professor Benard Chove,

Bank at the Main Campus

construction of the building had

of SUA is progressing well.

costed US dollars 457,976.59 and will

Explaining the status of the

serve food processing pilot plant, two

construction project which started

laboratories, one seminar room and a

late last year, the SUA Chief Planning

few staff offices.

Officer Mr. Richard Masawe said that the one storey building for the

He informed further that equipment

Food Science Department has been

installed for food processing pilot

completed and handed over to the

plant in the building had cost US

Management of SUA and the other

dollars 995,920.

buildings for the Departments of Agricultural Engineering and Land Use

The vertical extension of Zoology Lab

Planning and Agricultural Economics

at the Faculty of Forestry and Nature

and Agribusiness will be handed over

Conservation has been completed

at the end of May 2013.

and the building has been handed over to Management.

According

12

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013

to

the

Head

of


Some equipment in the new Food Science Laboratory

Also a two-storey building will be

will be adjacent to the SUA’ Business

constructed at Solomon Mahlangu

constructed at the Main Campus

Centre. Mr Masawe also said to

Campus with the support of the

to

theatres,

address requirements of students

EPINAV programme and that a design

computer room and staff offices. A

pursuing studies for teaching science

was being worked out for the project

contractor has been identified for the

subjects in colleges and secondary

to start in August 2013.

construction of the building

schools, two laboratories will be

provide

for

lecture

which

NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS IN RESEARCH AND OUTREACH UNDER THE SUA- EPINAV AND CCIAM PROGRAMMES Background/Introduction

Transformation

for

Improved

Livelihoods). Both are collaborative SUA’s role as an agent of change for development and improvement of

rural

livelihoods

strengthened

has

through

programmes

financed

been various

under

a

broader framework of Norwegian Government and peoples’ assistance to the Tanzania Government poverty reduction efforts. Currently two major programmes are ongoing under this support. A. EPINAV The as

current EPINAV

programme (Enhancing

known Pro-poor

Innovations in Natural Resources and Agricultural Value-chains) was

Major lessons learnt from implementation of PANTIL (2005 – 2010) and previous programmes supported by the Norwegian government include involvement of farmers in participatory action research using multidisciplinary research teams.

research programmes between SUA and Norwegian institutions, namely, University of Life Sciences (UMB) and Norwegian College of Veterinary Sciences (NVH). Major

lessons

learnt

from

implementation of PANTIL (2005 – 2010)

and

supported

previous by

programmes

the

Norwegian

government include involvement of farmers in participatory action research using

multidisciplinary

research

teams. This has strengthened the capacity of SUA scientists to transfer technologies to target communities through

continuous

learning

and

preceded by PANTIL (Programme for

interaction. The PANTIL programme

Agricultural and Natural Resources

used

the

Sustainable

Livelihood ...page 14

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

13


Achievements in Research

...from page 13

information and building the capacity of players to articulate and satisfy their demand for knowledge, technology and other resources. Several research and development projects are in progress under EPINAV programme. Some of the exemplary achievements so far include the following (For more information go to http://www.suanet. ac.tz/epinav/): 1. Tilapia research project The project’s aim is to address the problem of low productivity of cultured Nile Tilapia and improving the growth rate and mature size of A demonstration concrete fish pond at the Morogoro SUA Nanenane pavilion

the fish through selective breeding in the low-input pond systems. Also the projects will aim to overcome overcrowding of fish by developing a protocol for production of all-male fingerlings through the hybridization of Nile Tilapia with Wami Tilapia and avail them to fish farmers. Tilapia

productivity

improved

by

will

ensuring

also

be

adequate

supply of good quality fingerlings by developing an appropriate method for artificial incubation of eggs to ensure a high hatching rate and survival of larvae. Furthermore, the project intends to develop methods of mass production of good quality fingerlings to meet the high demand of Nile

Fish pond in Mbarali district

Approach (SLA) in improving agricultural practices and livelihoods of target communities. The EPINAV programme aims at empowering and enhancing communities and institution’s capabilities and readiness to adapt and be more resilient to the impacts of climate change. The EPINAV is employing an Innovation Systems and Value Chain approaches in improving communication and dissemination of

14

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013

Tilapia fingerlings by fish farmers.

So far the major challenge facing the success of this initiative is inadequate water supply, especially during dry seasons.

The project is being undertaken in Mvomero and Mbarali districts. Number of beneficiaries ‌ So far the major challenge facing the success of this initiative is inadequate water supply, especially during the dry season.


Achievements in Research continues

2. Integrated Dairy

technology to the 6 new villages.

Production System in

Earlier,

Njombe District

their

used in the households, slurry and

the

dry manure is added. Some farmers

An integrated dairy farming system

wetlands (vinyungu) which is an

have even started nurseries for multi-

that

the

environmentally harmful practice and

purposes and timber production.

PANTIL programme in four villages of

also time consuming. The project

Including trees in the farming system

Njombe, has recorded commendable

now has introduced tower gardens

providing quality fodder and improves

improvements in milk production as

that are established close to the

crop production. The re-use of these

well as garden and field crops, are

homesteads, and promote both a

inputs means that resources are fully

now being scaled up to ten villages

family’s nutrition and income from

and efficiently utilized.

developed

during

vegetable

would

the sale of vegetables. Water already have

was

farmers

gardens

in

...page 16

in the district. Improved fodder and keeping of fodder for the dry season have raised milk production from an average of 6 to 16 litres per cow per day. As a result of the increased milk production, the CEFA Milk Processing Factory was established. Here the farmers together can deliver up to 3000 litres of milk per day during dry season, and more than 6000 litres during rainy season. Manure and urine from the dairy animals is used to improve soil fertility and pH. Because most of the soils in Njombe are acidic, the urine works as a buffer that elevates pH levels. The dung is either used for biogas production or turned into dry manure.

Preserving fodder for dry season

The use of urine and dry manure has resulted in a great increase in crop yields. Biogas as energy source is used for lighting and cooking. Experiences from the project show that using biogas reduces the time spent by women and children in collecting firewood. It also improves the health of the family, as there is no smoke from the cooking. A bi-product of biogas is slurry, which is a very good fertilizer. The project has entered into a collaboration agreement

with

the

Tanzania

Domestic Biogas Programme (TDBP) to carry out studies on the use of bio-slurry and to extend the biogas

Tower gardens near homesteads

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

15


producers prefer the government to exercise control on input supply so as to ensure quality because most of the available inputs, especially pesticides and seeds, are claimed to be counterfeit.

Roadside tomato marketing

...from page 15

3. Innovative communication

instead of 14 days and one day instead

highly

pathways in tomato value

of seven days before harvesting. After

diseases attack.

chains

harvesting, tomatoes are sprayed with

susceptible

to

pests

and

The major purpose of this project

selectron for attractive shiny ripening

4. Increased market access

is

one week before they are ready for

of beef and milk from

communication and knowledge within

the market.

pastoral system through

the tomato value chain and offer an

three types of pesticides i.e. “DUME”

innovative value chain

innovative intervention to improve

+ “CLAX” + “ACTELLIC” to control

approaches

production and the marketing of

pests/diseases, which they belive to

The main objective of this project is

tomatoes in Kilolo District in Iringa

be effective.

to enhance beef and milk productivity

to

understand

the

nature

of

In addition, some mix

and Dodoma Municipality.

and Again,

access

of

pastoral

systems. Guided by a value chain

It was noted that farmers have

government to exercise control on

framework, the project will analyse

generated their own tendency of

input supply so as to ensure quality

holistically pastoral cattle and the

pesticide

trust

because most of the available inputs,

milk market, introduce and up-scale

stockists’ advice more than that of

especially pesticides and seeds, are

appropriate technologies that lead

extension officers. This tendency

claimed to be counterfeit. They claim

to improved production. Key actors

results

use.

that most of the tomato seeds in the

in the beef and milk value chain such

pesticide

market do not germinate properly or

as livestock keepers, animal health

application for tomatoes, farmers

there is mixture of different varieties

providers, cattle buyers, transporters,

apply “caratel” every seven days

upon germination. They are also

milk vendors/hawkers, processors,

For

into

instance,

16

improper

and

input

regarding

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013

prefer

market

the

application

producers


It is envisaged that the project will empower pastoral farmers through training in entrepreneurial skills for sustainable sources of income and livelihood.

livestock markets, slaughter houses, etc. were identified. This will culminate in organizing pastoralists into groups, improve

environment

and

cattle

production systems, increase linkages to the market while cooperating with other stakeholders in order to improve profitability. It is envisaged that the project will empower pastoral farmers through training in entrepreneurial skills for

adopted strategies in pastoral and agro-pastoral communities. Cattle fattening can be achieved through intensifying feeding especially energy

and

protein

concentrates

and reducing energy expenditure by restricting movement of the animals. To promote this practice, the project trained 101 livestock keepers from four villages: Nanja and Losirwa of Monduli district; Lerang’wa and

sustainable sources of income and

Irkaswaa of Longido district on cattle

livelihood. The end result will be

fattening. After the training, fattening

improved food security, livelihoods,

demonstration units were set up in

conflict

as

each project village. Between 20 to 30

resilience to climate change issues

mitigation,

as

well

livestock keepers were organized into

in pastoral communities of Kilosa

groups in each village to contribute

district improved. 5. Coping strategies for improved resilience of agro-pastoral communities in Monduli and Longido Districts Livestock keepers have been able to track climate variability very well

in the past. However, their strategies cannot mitigate the increased rate of intensified droughts and constraints related to livestock movements. Initially,

the

project

made

an

assessment of the impact of climate on herd composition, management practices

Herds of cattle and goats at Mabwegere, Kilosa

and

effectiveness

steers

and

participate

in

the

fattening process. The units provide opportunities for farmers to observe and learn by doing. Three months later, the fattened cattle will be sold at niche markets to fetch premium prices. ...page 18

of

A slaughter house at one of the cattle markets

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

17


...from page 17

On the other hand, another group of

6. The role of mobile phones

Lack of timely agricultural information

115 livestock keepers (101 women

in improving coverage of

is a big problem and a constraint to

and 14 men) from same villages were

agricultural extension

small-scale agricultural producers in

trained on improved local chicken

services.

Tanzania. It is from this reality that the

production. The dominancy of women

In Africa, the largest increase in

project is trying to investigate if mobile

in this group reflects that women

the use of ICTs has been in mobile

phones could connect these different

are a disadvantaged group in the

telephones. In Tanzania as well, the

stakeholders in maize value chains

pastoral communities and probably

mobile phone market is growing in

in an interpersonal relation level for

chicken is the only asset that they can

a steadfast manner. Predictably, if

fast, easy and flexible agricultural

freely own and manage. The training

this is accompanied by farmers with

information sharing despite distance

covered systems of keeping poultry,

positive economic impact, the results

and

poultry house and accessories, feeds

could be extraordinary.

The project has Kilosa as its area of

and feeding, bio-security, poultry diseases, egg selection, hatching and record keeping. During

backstopping

visit

by

project team members, it was found that some chicken keepers have improved their practices including construction of new poultry houses or modifications to existing ones, use of proper feeders and watering utensils, placing of nest boxes and perches and use of litter material.

extension

service

shortfalls.

operation and maize value chain as its

Cattle fattening can be achieved through intensifying feeding especially energy and protein concentrates and reducing energy expenditure by restricting movement of the animals.

focus from which to draw lessons. In Kilosa district, there are some opportunities in which if tapped may perhaps address the issue. Such opportunities include the presence of the Kilosa Rural Services and Electronic Centre (KIRSEC) which provides agricultural news to the community. Another opportunity is a telecenter with the prime goal to demonstrate the use of ICTs in disseminating and

Emaciated cattle as a result of persistent drought as captured at the Arusha cattle holding yard

18

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013


Combined cattle and chicken keepers training at Losirwa village

Cattle in the feedlot at Irkaswaa village

An improved poultry house at Nanja village

communicating agricultural information and knowledge. While examining the dynamics of the maize value chain, the researchers are paying particular attention to the practical needs and access to and control of information amongst the different actors. Based on this, the project will develop mechanisms through which mobile phones could easily and flexibly help maize value chain actors access extension services. Findings of the project will provide possible areas of intervention in the study area and Tanzania in general. Depending on the type of audience, different types of communication channels including flyers/

During backstopping visit by project team members, it was found that some chicken keepers have improved their practices including construction of new poultry houses or modifications to existing ones, use of proper feeders and watering utensils, placing of nest boxes and perches and use of litter material.

brochures/posters, CDs, DVDs, radio, free mobile calls and SMS, websites, newsletters articles and pod-casts will be used to disseminate research findings. 7. Improving cattle husbandry, slaughter operations and meat handling The project aim is to investigate best practices to increase the market share of locally produced beef through improved cattle husbandry, slaughter operations and meat handling. Studies have shown that local breeds of cattle can produce meat of reasonable quality when subjected to improved nutrition and husbandry under feedlot conditions. ...page 20

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

19


Baling of crop residues in Hanang for cattle fattening

...from page 19

B. CCIAM

Fattening based on the use of

techniques will be promoted through

agricultural by-products will shorten

strategic training of stakeholders, be

the time taken by beef cattle under

it producers, butcher operators or

The Government of the Kingdom

traditional production systems to

live-cattle traders.

of Norway and the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania

reach desirable market weight. Fattening experiments using locally available crop residues has been initiated and already showing positive prospects in Arusha and Hanang Districts. The project will help to understand the need for ensuring a steady supply of quality beef at the market. At the same time there is a need of putting in place a system that not only assures quality of the produced meat but also ensures uniform standards of the beef produced. The system, however, needs to be operational and set up through model slaughter houses and retail shops in specified areas and

The project will help to understand the need for ensuring a steady supply of quality beef at the market. At the same time there is a need of putting in place a system that not only assures quality of the produced meat but also ensures uniform standards of the beef produced.

signed an Agreement to support the participation of Tanzania in the development and implementation of programmes to address challenges of climate change with the purpose of increasing Tanzania’s participation in the mitigation of/and adaptation to the effects of climate change. One such programme is the Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation (CCIAM). The

CCIAM

collaboration

programme between

is

a

Tanzanian

institutions (Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM), Ardhi University (ARU)

supervised by designated district

and Tanzania Meteorological Agency

councils’ staff. The use of approved

(TMA)), and Norwegian institutions.

techniques in handling and ensuring

It is a 5 year programme spanning

quality meat is also needed. These

the period 2009-2014, aiming at

20

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013


developing and sustaining adequacy

is active. These projects were chosen

pilot project) will not pay anything

in national capacity to participate

specifically because of differences in

directly to the local community, but

in climate change initiatives and

ecology, forest management regimes

rather encourage them to conserve

address the effects and challenges

and cultural behaviour. Based on

the forest through sensitization.

of

these differences the reality of REDD+

climate

change.

Specifically,

the programme is committed to build

capacity

for

Tanzania

will be very different.

What the researchers found is that although the cultural tradition of

to

participate in the development and

Rungwe District

sustainable forest use is great the

implementation

Reduced

Because of the land scarcity in

local communities might experience

Emissions from Deforestations and

Rungwe, many people have been

difficulties with the implementation of

Forest Degradation (REDD) initiatives.

forced to adapt and are now doing

REDD+. One reason for this is that the

Through the REDD+ initiative, activities

agriculture, livestock keeping and tree

forest in question is not owned by the

aim also to raise the resilience and the

planting, for both consumption and for

villagers but is now a Nature Reserve

adaptive capacity of the ecosystem

the market. Due to this fact, general

with strict central rules, meaning the

and therefore benefit the people

awareness of forest conservation is

villagers cannot go there anymore. If

who depend on it. There are several

very high. Also, the people generally

REDD+ is built on top of this Nature

research and development projects

use a lot of tree products from their

Reserve an important question is

undertaken through this programme.

own woodlots. It will therefore be

then “who will receive the carbon

Some of the notable achievements

difficult to prevent them, especially

payment?�

are highlighted below (For more

since WCS (which is in charge of the

of

the

...page 22

information go to http://www.suanet. ac.tz/cciam): 1. Assessment of REDD+ options for Livelihood Security and Sustainable Development This project is investigating different options

available

for

REDD+,

such as Community Based Forest Management (CBFM), Joint Forest Management (JFM) and Centrally Managed

Forest

Reserves.

For

each option the project makes an

Nature Reserves have the highest status of protection in Tanzania with very strict rules

assessment of how it will affect the local communities and how much it will cost to establish REDD+ under each of these management systems. To

gain

options

information for

REDD+

on

different

the

project

selected two research areas with a

REDD

pilot

project

in

place:

Rungwe District where the Wildlife Conservation

Society

(WCS)

is

involved, and Kondoa District where the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF)

The people generally use a lot of tree products from their own woodlots. It will therefore be difficult to prevent them, especially since WCS (which is in charge of the pilot project) will not pay anything directly to the local community, but rather encourage them to conserve the forest through sensitization

Dry forests found in many places in Tanzania as main source of forest products

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

21


...from page 21

Kondoa district In Kondoa there are no Nature Reserves as in Rungwe but rather village forests under CBFM and a Forest Reserve under JFM. In the Kolo Hills project, researchers found that local people don’t have planted trees on their farms instead they use the nearby forests for firewood and building materials. Many had also previously been involved in a conservation project (HADO) but had been left with a negative view because their land was taken away in the name of conservation. This made them very skeptical of REDD+ thinking the same might happen again this time While early findings show that REDD A flip chart developed through participatory methods outlining REDD+ benefits posted at a village office, Kigoma

on top of CBFM can work well since the villagers are managing the forest on their own and getting all the benefits, it seems to be more difficult with JFM, especially when it comes to how to share the revenue from REDD between the government and the village. The researchers are analysing each option to see how well they might perform in a REDD+ context. The research outcomes will form the basis for offering advice to decision makers in their quest to finding the best solution for REDD+. 2. Good governance: key to local government in implementing REDD Local Government Authorities (LGAs) are responsible for the provision of

wide-ranging

public

services

including environmental protection, forest conservation and community development, among others. But the key challenge for such incentives is governance.

22

SUA NEWSLETTER

LGAs are strategically placed as the

sharing mechanisms through focus

interface between local communities

group

and central government, representing

questionnaires

local

local

review. Communities have expressed

concerns and responding to local

their views on possible benefit sharing

communities,

voicing

discussions, and

interviews, documentary

needs. But the role of the LGAs

approaches as they reflected on the

is not very clear when it comes to

existing practices and challenges.

implementation of the National REDD Strategy.

The project team is also working on a model for LGA participation

The project sets out to

critically

in REDD. The envisaged practical

assess the current role of LGAs in

model will guide the flow of REDD

relation to forest conservation and the

funds to LGAs and those involved in

potential role that it might play under

forest conservation. As such, LGAs

different scenarios concerning the

will be able to generate benefits from

governance of REDD.

the forests while at the same time

The project covers three districts:

providing services to conserve those

Kilwa, Kilosa and Kigoma which are

forests. As a consequence, REDD will

found in Lindi, Morogoro and Kigoma

effectively prevent the degradation of

regions, respectively.

forests to result in multiple benefits in addition to protecting or enhancing

Data has been collected on revenue generation from forest and forest products

June 2013

and

existing

benefit

carbon stocks.


Houmour

our!

Academic Hum

ey city park, and th walking through a e ar r so es of pr a post-doc, and a A Ph.D. student, a genie comes up the lamp, and s ck pi t en ud st Ph.D. brass lamp. The come across an old t one wish.” dr ill - you each ge e th ow kn u yo , nie announces, “OK out of it. The ge bean island, lying y beach of a Carib nn su e th on be says, “I want to The Ph.D. student e Caribbean. diately, he is in th me Im .” ink dr a and sipping in a lounge chair s in one of the beache home overlooking w ne my in be , “I want to The post-doc says ately, she’s there. me dinner.” Immedi s xe fi d an sb hu ing while my Hawaii, and relax ofessor you want?” The pr do t ha w , “OK , d says the professor an The genie looks at in an hour”. and working with lab my in ck ba o ose tw replies, “I want th

Things people will say to you when you publish your paper on “The Complete Unified Theory of Absolutely Everything”: Your colleagues: “It’s a fine piece of work. I was going

I’m not sure it will lead to a patent for the University.”

to publish something just like that - but I hadn’t sent it out

Your ex-spouse: “I see you’ve maintained your intense

because I was taking time to edit it carefully”.

dedication to your research.”

Your Department head: “This is great - but what do

Your father: “I never have

you have in the pipeline to publish next?”

understood why people study things

Your Dean: “It’s excellent research. It’s a shame it wasn’t

like this.”

supported by an external grant”.

Your mother: “It’s very nice. It must be why you couldn’t come home

Your Provost: “This is a fine piece of scholarship - but

for Easter last year.”

June 2013

SUA NEWSLETTER

23


Events in Pictures

Ireland Minister of  State for Trade and Development Hon. Mr. Joe Costello, unveiling SUA/ILRI/Irish Aid Dairy Project office. Looking on are the SUA Vice Chancellor, Prof. Gerald Monela (centre) and the Ambassador of  Ireland to Tanzania, Her Excellence. Fionnuala Gilsenan [right].

A group of students from the Royal Kingdom of Norway who accompanied Ministers being exposed to apiary activities performed at the University

24

SUA NEWSLETTER

June 2013

His Excellence the Ambassador of Republic of South Africa in Tanzania Hon. Thanduyise Henry Chiliza, laying a wreath in memory of fallen heroes during the Reconciliation day commemorated on 28th February 2013, at the Solomon Mahlangu Campus in Morogoro


Some of the exhibits at the SUA pavilion during the 8th exhibitions for the Higher Learning Institutions organized by Tanzania Commission for Universities. The exhibitions were held from 22nd - 24th May, 2013 at the Diamond Jubilee Hall in Dar Es Salaam

SUA Vice Chancellor, Prof. Gerald Monela welcoming the ambassador of Norway in Tanzania Her Excellence Ingunn Kleipsvik (first right) and Minister for International Development, Hon Mr. Heikki Eidsvold (second right) from the Royal Kingdom of Norway, during their visit to SUA on 20th March, 2013. During their visit, among other things the Ministers launched a Programme namely Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) and also announced establishing National Carbon Monitoring Centre to be hosted at SUA with the support of the Norwegian Government. On the lets behind the Vice Chancellor is the Minister of State in the Vice President’s Office Dr.Thereza L. Huviza [MP]


ACADEMIC programmes offered at Sokoine university of agriculture SUA offers certificates, diploma, undergraduate and postgraduate degree training; which are internationally recognized. The programmes are offered under the following host institutes/ faculties: Certificate and Diploma Programmes Computer Centre 1. Certificate in Information Technology 2. Diploma in Information Technology Faculty of Veterinary Medicine 3. Diploma in Tropical Animal Health and Production 4. Diploma in Laboratory Technology Sokoine National Agricultural Library 5. Diploma in Information and Library Science 6. Diploma in Records, Archives and Information Management.

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine 20. Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine 21. BSc. Biotechnology and Laboratory Sciences Faculty of Science 22. BSc. Environmental Sciences and Management 23. BSc. Informatics 24. BSc . with Education (Chemistry and Biology) 25. BSc . with Education (Chemistry and Mathematics) 26. BSc. with Education (Informatics and Mathematics) 27. BSc. with Education (Geography and Mathematics) 28. BSc. with Education (Geography and Biology) Development Studies Institute 29. Bachelor of Rural Development

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMMES. POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Faculty of Agriculture 1. BSc. Agriculture General 2. BSc. Agricultural Engineering 3. BSc. Agronomy 4. BSc. Animal Science 5. BSc. Food Science and Technology 6. BSc. Human Nutrition 7. BSc. Home Economics 8. BSc. Horticulture 9. BSc. Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness 10. BSc. Agricultural Education 11. BSc. Aquaculture 12. BSc. Range Management 13. Bsc. Family and Consumer Studies 14. Bsc. Bioprocess and Post-harvest Engineering 15. Bsc. Irrigation and Water Resources Engineering 16. Bsc. Applied Agricultural Extension Faculty of Forestry & Nature Conservation 17. BSc. Forestry 18. BSc. Wildlife Management 19. Bachelor of Tourism Management

26

SUA NEWSLETTER

Faculty of Agriculture 1. MSc. Crop Science 2. MSc. Agricultural Education and Extension 3. MSc. Agricultural Economics 4. MSc. Soil and Land Management 5. MSc. Tropical Animal Production 6. MSc. Food Science 7. MSc. Agricultural Engineering 8. MSc. Human Nutrition 9. MSc. Irrigation Engineering and Management 10. MSc. Land Use Planning and Management 11. MBA. Agribusiness 12. Postgraduate Dip. In Agricultural Economics 13. MBA. Agricultural and Applied Economics 14. MBA. Evening Programme 15. Doctor of Philosophy in the stated fields above, (including in Soil and Water Management by coursework and research). Faculty of Forestry and Nature Conservation 16. MSc.Management of Natural Resources for Sustainable Agriculture 17. MSc. Forestry 18. MSc. Wildlife Management June 2013

19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

MSc. Agroforestry MSc. Ecosystem Sciences and Management MSc. Forest Products and Technology MSc. Forest Resource and Management MSc. Forest Engineering MSc. Environmental and Natural Resources Economics 25. Doctor of Philosophy Faculty of Veterinary Medicine 26. Master of Veterinary Medicine 27. Master of Preventive Veterinary Medicine 28. Master of Science in Applied Microbiology 29. Master of Science in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology 30. Master of Science in Parasitology 31. Master of Science in Anatomy 32. Master of Science in Applied Cell Biology 33. Master of Science in Clinical Pathology 34. Master of Science in Natural Products 35. Master of Science in Veterinary Surgery 36. Master of Science in Veterinary Anesthesiology 37. Master of Science in Animal reproduction & Biotechnology 38. Master of Science in Comparative Animal Physiology 39. Master of Science in Biochemistry 40. Master of Science in Clinical Chemistry 41. Master of Science in Applied Toxicology 42. Master of Science in Pharmacology 43. Master of Science in Public Health & Food Safety 44. Master of Science in Epidemiology 45. Master of Science in One Health Molecular Biology 46. Doctor of Philosophy Faculty of Science 47. Postgraduate Diploma in Education Development Studies Institute 1. Master of Rural Development 2. Doctor of Philosophy


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