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AWAMAKI 2016 ANNUAL REPORT


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Who We Are Message From Executive Director Story Of The Year Data Dashboard Cooperative Spolight Financial Statement Connect With Us Thank You Staff

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WHO WE ARE Awamaki collaborates with rural Andean communities to create economic opportunities and improve social well-being. We are a growing and sustainable not-for-profit business helping women’s cooperatives learn to start and run their own businesses. We offer skills trainings and market access opportunities to the women’s cooperatives in our program. We believe that empowering women transforms communities. Poor women know what their families need. Given the opportunity to earn an income, they invest in their children, their homes, their farms, their businesses, and their communities.

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MESSAGE FROM OUR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dear Friends,

This has been a year of living our mission. Three years ago, we set a goal of bringing our cooperatives to independent business success. We want the artisan groups with whom we work to be able to create, market and sell to any client, and not just us, so that their economic empowerment does not depend on one NGO. For three years we have been working with our six cooperatives to teach the business and technical skills they will need. Now, two of our knitting cooperatives are working sustainably with other clients. One group has had over $3000 in orders from multiple other clients; another is just beginning their first client relationship. As these groups expand their client portfolios and sell more to others, we can take on new groups and begin to work through the long waiting list of women artisans who want to join our program. One of the behind-the-scenes issues we’ve dealt with at Awamaki is local sustainability. For years we have been investing in the skills of our local staff, promoting women from our

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Peruvian team; now, our team of nine is 2/3 Peruvian. Through years of planning and deep investments in training we are close to making this goal a reality. Often your donations helped give us the time or resources we needed to make these investments. One of my personal highlights of the year was bringing two of our Peruvian staff members to the U.S. Thanks to the generosity of over 50 donors and the Mary’s Pence foundation, we were able to fund the travel of our two artisan coordinators, Martha and Mercedes, to present at a textiles conference. This was a powerful experience for them as they saw for the first time the market for which our artisans make products, and shared their experiences and craftsmanship with textile professionals and

enthusiasts at the Textile of Society America Symposium conference in Savannah, Georgia. It was also a powerful experience for all of us as we continute to invest in women’s leadership development at every level of Awamaki, and live our mission not only in our programmatic work but in our operational strategy as well. There is no manual for straddling the U.S., Peruvian and Quechua worlds as we do. Working productively and collaboratively across borders, language and cultures is a learned skill. However, as we as an organization invest in our team, our team invests in our women artisans. Your support makes this possible, so that both Awamaki and our artisan partners can grow our businesses and deepen the impact we have on

families and communities in Peru. in our operational strategy as well. There is no manual for straddling the U.S., Peruvian and Quechua worlds as we do. Working productively and collaboratively across borders, language and cultures is a learned skill. However, as we as an organization invest in our team, our team invests in our women artisans. Your support makes this possible, so that both Awamaki and our artisan partners can grow our businesses and deepen the impact we have on families and communities in Peru. Thanks of this

for being journey with

part us.

Warmly,

Kennedy Leavens

Executive Director

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STORY OF THE YEAR

I

n October2016, Martha and Mercedes, the Women’s Cooperatives Knitting and Weaving Coordinators respectively, represented Awamaki on a panel discussion at the Textile Society of America’s 2016 Symposium in Savannah, Georgia. This trip was an opportunity for Awamaki to invest in our hardworking staff members so they can better lead our women artisans. Even though Martha and Mercedes spent only ten days in Georgia and North Carolina, their trip was a whirlwind of visits to stores and suppliers as well as the textile conference. Martha and Mercedes began their journey at Ten Thousand Villages in Atlanta, Georgia. This was their first time seeing any other fair trade products besides our own. They had tons of ideas for different products the women could make, and new ways to present the products. The next day included a visit to the oldest working textile mill company in Charlotte, North Carolina. Martha and Mercedes saw how upholstery was made on large-scale looms and agreed afterwards this was the most interesting day of their trip. They enjoyed seeing how the

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business was organized, including the archive rooms and catalog system used to track textile production. Later in the day, store managers from local museum stores also sat down with the Awamaki team to talk about what makes a successful product. After days of taking in information, it was finally time to present at the conference. Martha and Mercedes shared their experiences, connected with other respected artisans, and learned more about fair trade. Mercedes took command of the stage - peaking in front of a crowd is where she shines, as we see all the time in her leadership of our women’s groups. Martha assisted, and was exhilarated after it was over. The experience gave Martha and Mercedes a new perspective to their work at Awamaki. Mercedes hoped that this trip would support Awamaki’s goal of preserving the women’s

cultural identity within their work, while at the same time improving the cooperatives’ business tactics in order to increase the women’s income and quality of life. Seeing the quality of other products in the market also inspired Martha and Mercedes to use their leadership skills to urge the women working with Awamaki to create the best possible product. This trip also highlighted that Peru is not just Machu Picchu. Leading a panel discussion at the symposium, Martha and Mercedes shared what makes the artisans in the region around Ollantaytambo so special, and the ways in which Awamaki aims to promote Peruvian culture. We are profoundly grateful to Global Giving for making it possible for us to offer this opportunity to Martha and Mercedes. We look forward to seeing how Martha and Mercedes use their new perspective and experience in their work. Story by: Lee Kennedy

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DATA DASHBOARD

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Statement of Financial Position Awamaki U.S. and Asociación Civil Awamaki, combined Assets Cash Accounts Receivable Inventory Fixed Assets Total Assets Liabilities Equity Opening Balance Unrestricted Net Assets Net Income Total Liabilities & Equity

2016

2015

2014

$150,700 -$3,700 $32,600 $2,400 $182,000

$116,900 $8,800 $29,800 $2,400 $157,900

$66,100 $5,200 $32,300 $2,400 $106,200

$1,400

$2,600

$300

-$35,700 $183,900 $32,400 $182,00

$35,700 $143,000 $48,000 $157,900

$10,000 $48,200 $47,700 $106,200

Note on financial statements:

Awamaki U.S. is a U.S. -based 501 (c)(3) non-profit responsible for raising funds to support the Awamaki goal of creating economic opportunities for rural Andean women. The Associación Civil Awamaki is a Peruvian non-profit civil association responsible for carrying out women’s empowerment programs in Peru.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Statement of Profit and Loss Awamaki U.S. 2015 2016

Income Fair Trad Product Sales Grants & Donations Tourism Income Other Total Income

Statement of Profit and Loss Asociaciรณn Civil Awamaki 2016 2015

Income Fair Trad Product Sales Grants & Donations Tourism Income Other Total Income

$113,000 $108,200 $211,100 $1,600 $433,900

$87,800 $92,500 $115,000 $4,900 $300,200

$128,300 $3,600 $153,100

$85,900 $45,900 $154,500

COGS

-

-

COGS

$120,700

$80,400

Profit

$149,100

$154,500

Profit

$313,200

$219,800

$1,300 $38,500 $68,700 $2,200 $110,700 $43,800

Expense Operations Facilities People Fundraising Program Other Total Expense Net Income

$21,200 $39,800 $132,300 $2,100 $82,000 $9,400 $286,800 $26,400

$20,600 $19,300 $117,500 $500 $57,500 $1,300 $216,700 $3,100

Expense Operations Facilities People Fundraising Program Other Total Expense Net Income

$8,900 $0.00 $134,200 $0.00 $143,100 $6,000

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CONNECT WITH US

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THANK YOU SUPPORTERS Serena Adlerstein Julie Alters Peter Anderson Nicholas Aquadro Lidia Baca Bernard Baskin Kamaria Baysmore Monica Beatriz Galiano Robert & Randee Blackstone Brenda Boehler Kaitlyn Bohlin William Breedlove Eileen Breslin Elizabeth Breslow David Brokaw Colleen Brophy Marian Cadiz Jennifer Carroll Quek Chinkwok Ken and Mary Cirillo David Cobb Ann Conroy Kimberly Cuenca Alessio Cusin Marcelo D’Amico and the 40in40 Foundation

Natalie Davis Kevin and Emily Davis Jackie Edwards Walter Euyang and Susan Lammers Iben Falconer Catherine Farrey Alejandra Ferrara Barbara Fingleton Elizabeth Fischbach Lucas Fletcher Christine Fletcher Steve Froemming Michelle Frost Nancy Fullman Cathy Fulton The David and Patricia Giuliani Foundation James Goldenring Julie Guise Michiko Gustafson David and Cindy Harrison John Harvey Nicholas Hayes Rosen Krissa and Marty Anderson Carol Henderson

Steven Holland Robert Homchick Anthony Host Linda Hubbard-Cooke Kenneth Hughes Kathryn Jamieson Carolyn Johnson Vernon Jones Karen and Jim Kretschmann Lori Kukler Barbara LaVelle Ladd Leavens and Nancy Kennedy Jacob Lipson and Kiry Nelson Alfred Lopez Raymond Lopez Andrew MacGregor Stella Mally Kelsey Mazeski Monty McGavock Nancy Meffe Robert Metcalfe Kate Mitchell Karen Mitchell Richard Morieko Kitty Mrache

Wendy Nadan Kathleen O’Connell Patrick OFarrell Linda Ohsberg Katie Otoole Paul Oyer Alan Painter Mark Perlotto Jacob Perrin Julie Pickett James Plowden Kevin R Ryan Rakower John Reed Jonathan Reingold Paula Reiss Barbara Rex Caitlin Rhoades Jeanette Richardson Steve Rogers Oceanside Rotary Stephen Rummage Kyle Samuels Alla Sazonova James and Rene Schwartz Michele Sheehan George Smith Vivian Smith

Alice Spinnler-Duerr Robert Stewart William Strong Caroline Tegeler Nancy Tegeler Save the Shelbees Nick Titus Gillian Walker Sandy Wan Pam Weeks John Weeks Vicki Weeks and David Jones Tom Weeks and Deb Oyer Wendy Weeks Susan Weinstein Chris Wismer Jessica Younker and Will Gaggioli

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STAFF AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS BOARD Annemarie Toccket Ladd Leavens Kramer Gillin Tom Weeks Jessica Younker Kennedy Leavens Kristen Clark

STAFF Kennedy Leavens, Executive Director Yovana Candela, Financial Manager and Operations Director Jess Sheehan, Head Designer Mercedes Durand, Women’s Artisanal Cooperatives Coordinator Martha Zuniga, Women’s Artisanal Cooperatives Coordinator Ana Katia Apaza, Administrative Assistant Sydney Perlotto, Marketing and Communications Coordinator Giulia Debernardini, Director of Sales and Impact Juan Camilo Saavedra, Sustainable Tourism Coordinator Laura Brokaw, International Partnerships Manager Annemarie Toccket, Resource Development Director

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Profile for Awamaki

2016 Annual Report  

Read on to learn about Awamaki's accomplishments in 2016.

2016 Annual Report  

Read on to learn about Awamaki's accomplishments in 2016.

Profile for awamaki
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