Issuu on Google+

WELCOME TO A PREVIEW OF THE 4TH EDITION (2013) OF

THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD, VOLUME I. NON-PASSERINES Editors: E C Dickinson and J V Remsen, Jr. This preview allows us to give potential readers an idea of the detailed content brought together in this work and how some of the less obvious content may be relevant to the readers’ needs of interests. No book developed a team as large as the team here assembled should be expected to be low-priced. To some the content will be of great value; this we believe applies to all who write scientific papers or books on birds because their publishers and their readers expect them to ensure their content is as accurate as possible. Managers of museum collections, biogeographers and conservationists will all see a reason to consider this work an important tool, perhaps even an indispensable one. In its original edition in 1980 this book was designed for the birder (or if your prefer the “twitcher”). Many birders are or become pioneering field ornithologists and from their experience flows much of the clarification of our perceptions of avian relationships, distributions, migrations and ecological needs. We still seek to serve this audience although a two volume work has become necessary to serve both audiences (and as these audiences should be using the same languages of names a single book that provides for both is needed). Innovations in this Edition respond to the wishes expressed by both groups as will the promised Updates. Most of the pages that follow are simple extracts from the book. A few pages, which, like this one lack page numbers are insertions to provide some explanations and insights into what is offered and why. ECD/March 2013 The pre-publication discount offer is open until April 30th. Buyers choosing that offer secure a guarantee that volume 2 will cost them the same price as volume 1. This preview also serves to facilitate book reviews for journals looking to provide a brief review (less than a page). Journals prepared to offer more review space will be offered a review copy.


The Howard and Moore 

COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE  BIRDS OF THE WORLD  4th Edition  Volume One    Non–passerines 

Edward C Dickinson and J V Remsen Jr. (editors)  Special Adviser   Joel Cracraft  Normand David  Robert J Dowsett  Steven M S Gregory  Tim Inskipp 

Marek Kuziemko  David Pearson  Shaun Peters  Daniel Philippe  Kees Roselaar 

Richard Schodde  Lars Svensson  Dick Watling  David R Wells 

Database design and management   Denis Lepage  with acknowledgements to Norbert Bahr and special thanks to  Jon Fjeldså Rauri Bowie Alice Cibois

Les Christidis Irby Lovette Jan Ohlson

Martin Päckert Frank E Rheindt Paul Scofield


Published by Aves Press Limited, Eastbourne  All rights in the title and front cover design of “The Howard and Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of  the World” are owned by the Trust for Avian Systematics. Registered charity No. 1014427.  Copyright 2013 © Edward C. Dickinson  (save to the extent owned by holding trustees  for the Trust for Avian Systematics).  ISBN  978‐0‐9568611‐0‐8 

Printed and bound by Imago in China 

Recommended Citation:  Dickinson, E.C. & J.V. Remsen Jr. (Eds). 2013. The Howard & Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the  World. 4th. Edition, Vol. 1, Aves Press, Eastbourne, U.K.  Citation to authored content within the book is recommended in the following format:  Cracraft,  J.  2013.    Avian  Higher‐level  Relationships  and  Classification:  Nonpasseriforms.  Pp.  xxi‐xli  in:  Dickinson, E.C. & J.V. Remsen Jr. (Eds) 2013. The Howard and Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the  World. 4th. Edition, Vol. 1, Aves Press, Eastbourne, U.K. 

A CIP catalogue record of this book is available from The British Library  All  rights  reserved.  No  part  of  this  work  may  be  reproduced  or  used  in  any  form  or  by  any  means,  without  written  permission of the publishers and other owners of intellectual property rights, and this applies to photographic, electronic  or mechanical means, including photocopying, recording, taping or information storage and retrieval systems 

Data set users for purposes of collection management and providers of  collection access and significant support through library and other facilities 

Host of on‐line editorial database 


PREFACE  THE TITLE   Until  recently  the  ownership  of  the  goodwill  in  the  title  of  this  book  belonged  to  the  individual  editor  of  the  succeeding editions. It now belongs to the Trust for Avian Systematics (“the Trust”) (U.K. Registered Charity No.  1014427); which will also own the intellectual property rights to the database created to facilitate the production of  this and future editions. These steps are being taken to increase the potential for the title to appear again in future  years.  The  Trust,  in  licencing  the  use  of  its  title,  places  obligations  on  the  Managing  Editor  which  include  the  updating of that database and recruiting successors. It is partly thanks to the existence of this editorial database  that our publishers, together with the Trust, have plans in place for an update process. Every copy of this work  contains, near the back, a registration form with a unique number (that may not be shared). This may be sent by  post or scanned and e‐mailed to the publishers. This will entitle the owner to a period of free access to the updates  as downloads (which will be included in a journal with an ISSN and which will qualify as an e‐publication under  the recently revised articles of International Code of Zoological Nomenclature). These updates will thus be citable. 

THE LIST CONCEPT AND THE FUTURE  With the third Edition in 2003 The  Howard & Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World began to evolve to  better  serve  the  academic  community.  In  the  light  of  the  way  publication  and  information  provision  is  being  changed by the Internet this was the right decision. Competing lists are available free on the web and these suffice  for the needs of many birders. By contrast the academic community and those who write scientific papers need a  work that  can be cited in the knowledge it can be checked. Web‐based lists are ephemeral; they change quietly  and what was there to be cited may have changed when next checked. They also do not qualify as a publication in  the eyes of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature.  While the appearance of the list in this Edition may look very similar, changes have been made to enhance its  utility  and  in part  we  see  it  as  an  increasingly  reliable  nomenclator  (although  only  for  currently  accepted  taxa).  This is expanded on in the Introduction. 

THE TEAM  This book is the work of a dedicated team whose roles in the current edition are set out below. Those involved in  the team for the preceding edition are asterisked, but some others listed were already helping.  The bulk of the revision of the list, including decisions on taxonomic issues up to generic level, rests with one  or more of the Regional Consultants. These are:  Europe: Kees Roselaar* and Lars Svensson  Africa: David Pearson* and Bob Dowsett  Asia: Edward Dickinson*, David Wells and Tim Inskipp  Australasia: Richard Schodde*  Western Pacific Islands: Dick Watling  The Americas: James Remsen, Jr.*, Daniel Philippe, Shaun Peters  The ordinal and familial sequence of the list finalised as late as possible (in early November 2012), comes from Joel  Cracraft, who, in his chapter, includes his own acknowledgements of help.  Essential support for the team of Regional Consultants has come (in alphabetical order) from:  Normand David: scientific name spellings/ the genders of genera and signals, footnotes and appendixes  relating to these 


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

Steven Gregory: generic names citations and type designation notes   Marek Kuziemko: general support to the Editors and the Assistant Editor   Denis Lepage: database development and management  Shaun Peters: Assistant Editor (range statement formatting, geographic terms, gazetteer and maps) and  general support to the Editors  Daniel Philippe: literature collection and support of the bibliographic database, ably assisted by Marek  Kuziemko  Norbert Bahr*: collection and analysis of new publications (to early 2010)  The Americas benefit from  the work and  published reports of the North American  Check‐list Committee of the  American  Ornithologists’  Union  and  from  parallel  work  by  the  South  American  Check‐list  Committee.  For  Europe  note  is,  of  course,  taken  of  the  reports  of  the  Taxonomic  Sub‐Committee  of  the  British  Ornithologists’  Union  Records  Committee,  but  especially  for  the  rest  of  the  Eastern  Hemisphere  it  was  realised  that  the  team  required  expert  help  to  evaluate  the  substantial  flow  of  molecular  studies.  In  consequence  an  independent  Editorial Advisory Committee was established comprising:  Jon  Fjeldså  (Chairman),  Rauri  Bowie,  Alice  Cibois,  Les Christidis,  Irby  Lovette,  Jan  Ohlson,  Martin  Packärt,  Frank  E. Rheindt and Paul Scofield.  Our grateful thanks are due to them for their extensive work.  The editors, Edward and ‘Van’, while being entirely clear that the responsibility for all that we publish rests with  them, would like to acknowledge the huge debt owed to all these colleagues without whom this  volume  of the  new (4th) edition could not have been completed.  Edward, as Managing Editor, would also like to thank the Trustees of the Trust for Avian Systematics, previously  the  Trust  for  Oriental  Ornithology  (and  by  extension  to  Thomas  Donegan  and  colleagues  at  Shearman  Sterling  (UK) LLP for extensive legal support geared to establishing the various formal legal relationships put into place);  also to George Finney at Bird Studies Canada for his interest and encouragement and for making the participation  of  Denis  Lepage  possible,  and  finally  to  Richard  Howard  who  still  takes  a  considerable  interest  in  the  work  bearing his name as well as that of the late Alick Moore.   We acknowledge the help and support of many others on the following pages. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  The most speciose families dealt were sent for comment, particularly on generic sequence and our references to  molecular studies, to the following specialists in their fields: 

Bill Clark (Accipitridae)  Pierre‐André Crochet (Laridae)  Thomas Donegan (Cracidae)  Carole Griffiths (Falconidae) 

Kevin Johnson (Columbidae)  Leo Joseph (Psittaciformes)  Jeremy Kirchman (Rallidae)  Helen Lerner (Accipitridae) 

Clive Mann (Cuculidae)  Philip McGowan (Phasianidae)  Karja Somadikarta (Apodidae)   

We are also pleased to acknowledge collaboration with BirdLife International (Stuart Butchart and Nigel Collar)  on our treatment of Extinct taxa (discussed further in the Introduction and also the subject of a brief appendix).  The  photograph  of  the  Colorful  Puffleg  which  appears  on  our  back  cover,  is  by  Luis  Mazariegos  who  very  kindly gave us permission to use it; colour maps in the CD are the work of Rob Still; to both these friends we are  most grateful. 

vi 


PREFACE 

Many  other  people  have  helped  us  with  all  sorts  of  task  ranging  from  questioning  apparent  errors  in  our  3rd  edition, supplying requested PDFs, to actually working quite extensively for us on special tasks. With apologies to  anyone omitted the list includes:  Jane  Acred,  Mark  Adams,  Alexandre  Aleixo,  Pekka  Alestalo,  Des  Allen,  Miguel  Alonso‐Zarazaga,  Per  Alström,  Nacho  Areta,  Ramana  Athreya,  Neil  Baker,  Richard  Banks,  Alexander  Bardin,  Juan  Mazar  Barnett,  Ian  Barr,  Nicolas Barre, Christine Barthel , John Bates, Ernst Bauernfeind, Bruce Beehler, Keith Betton, Mike Blair, Walter  Bock,  Walter  Boles,  Enrico  Borgo,  Patrice  Bouchard,  Frederik  Brammer,  Axel  Braunlich,  Vincent  Bretagnolle,  Lynda  Brooks,  Ralph  Browning,  Murray  Bruce,  Rémy  Bruckert,  Don  Buden,  John  Terry  Burridge,  Ingvar  Byrkjedal, Nicholas Carlile, Clair Castle, Roger Charlwood, Anthony Cheke, Pengjun Cheng, Terry Chesser, Alice  Cibois,  Paul  Clapham,  Stephanie  Clarke,  Nigel  Cleere,  Ed  Colijn,  Nigel  Collar,  Martin  Collinson,  Katrina  Cook,  John Cooper, Paul Coopmans, Gill Cornelius, Gathorne Cranbrook, João Crawford‐Cabral, Fergus Crystal, Andres  Cuervo,  Mikhail  Daneliya,  Ann  Datta,  Greg  Davies,  Richard  Dean,  Devashish  Deb,  René  Dekker,  Theo  de  Kok,  Ramil del Rosario, Ron Demey, Bob Dickerman, Philip Dickinson, Ding Chang‐qing, Lisa di Tommaso, Gunthard  Dornbusch, Will Duckworth, Diana Duncan, Jon Dunn, Guy Dutson, Pascal Eckhoff, Andy Elliott, Ian Endersby,  Neal Evenhuis, He Fen‐qi, Tobias Fendt, Clem Fisher, Dana Fisher, John Fitzpatrick, Joseph Forshaw, Alain Fossé,  Rosendo Fraga, Sylke Frahnert, Johan Fromholtz, Ross Galbreath, Anita Gamauf, Christine Giannoni, Dan Gibson,  Frank  Gill,  Tom  Gilissen,  Thomas  Gladwin,  Michel  Gosselin,  Jon  S.  Greenlaw,  Marcel  Guntert,  Martin  Haasse,  Alison  Harding,  Frank  Hawkins,  Gillian  Hawkins,  He  Fen‐qi,  Alain  Hennache,  Graham  Higley,  Christoph  Hinkelmann, Janet Hinshaw, Tony Holcombe, Jesper Hornskov, Julian Hume, Valentin Ilyashenko, Carol Inskipp,  Michael Stuart Irwin, Helen James, Alvaro Jamarillo, Karsten Jedlitschka, Justin Jensen, James Jobling, Carl Jonas,  Colin Jones, Peter Kaestner, Mikhail Kalyakin, Krys Kazmierczak, Robert S Kennedy, Rebecca Kimball, Ben King,  Ragnar  Kinzelbach,  Guy  Kirwan,  Richard  Klim,  Alan  Knox,  Evgeny  Koblik,  Claus  König,  Margaret  Koopman,  Peter  Kovalik,  Andrew  W.  Kratter,  Jörg  Kretzschmar,  Alain  Lebossé,  Mary  LeCroy,  Françoise  Lemaire,  Leone  Lemner, Michèle Lenoir, Helen Lerner, David Lohman, Murray Lord, Vladimir Loskot, Michel Louette, Mathew  Louis,  Chris  Lyal,  Clive  Mann,  Roy  MacDiarmid,  Eleanor  MacLean,  Judith  Magee,  Stephanie  Marshall,  Jochen  Martens,  Eileen  Matthias,  Gerald  Mayr,  Bob  McGowan,  Gerlof  Mees,  Eberhard  Mey,  Ellinor  Michel,  Pawel  Mielczarek, Danny Mierte, J. Pieter Michels, Helen Millington, Hector Miranda, Jiri Mlíkovsky, Blaise Mulhauser,  Yang Nan, Rishad Naoroji, Adolfo Navarro‐Sigüenza, Alex Nazarenko, Bernd Nicolai, Svetlana Nikolaeva, Storrs�� Olson, Ronald Orenstein, Dieter Oschadleus, Leslie Overstreet, Fernando Pacheco, Martin Päckert, Thomas Pape,  David Parkin, Didier Partouche, Eric Pasquet, Michael Patten, Robert Payne, Mark Peck, John Penhallurick, Alan  Peterson, Vitor Piacentini, Florence Pieters, Alison Pirie, Aasheesh Pittie, Manuel Plenge, Roberto Poggi, Eugene  Potapov,  Roald  Potapov,  Doug  Pratt,  David  Priddell,  Robert  Prŷs‐Jones,  Peter  Pyle,  Christiane  Quaisser,  Mike  Ramos,  Fabio  Raposo,  Pamela  Rasmussen,  Laurent  Raty,  Matt  Rayner,  Yaroslav  Red’kin,  Michael  Reiser,  Swen  Renner,  Robin  Restall,  Clive  Reynard,  Nate  Rice,  Adam  Riley,  Mark  Robbins,  Clemencia  Rodner,  Françoise  Romagné, Kees Rookmaaker, Gary Rosenberg, Travis Rosenberry, Katja Rosvall, Philip Round, Ronald de Ruiter,  Douglas  Russell,  Simon  Rycroft,  Roger  Safford,  Svenja  Sammler,  George  Sangster,  Karl‐Ludwig  Schuchmann,  Tom  Schulenberg,  Sylvia  Schwenke,  Paul  Scofield,  Lucia  Liu  Severinghaus,  Françoise  Sevre,  Fred  Sheldon,  Jay  Sheppard,  Jevgeni  Shergalin,  Hadoram  Shirihai,  Vladimir  Shishkin,  Alan  Sieradzki,  Luís  Fabio  Silveira,  Jane  Smith,  Tadeusz  Stawarczyk,  Frank  Steinheimer,  Gary  Stiles,  Ante  Strand,  Andy  Swash,  Paul  Sweet,  Ann  Sylph,  Hiraka Takashi, Barry Taylor, Alan Tennyson, Jean‐Claude Thibault, Dieter Tietze, Joe Tobias, Pavel Tomkovich,  Till Töpfer, Stephen Totterman, Steven Tracey, Thomas Trombone, Don Turner, Risto Väisänen, Arnoud van den  Berg,  Renate  van  den  Elzen,  Kirsten  van  den  Veen,  Steven  van  der  Mije,  Hein  van  Grouw,  Mariijn  van  Hoorn,  Oscar  van  Rootselaar,  Carlo  Violani,  Ruud  Vlek,  Claire  Voisin,  Jean‐François  Voisin,  Anne‐Claire  Volongo,  Michael  Walters,  David  Weidenfeld,  Francisco  Welter‐Schultes,  Sophie  Wilcox,  Mike  Wilson,  Daria  Wingreen‐ Mason, Raffael Winkler, Judith White, Trevor Worthy, Takeshi Yamasaki, Zhang Zhengwang, Zheng Guang‐mei,  Dario Zuccon. 

vii


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

SUBSCRIBERS  Allen, Philip  Backhurst, Graeme  Bailey, Stephen F.  Baker, Helen  Barnes, Stuart  Beehler, Bruce  Bennett, Keith  Blair, Mike  Bock, Walter  Borgo, Enrico  Braunlich, Axel  Burridge, John T.  Capek, Miroslav  Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh  Cheke, Anthony  Clapham, Paul  Cuervo, Andres  Daniels, Brian  Davison, Geoff  Dean, Richard  Deb, Devashish  Demey, Ron  Derryberry, Liz  Dickson, Paul  DiCostanzo, Joseph  Dumbacher, John  Duncan, Alex  Dunn, John  Eggenkamp, H.H.  Elliott, Andy  Elphick, Jonathan  Endersby, Ian  Erritzoe, Johannes  Escalante, Patricia  Fisher, Clem  Fisher, Clemency   Fishpool, Lincoln  Fossé, Alain  Fuisz, Tibor  Gamauf, Anita  Garrett, Kimball  Geneva Mus. Nat. Hist.     

 

viii 

Guimond, Alain  Hale, Allen   He Fen‐Qi  Hennache, Alain  Hinkelmann, Christoph  Hiraoka Takashi  Howe, William  Jirle, Erling  Johansson, Ulf  Jornvall, Hans  Kazmierczak, Krys  Kirwan, Guy  Koopman, Margaret  Kristensen, Jan  Krueper, David  Lagerqvist, Marcus  Lebossé, Alain  Lei Fu‐min  Leven, Michael  Longmore, Wayne  Maley, James  Manegold, Albrecht  Martens, Jochen  McGhie, Henry  Mendoza, Claudia  Mey, Eberhard  Mlikovsky, Jiri  Nicolia, Bernd  Nikolaus, Gerhard  Nishiumi, Isao  Nores, Manuel  Oliveros, Carl  Olsson, Urban  Pacheco, J.F.  Patten, Michael  Payne, Bob  Penhallurick, John  Perron, Richard  Pittie, Aasheesh  Plenge, Manuel  Reiser, Michael  Robbins, Mark  Roberson, Don 

Round, Philip  Rudd, Jane [Leo Joseph]  Rumsey, Stephen  Sage, Bryan  Sangster, George  Schulenberg, Tom  Schweizer, Manuel  Severinghaus, Lucia  Sheldon, Fred  Sheppard, Jay  Shigeta, Yoshimeta  Silveira, Luis F  Smart, Mary (Te Papa)  Springer, Heinrich  Stawarczyk, Tadeusz  Steinheimer, Frank  Switzer, Melissa [= John Fitzʹ]  Sypniewski, Ted  Tertitsky, Grigory  Tom Gladwin  Tomkovich/Koblik  Tsurumi, Miyako  Turner, Don  Tyrberg, Tommy  van Balen, Bas  Van Bambeke, Joelle  van den Berg, Arnound  van den Elzen, Renate  van Loon, A.J.  Voelker, Gary  White, Clayton  Winker, Kevin  Winkler, Raffael  Witt, Chris  Woods, R.  Worthy, Trevor  Woxvold, Iain  Zhang, Zheng Wang  Zheng, Guang‐mei  Zhu Lei  Zou, Fasheng  Zuccon, Dario   


NOTE TO BROWSERS I

THE TRUST FOR AVIAN SYSTEMATICS U.K. REGISTERED CHARITY NO.

1014427

The Trust is the owner of the Intellectual Property in the title The Howard and Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World and of the content of the database through which the work is produced. This database is maintained by all members of the team assembled by a Managing Editor. All of them assign non-exclusive rights in perpetuity to the Trust for what they contribute to that database. This places the Trust in a position to assure, in so far as it is reasonably possible, that, based on this resource and a trusted title, successive editors will be able to create editions for as far into the future as this reference work is considered valuable. Primary responsibility for the selection of a new Managing Editor lies with the existing Managing Editor and the Trust sees succession planning as important. The Trust also has the power to prevent a Managing Editor from continuing in office if the quality of the work fails to reach the standard the Trust expects from the work. For this service the Trust receives a fee for licensing the one-time use of the title to a combination of a Managing Editor and a sympathetic publisher (one who will accept some significant contractual restrictions on the rights normally vested in a publisher, in particular a single-edition contract for print entirely separate from any contract for electronic publication). The Trust is not a membership organisation; there are some important advantages of this that outweigh the opportunity to seek membership subscriptions. The principal advantage lies in not having to find suitable member-candidates willing to stand for periodic election by members who may have other agendas which cause them to share only incompletely the aspirations of a tightlyfocussed Trust. However, the Trust is not a “closed shop”. It is intended that all interested avian systematists may build a relationship with the Trust, preferably perhaps as members of a national ornithological society (or union) willing to encourage a subset of its members to become honorary affiliates of the Trust and to provide the appropriate liaison. The Trust’s objectives include restoring balance to the relationship between those establishing molecular phylogenies and those reviewing and revising taxonomies so that the there is mutual understanding and a clear goal of informing the public through the use of the appropriate language for scientific names as laid down in the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. The Trust’s approach to this will be to seek ambassadors country by country who can promote this vision of collaboration. It will also work, perhaps in conjunction with the Standing Committee on Ornithological Nomenclature, to help journal editors understand the requirements of the Code. The Trust also recognises that there are problems in providing the knowledge needed by students in this field and hopes to stimulate the development of course modules offering the extra content needed. The Trust may be contacted through the Hon. Secretary (Hein van Grouw), c/o The Natural History Museum, Tring, Hertfordshire, HP23 6AP


Contents 

Preface  Subscribers  Contents  Introduction  Avian higher level relationships and classification. By Joel Cracraft  Table of contents, links and statistics  Making full use of the list as presented  The Checklist  Appendix 1. Nomenclature of the higher classificatory ranks of birds. By R. Schodde  Appendix 2. Matters of nomenclature and taxonomy  2.1 New nomenclatural acts herein (First Reviser actions)  2.2 Deferred actions  2.3 New taxa in the Branta canadensis complex  2.4 Names given to other extinct taxa  2.5 Notes on particular nomenclatural issues (background notes)  2.6 Notes on particular taxonomic issues (background notes)  Appendix 3. English names. By D.R. Wells, R.J. Dowsett & L. Svensson  Appendix 4.  Variable species‐group names. By N. David & M. Gosselin  Index to scientific names  Index to English names  Tear‐out Registration Request for free on‐line updates. 

v  viii  ix  xi  xxi  xlv  xlix  1  387  391  391  391  394  399  400  401  403  405  409  453   

The above list does not include the contents of the accompanying CD; for that see next page. 

ix


Contents of the accompanying CD‐ROM 

List of References  Appendix 5.  I.C.Z.N. Decisions and Opinions (Ornithology)  Appendix 6.  Gazetteer (place names used in this work)  By S. Peters  Appendix 7.  Selected maps (mainly to illustrate taxon ranges)  Appendix 8.  Species‐group name spellings (conflict cases examined)  By N. David & E.C. Dickinson   Appendix 9.  Dates of Publication (links to “Priority! The Dating of Scientific Names in  Ornithology”) 

To come in the CD with vol. 2:  Index of synonyms listed in the footnotes of the two volumes (with original and current  spellings and genus names)   


INTRODUCTION  With  the  universal  recognition  that  phylogenetic  relationships  affect  analyses  of  comparative  biology,  and  with  the  consequent  dramatic  increase  in  data  on  those  phylogenetic  relationships  using  techniques  that  directly  compare  DNA  sequences,  a  classification  that  reflects  these  data  becomes  a  useful  tool  for  those  interested  in  evolutionary  processes.  The  objective  of  the  2003  edition  of  the  Howard  and  Moore  Checklist  (Dickinson  2003;  hereinafter  H&M3)  was  to  provide  a  comprehensive,  conservative  classification  of  birds  of  the  world  that  was  based on research on avian systematics and to set a high standard of nomenclatural accuracy. For this edition this  objective is unchanged, but to this we have added the goal of directly linking this classification, through footnotes,  to the research on which it is based. Simply put, our objective is to provide a complete list of valid taxa of birds  presented as a classification in a phylogenetic framework and  using the hierarchical Linnaean  system. We have  also made a major effort to upgrade the accuracy and detail of the distribution statements for each taxon because  understanding bird biogeography is critical to understanding bird classification.  The Peters Check‐list series is usually regarded as the foundation for bird classification for the 20th century.  However, many names treated therein as valid taxa, from family to subspecies, are no longer in use for a variety  of  reasons  that  range  from  research‐driven  changes  in  classification  to  new  findings  in  nomenclature.  In  our  footnotes, we provide citations leading to the rationale for why some “Peters’ names” are no longer used in this  classification, thus linking the monumental Peters Check‐list series to our current classification.  The explosion of research on the phylogeny of birds in the last decade, more than in any other in history, has  led  to  dramatic  changes  in  our  understanding  of  the  relationships  among  birds.  This  revolution  means  that  the  classification  in  H&M3  is  not  just  badly  out  of  date  but  in  many  places  virtually  obsolete.  From  relationships  among orders of birds, to composition of families and genera, to many revelations of hidden species diversity, the  classification  of  birds  of  the  world  has  undergone  major  changes.  This  explosion  has  been  ignited  by  the  widespread use of techniques, particularly DNA sequencing, that allow direct assessment of the genetic signature  of the phylogeny of birds. Therefore, a major task for this edition of the Howard and Moore Checklist (Dickinson  and  Remsen  2013;  hereinafter  H&M4)  was  to  integrate  this  research  into  the  classification  of  birds.  Our  classification  is  referenced  explicitly  to  original  research  papers  whenever  possible,  or  to  syntheses  of  that  research,  so  that  the  user  can  determine  the  source  for  the  changes;  consequently,  we  have  also  generated  an  extensive bibliography on avian phylogeny and classification.  However, rather than automatically incorporate every published opinion or result into our classification, we  have  attempted  to  evaluate  published  evidence  at  all  levels,  from  higher‐level  taxonomy  to  issues  of  nomenclature.  The  literature  on  birds,  particularly  field  guides,  is  filled  with  assertions  and  opinions  on  bird  relationships, particularly with respect to species limits. Although many of these opinions, typically from astute  field ornithologists, will sooner or later be shown to be correct, our conservative approach is to wait until actual  data  or  explicit  rationale  has  been  published  in  technical  literature.  Even  the  technical  literature  often  contains  results  that,  in  our  opinion,  require  independent  confirmation,  particularly  if  based  on  small  sample  sizes  with  respect  to  genes,  populations,  or  taxa.  Because  taxonomic  decisions  are  sometimes  subjective,  interpretations  or  opinions of others are alternative hypotheses and so many are cited in the footnotes so that they are not lost to  view.  During  the  last  ten  years  we  have  continued  to  work  hard  to  improve  the  accuracy  of  spellings  of  taxon  names and dates of publication. We have evaluated all cases known to us (in mid 2011) in which dates or spellings  were matters of dispute 1. See Methodology below.  During  the  same  period,  we  have  also  overhauled  nearly  completely  the  range  statements  from  previous  editions, in this edition giving particular attention to the Western Hemisphere. 

METHODOLOGY  Interpretation of genetic evidence  In  2003  we  had  relatively  few  such  studies  to  consider.  How  the  world  has  changed!  The  following  table,  which  tabulates  the  number  of  papers  addressing  the  phylogeny  of  birds  using  molecular  techniques,  is  instructive: 

1

 Those that have come to our notice later will be researched when time permits and will be published. 

xi


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

Year 

Global

Old World

New World

Total

2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  2010  2011  2012 

23  22  29  42  28  33  32  40  44  39  50  36 

18  27  27  43  44  31  62  59  48  62  61  71 

37  45  49  45  56  67  69  86  68  98  100  92 

78  94  105  130  128  131  163  185  160  199  211  199 

Interpretation of genetic data for implementation into a classification is a rapidly evolving field. Many early  and  some  recent  studies  suffer  from  lack  of  statistical  rigour,  poor  sampling  in  terms  of  taxa  and  genes,  and  failure to consider the issue of gene trees vs. species trees and consequent problems of incomplete lineage‐sorting.  Interpretations  of  genetic  distance  as  measures  of  taxon  rank  are  particularly  problematic,  because  they  are  typically  based  on  percent  differences  in  DNA  sequences  of  only  one  or  two  genes  from  a  genome  of  perhaps  25,000  genes,  an  unknown  percentage  of  which  are  also  variable.  This  is  not  the  place  for  a  full  review  of  such  problems.  We  do  not  use  genetic  distance  to  assign  taxon  rank.  The  potential  for  objective,  quantitative  assignment of taxon rank using genetic distance has obvious appeal, and has catalyzed, for example, the Barcode  Initiative (e.g., Hebert and Gregory 2005). However, the conceptual flaws of such a system are well known (e.g.  Moritz & Cicero 2004, Will et al. 2005).   We are also wary of the use of single gene trees, i.e., a phylogenetic hypothesis derived from the analysis of a  single  locus,  for  assignment  of  taxon  rank  at  the  species/population  level.  A  consequence  of  the  mechanics  of  evolution at the population level is that two different genes may show conflicting results in terms of which species  are most closely related. Thus, a “gene tree” may not reflect the true historical branching pattern of relationships,  i.e. the “species tree”. Although this problem has been known for many years (e.g., Pamilo &  Nei 1988, Page &  Charleston  1997),  ornithologists  have  often  ignored  it,  and  some  continue  to  do  so  in  determining  species  relationships using genetic data.  For  the  Western  Hemisphere,  we  have  been  able  to  benefit  from  reviews  of  papers  based  on  genetic  data  undertaken  by  the  classification  committees  of  the  American  Ornithologists’  Union.  The  North  American  Classification  Committee  (hereafter  NACC)  publishes  such  evaluations  annually  in  The  Auk  (e.g.,  Chesser  et  al.  2012). The South American Classification Committee’s (hereafter SACC) evaluations are not published in printed  form but appear on‐line (see Remsen et al. 2013).  For the Eastern Hemisphere, such independant evaluations tend to be restricted to individual countries. See  for  example  the  reports  of  the  Taxonomic  Sub‐Committee  of  the  British  Ornithologists’  Union’s  Records  Committee  (e.g.,  Sangster  et  al.  2012).  However,  many  countries  are  not  within  the  scope  of  such  reports.  To  remedy  this,  an  independent  Editorial  Advisory  Committee  was  appointed  (see  title  page)  with  an  Eastern  Hemisphere  remit.  The  EAC  evaluates  papers  with  respect  to  taxon  sampling,  insufficient  resolution  of  the  alternative  interpretations,  procedural  problems,  or  absence  of  formal  taxonomic  recommendations.  The  EAC’s  views  have  been  considered  by  our  Regional  Consultants  (RCs),  and  if  they  affect  two  or  more  areas  and  if  agreement among RCs was not rapid, then also by one or both editors. The EAC knew that its advice might not  always  be  followed  and  was  assured  of  its  independence  by  the  right  given  its  Chair  to  make  known  any  disagreement with decisions we have chosen to make. Thus the ultimate responsibility is always ours.  

General matters of classification  In  the  footnotes,  we  cite  published  sources  for  our  treatment  wherever  possible.  For  taxa  from  the  Western  Hemisphere, we typically start with NACC or SACC classifications as the foundation although neither deal with  subspecies. For the Eastern Hemisphere, we typically start with the classifications from the Handbook of the Birds of  Europe, the Middle East and North Africa (also known as The Birds of the Western Palearctic) (Oxford University Press),  the  Birds  of  Africa  (Academic  Press)  and  the  Handbook  of  Australian,  New  Zealand  and  Antarctic  Birds  (Oxford  University  Press),  plus  recent  national  or  regional  checklists  (e.g.  Gill  et  al.  2010).  For  both  hemispheres  the 

xii 


INTRODUCTION 

Handbook  of  the  Birds  of  the  World  series  (Lynx  Edicions,  Barcelona)  has  also  been  consulted.  If  recent  comprehensive papers are available, then we also cite those for baseline family classifications. We recognize that  much  of  bird  classification  has  not  been  analyzed  under  a  modern  phylogenetic  framework  and  that  linear  sequences are maintained largely by historical momentum. Fortunately, the number of families lacking a modern  analysis is dwindling rapidly although sufficient screening of the genera is often still lacking (and too often genus  representation is not based on the type species2, and generic names in synonymy, which that should be screened if  any attempt is to be made to subdivide a genus, are neglected).  For almost all taxa treated as valid in the Peters Check‐list series that are no longer used in H&M4, we provide  footnotes to explain the fate of those names3. However, if the Peters Check‐list placed a name in synonymy that is  also treated as a synonym in H&M4, we  do not repeat  that information. In the course of our  research, we have  discovered a number of subspecies names, validly described, that were overlooked by the Peters Check‐list volume  in  which  they  should  have  appeared,  and  these  are  also  footnoted.  To  the  best  of  our  knowledge,  we  have  included herein all new genera, species, and subspecies validly described after publication of the Peters Check‐list  volume  for  the  families  in  which  they  are  placed4.  Please  alert  the  editors  to  any  omissions.  Those  we  consider  valid are listed in the classification. Those that we do not list are set out in Appendix 2.2 with an assurance that  our reasons for deferring or denying recognition will be published in a peer‐reviewed journal.  

Orders and Families  No objective definition exists as to what constitutes an order or family other than the criterion of monophyly.  We note, however, that monophyletic groups of living birds traditionally ranked as orders have fossil records that  typically extend as far back as the Eocene, often to the Palaeocene, and occasionally to the Cretaceous. Likewise,  nonpasserine  taxa  ranked  as  families  typically  have  fossil  records  that  extend  as  far  back  as  the  Oligocene  or  Eocene.  Although  no  formal  scheme  exists  for  determining  lineage  ranks  based  on  age,  we  note  that  there  is  at  least a rough relationship between rank and lineage age that offers hope for a future, more textured delimitation  of higher taxon categories. Meanwhile, our ranking of higher taxa, as well as the relationships among them, has  been supplied by Joel Cracraft whose chapter follows.  We are often asked how family names are chosen. We recommend the treatment of this subject by Bock (1994)  based on the rules of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature5. The key point is that the dates of the  names  of  the  genera  within  the  family  are  not  the  basis  for  a  choice.  In  other  words  the  Principle  of  Priority  applies  to  the  family  group‐name  itself  (i.e.,  which  family,  subfamily  or  tribe  name  first  appeared  first  in  the  literature). In fact, the generic name from which the family or other group name is derived is itself sometimes now  only used as a subgenus or in synonymy. For example, this rule means that the subfamily name for the group that  includes the New World ground doves is  PERISTERINAE even though the root of that name is not reflected in the  name of any currently used genus6. Our use of the name IERAGLAUCINAE is a further example.  Our list, as in H&M3, is organised by family; however, unlike H&M3, the families are linked to higher‐level  taxa in the chapter by Cracraft (pp. xix‐xli). And, because the timing is appropriate to bring such names back and  to  standardise,  for  the  Class  Aves,  the  suffixes  that  should  be  common  to  the  various  ranks,  we  include  an  historical appraisal of the use of such suffixes (see Appendix 1). 

Genera  As with orders and families, no modern,  objective definition exists for what constitutes a Genus other than  the  criterion  of  monophyly.  The  traditional  concept  of  a  “genus”  in  ornithology  involves  morphological  continuity. In other words, even if no single diagnostic character for the genus exists, species included within a  genus typically share morphological themes. Herein, we maintain traditional generic limits whenever the criterion  of monophyly is verified or strongly suspected from indirect evidence (as noted in footnotes). We look forward to  the development of more objective criteria for future classifications. Naturally the root concept requiring the type  species will remain. Given the importance of these higher ranks in comparative biology, the absence of formal or 

2 It is rarely necessary to take a sample from a type specimen. Any reliably identified specimen of that species, or, if polytypic, of the  nominate subspecies, is sufficient.   3 Some were only noticed late in the process; see Appendix 2.2.  4 Again a few have recently been brought to our attention and these are in the same appendix; see Appendix 2.2.  5 However, as a reference list it is incomplete. It also lists a few family‐group names, all post 1930, that were not published with  descriptions, as required by Article 13 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (the Code), and are therefore not available  for use from the cited sources.  6 See also Art. 40.2 of the Code, which serves to protect the effects of certain nomenclatural acts prior to 1961. 

xiii


INTRODUCTION 

This work revealed that there has been no safe repository for decisions made by First Revisers under Art. 24.2  of  the  Code;  this  needs  rectification  and,  because  ZooBank8  intends  to  register  these,  we  have  begun  to  collect  them (David et al., 2009). We would greatly welcome inputs from readers.  

Dates of publication  Accurate dates of publication are critical for establishing the correct name for a taxon under the Principle of  Priority,  which  is  explained  in  the  Code  (Art.  23).  The  goal  of  this  principle  is  to  ensure  that  the  first  author  to  validly name an animal receives the appropriate credit.   The  practices  of  printers  and  of  distribution  of  books  were  so  different  in  the  early  years  of  Linnean  nomenclature due in part to the cost of type that many early works appeared in parts that may or may not have  been dated. In addition, printed dates when present can be shown to be wrong.  Our research in this area has been detailed in Dickinson et al. (2011) and the CD in that work included a table  that listed all the names for which a date change in H&M4 then seemed likely. That table is being updated, and  the passerine part of it appears updated on our CD as Appendix 9 with a brief introduction. A few errors in that  table  and  elsewhere  in  Dickinson  et  al.  (2011)  have  been  described  and  corrected  by  Dickinson  &  Jones  (2012).  Names with such date changes, whether footnoted or not, have the symbol δ at the end of the name string. A few  footnotes explain date changes recommended elsewhere.  Because  we  use  accurate  dates  of  publication  the  citations  in  our  List  of  References,  on  our  CD,  use  these  dates – despite conventions to the contrary – and place the volume date after the pagination. 

English names  We  distinguish  between  the  name  and  how  it  is  spelled  or  formatted.  To  accommodate  American  English  spelling, the names of Western Hemisphere birds use American spellings (e.g. color not colour). For a variety of  reasons,  not  least  indexing,  we  choose  to  avoid  using  hyphenated  two  word  “genus”  names  when  both  have  meaningful initial capital letters. We acknowledge that this is a widespread American practice, but it is not widely  shared in the rest of the world. This change is the main feature of a broader policy set out in Appendix 3.  Otherwise our policy on English names is to follow recognized regional authorities, e.g the North American  Classification  Committee  and  the  South  American  Classification  Committee  of  the  American  Ornithologists’  Union. In the Eastern Hemisphere we follow a variety of lists based on the preferences and advice of our Regional  Consultants. Although we see the appeal of ultimate standardisation, a concept promoted by Gill & Wright (2006),  we think that a settled methodology has yet to be broadly agreed – as is reflected by our removal of hyphens –  and English names should be a matter of regional choice with change through convergent evolution not abrupt  dictation. Thus, when two regions use different English names for the same species, we list both. We think that,  for the tiny number of species for which this is the case, ornithologists and birders are able to cope with the use of  different names in different regions; indeed they need to as the local field guides often retain the local preferences.  Indeed,  occasional  cultural  differences  add  texture  rather  than  confusion  to  ornithology.  Despite  this,  in  some  cases, we have modified English names to follow Gill & Wright (2006) or one of their subsequent updates. 

Extinct taxa  In this edition we have ‘subcontracted’ all decisions on extinction or near extinction to BirdLife International,  and  we  are  very  grateful  for  their  help.  Thus  a  species  coded  as  “extinct”  (†)  in H&M4  is  one  that  the  editorial  team of H&M4 and BirdLife International have agreed to list so (only in footnotes do we sometimes suggest that  there may be an issue). BirdLife also supplied us with the list of names with which to use the combination †? to  indicate ‘probably extinct’ although hope is kept alive.  There is always a gray area where the line is drawn to exclude fossils and subfossils. Peters (1931) judged it  best to require there to be “at least a fragment of the skin and feathers”; this has been relaxed by us, and others  before  us,  to  allow  a  few  taxa  that  were  well  depicted  without  specimens  being  safely  preserved.  The  BirdLife  International  criteria  include  more  such  borderline  cases  than  we  do;  thus  in  Appendix  2.4  we  provide  a  complementary list giving full equivalence with the BirdLife documents supplied to us. However, there are a few  minor problem cases, mainly of nomenclature, never fully discussed with BirdLife. 

8

 ZooBank is the new registry of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. 

xvii


Avian Higher‐level Relationships and Classification:  Nonpasseriforms  Joel Cracraft  Department of Ornithology, American Museum of Natural History  Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, New York 10024, USA  Biological classifications are evolving information systems. The information they carry is the hierarchical pattern  of  evolutionary  relationships  that  has  resulted  from  the  unfolding  of  the  great  Tree  of  Life.  Knowledge  about  those  relationships  keeps  being  refined  and  classifications  consequently  change  to  accommodate  that  new  understanding. Classifications are generally seen as being less important than the phylogenies on which they are  based,  and  although  that  will  always  be  the  case,  classifications  are  essential  frameworks  for  multiple  user‐ communities just because names and classificatory hierarchies do convey information about levels of relationship.  Thus, classifications that mirror the relationships of organisms are of great significance for the general biological  community  undertaking  comparative  studies,  as  well  as  for  audiences  who  use  checklists,  field  guides,  biotic  surveys, and other materials that rely on taxonomic names.  In the previous edition of the Howard & Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World (Dickinson 2003), an  introductory  chapter  reviewed  recent  advances  in  avian  phylogenetics  (Cracraft  et  al.  2003).  In  that  edition  a  decision was made to include only a minimal amount of hierarchical detail in the classification, and thus only the  ranks  of  family,  genus,  species,  and  subspecies  were  used.  Since  then,  understanding  about  the  higher‐level  relationships  of  birds  has  expanded  significantly.  Data  produced  from  these  studies,  primarily  from  molecular  systematic  analyses,  have  begun  to  clarify  the  relationships  among  and  within  the  major  groups  of  birds.  Therefore,  in  order  to  enhance  the  informativeness  of  the  Checklist,  this  edition  expands  the  use  of  hierarchical  levels to better reflect this growth in knowledge. It is still the case, however, that the phylogenetic placement of  many  groups  remains poorly resolved, hence care has been taken to reflect phylogenetic findings that are well‐ supported, preferably by large amounts of data or across multiple independent studies.  As was noted in the review in the previous edition, this volume is not the place to debate the science but to  summarize  emerging  consensuses  about  relationships.  Although  there  is  considerable  debate  in  the  scientific  literature  over  the  ability  of  the  Linnaean  hierarchy  to  reflect  relationships  as  organismal  phylogenies  keep  dramatically  expanding,  it  is  important  to  use  group‐names  that  are,  first,  familiar  to  contemporary  systematic  ornithology;  second,  historical  names  that  generally  circumscribe  clades  revealed  by  new  evidence;  and  third,  names  that  facilitate  communication  (see  Livezey  &  Zusi,  2007,  p.  87).  At  the  same  time,  stability  is  not  always  possible because many traditional group‐names (e.g. Ciconiiformes) may apply to groups that are now known to  have included families that are not related. In such cases, an effort has been made to apply names in a manner that  least  disrupts  communication  about  groups,  that  adheres  to  the  International  Code  of  Zoological  Nomenclature  (ICZN  1999),  and  that  minimizes  the  number  of  new  names  that  have  to  be  introduced  to  specify  hierarchical  relationships. There has been considerable debate in zoology and in ornithology on the rules that govern “family‐ group” names (superfamily down to, but not including, the genus level) (see Bock 1994). Above that level, over  the years many ornithologists have used the ordinal‐ending “‐iformes” but that has not always been the case (see  Mayr & Amadon 1951 and Stresemann 1959 for exceptions). The names for taxa ranked above the ordinal‐level, in  contrast,  have  not  been  uniform  in  ending.  We  would  predict  that  as  relationships  become  more  strongly  supported, newly introduced names for clades will become more widely accepted and some of those names (e.g.  such as Neoaves) are used here.  

Systematic and taxonomic terminology  This chapter discusses phylogenetic relationships and their implications for classification and for the names of  groups,  therefore  it  is  appropriate  to  review  terminology  commonly  used  within  systematic  ornithology.  In  attempting  to  reconstruct  relationships  among  birds,  systematists  collect  data  from  species  and  those  data  can  take the form of morphological (e.g. skeletal or muscular system), or increasingly they extract DNA from tissues,  including from museum specimens, and determine their nucleotide sequence. Most of the work discussed here is  based on these newer molecular data. Once comparable DNA sequences are gathered for a set of taxa, algorithms  are  used  to  analyze  the  data  and  build  phylogenetic  trees.  These  trees  are  described  by  the  pattern  of  branches  (lineages)  that  connect  to  one  another  at  nodes  (internodes)  thus  signifying  a  pattern  of  relationships.  Given  a  specific tree we say that two branches  — they may be species or  groups of species (e.g. genera, families) — are 

xxi


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

sister‐groups if they share a more  recent  common ancestor with each other than either does with a third taxon.  Depending on the quality and quantity of data for a particular question, relationships may be fully resolved into  two descendant branches (dichotomous) or they may be unresolved with three or more descendant branches from  a given node (polytomous). In building trees the algorithms also evaluate statistically the degree to which the data  support the relationships specified by each node on the tree. The more data employed in the analysis, the more we  expect or hope that support for relationships will increase, although this is not always the case.   Within  taxonomy,  we  say  a  group  is  monophyletic  if  all  the  members  of  that  named  group  share  a  more  recent  common  ancestor  with  each  other  than  any  has  to  another  outside  group  (e.g.  the  perching‐birds,  Passeriformes, are monophyletic). In contrast, a taxonomic group is said to be non‐monophyletic or polyphyletic  when  one  or  more  of  its  members  are  related  to  others  outside  the  group.  The  classical  waterbird  orders  Pelecaniformes  and  Ciconiiformes  are  no  longer  considered  to  be  monophyletic,  consequently  this  requires  changes in classification in order to maintain the principle of recognizing only monophyletic groups.  In  this  classification  widely‐used  higher‐taxon  names  are  maintained  as  much  as  possible,  especially  for  names  ranked  at  order  level  and  below.  When  major  changes  in  relationships  require  a  name  to  recognize  new  phylogenetic knowledge, new names are not proposed here. Instead, use is made of pre‐existing names from the  older literature. Most of these names are applied above the level of superfamily and are not (currently) governed  by  the  International  Code  of  Zoological  Nomenclature.  Nevertheless,  in  applying  these  names,  and  choosing  among alternatives, we have selected the oldest family‐group name available, and in order to facilitate the use of  this classification, a consistent ending for each rank above the level of superfamily is used. At the same time, this  chapter does introduce ranks that will be unfamiliar to some readers, even though many of those ranks are well‐ known within ornithology (e.g. Sibley & Monroe 1990). 

Phylogenetic Relationships and the Checklist Sequence  Translating a complex phylogenetic tree into a linear classification is an inexact science in as much as there are  many more hierarchical relationships (groups within groups) than there are Linnaean ranks that can be used to  represent them. As a consequence one must adopt various “conventions” within that linear classification (see the  suboscine classifications of Moyle et al. 2009 and Tello et al. 2009 for details). The most important, and often used,  convention  is  that  of  “phyletic  sequencing”  in  which  a  linear  sequence  of  taxa  having  the  same  taxonomic  rank  is  taken to specify a set of phylogenetic relationships, with the first taxon in the sequence interpreted to be the sister‐ group  of  all  the  subsequent  taxa  at  that  same  rank.  For  example,  using  this  “sequencing  convention,”  the  classification  Order Galliformes  Family Megapodiidae (megapodes)  Family Cracidae (guans, curassows)  Family Numididae (guineafowl)  Family Odontophoridae (New World quails)  Family Phasianidae (partridges, pheasants)  would imply that, within the Galliformes, the family Megapodiidae is the sister‐group of all four families below it  in the list; that Cracidae is the sister‐group of Numididae + Odontophoridae + Phasianidae; and that Numididae is  the  sister‐group  of  Odontophoridae  +  Phasianidae.  Thus,  the  classification  specifies  the  set  of  hierarchical  relationships: (Megapodiidae (Cracidae (Numididae (Odontophoridae + Phasianidae)))). This example is straight‐ forward because we have strong evidence for the hierarchical relationships of these five families.   There are also many nodes on the avian tree for which there is little or no support, and it is has been difficult  for classifications to reflect this ambiguity. This classification therefore introduces another convention: in a list of  names at a given rank, if those names are preceded by an asterisk (*), then the relationships among those taxa, at  that rank, are ambiguous or uncertain. Thus the classification  Infraclass Palaeognathae  Superorder Struthionimorphae  *Superorder Rheimorphae  *Superorder Tinamimorphae  *Superorder Apterygimorphae  implies  that  the  Struthionimorphae  (ostriches)  are  the  sister‐group  of  Rheimorphae  +  Tinamimorphae  +  Apterygimorphae,  but  that  relationships  among  the  latter  three  higher  taxa  are  ambiguous  given  current  evidence.  

xxii


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

to Fig. 1B

1A

NEOGNATHAE

GALLOANSERES

PALAEOGNATHAE

Suloidea Ardeoidea

Pelecani Pelecaniformes

Pelecanoidea Ciconioidea

Ciconii

Procellariiformes

Procellariimorphae

Sphenisciformes Gaviiformes Musophagiformes Otidiformes Gruoidea

Gruiformes

Ralloidea Cuculiformes Opisthocomiformes Trochiloidea Caprimulgiformes

Phaethontiformes Eurypygiformes Mesitornithiformes Pterocliformes Columbiformes Phoenicopteriformes

Galliformes

Anseriformes Apterygiformes Casuariiformes Rheiformes Tinamiformes Struthioniformes

Figure 1A. Phylogenetic tree to family level exluding cohorts Charadriia and Coracornithia.

xlii

AEQUORNITHIA

NEOAVES

Anhingidae Phalacrocoracidae Sulidae Fregatidae Ardeidae Threskiornithidae Balaenicipitidae Scopidae Pelecanidae Ciconiidae Procellariidae Hydrobatidae Diomediidae Oceanitidae Spheniscidae Gaviidae Musophagidae Otididae Aramidae Gruidae Psophiidae Heliornithidae Saurothruridae Rallidae Cuculidae Opisthocomidae Aegothelidae Apodidae Trochilidae Caprimulgidae Nyctibiidae Podargidae Steatornithidae Phaethontidae Eurypygidae Rhynochetidae Mesitornithidae Pteroclidae Columbidae Phoenicopteridae Podicepedidae Odontophoridae Phasianidae Numididae Cracidae Megapodiidae Anatidae Anseranatidae Anhimidae Apterygidae Casuariidae Tinamidae (+moas) Rheidae Struthionidae

Columbimorphae


NOTE TO BROWSERS II.

PHYLOGENETICS AND LINNEAN NOMENCLATURE In the last edition (2003) the Howard & Moore Checklist working with Joel Cracraft chose to emphasize the degree to which the historically accepted relationships of birds were in dispute. That list contained no ranks above the level of family (because which families attached to which Order was then the focus of many studies seeking greater certainty) and indeed, at and below the rank of family, various groups of birds were declared “incertae sedis” (relationships uncertain). Ten years later there is more certainty, enough that this list comes with a totally new chapter by Joel Cracraft illustrating, by a “tree” (see preceding page for half of that tree), a reasonable hypothesis of the branching of avian evolution based on numerous published studies. And with this he provides an ordered sequence, which he explains, while at the same time placing non-passerine families, however tentatively (for in many areas hypotheses still need corroboration) within orders, and orders within broader groupings. And this, of course, provides the list sequence. There tends to be a certain disconnect in name use reflecting the flexibility of phylogenetics where trees can sprout small branches at multiple points along a major branch, or along the trunk, and the constrained, rather rigid approach of nomenclatural rules which provide – in a beneficially simple way -- for only three groups of ranks (family-group, genus-group and species-group): a simplification rooted in the Linnean binomial system. At the familial level the suffix –idae is well understood to signal that rank. Above that rank, where the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature does not yet provide for conformity in the suffix to be used at given higher ranks, the generalized accepted use of the suffix –iformes is an uncontested signal of ordinal rank, whereas at other ranks suffix choice has not helped to achieve standard endings (as one of our appendices – by Richard Schodde, Chair of the Standing Committee on Ornithological Nomenclature, illustrates). This situation is unhelpful and it is timely to propose, adopt and explain standard suffixes, which we do. Standard suffixes can bring with them a framework that can be applied by students of phylogeny, by working taxonomists, and by all authors needing to use names for higher ranks of birds. No-one should be surprised if the molecular community still find too few ranks to please them and they propose to insert others, but please let them too recognise the value to common understanding of adopting the concept of standard suffixes. Note finally that the ranks that seem to be needed for birds may not suit those who study other branches of zoology.


Table of contents, links to past lists, and statistics 

Taxon name in the  sequence  used in this edition  STRUTHIONIFORMES  Struthionidae  RHEIFORMES  Rheidae  TINAMIFORMES  Tinamidae  APTERYGIFORMES  Apterygidae  CASUARIIFORMES 

Vol. 

Page 

H&M 3  (2003)  page  no. 

Numbers per taxon  This  edition  page no. 

Genera 

Species  (inc. listed  extinct). 

Extinct  Species 

Subspecies  (inc. listed  extinct)1. 

Extinct  Subspecies 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

34 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

35 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 

31 

47 

125 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 

35 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casuariidae 

35 

ANSERIFORMES 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anhimidae 

505 

61 

Anseranatidae 

426 

61 

Anatidae 

427 

61 

53 

159 

131 

GALLIFORMES 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Megapodiidae 

II 

35 

20 

22 

32 

Cracidae 

II 

37 

22 

11 

54 

54 

Numididae 

II 

133 

40 

26 

18 

Odontophoridae 

II 

42 

41 

27 

10 

33 

118 

Phasianidae 

II 

24, 42 

44 

31 

52 

178 

466 

PHOENICOPTERIFORMES 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phoenicopteridae 

269 

80 

49 

Podicipedidae 

140 

79 

50 

22 

43 

COLUMBIFORMES  Columbidae  PTEROCLIFORMES 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III 

11 

157 

52 

46 

313 

607 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III 

156 

81 

16 

31 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mesitornithidae 

II 

141 

116 

82 

EURYPYGIFORMES 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eurypygidae 

II 

215 

117 

82 

Rhynochetidae 

II 

215 

116 

82 

Pteroclidae  MESITORNITHIFORMES 

PHAETHONTIFORMES 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

155 

88 

83 

13 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steatornithidae 

IV 

174 

238 

83 

Podargidae 

IV 

175 

237 

83 

13 

24 

Phaethontidae  CAPRIMULGIFORMES 

Nyctibiidae 

IV 

179 

238 

85 

12 

Caprimulgidae 

IV 

184 

238 

85 

20 

92 

180 

Aegothelidae 

IV 

181 

245 

94 

11 

13 

Apodidae 

IV 

220 

246 

95 

20 

99 

242 

Trochilidae 

255 

105 

105 

338 

531 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II 

141 

205 

136 

OPISTHOCOMIFORMES  Opisthocomidae  CUCULIFORMES  Cuculidae 

1

Peters’  Check‐list 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IV 

12 

207 

136 

36 

140 

216 

 This number does not inclued the nominate subspecies.  xlv


NOTE TO BROWSERS III

CONNECTIVITY, CROSS-REFERENCES AND NUMBERS The three pages preceding this one are first and foremost a list of contents; a quick reference to the first page on which each family appears. The headers to the righthand pages in any two-page spread will also help here. If searching for a genus without knowing its family use the index. The index to scientific names lists every subspecies, species and genus that we list; it does not include scientific names in the footnotes – and index to these will be placed on the CD to volume 2. Science progresses through publication of ideas and their acceptance or rejection. Historians and others often wish to examine what has changed and for this reason we provide not only a guide to where to find the start point of families as they are listed in this edition, but also where that point was in last edition, and where it was in the seminal Peters’ Check-list series which, despite its shortcomings – such as taxonomic decisions made by the editors with no explanation, nor, usually, any prior peer-reviewed publication, and limited provision of synonymies in some parts, was robust enough to command admiration and a wide degree of respect for most of the content – as a basis in which to build. In the table of contents quick cross-references are given for each recognised family to where they are found in both these works. In 2003 our 3rd edition tabulated the number of genera and species per family; in this edition we also include subspecies and show, with the help of BirdLife International, how many species or subspecies are considered extinct. If we compare the numbers from the 2003 edition and this one the comparison is as follows: 2003

2013

Non-passerine genera

936

983

Non-passerine species

3752

4072

The increased numbers of species come from new species described since mid 2001, additional compelling evidence for separating species and, sometimes, a reevaluation of our previous judgements. Since this work was sent to the printers more new species have been named!


MAKING FULL USE OF THE LIST AS PRESENTED  Below are some selected, cut‐down and non‐consecutive portions of the list: 

ANATIDAE ‐ DUCKS, GEESE, SWANS (53:159)1  ANATINAE – TRIBE: ANATINI  PTERNISTIS Wagler, 1832   M – Tetrao capensis J.F. Gmelin, 1788; type by subsequent designation (G.R. Gray, 1841, A List of  the Genera of Birds, ed. 2, p. 79). = Tetrao afer Statius Muller, 1776   2  Columba torringtoniae (Blyth & Kelaart, 1853) SRI LANKA PIGEON3 α δ   

Sri Lanka [186] 

†Ectopistes migratorius (Linnaeus, 1766) PASSENGER PIGEON  v  C and E North America >> S and SE USA to NE Mexico  Patagioenas fasciata BAND‐TAILED PIGEON4    1  monilis (Vigors, 1839)5    1  fasciata (Say, 1822)6,7 α    1  vioscae (Brewster, 1888)    2  crissalis (Salvadori, 1893)    2  albilinea (Bonaparte, 1854)8    2  roraimae (Chapman, 1929) 

v  Mountains of SW British Columbia to W Nevada and S California  [2649]  v  Mountains of SW USA (SC Utah and NC Colorado) to N  Nicaragua    NW Mexico (Sierra de San Lázaro in S Baja California)  v  Mountains of Costa Rica and W Panama (Chiriquí, Veraguas)    Santa Marta Mts.; Coastal Range of Venezuela; Trinidad; Andes  from Venezuela to NW Argentina    Tepuis of S and SE Venezuela 

GENUS INCERTAE SEDIS   Gallirallus calayanensis Allen, Oliveros, Española, Broad & Gonzalez, 2004 CALAYAN RAIL  v  Calayan (Babuyan Is.) [28] 

 Composition and sequence of subfamiles, tribes and genera largely derived from Gonzalez et al. (2009) [931]. See also Bulgarella et al. (2010) [320] and Fulton et al. (2012) [863].   Includes ovambensis, bradfieldi and crypticus Stresemann, 1939 [2474]; see R.M. Little in Hockey et al. (2005) [1112]. 3 Original spelling torringtoniae. Previously correctly emended based on internal information see Pittie & Dickinson (2006) [1974].  4 The albilinea group was formerly treated as a separate species but see Hellmayr & Conover (1942) [1087].  5 For continued recognition see Gibson & Kessel (1997) [903].  6 Includes letonai; see Monroe (1968) [1683]. Includes parva; see Brodkorb (1943) [268] but see also Monroe (1968) [1683].  7 For date correction see Woodman (2010) [2822].  8 Includes tucumana; see Hellmayr & Conover (1942) [1087].  1 2

The selected elements above allow a fairly full explanation of the presentation of the list. Each family name in scientific form  is followed by the English group name or a number of group names that figure in the family. The figures in parentheses, in  the  example  above,  reports  that  the  family  contains  159  species  divided  into  53  genera.  A  footnote  attached  to  the  family  usually  provides  references  to  the  authorities  for  taxon  composition;  if  not  subdivided  then  a  family  footnote  will  be  concerned with the linear sequence of genera (which may be only partly resolved, such that there are genera that need to be  distinguished from their better understood fellows, giving a first necessary reason to use the term Incertae Sedis: see below).  We  employ  sub‐family  and  tribe  names  only  where  agreed  with  Joel  Cracraft  seeking  to  use  both  terms  at  broadly  equivalent ranks as their names imply, and only when sufficiently justified by broad taxon‐sampling; thus some tribe names  that  might  be  expected  are  not  used.  When  we  do  use  them,  footnotes  there  may  have  similar  content  to  that  given  elsewhere at family level.  The generic name (in italic capitals) is provided with author and date. Following this is one of three letters M, F or N.  These indicate the gender (masculine, feminine or neuter) of the generic name. For more information on the importance and  significance of the gender see Appendix 4. Following the gender, in this edition, for the first time is listed the type species  and the method by which the type has been selected. If the selection is by subsequent designation or subsequent monotypy  (see I.C.Z.N. 1999 for definitions) the work in which the selection was made is cited. If the type species is now considered to  be a junior synonym or otherwise invalid (e.g. due to homonymy), the senior equivalent is listed last, preceded by an equals  sign.  

xlix


The first species listed above is monotypic, the second is preceded by the  †  symbol, implying that it is considered to be  extinct.  When  †? is  used  there  is  doubt  about  extinction  (but  see  Introduction).  The  third  species  is  polytypic,  when  the  author  of  the  species  is  also  the  author  of  the  nominate  (i.e.  the  oldest)  subspecies.  Every  subspecies  is  provided  with  an  author  and  date,  and  where  a  species  or  subspecies  was  described  as  being  in  a  different  genus  from  that  now  used,  the  author’s name and date appear in parentheses. In the case of the last species above (Gallirallus calayanensis), five authors are  listed, this is the maximum number that we list before resorting to listing only the senior author, followed by et al. (Latin et  alia = and others). In our List of References the authors of scientific papers and books are all set down; be warned however,  the author(s) of a name in that paper may be fewer in number or may have their names in a different sequence.   In three cases above number (186, 2649 and 28) appear in square brackets after the range statement. These numbers are  those attached governing the sequence in the List of References, in alphabetical order by the name of the senior author of the  work in which the original description is to be found. Very occasionally similar bracketted numbers, present for the same  reason, will be found in the genus name line before the M, F or N. Do not be surprised if the reference you are led to seems  to be by a senior author not the author of the taxon name (who may or may not have been a co‐author of the paper).  The  subspecies  listed  under  Patagioenas  fasciata  are  grouped  into  two  subspecies  groups,  indicated  by  preceding  numerals, i.e. the first group of three by a ‘1’, and the second group by a ‘2.’  When  a  species‐group  name  is  followed  by  a  ‘v’  in  the  centre  column  the  specific  epithet  (the  second  element  of  a  species name, or the subspecies name is variable, that is it’s terminatation changes with the gender of the genus name with  which it is currently associated. Beware that the species name and the subspecies name may each be variable. By implication  all  other  names  are  invariable,  and  do  not  change  when  species  are  transferred  from  one  genus  to  another.  For  a  full  explanation see Appendix 4).  The last species is preceded by Genus Incertae Sedis (which can be Genera Incertae Sedis i.e. plural), meaning that they are  of uncertain taxonomic position. Some species are judged to be close to, but not members of, a particular family. This can be  for a variety of reasons, more usually these days because they have not been sampled for molecular analysis, or because the  results are statistically low in confidence.  In the case of  the example shown,  molecular evidence suggests that the generic  name used – within which it was first quiet recently – is due for replacement. It does not belong with the other species called  Gallirallus.  Finally the two lower‐case Greek letters (α, δ) that can be seen following various names have the following significance:   α implies that the date of publication differs either from that given in H&M3 or from that in the Peters Check‐list series  (or from both); such differences are due to focussed research which led to the publication of Priority! The Dating of Sciemtific  Names in Ornithology (Aves Press; Dickinson, Overstreet, Dowsett & Bruce, 2011). An order form for that is available at the  back of this volume offering H&M4 readers a 50% discount: see also www.avespress.com for more details.  δ  implies that the spelling of the species or subspecies scientific name has been researched because of the occurrence of  different  forms  of  the  spelling.  In  important  cases  there  is  also  a  case‐specific  explanatory  footnote  attached  to  the  taxon  name. However, see also Appendix 8 on our CD.    


NOTES TO BROWSERS IV

MAKING FULL USE OF THE LIST AS PRESENTED Below are some selected, cut‑down and non‑consecutive portions of the list: Each family heading tells you how many genera and species it contains

ANATIDAE ‑ DUCKS, GEESE, SWANS (53:159)1 ANATINAE – TRIBE: ANATINI

NEW IN THIS EDITION Every genus -group name is complemented by a type species note as shown here

PTERNISTIS Wagler, 1832 M – Tetrao capensis J.F. Gmelin, 1788; type by subsequent designation (G.R. Gray, 1841, A List of the Genera of Birds, ed. 2, p. 79). = Tetrao afer Statius Muller, 1776 2 Columba torringtoniae (Blyth & Kelaart, 1853) SRI LANKA PIGEON3 α δ

See notes on next page to explain the α and δ symbols Sri Lanka [186]

†Ectopistes migratorius (Linnaeus, 1766) PASSENGER PIGEON v Patagioenas fasciata BAND‑TAILED PIGEON 1 monilis (Vigors, 1839)5 1

fasciata (Say, 1822)6,7 α

1 2 2

vioscae (Brewster, 1888) crissalis (Salvadori, 1893) albilinea (Bonaparte, 1854)8

2

roraimae (Chapman, 1929)

GENUS INCERTAE SEDIS

4

Small numbers to the left of subspecific names signal the subspecies group to which each belongs

C and E North America >> S and SE USA to NE Mexico

V is for variable; see Appendix 4 for a briefing on such names v v

v

Mountains of SW British Columbia to W Nevada and S California [2649] Mountains of SW USA (SC Utah and NC Colorado) to N Nicaragua NW Mexico (Sierra de San Lázaro in S Baja California) Mountains of Costa Rica and W Panama (Chiriquí, Veraguas) Santa Marta Mts.; Coastal Range of Venezuela; Trinidad; Andes from Venezuela to NW Argentina Tepuis of S and SE Venezuela

Incertae sedis means “relationships uncertain”; in this example the taxon, described in Gallirallus does not fit there if that is treated as a narrow genus, as it is here. This species appears to need its own genus; none has yet been proposed.

Gallirallus calayanensis Allen, Oliveros, Española, Broad & Gonzalez, 2004 CALAYAN RAIL v Calayan (Babuyan Is.) [28]

Numbers in square brackets are citations; see references on CD.

Composition and sequence of subfamiles, tribes and genera largely derived from Gonzalez et al. (2009) [931]. See also Bulgarella et al. (2010) [320] and Fulton et al. (2012) [863]. Includes ovambensis, bradfieldi and crypticus Stresemann, 1939 [2474]; see R.M. Little in Hockey et al. (2005) [1112]. 3 Original spelling torringtoniae. Previously correctly emended based on internal information see Pittie & Dickinson (2006) [1974]. 4 The albilinea group was formerly treated as a separate species but see Hellmayr & Conover (1942) [1087]. 5 For continued recognition see Gibson & Kessel (1997) [903]. 6 Includes letonai; see Monroe (1968) [1683]. Includes parva; see Brodkorb (1943) [268] but see also Monroe (1968) [1683]. 7 For date correction see Woodman (2010) [2822]. 8 Includes tucumana; see Hellmayr & Conover (1942) [1087]. 1

2

The selected elements above allow a fairly full explanation of the presentation of the list. Each family name in scientific form is followed by the English group name or a number of group names that figure in the family. The figures in parentheses, in the example above, reports that the family contains 159 species divided into 53 genera. A footnote attached to the family usually provides references to the authorities for taxon composition; if not subdivided then a family footnote will be concerned with the linear sequence of genera (which may be only partly resolved, such that there are genera that need to be distinguished from their better understood fellows, leading a first necessary reason to use the term Incertae Sedis: see below). We employ sub‑family and tribe names only where agreed with Joel Cracraft seeking to use both terms at broadly equivalent ranks as their names imply, and only when sufficiently justified by broad taxon‑sampling; thus some tribe names that might be expected are not used. When we do use them, footnotes there may have similar content to that given elsewhere at family level. The generic name (in italic capitals) is provided with author and date. Following this is one of three letters M, F or N. These indicate the gender (masculine, feminine or neuter) of the generic name. For more information on the importance and significance of the gender see Appendix 4. Following the gender, for the first time in this edition, is listed the type species and the method by which the type has been selected. If the selection is by subsequent designation or subsequent monotypy (see I.C.Z.N. 1999 for definitions) the work in which the selection was made is cited. If the type species is now considered to be a junior synonym or otherwise invalid (e.g. due to homonymy), the senior equivalent is listed last, preceded by an equals sign.

xlix


ANATIDAE 

Aythya marila GREATER SCAUP      marila (Linnaeus, 1761)      nearctica Stejneger, 18851 

  N Europe and NW Asia >> W and S Europe, NW India  v  NE Siberia (east of R. Lena), Alaska and N Canada >> coastal  China, Japan, Korea; W and E USA 

Aythya affinis (Eyton, 1838) LESSER SCAUP  v  C Alaska to NW and N USA >> S USA, Central America and West  Indies 

RHODONESSA Reichenbach, 1853   F – Anas caryophyllacea Latham, 1790; type by original designation    Rhodonessa caryophyllacea (Latham, 1790) PINK‐HEADED DUCK  v  Nepal, E and NE India, Bangladesh, Myanmar 

ANATINAE – TRIBE: ANATINI  TACHYERES Owen, 1875   M – Anas brachyptera Latham, 1790; type by monotypy    Tachyeres patachonicus (P.P. King, 1831) FLYING STEAMER DUCK2, 3  v  Coastal S Chile and S Argentina [1337]  Tachyeres pteneres (J.R. Forster, 1844) MAGELLANIC STEAMER DUCK   

Coastal S Chile (south from Los Lagos) and extreme S Argentina  (Tierra del Fuego and Isla de los Estados) 

Tachyeres brachypterus (Latham, 1790) FALKLAND STEAMER DUCK  v  Falkland Is.  Tachyeres leucocephalus Humphrey & Thompson, 1981 WHITE‐HEADED STEAMER DUCK  v  Coastal S Argentina (Chubut) [1156] 

LOPHONETTA Riley, 1914   F – Anas cristata J.F. Gmelin, 1789; type by original designation = Anas specularioides P.P. King,  1828  4  Lophonetta specularioides CRESTED DUCK      alticola (Menegaux, 1909) 

 

   

 

specularioides (P.P. King, 1828) 

Andes from C Peru (Ancash) to C Chile (Maule) and WC  Argentina (Mendoza)  S Chile, WC and S Argentina; Falkland Is. 

SPECULANAS von Boetticher, 1929   F – Anas specularis P.P. King, 1828; type by original designation  5  Speculanas specularis (P.P. King, 1828) SPECTACLED DUCK  v  Andean valleys of S Chile (south from Bíobío) and S Argentina  (south from Neuquén) >> WC Argentina 

AMAZONETTA von Boetticher, 1929   F – Anas brasiliensis J.F. Gmelin, 1789; type by original designation  6  Amazonetta brasiliensis BRAZILIAN TEAL      brasiliensis (J.F. Gmelin, 1789)     

v  E Colombia, Venezuela and Guyana south to SC Brazil (Mato  Grosso and São Paulo)    E Bolivia and S Brazil (S Mato Grosso and São Paulo) to NE  Argentina (Entre Ríos) and Uruguay 

ipecutiri (Vieillot, 1816) 

SPATULA Boie, 1822   F – Anas clypeata Linnaeus, 1758; type by monotypy  7  Spatula querquedula (Linnaeus, 1758) GARGANEY   

W Europe to Japan >> Africa, SW and S Asia, S China, SE Asia,  New Guinea, N Australia, central Pacific Ocean 

Spatula hottentota (Eyton, 1838) HOTTENTOT TEAL8, 9  v  N Nigeria to Eritrea south to E and S Africa, Madagascar  Spatula puna (von Tschudi, 1844) PUNA TEAL   10

 

Andes from C Peru (Junín) to N Chile (Antofagasta) and NW  Argentina (Jujuy) 

 The name mariloides Vigors, 1839, sometimes applied to all or part of this population, is unavailable because it was attached to specimens of the Lesser Scaup; see Banks (1986) [84]. Its type locality  has been corrected to San Francisco Bay.   The prior name Oidemia patachonica King, 1828, thought to have been provided for a different species, has been suppressed in relation to priority; see Opinion 1648 (I.C.Z.N., 1991) [1193].  3 Birds on the Falklands previously thought to be this species are actually a flying population of T. brachypterus; see Fulton et al. (2012) [863].  4 For continued recognition as separate from Anas see Johnson & Sorenson (1999) [1255] and Eo et al. (2009) [777].  5 For treatment as separate from Anas, see Livezey (1991, 1997) [1440] [1442], Johnson & Sorenson (1999) [1255], and Eo et al. (2009) [777].  6 For continued recognition as separate from Anas see Kear (2005) [1302].  7 Recognition based on molecular distance in Fig. 1 in Gonzalez et al. (2009) [931].  8 For suppression of Anas punctata Burchell, 1822, see Opinion 1078 (I.C.Z.N., 1977) [1190].  9 For close relationship to S. puna and S. versicolor, see Johnsgard (1965) [1243] and Johnson & Sorenson (1999) [1255].  10 For treatment as a separate species from A. versicolor see Hellmayr & Conover (1948) [1088] and Blake (1977) [171].  1

2

15


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

Spatula versicolor SILVER TEAL      versicolor (Vieillot, 1816)     

fretensis (P.P. King, 1831) 

 

S Bolivia and Paraguay to C Argentina (Río Negro), also C Chile  (Santiago to Araucanía)  v  C Chile (Los Lagos) and C Argentina (Chubut) south to Tierra del  Fuego >> NE Argentina, Uruguay and SE Brazil; Falkland Is 

Spatula platalea (Vieillot, 1816) RED SHOVELER   

C Chile and S Brazil to Tierra del Fuego; Andes of SE Peru  (Cuzco, Puno) 

 

S Angola to W Zimbabwe and S South Africa 

Spatula smithii E. Hartert, 1891 CAPE SHOVELER  Spatula rhynchotis AUSTRALASIAN SHOVELER      rhynchotis (Latham, 1801) α      variegata Gould, 1856 

v  S Australia, Tasmania  v  New Zealand 

Spatula clypeata (Linnaeus, 1758) NORTHERN SHOVELER  v  N Eurasia; North America >> N and E Africa, SW and S Asia,  China, mainland SE Asia; Mexico  Spatula cyanoptera CINNAMON TEAL      septentrionalium (Snyder & Lumsden, 1951) 

           

tropica (Snyder & Lumsden, 1951) δ  †?borreroi (Snyder & Lumsden, 1951)  orinoma (Oberholser, 1906) δ 

   

cyanoptera (Vieillot, 1816) 

 

W North America (S British Columbia and S Alberta to N Baja  California and C Mexico) >> Central America and NW South  America  v  NW Colombia (Cauca and Magdalena valleys)     E Andes of Colombia  v  Andes of Peru (Cajamarca) to N Chile (Antofagasta) and NW  Argentina (Jujuy)  v  Lowlands of coastal S Peru, Paraguay and SE Brazil south to  Tierra del Fuego 

Spatula discors (Linnaeus, 1766) BLUE‐WINGED TEAL1   

S Canada and USA >> Central America, West Indies, South  America S to C Argentina 

SIBIRIONETTA von Boetticher, 1929   F – Anas formosa Georgi, 1775; type by original designation  2  Sibirionetta formosa (Georgi, 1775) BAIKAL TEAL  v  E Siberia >> Japan, Korea, E China 

MARECA Stephens, 1824   F – Mareca fistularis “Stephens”; type by subsequent designation (Eyton, 1838, Monograph on the  Anatidae, p. 33). = Anas penelope Linnaeus, 1758  3  Mareca falcata (Georgi, 1775) FALCATED DUCK  v  E Siberia, Mongolia, NE China >> Japan, Korea, S China, NE India,  N continental SE Asia  Mareca strepera GADWALL      strepera (Linnaeus, 1758)     

†couesi (Streets, 1876) 

v  N and C Eurasia; North America >> SC and SE Eurasia, Africa; C  North America    Tabuaeran (Line Is.) 

Mareca penelope (Linnaeus, 1758) EURASIAN WIGEON4   

N Eurasia >> N, NE Africa, S Asia, China, Japan, Philippines 

Mareca americana (J.F. Gmelin, 1789) AMERICAN WIGEON  v  Alaska, Canada, N USA >> coasts of North America to Costa Rica,  West Indies  Mareca sibilatrix (Poeppig, 1829) CHILOE WIGEON   

C and S Chile (south from Coquimbo) and S Argentina (south  from Córdoba and Buenos Aires) >> S Paraguay and SE Brazil  (Rio Grande do Sul); Falkland Is. 

ANAS Linnaeus, 1758   F – Anas boschas Linnaeus, 1766; type by subsequent designation (Lesson, 1828, Manuel  d’Ornithologie, 2, p. 417). = Anas platyrhynchos Linnaeus, 1758    Anas sparsa AFRICAN BLACK DUCK      leucostigma Rüppell, 18455 

 Includes orphna; see Palmer (1976) [1832].   Recognition based on molecular distance in Fig. 1 in Gonzalez et al. (2009) [931].   Recognition based on molecular distance in Fig. 1 in Gonzalez et al. (2009) [931].  4 Forms a superspecies with M. americana and M. sibilatrix; see Sibley & Monroe (1990) [2354].  5 Includes maclatchyi; see Johnsgard (1979) [1247].  1 2 3

16 

 

SE Guinea; SE Nigeria to S Gabon; South Sudan and Ethiopia to  Tanzania and Angola 


ANATIDAE 

   

sparsa Eyton, 1838 

Anas undulata YELLOW‐BILLED DUCK      ruppelli Blyth, 18551 δ      undulata C.F. Dubois, 1839 

v  Zimbabwe, E Botswana, Namibia, South Africa    E Nigeria and C Cameroon (subsp.?); Ethiopia, N Kenya  v  S Kenya to Angola and South Africa 

Anas melleri P.L. Sclater, 1865 MELLER’S DUCK2    Anas superciliosa PACIFIC BLACK DUCK      superciliosa J.F. Gmelin, 17893 

   

pelewensis Hartlaub & Finsch, 18724 

E Madagascar 

v  Sumatra, Java, Bali, Kangean Is., Sulawesi, S Moluccas, W and C  Lesser Sundas (east to Timor), S New Guinea, Australia,  Tasmania, New Zealand  v  Micronesia to N New Guinea, Bismarck Arch., Solomons, C and E  Melanesia and W Polynesia to Iles Australes 

Anas luzonica Fraser, 1839 PHILIPPINE DUCK  v  Philippines  Anas laysanensis Rothschild, 1892 LAYSAN DUCK  v  Laysan (NW Hawaiian Is.)  Anas zonorhyncha Swinhoe, 1866 CHINESE SPOT‐BILLED DUCK5   

SE Siberia, Japan, Korea, E China >> S China, Taiwan  

Anas poecilorhyncha INDIAN SPOT‐BILLED DUCK      poecilorhyncha J.R. Forster, 1781      haringtoni (Oates, 1907) 

v  S Asia    SW China, N continental SE Asia 

Anas platyrhynchos MALLARD6      platyrhynchos Linnaeus, 17587, 8 

 

       

   

conboschas C.L. Brehm, 1831  diazi Ridgway, 18869 

Europe, Asia; North America >> south to N Africa, Europe, SW, S  and E Asia; south to Mexico  Coasts of SW and SE Greenland  SC USA (SE Arizona, S New Mexico, SW Texas) to C Mexico  (Jalisco and México) 

Anas rubripes Brewster, 1902 AMERICAN BLACK DUCK10    Anas fulvigula MOTTLED DUCK      fulvigula Ridgway, 1874      maculosa Sennett, 1889 

E Canada and NE USA >> E USA 

  SE USA (Florida Pen.)  v  Coastal SC USA (Louisiana, Texas) and NE Mexico (Tamaulipas) 

Anas wyvilliana P.L. Sclater, 1878 HAWAIIAN DUCK  v  Hawaiian Is. (Kauai and Niihau, reintroduced to Oahu, Hawaii  and Maui)  Anas gibberifrons GREY TEAL11    1  albogularis (Hume, 1873)    2  gibberifrons S. Müller, 1842    3  gracilis Buller, 186912    3  †remissa Ripley, 194213 

v  Andamans     S Sumatra, Java, Bali, Sulawesi, W and C Lesser Sundas (east to  Timor and Wetar)   v  New Guinea, Australia, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, New Zealand  v  Rennell (S Solomons) 

Anas castanea (Eyton, 1838) CHESTNUT‐BREASTED TEAL/CHESTNUT TEAL14  v  S Australia, Tasmania  Anas aucklandica NEW ZEALAND TEAL15      chlorotis G.R. Gray, 1845      aucklandica (G.R. Gray, 1844)      nesiotis (J.H. Fleming, 1935) 

v  New Zealand; formerly Chatham Is.  v  Auckland Is.    Campbell I. 

Anas bernieri (Hartlaub, 1860) MADAGASCAR TEAL/BERNIER’S TEAL   

W Madagascar 

 Correct original spelling. Spelling rueppelli in Johnsgard (1979) [1247] an unjustified emendation.   Introduced to Mauritius.  3 Includes rogersi because its type locality lies within Australia; see Marchant & Higgins (1990) [1497].  4 Includes rukensis Kuroda, Sr., 1939 [1389]; see Baker (1951) [76].  5 For separation from A. poecilorhyncha, see Leader (2006) [1410].  6 For comments on the relationships of this and the next three species, see A.O.U. (1998) [3].  7 Includes neoborea Oberholser, 1974 [1772]; see Browning (1978) [294] and David et al. (2009) [576].  8 Introduced to South Africa, Mauritius, S Australia, New Zealand, Chatham Is., New Caledonia and C Vanuatu.  9 Small samples with limited geographic and gene sampling (McCracken et al. 2001 [1569], Kulikova et al. 2004 [1384], Gonzalez et al. 2009 [931]) suggest that this should be treated as a separate  species. However, see Hubbard (1977) [1142] for evidence of widespread gene flow between this and A. p. platyrhynchos.  10 Treated as a separate species from A. platyrhynchos despite frequent hybridization because mating mostly assortative, see e.g., Brodsky & Weatherhead (1984) [269].  11 For comments on relationship to A. castanea, see Kennedy & Spencer (2000) [1319].  12 Treated as a species (with remissa in synonymy) by Marchant & Higgins (1990) [1497] and Kear (2005) [1302], but see Mees (2006) [1614].  13 For recognition see Mayr & Diamond (2001) [1557]. Not recognised by Kear (2005) [1302].  14 For close relationship to A. gibberifrons gracilis, see Joseph et al. (2009) [1276].  15 For treatment as three separate species; see Marchant & Higgins (1990) [1497], Kennedy & Spencer (2000) [1319] and Kear (2005) [1302].  1 2

17


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

Anas capensis J.F. Gmelin, 1789 CAPE TEAL  v  Chad to Ethiopia, E Africa, Angola, Botswana and South Africa  Anas bahamensis WHITE‐CHEEKED PINTAIL      bahamensis Linnaeus, 1758     

rubrirostris Vieillot, 1816 

   

galapagensis (Ridgway, 1890) α 

v  West Indies; Netherlands Antilles; coastal N South America from  Colombia to N Brazil (Belém)  v  E Bolivia, W Paraguay, N and C Argentina (south to Buenos  Aires) and Uruguay; coastal Ecuador, Peru and C Chile  v  Galapagos Is. 

Anas erythrorhyncha J.F. Gmelin, 1789 RED‐BILLED TEAL  v  Ethiopia to E and S Africa, Madagascar  Anas acuta Linnaeus, 1758 NORTHERN PINTAIL   1

v  (a) N Europe, N Asia >> N tropical and E Africa, India, China,  Philippines; (b) N North America >> Central America  Anas georgica YELLOW‐BILLED PINTAIL      †niceforoi Wetmore & Borrero, 1946      spinicauda Vieillot, 18162     

georgica J.F. Gmelin, 1789 

   

Andes of EC Colombia (Boyacá and Cundinamarca)  Andes from S Colombia to Tierra del Fuego, into lowlands of  Chile and Argentina >> Uruguay and SE Brazil; Falkland Is.  v  South Georgia I. 

Anas eatoni KERGUELEN PINTAIL/EATON’S PINTAIL3      eatoni (Sharpe, 1875)      drygalskii Reichenow, 1904 

   

Anas crecca COMMON TEAL/GREEN‐WINGED TEAL4      crecca Linnaeus, 17585 

 

   

carolinensis J.F. Gmelin, 17896 

Anas andium ANDEAN TEAL7      altipetens (Conover, 1941)      andium (Sclater & Salvin, 1873)  Anas flavirostris SPECKLED TEAL      oxyptera Meyen, 1834     

flavirostris Vieillot, 1816 

Iles Kerguelen  Iles Crozet 

N Eurasia, Aleutian Is. >> C and S Europe, N Africa, SW, S and E  Asia   v  N North America >> W and S North America, Central America,  West Indies     

Andes of SW Venezuela (Trujillo) to NE Colombia (Bogotá)  Andes of C Colombia (Caldas and Tolima) to S Ecuador (Azuay) 

v  Andes of N Peru (Cajamarca) to N Chile (Atacama) and NW  Argentina (Catamarca)  v  Lowlands from C Chile (Coquimbo) and C Argentina (Córdoba)  south to Tierra del Fuego >> Paraguay and SE Brazil; Falkland  Is.; South Georgia I. 

ANATINAE – GENERA INCERTAE SEDIS8  THALASSORNIS Eyton, 1838   M – Thalassornis leuconotus Eyton, 1838; type by original designation    Thalassornis leuconotus WHITE‐BACKED DUCK      leuconotus Eyton, 18389 δ      insularis Richmond, 1897 

v  N Benin, E Cameroon to S Ethiopia and south to S South Africa  v  Madagascar 

STICTONETTA Reichenbach, 1853   F – Anas naevosa Gould, 1841; type by original designation    Stictonetta naevosa (Gould, 1841) FRECKLED DUCK  v  Inland S Australia 

BIZIURA Stephens, 1824   F – Biziura novaehollandiae Stephens, 1824; type by monotypy = Anas lobata Shaw, 1796  10  Biziura lobata MUSK DUCK      lobata Shaw, 179611      menziesi Mathews, 191412 

v  SW Australia    C South Australia to SE Australia, Tasmania [1526] 

 Considered to form a superspecies with A. georgica and A. eatoni by Johnsgard (1979) [1247] and Sibley & Monroe (1990) [2354].   May merit treatment as a separate species (Ridgely & Greenfield 2001) [2096]; in fact, no real rationale has ever been published for its treatment as conspecific with A. georgica.   For treatment as a separate species from A. acuta see Stahl et al. (1984) [2417].  4 Forms a superspecies with A. andium and A. flavirostris; see Johnsgard (1979) [1247].  5 Includes nimia; see Gibson & Byrd (2007) [901].  6 Treated as a separate species by Sangster et al. (2001, 2002) [2233] [2235], but see Peters et al. (2012) [1908].  7 For treatment as a separate species from A. flavirostris see Hellmayr & Conover (1948) [1088] and Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) [2096].  8 Genera placed here either await molecular screening or have emerged from that with conflicting results; morpho‐behavioural evidence is not seen as determinant.  9 Correct original spelling. Spelling leuconotos in Dickinson (2003) [692] an ISS.  10 Formerly considered closely related to Oxyura and related genera, but see McCracken et al. (1999) [1568]; see also Gonzalez et al. (1999) [931].  11 Circumscription follows Guay et al. (2010) [1021].  12 For recognition see Guay et al. (2010) [1021].  1 2 3

18 


ANATIDAE 

PLECTROPTERUS Stephens, 1824   M – Anas gambensis Linnaeus, 1766; type by subsequent designation (Eyton, 1838,  Monograph on the Anatidae, p. 10).    Plectropterus gambensis SPUR‐WINGED GOOSE      gambensis (Linnaeus, 1766)      niger P.L. Sclater, 1877 

v  Senegal to Sudan, south to C and E Africa  v  Southern Africa 

HYMENOLAIMUS G.R. Gray, 1843   M – Anas malacorhynchos J.F. Gmelin, 1789; type by monotypy  1  Hymenolaimus malacorhynchos (J.F. Gmelin, 1789) BLUE DUCK   

C North Island and montane W South Island (New Zealand)  

MERGANETTA Gould, 1842   F – Merganetta armata Gould, 1842; type by monotypy    Merganetta armata TORRENT DUCK      colombiana Des Murs, 1845      leucogenis (von Tschudi, 1843)      turneri Sclater & Salvin, 1869      garleppi von Berlepsch, 1894      berlepschi E. Hartert, 1909      armata Gould, 18422 

v  v        v 

Andes of W Venezuela to S Ecuador  Andes of N and C Peru (Amazonas to Junín)  Andes of S Peru (Cuzco) to extreme N Chile (N Tarapacá)  Andes of N and C Bolivia (La Paz to Chuquisaca)  Andes of S Bolivia (Tarija) to NW Argentina (N La Rioja)  Andes of C and S Chile (south from Atacama) and S Argentina  (south from C San Juan) 

SALVADORINA Rothschild & Hartert, 1894   F – Salvadorina waigiuensis Rothschild & Hartert, 1894; type by monotypy  3  Salvadorina waigiuensis Rothschild & Hartert, 1894 SALVADORI’S TEAL4  v  Montane New Guinea 

SARKIDIORNIS Eyton, 1838   M – Anser melanotos Pennant, 1769; type by original designation    Sarkidiornis melanotos COMB DUCK      melanotos (Pennant, 1769)     

sylvicola H. & R. von Ihering, 19075 

   

Sub‐Saharan Africa, Madagascar, Pakistan, India, SE China,  continental SE Asia  N Colombia E to E Brazil and S to N Argentina (Córdoba) and  Uruguay 

CAIRINA J. Fleming, 1822   F – Anas moschata Linnaeus, 1758; type by monotypy  6  Cairina moschata (Linnaeus, 1758) MUSCOVY DUCK  v  C Mexico to E Peru, east to E Brazil and south to NE Argentina  and N Uruguay 

AIX Boie, 1828   F – Anas sponsa Linnaeus, 1758; type by subsequent designation (Eyton, 1838, Monograph on the Anatidae,  p. 35).  7  Aix galericulata (Linnaeus, 1758) MANDARIN DUCK  v  SE Siberia, Japan, Korea, E China, >> south of 40° N  Aix sponsa (Linnaeus, 1758) WOOD DUCK   

S Canada and W, SC and E USA; Cuba 

CHENONETTA von Brandt, 1836   F – Anser lophotus von Brandt, 1836; type by monotypy = Anas jubata Latham, 1801    Chenonetta jubata (Latham, 1801) MANED DUCK α  v  Australia, Tasmania 

NETTAPUS von Brandt, 1836   M – Anas madagascariensis J.F. Gmelin, 1789; type by monotypy = Anas aurita Boddaert, 1783    Nettapus auritus (Boddaert, 1783) AFRICAN PYGMY GOOSE  v  Senegal to Ethiopia south to South Africa; Madagascar  Nettapus coromandelianus ASIAN PYGMY GOOSE/COTTON TEAL      coromandelianus (J.F. Gmelin, 1789)     

albipennis Gould, 1842 

v  S Asia, S China, mainland SE Asia, Greater Sundas, Philippines, N  Sulawesi, lowland N New Guinea  v  NE Australia (E Queensland) 

 For possible relationships see Worthy (2009) [2824] and Robertson & Goldstein (2012) [2158].   Includes fraenata; see Johnsgard (1979) [1247].   For reasons to retain this genus see Mlíkovsky (1989) [1669].  4 Not known to occur on Waigeo.  5 Includes carunculatus; see Hellmayr & Conover (1948) [1088] and Johnsgard (1979) [1247].  6 Gonzalez et al. (2009) [931] suggested a close relationship with shelducks. Corroboration needed.  7 For sister relationship to Cairina, see Gonzalez et al. (2009) [931].  1 2 3

19


NOTE TO BROWSERS V

MOLECULAR PHYLOGENIES : GAINS AND GAPS This family is a good example of the insights gained from published molecular studies. Here is a comparison between this edition and that previous one; 2003

2013

Dendrocygninae

YES

YES

Oxyurinae

YES

Anserinae

YES

Subfamilies and tribes

Malacorhynchini Cereopsini Cygnini Anserini

YES YES YES YES YES

Stictonettinae

YES

NO

Tadorninae

YES

NO

Anatinae

YES

YES

Mergini Tadornini Aythyini Anatini Genera Sedis Incertae

YES YES YES YES YES

Genera

49

158

Species

53

159

You will observe: (1) that evidence of the detail in the tapestry of life, although still incomplete allows the suggestion of tribes within the true geese and within the true ducks and that the genus Oxyura moves from the Anatinae to a sub family to itself, while the shelducks and the genus Stictonetta cannot be treated as subfamilies: the former are well sampled and become a tribe, while Stictonetta is unresolved, as are the genera Thalassornis, Biziura, Plectopterus, Hymenolaimus, Merganetta, Salvadorina, Sarkidiornis, Cairina, Aix, Chenonetta and Nettapus; these all require corroborative findings prior to their being placed as determined. For a well-known family a gap of 12 genera out of 53 is striking evidence of how much remains to be done. (2) that Anatid genera used in the past (e.g. Mareca, Spatula and Sibirionetta) also begin to reemerge from a genus Anas that, as recently used, is now seen not to be monophyletic and may require further subdivision as more species are sampled.


Appendix 4:  Variable species‐group names and their gender endings  Normand David 1 and Michel Gosselin 2  202‐53 Hasting, Dollard‐des‐Ormeaux, Québec, Canada. H9G 3C4.  Canadian Museum of Nature, P.O. Box 3443 Station D, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. K1P 6P4. 

1  2 

In Latin, as in Greek and a number of other languages, all nouns have a gender (masculine, feminine, or neuter),  and adjectives have to match the gender of the noun they qualify. Generally, the ending (the last few letters) of an  adjective will vary according to the gender. Likewise, in zoological nomenclature each genus has a gender, and  species‐group names (i.e. the species and subspecies epithets) that are adjectives or participles may need to have  their  endings  modified  when  they  are  moved  between  genera  of  different  genders  (ICZN  1999:  Art.  31.2,  34.2).  Since Latin grammar is increasingly unfamiliar to scientists of the 21st century, basic information on Latin gender  endings is provided here.  The  Howard  &  Moore  Complete  Checklist  of  the  Birds  of  the  World  (4th  ed.)  includes  some  30,000  species‐group names, of which about 54% are adjectival, and potentially variable. The rest (46%) are nouns, noun  phrases  or  are  words  that  are  neither  Latin  nor  latinized,  and  are  therefore  invariable  according  to  the  ICZN  (1999)  Code  [Art.  31.2.1,  31.2.3].  In  the  main  body  of  the  Howard  &  Moore  Checklist,  epithets  that  are  variable  according to the ICZN rules are flagged with a “v” to indicate that they may need to have their ending modified if  they are moved to a different genus. Some Latin adjectives (such as bicolor [bicoloured], pugnax [combative], velox  [swift], etc.) have the same ending whether they are masculine, feminine, or neuter, and are therefore not marked  as variable.  It must be remembered that sub‐specific epithets may be variable even though the species’ epithet is not, and  conversely, a variable species epithet may be followed by sub‐specific epithets that are invariable.  Although the requirements of the ICZN Code and the relevant rules of Latin grammar apply to all zoological  names, for reasons of practicality the names and examples quoted in the present Appendix draw only from the  Howard & Moore Checklist nomenclature. 

Procedure  The key piece of information needed to provide for gender agreement on variable species‐group names is the  gender  of  each  genus.  This  is  generally  easy  to  find  (ICZN  1999:  Art.  30),  but  challenging  situations  sometimes  occur (see David & Gosselin 2002b, 2008). To facilitate this exercise, every genus in the present work has had its  gender  verified  according  to  the  ICZN  (1999)  Code,  and  marked  as  masculine  [M],  feminine  [F]  or  neuter  [N].  About 51% of the generic names in the Howard & Moore Checklist are masculine, 46% feminine, and 3% neuter.  When a taxon needs to be moved to a different genus, the first step, as far as gender agreement is concerned, is  to verify whether the epithet is variable (flagged with a “v”) and whether the new genus and the current genus  have different genders. Only when these conditions are both met does gender agreement become a requirement.  In all other cases the species‐group name will remain as is.  The most common set of Latin adjectival  endings is ‐us [M], ‐a [F], ‐um [N]. It accounts for about 62% of all  variable endings in the present work, and occurs in classical Latin adjectives (either simple or compounded), in  latinized Greek adjectives,��and in newly derived epithets created by appending Latin adjectival suffixes to Latin  or foreign words (such as in americanus, which is obviously a word that did not exist in classical Latin). The next  most common set of adjectival names ends in ‐is [M], ‐is [F], ‐e [N], and accounts for about 35% of the variable  species‐group names in the present work. Again, these occur mostly in classical Latin adjectives, latinized Greek  adjectives, and newly derived epithets created by appending a Latin adjectival suffix to a Latin or a foreign word  (such  as  in  canadensis).  Together,  these  two  groups  account  for  about  97%  of  the  adjectival  endings  and  are  relatively easy to deal with. It is the more unusual epithets that need our attention.  Three tables are presented below, one for each “starting gender”: they show the sets of variable endings that  apply, and how these relate to alternative genders.  As mentioned above, 97% of the variable avian names will fall  in  the  standard  ‐us,  ‐a,  ‐um  or  ‐is,  ‐is,  ‐e  groups,  so  the  tables  will  be  of  most  use  in  relation  to  the  other,  less  frequent  endings  (e.g.  a  seemingly  standard  but  actually  exceptional  ‐a  feminine  ending  that  requires  an  ‐er  masculine counterpart).   If, for example, Eos rubra [variable] was to be moved to a masculine genus, such as Trichoglossus, the first step  would  be  to  note  the  current  gender  of  Eos,  which  is  feminine.  Since  the  change  of  gender  would  then  be  from  feminine to  masculine, the ending of the corrected epithet will be found in Table 2  [feminine endings]. Because  rubra ends in ‐a (and yet not in ‐fera or ‐gera), the expected masculine ending would be ‐us, but since rubra appears  among  the  exceptions  to  the  ‐us  ending  [where  its  masculine  counterpart  is  shown  as  being,  in  fact,  ruber],  the  405


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

taxon would thus be named Trichoglossus ruber. Exceptions such as this one normally arise only with names that  are (or are composites that end in) classical Latin words, and are therefore clearly mentioned in Latin dictionaries.  The present Appendix was  created to facilitate the work of avian systematists, but  in case  of doubt the final  word always rests with the ICZN rules, as well as with classical Latin dictionaries. Authoritative on‐line Latin and  Greek  dictionaries  are  available  at  www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/resolveform?&lang=Latin.  Other  classical  dictionaries include Glare (1982), Lewis & Short (1991) and Liddell & Scott (1996), while useful information can  also be found in David & Gosselin (2002a, 2011).  We  thank  Edward  C.  Dickinson  and  Miguel  A.  Alonso‐Zarazaga  for  comments  on  earlier  versions  of  this  Appendix. 

Literature Cited  David, N. & M. Gosselin. 2002a. Gender agreement in avian species names. Bull. Brit. Orn. Club 122:14‐49.  David, N. & M. Gosselin. 2002b. The grammatical gender of avian genera. Bull. Brit. Orn. Club 122: 257‐282.  David, N. & M. Gosselin. 2008. The grammatical gender of Poecile and Leptopoecile. Dutch Birding 30: 19.  David, N. & M. Gosselin. 2011. Gender agreement of avian species‐group names under Article 31.2.2 of the ICZN Code. Bull.  Brit. Orn. Club 131: 103‐115.  Glare, P. G. W. 1982. Oxford Latin dictionary. Oxford University Press.  International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. 1999. International code of zoological nomenclature. International Trust for  Zoological Nomenclature, London.  Lewis, C. T. & C. Short. 1991. A Latin dictionary. Clarendon Press, Oxford.  Liddell, H. G. & R. Scott. 1996. A Greek‐English lexicon / with a revised supplement. Oxford University Press. 

Table 1. Expected feminine and neuter endings of variable species‐group names derived from their current masculine  ending.  The  endings  presented  in  the  table  show  the  exact  letters  to  be  substituted.  Words  that  are  not  found  in  the  masculine form in the Howard & Moore Checklist are not treated here. 

     

MASCULINE  ending 

expected  FEMININE 

expected  NEUTER 

‐fer 

‐fera 

‐ferum 

Exceptions:  afer  | African  cafer  | south African  caffer  | south African 

     

‐ger         

Exceptions:  aeger | feeble  (‐)niger | black(‐) *  piger | sluggish  impiger | active 

406 

Exceptions:  acer  | sharp  (‐)alter  | another *  celer  | swift  dexter  | skilful  paluster  | of marshes  tener  | delicate 

     

‐gera         

Exceptions:  = aegra   = (‐)nigra *  = pigra  = impigra 

           

Exceptions:  = acris  = (‐)altera *  = celeris  = dextra  = palustris  = tenera 

Exceptions:  = afrum  = cafrum  = caffrum  ‐gerum 

       

‐ra 

‐er  (other than ‐fer or ‐ger)             

Exceptions:  = afra   = cafra  = caffra 

Exceptions:  = aegrum  = (‐)nigrum *  = pigrum  = impigrum  ‐rum 

           

Exceptions:  = acre  = (‐)alterum *  = celere  = dextrum  = palustre  = tenerum 

‐is 

‐is 

‐e 

‐or 

‐or 

‐us 

‐us 

‐a 

‐um 


APPENDIX 4 

Table 2. Expected neuter and masculine endings of variable species‐group names derived from their current feminine  ending.  The  endings  presented  in  the  table  show  the  exact  letters  to  be  substituted.  Words  that  are  not  found  in  the  feminine form in the Howard & Moore Checklist are not treated here. 

FEMININE  ending 

expected  NEUTER 

expected  MASCULINE 

‐fera 

‐ferum 

‐fer  Exceptions 1 

‐gera 

‐gerum 

‐ger  Exceptions 2 

‐a  (other than ‐fera or ‐gera)                       

Exceptions:  aegra  | feeble  afra  | African  (‐)altera  | another *  (‐)atra  | dark(‐) *  caffra  | south African  dextra  | skilful  (‐)nigra  | black(‐) *  pulchra  | beautiful  (‐)rubra  | red(‐) *  sacra  | sacred  vafra  | cunning  ‐is 

       

‐um 

                      ‐e 

Exceptions:  acris [F]  | sharp  alacris [F]  | sharp‐winged  celeris [F]  | swift  incelebris [F]  | not famous  ‐or 

‐us 

‐is         

‐us 

Exceptions:  = aeger  = afer  = (‐)alter *  = (‐)ater *  = caffer  = dexter  = (‐)niger *  = pulcher  = (‐)ruber *  = sacer  = vafer 

Exceptions:  = acer  = alacer  = celer  = inceleber  ‐or 

  Names  that  were  originally  coined  with  a  masculine  –ferus  ending,  such  as  Florisuga  mellivora  flabellifera  (from  Trochilus flabelliferus Gould, 1846), should revert to their original –ferus ending when combined with a masculine  genus. See David & Gosselin (2011). 

1

 Names that were originally coined with a masculine –gerus ending, such as Campethera punctuligera (from Picus  punctuligerus Wagler, 1827), should revert to their original –gerus ending when combined with a masculine genus.  See David & Gosselin (2011). 

2

* Also applies to any compound word that ends with this adjective. 

407


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

Table 3. Expected masculine and feminine endings of variable species‐group names derived from their current neuter  ending.  The  endings  presented  in  the  table  show  the  exact  letters  to  be  substituted.  Words  that  are  not  found  in  the  neuter gender in the Howard & Moore Checklist are not treated here. 

 

408 

NEUTER  ending 

expected  MASCULINE 

expected  FEMININE 

‐e 

‐is 

‐is 

‐ferum 

‐fer 

‐fera 

‐gerum 

‐ger 

‐gera 

‐um  (other than ‐ferum or ‐gerum ) 

‐us 

‐a 

‐us 

‐or 

‐or 


Index of Scientific Names aalge, Uria  223  abbotti, Cacatua sulphurea  355  abbotti, Dryolimnas cuvieri  155  abbotti, Megapodius nicobariensis  21  abbotti, Nesoctites micromegas  298  abbotti, Nyctibius jamaicensis  85  abbotti, Papasula  194  abbotti, Psittacula alexandri  374  abbotti, Psittinus cyanurus  373  abbotti, Spilornis cheela  237  abbotti, Threskiornis bernieri  191  abbreviatus, Ramphastos ambiguus  323  abdimii, Ciconia  182  abdulalii, Accipiter virgatus  246  abeillei, Abeillia  123  ABEILLIA  123  abessinicus, Mesopicos goertae  313  abieticola, Dryocopus pileatus  303  abingoni, Campethera  299  ablectaneus, Agapornis canus  385  abnormis, Sasia  295  aburri, Aburria  23  ABURRIA  23  abyssinicus, Asio  268  abyssinicus, Bucorvus  282  abyssinicus, Coracias  333  abyssinicus, Dendropicos  312  abyssinicus, Falco biarmicus  352  abyssinicus, Phoeniculus somaliensis  287  abyssinicus, Todiramphus chloris  344  abyssinicus, Turtur  72  abyssinicus, Urocolius macrourus  278  acadicus, Aegolius  264  ACCIPITER  244  accipitrinus, Deroptyus  363  accrae, Caprimulgus natalensis  93  ACEROS  285  achrustera, Callipepla californica  28  acis, Tanysiptera galatea  345  ACRYLLIUM  26  ACTENOIDES  342  acteon, Halcyon leucocephala  342  actites, Calidris alpina  212  ACTITIS  216  actophila, Butorides striata  187  ACTOPHILORNIS  209  acuflavidus, Thalasseus sandvicensis  232  acuminata, Calidris  211  acuta, Anas  18  acuticauda, Apus  103  acuticauda, Sterna  232  acuticaudatus, Psittacara  368  acutipennis, Chordeiles  87  adalberti, Aquila  242  adamauae, Lybius leucocephalus  330  adamsii, Gavia  170  adansonii, Synoicus  35  addae, Ocreatus underwoodii  120  addendus, Cacomantis variolosus  147  adela, Oreotrochilus  114  adeliae, Pygoscelis  170  ADELOMYIA  113  adiantus, Cepphus columba  222  admiralitatis, Alopecoenas beccarii  66  admiralitatis, Hypotaenidia philippensis  155  admiralitatis, Macropygia amboinensis  58  admiralitatis, Todiramphus saurophagus  345  adorabilis, Lophornis  113  adscitus, Platycercus  376  adspersus, Crypturellus undulatus  3  adspersus, Pternistis  37  adustus, Phalaenoptilus nuttallii  90  AECHMOPHORUS  51  AEGOLIUS  264  AEGOTHELES  94  AEGYPIUS  239  aegyptiaca, Alopochen  13  aegyptiaca, Streptopelia senegalensis  56 

aegyptius, Caprimulgus  91  aegyptius, Centropus senegalensis  139  aegyptius, Milvus migrans  250  aegyptius, Pluvianus  200  aenea, Chloroceryle  340  aenea, Ducula  73  aeneicauda, Chalybura buffonii  125  aeneocauda, Metallura  116  aeneosticta, Adelomyia melanogenys  113  aeneus, Glaucis  106  aenigma, Aerodramus vanikorensis  100  AEPYPODIUS  20  aequabilis, Caprimulgus atripennis  92  aequatoriale, Apaloderma  279  aequatorialis, Androdon  109  aequatorialis, Campylopterus largipennis  124  aequatorialis, Chordeiles acutipennis  87  aequatorialis, Eubucco bourcierii  323  aequatorialis, Falco sparverius  350  aequatorialis, Gallinago nigripennis  215  aequatorialis, Heliodoxa rubinoides  120  aequatorialis, Jynx ruficollis  295  aequatorialis, Momotus  336  aequatorialis, Neomorphus geoffroyi  137  aequatorialis, Penelope purpurascens  23  aequatorialis, Pogonornis bidentatus  330  aequatorialis, Rallus limicola  152  aequatorialis, Tachymarptis  103  aequatorius, Micronisus gabar  243  aequinoctialis, Buteogallus  252  aequinoctialis, Procellaria  178  aereus, Ceuthmochares  140  aerobates, Apus affinis  104  AERODRAMUS  100  AERONAUTES  102  aerophilus, Aerodramus salangana  102  aeroplanes, Hemiprocne mystacea  95  aeruginosa, Eupsittula pertinax  366  aeruginosus, Cacomantis sepulcralis  147  aeruginosus, Circus  243  aeruginosus, Colaptes rubiginosus  307  aesalon, Falco columbarius  351  aestiva, Amazona  362  aethereus, Aglaiocercus coelestis  113  aethereus, Nyctibius  85  aethereus, Phaethon  83  aetherodroma, Chaetura spinicaudus  97  AETHIA  221  aethiopicus, Eurystomus glaucurus  333  aethiopicus, Threskiornis  191  aethopygus, Phaethornis  106  afer, Eurystomus glaucurus  333  afer, Pternistis  38  afer, Turtur  72  affinis, Accipiter virgatus  246  affinis, Aegotheles  94  affinis, Apus  104  affinis, Aythya  15  affinis, Batrachostomus javensis  84  affinis, Caprimulgus  93  affinis, Ceyx azureus  338  affinis, Colius striatus  277  affinis, Collocalia esculenta  99  affinis, Coracias benghalensis  333  affinis, Gelochelidon nilotica  230  affinis, Haplophaedia assimilis  116  affinis, Ithaginis cruentus  49  affinis, Milvus migrans  250  affinis, Ninox  259  affinis, Penelopides panini  286  affinis, Pogoniulus pusillus  329  affinis, Sarothrura  163  affinis, Tanygnathus megalorynchos  373  affinis, Treron pompadora  69  affinis, Tricholaema leucomelas  329  affinis, Veniliornis  319  affinis, Zapornia pusilla  158  afra, Afrotis  167 

afra, Scleroptila  40  afraoides, Afrotis  167  africana, Aquila  242  africana, Coturnix coturnix  34  africana, Upupa epops  287  africana, Verreauxia  295  africanus, Actophilornis  209  africanus, Bubo  276  africanus, Gyps  239  africanus, Microcarbo  195  africanus, Rhinoptilus  219  africanus, Tachymarptis melba  103  AFROPAVO  33  AFROTIS  167  agami, Agamia  184  AGAMIA  184  AGAPORNIS  385  agassizii, Nothura darwinii  5  AGELASTES  26  agilis, Amazona  360  agilis, Veniliornis passerinus  319  AGLAEACTIS  117  AGLAIOCERCUS  113  agricola, Streptopelia orientalis  55  ahantensis, Pternistis  38  aheneus, Chalcites minutillus  145  aigneri, Vanellus indicus  206  aikeni, Megascops kennicottii  269  AIX  19  ajaja, Platalea  191  akeleyorum, Bostrychia olivacea  192  akool, Zapornia  158  alagoensis, Penelope superciliaris  22  alai, Fulica  162  alaris, Gallicolumba rufigula  68  alascensis, Buteo jamaicensis  254  alascensis, Lagopus lagopus  46  alaschanicus, Phasianus colchicus  43  alba, Ardea  189  alba, Cacatua  355  alba, Calidris  212  alba, Gygis  224  alba, Lagopus lagopus  46  alba, Platalea  191  alba, Pterodroma  177  alba, Tyto  257  albaria, Ninox novaeseelandiae  258  albatrus, Phoebastria  172  albellus, Mergellus  12  albeola, Bucephala  11  albeolus, Melanerpes formicivorus  310  albertaensis, Larus californicus  227  alberti, Crax  25  alberti, Eudynamys orientalis  144  alberti, Lewinia pectoralis  153  alberti, Todiramphus chloris  344  albertinum, Glaucidium capense  261  albertisi, Aegotheles  95  albertisii, Gymnophaps  80  albescens, Dendrocopos himalayensis  315  albescens, Rhea americana  1  albescens, Tachybaptus ruficollis  50  albicapilla, Macropygia amboinensis  57  albicauda, Hydropsalis cayennensis  89  albicauda, Lybius leucocephalus  330  albicauda, Penelope argyrotis  22  albicaudata, Coeligena violifer  118  albicaudatus, Geranoaetus  252  albiceps, Eolophus roseicapilla  354  albiceps, Macropygia amboinensis  58  albiceps, Vanellus  206  albicilla, Haliaeetus  249  albicilla, Todiramphus chloris  344  albicincta, Streptoprocne zonaris  96  albiclunis, Pelagodroma marina  172  albicollis, Leucochloris  126  albicollis, Merops  331  albicollis, Nyctidromus  88  409


Index of English Names Adjutant Greater  182, Lesser  182   Albatross Black‐browed  173, Black‐ footed  172, Bullerʹs  173, Grey‐ headed  173, Laysan  172, Light‐ mantled  173, Royal  173, Short‐tailed  172,  Sooty  173, Wandering  173, Waved  172,  White‐capped  173, Yellow‐nosed  173   Anhinga   198   Ani Greater  136, Groove‐billed  136, Smooth‐ billed  136   Aracari Black‐necked  326, Chestnut‐ eared  326, Collared  326, Curl‐ crested  326, Green  326, Ivory‐billed  326,  Lettered  326, Many‐banded  326, Red‐ necked  326   Argus Crested  33, Great  33   Auk Great  222, Little  222   Auklet Cassinʹs  221, Crested  221, Least  221,  Parakeet  221, Rhinoceros  220,  Whiskered  221   Avocet American  201, Andean  201, Pied  201,  Red‐necked  201   Avocetbill Mountain  114   Awlbill Fiery‐tailed  110      Barbet Acacia Pied  329, Anchietaʹs  328,  Banded  329, Bearded  330, Black‐ backed  330, Black‐banded  320, Black‐ billed  330, Black‐breasted  330, Black‐ browed  320, Black‐collared  330, Black‐ girdled  322, Black‐spotted  322, Black‐ throated  329, Blue‐eared  321, Blue‐ throated  321, Bornean  321, Bristle‐ nosed  327, Brown  321, Brown‐ breasted  330, Brown‐chested  322, Brown‐ headed  320, Brown‐throated  320,  Chaplinʹs  330, Chinese  320,  Coppersmith  321, Crested  327,  DʹArnaudʹs  327, Double‐toothed  330,  Fire‐tufted  319, Five‐colored  322, Flame‐ fronted  321, Gilded  322, Golden‐ naped  321, Golden‐throated  320, Gold‐ whiskered  320, Great  320, Green  327,  Green‐eared  320, Grey‐throated  327,  Hairy‐breasted  329, Lemon‐throated  323,  Lineated  320, Malabar  321, Miombo  Pied  329, Mountain  321,  Moustached  321, Naked‐faced  327,  Orange‐fronted  322, Prong‐billed  322,  Red‐and‐yellow  327, Red‐crowned  320,  Red‐faced  330, Red‐fronted  329, Red‐ headed  323, Red‐throated  320, Red‐ vented  320, Scarlet‐banded  322, Scarlet‐ crowned  322, Scarlet‐hooded  323,  Sira  322, Sladenʹs  327, Spot‐crowned  322,  Spot‐flanked  329, Sri Lankan Small  321,  Taiwan  320, Toucan  322,  Versicolored  323, Vieillotʹs  330, White‐ cheeked  320, White‐eared  328, White‐ headed  330, White‐mantled  322,  Whyteʹs  328, Yellow‐billed  330, Yellow‐ breasted  327, Yellow‐crowned  321,  Yellow‐fronted  320, Yellow‐spotted  327   Barbthroat Band‐tailed  106, Pale‐tailed  106,  Sooty  106   Bateleur   238   Baza Black  236, Jerdonʹs  236, Pacific  236   Bee‐eater Black  333, Black‐headed  331, Blue‐ bearded  331, Blue‐breasted  332, Blue‐ cheeked  332, Blue‐headed  333, Blue‐ moustached  333, Blue‐tailed  332, Blue‐ throated  332, Böhmʹs  332, Chestnut‐ headed  332, Cinnamon‐chested  332,  European  332, Green  331, Little  332,  Northern Carmine  331, Olive  332,  Purple‐bearded  331, Rainbow  332, Red‐ bearded  331, Red‐throated  331, 

Rosy  331, Somali  331, Southern  Carmine  331, Swallow‐tailed  332, White‐ fronted  331, White‐throated  331   Besra   246   Bittern American  185, Australasian  185,  Black  186, Cinnamon  186, Dwarf  186,  Eurasian  185, Forest  184, Least  185,  Little  185, New Zealand  186,  Pinnated  185, Schrenckʹs  186, Stripe‐ backed  185, Yellow  186   Bleeding‐heart Luzon  68, Mindanao  68,  Mindoro  68, Negros  68, Sulu  68   Blossomcrown   124   Bluebonnet   375   Bobwhite Black‐throated  29, Crested  29,  Northern  28   Boobook Andaman  259, Barking  258,  Bismarck  260, Brown  259, Camiguin  259,  Cebu  259, Christmas Island  260,  Cinnabar  259, Halmahera  259,  Hantu  259, Jungle  260, Least  259,  Luzon  259, Manus  260, Mindanao  259,  Mindoro  259, Northern  258, Ochre‐ bellied  259, Papuan  260, Philippine  259,  Red  258, Romblon  259, Russet  260,  Solomon Islands  260, Southern  258,  Speckled  260, Spotted  258, Sulu  259,  Sumba  258, Tanimbar  260, Togian  259   Booby Abbottʹs  194, Blue‐footed  195,  Brown  195, Masked  195, Nazca  195,  Peruvian  195, Red‐footed  194   Brant   9   Brilliant Black‐throated  120, Empress  120,  Fawn‐breasted  120, Green‐crowned  120,  Pink‐throated  120, Rufous‐webbed  120,  Velvet‐browed  120, Violet‐fronted  121   Brolga   165   Bronzewing Brush  67, Common  67,  Flock  67, Harlequin  67, New Britain  66,  New Guinea  66   Brush‐turkey Australian  20, Black‐billed  20,  Brown‐collared  20, Bruijnʹs  20, Red‐ billed  20, Wattled  20   Budgerigar   383   Bufflehead   11   Bush‐hen Isabelline  159, Plain  159, Rufous‐ tailed  159, Talaud  159   Bustard Arabian  166, Australian  166,  Black  167, Black‐bellied  165, Blue  167,  Buff‐crested  166, Denhamʹs  166,  Great  167, Great Indian  166,  Hartlaubʹs  166, Heuglinʹs  166,  Houbara  167, Kori  166, Little  166, Little  Brown  165, Ludwigʹs  166,  Macqueenʹs  167, Nubian  166, Red‐ crested  167, Rüppellʹs  165, Savileʹs  166,  Vigorsʹs  165, White‐bellied  167, White‐ quilled  167   Buttonquail Barred  218, Black‐breasted  218,  Black‐rumped  218, Buff‐breasted  218,  Chestnut‐backed  218, Common  217,  Little  218, Madagascar  218, Painted  218,  Red‐backed  217, Red‐chested  218,  Spotted  218, Sumba  218,  Worcesterʹs  218, Yellow‐legged  218   Buzzard Augur  254, Barred Honey  235, Black  Honey  236, Black‐breasted  235,  Eurasian  255, European Honey  235,  Forest  255, Grasshopper  250, Grey‐ faced  250, Himalayan  255, Jackal  254,  Japanese  255, Lizard  242, Long‐ legged  255, Long‐tailed Honey  236,  Madagascar  255, Mountain  255, Oriental  Honey  235, Philippine Honey  235 Red‐ necked  254, Rough‐legged  254, Rufous‐ winged  250, Upland  255, White‐ eyed  250  

Canvasback   14   Capercaillie Black‐billed  47, Western  47   Caracara Black  349, Carunculated  348,  Chimango  348, Crested  348,  Guadalupe  348, Mountain  348, Red‐ throated  348, Southern  348, Striated  348,  White‐throated  348, Yellow‐headed  348   Carib Green‐throated  111, Purple‐ throated  111   Cassowary Dwarf  6, Northern  6, Southern  6   Chachalaca Buff‐browed  25, Chaco  24,  Chestnut‐winged  24, Colombian  24, East  Brazilian  24, Gray‐headed  24, Plain  24,  Rufous‐bellied  24, Rufous‐headed  24,  Rufous‐vented  24, Scaled  24,  Speckled  24, Variable  24, West  Mexican  24, White‐bellied  24   Chicken Greater Prairie  48, Lesser Prairie  48   Chuck‐willʹs‐widow   90   Cockatiel   353   Cockatoo Blue‐eyed  355, Gang‐gang  354,  Glossy Black  353, Long‐billed Black  354,  Major Mitchellʹs  354, Palm  354,  Philippine  355, Red‐tailed Black  353,  Salmon‐crested  355, Short‐billed  Black  354, Sulphur‐crested  355,  White  355, Yellow‐crested  355, Yellow‐ tailed Black  353   Cocquette Short‐crested  112   Colasisi   384   Comet Bronze‐tailed  114, Gray‐bellied  114,  Red‐tailed  114   Condor Andean  233, California  233   Coot American  162, Caribbean  162,  Common  161, Giant  162, Hawaiian  162,  Horned  162, Red‐fronted  162, Red‐ gartered  162, Red‐knobbed  161, Slate‐ colored  162, White‐winged  162   Coquette Black‐crested  113, Dot‐eared  112,  Festive  112, Frilled  112, Peacock  113,  Racket‐tailed  112, Rufous‐crested  112,  Spangled  112, Tufted  112, White‐ crested  113   Corella Little  354, Long‐billed  354, Solomon  Islands  355, Tanimbar  355, Western  354   Cormorant Bank  197, Black‐faced  197,  Brandtʹs  196, Cape  197, Crowned  195,  Double‐crested  196, Flightless  196,  Great  197, Great Pied  197, Guanay  196,  Imperial  196, Indian  197, Japanese  197,  Little  195, Little Black  197, Little  Pied  195, Long‐tailed  195,  Magellanic  196, Neotropic  196,  Pelagic  197, Pygmy  195, Red‐faced  197,  Red‐legged  196, Socotra  197,  Spectacled  197   Corncrake   155   Coronet Buff‐tailed  119, Chestnut‐ breasted  119, Velvet‐purple  119   Coua Blue  138, Coquerelʹs  137, Crested  138,  Giant  137, Red‐breasted  138, Red‐ capped  138, Red‐fronted  138,  Running  138, Snail‐eating  137,  Verreauxʹs  138   Coucal African Black  139, Bay  139, Biak  138,  Black‐faced  138, Black‐hooded  138,  Black‐throated  139, Blue‐headed  139,  Buff‐headed  138, Coppery‐tailed  139,  Gabon  139, Goliath  139, Greater  139,  Greater Black  138, Green‐billed  138,  Javan  139, Lesser  140, Lesser Black  140,  Madagascar  139, Pheasant  140,  Philippine  140, Pied  138, Rufous  138,  Senegal  139, Short‐toed  138,  Violaceous  140, Violet  140, White‐ browed  139  

453


List of References 1  1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  9.  10.  11.  12.  13.  14. 

15.  16.  17.  18.  19.  20.  21.  22.  23.  24.  25.  26.  27.  28.  29.  30.  31.  32. 

A.O.U.,  1957.  Check‐list  of  North  American  Birds.  i‐xiii,  1‐691.  –  American  Ornithologists’  Union,  Baltimore,  Maryland.  A.O.U., 1983. Check‐list of North American Birds. i‐xxix, 1‐877. – American Ornithologists’ Union, Lawrence, Kansas.  A.O.U., 1998. Check‐list of North American Birds. i‐liv, 1‐829. – American Ornithologists’ Union, Washington D.C.  Abbott, C.L. & M.C. Double, 2003. Phylogeography of Shy and White‐capped albatrosses inferred from mitochondrial  DNA sequences: implications for population history and taxonomy. – Molecular Ecology, 12: 2747‐2758.  Abdulali, H., 1964. Four new races of birds from the Andaman and Nicobar islands. – Journal of the Bombay Natural  History Society, 61 (2): 410‐417.  Abdulali, H., 1965. Notes on Indian birds 3 ‐ the Alpine swift, Apus melba (Linnaeus), with a description of one new  race. – Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society, 62 (1): 153‐160.  Abdulali, H., 1967. More new races of birds from the Andaman and Nicobar islands. – Journal of the Bombay Natural  History Society, 63 (2): 420‐422 (1966).  Abdulali,  H.,  1979.  The  birds  of  Great  and  Car  Nicobars  with  some  notes  on  wildlife  conservation  in  the  islands.  –  Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society, 75 (3): 744‐772 (1978).  Abdulali, H. & R. Reuben, 1965. The Jungle Bush‐Quail Perdicula asiatica (Latham): a new record from south India. –  Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society, 61 (3): 698‐691 (1964).  Adamowicz, M.A.P., 1858. Note nécrologique sur le Comte Constantin Tyzenhauz. – Revue et Magasin de Zoologie pure  et appliquée, 9 (12): 591‐604 (1857).  Adams, J. & E.R. Slavid, 1984. Cheek plumage pattern in Colombian Ruddy Duck Oxyura jamaicensis. – Ibis, 126 (3):  405‐407.  Agne, C.E.Q. & J.F. Pacheco, 2011. Um novo nome para Chordeiles nacunda minor (Cory, 1915). – Revista Brasileira de  Ornitologia, 19 (1): 80.  Ahmed, R., 2011. Subspecific identification and status of Cattle Egret. – Dutch Birding, 33 (5): 294‐304.  Ainley, D., D.A. Manuwal, J. Adams & A.C. Thoresen, 2011. Cassin’s Auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus). No. 50. In: The  Birds  of  North  America2  Online.  A.  Poole,  (Ed.).  –  Cornell  Laboratory  of  Ornithology,  Ithaca,  New  York.  Retrieved  from The Birds of North America Online. doi. 10.2173/bna/50  Ainley, D.G., 1980. Geographic variation in Leach’s Storm‐Petrel. – Auk, 97 (4): 837‐853.  Ainley, D.G., 1983. Further notes on variation in Leach’s Storm‐Petrel. – Auk, 100 (1): 200‐233.  Aldrich, J.W., 1942. New Bobwhite from northeastern Mexico. – Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, 55:  67‐70.  Aldrich,  J.W.,  1946.  New  subspecies  of  birds  from  western  North  America.  –  Proceedings  of  the  Biological  Society  of  Washington, 59: 129‐136.  Aldrich, J.W., 1946. The United States races of the Bobwhite. – Auk, 63 (4): 493‐508.  Aldrich,  J.W.,  1972.  A  new  subspecies  of  Sandhill  Crane  from  Mississippi.  –  Proceedings  of  the  Biological  Society  of  Washington, 85: 63‐70.  Aldrich,  J.W.,  1981.  Geographic  variation  in  White‐winged  Doves  with  reference  to  possible  source  of  new  Florida  population. – Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, 94 (3): 641‐651.  Aldrich,  J.W.  &  B.P.  Bole,  Jr.,  1937.  Birds  and  mammals  of  the  western  slope  of  the  Azuero  Peninsula  (Republic  of  Panama). – Science Publications / Cleveland Museum of Natural History, 7: 1‐196.  Aldrich, J.W. & A.J. Duvall, 1958. Distribution and migration of races of the Mourning Dove. – Condor, 60 (2): 108‐128.  Aldrich, J.W. & H. Friedmann, 1943. A revision of the Ruffed Grouse. – Condor, 45 (3): 85‐103.  Ali, S., 1943. The birds of Mysore. – Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society, 44 (2): 206‐220.  Ali, S. & S.D. Ripley, 1983. Handbook of the Birds of India and Pakistan. 2nd. ed. 4. i‐xvi, 1‐267. – Oxford University  Press, Bombay.  Allen,  D.,  C.  Espanola,  G.  Broad,  C.  Oliveros  &  J.C.T.  Gonzales,  2006.  New  bird  records  for  the  Babuyan  islands,  Philippines, including two first records for the Philippines. – Forktail, 22: 57‐70.  Allen, D., C. Oliveros, C. Española, G. Broad & J.C.T. Gonzales, 2004. A new species of Gallirallus from Calayan island,  Philippines. – Forktail, 20: 1‐7.  Allen,  G.A.,  Jr.,  G.A.  Allen,  III.  &  L.  Allen,  1977.  New  species  of  curassow  discovered.  –  Game  Bird  Breeders,  Aviculturists, Zoologists and Conservationists’ Gazette, 26 (6): 6.  Allison, A., 1946. Note d’Ornithologie No. 2. – Notes d’Ornithologie. ��Musée Heude, Université de l’Aurore. Shanghai, 1 (2):  1‐7.  Alvarenga,  H.M.F.,  E.  Höfling  &  L.F.  Silveira,  2002.  Notharchus  swainsoni  (Gray,  1846)  (Bucconidae)  é  uma  espécie  válida. – Ararajuba, 10: 73‐77.  Alviola,  P.L.,  1997.  A  new  species  of  frogmouth  (Podargidae  ‐  Caprimulgiformes)  from  Busuanga  Island,  Palawan,  Philippines. – Asia Life Sciences, 6 (1/2): 51‐55. 

 Because this work doubles as a nomenclator, dates given are intended to be those of publication; thus, if the work was delayed beyond  the volume year, the volume date appears last in brackets. See Ref. 7 for example.  2 See note at the end of this list for limitations of responsibility in respect of all refernces to this publication whether to printed issues or  online.  1

1


LIST OF REFERENCES 

2871.  2872.  2873.  2874. 

2875.  2876.  2877. 

Zink, R.M., S. Rohwer, S.V. Drovetski, R.C. Blackwell‐Rago & S.L. Farrell, 2002. Holarctic phylogeography and species  limits of Three‐toed Woodpeckers. – Condor, 104 (1): 167‐170.  Zino, F., R. Brown & M. Biscioto, 2008. The separation of Pterodroma madeira (Zino’s Petrel) from Pterodroma feae (Fea’s  Petrel) (Aves: Procellariidae). – Ibis, 150 (2): 326‐334.  Zonfrillo,  B.,  1988.  Notes  and  comments  on  the  taxonomy  of  Jouanin’s  Petrel  Bulweria  fallax  and  Bulwer’s  Petrel  Bulweria bulwerii. – Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 108 (2): 71‐75.  Züchner, T., 1999. Species accounts within the family Trochilidae (hummingbirds), pp. 549‐680. In: Handbook of the  Birds  of  the  World,  5.  Barn‐Owls  to  Hummingbirds.    J.  del  Hoyo,  A.  Elliott  &  J.  Sargatal  (Eds.).  –  Lynx  Edicions,  Barcelona.   Zusi, R. & J.T. Marshall, Jr., 1970. A comparison of Asiatic and North American sapsuckers. – Natural History Bulletin  of the Siam Society, 23 (3): 393‐407.  Zusi,  R.L.  &  J.R.  Jehl,  1970.  The  systematic  position  of  Aechmorhynchus,  Prosobonia  and  Phegornis  (Charadriiformes:  Charadrii). – Auk, 87 (4): 760‐780.  Zyskowski,  K.,  A.T.  Peterson  &  D.A.  Kluza,  1998.  Courtship  behaviour,  vocalizations,  and  species  limits  in  Atthis  hummingbirds. – Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 118 (2): 82‐90. 

    Notice:  Searches in issues of the series The Birds of North America have been conducted partly in printed copies and partly  online.  When  compiling  our  final  reference  list  in  was  realised  that  we  did  not  always  know  which  had  ben  consulted and also that we had not noted date of access to the online issues. It is thus possible that we cite a paper  issue which has been updated since. It is also possible that we have cited editors for an issue not bearing the date  we  give.  Furthermore  the  places  of  publication  and  the  institution  responsible  as  we  give  them  may  not  accord  with the version we examined or with what the website now suggests be cited. We have given a “doi” for each  issue we cite but these links will probably only give limited access unless you are a subscriber and we accept no  responsibility for whether you gain access or not. These limitations to our responsibility apply to all other on‐line  documenttion  we  cite.  Note  too  that  the  latest  modification  of  the  International  Code  of  Zoological  Nomenclature  while making it possible to publish a new name or a new nomenclatural act in an e‐journal or an e‐book, subject to  certain  conditions,  almost  certainly  does  not  extend  this  freedom  to  certain  forms  of  distribution  through  the  Internet. 

85


Appendix 5:  I.C.Z.N. Directions and Opinions (Ornithology) up to 2012  Edward C. Dickinson    The  two  tables  that  are  presented  here,  one  listing  Directions,  the  other  listing  Opinions  of  the  International  Commission for Zoological Nomenclature have been prepared with the encouragement and assistance of Ellinor  Michel and Svetlana Nikolaeva.   We have not found a similar list to be readily available and it was felt to be a useful addition to this work.  The lists are perhaps not entirely comprehensive and if any reader finds that a relevant Direction or Opinion  has  been  omitted  please  do notify  info@avespress.com  so  that  the  relevant  list  can  be  corrected.  We  would  also  welcome  suggested  contents  summaries;  the  task  of  inserting  these  was  only  acted  on  where  an  Opinion  was  consulted. 

References  Bock, W.J., 1994. History and nomenclature of Avian Family‐group Names. – Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History,  222: 1‐281.  Dickinson, E.C., 2011. Vieillotʹs Histoire naturelle des oiseaux de lʹAmerique septentrionale, depuis Saint Dominique jusquʹà la baie de  Hudson; contenant un grand nombre dʹespèces deécrites ou figurées pour la première fois. – Zoological Bibliography, 1 (3): 136.  Mathews,  G.M.,  1934.  A  new  Fork‐tail  Petrel  and  proposals  of  new  names.  –  Bulletin  of  the  British  Ornithologistsʹ  Club,  55  (ccclxxx): 23‐24.  Salomonsen,  F.,  1967.  Passeriformes:  suborder  Oscines,  family  Meliphagidae.  Pp.  338‐450.  In:  Check‐list  of  Birds  of  the  World.  A  continuation  of  the  work  of  James  L.  Peters.,  12.    R.A.  Paynter,  Jr.  (Ed.).  –  Museum  of  Comparative  Zoology,  Cambridge,  Massachusetts.  Steinheimer,  F.D.,  E.C.  Dickinson  &    M.  Walters,  2006.  The  zoology  of  the  HMS  Beagle.  Part  III.  Birds:  new  avian  names,  their  authorship and dates. – Bulletin of the British Ornithologistsʹ Club, 126 (3): 171‐193.  Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr. &  E. Mayr, 1986. Passeriformes: suborder Oscines, family Muscicapidae (sensu stricto). Pp. 295‐375.  In: Check‐list of Birds of the World. A continuation of the work of James L. Peters, 11.  E. Mayr & G.W. Cottrell (Eds.). – Mus.  Comp. Zoology, Cambridge,  Massachusetts. 

1


APPENDIX 5 

Direction 

Content summary (usually brief, or  not needed if title is clear) 

Date 

115 

MEROPIDAE (Aves): attributed to Rafinesque, 1815  (Correction to entry No. 1 in the Official List of  Family‐group names in Zoology). – Bull. Zool.  Nomen. 41 (1): 41‐42. 

1984 

 

122 

Bubo Duméril, 1806, and Surnia Duméril, 1806  (Aves). Official list entries completed. – Bull. Zool.  Nomen., 45: 87‐88. 

1988 

Type species of Surnia is Strix capensis  Statius Muller p. 69. 

Case No. 

2286 

 

Table 2. Summary of ICZN opinions that seem to affect ornithology. 

Opinion 

Content summary (usually brief, or  not needed if title is clear) 

Date 

Case  No. 

Rentention of ‐ii or ‐i in specific patronymic names. –  pp. 11‐12 in Opinions 1‐25. – Smithsonian Institution  (Publ. No. 1938). 

1910 

 

 

26 

Cypsilurus vs. Cypselurus. – pp. 63‐64 in Opinions 26‐ 29. – Smithsonian Institution (Publ. No. 1989). 

1910 

Cypsilurus should be corrected to  Cypselurus. 

 

1911 

Swainson’s bird genera in the  Philosophical Magazine of 1827 are  monotypic, and according to Article  30c the species mentioned are the types  of their respective genera. Therefore,  these types must take precedence over  the designated types of Swainson  which occurred later, in the Zoological  Journal of 1827. 

 

 

 

30 

Swainson’s bird genera of 1827. – pp. 69‐72 in  Opinions 30‐37 pp. 69‐88] Smithsonian (Publ. No.  2013). 

31 

Columbina vs. Chaemepelia. Pp. 73‐75 in Opinions 30‐ 37. – Smithsonian Institution (Publ. No. 2013). 

1911 

In 1840 [G.R.] Gray designated as type  of Columbina Spix, Columba passerina  Linn. As this species is not one of the  original species of Columbina Spix,  Gray’s type designation is not valid  and Columbina* remains without a  designated type. [* Footnote by  Commissioner L. Stejneger: “At the time  of the writting of Opinion 31, the  second edition of Gray’s list of the  Genera of Birds, published 1841, had  not been seen by the writer, nor was  the point bought out clearly in the  documents submitted, and hence  escaped notice, that Columbina  strepitans Spix was designated by Gray  in 1841, p. 75, as the type of Columbina.  This action of Gray is undoubtedly  valid and the type of Columbina is  therefore C. strepitans Spix. In view of  this fact bought to the attention of the  Commission by Mr. W.E.Clyde Todd,  Opinion 31 is hereby changed  accordingly, and will be submitted to  the members of the Commission for  approval.”] The valid type of  Chaemepelia Swainson is Columba  passerina Linn., designated by Gray,  1841. 

37 

Shall the genera of Brisson’s Ornithologia, 1760, be  accepted? –  pp. 87‐88 in Opinions 30‐37 pp. 69‐88.  [Smithsonian Publ. 2013]. 

1910 

Brisson’s (1760) generic names of birds  are available under the Code. 

5


NOTE TO BROWSERS VI

THE INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION FOR ZOOLOGICAL NOMENCLATURE Some years before the middle of the 19th century, and getting on for 100 years after Linnaeus proposed binomial nomenclature, it became clear to natural historians that only by having rules of nomenclature could communication between scientists be based on the sender and receiver each knowing, with certainty, the object of discussion. As the rules were developed it was recognised that binomial scientific names should have authors and that the first author to use a name should be credited for it, and that by adding both an author and a date to a name the result should be a unique “name string” defendable, against later coiners of the same name for some other organism, by the recognition of Priority as a fundamental principle on which rules of nomenclature could and should be based. The rules that began to take shape in the 1830s have become more elaborate as reasons were found to widen their scope to further improve uniformity of application and by 1895 a Commission was established to take responsibility for zoological nomenclature. There was at this point not one Code but a number and it was 1901 before an outline of a uniform Code was agreed, and that, after editing appeared in 1905 becoming the Règles Internationales: the forerunner of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (1961). The Code reached its fourth edition in 1999 evolving through those years to give almost as much importance to Stability as to Priority, and recently came to grips with the difficult issue of electronic publication. A fifth edition of the Code is in the making. Such is the breadth of zoology that most zoologists will never know if zoologists in another branch of zoology are using the same name. In this checklist we have put aside a number of names because they prove to have had prior use in another discipline. The authority to which one appeals, if one feels that priority is unclear or works to the detriment of stability, is the Commission. After due process by its Commissioners, the Commission’s Secretariat publishes the decisions reached. This seriously underfunded body is the firm skeleton on which all our scientific names rest. If the skeleton crumbles the result will be nomenclatural anarchy. Taxonomists are well served by the guardians of nomenclature, not least because they know where nomenclature stops and taxonomy begins (and vice versa); whether they personally seek to understand the rules of nomenclature or not, they recognise the value of the framework and the need to respect it. They need to go further and to lobby their fellow zoologists who also benefit from this framework to see that the Commission is regularly sustained with funding sufficient to do its job.


Appendix 6:  Gazetteer (place names used in this work) Shaun Peters    This  covers  all  the  place  names  used  in  the  range  statements  in  this  edition  of  The  Howard  and  Moore  Complete  Checklist of the Birds of the World, and together with the maps that accompany it, may help birders seeking to locate  particularly scarce birds that they want to see. It may also help them to plan long distance travel without need of a  detailed atlas. Many public  libraries keep  The Times  Comprehensive Atlas in their Reference section, and, as fresh  editions  appear  every  few  years,  secondhand  copies  of  earlier  editions  are  inexpensive  (and  most  information  although taken from the 12th edition is little different from prior editions).  Locality names used in the range statements are generally those used in The Times Comprehensive Atlas of the  World 12th  edition (Reprinted with changes 2008, Times Books Group Ltd, London). Thus among major  changes  readers  will  find  we  use  Myanmar  instead  of  Burma,  Democratic  Republic  of  Congo  (DR  Congo  in  the  ranges)  instead  of  Zaire,  People’s  Republic  of  Congo1  (PR  Congo  in  the  range  statements)  instead  of  Congo  and  the  provinces of South Africa have been renamed. Also newly independent South Sudan gets its own recognition.  In some cases we have diverged from the name used in the Times Atlas. Most such cases are those in which we  have used an anglicized version of the name, although we have retained quite a number of Spanish, Portuguese  and French names (particularly in Middle and South America and island groups in the Indian and Pacific Oceans)  because  these  are  the  names  the  birder  in  the  field  will  need.  The  selection  of  what  to  change  has  been  rather  eclectic,  and  reflects  consultation  within  our  team  and  making  best  use  of  the  preferences  expressed  by  our  Regional Consultants.  As in Dickinson (2003) the Russian Federation can usefully be visualized as four regions:   a)  European  Russia  lying  west  of  the  Ural  Mts.  (in  this  edition  of  the  Checklist  simply  referred  to  as  Russia),   b)  Siberia stretching across the north from the Ural Mts. to the Bering Sea,   c)  Transbaikalia, essentially from Lake Baikal to Mongolia, and   d)  the Russian Far East, in the south‐east of the country.   In South and South‐east Asia we have used S Asia as shorthand for the Indian subcontinent when most of its  area and all of its countries, including Sri Lanka, are involved, the same applies to Mainland SE Asia for the whole  of South‐east Asia including the Thai‐Malay Peninsula, and to Continental SE Asia for South‐east Asia excluding  the Thai‐Malay Peninsula.  The regional boundaries of the Lesser Sundas and Moluccas are taken from Coates & Bishop  A guide to the  birds  of  Wallacea  (1997,  Dove  Publications,  Alderley)  but  make  an  exception  by  the  inclusion  of  Gebe  in  the  Moluccas (for faunistic reasons).  We  have  treated  the  island  of  New  Guinea  as  a  single  geographical  area  dividing  it  into  seven  regions,  i.e.  NW, N, WC,  EC, SW, SC and SE (see map 5 on this CD). The use of the name Solomons is geographical rather  than political, i.e. the North Solomons (Buka, Bougainville and nearby islands) which are politically part of Papua  New  Guinea  are  included.  The  same  applies  to  the  Comoros  (we  use  in  its  geographic  context,  thus  including  Mayotte) and to Netherlands Antilles (i.e. Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao).  This  Gazetteer  may  be  found  incomplete  when  applied  to  volume  2  but  on  the  CD  with  that  volume  it  is  intended  to  include  an  updated  version  of  this  one  that  will  also  include  all  names  treated  in  volume  2.  It  lists  localities  in  the  form  they  appear  in  the  book,  their  location  (i.e.  island  group  that  an  island  belongs  to,  or  the  country or state of which it is a part), plus the plate number (map number), grid reference and name used in the  Times Atlas. Occasionally alternative or historical names are added under Alternate Name.  Where a locality is not shown in the Times Atlas reference is made to one of the eleven maps on the CD (see  below)  or  a  description  or  co‐ordinates  (in  decimal  format)  are  given  under  Comments.  The  choice  of  maps  to  include is focused on areas where birding hotspots are not on the usual run of maps and thus the places shown  relate  to  historic  locations  for  expeditions  that  collected  many  of  the  birds  upon  which  our  specimen‐based  knowledge  is  founded.  In  other  cases  maps  are  provided  to  help  with  geographic  borders  at  state  level  (as  in  Costa Rica and Panama). 

1

 We have really used PR Congo (not the current name) to contrast with DR Congo.  1


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

  Locality 

Type 

Location 

Alternate name 

‘Abd al Kuri I.  Acre 

island  state 

Yemen  Brazil 

   

Adak 

island 

Aleutian Is. 

 

Adelbert Range 

mountains 

New Guinea 

 

Adélie Land 

region 

Antarctica 

 

Admiralty Is. 

islands 

New Guinea 

 

Adriatic Sea 

sea 

Europe 

 

Afghanistan 

country 

Asia 

 

Africa 

continent 

n/a 

 

Aguascalientes 

state 

Mexico 

 

Aguijan 

island 

Northern Mariana Is. 

Agiguan 

Ailinglaplap 

atoll 

Marshall Is. 

Lambert 

Aïr Massif 

mountains 

Niger 

 

Aisén 

administrative region 

Chile 

 

Aitape 

town 

New Guinea 

 

Aitutaki 

island 

Cook Is. 

 

Alabama 

state 

USA 

   

Alagoas 

state 

Brazil 

Alai Range 

mountains 

Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and China 

 

Alamagan 

island 

Northern Mariana Is. 

 

Alaska 

state 

USA 

 

Alaska Pen. 

peninsula 

USA 

 

Albania 

country 

Europe 

 

Albano 

town 

Amazonas (Brazil) 

 

Alberta 

province 

Canada 

 

Alcester I. 

island 

New Guinea 

 

Aldabra 

atoll 

Seychelles 

 

Aldabra Is. 

islands 

Seychelles 

 

Aleutian Is. 

islands 

USA 

 

Alexander Arch. 

islands 

SE Alaska 

 

Algarrobo 

town 

Chile 

 

Algeria 

country 

Africa 

 

Alofi 

island 

Wallis and Futuna Is. 

 

Alor 

island 

Lesser Sundas 

   

Alpine New Guinea 

region 

New Guinea 

Alps 

mountains 

Europe 

 

Altai Mts. 

mountains 

Russian Federation, Mongolia and China 

Altayskij Krebet 

Altun Shan 

mountains 

Xinjiang 

 

Amak I. 

island 

Alaska 

 

Amami Is. 

islands 

Japan 

 

Amapá 

state 

Brazil 

 

Amazonas 

state 

Brazil 

 

Amazonas 

department 

Colombia 

 

Amazonas 

department 

Peru 

 

Amazonas 

state 

Venezuela 

 

Amazonia 

region 

South America 

 

Amazonian Brazil 

region 

Brazil 

 

Ambae 

island 

Vanuatu 

Aoba, Omba 

Ambon 

island 

Moluccas 

 


APPENDIX 6 

  Times Atlas 12th ref 

Times Atlas 12th name 

Comments 

33  K9  120 G5 

‘Abd al Kūrī  Acre 

   

94  A4 

Adak Island 

 

12  H6 

Adelbert Range 

 

122  J2 

Adélie Land 

 

12  I4 

Admiralty Islands 

 

75  H5 

Adriatic Sea 

 

32  K5 

Afghanistan 

 

82 

Africa 

 

113 E4 

Aguascalientes 

 

4  inset 1 

Aguijan 

 

4  inset 3 

Ailinglaplap 

 

86  F2 

Massif de lʹAïr 

 

121  D11 

Aisén 

 

12  G5 

Aitape 

 

6  inset 2 

Aitutaki 

 

107  J9 

Alabama 

 

117  N9 

Alagoas 

 

41  N8 

Alai Range 

 

4  inset 1 

Alamagan 

 

95  L3 

Alaska 

 

95  G5 

Alaska Peninsula 

 

80  E3 

Albania 

 

117 D6 

Albano 

 

96  R5 

Alberta 

 

12  L8 

Alcester Island 

 

92  inset 9 

Aldabra Atoll 

 

92  inset 9 

Aldabra Islands 

 

95  inset C5 

Aleutian Islands 

 

95  M4 

Alexander Archipelago 

 

121  E4 

Algarrobo 

 

83  I5 

Algeria 

 

4  inset 9 

Île Alofi 

 

15  J8 

Alor 

 

Not in Times Atlas 

Not in Times Atlas 

areas above 3000 metres asl ‐ see map 5 

75  A4 

Alps 

 

26  H2 

Altai Mountains 

 

26  H8 

Altun Shan 

 

95  G5 

Amak Island 

 

20  inset G18 

Amami‐Ō‐shima 

 

117  G4 

Amapá 

 

117  B7 

Amazonas 

 

116  H9 

Amazonas 

 

120  C3 

Amazonas 

 

116  J7 

Amazonas 

 

Not in Times Atlas 

Not in Times Atlas 

See map 10 

Not in Times Atlas 

Not in Times Atlas 

See map 10 

4  inset 10 

Aoba 

 

15  L5 

Ambon 

 

3


Appendix 8:  Changes in the spellings of scientific names: Vol. 1  Normand David and Edward C. Dickinson    Introduction  Dickinson  (2003),  able  to  use  the  electronic  file  used  for  production  of  Howard  &  Moore  (1994),  made  a  number of changes to spellings used there mainly based on spellings in the volumes of Peters’ Check‐list (which  were footnoted) but also retained old errors and made a few new mistakes. It is remarkably easy to get spellings  wrong! Some of the changes made in Dickinson (2003) were explained in pp. 827‐829, where it was suggested that  the contentious subject of prevailing usage could be tamed by the availability of a simplified methodology. That  trial balloon did not stay aloft long, and rightly so because the table listed a mixed bag of cases involving original  spellings and cases involving subsequent spellings. The International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (I.C.Z.N.,  1999;  hereinafter  “the  Code”)1  treats  these  very  differently;  in  most  instances  original  spellings  (Art.  32)  have  enduring  protection  and  unless  they  have  dropped  out  of  use  altogether  we  believe  they  should  prevail.  By  contrast  subsequent  spellings  (Art.  33)  are  intrinsically  unavailable  if  they  were  accidental  (i.e.  incorrect  subsequent  spellings),  but  if  deliberate  (emendations)  they  take  the  place  of  the  original  spellings  if  they  are  justified emendations (Art. 33.2) and even if unjustified may become accepted due to prevailing usage.   In this edition of the Howard and Moore Checklist we have focussed on establishing correct original spellings in  all  cases  where  we  are  aware  of  more  than  a  single  spelling  being  used  when  the  spellings  in  the  volumes  of  Peters Check‐list are brought together with those in Dickinson (2003). We recognise that a subset of the names we  have  examined  will  fit  the  definitions  of  Art.  33.2.3.1  or  Art.  33.3.1.,  and  in  such  cases  our  usage  may  be  challenged by those who elect to apply the general definiton (I.C.Z.N., 1999: Glossary, p. 121 “usage, prevailing”).  Such cases requires much deeper searches of the literature to establish the extent of usage of the original spelling  compared to the unjustified emendation (and whether the latter has been attributed to the author and date of the  original spelling – since only then do Arts. 33.2.3.1 and 33.3.1. permit an unjustified emendation to prevail). Note  that this stipulation removes from consideration all works that do not cite the authors and the dates for names.  The  more  precise,  although  demanding,  definition  set  out  in  Art.  23.9  of  the  Code  is  evidently  provided  specifically  and  only  for  the  reversal  of  precedence.  That  this  is  so  is  evident  from  the  important  distinctions  between that definition and that in the Glossary. In the Glossary there is mention  • of  “a  substantial  majority”  (clearly  more  than  a  simple  majority  of  50%  plus  1,  but  how  much  more  substantial?),   • of “authors concerned with the relevant taxon” (this would appear to exclude all general works such a field  guides, illustrated monographs of whole groups of taxa for the general public and perhaps even global  checklists) , and  • of “no matter how long ago” as compared to “the immediately preceding 50 years”.  We do not feel that this vague platform provides a basis for assessing prevailing usage; furthermore the Code  makes no provision for formally retaining any spelling judged to be in prevailing usage and as we all easily make  mistakes, and have multiple supposedly authoritative sources to draw upon, what prevails may well change and  a fresh judgement be made. This, in our view, is not a recipe for stability; it is a recipe for instability.   As  stated  by  the  editors  (p.  xvi)  a  better  basis  for  stability  derives  from  the  original  spelling  and  the  application of the Code’s articles and the rulings of the I.C.Z.N. That said we do not deny anyone the right to try  to apply the Glossary definition of “usage, prevailing” to cases qualifying for that treatment.  Those who complain about instability of scientific names often fail to analyse what changes occur. The vast  proportion of all such change is either driven by taxonomy – because a species has been moved from one genus to  another (see Olson, 1987), or by gender agreement, or both. As long as the ICZN requires gender agreement (Art.  31.2) we support it (although we are unlikely to oppose change to that rule). Because we support it we have gone  to  extra  lengths  in  this  edition  to  help  others  to  apply  it  –  see  the  insertions  of  “v”  for  variable  which,  in  combination with the genders signalled for each genus name, go a long way to facilitating observance of the rules.  Indeed David & Gosselin (2013), in this volume, pp. 405‐407, set out the rules or steps to be followed.   1

 The acronym ICZN when used in the text refers to the Code, not to the Commission; to distinguish the two we cite the Commission, as  authors of the Code, in the form “I.C.Z.N.”.  1


THE HOWARD AND MOORE COMPLETE CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF THE WORLD 

What then are the Articles that must be followed, apart from gender agreement? First, the original name may  actually  have  been  incorrect,  quite  apart  from  gender  issues  (taken  up  in  Art.  34.2),  in  which  case  it  must  be  corrected (Art. 32.5). Second, when there are two or more original spellings the selection of a First Reviser must be  followed. Third, the Commission may have ruled on a spelling and then should be followed 2.     In  working  towards  the  decisions  covered  by  this  appendix  we  consulted  with  Andy  Elliott  of  Lynx  Publications,  because  one  of  us  (ND)  was  advising  the  editors  of  the  Handbook  of  Birds  of  the  World  on  these  very same spellings. Our focus for this exercise was emendations and whether they were justified or unjustified.  We thank Andy for his reasoned and helpful participation in this process which led to almost all decisions being  made unanimously.   We now report on the whole exercise under four headings, providing details mainly on non‐passerine cases;  the passerines will be dealt with in the appendix to the second volume of this work. All names in the body of the  Checklist  which  have  changed  either  since  the  relevant  volume  of  Peters  Check‐list  3  or  since  Dickinson  (2003)  display  the  symbol  δ  after  their  ‘name  string’  (i.e.  after  the  author  and  date);  many  such  names  have  footnotes  attached to them. This appendix treats those and a few others.  We do not list cases such as that of Indicator archipelagicus where Peters (1948) miscited the original spelling as  archipelagus and used the incorrect subsequent spelling that he had ‘cited’. 

Section 1:  Conservation of spellings only exceptionally4 subject to potential change on account of prevailing usage  1.1   Mandatory changes to adjectival names under Arts. 31.2 and 34.2  In  this  edition,  we  have  flagged  with  “v”  (for  variable)  each  declinable  Latin  or  latinized  adjectival  or  participial  species‐group  name.  The  endings  (suffixes)  of  all  such  names  must  agree  in  gender  with  that  of  the  generic  name  with  which  it  is  combined.    The  specific  examples  and  general  instructions  provided  by  David  &  Gosselin (2000, 2002a, 2002b) allowed many changes to be made in Dickinson (2003). However, during this fresh  process we noticed that that edition contained a number of  adjectival epithets that did not agree  in gender and  that were not covered by the above mentioned references and which have been examined since. There are listed  below and take account of the findings of David & Gregory (2008).  Name in Dickinson (2003) 

Name in this edition (2013) 

Page 

Anas [F] cyanoptera orinomus  Anas [F] cyanoptera tropicus 

Spatula [F] cyanoptera orinoma  Spatula [F] cyanoptera tropica 

16  16 

Tetrastes bonasia rhenana 

Tetrastes bonasia rhenanus 

45 

Tetrastes sewerzowi secunda 

Tetrastes sewerzowi secundus 

45 

Ptilinopus subgularis epia 

Ptilinopus subgularis epius 

76 

Alectroenas nitidissima  

Alectroenas nitidissimus  

79 

Alectroenas pulcherrima  

Alectroenas pulcherrimus  

80 

Tachymarptis melba nubifuga 

Tachymarptis melba nubifugus 

103 

Charadrius hiaticula psammodroma 

Charadrius hiaticula psammodromus 

202 

Tringa totanus eurhinus 

Tringa totanus eurhina 

216 

Otus [M] albogularis macabrum 

Megascops [M] albogularis macabrus 

272 

Ceyx lepidus gentiana 

Ceyx lepidus gentianus 

338 

Actenoides princeps erythrorhampha 

Actenoides princeps erythrorhamphus 

342 

Falco araea araea 

Falco araeus  

Touit surdus chryseura 

Touit surdus chryseurus 

Northiella haematogaster haematorrhous 

Northiella haematogaster haematorrhoa 

350  357 fn  375 

 Although here we make a distinction; we follow Art. 80.8 as regards the veracity of a spelling in the Official List of Available Names in  Zoology only if the Commissioners rendering their Opinion were actually ruling on the spelling of the name as opposed, say, to its  precedence. For example, Opinion 409 (I.C.Z.N., 1956) suppressed seven specific names for the purposes of the Law of Priority; the  suppression  of  Pelecanus  cirrhatus  J.F.  Gmelin  led  to  the  placement  on  the  Official  List  of  the  name  albiventor  Lesson,  1831  “as  published in the combination Carbo albiventor”; however Lesson, 1831 actually spelled the name albiventer and the spelling in Opinion  409  is  a  lapsus  calami  and  an  incorrect  subsequent  spelling.  Repeated  requests  to  the  Secretariat  of  the  Commission  to  correct  this  under Art. 80.4 have been disregarded, no doubt due to more pressing matters.   3 Which, in the case of volume 1 of which there were two editions, implies the later (1979) edition.  4 These are exceptions arising solely under Arts. 33.2.3.1 and 33.3.1.  2


Appendix 9:  Dates of publication (links to Priority! The Dates of Scientific  Names in Ornithology).  Edward C. Dickinson    Introduction  Since  2003  there  has  been  a  very  considerable  effort  made  to  correct  those  dates  of  publication  which  have  been found to be wrong in the volumes of Peters Check‐list and also to correct mistakes in dates used in Dickinson  (2003). Much help was received from Alan Peterson and Colin Jones.   However, the bulk of this work was summarised in the above‐mentioned book by Dickinson et al. (2011) and  in the many pages of tables supplied in a CD with it. The work for that was a planned component of the overall  task of making The Howard and Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World as reliable a source of information  as  possible  for  any  author  writing  scientific  papers  about  birds  where  name  spellings,  authors  and  dates  of  publication are all data which deserve particular attention.     After that book went to press it was finally possibly, thanks to the help of Alain Lebossé, to resolve the issues  surrounding names introduced by Temminck in the wrappers which accompanied the first twenty livraisons of  the  Nouveaux  recueil  de  planches  coloriées  d’oiseaux,  pour  servir  de  suite  et  de  complément  aux  planches  enluminées  de  Buffon.  When  dated  by  Sherborn  (1898)  only  two  of  the  twenty  wrappers  could  be  traced  so  that  the  original  scientific  names,  given  on  the  wrappers,  for  the  birds  depicted  in  108  plates  were  spelled  either  on  the  basis  of  bibliographic reviews or on the spellings used in the texts that appeared months or even years after the plates. It is  important to realise, in the context of Art. 8 of the Code (I.C.Z.N., 1999), that Temminck originally did not intend  to issue any text so that it is reasonable to believe that the wrappers respond perfectly to the question of whether  they  were  “issued  for  the  purpose  of  providing  a  public  and  permanent  scientific  record.”  All  18  remaining  wrappers have been located and images of the essential texts from the back of each one have been published in  the pages of Zoological Bibliography by Lebossé & Bour (2011) and Dickinson (2012).  As in other parts of science definite proof is not always available and when it is lacking there may be differing  views on whether or not to make a change. In general, by not quite always, the temptation to make a change in a  date based on probability has been resisted.   Mlíkovsky (2012a) has found proof that the first volume of Museum Heineanum by Cabanis was published in  1853 and not as previously argued in 1851 (or partly in 1850 and mainly in 1851). He has recommended that this  date  change  not  be  implemented  yet  because  priority  given  to  names  in  this  volume  over  names  used  by  Reichenbach,  and  perhaps  others,  may  prove  to  be  prior  names.  Here  his  suggestion  to  defer  any  change  is  accepted; so too are changes to dates for some names in Fauna Japonica: Aves by Temminck & Schlegel where again  Mlíkovsky  (2012b)  has  found  undiscovered  information  that  ties  certain  plates  to  particular  livraisons  where  previously it was not certain which livraison held them. Other recent papers by this author (e.g. Mlíkovsky, 2012c)  also await review. 

Legend:  •

In  columns  B,  C  and  D  names  spelled  in  red  reflect  taxonomic  changes  such  as  movement  to  a  different genus (since Dickinson, 2003) and Dickinson et al. (2011), or the uniting of two species,  or separation into two species, in this edition (sometimes with consequential changes to the suffix  of the species‐group name). 

In column E red is used for names of authors when the authorship has been revised (the previous  author is listed first and the one given in this edition is listed second. 

In columns J and L dates shown in red represent changes; in the first case since that date in Peters  (col. H), and in the second case since 2003. 

Gray shading in the cells from column I to M implies that some evidence for a date change was  available and was considered but not accepted as determinative. 

In the case of Latham (1801) the red date for 1802 was a change made in Dickinson (2003) which  as  anticipated  has  been  shown  to  have  been  mistaken.  See  Schodde,  Dickinson,  Steinheimer  &  Bock (2010).  1


4th Edition Preview of Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World