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a u s t r a l i a n

JULY 2014

your heart in your hands

No. 134 (Vol. 15.07) AUD $9.95* NZ $12.20* (Both incl. GST)

START STITCHING NOW FOR CHRISTMAS

• Gift envelopes • Bonbon quilt • Traditional stockings • Treetop angel • Elf & sleigh cushion


Heavy Duty

This SINGER® HEAVY DUTY sewing machine is a true workhorse. With a heavy duty metal interior frame, stainless steel bedplate, extra-high sewing speed and powerful motor, it can sew through just about anything you throw at it. Convenience features including an automatic needle threader, top drop-in bobbin, fully automatic 1-step buttonhole and drop feed for free motion sewing adds a new dimension of ease to heavy duty sewing.

Give your work a neat, finished edge and professional looking results with the SINGER® HEAVY DUTY SERGER. From high-traffic upholstery and sturdy outerwear to your own original projects. Whether you’re ready for a serger or ready for an upgrade, this machine delivers consistent, quality stitches through super heavy-duty fabrics. When the going gets tough, the tough get sewing.

Find your local Singer® dealer at www.singerco.com.au or call (02) 4337 3737 BLES-431-SG


Yule love it!

This is the time of year when Homespun truly celebrates Christmas. Each July, we bring you festive projects to get working on now, so they’re finished and gift-wrapped well before reindeer start skidding across your roof. And we think we’ve outdone ourselves this year, with crafts that are a joy to make – and to receive. There’s a bonbon quilt; romantically old-fashioned stockings to drape from your mantel; a Santa’s-sleigh and elf-softie cushion; embroidered gift envelopes; and a cute angel doll with just a hint of attitude. All of which are special season’s greetings gifts from us to you.

PATTERN SHEETS To Print out Pattern Sheets visit www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern

YOU’RE INVITED Become part of the Homespun family by: * SUBSCRIBING to our monthly magazine (see page 116) * CHECKING OUT OUR WEBSITE at www.homespun.net.au * FOLLOWING US ON FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/homespunmag * TAPPING INTO PINTEREST www.pinterest.com/homespunmag Homespun

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OUR PROJECTS THIS ISSUE

38

32 Every which way

52

66 Floral arrangements

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Robbie the raccoon

Little star in stripes


74

84 Bonbon, très bon

94

Candy Carol

98 Joyeux Noël

Heaven sent

118

104 Santa’s little helper

BOM Happiness Quilt Part 6 Homespun

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a u s t r a l i a n

omespun your heart in your hands

Editor Susan Hurley Deputy Editor Elizabeth Newton Technical Editors Megan Fisher, Michael O’Neile Writer/coordinator Emma Bradstock Writer/researcher Janai Velez Layout & Artwork Martha Rubazewicz Pattern Artist Susan Cadzow Photography Ken Brass, Sue Stubbs Stylist Sandra Hinton

Quilt Totes

Advertising Rob Jordan (NSW and Qld) ph: (02) 9887 0359, fax: (02) 9805 0714, mob: 0411 424 196 Angelos Tzovlas (Vic, WA, SA, Tas and NT) ph: (03) 9694 6404, fax: (03) 9699 7890, mob: 0433 567 071 Advertising Production Kate Martin Advertising Senior Designer Martha Rubazewicz Associate Publisher Karen Day Subscriptions & mail orders 1300 303 414 or +61 2 9887 0317 Editorial enquiries ebradstock@universalmagazines.com.au Advertising enquiries rjordan@universalmagazines.com.au atzovlas@universalmagazines.com.au Subscription enquiries www.universalshop.com.au or 1300 303 414

OUR PURPOSE DESIGNED BAGS ...

Printed by KHL Printing Co Pte Ltd, Singapore Distributed by Network Services — ph: 1300 131 169, website: www.netonline.com.au NZ Distributor Netlink — ph: (09) 366 9966 Needlecraft — ph: (06) 356 4793, fax: (04) 355 4594, website: www.needlecraft.co.nz UK Distributors The Cotton Patch — ph: +44 121 702 2840, email: mailorder@cottonpatch.co.uk Manor House Magazines — ph: +44 167 251 4288, email: info@manorhousemagazines.co.uk USA Distributor Brewer Quilting & Sewing Supplies — ph: toll free 1 800 676 6543, fax: 1 800 216 2374, website: www.brewersewing.com Singapore Distributor Car Kit Pte — ph: +65 6 282 1960, fax: +65 6 382 3021, website: www.magazines1source.com

Chairman/CEO Publisher Chief Financial Officer Associate Publisher Associate Publisher Circulation Director Creative Director Print Production Manager Editorial Production Manager Prepress Manager Marketing & Acquisitions Manager

Prema Perera Janice Williams Vicky Mahadeva Emma Perera Karen Day Mark Darton Kate Podger Lilian Ohanessian Anastasia Casey Ivan Fitz-Gerald Chelsea Peters

Circulation enquiries to our Sydney head office (02) 9805 0399.

Shop Online b it tto view i our entire ti range & products. d t Visit our website Bus groups welcome by appointment. TO ORDER – visit

www.patchworkonparade.com.au or phone 08 8285 4709 Open Tuesdays from 10am to 4pm.

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Homespun is published by Universal Magazines, Unit 5, 6-8 Byfield Street, North Ryde NSW 2113. Phone: (02) 9805 0399, Fax: (02) 9805 0714. Melbourne office, Level 1, 150 Albert Street, South Melbourne Vic 3205. Phone: (03) 9694 6444, Fax: (03) 9699 7890. This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries should be addressed to the publishers. The publishers believe all the information supplied in this book to be correct at the time of printing. They are not, however, in a position to make a guarantee to this effect and accept no liability in the event of any information proving inaccurate. Prices, addresses and phone numbers were, after investigation, and to the best of our knowledge and belief, up to date at the time of printing, but circumstances may have since changed. It is not possible for the publishers to ensure that advertisements appearing in this publication comply with the Trade Practices Act, 1974. The responsibility must, therefore, be on the person, company or advertising agency submitting the advertisements for publication. While every endeavour has been made to ensure complete accuracy, the publishers cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions. This magazine may have some content that is advertorial or promotional in nature. Please pass on or recycle this magazine. * Recommended retail price ISSN 1443-4792 Copyright © Universal Magazines

MMXIV ACN 003 026 944 www.universalmagazines.com.au


CONTENTS July 2014 Stitching 32 QUILT Every Which Way Jemima Flendt 38 SOFTIE Robbie the Raccoon Jennifer Goldsmith 52 WALLHANGING ORGANISER Floral Arrangements Bronwyn Hayes 66 KNIT Little Star in Stripes Charlotte Rion 74 QUILT Bonbon, Très Bon Leanne Harvey 84 DOLL Candy Carol Debra Gardiner 94 SEWING Joyeux Noël Celeste Bouchayer 98 EMBROIDERY & SEWING Heaven Sent Nicole Stark 104 SOFTIE & CUSHION Santa's Little Helper Claire Turpin 118 BLOCK OF THE MONTH PART 6 Happiness Quilt Monica Poole

Sourcing 14 PIN INTEREST A feast of fabulous ideas from the best creative minds 26 SALVAGE Waste-not, want-not wonderland 27 SELVEDGE Designer Edge with Jannick Deslauriers and magic poppy fields 51 WHAT A CUTE IDEA! 5 Stroll along a streetscape of sweet softie cottages 115 ANOTHER CUTE IDEA! 1 Toadstool-top cushions that make children’s tea parties extra special 137 NEXT MONTH 13 A crafty little teaser for what's in store in Homespun August issue 138 STOCKISTS 13 & CONTACTS

Showing & telling 8 READERS’ SHOWCASE Homespun readers share their successes 73 CHRISTMAS SPECIAL Welcome to our annual ‘Stitch Now For Xmas’ special

Shopping 22 PATTERN & PALETTE PLAY Fabrics – Dreaming of a white Christmas 30 WINDOW SHOPPING Goods that’ll give you goose bumps! 124 ON THE ROAD Craft shopping in NSW’s Blue Mountains & Hunter Valley 130 MARKET PLACE A roundup of great products and shops

SUBSCRIBING DON’T MISS THIS MONTH’S SPECIAL OFFER

116 Homespun

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READERS’ SHOWCASE One of the joys of putting Homespun together each month is seeing the vision of our designers translated by our enthusiastic readers into personal masterpieces. Thankfully, our readers are a sharing lot, so we receive feedback in the form of letters and emails, with photographs of their creativity. We’d love to hear from you, too. Write to us with your crafty triumphs or with any tips, advice and new-product sightings you’d like to share with others.

THIS MONTH’S WINNER

Daryl Perry, from New Mexico, USA, for her tree skirt: “I made this tree skirt using appliqué designs mostly from various Homespun issues (soldier, penguin, snowmen with watering-can and angel from Merry and Bright by Natalie Bird in Vol 12 No 7 and snowmen in cart, snowmen in umbrella and Santa with list from It’s Time for Christmas by Bronwyn Hayes in Vol 14 Nos 2-11). I machine blanket stitched around each appliqué, hand embroidered the details and added a few tiny jingle bells, some sequins and a few buttons to the various appliqués on the tree skirt. I added a fabric ruffle and quilted the tree skirt too. Since the tree is artificial I didn't need a slit, just a hole in the centre. This could double as a table topper on a round table too with a candle and some pine cones in the middle. There was still snow on the ground when I took the photos.”

Congratulations to Daryl for a great effort. As the winner this month, she will be receiving g the following prize: Q A set of six delightful new patterns from The Rivendale Collection by Sally Giblin. Freckles is an attractive patchwork and appliqué tote design, while the drawstring closure on the Mrs Pickles bag sets it apart. The Brambles cushion combines a large stitchery design with a muted patchwork and appliqué background, and the Bloomers cushion has a panel of appliquéd flowers with prairie points at each end. Rounding out the set are two quilt patterns, charm-square friendly Petal Pushers with a strip of appliquéd flowers and Raspberry Jam, a pieced, scrappy concoction (not shown). Turn to our Stockists page at the back of the magazine for contact details for Sally Giblin, of The Rivendale Collection.

SEND YOUR LETTERS TO: Email enewton@universalmagazines.com.au Mail Homespun Readers’ Showcase, Locked Bag 154, North Ryde NSW 1670 or share photos of your projects on Flickr www.flickr.com/groups/homespunmagazine

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th

14 Brother International

Quilting Contest YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO EXHIBIT AT THE TOKYO QUILT SHOW 2015 LIKE OUR 2013 AUSTRALIAN WINNER DALE ROBSON

LAST YEAR’S WINNER · ‘Cradle of Life’ Dale Robson

Let your imagination run free, just create an “Eco” themed quilt and enter the competition for your chance to win exciting prizes!

This is your chance to win a brand new Brother DreamWeaver VQ3000 Quilting and Sewing Machine valued at $4,499! The DreamWeaver VQ3000 is the most advanced home-based quilting and sewing machine ever introduced by Brother. A dream to use, the VQ3000 offers our largest workspace ever plus some of the most visionary features ever designed.

www.brother.com.au | facebook.com/brotheraustralia Visit www.brother.com.au/quiltingcontest for conditions of entry and to download your entry form


COLOUR PLAY Chris Rendrich, from Germany: “I just finished Bronwyn Hayes’ It’s Time for Christmas (from Vol 14 No 2-11). I chose dark-blue backgrounds for the snowmen to show them off better and deep red to add some Christmas warmth. This was an experiment, and I worried a lot along the way whether it would look good in the end, but I’m very happy with the way things turned out. A great pattern. The quilted motifs are from the Quiltmaker’s magazine, and I used cream thread to do them justice. I could hardly wait for each issue to arrive (which took forever, living on the other side of the planet). I’m looking forward to lovely new ideas to make!”

PRETTY PRACTICAL Amanda Galbraith, from Cairns, Qld: “I loved the Christmas Spirit stitchery (by Rosalie Quinlan in Vol 14 No 7) as soon as I saw it. I made mine into a table decoration using linen fabric saved from ma cupboard when my Nanna passed away. I know she would love it. I madee the apron (And a Pinch of ... by Natashia Curtin from Vol 14 No 12) during g the school holidays and d thought it would create reate interest with the high school students I work with in cooking classes. I’m absolutely thrilled when my Homespun arrives in the letterbox. I love the type of paper used for the pages.”

MY NO 1 BOM Veronica Burgess, from Canberra, ACT: “This is the first time I’ve stitched a BOM, and I couldn’t resist it. I decided to appliqué the blocks as well as personalise a few of them. I had it professionally quilted by ‘Robyn’ in Canberra. Thank you Bronwyn Hayes and Homespun for such a lovely Christmas quilt pattern, It’s Time for Christmas. I enjoyed stitching every bit of it.”

PUTTING ON THE GLITZ Veronika Mickenhagen-Cox, from Germany: “I finished It’s Time for Christmas with the wonderful Red Brolly motifs in November last year. It was so much fun doing the stitchery and the appliqués with the nice figures. I quilted Christmas motifs on the blocks with a gold embroidery yarn from Madeira. I added a white-golden border, and the shimmering in combination with the gold yarn looks so regal. The photo doesn’t show how nice it looks and how well it all works together. I really love it! Thank you for this great block of the month.”

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All That Is Spring & The Summer Fair Your Stockists NEW SOUTH WALES Hobbysew Top Ryde Shop MM20A, Lvl 2, Top Ryde City Centre Ryde NSW 2112 Tel. 02 9877 5067 E. topryde@hobbysew.com Peg’s Pieces 138 Oak Rd, Kirrawee NSW 2232 Tel. 02 9542 3513 E. pegspieces@optusnet.com.au Glendoon Cottage 89-91 Lawes St, East Maitland NSW 2323 Tel. 02 4933 8433 E. glendooncottage@y7mail.com Finders Keepers Giftware & Fabric Shop 1, The Central Arcade, Muswellbrook, NSW 2333 Tel. 02 6543 4449 E. info@fkgf.com.au Fortunes and Fairies Shop 8 Magnolia Mall 285 Windsor St, Richmond NSW 2753 Tel. 02 4578 1650 www.fortunesand fairies.com The Home Patch Cnr Durham & Stewart Street, Bathurst NSW 2795 Tel. 02 6331 5002 Email. info@homepatch.com.au

A.C.T Hobbysew Belconnen Shop 105A, Ground Lvl, Lakeside Carpark 7ESTÚELD Â&#x;"ELCONNENÂ&#x;!#4Â&#x; Tel. 02 6253 0011 E. belconnen@hobbysew.com

VICTORIA Sewn And Quilted 92 Whitehorse Rd, Blackburn VIC 3130 Tel. 03 9877 1664 www.sewnandquilted.com.au Patchwork With Gail B 202 Canterbury Rd, Bayswater North VIC 3153 Tel. 03 9729 3635 E. sales@patchworkwithgailb.com A Little Different 1/346 Pakington St, Newtown VIC 3220 Tel. 03 5224 2593 E. alittlediff@ozemail.com.au Honeysuckle Stained Glass & Patchwork 2 Havilah Rd, Bendigo VIC 3550 Tel. 03 5441 3289 www.honeysucklepatchwork.com.au Candleberry Country Shop 2, The Village Walk, Yarragon VIC 3823 Tel. 03 5634 2755 E. candleberrycountry@yahoo.com.au Sewing ‘n’ Beyond 1b, 9-11 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud VIC 3939 Tel. 03 5981 2020 E. sewingnbeyond@hotkey.net.au

QUEENSLAND Sewco Sewing & Patchwork Kessels Central 583-585 Kessels Rd, MacGregor QLD 4109 Tel. 07 3849 4176 E. mtgravatt@sewcosewingandpatchwork.com &IÞS&ABRICOLOGY 64D Trees Rd, Tallebudgera QLD 4228 4ELÂ&#x;Â&#x;Â&#x;Â&#x;Â&#x;Â&#x;%Â&#x;INFO ÚÚSFABRICOLOGYCOMAU The Patchwork Angel 343 Mons Rd, Forest Glen QLD 4556 Tel. 07 5477 0700 E. info@patchworkangel.com.au

SOUTH AUSTRALIA Hettie’s Patch 294 Port Rd, Hindmarsh SA 5007 Tel. 08 8346 0548 E. hetties@bigpond.net.au


Wild Cotton Fabric www.wildcottonfabric.com.au Tel. 0421 901 976 E. admin@wildcottonfabric.com.au Tea Tree Fabrics www.teatreefabrics.com.au Tel. 0401 094 535 E. emily@teatreefabrics.com.au Sew Piecefully Patchwork www.sewpiecefullypatchwork.com.au Tel. 03 5281 2824 E. sewpiecefullypatchwork@hotmail.com Under The Mulberry Tree www.underthemulberrytree.com Tel. 0437 918 186 E. info@underthemulberrytree.com Catharina’s Vintage Stitches www.catharinasvintagestitches.com.au Tel. 0409 700 385 E. catharinas48@gmail.com Sew Creative Supplies www.sewcreativesupplies.com.au Tel. 0414 473 040 E. orders@sewcreativesupplies.com.au Home Treasure Fabrics www.hometreasurefabrics.com Tel. 0427 077 024 E. mick@hometreasurefabrics.com FabricDirect.com.au www.fabricdirect.com.au Tel. 0404 192 047 E. fabricdirect@bigpond.com The Fabric Mamma Tel. 0423 849 323 E. thefabricmamma@gmail.com A Patchwork Quilt www.apatchworkquilt.com.au Tel. 0425 861 464 Frankly Linen www.franklylinen.co Tel. 0468 617 720 E. franklylinen@hotmail.com

Country Hart Designs 13 Alexander St, Port Pirie SA 5540 Tel. 08 8632 3172 E. countryhart@bigpond.com

WESTERN AUSTRALIA Craft Collections Unit 1, 13 Mummery Crescent, Bunbury WA 6230 Tel. 08 9791 1961 E. stuffnbears@westnet.com.au

NEW ZEALAND Away With The Fairys 1738 Main Rd, Cust Village NZ 7444 Tel. 033 125 250 W. www.awaywiththefairys.co.nz Kitz ‘n’ Thingz 152 Spey St, Invercargill NZ 9810 Tel. 032 149 111 E. kitznthingz@xtra.co.nz Berry Patch Cottage www.berrypatchcottage.co.nz Tel. 021 143 9090 E. berrypatchcottage@gmail.com

ONLINE STORES Fabric Pixie www.fabricpixie.com.au Tel. 0415 826 994 E. deanne@fabricpixie.com.au Stitches From The Bush www.stitchesfromthebush.com.au Tel. 07 4676 4184 E. stitchesfromthebush@bigpond.com

Beautiful new fabric, papercraft and accessory collections from Tilda, available now. Contact your stockist to view. Two Green Zebras Pty Ltd Tel. 02 9525 7010 E. sales@twogreenzebras.com www.twogreenzebras.com


Best of the best from

mak e smil s you e

Here are our favourite star crafts on Pinterest this month.

Best cushions

HAPPY FEET

Best crochet

Twinkle, twinkle little shining stars. Designer: Natalya Andreyeva. Contact: www.NatkaLV.etsy.com, natka@apollo.lv.

Question: Of all the adorable animals roaming the planet, which is the one that melts the stoniest hearts? Answer: Penguin. Another question: Wouldn’t you just love to own one? Well, now you can, albeit in knitted form. Cleckheaton’s Aussie Animals book has a pattern

for this irresistible fairy penguin (he’s tucked in amongst a cockatoo, koala, frill-necked lizard, platypus et al., but he steals the show as far as we’re concerned). He’s in Country 8-ply and, for an outlay of just two balls, you can have him in your home in a matter of hours. For stockist information, visit cleckheaton.com.au or phone 1800 337 032.

AND WHILE WE’RE ON THE SUBJECT OF KNITTING AND PENGUINS ...

Best buttons

Pearl, plain and pretty – a collage of closures. Designer: Bilancia Designs. Contact: www.bilanciadesigns.com.

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Because these sweet animals can be so damaged by oil spills (a patch of oil the size of a thumbnail can kill them), the Penguin Foundation invites the public to knit jumpers for the tiny critters. When oiled penguins are rescued at Phillip Island Nature Parks, a knitted jumper is fitted on them to prevent them from preening and swallowing the toxic oil before they are thoroughly washed. We know that knitters will immediately want to leap into action, but sometimes the Penguin Foundation has sufficient stocks, so any surplus sweaters are sold on toy penguins, with all proceeds going to the Penguin Foundation to assist wildlife rescue and rehabilitation, conservation and research on Phillip Island. Either way, it’s a wonderful cause. Find out more at penguinfoundation.org.au/ about-the-penguin-foundation/wildlife-rehabilitation.

Penguin jumper photograph: Phillip Island Nature Parks. Toy sewing machines photographs: Susan Borgen

Heavenly designs make decorative dreams come true. Designer: Colette Bream. Contact: www.colettebream.com, www.colettebream.etsy.com, www.facebook.com/colettebream.


PIN INTEREST Bright ideas, fabulous products, clever tips & quick reads

JAM PACKED It’s inconceivable to toss out a Bonne Maman jar after the last sweet jam morsel has been scraped from the bottom. For years, cooks have scoured them clean and used them for kitchen storage. But it’s time they spread their wings to other areas of the home – hence this cute idea for us crafty folk. Stray threads, buttons and ribbon find a new home in these jars. Glue a pincushion to the lid to double the functionality. (And the natty, space-saving kitchen storage idea would be equally good in your studio, we think.) Buy Bonne Maman delish delights for under $5 at supermarkets.

SEW SWEET Susan Borgen is what you could comfortably call an avid collector. Among her favourite vintage pieces are toy sewing machines, which are not only evocative of heady, happy days of decades past, but also a mainstay of her current Etsy business – go to tparty.etsy.com to see her collection of beautiful bits and pieces, all of which help transport you to simpler times. You can visit Susan and her T-Party Antiques at the website, Tpartyantiques.com or blog tparty.typepad.com.

Kombi resurrection K

A part of our hippy history is about to die with the demise of the wonderful old Kombi vans – after 60 years in production. Thank goodness d for f Tracy Harrison, of Slightly Sheepish, who’s brought this icon back to our homes in the form of knitted cushions. Get yourself into gear and contact www.slightly-sheepish.com f to t order a knitting pattern for this and other VW and campervan ideas. Beep! Beep!

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PIN INTEREST

SNIPPET

et the old a hurry? Forg in rd o c d te ines are Need a twis thod – mach e m il c n e p rd that and bly short co doorhandle a n so a re a , put If it’s to a bobbin d your friends. n e d a re e e one th ing machin you need, ti r of the sew e d in it w h in u b o b d taut as y it on the bo er thread en th o ds. If e th ld o and h a few secon st ju in e n o ’s d nd to the pedal. It ne thread e o e ti , rd o c longer e the other you need a ing stable, ti th y n a r o le achment, a doorhand or whisk att r te a e b a to irr. You thread end give it a wh d n a e in h c rill. ma an electric d put it in the in r re ir st t in a pa about three can also use the threads t u c to r e b gth plus Just remem hed cord len is n fi d re si e knots. times your d stage in the a bit for wa

moody chews Here’s something adorable from Stephanie Jessica Lau, of All About Ami (www.AllAboutAmi.com). Four little pork dumplings, each with a different expression. There’s quite a lot of food craft around at the moment, but we couldn’t go past these steamboat crocheted comestibles. cou

Knitting in a mess?

GLITTER ARTY Bling’s the thing with this canny little remake by Holly Charlesworth, who owns the My Sister’s Suitcase blog along with Natalie Shirley. With a snip and a stitch (or several), she has completely transformed one of those ‘I’ll never wear it again’ garments into a dazzling feature cushion. Cute! Go to www.sisterssuitcaseblog.com/2012/12/diy-sequin-pillow.html for more.

Dropped stitches and mistakes in knitting have always been tricky to correct. If the mistake was a long way down the piece, sometimes the only solution was unravelling hours and hours of knitting and redoing it – until now. Bonnie Kellogg first came up with the Fix-A-Stitch more than 50 years ago, and at last, it’s on the market. Resembling a double-ended crochet hook but with a deeper throat, the tool allows you to easily rework both knit and purl stitches from the front of the work. There are three sizes included in the pack to handle fine to chunky yarns, and their bubblegum-pink colour makes them hard to lose. They also double as convenient cable needles, the hooks helping them stay iin the stitches. To see the tool in action, vvisit www.fixastitch.com. For stockists, go to www.bncooperagencies.com.au g or phone (03) 9580 8616.

THIMBLE GREENHOUSE Here’s how to acquire ‘cultivated’ taste on a small scale. Corinne Dean and Sarah Boone must have dug very delicately to plant out their mini greenhouse with succulents in thimble pots and bottle lids, some of which are set on empty cotton reels. We simply love this. The name of their blog (Small World Land) is a dead giveaway – go to www.smallworldland.blogspot.com for other littlies.

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Faeries in My Garden “Beautiful Designs - Exquisite Fabrics” INVITES YOU TO JOIN OUR BRAND NEW BLOCK OF THE MONTH PROGRAMME FOR 2014

An English Country Garden

Memories of a journey through the English countryside.

“An English Country Garden” Queen Size Quilt (Size: 230cm (90½”) square; Block of the Month:

$39 per month for 18 months (Aust. N.Z.) $45 per month for 18 months (Other Overseas)

Faeries in My Garden

Threads for whole quilt: $10 per month for the first 13 months Embroidery Backing: $25 (special if purchased with Month 1) Derwent Watercolour pencils set 24: Special price $39 + $7 P&H if purchased with Month 1

The quilt features 13 embroidered blocks, enhanced by colouring using watercolour pencils. It’s so simple! ~ detailed instructions for colouring given in pattern.

70 Park Parade Shorncliffe Qld 4017 • Ph: (07) 3869 0808 Email: shopatfaeries@bigpond.com • www.faeriesinmygarden.com.au Visit our website and sign up for our newsletters to be informed of our latest designs. Hop on Facebook and “like” us for the most up-to-date posts.

Starting Now! Find us on Facebook


diary dates

PIN INTEREST

Email details of your upcoming event to ebradstock@ universalmagazines.com.au or send them to Homespun Diary Dates, Locked Bag 154, North Ryde, NSW 1670. Please notify us at least four months before the event.

Crafty folk at Valley & Co. Lifestyle (valleyandcolifestyle.com) have come up with a cute coaster concept that they estimate will set you back just $1 a piece, and they are happy for us to share their step-by-steps with you. So here goes ... YOU’LL NEED: • Can lids • Can opener (the sort that takes the lid off without sharp edges) • Thin nautical rope (available from craft suppliers) • Hot glue and scissors

HERE’S HOW: Step 1: Remove as much paper as you can from the lids. Clean the surface, then dollop a big bead of hot glue in the centre of the lid.

Step 3: Glue down the end of the rope so that it sits flush with the edge of the lid, then snip with scissors. You could burn the edge so that it doesn’t fray if you have a plastic rope, but gluing works well.

NSW – Country July 26-27

Malvern The Embroiderers’ Guild Victoria state-wide annual exhibition Wild Things; Embroidery House, 170 Wattletree Road, Malvern. Open 10am-4pm. Entry $5 (members), $7 (non-members). More information: Phone (03) 9509 2222, www.embroiderersguildvic.org.

Broken Hill CraftAlive Broken Hill; The Events Centre, Broken Hill. Open 10am-5pm. More information: www.craftalive.com.au.

Vic – Country July 11-13 Warrnambool CraftAlive Warrnambool; Warrnambool Stadium, Warrnambool. Open 10am-5pm. More information: www.craftalive.com.au.

August 1-3 Hopetoun Hopetoun Patchwork Group Biennial Exhibition; Hopetoun Memorial Hall, Austin Street, Hopetoun. Open Fri-Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 10am-4pm. Entry $5. More information: Joan on 0488 978 039.

August 2 Mornington Peninsula Mornington Peninsula Patchworkers’, Point Nepean Patchwork & Quilters’ and the Westernport Quilters’ Peninsula Quilters’ Patchwork Quilt-In; Peninsula Community Theatre, Cnr Nepean Highway and Wilsons Road, Mornington. Special guests, and much more. Bring your own lunch, mug and hand sewing project. Open 10am-4pm. Entry $10, $3 discount on pre-purchased tickets. More information: Visit pq-pq.org, email admin@pq-pq.org or call Christine on 0488 239 098, Janet on (03) 5975 1007, Robyn on 0416 213 248.

NSW – Sydney August 2-3 Camden Camden Country Quilters’ Guild 25th Annual Exhibition; A.H.& I Hall Argyle Street, Camden. Open 9.30am-4pm. Entry $6. More information: Chris on (02) 4655 8293.

Step 2: Starting at the centre of the lid, wind your rope around and around the lid surface in a circular motion, gluing as you go.

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August 8-10 Step 4: Repeat with other types of rope on the lids to create a variety of nautical looks.

Hunters Hill Hunters Hill Quilters’ Biennial Quilt Show; Hunters Hill Town Hall, Alexandra Street, Hunters Hill. Open 10am-4pm. Entry $6. More information: Contact Jenny on (02) 9413 3814.

August 1-3 Wagga Wagga CraftAlive Wagga Wagga; Wagga Wagga Showgrounds, Kyemba Smith Hall and Hammond Hall Showground, Wagga Wagga. Open 10am-5pm. More information: www.craftalive.com.au.

August 8-17 Bowral Southern Highlands Textile and Fibre Network ‘The 1920s – An Explosion of Ideas’; Bowral and District Art Society, 1 Short Street, Bowral. Open 10am-4pm. More information: Carol Bairnsfather on (02) 4861 6076.

Qld – Brisbane July 19-20 Brookfield Schoolhouse Quilters’ Biennial Quilt Show; Brookfield Show Ground Hall, Brookfield Road, Brookfield. Open 10am-4pm. Entry $5. More information: Pat on (07) 3379 1318.

Qld – Country August 8-10 Bundaberg Bundaberg Quilters’ 13th Biennial Quilt Exhibition; Civic Centre, Bourbong Street, Bundaberg. Open 10am4pm. Entry $6, concession $5, children under 12 free.

August 9 Home Hill The Burdekin Craft Spectacular; Burdekin Memorial Hall, 9th Avenue, Home Hill. Open 9am-3pm. More information: Phone Judy on (07) 4782 2142.

WA – Perth August 1-3 Claremont WA Craft Show (hosted by True Blue Exhibitions) and 2014 WA Teddy Bear Show (organised by The Teddy Tree); 1 Graylands Road, Claremont. Craft Show covers a wide range of crafts . More information: Visit www.trueblue-exhibitions.com.au. Teddy Bear Show contact Jennie

Coasters photography: Elle G Photography

Roping in your coasters

Vic – Melbourne August 9-24


PIN INTEREST

THE BLACK AND WHITE TRUTH

ap Setting your cs at Xmas tree

A KIDS’ VIEW OF QUILTING How do you take the adorableness of children and add even more cuteness? Lauryn Martin knows. She uses impossibly sweet children’s clothing as the ‘fabric’ of her quilts. Take a look at some of those blocks – onesies, bows and ruffles, animal costumes, sunshine-cheery prints. It’s not only a clever idea, it completely captures you. Contact details for Lauryn are: Website: www.LaurynMartin.com; Etsy: www.etsy.com/shop/22hands; and Email: lauryn.w.martin@gmail.com.

Since this is our special ‘Get Ready for Christmas’ issue, we thought you’d appreciate this clever little extra yuletide project that combines recycling and creativity. Ordinary bottle tops are crochet-covered then attached to a thread cone to create a tabletop tree. If you can’t get a cone, you could make your own shape from heavy cardboard. This is a creation from Agustina Yornet – her eponymous blog is www.agusyornet.com. She has kindly agreed to share the making instructions with Homespun readers. So let’s get started: First of all, here are your ‘ingredients’.

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Using green 4 ply crochet cotton and 2.25mm (UK 13/US 1) crochet hook, start with a magic circle and work 6 dc into it. For Round 2, work 2 dc in each stitch (12 sts) and in Round 3, *work 1 dc in next stitch, then 2 dc in the following stitch* six times (18 sts). For Round 4, *work 1 dc in next two stitches, 2 dc in next stitch*, six times (24 sts). Work in rounds without further shaping until the sides are long enough to cover the cap and fasten off, leaving a long end. Insert the cap in the crochet with the flat side down and sew firmly back and forth across the underside to secure it around the cap. Agustina made the top for the cone from the tip of a Styrofoam cone, which she glued on then painted. Using a glue gun, she positioned the crocheted caps around the base then worked in ever-decreasing rows to the top of the tree.

2 You need: a thread cone (Agustina used one that is 25cm tall, which took 38 bottle caps); green acrylic paint; green wool; and a bow and small hearts (or something similar) to decorate. You begin your mini tree by crocheting green covers for each of your bottle caps.

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Kids’ clothing quilt photograph: Nikkala Anne Photography

Jenn Poort, creator of the Color ‘n Cream blog, explains her passion for stitching like this: “I started blogging at the end of 2012, combining the two things I love most – crochet and colour.” And her blog (colorncream.blogspot.nl) is, as you’d expect, alive with electric brights. So why then did we choose a monochromatic creation? Because we simply couldn’t resist its colour simplicity – and its jolt of bright pink in the top corner – you can direct link to the tutorial at colorncream.blogspot.nl/2014/02/tutorial-flower-square-v.html or shop for more at www.etsy.com/shop/ColornCream.


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lyn’s fine needlework PATCHWORK – QUILTING – EMBROIDERY TOMORROW·S PROMISE HIDDEN STARS PATCHWORK BLOCK OF THE MONTH 12 month program

The quilt is designed by Marti Michell using Tomorrow’s Promise fabric from Maywood Studios. $25.00 per month for 12 months for pattern and the fabric for the front of the quilt, includes free postage to Australia and NZ. Marti Michell PERFECT PATCHWORK TEMPLATE sets A & C are available if required.

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Pattern & Palette Play Midwinter Australia may not be all snowflakes and toboggans, but we’re still dreaming of a white Xmas here at Homespun. Compiled by Janai Velez 22

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01 Northcott ‘Winter Wonderland’ 20344-10. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 02 Northcott ‘Stonehenge Starry Night 2’ 3956M-189 (Starlight colourway). Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 03 Northcott ‘Winter Wonderland’ 20347-40. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 04 Northcott ‘Alpine Getaway’ F20329-44 (flannel). Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 05 Northcott ‘Stonehenge Starry Night 2’ 3954M-184 (Starlight colourway). Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 06 Leutenegger ‘A Wandering Mind’ Scribble Stripe L00506-2, aqua. Distributed by Leutenegger. 07 Camelot ‘Mint To Be’ D693339. Distributed by Leutenegger. 08 Camelot ‘Mint To Be’ D693334. Distributed by Leutenegger. 09 Andover ‘Nara’ D7547G. Distributed by Leutenegger. 10 Andover ‘Nara’ D7549G. Distributed by Leutenegger. 11 Andover ‘Bare Branches’ D7535MT. Distributed by Leutenegger. 12 Andover ‘Bare Branches’ D7530MT. Distributed by Leutenegger. 13 Riley Blake Designs ‘Butterfly Dance’ Circles C3894-Blue. Distributed by Millhouse Collections. 14 Riley Blake Designs ‘Oh Boy’ Swirls C3302-Gray. Distributed by Millhouse Collections. 15 Northcott ‘Winter Wonderland’ 20345-10. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 16 Riley Blake Designs ‘Oh Boy’ Swirls C3302-Aqua. Distributed by Millhouse Collections. 17 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘Winter’s Grandeur 2’ RK14586277 (Winter colourway). Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 18 Dashwood Studio ‘Christmas Wish’ Snowflake Blue D1047BLUE. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 19 Free Spirit ‘True Colours’ PWTC017.SANDX, designed by Jenean Morrison. Distributed by XLN Fabrics.

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Suppliers: Q Craft Project – Charles Parsons:

1300 364 422, info@craftproject.com.au. Q Leutenegger: (02) 8046 4100,

sales@leutenegger.com.au, www.leutenegger.com.au. Q Lloyd Curzon Textiles: (08) 8362 2451, www.lcurzon.com.au. Q Macs Crafts: (02) 8824 1111, sales@macscrafts.com.au. Q Millhouse Collections: (07) 5449 1936, sales@millhousecollections.com. Q PK Fabrics: (02) 9557 2022, sales@pkfabrics.com.au. Q Two Green Zebras: (02) 9525 7010, sales@twogreenzebras.com, www.twogreenzebras.com. Q XLN Fabrics: (02) 9621 3066, info@xln.com.au.

20 Moda Fabrics ‘Color Me Happy’ 10825-11. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 21 Moda Fabrics ‘Sphere’ 1544-11. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 22 Moda Fabrics ‘Sphere’ 1545-23. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 23 Moda Fabrics ‘Bartholo-Meows Reef’ 39532-16. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 24 Art Gallery Fabrics ‘Minimalista’ Confetti Turquoise MNL-405, designed by AGF In-House Studio. Distributed by Craft Project – Charles Parsons. 25 Art Gallery Fabrics ‘Legacy’ Drawn Destiny Linen LGY-305, designed by Angela Walters. Distributed by Craft Project – Charles Parsons. 26 Benartex ‘Ho, Ho, Ho, Let it Snow’ Frosted Window BT3295-24, aqua, designed by Nancy Halvorsen. Distributed by Macs Crafts. 27 Benartex ‘Ho, Ho, Ho, Let it Snow’ Frosted Window BT3295-11, shadow, designed by Nancy Halvorsen. Distributed by Macs Crafts. 28 Riley Blake Designs ‘Fly Aweigh’ Circles C3876-Aqua. Distributed by Millhouse Collections.

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Fabrics shown were available at the time of going to print. Check with the suppliers for current availability and your nearest stockist.

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Breathe new life into little leftovers, small scraps and otherwise wasted remnants with clever ideas that demonstrate your creativity.

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Photography: Olaf Szczepaniak/Zuhause Wohnen/ Jahreszeiten Verlag/Picture Media. Selvedge story by Susan Hurley

SALVAGE


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DESIGNER EDGE

JANNICK DESLAURIERS

Gathering points Even the smallest offcuts can be made into cool rosette brooches. For this double variety, choose a long rectangular strip, fold in half and sew the short ends together to make a circle. Fold in half again, with long ends matching and wrong sides together before doing a line of running stitch near the raw edges. Pull up the thread to gather the fabric. Repeat the process with a smaller strip of fabric for the top layer, then stitch it all together with a Suffolk puff at the centre. When you attach a brooch clip to the back, the job’s done. Easy rosette in no time!

Circle of light If you’ve still got some tweedy leftovers after making your rosette brooch, we suggest trying this bright idea – personalising a standard linen lampshade with mixed-size fabric circles. All you need to do is iron lightweight fusible interfacing to the wrong side of the fabric (to help prevent fraying) before cutting the circles – you can use household objects such as eggcups and glasses as circle guides. Then it’s just a matter of gluing the cut-outs onto your shade. If you use Off ‘N On Glue, the fabric will be removable, making future remodelling possible.

If you were to hear a location description as “industrial neighbourhood, enclosed space, city centre”, what visual images would you conjure? Factories? Assembly lines? The heave and heat of a mighty metropolis? Bet the last thing you’d picture would be a flourishing garden. Well, in fact, this is the setting from which artist Jannick Deslauriers digs through her imagination, plants the seeds of creative thought then propagates the concepts to bring glorious floral installation artworks into full bloom. Never mind that the flowers are made from organza, silk, crinoline and thread. They are so breathtakingly beautiful they practically fill the Montreal air with fragrance. “My aim was to create a space that would feel like a dream, like an apparition,” says Jannick of her decision to make a garden of delights with “human-size” poppies precariously balanced on slender stems and reaching not for the heavens but lofty gallery ceilings. “In Greek mythology,” she says, “this flower represents dreams and hallucinations. In Baudelaire’s poetry, opium (the drug made from poppies) is used to escape reality. I wanted to create a floating field that would make viewers feel like they were walking in a dream.” The technical know-how and artfulness are, of course, not only the products of a fertile imagination but also the right technical training. Jannick first studied visual arts at Concordia University, in Canada, before becoming an art teacher – regimens that stood her in good stead for her exhibition pieces that followed. Her ethereal blooms look as if they have fallen from the heavens and planted themself gently where they landed but, in reality, they are made of sterner stuff and are intricately and painstakingly constructed. “As my work is really time-consuming and detailed, I have to really concentrate on what I’m doing,” Jannick says. “But after a certain time, it becomes almost meditative.” With the ‘growth’ of every flower, Jannick becomes more proficient and satisfied with her work. The more she does, the more confident she becomes about mastering her distinctive technique. Eden, we think, might have just found a new location in Montreal. Find out more about Jannick Deslauriers at her website, www.jannickdeslauriers.com. Homespun

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Perfect for Small Spaces & Going Places Imagine a sewing machine compact enough to whisk E[E]XSEWI[MRKGPEWWSV½XMR]SYVFSSOWLIPJ2S[ imagine this same machine is chock-full of features like the original IDT™W]WXIQKYEVERXIIMRKEFWSPYXIP]IZIR JEFVMGJIIHJVSQXSTERHFSXXSQHIWMKRIHXSQIIXXLI *

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Find your nearest dealer at www.pfaff.com/au or phone (02) 4337 3737 BLES-493-PF


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Have a gander! They aren’t as elegant as swans or as cute as fluffy ducks, but geese sure have their own flighty charm.

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01 & 02 Check out your kitchen with these farmyard friendly designs. The thes ‘Gingham Geese’ double oven glove ‘Gin and gauntlet are from Ulster Weavers. 03 This T family of ceramic geese measuring spoons is stackable. The mea set comprises a tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon and ¼ teaspoon. Contact te Made590 for more details. Mad 04 Designer Marcantonio Raimondi Malerba saw the potential of using Mal crates crat as quirky animal furniture. Contact Spotted for info on his Con ‘Sending Animals Duck’ side table. ‘Sen 05 It’s no longer a flight of fancy – you can have all the furnishing sophistication you want thanks to étoile home’s cotton/linen ‘Geese’ cushion in petrol cott blue. blue It measures 45 x 45cm. 06 Bambule specialises in cuddly gifts, and they don’t come any cuddlier than when whe they’re made from recycled Australian woollen blankets. Hard to Aus choose cho a favourite colourway, isn't it?


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07 The graphic g on the ‘Duck, Duck, Goose’ dress from The Children’s Wardrobe adds a quaint touch. 08 Aly Parrott creates magical animal pillow toys, but none cuter than the delicate goose design. 09 We love the stylised design on these button earrings. You can find out more by contacting The Cotton Shoppe. 10 BialaKura Photograph’s prints are photographs of European architectural elements incorporated into bird shapes. Look closely and you’ll see that the ‘Goose’ feathers are actually peeling teal paint on weathered wood. 11 & 12 Leslie Gerry’s fun, fresh designs are available on all sorts of products, from mugs and teatowels to stationery. 13 Look what can be achieved with just wire and wood. Artist Bud Bullivant says his sculptures are “an abstraction that’s just realistic enough to delight our memories of scenes from our own observations”. Contact Wired by Bud.

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WHERE TO BUY UY Q Aly Parrott: www.etsy.com/shop/alyparrott. op/alyparrott. Q Bambule: www.etsy.com/shop/Bambulehandmade. /Bambulehandmade. Q BialaKura Photograph: www.bialakura.etsy.com. bialakura.etsy.com. Q étoile home: www.etoile-home.com. e.com. Q Leslie Gerry: www.lesliegerry.com. com. Q Made590: (02) 9550 1020, www.made590.com. ww.made590.com. Q Spotted: www.notonthehighstreet.com/spotted. treet.com/spotted. Q The Children's Wardrobe:

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www.etsy.com/shop/thechildrenswardrobe. enswardrobe. Q The Cotton Shoppe: www.etsy.com/shop/TheCottonShoppe. nShoppe. Q Ulster Weavers: www.ulsterweavers.com. eavers.com. Q Wired by Bud: www.etsy.com/shop/WiredbyBud. hop/WiredbyBud. se quilt project. Turn to page 32 for our flying-geese

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EVERY WHICH WAY Jemima Flendt set her ‘flying geese’ aloft on a deep-blue sky background. Despite launching them in all directions, her colour scheme and fine pattern balance have ensured their destination is high-style design.

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Materials Q 4.4m (4&/8yd) navy spot print fabric (background) Q 25cm (¼yd) each of 10 different coloured spot print fabrics (Flying Geese) Q 55cm (%/8yd) red and white print fabric (binding) Q 2m (2¼yd) extra-wide backing fabric Q Batting at least 195cm (77in) square Q Sharp pencil Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat 34

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Q Sewing machine with ¼in foot Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 174cm (68½in) square Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements (except the backing) are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. A seam allowance of ¼in is used throughout and is included in the cutting. www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern


Cutting

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From the navy spot print fabric, cut: • 35 strips, 2½in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut 28 of the strips into 448 squares, 2½in (Flying Geese). Set aside the remaining seven strips for the border • 14 strips, 4½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 56 rectangles, 4½ x 8½in (half-blocks) • Two strips, 8½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut eight squares, 8½in (A). From seven of the coloured spot print fabrics, cut: • Three strips, 2½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 24 rectangles, 2½ x 4½in (Flying Geese). From two of the coloured spot print fabrics, cut: • Three strips, 2½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 20 rectangles, 2½ x 4½in (Flying Geese). From the remaining coloured spot print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 2½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 16 rectangles, 2½ x 4½in (Flying Geese). After completing Steps 2-4, you should have a total of 224 spot print rectangles.

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From the red and white print fabric, cut: • Seven strips, 2½in across the width of the fabric (binding).

Flying Geese blocks

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Using a sharp pencil, rule a diagonal line from corner to corner on the wrong side of the 448 navy spot print 2½in squares. Referring to Diagram 1, lay a marked square, right sides together, over the right end of a coloured spot print rectangle with three edges level. Sew along the marked line, trim the seam to ¼in and press the seam towards the navy fabric. Lay another marked square over the other end of the coloured rectangle, right sides together, and sew along the marked line. Trim the seam and press as before. This completes one Flying Geese unit. Make a total of 224 Flying Geese units as described in Steps 7-8. Lay out four matching Flying Geese units one under the other so they are all ‘flying’ in the same direction. Sew the units together, right sides

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Flying Geese block

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together, and press the seams towards the top edge of the navy fabric. The unit should measure 8½ x 4½in from raw edge to raw edge. Make a total of 56 units like this.

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Place a 4½ x 8½ navy spot print rectangle face up on the table and lay a Flying Geese unit on top of it, right sides together. Sew them together along the

Diagram 1 Homespun

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Step 8

Step 10

Quilt layout diagram

long right edge to make a block, as shown in Diagram 2. It should measure 8½in square from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat this step to make a total of 56 blocks. The geese should be on the right edge of each block.

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Assembly

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Lay out the Flying Geese blocks and 8½in navy A squares in eight rows of eight blocks, with one A square in each row. Refer to the Quilt Layout Diagram. Spend some time rearranging the blocks to balance the colours. Jemima recommends that the A squares be surrounded by Flying Geese so that the ‘negative’ spaces aren’t too big. When you’re happy with the layout, sew the blocks together in rows, pressing the seams of odd rows to the left and even rows to the right so that you can ‘nest’ the seams. Join the rows together and press the seams in one direction. For the border, join the remaining seven 2½in navy spot print width-of-fabric strips together, end to end, to make one length. Press the seams open.

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Measure the length of the quilt through the centre and cut two strips to this measurement from the long strip. Sew them to the left and right edges of the quilt, matching the centre points and pressing the seams outwards. Measure the width of the quilt across the centre and cut two strips to this measurement from the remainder of the long strip. Sew them to the top and bottom edges of the quilt and press the seams outwards.

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Jemima’s quilt was professionally machine quilted with an all-over triangle pattern, using grey thread to blend in with the quilt. If you’re doing this, take the backing fabric, batting and quilt top to your quilter. This design was quilted by Carol Brady, of the Quilting Cottage. If you’re quilting the project yourself, smooth the backing fabric on the floor, right side down, and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it’s smooth. Lay the pressed quilt top, right side up, over the batting and

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baste the three layers together with thread or safety pins. Quilt as desired. Trim the batting and backing fabric ¼in outside the raw edge of the quilt. Cut the ends of the 2½in red and white print binding strips at a 45-degree angle. Join the strips, end to end, to make one length and press the seams open. Fold the long strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, stitch the binding to the edge of the quilt with a ¼in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 82 for details. Turn the binding over and hand stitch it to the back of the quilt. Label and date your quilt.

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For contact details for Jemima Flendt, of Tied with a Ribbon, and Carol Brady, of The Quilting Cottage, turn to the Stockists list at the back of the magazine.


Getting to know… JEMIMA FLENDT Why this skill – and this style? I love hand sewing and incorporating it into quilts. I always have to have my hands busy and always have a project when I am out and about and need to fill in some time. Who taught you your crafting skills? I used to do a lot of craft with my nana when I was a young girl – sewing, learning to crochet and bake. My mum also was always sewing clothes for my family, so it was a big part of my childhood. I love taking classes and learning from others. It’s the tips and tricks that you learn from others that become valuable tools for your craft. Becoming a Home Ec teacher was such a wonderful way to pursue two loves and be able to inspire students to develop a love for these skills too. What are some of the important tips you can pass on? It’s great to take shortcuts and learn new ways but it’s about learning the right shortcuts that won’t compromise on the detail. Do you think of your craft as a passion or a spare-time-filler? It’s definitely my passion. I love shopping for fabric just so much, so I’m out quite often in quilting and fabric stores, either searching for the perfect fabric for a project or seeing what’s new. From where do you draw inspiration? Quite often, from other women I sew with. I love being around others while sewing, stitching, crocheting ... So many ideas and new projects are shared. I read blogs and love connecting with what is happening around the world in terms of fabrics, trends and all things quilting. What are your favourite materials to work with? Fabrics like cotton, linen and lawn; ribbon; felt; and embellishments. I’m also a huge fan of Liberty ranges, and I love adding to my stash of these simply stunning and special fabrics. Where do you work? I’m lucky enough to have a sewing room. Originally, when we built our house, we had a guest room but, as my sewing machines, equipment and fabric stash grew, the guest room was disassembled, as I took over more and more with my stitching and designing. I have been able to continue to add more equipment and fabric to make it a great working room. I love sewing and being in this space. There are quilts hanging on the walls and art prints that inspire me to make a creative, bright and cheery place to spend lots of time.

JEMIMA’S LAYOUT TIP Don’t feel that you have to stick to my exact block layout. Be creative and arrange your blocks in a way that pleases your eye and suits the colours and prints you have chosen.

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ROBBIE THE RACCOON ‘Robber the Raccoon’, more like it! This cunning (but mighty cute) little critter by Jennifer Goldsmith can’t keep his greedy paws off pantry temptations. His sack goes where he does, ready to be filled with his booty of cakes, croissants and strawberries. He is known to police!

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Q Fusible web Q Tear-away stabiliser Q Waxed dental floss Q Fray Stop or similar product Q Doll-making needle Q Screwdriver and spanner for joints Q Stuffing tool Q Air-erasable marking pen Q White tailor’s chalk Q Ironing cloth Q Sewing machine with ¼in foot Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, blanket stitch, running stitch, straight stitch Finished size: 33cm (13in) seated

Materials Q 35cm (#/8yd) grey wool flannel (body) Q 15 x 40cm (6 x 16in) white wool flannel (face and ears) Q 15 x 30cm (6 x 12in) black wool flannel (eye patches and tail stripes) Q 6cm (2½in) square grey wool felt (eye outlines) Q 10 x 20cm (4 x 8in) light grey wool felt (cheeks) Q 20 x 25cm (8 x 10in) black wool felt (mask) Q One pair of black and white striped knee-high socks (jumper) Q 60cm (¾yd) of 2cm (¾in) wide white knit-fabric binding (jumper) – see Note Q 18cm (7in) square of light-coloured felt (joint padding) Q Two 14mm (%/8in) glass teddy eyes with loops (eyes) – see Note Q Black plastic safety nose Q Set of four 35mm (1#/8in) bear joints with screws, nuts and disks Q Two florist’s round corsage magnets (1cm (#/8in) diameter) (to clasp hands together) 40

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Q 30cm (#/8yd) each of two cotton print fabrics (outer sack and lining) – see Note Q 60cm (¾yd) of 25mm (1in) wide cotton check bias binding (sack tie) Q 20 x 25cm (8 x 10in) red wool felt (strawberries, cherries) Q 10 x 25cm (4 x 10in) green wool felt (strawberry leaves) Q 25cm (10in) square each of six shades of wool felt from beige to dark brown (croissant, cupcakes, cream bun, icing) Q 10cm (4in) square light pink wool felt (icing) Q 5 x 12cm (2 x 5in) white wool felt (cream) Q Stranded embroidery cottons in dark grey, cornflower blue, red, green, browns, pink, white and cream Q Seed beads and bugle beads (cake sprinkles) Q Fibre fill Q Paper, cardboard or template plastic (patterns) Q 20cm (8in) of 1cm (#/8in) wide black elastic (mask)

Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. Set your sewing machine to a shorter than usual stitch length to give smoother seams. Remember that you are making a left and right side of the figure, so you will need to reverse (turn over) some of the pattern pieces – this is noted on the patterns. The toy is not intended for a child under three years as it has glass eyes and beads that may be a choking hazard. Jennifer’s loot sack is made from pieced fabric – she haphazardly pieced together assorted rectangles to make two pieces of fabric that were about 30 x 45cm (12 x 15in) each before cutting out the sack shapes. A seam allowance of ¼in is used throughout and is included in the patterns. Yardage requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. The lines and arrows on the patterns indicate the fabric grain – match them to the straight grain of the woven fabrics. Wool flannel can vary between manufacturers and some looser weaves can pull apart during toy making. To strengthen the raw edges, apply Fray Stop to the edges, allowing it to dry completely before starting to sew. Take extra care when turning and stuffing the flannel shapes to avoid puncturing the fabrics with the tool. If you can’t source the knit binding, cut strips of white rib-knit fabric, 1½in wide, across the stretch of the fabric to the lengths specified in Steps 38 and 39. Press them in half along the length, then press the long edges in to the centre to form binding. www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern


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Trace all the shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto paper or template plastic, transferring all the markings and labels. Jennifer recommends gluing the paper patterns to cardboard for accuracy and durability. Cut them out on the lines. From the grey wool flannel, cut: • One face side and one face side reversed • One head gusset • One head back • Two arms and two arms reversed

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• Two legs and two legs reversed • One body and one body reversed • Two tails. From the white wool flannel, cut: • One face front • One ear and one ear reversed. From the black wool flannel, cut: • One ear and one ear reversed. Onto the paper side of the fusible web, trace from the Pattern Sheet: • Two small tail stripes • Two large tail stripes • One left and one right eye patch.

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Cut the shapes out of fusible web roughly. Lay them on the wrong side of the remaining black wool flannel, cover them with an ironing cloth and press to fuse them in place. When they are cool, cut them out along the traced lines. From the grey wool felt, cut: • One eye outline and one eye outline reversed. From the light grey wool felt, cut: • One cheek and one cheek reversed.

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Assembly

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Match each black ear with a white one, right sides together, and pin them together. Sew around the curved edge, leaving the straight edge open. Clip the curves and turn the ears right side out. Fold in ¼in along the straight edge and use dental floss to ladder stitch along it. Pull the thread firmly to slightly gather the bottom of the ears and tie off the floss securely. Match each arm with an armreversed shape, right sides together. Sew around the edge, leaving an opening for turning where marked on the pattern. Clip the curves and turn them right sides out. Repeat Step 10 to make the legs. Peel the backing paper from one large and one small black tail stripe. Referring to the pattern for placement, lay the stripes on one of the grey tail shapes, cover them with the ironing cloth and press to fuse them in place. Pin tear-away appliqué stabiliser behind the tail shape. Set your machine to a close zigzag stitch and use black thread to sew along the edges of the black stripes. Secure the threads and remove the stabiliser. Repeat Steps 12-13 to appliqué the other tail shape. With right sides facing, pin the tail shapes together. Work a few hand stitches along the seam lines to maintain the alignment of the stripes, then sew the seam around the tail, leaving an opening for turning where marked on the pattern. Clip the point and curves and turn the tail right side out. The body seams run down the centre front and back and the darts are at the sides. Fold a body shape, right sides together, along the darts so that the straight edges are aligned and pin them in place. Sew the darts from the outer edges to the points. Repeat with the body reverse shape. Match the two bodies, right sides together. Slip the tail between the layers where marked on the pattern with its straight edge protruding a little beyond the curved

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edge of the body shapes. Pin the shapes together, carefully aligning the darts. Sew around the body, leaving the straight neck edge open as well as the opening for turning marked on the pattern. Turn the body over and check that the stitching has gone through both layers of flannel all the way around. Clip the seam allowance to reduce the bulk of the tail and curves. Leave the body inside out for now. The head consists of seven pieces – Jennifer recommends that you work slowly and methodically, especially if this is the first time you’ve constructed a complex shape like this. Lay the white face front right side up on the ironing board. Remove the backing paper from the black eye patch appliqué shapes and position them on the face where indicated by the dotted lines on the pattern. Slide the grey wool felt cheek shapes

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Back view

between the white face and black eye patch shapes on each side, referring to the pattern for the placement. Cover the face with the ironing cloth and press with the iron to fuse them in place. Where the felt sits between the layers, you’ll need to pin as well. Place tear-away stabiliser behind the face front. Set the machine to a close zigzag stitch and sew around the edge of the black appliqué shapes with black thread. Secure the threads and remove the stabiliser. The grey cheek shapes aren’t stitched – their raw edge sits up from the face once it’s stuffed. On your work surface, lay out the white face and grey face side pieces as shown in Diagram 1. Then flip the grey shape over on top of the face, right sides together, and bring the curved edges together with pins. This may seem tricky at first

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Head

and may need a bit of fiddling and re-pinning to get right. Jennifer says that it’s much easier to sew this curved seam by hand using a doubled length of sewing thread and small, neat backstitches. Don’t pull the thread too tightly and cause the seam to pucker; avoid catching the grey felt cheek shape in the seam. Repeat this step for the other side of the face. Sew the chin dart in the front of the face in white thread using the same method as in Step 15. Sew the darts in the back of the head in grey thread. Pin the head gusset to the face, right sides together, placing your first pin at the nose and working towards the edges. Stitch the seam. If you prefer, sew the tighter nose curve by hand. Check that both fabrics are caught in the seam all the way round Attach the safety nose to the middle of the white face front between the two black eye-patch

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Head with mask

appliqués according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Pin the back of the head to the front of the head, right sides facing. Begin pinning at each side of the neck, then pin at the top of the head and pin the rest of the seam together evenly between them. Stitch this seam, check it is completely sewn and turn the head right side out. With the body inside out and the head right side out, slip the head through the neck opening of the body, with the nose pointing towards the belly. Align the chin dart with the centre of the belly. If you prefer to have the raccoon with its head slightly turned as Jennifer has done, set the chin seam a little off centre from the belly. Insert your fingers inside the head and push out towards the shoulders so that the raw edges around the neck and head are aligned. Pin the neckline and sew around it with small neat backstitches using dental floss. Sewing this seam by hand is much less frustrating than attempting it by machine. Turn the head and body right side out through the opening in the back.

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Jointing Diagram 1

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From the light-coloured

felt, cut eight circles about 1½in in diameter to protect the fabric from the friction of the joints. Snip a small hole in the centre of each circle for the bolts to fit through. Each joint consists of two wooden disks, two washers, one bolt, one lock nut and two felt circles. Referring to the pattern for placement, make small holes in the inner side of the arms and legs, and in the body for the joints using sharp-pointed embroidery scissors. Before making the holes, ensure you are creating left and right arms and legs – once the holes are made, they’re there for good! Apply a tiny amount of Fray Stop around the holes, but be careful that it doesn’t soak through to the other layer of each limb. Place a washer onto a bolt, then a wooden disk and a felt circle. Insert this loaded bolt inside a limb and poke the end through the hole you made for it. Then insert the bolt end through the corresponding hole in the body. Inside the body, slip a felt circle, wooden disk, washer and nut over the bolt end and use a screwdriver and spanner to tighten the joint. See Diagram 2 on page 44. Repeat this step for the other three limbs. Adjust the tension on the joints to fine tune them for uniform movement. If they’re too loose, the limbs will be floppy and the raccoon won’t sit well.

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washer disk

felt limb

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body felt disk washer

Diagram 2

Filling Stuff the head through the opening in the back using small pieces at a time. Fill the nose firmly and load the cheeks with stuffing to sculpt the shape of the face. When the head is sufficiently filled, continue filling the belly and bottom and close the back opening with ladder stitch using dental floss. Before stuffing the arms, insert one half of the florist’s corsage magnets into each paw. Manipulate them so that the two halves attract rather than repel, then stuff around them firmly to keep them in position on the inside end of the arms. Continue filling the arms and sew the openings closed. Stuff the legs in the same way, omitting the magnets. Eye placement Attaching the eyes at this stage allows you to sculpt the head by tensioning the threads that hold them. Using the pattern as a guide, or varying the placement as you wish, make a small snip in the felt eye circles and slip the loop of the eyes through them to check the position. Pin them in place through the loops. Thread the doll needle with a long, doubled length of dental floss and insert it into the centre back of the head just above the neckline, leaving a tail of about 12cm (5in). Bring the needle out at one eye

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Repeat this step with the other sock to make two front/back shapes. Use the remaining sock material to cut two sleeves, ensuring the stripe placement is the same on each one. Sew around all the raw edges with zigzag stitch with the exception of the straight bottom edges of the front and back pieces and the cuffs of the sleeves. This will give a slightly fluted ‘lettuce leaf’ effect. Pin the front and back shapes, right sides together, and sew from the neck to the outer edge of the shoulder on both sides. With right sides facing, pin a sleeve top to each side, centred on the shoulder seams you just sewed. Pin them together at the points marked with an X and pin the seams between them evenly. Sew from one X, up around the shoulder and down to the other X for each sleeve. With right sides together, lay the jumper on the work surface with the sleeves out to the sides. Pin the sleeve and underarm seams together and sew from the sleeve cuff to the armpit and down to the bottom hem at each side Cut two 10cm (4in) lengths of knit binding for the sleeve cuffs and sew the short ends together to make circles. Unfold one long edge of the binding and pin it to the bottom edge of the sleeve cuff, right sides together, raw edges matching and the seams nearby each other. Hand stitch around the crease line of the binding

position through the hole in the felt and take it through the loop on the eye. Make a tiny snip in the head just large enough for the eye loop to sink into, go back through that hole and come out just next to the entry point. Repeat this sequence for the other eye, making the entry and exit points no more than 7mm (¼in) apart. Tie the two thread tails at the back in a single knot. Before tying again to form a reef knot, adjust the tension on the threads to shape the head by indenting the eyes in the face. After tying the knot securely, bury the thread ends inside the head and trim them under tension to make the ends pop back inside. Ear placement The position of the ears gives personality to the raccoon. Jennifer placed hers over the gusset seam with about one third over the gusset and the rest over the side of the face. When you’re happy with the ear positions, pin them in place and use doubled grey thread to ladder stitch them in place securely around the front and back.

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Clothes Jumper Cut one of the socks lengthwise from the top to the toe and open it out. Pin the jumper front/back pattern to it with the neck edge in line with the top of the sock and cut it out.

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Getting to know…

JENNIFER GOLDSMITH Any other creatures you’re still hankering to make? Absolutely! I have a notebook that I carry with me to jot down ideas. There’s quite a backlog sitting in there. I always have far more ideas than I do hours in the day. I carry the notebook because, for me inspiration comes from everywhere. The other day our daughter was chatting away to me while travelling in the car. It was the end of a long day, and she was a little tired. She was telling me all about how she had learnt about grizzly bears at school that day … or ‘grizzy’ bears, as she called them. All I’ve thought about since is what a ‘grizzy bear’ would look like. Would he be squat and round? Would he have a goofy grin? How many darts would a body need to be as wonderfully round as he appears in my mind? Would he wear underwear or a bowler hat? The possibilities have put ‘grizzy bears’ right up near the top of my ‘to make’ list. Watch this space! How long does it take you to make your softies? It’s highly variable. If the softie’s something I’ve made a few times before, then they seem to come together in no time. If it’s a design percolating away in my mind and finding its way out through my

– this is easier than trying to juggle it on the machine. Turn the folded edge of the binding to the wrong side of the sleeve and pin it to cover the line of stitching you just sewed. Slip stitch it in place neatly. Repeat for the other sleeve. Cut a 38cm (15in) length of binding for the hem of the jumper and repeat Step 38, but this time you can sew the first line of stitching by machine if you prefer. Put the jumper over the raccoon’s head and slip the arms through the sleeves. Mask As Jennifer says, all good robbers need to be hard to spot in a line up, so trace around the mask template twice onto the black felt and cut the shapes out carefully. Cut a 20cm (8in) length of elastic and pin the ends to the sides of one mask shape at a slightly downward angle. Check there are no twists in the elastic – it should overlap the mask by about 12mm (½in) at each end. Lay the other mask shape over the top and

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fingers to the fabric then it can take days, even weeks. If all in the universe aligns in my favour, then a couple of days would be a wonderful turnaround time from idea to polished and finished softie in hand. In the past I’ve been someone who likes quick results – I wanted something new in my hands a few hours after starting. That’s how I used to design and, if I’m honest, the results spoke of my haste to have a finished creation in my hands. I was all rush and no ponder. These days if I reach a point in the design where I’m floundering and not entirely happy with what I’m working on then I will put the design ‘down’ for a while. I often leave works in progress propped up somewhere I can see them so I can think about the next step while I go about other tasks. Is there a lot of planning involved? Taking time to plan how you’re going to achieve the shapes, lines and angles you imagine is an important part of realising the idea that has inspired a design. These ideas quickly turn into drawings. Quick, energetic scratching on paper gets the ideas out of my head and onto something tangible so they can take the next steps in their evolution. Once this frantic emptying of my ideas is over and done with, I can cull some of the more ridiculous ideas and focus. What’s the trickiest part? Having the confidence to put what I make out there into the world. Some days it’s easy. Some days it’s the hardest thing I could imagine. The second trickiest part of the making is the pattern writing. Everything I do makes sense to my hands and seems obvious in my head. Trying to translate that into something everyone else will understand and feel just as inspired by is terribly daunting. I find that I often overengineer my wording and need to wind back what I want to say to something more succinct. Do you work on your softies while on holidays? No. I don’t take stitching with me when we go away. That’s not to say that I don’t think about it or look for inspiration. My notebook is always

waiting to have ideas added no matter where we are. I think that the most ‘worky’ thing I do when we’re on holidays is visit the odd fabric store. Even then, we don’t tend to find ourselves in many on such occasions. I suspect my husband may plan it that way! What materials would you never use? Velcro and I have never been friends. Ever. I always found it difficult to sew with and, in the past, have never felt happy when I’ve included it in a design. It was suggested to me that this little raccoon could use Velcro to make his hands clasp together. I quickly found another solution that I was far happier with. Perhaps I just don’t understand the many possibilities offered by Velcro? Maybe we need to hang out together for a while and find a happy place with each other! How many years have you been doing this? I’ve been making my own designs for over 10 years now. Although I’ve been contributing to Homespun for a little while now, I’ve only just released some of my patterns for sale through patchworking stores and my own Etsy store. As I write this, there are only six patterns available but there are more in the melting pot. Is there a craft you don’t know how to do? Crochet. The gentle art of crochet completely baffles me! The women in my family can crochet in their sleep. I just tie myself in knots and give up in frustration. What’s next on the agenda? The plan has always been to one day make something of the somethings that I make. Does that make sense? I’d really love to figure out how to get a full range of my own patterns out there into the market place, going out into people’s lives, being made by mothers and grandparents to become part of childhood memories. Wouldn’t that be grand? I’d also really love to dabble in fabric design. One of my friends and I have had a bit of a play with silk screen printing of late and I could easily see myself getting lost in that for weeks if nobody reminded me to come up for air.

pin them together, sandwiching the elastic ends between them. Thread your needle with four strands of cornflower blue embroidery thread and work a line of neat running stitch around the eye holes to hold the layers together. Machine stitch around the outer mask edges using black thread, then work a matching row of blue running stitch just inside the machine stitching to finish.

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Loot sack

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From the fabric you’ve chosen for the outer sack, cut two sack shapes and repeat this step to cut two shapes from the lining fabric. Fold the length of check bias binding in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching. Press. Sew along the long open edge and tie a knot in each end. Bring the two ends together and crease the halfway fold with the iron. With right sides facing, pin the edges of the outer sacks

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together, leaving the top edge open. About 8cm (3in) down from the top, slip the bias binding between the layers with the fold protruding slightly from the edge of the sack. Sew around the pinned edges, catching the folded binding at the seam but ensuring it isn’t caught in the other stitching. Turn the sack right side out and press. Pin the two lining pieces together, right sides facing. Sew the seam, leaving an opening in the side for turning and the top straight edge open. Don’t turn it right side out.

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Cupcakes

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50

49

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Using three strands of thread to match the icing colour, blanket stitch the icing to one of the cake circles. Use one strand of the same thread to stitch a scattering of bead ‘sprinkles’ over the icing. Jennifer added a red ‘cherry’ circle to one of her cakes. Match the two cake circles, wrong sides together, and blanket stitch around the outer edge with matching thread. Stop stitching before you get back to the start, stuff the cake with fibre fill and finish sewing the edge closed.

Strawberries Using the air-erasable pen, trace around the strawberry template twice on red wool felt for each strawberry you wish to make. Use three strands of green embroidery thread to straight stitch six ‘V’ shapes on each shape. Cut out the shapes on the lines. Pair them, wrong sides together, and blanket stitch around them with matching thread, stopping to fill them before finishing the stitching.

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Slip the outer sack inside the lining, right sides together and seams and raw edges matching. Sew around the upper edge. Turn the sack right side out through the opening in the lining seam. Ladder stitch the opening closed, push the lining inside the sack and press. Using three strands of grey embroidery thread, work a line of decorative oversize running stitch 1cm (#/8in) from the upper edge.

Loot Cupcakes For each cake, cut two shapes from a medium brown/beige felt and one wobbly icing shape from dark brown (chocolate) or pink (strawberry) felt.

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FRAZZY DAZZLES PATTERNS TO WIN! If this adorable raccoon leaves you longing for more Frazzy Dazzle magic, you’re in luck. Thanks to Jennifer’s generosity, we have a set of six patterns to give away. To be in the running to win, simply tell us in 25 words or fewer what animal you think will be the next ‘hot’ thing in crafting and why. We’ve already seen dolphins, owls, foxes and penguins hit the big time, so what’s next? Email your entry to ebradstock@universalmagazines.com.au or send it to Homespun Vol 15 No 7 Competition, Universal Magazines, Locked Bag 154, North Ryde NSW 1670. Entries close on Friday, August 15, 2014.


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Strawberries

Trace one strawberry leaf shape on green felt for each strawberry and cut them out. Fold it in half over the top of the strawberry and sew it in place with three or four short straight stitches on top of each other at the centre top through all the layers – the ends of the leaves remain free. Cream bun Cut two bun shapes from light brown felt, one icing shape from dark brown felt, one filling shape from white felt and three cherry shapes from red felt. Blanket stitch the dark brown icing, white filling and red cherries to one bun shape using three strands of matching threads. Finish the bun as in Step 49.

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Cream bun

Croissant Select four different brown felts. From one colour, cut two croissant crescent shapes and then cut one of each layer shape from the other three colours. Using thread to coordinate with most of the colours, blanket stitch the left and right edges of each layer to one croissant crescent, starting with the largest one. Match the other croissant shape with the decorated one and repeat Step 49 to finish it. The blanket stitch along the top and bottom edges should catch all the layers at the same time.

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For contact details for Jennifer Goldsmith, of Frazzy Dazzles, see the Stockists list at the back of the magazine.

JENNIFER’S DESIGNING TIP When I’m designing, I always keep my drafts to hand as I work through the process. I never know when a design is going to take a different direction, and being able to track my thoughts right back to the beginning of the process and recall previous inspiration can be invaluable for a perfect end result. Croissant

Tranquility CRAFTS ‘N SUPPLIES 37 Holmes Rd, Moonee Ponds 3039 Telephone: 03 9375 3575 Email: tranquilitycrafts@bigpond.com.au

‘Plates’ NEW BOM Quilt measures 52” x 70”. Embroidered using D.M.C. threads. 8-part Block of the Month. $17.50 per month (plus p&h). Includes pattern, pre-stamped fabric and parlon. Or $29.50 per month (plus p&h). Includes patterns, pre-stamped fabric, parlon and all fabric for quilt top and binding.

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www.designerstitches.net

Waratah Rhythms (85cm design)

French Tulips (38cm design)

Orchids in the Rain (26cm design)

Ready for Harvest

Hearts and Bows (38cm design)

Frog Frolics (21cm x 26cm design)

(26cm x 38cm design)

Delightfully French A delight for the hand quilter or needleworker this lovely selection of six designs are worked in the yarn-filled technique of French Trapunto (Boutis). The fabric colour comes in white or ivory although other colours can be organised for you at a small additional cost. The completed result of each has a beautiful embossed reversible finish which may be washed and made into many things from framed pieces, quilts or cushion covers, in fact the application is up to you.

Each kit comes complete with all necessary notions, design, colour guide and easy to follow illustrated instructions. A pattern pack including the design, instructions, and full materials list, is also available. A long trapunto needle is useful for filling long channels. A 6 inch practice block may also be purchased with kits or pattern packs. This is helpful for first timer’s to practice the technique prior to working the kit or pattern. Extra yarn and thread come with this.

YES! I would like to order: WARATAH RHYTHMS … KIT for $109 … Pattern Pack for $45 … White or … Ivory fabric

READY FOR HARVEST … KIT for $57 … Pattern Pack for $28 … White or … Ivory fabric

FRENCH TULIPS … KIT for $59 … Pattern Pack for $29 … White or … Ivory fabric

FROG FROLICS … KIT for $46 … Pattern Pack for $28 … White or … Ivory fabric

HEARTS & BOWS … KIT for $59 … Pattern Pack for $29 … White or … Ivory fabric

EXTRAS … Trapunto Needle for $10 … Practice Block $5

ORCHIDS IN THE RAIN … KIT for $55 … Pattern Pack for $28 … White or … Ivory fabric

Prices include postage and handling within Australia. Freight for overseas orders may be slightly more.

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New from The Teddy Tree...

"Neigh Neigh"

The Nicholas Building 2nd Floor - 37 Swanston St, Melbourne Victoria

A pretty little pony with flowing mane and button joints (fabric colours are representative only). Kits available $28.00 + postage. Pattern only $14.00 + postage. Contact the shop for more details.

TELEPHONE (03) 9639 0088 - WWW.LUCCELLO.COM.AU

226 6S Scarborough carborough b ugh B Beach each hR Road oad d Mt Hawthorn WA 6016 P.08 9201 1011

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180 Kingaroy Street, Kingaroy Qld 4610 Telephone: (07) 4162 2040 Open Monday to Saturday (occasional Sundays)

Where you will find Somethings n to Make your House a Home! ngs Fabrics................................ $12-$24/m 4 4/m Jelly Rolls............................ $40-$500 Layer Cakes........................ $30-$500 Dessert Rolls...................... $45 Charm Packs...................... $15 Mini Charms (Candy)......... $8.50 Honey Buns........................$30-$400 Honeycomb Hexagons....... $25

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What a cute idea!

THE BLOCK In this gorgeous miniature streetscape, fibro bows out to fabric and doorknobs to buttons. And building materials are just that – materials. Don’t you just want to start stitching a whole village? Well, with Kim Kruzich’s help you can; go to retro-mama.blogspot.com/2011/10/home-for-holidays.html for her tutorial and you will have a mini metropolis in no time. Kim is the super creator from Retro Mama. See her other wares on Etsy, www.etsy.com/shop/retromama. Homespun

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FL RAL ARRANGEMENTS Bronwyn Hayes has cultivated a garden of delights for her blooming marvellous wall organiser. All that’s missing are silver bells, cockle shells and little maids all in a row! There’s a pocket for every month, so you can use it in your craft studio or as a digging and planting calendar.

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Materials Q 70cm (¾yd) light grey floral print fabric (background). Q 75cm (&/8yd) cream floral print fabric (pockets) Q 30cm (#/8yd) light blue spot print fabric (pocket edgings, labels and name plate) Q 90cm (1yd) contrasting pink spot print fabric (binding, hanging tabs, labels, some flowers, owl and a butterfly) Q 70cm (¾yd) backing fabric Q Fat eighth dark pink print fabric (one large rose) Q 8 x 15cm (3 x 6in) each of two or three coordinating fabrics for each fabric flower or butterfly – about 14 assorted print fabrics in all – see Note Q 30cm (12in) square each of red floral print and red spot print fabrics (flowers and butterfly) Q 15cm (6in) square each of green spot print and grey floral fabric (leaves and rose) Q 30cm (12in) squares of felt in light yellow, dark yellow, light pink, dark red, light red and white (flowers, rabbits, owl tummy) Q 15cm (6in) squares of felt in a large variety of colours, such as blue, pink, red, orange, green, purple, grey and apricot (flowers and leaves) Q Cosmo stranded embroidery cotton in Seasons Variegated Green (8016), Seasons Variegated Yellow/Orange (8046), Brown (129), Pink (502), Black (600), Grey (892) and White (2500)

Q Cottage Garden Threads stranded embroidery cottons in Damask Rose (102), Snapdragon (503) and Poppy (600) Q Six buttons – Bronwyn used two large cream, two medium flowers and two small flat buttons in coordinating colours (hanging tabs) Q 21 assorted coloured felt balls or pompoms, 12mm (½in) in diameter Q 2m (2¼yd) fusible interfacing Q 90cm (1yd) lightweight fusible batting Q Fusible web Q Small amount of fibre fill Q Template plastic and permanent marker Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, blanket stitch, chain stitch, colonial knot, cross stitch, running stitch, satin stitch Finished size: 99 x 61cm (39 x 24in)

Note: Please read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that all fabrics, except the felt, be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabrics, interfacing and batting 107cm (42in) wide. When selecting the fabrics for the flowers, Bronwyn recommends choosing prints with bright, bold patterns. You can use bright or patterned acrylic or wool felts in this project. All seams are ¼in unless otherwise stated. All the leaves are attached by backstitching down the vein lines with BRONWYN’S DIMENSIONAL TIP two strands of Fabrics backed with lightweight fusible batting have a similar Seasons Variegated feel to felt, meaning that they can be used interchangeably Green (8016) thread for the various flower parts to get the colours and patterns unless otherwise you want. Felt has sufficient body to hold its shape well in noted. three-dimensional flowers, so you can afford to only stitch thee felt blooms to the background at the centre or in a few places,, not all the way around the edges, as in conventional flat appliqué. ué.

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Preparation and cutting

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Trace the appliqué shapes for the owl, four bunnies, six butterflies and the name plate from the Pattern Sheet onto the paper side of the fusible web, leaving about ½in between them. Cut them out roughly and fuse them to the wrong side of your chosen fabrics. Cut them out neatly on the traced lines and set them aside. Trace the templates for the various flowers and leaves from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic, label them and cut them out accurately on the lines. From the light grey floral print fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 39 x 24in (background). From each of the cream floral print fabric and the fusible interfacing, cut: • One strip, 7¼ x 42in (October-December pockets) • One strip, 6½ x 42in (July-September pockets) • One strip, 5¼ x 42in (March-June pockets) • Two rectangles, 5½ x 10½in (January and February pockets). From the remaining fusible interfacing, cut: • Two rectangles, 39 x 24in. From the light blue spot print fabric, cut: • Four squares, 3in (pocket trims) • Six squares, 4½in (pocket trims). From the pink spot print fabric, cut: • Four strips, 3¼in across the width of the fabric (binding)

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24in 3½in

• Two rectangles, 5½ x 9½in (hanging tabs). Set the remainder aside for the pocket labels, flowers and butterfly. From the backing fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 39 x 24in (back). From the lightweight fusible batting, cut: • One rectangle, 39 x 24in.

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34in

Background panel

8¾in

Layout diagram

matching. Pin the layers together. To make it easier to handle when attaching the pockets, baste the layers together with large stitches, then remove the pins. Peel the backing paper from the owl’s body, wings and tummy and fuse them to the centre bottom of the name plate panel. Peel the backing paper from the oval. Work blanket stitch around the owl in two strands of Poppy (600) thread and running stitch just inside the tummy with the same thread. Backstitch around the eye in four strands of Black (600) and satin stitch the inner eyes with two strands of the same thread. Satin stitch the beak with two strands of Brown (129). Lay the name plate over the Pattern Sheet and trace the lettering. Backstitch it with four strands of Poppy (600) thread.

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10

13

11

14

Fuse a rectangle of interfacing to the wrong side of the rectangles of light grey floral print and backing fabric. Then fuse the rectangle of lightweight fusible batting to the wrong side of the light grey floral print fabric over the interfacing. Lay the backing, right side down on the table. Place the light grey floral print panel on top, right side facing up and all the corners and edges

Homespun

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15

Centre the name plate between the side edges on the background panel with its top edge about 3½in from the top edge of the background panel. Work a row of running stitch about ¼in inside the raw edge in four strands of Poppy (600) thread. The daffodils will be added later. Peel the backing paper from the four bunnies and position them on the background panel. The back paws of the two in the centre row are 20in from the top edge; the back leg of the standing bunny is 8¾in from the bottom edge. Fuse them in place, then blanket stitch around them with two strands of White (2500). Work colonial knots for the eyes in three strands of Grey (892), and backstitch the standing bunny’s front leg with the same thread. Pockets Fuse the interfacing to the wrong side of the corresponding fabric pieces cut for the pockets. Backing them with interfacing strengthens them against wear and tear and sagging. Fold the 7¼ x 42in pocket strip in half, right sides together, to measure 7¼ x 21in and pin. Sew around the entire open edge, leaving a gap for turning. Trim the corners, turn it right side out and slip stitch the opening closed. Press. Repeat Step 18 for the other two long pocket rectangles. They should measure 6¼ x 20½in and 5 x 20½in. With right sides together, fold the two individual pocket rectangles in half, short edges matching. Sew around the open edges, leaving a gap for turning. Trim the corners, turn them right side out and slip stitch the openings closed. Press. You should have two 5in square pockets.

16

17 18 19

20

January and February – briar roses

21

Lightly mark the vertical pocket divisions on the three long pockets. On the March-June pocket, measure and mark a line every 5!/8in across the pocket. For the other pockets, measure 6¾in from the left and right edges, leaving a 7in pocket in the middle. These lines are guides for the pocket trims as well as the stitching lines. Iron matching squares of fusible web to the wrong side of the pocket trim squares. When the fabric has cooled, fold them in half diagonally and finger press the fold line. Unfold them. Peel the backing paper off each square and refold them. Slip each

22

triangle over the top, folded edge of a pocket strip, and centre it between a pair of the marked lines or between a marked line and side edge of the pocket strip; you will have triangular trims on the inside and outside of each pocket, as shown in Diagram 1. Use the folded 3in squares on the March-June pocket strip, and the folded 4½in squares on the other two pocket strips. Check that the top edge of the pocket strip has been pushed right up into the fold of each trim triangle, then fuse each pocket trim in place. Machine stitch around each pocket trim ¼in inside the raw edge.

BRONWYN’S REUSING TIP This project has wider than normal binding, so for the pink month labels, I stitched on some leftover binding instead of a single layer of fabric. The embroidery holds the layers together and they’re slip stitched in place. Diagram 1

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Making the flowers January and February Choose six print fabrics from your assortment. From each of them, cut: • One rectangle, 4½ x 8in. To make a briar rose, fold a rectangle in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, to measure 2¼ x 8in and finger press the fold. Place the briar rose template on the fabric with its straight edge on the fold of the fabric. Trace around the curved edge with a pencil, then sew along the line by machine. Trim the fabric !/8in outside the stitching. Sew a line of running stitch close to the folded edge of the fabric. Pull up the thread to gather the fabric just enough so that you can overlap the short ends. Sew the short ends together. Repeat with the remaining fabric rectangles, to make a total of six briar roses. Sew a cluster of three briar roses on each of the two individual pockets you made in Step 20, referring to the photos as a guide. Sew a felt ball or pompom in the centre of each one. Use the narrow leaf template to trace, then cut: • Four leaves from green felts. Pair a medium and dark green leaf and attach them near the roses on each pocket. March Using the violet template, trace, then cut: • Six shapes from purple felts. If you wish, work some lines of backstitch in Black (600) as shown on the pattern to give the petals definition. (Bronwyn embroidered only two of her flowers.) Work a line of running stitch across the centre of each violet from A to B. Pull up the

23 24

25

26 27 28 29 30

thread to gather the centres and fasten the thread. Arrange the six violets on the trim area of the left-most pocket of the MarchJune pocket strip. Stitch through their centres only so the petals remain threedimensional. Sew a felt ball or pompom to the centre of each. Fuse lightweight fusible batting to the wrong side of a green print leaf fabric. Using the wide leaf template, trace and cut: • Two leaf shapes. Fold a pleat in the wider end of the leaves, then sew them under one of the violets with their bases overlapping a little. April Use the daisy template to trace, then cut: • One shape from each of three felts. Cut along all the vertical lines to create the petals. Work a line of running stitch close to the straight edge of the felt and pull up the thread to gather until the short ends overlap slightly. Fasten the thread. Sew the flowers on the pocket to the right of the violets. Sew a green felt ball or pompom to the centre of each flower. Fuse lightweight fusible batting to the wrong side of your chosen green print fabric for the leaf. Use the April leaf template to trace, then cut: • One leaf. Trace or copy the lettering onto the right side of the leaf fabric. Use four strands of Snapdragon (503) thread to backstitch the April lettering. Fold a pleat in the wide end and sew the leaf under the daisies. May Use the geranium template to trace, then cut: • Nine petals from felt. Bronwyn used three different shades of red for her flowers.

31

32 33

March – violets

34 35

36

April – daisies

37

38

May – geraniums Homespun

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39

Referring to Diagram 2, twist each petal, then wrap matching thread around the centre to hold the twist in place; this gives the petals dimension. Sew their centres to the triangular trim of the next pocket, leaving the outer edges of the petals free. Bronwyn added petals in different shades at random.

Diagram 2

40 41

Use the geranium leaf template to trace, then cut: • One leaf from dark green felt. Chain stitch a vertical stem under the petals with Seasons Variegated Green (8016) thread, then sew the leaf in place. June Use the forget-me-not template to trace, then cut: • 15 flowers from felt. Bronwyn used three different shades of blue for her flowers. Use the narrow leaf template to trace, then cut: • Four leaves. Bronwyn used three different shades of green for her leaves. Sew the flowers to the triangular trim of the right-most pocket by working a small cross stitch in the centre of each one using three strands of White (2500) thread. Bronwyn added randomly placed petals in different shades. Just before you finish the last few, pin the leaves in pairs underneath the cluster and anchor them at the base only. Finish by sewing the last few flowers over the base of the leaves. For the stem, sew two vertical lines of chain stitch side by side using three strands of Seasons Variegated Green (8016) thread.

42 43 44

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June – forget-me-nots

July

46 47

Use the sweet-pea centre template to trace, then cut: • Three centres from different felts. Work a line of running stitch around the curved edge of the centre shapes. Pull the thread up tightly to gather the edges so the ends overlap, forming a shell-like shape, as shown in Diagram 3. Use the sweet-pea petal template to trace, then cut: • Three petals from different felts. Using the Pattern Sheet as a guide, draw the sweet pea stems and vines onto the left pocket of the July-September pocket strip. Chain stitch over the lines using four strands of Seasons Variegated Green (8016). Use the wide leaf template to trace, then cut: • Three leaves from green felts. Referring to the photograph, arrange the leaves, petals and centres on the pocket and stitch them in place.

48 49 50 51

August Use the hydrangea template to trace, then cut: • 11 petals. Bronwyn used three different shades of blue for her flowers. Attach the petals to the centre pocket in the same way as the forget-me-not flowers in Step 44 using Seasons Variegated Yellow/Orange (8046) and White (2500) threads. Draw a vertical stem under the cluster of petals and work two rows of chain stitch in four strands of Seasons Variegated Green (8016). Use the wide leaf template to trace, then cut: • One leaf from dark green felt • One leaf from green print fabric that has been backed with fusible batting. Fold a pleat in the base of each leaf. Pin them in place on the pocket and sew a line of backstitch along the pleat in two strands of White (2500) to hold them in place.

52 53

54 55


Diagram 3

September Use the pansy-base template to trace, then cut: • One base from felt • Two bases from print fabrics backed with fusible batting. Re-use the geranium petal template to trace, then cut: • Three upper petals from different felts • One upper petal from pink print fabric backed with fusible batting. Use the narrow leaf template to trace, then cut: • Four leaves from green felts. Draw three vertical lines in a slight fan shape from the bottom of the right pocket to about halfway up. Chain stitch the stems with four strands of Seasons Variegated Green (8016). Sew the pansy base petals in place on the trim area of the pocket, anchoring them at the centre only. Twist the upper petal shapes as you did for the geraniums and stitch them to the top halves of the base petals, adding a second twisted geranium petal to one of them. Sew a coloured felt ball or pompom to the centre of the flowers. Add the leaves in pairs at either side and backstitch down the centres. October You need to make a total of seven daffodils – four for the left pocket of the

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remaining long pocket strip and three for the name plate. For the trumpets, cut: • Six rectangles, 1½ x 3½in from different felts • One rectangle, 1½ x 3½in from print fabric backed with fusible batting. Use the daffodil template to trace, then cut: • Four flowers from a variety of felts • Three flowers from a variety of print fabrics backed with fusible batting. Use the two daffodil leaf templates to trace, then cut: • One of each shape from green felt. To make each daffodil, roll a trumpet rectangle to form a cylinder, overlapping the edges slightly; hold it in place by sewing a line of running stitch down the join. Sew a row of running stitch close to the bottom edge of the cylinder; pull up the thread to gather it. Sew the gathered end of the trumpet to the middle of a flower shape. On the left pocket of the OctoberDecember pocket strip, draw three lines in a fan shape for the stems. Chain stitch them using four strands of Seasons Variegated Green (8016). Add the leaves at either side of the stems. Arrange four of the daffodil flowers and sew them in place. Put the remaining three daffodils aside.

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58

63

59

64

60

61

July – sweet peas

August – hydrangeas

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September – pansies Homespun

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November Choose two pink/red print fabrics for the roses and from each one, cut: • One rectangle, 9 x 11½in. Repeat the process described in Steps 24-25, but this time use the Rose template, not the Briar Rose, and instead of overlapping the ends to create a simple ‘circle’, roll the fabric around itself several times to create a loose flower shape. Bronwyn says that you might need to practise several times before you achieve a flower that you’re happy with. Sew across the gathered end to hold the shape in place. Re-use the sweet-pea centre template to, trace, then cut: • Three shapes from pink felts for the rose centres. Make the centres as described in Step 47. Push two of them into the middle of the fabric outer roses. The other one is for the rosebud. From a pink fabric, cut: • One square, 4in. Repeat Steps 24-25 using the rosebud template to construct the outer bud. Push the remaining felt centre into it. Use the wide leaf template to trace, then cut: • Four leaves from green felts. Draw two stem lines on the centre pocket and chain stitch them with four strands of Seasons Variegated Green (8016). Arrange the roses, bud and leaves and sew them in place. Bronwyn pinched the base of the leaves together as she stitched them in place. December Use the large aster template to trace, then cut: • Six flowers from a variety of coordinated felts. Use the small aster template to trace, then cut: • Three flower centres from light yellow felt. Use the narrow leaf template to trace, then cut: • Four leaves from green felts. Layer two flower circles in your hand and make 2cm (¾in) freehand cuts all the way around through both layers to form the narrow

66 67

68 69 October – daffodils

70 71 72 73

74 75 76 77 November – roses and rosebud

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Homespun


The Patchwork Angel These lovely patterns are designed by Michele Hill and inspired by William Morris designs. Michele was recently awarded the prestigious Rajah award at the Australian Quilt Convention.

MORRIS IN MY GARDEN

MY WALK IN MELBOURNE

WOVEN VERDE

This quilt came about because of the stash of muted William Morris fabrics that Michele had accumulated! The medallion style quilt has a central panel of roses spilling out of an urn from Michele’s front garden. (Mind you she says the roses don’t grow in the urn!) Finished size is 76” x 76”. Pattern is $17.95 plus p&h.

This quilt was inspired by the Block Arcade floor from Melbourne, Victoria in Australia. The tiled floor reminded Michele of the beautiful designs of William Morris. Finished quilt is 79” x 79”. Patterns is $15.95 plus p&h.

Inspiration for this appliquéd quilt came from a small black and white photo Michele has of a carpet designed by William Morris, Bellflowers, c1880 and woven by Wilton Royal carpet works. The original quilt has gone missing in the post in 2002! Finished size is 62” x 70”. Pattern is $15.95 plus p&h.

(Left) WILLIAM DE MORGAN SAMPLER This quilt has been inspired by the historical tiles of William de Morgan (1839-1917). Only a few colours were depicted in the original tiles and Michele has tried to reflect those colours in her quilt. There are thistles, peacocks and hares as just some of the appliqué. Finished quilt is 69½” x 69½”. Pattern is $20.95 plus p&h. (Right) A WILLIAM MORRIS GARDEN This quilt was inspired by some of the flowers that William Morris had in his gardens. The designs reflect an Art Nouveau style among with a touch of inspiration from Eugene Grasset. Finished quilt is 59” x 77”. Pattern is $20.95 plus p&h. We would love to make you up a kit for any of these lovely quilts. “Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.” William Morris

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5/21/2014 2:50:46 PM


Diagram 4

BRONWYN’S DECORATIVE TIP Using four strands of any of the variegated thread colours, work a line of running stitch over the structural machine stitching holding the pockets in place. This gives the organiser a lovely handmade look.

December – asters

petals. Repeat this step for the other two pairs of circles. Work a line of running stitch close to the edge of a flower centre circle and pull up the thread to gather. Stuff the shape firmly with fibre fill and secure the thread. Scatter colonial knots over the top using four strands of Seasons Variegated Yellow/ Orange (8046). Make three centres. Slip stitch a centre to each pair of flower circles to complete the asters. Chain stitch three vertical stems in four strands of Seasons Variegated Green (8016) on the right pocket. Arrange the flowers, tuck the leaves underneath and sew them all in position.

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79

Month labels

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Trace the lettering for January, May, July, September and November onto blue spot print fabric, leaving space around each word. Trace the lettering for February,

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Homespun

March, June, August, October and December onto pink spot print fabric, leaving space around the words. (See Bronwyn’s Re-using tip on page 56 for another idea.) Backstitch all the month names with four strands of Snapdragon (503) thread. Iron fusible web to the back of the embroidered fabric. Cut out the individual months, using the photographs as a guide. Peel off the backing paper and fuse them to the correct pockets. Bronwyn suggests slip stitching them in place for added security.

marked lines to divide the long pocket strips into separate pockets for each month. Reverse stitch at the top edges to secure them. Peel the backing paper off the six butterfly shapes you prepared in Step 1. Fuse them together in pairs, wrong sides together. Fold the butterflies in half and sew across the bottom of the fold to make the wings sit up nicely. Sew a felt ball or pompom to the underside of the butterflies. Refer to Diagram 4. Sew the felt balls to the background panel between the rows of pockets to complete the butterflies. The balls raise the butterflies off the surface, giving them the appearance of being in flight. Sew three daffodils and four narrow felt leaves to the top of the embroidered name plate.

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84

82

85

Finishing

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83

Position the individual pockets on either side of the name plate and arrange the three long pocket strips on the rest of the panel, as shown in the Layout Diagram on page 55. Pin them in place. Machine stitch them in place, leaving the top edges open. Stitch vertical lines along the

87


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Binding and tabs Join the 3Âźin binding strips, end to end, with diagonal seams to make one length. Trim the seams and press them open. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. Open the binding, turn the raw edges in to the centre crease and press. Fold the strip in half and press again. See Diagram 5. Slip the folded binding around the raw edges of the background panel; push the background panel right up into the fold. Stitch the binding in place, folding the corners into mitres as you go. Bronwyn slip stitched both sides of her binding in place by hand, but you could machine stitch it if you prefer. Remove the basting stitches from the background panel. Fold the tab strips in half with the long edges matching and right sides together. Sew around the raw edges with a Âźin seam, leaving an opening for turning. Trim the corners and turn the strips right side out. Push out the corners neatly, slip stitch the openings closed and press. Topstitch Âźin from all the edges. Fold the tabs in half, short ends matching, and sew them to the top of the background panel through all layers. Bronwyn had about half the tabs over the panel and half to take the rod, but you can adjust this according to the width of your hanging rod. Machine stitch across the tabs level with the top edge of the binding. Layer two groups of three buttons in ascending size and sew them securely to the tabs through all layers.

88

Diagram 5

Step 92

89

90

91

92

For contact details for Bronwyn Hayes, of Red Brolly, see the Stockists list at magazine. the back of the magazine

64

Homespun


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Babies need to be well rugged up in winter, and we’ve taken good care of that with this super-cosy 12-ply jumpsuit. Save it specially for the frostiest of days outdoors.

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Photography: Francis Amiand; Design: Charlotte Rion; Famili/Picture Media

LITTLE STAR IN STRIPES


Homespun

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Back T

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Materials Q Patons Jet 12 ply 50g balls: 4 (5-7) balls of Flame red (826) – main colour – and 3 (4-5) balls of White (814) – contrast colour Q One pair each of 4.50mm (UK 7/US 7) and 5.50mm (UK 5/US 9) knitting needles or size needed to give correct tension Q Two stitch holders Q Wool needle for sewing seams Q Snap fasteners (3-3-4), sewing needle and matching thread Finished sizes: Age in months

3

6

12

To fit chest cm (in)

40 (16)

45 (18)

52 (20½)

Actual size at underarm cm (in)

54 (21)

58 (23)

62 (24½)

Length (approx.) cm (in)

48 (19)

54 (21)

60 (23½)

Sleeve length cm (in)

15 (6)

17 (6½)

20 (8)

Note: This is an intermediate skill-level project. Use only the yarn specified. Other yarns are likely to produce different results. Quantities are approximate as they can vary between knitters. Check the ball bands to ensure that all yarn of each colour is from the same dye lot. We recommend using mattress stitch to sew up the jumpsuit.

Tension This handknit has been designed at a tension of 16.5 sts and 22 rows to 10cm (4in) over stocking stitch, using 5.50mm needles. To work a tension square, using 5.50mm needles, cast on 24 sts. Work 32 rows stocking st. Cast off loosely. Check your tension carefully. If fewer sts to 10cm (4in), use smaller needles; if more sts, use larger needles.

Abbreviations alt = alternate; beg = begin, beginning; C = contrast colour; cont = continue; dec = decrease, decreasing; foll = following; garter st = all rows knit; inc = increase, increasing; K = knit; M = main colour; P = purl; patt = pattern; psso = pass slipped st over; rem = remain, remaining; rep = repeat; sl = slip; st/s = stitch, stitches; stocking st = 1 row knit, 1 row purl (knit side is right side); tog = together 68

Homespun

First leg (beg at ankle) – Using 5.50mm needles and C, cast on 17 (19-21) sts. Working in stocking st, work 2 rows C, then 2 rows M. Last 4 rows form the stripe patt for rem. Keeping stripes correct, inc one st at each end of next row, then in every foll 4th (6th-6th) row until there are 27 (29-31) sts. Cont without further shaping until leg measures 14 (16-18)cm (5½-6¼-7in) from beg, ending with a purl row.** Break off both colours and leave the sts on a stitch holder. Second leg – Work as for first leg to **. Next row – K 27 (29-31), turn, cast on one st, turn, with right side facing, knit 27 (29-31) sts from first leg stitch holder ... 55 (59-63) sts. Cont in patt without shaping until back measures 14 (16-21)cm (5½-6¼-8¼in) from crotch, ending with a purl row. Shape sides – Dec one st at each end of next row, then in every foll 4th row until 47 (51-55) sts rem. Work 3 rows. Shape armholes – Cast off 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows ... 41 (45-49) sts. Dec one st at each end of next row, then in every foll alt row until 37 (41-43) sts rem. Work 21 (23-25) rows in patt without further shaping. Shape shoulders – Cast off 5 (6-6) sts at beg of next 2 rows, then 6 (6-7) sts at beg of foll 2 rows. Leave rem 15 (17-17) sts on stitch holder.

Front First leg (beg at toe) – Using 5.50mm needles and M, cast on 5 sts.

Working in stocking st, inc one st at each end of next 2 rows ... 9 sts. Working in stripes as for back (beg with 2 rows C), work 4 (8-8) rows. Beg leg – Keeping stripes correct, cast on 4 (5-6) sts at beg on next 2 rows ... 17 (19-21) sts. Work 2 rows. Inc one st at each end of next row, then in every foll 4th (6th-6th) row until there are 27 (29-31) sts. Cont without further shaping until leg measures the same as the back leg from cast-on at beg of leg to the crotch, ending with the same colour purl row.** Break off both colours and leave sts on a stitch holder. Second leg – Work as for first leg to **. Next row – K 27 (29-31), turn, cast one one st, turn, with right side facing, knit 27 (29-31) sts from first leg stitch holder ... 55 (59-63) sts. Work 15 (17-17) rows in patt. Divide for left front – Next row – K5, turn. Cont in patt on these 5 sts until work measures same as the back from the crotch to beg of side shaping, ending with the same colour purl row. Shape side and front edge – Dec one st at side edge in next row, then in every foll 4th row 3 times, AT THE SAME TIME inc one st at front edge in next row, then in every foll alt row 7 times ... 9 sts. Work 1 row. Shape armhole – 1st row – cast off 3 sts, knit to last st, inc in last st ... 7 sts. Dec one st at armhole edge AND inc one st at front edge in every foll alt row 2 (2-3) times ... 7 sts. This completes the armhole shaping.

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CT

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Inc one st at front edge in every foll alt row 2 (1-2) times, then in every row until there are 18 (20-21) sts. Work 1 row. Tie a coloured thread at front edge of last row. Beg neck shaping – Dec one st at neck edge in every row until 11 (12-13) sts rem. Shape shoulder – Cast off 5 (5-6) sts at beg of next row. Work 1 row. Cast off rem 6 (6-7) sts. With right side facing, join appropriate colour to rem 50 (54-58) sts for right front. Cont in patt until the right front measures the same as the back from the crotch to beg of side shaping, ending with the same colour purl row. Dec one st at front edge in next row, then in every foll alt row 8 times, AT THE SAME TIME dec one st at side edge in next row, then in every foll 4th row 3 times ... 37 (41-45) sts. Shape armhole – 1st row – Cast off 3 sts, purl to end ... 34 (38-42) sts. Dec one st at each end of next row, then in every foll alt row 1 (1-2) times ... 30 (34-36) sts. This completes the armhole shaping. Dec one st at front edge in every foll alt row 2 (1-2) times, then in every row until 11 (12-13) sts rem. Work 1 row. Shape shoulder – Cast off 5 (6-6) sts at beg of next row. Work 1 row. Cast off rem 6 (6-7) sts.

Sleeves (make two) Using 4.50mm needles and M, cast on 30 (32-34) sts. Work 5 rows garter st (first row is the wrong side). Change to 5.50mm needles. Working in stocking st, work 2 rows C, then 2 rows M. 70

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Keeping stripes correct, inc one st at each end of next row, then in every foll alt row until there are 38 (42-42) sts, then in every foll 4th row until there are 44 (48-52) sts. Cont without further shaping until sleeve measures approx. 15 (17-20)cm (6-6¾-8in) from beg, ending with same colour purl row as back to armholes. Shape top – Cast off 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows ... 38 (42-46) sts. Dec one st at each end of next row, then in every foll alt row 1 (1-2) times ... 34 (38-40) sts. Work 1 row. Cast off 2 sts at beg of next 2 rows. Cast off rem 30 (34-36) sts.

Feet (make two) Using 4.50mm needles and M, cast on 41 (47-51) sts. Work 10 rows garter st. Shape sole – 1st row – K1, * sl 1, K1, psso, K15 (18-20), K2tog, K1, rep from * once … 37 (43-47) sts. Knit 1 row. 1 3rd row – K1, * sl 1, K1, psso, K13 nce (16-18), K2tog, K1, rep from * once … 31 (39-43) sts. Knit 1 row. 5th row – K1, * sl 1, K1, psso, K11 (14-16), K2tog, K1, rep from * once… 29 (35-39) sts.. Size 12 months only – Knit 1 row. 7th row – K1, * sl 1, K1, psso, so, K14, K2tog, K1, rep from * once. e. All sizes … 29 (35-35) sts.. Cast off loosely.

Right front band nd and neckband d Join the shoulder seams. ms. With right side facing, g, using 4.50mm needles and M, beg at dividing point for fronts, knit up 12 (13-13) sts evenly enly along straight right front edge, knit up 42 (44-48) sts evenly venly along sloped right front edge to o shoulder seam, knit 15 (17-17) stss from back stitch holder, then knit up 10 sts evenly along left front edge to coloured thread ... 79 (84-88) 4-88) sts. Work 4 rows garter st. t Cast off loosely (on wrong side).

Left front band With right side facing, using 4.50mm needles and M, knit up 34 (36-42) sts evenly along end of right front band and along shaped edge of left front, then knit up 12 (13-13) sts evenly along straight edge of left front to dividing point ... 46 (49-55) sts. Work 4 rows garter st. Cast off loosely (on wrong side).

To make up Do not press. Join inner leg and side seams. Join sleeve seams, then placing centre of sleeve to shoulder seam, sew in sleeves evenly. Sew end of front bands in position. Using a flat seam, join the heel and sole seams of the feet. Sew them to the lower edge of the legs. Sew the snap fasteners evenly along the overlapping sloped front edges. Twisted cords – Cut two 90cm (36in) lengths of C yarn and make a twisted cord. Repeat this step to make a second cord. Attach them securely to the edges of front bands as shown in the photograph.


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Time to tie up Christmas stitching Nothing speaks more convincingly of Xmas than handmade gifts and decorations. But if you want to have your stitching finished in time, you’ll need to make a start now. Let’s get you inspired with this year’s selection of celebratory yuletide projects.

OUR CHRISTMAS PROJECTS: BONBON, TRÈS BON by Leanne Harvey (see page 74) CANDY CAROL by Debra Gardiner (see page 84) * JOYEUX NOËL by Celeste Bouchayer (see page 94) HEAVEN SENT by Nicole Stark (see page 98) * SANTA’S LITTLE HELPER by Claire Turpin (see page 104) Homespun

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BONBON, TRÈS BON Leanne Harvey has made a lasting celebration of Christmas with her crackers and gift-boxes quilt. If you start stitching it now you’ll ’ll have h now, it ready for this upcoming Xmas – and many more to come!

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Homespun

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Materials Q 3m (3#/8yd) solid white fabric (background and border) Q 10cm (!/8yd) each of 20 assorted print fabrics (crackers) Q 15cm (¼yd) each of four assorted print fabrics (presents) Q 35cm (½yd) multi-coloured stripe print fabric (present ties) 76

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Q Large scraps of four assorted green print fabrics (tree) Q Scraps of yellow and brown print fabrics (star and trunk) Q 50cm (½yd) pink and white stripe fabric (binding) Q 3.4m (3¾yd) backing fabric Q Batting at least 175cm (69in) square Q Template plastic and permanent marking pen

Q Fusible web Q Assorted threads for machine or hand appliqué – Leanne used yellow, green, aqua and pink Q Sharp pencil Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with ¼in foot Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 159 x 156cm (62½ x 61½in)

Finished Cracker block size: 3 x 11in Note: It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. A seam allowance of ¼in is used throughout and is included in the cutting. The appliqué method used is fusible web with satin stitch by machine.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern


Preparation and cutting

3½in

1

Trace the A and B tree templates from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic with a permanent marker. Cut them out accurately on the lines. Trace the appliqué bow shape four times and the appliqué star shape once from the Pattern Sheet onto fusible web, leaving about ½in between the shapes. Cut them out roughly. Fuse the star shape to the wrong side of the yellow fabric scrap and cut it out accurately on the line. From the solid white fabric, cut: • 18 strips, 1½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 480 squares, 1½in (Cracker blocks) • 24 strips, 1½in (sashings and border) • Two strips, 3½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 53 rectangles, 1½ x 3½in (vertical sashings) • One strip, 12½in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut 10 strips, 1½ x 12½in (Present and Tree blocks). Trim the remainder of the strip to 10½in. Crosscut four rectangles, 3½ x 10½in (Present blocks). From the remainder

3½in

3½in

3½in

1½in

B reversed 10½in

12½in

2

3

B

Discard

Discard

Diagram 1

of the strip, cut one Template B and one Template B reversed (Tree block). See Diagram 1. • Two rectangles, 3½ x 4½in (trunk background). From each of the 20 assorted print fabrics for the crackers, cut: • One strip, 3½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut three rectangles, 3½ x 8½in and six rectangles, 2 x 3½in (Cracker blocks). From each of the four assorted print fabrics for the presents, cut: • One strip, 4½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut four rectangles, 4½ x 5in (A) (Present blocks).

6

From the multi-coloured stripe print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 1½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut eight strips, 1½ x 4½in and four strips, 1½ x 10½in (ribbons). Fuse the four fusible-web bow shapes to the wrong side of the remaining multi-coloured stripe print fabric and cut them out accurately on the lines. From the assorted green print fabrics, cut a total of: • Three rectangles, 2½ x 12½in (tree) • One rectangle, 3½ x 12½in (treetop). Leanne arranged her pieces from light

4

7

5

8

Cracker blocks Homespun

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to dark, with the lightest green at the top. From the brown print scrap, cut: • One rectangle, 2½ x 3½in (trunk). From the pink and white stripe fabric, cut: • Six strips, 2½in across the width of the fabric (binding).

9

10

Cracker blocks Diagram 2

Diagram 3

11

Rule a diagonal pencil line from corner to corner on the wrong side of the 1½in white squares. To make a block, choose one 3½ x 8½in rectangle and two 2 x 3½in rectangles all cut from the same fabric in Step 4 and eight white squares from Step 11. Begin by making the centre unit. Referring to Diagram 2, place four background squares on the corners of the largest print rectangle, right sides together, with the lines going in the correct directions. Stitch along the drawn lines, trim the corners ¼in away from the stitching and press the seams outwards. To make the end units, place two background squares on each of the smaller rectangles, as shown in Diagram 3. Sew along the marked lines, trim the corners and press as before. Sew an end unit from Step 14 to each end of the centre unit, with the white triangles adjacent to each other. Press the seams open to complete one Cracker block. It should measure 3½ x 11½in, raw edge to raw edge. Repeat Steps 12-15 to make a total of 60 Cracker blocks.

12 13

Present block

14

15

16 Diagram 4

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Present blocks

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Select four A rectangles all cut from the same fabric. Sew a 1½ x 4½in multicoloured stripe strip between two rectangles. Repeat this step with the remaining two A rectangles. Sew a 1½ x 10½in multi-coloured stripe strip between the two units to form the present. See Diagram 4. To complete the block, sew a 3½ x 10in white strip to the top of the present. Then sew a 1½ x 12½in white strip to the left and right edges. It should measure 12½in square, raw edge to raw edge. Peel the backing paper from one of the multi-coloured stripe bow shapes, position it on top of the block and press with an iron to fuse it in place. Repeat Steps 17-20 to make another three blocks. Appliqué the bows in place using your preferred method. Leanne set up her machine for a close satin stitch in a medium width and used yellow, green, aqua and pink rayon machineembroidery threads around the bows.

18 19

20 21 22

Tree block

23

Arrange the green rectangles in a pleasing order with the wider strip at the top. Sew them together on the longer edges and press the seams open. Centre Template A on the green panel with the bottom edges aligned. Cut out the tree shape immediately beside the template.

24


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LEANNE’S ORGANISING TIP Always bag and label your cut pieces for reference. There might be an interval between cutting and assembly, or you might have to stop for a while and return to the project at a later stage and you can easily pick up where you left off if you know what pieces go where.

Tree block

Quilt layout diagram

25

lay out 12 rows of Cracker blocks: seven rows will have five complete blocks in them; the remaining five rows begin and end with half-blocks. Move the blocks around to distribute the colours and patterns in a pleasing way. Leave space to add the present/tree row. When you’re happy with the layout, add 1½ x 3½in vertical sashing strips between every pair of the blocks. Sew the blocks and vertical sashing strips in each row together. Press the seams away from the sashings. Lay out the four Present blocks and the Tree block in a row. When you’re pleased with their arrangement, join them together.

Sew the B and B reversed shapes you cut in Step 3 to either side of the tree shape and press the seams. Join a white 3½ x 4½in rectangle to each side of the brown 3½ x 2½in rectangle to form the trunk unit and press the seams towards the brown fabric. To complete the Tree block, sew the trunk unit to the bottom of the tree and then sew a 1½ x 12½in white strip to the left and right edges.

26 27

Assembly

28

To make the 10 halfblocks, cut five of the Cracker blocks in half and trim ¼in from the cut ends. Referring to the Quilt Layout Diagram,

29 80

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30

31

32

Measure your rows. They should all be the same width. If they’re not, unpick and re-sew some of the seams until they are. Join 18 of the 1½in white strips end to end to make one length. Press the seams open. From it, cut 12 strips the same measurement as your block rows. Lay them between each pair of rows. Join the block rows and sashing strips. Repeat Steps 20 and 22 to appliqué the star to the top of the tree. Border Join the remaining six 1½in white strips end to end to make one length and press the seams open. Measure the quilt top vertically through the

33

centre and cut two border strips to this measurement from the long strip. Sew them to the left and right edges of the quilt, matching the ends and centre points, and press the seams towards the border. Repeat Step 37, measuring the quilt top horizontally, to add the top and bottom borders.

38

Finishing

34 35

39

36

40

37

Remove the selvedges and cut the length of backing fabric into two equal lengths. Sew the two pieces side by side with a ½in seam and press it open. Leanne quilted an all-over design on her quilt with her long-arm machine. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, smooth the


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backing fabric on the floor with the right side down and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top and ensure it is free of wrinkles. Lay the pressed quilt top over the batting with the right side facing up and baste the three layers together with thread or safety pins. Quilt as desired. Trim the excess batting and backing fabric ¼in outside the edge of the quilt. Join the binding strips you cut in Step 10 with diagonal seams to make one length, matching the stripes ideally. Trim the seams

41 42

to ¼in and press them open. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, stitch the binding to the edge of the quilt with a ¼in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams below for details. Turn the binding over and stitch it by hand to the back of the quilt. Label and date your quilt.

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For contact details for Leanne Harvey, of Mount Vincent Quilts, see Stockists at the back of the magazine.

Binding diagrams

40cm (16in)

Rule a line along the 45-degree fold

Mitring corners

Getting to know…

LEANNE HARVEY Why this particular craft? I came across patchwork after having my second baby. I was totally hooked, right from the first wonky (unintentionally) quilt that I made for my bestie’s daughter. Have you tried plenty of others? Absolutely! Scrapbooking and knitting (fail). And I love to crochet. If you weren’t doing this, what would occupy your time? I’ve always been in the textile industry. So I would probably still be dressmaking or working at Spotlight or something like that. Who taught you your crafting skills? My extended family are very creative, so it was around me from birth. My mother sewed heaps of our clothes when we were young,

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Join the ends by matching the fold line and the drawn line and sewing them together. Trim the seam, press it open and refold the binding, then finish sewing it to the quilt.

and when I was old enough, I would help her. I started designing clothes for my dolls, and it wasn’t long before I was designing clothes for myself. After high school, I worked in a textile mill while I completed an Associate Diploma in Textile Technology. Patchwork is pretty much self-taught, but I did have a lifelong background in sewing, so it came pretty easily. I loved it from the first stitch. I research all the time and love learning about the history of textiles. What does this craft mean to you? Other than my family, it’s my everything. I quilt every weekday and I design and make quilts on the weekends. I wish I didn’t have to sleep! Is it hard to find time or is it a profession? I am a professional long-arm quilter, so you would think I would patch all the time. Nope! Mostly, I make time after dinner in the evenings, when the boys’ tummies are full and they are happy. Any funny stories along the way? I have been addicted to fabric since birth. My mum tells the story that when I was about 18 months old she would take me on the bus to the shops. I would reach out and touch the bottoms of ladies dresses, rubbing the fabric between my chubby little fingers. How cute!

From where do you draw inspiration? From everything around me. Vibrant colours from flowers, falling-down barns, cows … yes I live in the country. When I’m in town, it’s the architecture, the tessellated tiles, the ocean. Quilts from the past – the list is long. My phone is full of photos of things that inspire me. Why this skill – and this style? When I discovered patchwork, it excited me so much. That excitement has never worn off. My sister tells me all the time that I’m like a child when it comes to loving bright colours. Do you ever see yourself stopping or diversifying? I love to sew. It always makes my heart feel good to be creating something. It still excites me when an idea works and becomes a beautiful quilt. In my mind, I see myself sewing and creating for all of my life. Are you married with children? I have three boys – they are aged 17, 15 and 10. Of course, there’s also my hubby of 21 years and our beautiful rescue dog, Diesel. Where do you live and work? I live with my family in the foothills of the Watagan Mountains at the southern end of the Hunter Valley [NSW]. The picturesque views are very inspirational, with kangaroos

frequently lazing about on our property. We live in an Americanstyle barn on two hectares. I have a 6 x 3-metre space off the lounge in which to go creatively nuts. I love that I’m always close to the family when I’m there. They are so used to me that I’m just background noise to them these days. My sewing space is very organised because I have to fit my long-arm quilting machine in there as well. I have loads of cupboard space, a generous cutting area, a big sewing table and a design wall. That makes me happy. Do you teach your skills to others? I love to teach. Seeing someone who thinks they’ll never be able to make something beautiful complete their first quilt and be excited about it really makes my day. It's satisfying. How would you describe your style? I’m a ‘Modern Traditionalist’. I like using the blocks of yesteryear and giving them a fresh new look with bright modern fabrics. I’m always designing new stuff, as well; there are a million ideas in my head. Any embarrassing botch-ups along the way? Oh, yes, plenty! I wouldn’t say embarrassing but there have been loads of projects that I’ve chucked over my right shoulder and given up on. You only live once – no use spending time on something that’s just never going to work.


BAKING SODA


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Candy Carol

Debra Gardiner’s lolly-pink angel is a bit of a Christmas enigma. On the one hand, she’s sweet as syrup; on the other, she’s all cutting-edge style. Put her on top of your tree and she will shine!

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Materials Q 40cm (½yd) pink print fabric (lower body, limbs and clothing) Q 30cm (#/8yd) calico or cream homespun (lower arms, head and upper body, swag and underskirt) Q 30cm (12in) square of brown felt (wings and star) Q DMC Stranded Embroidery Cotton in Medium Red (304), Baby Pink (818) and Ultra Dark Coffee Brown (938) Q 50cm (½yd) of 6mm (¼in) wide brown ribbon Q 8 x 12cm (3 x 4½in) fusible interfacing Q 1-1½ cups of clean dry sand Q Fibre fill Q Two brown two-hole buttons 12mm (½in) diameter (shoulder joints) Q 15cm (6in) bendable wire (star) Q Matisse acrylic background paint in brown Q 6mm (¼in) flat paintbrush Q Tea bags or instant coffee Q PVA glue Q Fray Stop or similar product Q Pink artist’s chalk/pastel or make-up blush Q Paper for tracing patterns Q Soft pencil Q Strong thread or dental floss Q 9cm (3½in) doll needle Q Pliers/wire cutters Q Turning/stuffing tool Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, cross stitch, running stitch, satin stitch, straight stitch Finished size: 39cm (15½in) or 22cm (8½in) seated Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. Requirements are based on fabrics 110cm (42in) wide. It is recommended that fabrics, except the felt, be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. This doll is mostly constructed using the trace, sew and cut method: the traced lines are the stitching lines and a seam allowance is added after stitching. Seam allowances for the clothing are ¼in unless stated otherwise. Use a shorter than usual machine stitch length for the doll. 86

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www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern


Preparation and cutting

PRO

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Debra likes to colour the cream fabric with tea or coffee to give her dolls an aged patina. Add two tea bags or one teaspoon of instant coffee to a cup of hot water and use the mixture to either sponge or soak the fabric or put it in a spray bottle and spray the fabric. Allow the fabric to dry and press it well before starting the project. Trace the shapes and all their markings from the Pattern Sheet onto paper and cut them out. Fold the cream homespun or calico in half, right sides together and selvedges matching. Pin the underskirt pattern on the fold and cut it out. From the remaining fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 6 x 14cm (2½ x 5½in) (swag) • Two rectangles, 12 x 15cm (4¾ x 6in) (body) • Two rectangles, 8 x 10cm (3 x 4in) (arms). Fold the pink print fabric in half, right sides together and selvedges matching. Trim the pattern for the underskirt on the broken line to shorten it for the skirt. Pin the pattern on the fold of the fabric and cut it out. From the remaining fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 20 x 9cm (8 x 3¼in) (legs) • Two squares, 15cm (6in) (body) • Two squares, 10cm (4in) (arms) • One rectangle, 1¾in x 6½in (skirt band). Trace around the base shape on the remaining pink print fabric and cut it out by eye ¼in outside the traced line. Use this fabric shape as the pattern to cut a base from fusible interfacing. Iron the interfacing to the wrong side of the pink print base shape. Mark the four centre points on the interfacing where shown on the pattern. Trace around the legs shape on the wrong side of one of the rectangles cut for them. Match this rectangle with the other one, right sides together and pin inside the traced legs outline. With right sides together, join the pink print and cream body fabrics on one 15cm (6in) edge; press the seam open. Join each cream arm fabric to a pink one on one 10cm (4in) edge; press the seams towards the cream fabric.

JEC

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2 3

4

5

6

7

8

Fold the joined body fabric in half, right sides together and long edges and seams matching. Lay the body pattern on top with the horizontal line on the pattern matching the seam and the head on the cream fabric. Trace around the pattern and transfer all the markings before pinning the layers together inside the shape. Fold each of the joined arm panels in half, right sides together and

9

long edges and seams matching. Trace an arm on each panel, matching the line on the pattern to the seam, with the narrower end on the cream fabric. Pin the layers of fabric together inside the shapes, keeping the stitching lines free of pins. Fold the brown felt in half and pin the wings and star patterns to it. Cut out the shapes right next to the paper.

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Assembly

11

Sew around the body on the traced line, leaving an opening in the side where marked and the bottom edge open. Cut the shape out ¼in by eye outside the marked line. Apply Fray Stop to the edges of the fabric, allow it to dry and then clip the seam allowance at the curves. Lightly mark the centre front and back of the bottom edge. Stitch around the leg shapes on the marked lines, leaving the top edges open. Cut the legs out ¼in by eye outside the line, apply Fray Stop to the seams and then clip into the curves. Turn the legs right side out. Use a paper funnel to fill the bottom section of the legs with sand, as marked on the pattern. Shake them a little to settle it into the ends of the feet. Stuff the rest of the legs with fibre fill. Use four pins to attach the base to the bottom edge of the body: match the end points with the side seams of the body and the centre marks with the marks you added to the body in Step 11. Insert the legs into the body through the side opening. With the feet pointing towards the head, match the raw edges of the legs with the bottom edge of the front of the body, with the legs centred between the side seams. Continue pinning the base to the body, sandwiching the raw edge of the legs between the body front and the base seam. Sew the base/body seam, clip the curves and turn the body right side out through the side opening. Use a paper funnel to fill the bottom part of the body below the opening with sand. Cover the sand with fibre fill. Stuff the head and shoulders firmly with small amounts of fibre fill until the neck is supported and smooth. Finish filling the body cavity and hand stitch the side opening closed neatly. Repeat the process described in Step 12 with the arm shapes. Use a turning tool to turn them right side out, then push the seams out smoothly. Stuff them, using smaller amounts to fill the hands and larger

12 13 14 15

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amounts towards the shoulders. Stitch the openings in each arm closed with matching thread.

¼in

Clothes and features Skirt

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Hem one long and two short edges of the pink skirt by folding a ¼in to the wrong side and pressing, then folding another ¼in under and pressing. Machine stitch the hems in place. Set the machine to its longest stitch length and sew twice along the unhemmed (waist) edge of the skirt, !/8in and ¼in from the raw edge; leave long threads at both ends. Pull up the threads to gather the skirt to measure 6in wide. With right sides together, pin the gathered edge of the skirt to one long edge of the skirt band, leaving ¼in of the band free at either end, as shown in Diagram 1. Sew it in place. Press under ¼in along the other long edge of the skirt band. Fold the band in half, right sides together with the folded edge level with the previous seam, and sew the short end seams. Turn the band right side out, pin the folded edge over the seam and slip stitch it in place. Top stitch the skirt band. Underskirt Hem three edges of the underskirt as described in Step 18. Use a soft pencil to mark a dot 12mm (½in) up from the hemmed edge every 5cm (2in). Using six strands of Ultra Dark Coffee Brown (938), stitch a line Steps 24-26 of running stitch

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Diagram 1

¼in


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12mm (½in) from the hemmed edge, stopping to work a cross stitch at each of the pencil marks. Repeat Step 19, but this time pull up the gathers to fit around the doll. Leave the thread ends to tie together later. Debra stained the underskirt a deeper colour than the body by sprinkling or spraying it again with the tea/coffee mixture. Allow it to dry thoroughly. Hair and shoes Mark the painting lines for the hair and shoes with a soft pencil. Use a flat paintbrush to apply one coat of undiluted brown paint to these areas and allow them to dry. Mix an equal amount of PVA glue with brown paint and apply a second coat to the same areas. Allow it to dry naturally or use a hairdryer. Face Lightly mark the facial features, using the pattern as a guide. Backstitch the eyebrow and eyes using three strands of Ultra Dark Coffee Brown (938) thread. Satin stitch the mouth with six strands of Medium Red (304). Begin and end the stitching through the back of the head. Blush the cheeks. Debra uses artist’s pastel applied with a dry paintbrush.

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matching thread. If you wish, sponge a little extra tea/coffee stain over the swag.

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Finishing

Match the two star shapes, wrong sides together, and machine stitch around the edge in matching thread. Insert one end of the wire between the layers of the star, manipulating it between the stitches. Use pliers to bend

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Fit the underskirt on the doll below the seam of the body, as shown on the pattern. Pull up the

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Steps 32-33

the end of the wire into a hook shape inside the felt star – do this from the back to avoid damaging the stitching on the star front.

Swag Wings and star

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At each end of one wing shape, work three long straight stitches in a star shape and add a short straight stitch over the point where they intersect using six strands of Baby Pink (818). Match the two wings, wrong sides together, and machine stitch around the edge in matching thread, leaving an opening. Don’t turn them through. Insert small amounts of stuffing through the opening to give the wings a little dimension and machine sew the opening closed. Machine stitch vertical and curved horizontal lines on the wings, using the pattern as a guide. On one of the felt star shapes, work lines of running stitch from just inside the points to meet at the centre, using three strands of Baby Pink (818).

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Trace around the swag shape on the wrong side of one of the rectangles cut for it. Trace the lettering from the Pattern Sheet onto the right side of the fabric, centring it within the outline traced on the wrong side. Backstitch the words with three strands of Ultra Dark Coffee Brown (938) thread. Work the star at the end of the Christmas Wishes message with three straight stitches in the same thread. Match the embroidered rectangle, right sides together, with the other rectangle for the swag and pin them together. Sew around the shape on the line you traced in Step 32, leaving an opening for turning. Cut the swag out ¼in by eye outside the stitching, clip the curves and turn the swag right side out. Stuff it with filling until plump and slip stitch the opening closed with

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gathering threads firmly and tie them in a secure knot. Use the thread ends to work a few stitches into the body to keep the underskirt in position. Fasten off the thread. Put the skirt on the doll above the underskirt. It should cover the pink body fabric. Overlap the skirt band at the centre back and secure it in place with a few stitches. Thread a doubled length of strong thread in the doll needle and knot the ends together. Beginning on the inside of one arm to hide the knot, take the needle through the top of one arm, go through one button and back through the arm again. Position the arm at the shoulder and take the needle through the skirt band and body, exiting on the opposite side and pulling the thread firmly. Take the needle through the top of the second arm, button and back through the arm. Go back through the body to the first side and repeat the sequence once more to make the arms secure. Refer to Diagram 2. Finish off the thread neatly

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Diagram 2

Diagram 3

underneath one of the arms and bury the end inside the doll. Use pliers to bend the other end of the wire on the star into a hook shape, as shown in Diagram 3. Stitch it securely to the back of the doll. Apply a small amount of PVA glue to the centre front area of the wings and press them in place on the doll’s back, covering the wire. Use a few pins to hold the wings in place until the glue dries. Cut the ribbon into two 25cm (10in) lengths. Fold each piece in half and stitch the centre points to the ends of the swag with small neat stitches. Wrap the ribbons around the doll’s arms and tie them in knots to finish.

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DEBRA’S DOLLMAKING TIP When turning small areas such as arms and legs, put a fat (thick-shake type) straw inside the limb and push the fabric into the straw with a turning tool. Alternatively, you can use a length of narrow brass tubing, which is available from selected hobby shops, hardware stores or the Wattlebee online shop.

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For contact details for Debra Gardiner, of Wattlebee Designs, see the Stockists list at the end of the magazine.


bringing them out each year and being reminded of when I made them. Some, my children have made with me. Actually, some stay out all year. Are your family Christmases big? Coming from a small family, they may not be big, but we celebrate together with my parents and sister. The family is growing, with two little grandsons, who make Christmas extra special again. Is Christmas a favourite time of year for you? Oh, who doesn’t love holidays! I know I do and, as much as Christmas is wonderful, I really look forward to long days of freedom. It’s also a time of renewed spirit, as I look forward to planning a new year. Have you always handmade Christmas gifts for friends and family? Over the years, I’ve found that everyone loves homemade gifts. We are all so time poor that a gift made can be so much more appreciated than store bought. I have a quilt from Mum that I treasure, along with jewellery from my very talented sister. What’s your idea of the perfect Christmas? Having my family together, the food just right and selecting gifts that everyone is happy with. Disasters do

Getting to know…

happen, of course … turkey dry? Where’s the ice? Forgot batteries. But we love it nevertheless. What style of doll is your favourite? I really enjoy varying my style, as I like to keep my work fresh. It all depends on the inspiration and what I want to achieve. I do like to age my dolls; it gives them extra depth, I think. But I also like fresh bright colour or unexpected combinations. Painted hair is my signature style and I usually apply this. Who taught you your skills? Mum was a great seamstress and always had lovely scraps of fabric around. She often mentions the ‘hole’ story, where a large hole was ‘mysteriously’ cut in a very expensive fabric she was to make a ball gown from for a client. Clever Mum worked around the hole, and I kept a very low profile for a bit! Do you have a dedicated workroom? Yes. I outgrew spare rooms in my house, and my husband and sons renovated our garage. Like most crafters, being able to leave a project ‘mid mess’ is a blessing. I also am a bit of a hoarder, and there was just too much to store. Everything has a place now, and I appreciate being able to find it.

DEBRA GARDINER Do you make many Christmas designs? I always like to design a new project every year. I think it makes that particular Christmas more special, and I can build up a collection. Are your Christmas decorations largely handmade? Mostly handmade and I really love

DEBRA’S PAINTING TIP When you’re painting dolls’ hair and shoes, always use undiluted acrylic paint straight from the container, to avoid drips. The paint can still run at times, so keep a hairdryer handy to stop any seepage.

The Stitcher’s Cupboard has moved! NEW LOCATION We are now at Shop 4a, 20 Argyle Street, Camden NSW 2570. Drop by and check out our new classes and workshops.

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When the carolling is done and weary children sleep, despite reindeer on the roof, there’s nothing lovelier than hanging traditional stockings at the base of their beds. Celeste Bouchayer’s designs bring the romance of Christmas past with all the anticipation of Christmas presents!

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Photography: Frederic Lucano; Styling: Vania Leroy/Marie Claire Idées/Picture Media

JOYEUX NOËL


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Materials To make one stocking Q 45cm (½yd) floral print fabric (outer stocking). See Note Q 45cm (½yd) coordinating fabric (lining) Q Chubby sixteenth (25 x 28cm/9 x 11in) accent fabric (cuff)

Q 60cm (¾yd) lightweight fusible batting Q 30cm (12in) silver ricrac Q Assorted braids, ribbons, ricrac, beads and other embellishments Q Silver fabric paint (optional) Q Pencil and A3 sheet of paper Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat

Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 49 x 31cm (19½ x 12in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. Requirements are based on fabric and batting 107cm (42in) wide.

Stocking reversed cut from lining fabric

Cuff cut from accent fabric with batting fused to the wrong side

Floral outer stocking with batting fused to the wrong side

A ¼in seam allowance is used throughout except where stated otherwise. It is assumed that you’ will cut the stockings by laying the pattern horizontally across the print fabric. If you wish to use a directional print or napped fabric and cut the stockings vertically down the fabric, you’ll need to purchase 60cm (¾yd).

Diagram 1

Preparation and cutting

Assembly

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Trace the stocking pattern from the Pattern Sheet onto a sheet of paper. Cut it out on the traced lines. Fold the floral print fabric for the outer stocking in half, short edges matching. Pin the stocking pattern to the fabric and cut the shape out of fabric. Repeat to cut the lining fabric and the batting in the same way. From the remainder of the batting, cut: • Two rectangles, 5¼ x 11in (cuff). From the accent fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 5¾ x 11½in (cuff).

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Fuse the batting to the wrong side of each floral print stocking shape. Centre each rectangle of batting cut for the cuff on the wrong side of a fabric cuff rectangle; there should be ¼in of fabric on all four sides of the fabric not covered by batting. Fuse the batting in place. Sew a floral stocking to one short edge of a cuff and a lining stocking reversed to the other short edge, as shown in Diagram 1. Press the seams towards the cuff. Fold the length of silver ricrac in half to form a loop. Pin the loop to the upper edge on the right side

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of the remaining lining stocking with its ends overhanging by about ¼in. The loop should be above the heel, not the toe. See Diagram 2. Baste the loop in place !/8in from the edge of the lining stocking. Repeat Step 6 with the remaining floral and lining stockings, and cuff. This time, you’ll also be catching the ends of the loop in a seam. Match the stocking+cuff+lining panels, right sides together – floral stockings matching – and pin the layers together. Stitch around the edge of the panel, starting at the bottom of the lining stocking. Use a #/8in seam on the

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www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern


They come in all forms ‒ personalised needlepoint, European-style winter knits, or just plain, white pillowslips ‒ but nothing quite beats the beauty of a classic hand-sewn Christmas stocking to capture the spirit of the occasion.

Diagram 3

lining stockings. When you get to the seam joining them to the cuffs, stop stitching with the needle in the up position. Move the fabric slightly so that you stitch the cuff and the floral stocking with a ¼in seam. When you return to sew the other edge of the lining stocking, switch back to a #/8in seam. The slightly wider seam makes the lining stocking a little bit smaller than the outer stocking, ensuring a neat fit. Leave a 4in opening in the bottom of the lining stocking. See Diagram 3.

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Clip into the seam allowances around the curves. Turn the stocking right side out through the opening left in the bottom edge of the lining. Press. Turn in the raw edges of the opening and slip stitch it closed. Push the lining into the floral stocking so that half of the cuff is inside the stocking and half is outside. Fold the top edge of the stocking over to form the cuff. Press. Embellish the cuff with your choice of buttons, sequins, braids, lace and bells.

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CUFF EMBELLISHMENT TIP Depending on the nature of the embellishments you choose for the stocking cuff, it may be easier to add them before stitching the stockings together. Embroidery, for example, would be much less awkward if worked on the cuff at an earlier stage, rather than when the stocking was fully assembled. Add these kinds of embellishments after Step 5. Refer to Diagram 4 to ensure that they will be the right way up on your finished stocking cuff. Diagram 2

Cuff

Amy

Floral outer stocking

Stocking reversed cut from lining fabric

Diagram 4 Homespun

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HEAVEN SENT Time for a little mail order from Santa, if not from Nicole Stark, who has designed these personalised gift envelopes to hang from the tree or be popped in among the presents.

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Materials Q 30cm (#/8yd) white cotton fabric (outer envelopes) Q 30cm (#/8yd) print fabric (envelope lining) Q DMC Stranded Embroidery Cotton in Red (321) Q DMC Light Effects Antiques Floss in Pewter (E415) Q Embroidery needle Q 30cm (#/8yd) medium-weight fusible interfacing Q 6mm (¼in) wide fusible-web tape Q 10cm (4in) embroidery hoop Q Paper for patterns Q Back closure options: • 12mm (½in) red button and small amount of white stranded thread • 25cm (10in) red ricrac, • 12mm (½in) red button and press stud Q 20cm (¼yd) of 3mm (!/8in) wide red ribbon Q Pencil/pigment pen and chalk pencil – see Note Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, colonial knot, running stitch, satin stitch Finished size: 12 x 18cm (4¾ x 7in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. The materials listed are sufficient for three envelopes but the instructions are written for making one with three closure options. Two strands of embroidery cotton and one strand of Effects thread are used throughout. Because it is not recommended to iron the markings of water-erasable pens before they are removed and this project has fusible interfacing, we suggest using a very sharp pencil or fine-pointed pigment pen to trace the lettering, keeping in mind that the stitching needs to cover all the markings. The construction lines should be drawn with a chalk pencil so they can be brushed off easily. A seam allowance of ¼in is used for construction and is included in the pattern. 100

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www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern


Preparation and cutting

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Trace the envelope shape from the Pattern Sheet onto paper and cut it out on the line. To use, pin it to the folded fabric or interfacing and cut around it next to the paper. From the white cotton fabric, cut: • One envelope shape on the fold • One square, 10cm (4in) (stamp). From the print fabric, cut: • One envelope shape on the fold (lining). From the fusible interfacing, cut: • One envelope shape on the fold. Trace the stamp design of your choice from the other side of the Pattern Sheet onto the middle of the small square of cotton fabric. Mark a 1½in square in chalk with the design centred in it as a guide for the running stitch that attaches the stamp to the envelope. On the white envelope shape, measure in ¼in from each inner corner and mark a 90-degree corner to show the finished size of the envelope front as a guide to the design placement. For the lettering, choose a script font that you like from your computer (or a font website) and type out the recipient’s name for the front and the message for the back on one or two lines as desired. Enlarge the point size as needed for the font you’ve chosen. Nicole used Edwardian Script ITC at size 90 for the name and size 48 for the back. It’s much easier to place complete words that are already correctly spaced than to trace individual letters. Position the name under the front area of the envelope – it should sit a little left of centre and slightly towards the bottom to balance the stamp and postmark. Trace the name with a very fine line. Then position

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the message for the back of the envelope upside down at the top of the flap shape above the centre rectangle and trace it, remembering to leave space for the seam allowance and button if using. To personalise your gift, or if you don’t have a computer and printer, use your own handwriting for the name and message. You can practise the size and style on paper first or write straight onto the fabric. Trace a postmark of your choice and cancelling lines from the Pattern Sheet onto the envelope front, positioning the circle about 1in down from the top fold and 4in from the right edge. The lines extend onto the stamp. Fuse the interfacing envelope shape to the wrong side of the white cotton shape.

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Embroidery

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Put the square of stamp fabric in the embroidery hoop and backstitch the design in Red (321) thread. The eye of the reindeer is in satin stitch. Cut out the stamp ¼in outside the chalk line – it should be 2in square. Position the embroidered stamp in the top right corner of the marked envelope front about ¼in from the top and side edges. Use Red (321) thread to work a line of running stitch around the marked square to attach it. Fray all the edges of the stamp by removing the long threads almost back to the stitching line. Using an embroidery hoop is optional for the envelope – the fabric is supported by the interfacing, so it’s less likely to pucker. Work the postmark and cancelling lines in backstitch with Pewter (E415) thread. Continue the lines onto the stamp just past the runningstitch outline. For the name and back message, use Red (321) to backstitch the strokes, satin stitch the solid balls at the end of swashes and work colonial knots for dots on letters such as ‘i’.

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Stamps

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Put the envelope face down on a clean, soft towel and press it gently from the wrong side to avoid flattening the stitches.

Assembly

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Before you start the assembly, decide on the type of closure you are using. If you plan to usse the thread loop and button closure, refer to Step 19 now. The other closures are added after assembly. With right sides together, match the embroidered envelope and the lining shape and pin around the edges. Sew around the shape, leaving an opening where marked on the pattern. Clip the inner corners and trim the seam allowance at the points before turning the envelope right side out. Push out the seam carefully all the way around and press well from the lining side, turning the edges of the opening in as you go. Stitch the opening closed neatly or seal it with a piece of fusible-web tape as Nicole did. Fold the two smaller side flaps in towards the centre and press. Then fold the lower flap up over the top of them and press. You can secure them together with neat handstitching, or apply strips of fusible-web tape to the two edges of the bottom flap on the lining side. Peel the paper off and iron the bottom flap over the side flaps to construct the envelope pocket. Finally, press the top flap in place.

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NICOLE’S THREAD TIP When using metallic thread such as the Effects range, I suggest that you use only short lengths at a time. This will prevent it from fraying and breaking as you work. Very annoying!

Finishing There are three back closure options for the envelopes. Button and loop Make a 4in twisted cord using Red (321) and White stranded thread. Secure the ends to prevent it unravelling. Before sewing the envelope front and lining together, place the loop of cord between the layers at the centre of the top flap with the ends protruding about ½in outside

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Step 19

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the raw edges. Sew a second time over this section of the seam to secure the cord well. Fold the top flap down and insert a pin into the lower flap through the bottom of the loop to position the button. Sew the button to the lower flap and fasten the envelope by passing the cord loop over it. Ricrac and press stud Pin a length of ricrac to the underside edge of the upper flap with half of the wavy edge showing. Begin just inside one side flap and trim the other end the same so that when the envelope is opened, you don’t see the ends. From the outside, work a line of running stitch !/8in from the edge of the flap in Red (321), catching the ricrac in place. Sew a decorative button to the upper flap. Underneath it, attach one half of a press stud to the lining. Sew the other half of the press stud to the lower flap to correspond. Fasten the press stud to close. Ribbon bow Work a line of running stitch in Red (321), !/8in from the edge of the upper flap. When you get to the middle of the flap, take the needle between the fabric layers and emerge at the centre edge. Sew a tiny double stitch to anchor the thread. Form a ½in loop of thread and sew another tiny double stitch to secure the loop. Take the needle back between the layers and continue running stitching around the flap edge. Fold the piece of ribbon in half and stitch the fold to the lower flap of the envelope at the bottom of the thread loop. To fasten, thread one half of the ribbon through the thread loop and tie the ends in a bow.

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For contact details for Nicole Stark, turn to the Stockists list at the end of the magazine.


Getting to know… NICOLE STARK

Back of envelopes

NICOLE’S WHITE PROJECT TIP Whenever you’re working with white fabric, always wash your hands before starting to avoid dirtying your work.

Button and loop closure

Press-stud closure

How long have you been embroidering? I started to cross stitch when I was about 10 years old and have been doing it ever since. What style of embroidery is your favourite? Probably sticheries like the ones I have done here (simple backstitch) but I still enjoy cross stitch. It’s all good! Do you have a dedicated workroom? No, I mainly work in the lounge. I have a special spot on the couch, with my OttLite and all my bits and bobs in my sewing basket beside me and dogs asleep at my feet. Is your embroidery a passion or a business? A passion and, every now and then, I get to do these projects for the magazine, which is always a good challenge. Did your mother teach you to sew? I was taught by my mum and granny, who lives in New Zealand. I then signed up for textiles in high school, which I loved. Do you have big family Christmases? Back when I was younger, we would fly over to New Zealand, where both my mum’s and dad’s families lived. We’d have massive family gatherings – loads of fabulous food, heaps of presents and lots of cousins and aunties and uncles. These days, it’s a much smaller affair. Last Christmas was a gathering of four people. We went to my husband’s Nan’s house with his uncle for lunch, followed by cooking at home and a drive, looking at Christmas lights. Is Christmas a favourite time of year for you? It is. I love decorating the house. Each year, we put up the Christmas lights on the outside of the house and lavishly decorate the inside. And, of course, there are plenty of new projects to sew, like stockings, table runners or buntings. Or gift envelopes! Have you always handmade Christmas gifts? No, not always, I will handmake gifts mostly now for my three nephews. Would you love to receive a present in an envelope like this? Yes, I would, it’s such a lovely personal touch. It’s especially good as a pocket for a gift voucher.

Bow closure Homespun

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Santa’s Little Helper

Most elves work late into the night behind North Pole doors – hammering, nailing, gluing and packing for the big gig of Christmas Eve. But Claire Turpin’s special elf got to go along for the sleigh ride. We think it’s more for Santa Claus’ comfort than the pleasure of the company! But we’re not saying a thing.

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Christmas Elf Materials Q Fat eighth red and white stripe fabric (lower body and legs) Q Fat quarter plain beige fabric (upper body, head and arms) Q 30 x 40cm (12 x 16in) green felt (jacket and hat) 106

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Q Scrap of brown felt (hair) Q One small press stud Q One 2cm (¾in) red button Q Tiny red star button (face) Q Small red bell (hat) Q Stranded embroidery threads in red, green and black Q Fibre fill Q Turning and stuffing tool Q Template plastic and

permanent marking pen Q Pencil, gel pen or tailor’s chalk Q Pinking shears (optional) Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, blanket stitch, satin stitch Finished size: 37cm (14½in)

Note: Read the instructions before starting the project. This softie is constructed using the trace, sew, cut method – traced lines are the stitching lines. Set the sewing machine to a shorter than usual stitch length for stronger, smoother seams. Seam allowances of ⅛in are included in the jacket and hat patterns.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern


Preparation and cutting

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Trace the shapes for the elf body, arm and clothing from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic, transfer all the markings and cut them out on the lines. (Don’t cut across the elf’s waistline.) From the red and white stripe fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 8 x 8½in with the stripes parallel to the 8in edges (A). From the beige fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 8 x 8½in (A) • Two rectangles 4 x 6in (B).

for the other arm. Claire says to persevere as this process can be a bit fiddly! Turn the elf right side out through the opening in the head and take some time to get all the points and curves smooth. Machine stitch down each side of the head so the ears don’t get stuffing in them. Stuffing Start by stuffing the points of the shoes with small amounts of filling, making sure that you push it firmly into place. Continue stuffing the elf firmly, all the way to the point of the head. When you’re happy with the amount of stuffing, stitch the opening closed by hand or machine. This stitching will be covered by the hat.

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Assembly

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Trace around the arm template twice on the wrong side of one of the B rectangles of beige fabric, leaving at least ¼in between them. Match the two B rectangles, right sides together, and pin them together. Stitch on the drawn lines, leaving the straight end open. Sew a second line of stitching on top of the first for extra strength. Cut the arms out about !/8in outside the stitching, clip the curves and turn the arms right side out. Stuff the arms firmly with fibre fill and set them aside. Match each red and white A rectangle with a beige A rectangle, right sides together. Sew each pair of rectangles along one of the 8in edges with a ¼in seam. Press the seams open. Match the two joined panels, right sides together and seams aligned. Lay the body template on the fabric, with the head and upper body on the beige fabric and matching the waistline on the template with the seam line. Trace around the template, marking the places to start and stop stitching. Pin the layers together. Sew on the drawn lines, starting and stopping where marked. Claire recommends stitching the seams twice for extra strength. Cut the shape out about !/8in outside the stitching and clip the curves. Push one of the arms into an armhole, hand end first, until the raw edges are level. Machine stitch across the armhole to close the opening and secure the arm. Repeat

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Clothes

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Arrange the jacket and hat shapes on the green felt, noting that you need to cut a jacket front, then flip the template over and trace it again in reverse. Trace around each template and cut the shapes out on the lines. Pin the pocket shape to one of the jacket fronts and sew around the curved edge as close as possible to the edge. Jacket Match the jacket fronts and jacket back at the shoulders, right sides together, and sew the shoulder seams.

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With right sides together, match the curved edge of the sleeve top to the curved armhole edge of the jacket. Begin by pinning at the centre point and the ends and use lots of pins in between. Sew the seam and repeat for the other sleeve. Pin the sleeve and underarm seams and sew the seam, pivoting at the armpit and stopping ½in from Step 25-28 the end of the sleeve so the cuff can be turned back. Leave the jacket inside out. Pin the collar around the neckline with the right side of the collar against the wrong side of the jacket neckline. The collar ends about ¼in from the front edges of the jacket. Machine stitch it in place. Turn the jacket right side out. Fold the collar over to the right side and pin it in place. Machine sew about !/8in from the neck edge to hold the collar in place and enclose the previous seam. Using two strands of red embroidery cotton, blanket stitch the hem and front edges of the jacket. Sew the two halves of a press stud to the top edges of the jacket fronts so the left side overlaps the right by ¼in. Sew the red button to the left side to finish. Put the jacket on the elf and turn up the sleeve cuffs. Hat Match the hat shapes, right sides

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together, and sew the seam, leaving the bottom edge open. Clip the curves and turn it right side out. Hand stitch the red bell to the point of the hat. Put the hat on the elf’s head so you can determine the position of the facial features. Draw the eyes, nose and mouth lightly, then remove the hat. Use two strands of black thread to satin stitch the eyes and backstitch the nose. Backstitch the mouth with two strands of red thread, sewing the tiny star button at one end as you go. From the leftover green felt, cut a ½in strip that’s long enough to go around the edge of the hat. Trim one long edge with pinking shears, or cut a zigzag pattern freehand as Claire has done. From the brown scrap of felt, cut two rectangles, ½ x 1in, and cut vertically several times partway along the length of them to make the hair tufts. Put the hat back on the elf’s head and pin the trim around the edge with the edges level. Tuck the brown felt hair tufts under the hat just in front of the ears. Using two strands of green thread, blanket stitch around the edge of the hat and trim, going into the head fabric as well, to secure the hat and hair tufts in place.

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Cushion Materials Q 90cm (1yd) navy blue upholstery-weight linen (cushion) Q Fat eighth red with white spot print fabric (sleigh) Q 20 x 30cm (8 x 12in) white with silver fleck print (sleigh details) Q 4 x 5cm (1½ x 2in) rectangles of four assorted print fabrics (present bows) 110

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Q 8 x 10cm (3 x 4in) rectangles of assorted print fabrics (presents) Q 15 x 40cm (6 x 16in) gold tone-on-tone print fabric (sleigh runner) Q 50cm (%/8yd) lightweight fusible batting such as Pellon Q 25cm (¼yd) red and white stripe print fabric (binding) Q Two 3cm (1¼in) red buttons Q 45cm (18in/size 18) cushion insert (see Note)

Q Fusible web Q Template plastic Q Machine embroidery threads to match the appliqué fabrics Q Pressing cloth or heat mat Q Tailor’s chalk or fabric marker Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 47cm (18½in) square

Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. Requirements are based on linen 140cm (54in) wide and all other fabrics 107cm (42in) wide. The appliqué method used is fusible web with blanket stitch by machine, but you can blanket stitch by hand if you prefer, using two strands of matching embroidery cotton. Don’t overfill the cushion by using a bigger insert or the elf won’t fit in the pocket.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-pattern


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Preparation and cutting

1

Trace the appliqué shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto the paper side of the fusible web, leaving about ½in between them. Cut them out roughly. Cut out the centre area of the sleigh shape, leaving about ¼in of fusible web inside the design line. (Removing the fusible web behind large appliqué shapes in this manner makes them less stiff in the finished project.) Fuse the appliqué shapes to the wrong side of the selected fabrics and cut them out accurately on the lines with small, sharp scissors. From the navy linen fabric, cut: • One strip, 18½in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut it to yield one square, 18½in (cushion front) and two rectangles, 12 x 18½in (cushion back) • Two rectangles, 12½ x 18½in (cushion pocket). Trace the template for the curved pocket top from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic and cut it out on the traced lines. Lay it on the right side of one of the linen pocket rectangles with the top right corners matching and the left and right

2 3

4 5

edges aligned. See Diagram 1. Trace along the curved edge with tailor’s chalk or a fabric marker, then cut the fabric on this line.

Appliqué

6

Peel the backing paper from all the appliqué shapes. Position the sleigh shape on the pocket with the top curves matching. Put the sleigh runner shape in place, tucking the top edges under the sleigh. Add the white details to the sleigh. When you’re happy with the positions of these shapes, cover them with a pressing cloth or heat mat and fuse them in place. Lay the pocket on the cushion front square with the bottom and side edges matching; both fabrics should have their right sides facing up. Referring to Diagram 2, position the presents on the cushion front – their bottom edges lie just under the edge of the pocket. Put the bows in place, then remove the pocket carefully without disturbing the pieces. Cover them with the pressing cloth or heat mat and fuse them in place. Set up your machine for blanket stitch. Sew around

Diagram 1

7 8

9

Diagram 2

all the shapes with threads to match the appliqué fabrics. Claire recommends using a smaller stitch length around the tiny bows. It’s not necessary to sew across the top of the sleigh because that edge is enclosed in the seam later. Finish off the threads neatly on the back.

Assembly

10

On one cushion back rectangle, turn under and press a 2in hem on one long edge. Stitch ¼in from the fold and ¼in from the raw edge of the hem. Fold the rectangle in half, short edges matching, to find the centre of the hem and mark 3in each side of it. Sew vertical buttonholes to fit your buttons at both marks. On the other cushion back rectangle, turn under and press a 1in hem on one long edge. Stitch ¼in from the raw edge of the hem. Iron the cushion front and pocket to some lightweight fusible batting and trim the batting even with the edges of the fabric. Quilt as desired. Claire set up her machine for straight-stitch quilting

11 12 13 Step 9

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Diagram 3

with invisible thread in the top and navy thread in the bobbin and stitched horizontal lines over the background at ½in intervals, stopping and starting to avoid stitching over the appliquéd shapes. Place the unquilted cushion pocket rectangle face up on the table. Lay the appliquéd cushion pocket face down on top with the bottom and side edges aligned and pin them together. Stitch along the curved upper edge only, ¼in inside the edge. Trim the excess fabric of the unquilted pocket rectangle even with the curved edge of quilted/appliquéd one. Clip the seam allowance on the curves, then turn the back rectangle over so that its wrong side is against the batting on the appliquéd pocket. Roll the seam between your finger tips to make the edge nice and sharp, then topstitch !/8in from the edge. Lay the completed pocket, appliquéd side facing up, on the cushion front (also with right side facing up) with the side and bottom edges matching and pin them together. Machine baste close to the edges to hold all the layers together. Put the cushion front face down on the table. Place the cushion back rectangle without buttonholes on top, with the right side facing up, raw edges matching and the hemmed edge towards the centre. Then put the rectangle with buttonholes on top, raw edges matching and right side facing up. See Diagram 3. The hemmed edges

14

15

16 17

should overlap in the middle. Pin the layers together and machine baste close to the edges again. From the red and white stripe binding fabric, cut: • Sufficient bias strips, 2¼in wide, to make a strip about 84in long when joined. If you’re not using a stripe fabric, or you want the stripes running perpendicular to the edge rather than on an angle, just cut two strips, 2¼in across the width of the fabric instead. Join the binding strips with diagonal seams to make one length, trim the seams to ¼in and press them open. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, sew the binding to the front of the cushion with a ¼in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 82 for details. Turn the binding over and stitch it by hand to the back of the cushion. Sew the buttons to the cushion back rectangle underneath the buttonholes. Put the cushion insert inside, pushing it into the corners, and fasten the buttons. Put the elf in the pocket to finish.

18

19

20 21 22

For contact details for Claire Turpin, of Claire Turpin Design, see Stockists at the back of the magazine. Thanks to Claire for providing the jacket step-by-step photos.

CLAIRE’S QUILTING GUIDE TIP The rows of quilting were all kept straight and in line using a quilting guide attached to the machine’s walking/quilting foot.

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Getting to know…

CLAIRE TURPIN Do you usually make Christmas projects? Christmas is a great time to get me thinking about making new things to decorate the house. There is usually a new project for Christmas every year. Are Christmas designs a favourite of yours? There are so many great projects for Christmas – my daughters all have hand appliquéd Santa sacks, and I would love to make them a new one every year. How did you come up with this cute idea? I have been playing around with designs for pocketed cushions for a while and just extended it to fit a Christmas theme. I’m thinking that there needs to be a whole family of them for this Christmas. Have you made pocketed cushions before? Yes, my youngest daughter has a favourite bunny that she was always losing, so I made her a pocketed ‘treasure-keeper’ cushion. Now, the bunny can go into his new home every morning to keep him safe for the day. How did you go about choosing the colours? I wanted the sleigh to really stand out, which is why I chose a navy-blue background – plus, it also represents the night sky. I always prefer to work with brights. The colours for the presents came from my assortment of fabric scraps, and I’m sure that Santa’s sleigh has always been red! Would you recommend a project like this for beginners? The cushion is an easy project for beginners, and I’ve tried to make the elf as simple as possible, so that anyone new to sewing won’t find it too tricky. Do your children help with ideas like this? Not so much anymore, as they’re getting older, although they always give me plenty of encouragement and are never too critical. Do you have hand-stitched Christmas stockings from your childhood? Unfortunately not. My mother didn’t sew much, so our Christmas stockings were, in fact, pillowcases. What are your favourite designs to make? I love appliqué work and have really perfected machine appliqué as my family life has got busier. I also love the challenge of seeing something I particularly like, for example zipped bags and pouches, and then working out a simple, clever way to make them. What’s your favourite childhood memory of Christmas? Breakfast of smoked salmon (fresh from the fish sheds in the English town where I grew up) with scrambled eggs and Bucks Fizz (non-alcoholic, of course!). The table was always laid beautifully the night before, and it set us up for a fabulous day.


Another cute idea! FOR TINY FAIRY TAILS Forget elves and pixies – these toadstools are tailored for your tiny tots’ seats. Alison Smith, from Smith and Scott, devised these adorable cushions so that children could make their own fantasy fairy rings. They may have to make do with a playroom, rather than a magic forest, but the scene is still set for adventure. Have a browse through the Etsy store at www.etsy.com/ shop/SmithAndScott.

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CK BLOTHE OF NTH MO

PART 6

HAPPINESS QUILT

With her usual design aplomb, Monica Poole brings you her sixth Block of the Month instalment – a celebration of colour and a dazzling blend of patterns. The pieced block features an octagon anchored by a ‘stamen’ of hexis.

SPIDER WEB 118

Homespun


Monica Poole’s Happiness Quilt features fabrics from the Riley Blake ‘Simply Sweet’, ‘Cotton Ombre’ and ‘Solid Colour’ ranges, which are distributed in Australia by Millhouse Collections. For wholesale enquiries or details of your nearest retail outlet, contact Millhouse Collections by phone on (07) 5449 1936 or email: sales@millhousecollections.com.

Preparation and cutting

1

From the solid white fabric, cut: • One strip, 3½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut eight rectangles, 3½ x 4in • One strip, 4½in across the width of the fabric and crosscut four rectangles, 4½ x 9in. Cut each rectangle once on the diagonal to yield eight triangles: cut two rectangles from the top left corner to the bottom right one and the other two rectangles from the top right corner to the bottom left one. See Diagram 1 (block background)

trouble to position the fusible web on her fabric so that a particular part of the printed design was centred in the circle. For this block, you need eight paper foundation patterns, four each of parts A and B. You can either trace them accurately from the Pattern Sheet, transferring all the letters and numbers, or print out the digital patterns from our website, www.homespun.net.au. The printed or traced side of the paper is the wrong side of the block.

5

8

Use scissors to cut the area 2 fabric strip so that it’s just slightly longer than area 2. Flip the paper to the blank side and place fabric 2 over fabric 1, right sides together and one edge level. On the printed side of the paper, sew on line A.

Foundation piecing

6 Diagram 1

• Two strips, 3¼in across the width of the fabric (block border). From each of the aqua spot, small-scale blue and small-scale yellow floral print fabrics, cut: • Two strips, 1%/8in across the width of the fabric (segments). From each of the green and red spot print fabrics, cut: • One strip, 1%/8in across the width of the fabric (segments). Use a compass to draw a circle with a radius of 5cm (2in) on the fusible web and cut it out roughly. Fuse it to the wrong side of the feature fabric and cut it out on the line. Monica took the

2

Thread the machine with white thread, insert a size 90 needle and set the stitch length to 2. Using a larger needle and shorter stitch length makes it easier to remove the paper foundation later. Hold the paper foundation with the printed side facing up. Place the fabric for area 1 under the shape numbered 1, with the wrong side of the fabric facing the blank side of the paper. Hold the paper and fabric up to the light to ensure that the fabric is covering all of area 1 plus at least ¼in all the way around it.

7

Step 7

9

On the blank side, open out fabric 2 so that it’s right side facing up and press. Fold the foundation along line B and check that fabric 2 extends ¼in past the fold. Use scissors to cut the area 3 fabric strip so that it’s just slightly longer than area 3. On the blank side, place fabric 3 over fabric 2, right sides together and with one edge level. Flip to the printed side and sew on line B.

10

3

4

At the end of Homespun's 10-part BOM, the Happiness Quilt will be donated to beyondblue, which aims to achieve an Australian community that understands depression and anxiety, empowering all Australians, at any life stage, to seek help. beyondblue raises awareness, reduces stigma and ensures people have access to the information they need to support recovery, management and resilience. beyondblue info line: 1300 22 4636 or infoline@beyondblue.org.au.

Homespun

119


Getting to know… MONICA POOLE Step 8

Step 9

Step 10

Step 11

What’s your preferred technique when making a quilt? My favourite way to make a quilt is quilt as you go. The main reason for this is that I like to make the entire quilt myself from start to finish and quilting as you go enables you to quilt small sections with ease before they’re joined together to make the complete quilt. When I design a quilt, it’s normally the idea or theme that comes to mind first, then, it’s working out which QAYG method I’ll use. This will also affect the overall quilt design as each method has its own set of guidelines that you need to work by to achieve the best results and it’s this challenge in my design process that I thoroughly enjoy. When it comes to design, my first love is appliqué as this allows me endless freedom. I love swirls and curls, which is why I often like to incorporate bias work with my appliqué designs. All of my work is machine sewn and for a neat finish around appliqué, I like to use either a machine blanket stitch or an eye-catching satin stitch. For a more free form look, I’ll use what I like to call ‘sketchy appliqué’ where I outline the shapes three or four times and then sketch in the details using a stipple foot. Sometimes I like to use a lot of different techniques to make the quilt a fun, learning experience for my students.

11 Step 13

Step 14

Open out fabric 3 so that it’s right side up and press. Check that fabric 3 covers all of area 3 and ¼in beyond it. From the printed side, fold the paper back along line C and trim the fabric ¼in from the fold. Continue piecing the strips in the same way, following the lettered and numerical order. Flip to the blank side and place a white triangle with the straight-grain edge level with the edge of the last strip, right sides together. Check that it will cover all of area 6 when it is stitched and opened out. Turn the paper over and sew on line E. Open out the triangle so that it’s right side up and press. Check that the fabric covers all of area 6 and ¼in beyond it.

12 13 14 15

Step 15

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Step 16


16 17 18

Press the block. Trim the edges of the block to the solid outer line, but don’t remove the paper yet. Repeat Steps 7-16 for the other seven foundations for this block. Arrange the eight segments, alternating A and B, to form the block. Join them together in pairs, being careful to match the seams, making four squares. Then join the squares to complete the Spider Web block. Monica recommends pressing the seams open for this block as there are so many seams meeting in one place.

Block border

19

Measure the length of the block and trim the two 3¼in strips of white fabric to this measurement. Sew them to the left and right edges of the block. Measure the width of the block and border, trim the remainder of the two 3¼in white strips to this measurement and sew them to the top and bottom edges of the block. It should measure approximately 20in square, raw edge to raw edge.

20

(It will be trimmed back to 19in square later on.) Now remove the foundation papers from the back of the block. Pull the block gently in each direction to loosen the papers. Any little corners that don’t come away cleanly can be removed with tweezers. Centre circle Peel the backing paper from the circle shape and position it in the middle of the block. Iron it in place and blanket stitch around it as you did for the circle in the Crazy Ball block. If you’re making the quilt top in the usual way, set the completed block aside until Part 10 of this project, to be published in Homespun 15.11.

BLO OF T CK MON HE TH

21 22 23

Quilt as you go

24

From both the backing fabric and batting, cut: • One square 21in. These are both slightly larger than the block background. Layer the backing fabric, right side down, the batting and the finished pieced square, centred right side up on top. If you’re using

25

fusible batting, iron the three layer ‘sandwich’ to hold it together – otherwise, use safety pins to baste the layers together. Thread the top of the machine with monofilament thread and use bobbin thread to match the backing fabric. Fit the walking foot to the machine, insert a size 80 quilting needle and set the stitch length between 2.5 and 3.0. Quilt closely around the edge of the circle and in the ditch of every seam including the border seams, but don’t quilt beyond the border.

26

For contact details for Monica Poole, of MoonShine Designs, see the Stockists list at the back of the magazine.

Townsville

Co C Cost of full kit is: $380 in including ncl backing & postage.

We also have blocks available av by the month.

Shop 3/277 Charters Towers Road, Road Mysterton QLD 4812 P 077 47 4755 2336 E shop@janometsv.com.au Homespun

121


HOMESPUN’S BEAUTIFUL NEW BLOCK OF THE MONTH H HO

The Happiness Quilt CREATED BY SUPER-DESIGNER MONICA POO LE

For a pa make th ttern to portable is fabulous b contact lock-keeper, M at Moon onica Poole, Sh www.m ine Designs, oon monica shineby po typepad ole. .com alive with modern qu is rich with colour and This T quilt fruit, embellished ripen with fform – orchards laden animals and insects. with a sprinkling of stylised bring readers instructions ach month, Homespun will Ea Each month (November 2014) nal fi The k. bloc t e eren diff a or fo for terpiece. (PLUS March mas your ing mbl asse ut is all abou us instructions for bon give s issue October and O the panels). from making cushions

START STITCHING NOW!

Fabric distributed by llections Coll o se C Millhou 07 5449 1936 s.com www.millhousecollection


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1. Tea Gardens

BLACK POSSUM FABRICS

Where’s Tea Gardens: One hour north of Newcastle, located on the beautiful Myall River surrounded by great coffee shops and eateries, and only 10 minutes from the Pacific Highway – well worth the trip! Where in Tea Gardens: Shop 1/197 Myall Street. We are located right in the main street of Tea Gardens, so it’s really easy to find us. Who plays host: Owners Jenifer and Hazel Gimbert Worth visiting because: A visit to Black Possum Fabrics is a must! After being in the business for over 30 years, we have created a haven of fabrics, with hundreds of bolts of fabrics from subtle designs to bright as bright, and everything in between. Along with all of our beautiful fabrics, we also stock DMC cottons, a wide range of ribbons and buttons and also plenty of patterns and quilting supplies. We run a number of block of the month programs such as Libby Richardson’s mystery quilt, Nature’s Gift by Petals and Patches, Monica Poole’s Happiness Quilt (published in Homespun issues 15.2-15.11 inclusive) and many more designs, all of which can be started at any time. What we recommend: Come and try one of our two wonderful retreats we hold each year at the beautiful Boathouse Resort. We only take 14 at each retreat, so numbers are limited, and we have tutors who will teach you a wide range of techniques. To ensure your place at one of our retreats, just give us a call. Address: Shop 1, 197 Myall Street, Tea Gardens, NSW 2324 Phone: (02) 4997 0866 Email: blackpossumfabrics@bigpond.com Website: www.blackpossumfabrics.com

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2. Waratah

ONPOINT PATCHWORK & NEEDLECRAFT

Where’s Waratah: Waratah is a suburb of Newcastle, approximately two hours north of Sydney. There is a lot to see in Newcastle, from beautiful beaches to nature reserves. A short drive to the Hunter Valley vineyards is a must when in Newcastle. Where in Waratah: 61a Station Street. Travel along Turton Road past Hunter Stadium and Waratah Village, then turn left into Station Street at the Town Hall Hotel corner – easy! Who plays host: Owned by Cath and Pat Guilfoyle since January 2003. Worth visiting because: At Onpoint, you’ll find a wide array of fabrics from many leading designers, all temptingly displayed on the shelves just to make your choice a little more difficult! We have so much on offer, from Civil War, olde-worlde florals, country and children's fabrics – you’ll certainly find just the right fabric for any project! If you’re looking for inspiration, just browse the many books and patterns on display and no doubt you will end up like many of our customers saying, “I only came in for a reel of cotton and I’m going out with all of this!” We have quality notions, rulers and templates in our nooks and crannies, just waiting to be found.

3. Georgetown

Customers are always welcome and we endeavour to go the extra mile to obtain something that may be hard to get like that elusive piece of fabric. We also run patchwork classes for all levels of expertise, and embroidery classes run twice monthly with wellknown local tutor, Adele Richards. We carry a wide range of threads including Cottage Garden and Threadworx, and patterns from many designers, including Brenda Ryan from Thimblestitch. Cross stitch kits and a variety of fabrics for embroidery are also available. What we recommend: If you haven’t used the Matilda’s Own Templates, we can thoroughly recommend them! Blocks fit together easily and the templates can be used for either machine or hand piecing. With many designs available, the possibilities are endless, so be sure to check them out. We also love the ¼ Plus tool, which allows you to mark intersections and sewing lines precisely. Address: 61a Station Street, Waratah, NSW 2298 Phone: (02) 4968 0094 Email: shop@onpointpatch.com.au Website: onpointpatchworkandneedlecraft.com

A QUILTERS HIVE

Where’s Georgetown: A suburb of Newcastle, the second largest city of NSW, just a short distance from the CBD. Where in Georgetown: 53 Georgetown Road. I’m situated in a group of shops not far from Waratah Shopping Village. You’ll find a red Australia Post box outside our door. Who plays host: Candy McCauley Worth visiting because: I have owned my shop for nearly five years and in that time, I have made it a happy and relaxed place to visit. I don’t like to limit my store to one thing, so I have a very wide variety of stock to tempt you. My style can sometimes be quirky, very pretty and bit old-worldy, but always beautiful. I stock a range of patterns from various designers and some of my favourites are Libby Richardson for her beautiful bears, Brenda Ryan for her whimsical and endearing stitcheries and Bronwyn Hayes for her quirky ladies. You’ll find ranges of Cottage Garden Threads, DMC and many beautiful trims including lace and ricrac. Each week there are sit and sew classes, always with morning tea and supper for a special treat – sometimes there is even some sewing done! Also, on the second and fourth Saturday of the month, we have classes with Jann Sturdy, who is a specialist tutor in her field of machine appliqué and machine quilting. These classes are very popular, so get in quick or you’ll miss out! What we recommend: I am currently running two block of the month programs, both from Libby Richardson. One which is Teddies at Play and the other is Libby’s Mystery Quilt. These are both beautiful designs, so be sure to check them out when you visit.

Address: 53 Georgetown Road, Georgetown, NSW 2298 Phone: (02) 4968 0864 Email: aquiltershive@optusnet.com.au

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4. Boolaroo PATCHWORK BY THE LAKE Where’s Boolaroo: We are 35-40 minutes from Newcastle, just up from the beautiful Lake Macquarie. Where in Boolaroo: 15A Main Road. You won't miss us thanks to the colourful flags that lead you to our door. Who plays host: Sandra and Kerry are there to greet you. Worth visiting because: You'll find the largest collections of fabrics that are sure to please every taste, from modern to traditional, young and young at heart. All of your quilting needs are covered, with battings, backing fabrics, patterns, rulers and threads including Signature, Gűtermann and Rasant. We also have plenty of haberdashery too. Adorning our walls are lots of quilts to inspire you, and each one comes in kit form to make fabric selections easier, especially if you need to finish a quilt quickly. We also have a collection of Kelly Lane giftware on offer, perfect for if you need to pick up a gift for someone, or just to treat yourself. What we recommend: We have just added a Riley Blake collection and two new Moda ranges to our shop – the first of many! Like us on Facebook for updates for when they arrive in store. Also, we have a special offer for Homespun readers! Just tell us or show us that you purchased this edition of Homespun and we will give you 10 per cent discount on your purchase when you visit. Address: 15A Main Road, Boolaroo, NSW 2284 Phone: (02) 4965 8418 Facebook: www.facebook.com/patchworkbythelake

5. Gateshead BATIK OETORO Where’s Gateshead: On the southern side of Newcastle. Where in Gateshead: Unit 3, 11 Nevin Close. We're in an industrial area, just two blocks off the highway – just turn off at Charlestown Toyota. Who plays host: Lynne is there every day, with occasional assistance from 'Tubby' (dear husband) and Britteny (daughter). Worth visiting because: We sell colour! Dyes, fabric paints, marbling inks, natural dyes, fabric crayons and Textas, gutta resist, more dyes, and dyeing-related products including chemicals. If you have or have wanted to venture into the world of creating your own fabrics with dyes, fabric paints and other media, you’ve come to the right place! You can hand dye your threads or fabric, print your own fabric, try batik, shibori or silk painting – we really have everything you need, and we can answer all your questions and provide instructions too. Even if it is as simple a project as getting those faded jeans back to black – we have that too. I have a lifetime of experience with textiles and I am more than happy to share! I was taught the ladylike accomplishments of hand embroidery and crochet at an early age, and then I really went off on a tangent dyeing cotton scraps with mulberries,. My dyeing experience has come a long way since then, and I now have plenty of industry experience and tertiary qualifications, so you really are in the right hands with any and every question about the wonderful textile technique that is dyeing. We’re open Mon-Fri 9am-4pm, closed weekends and public holidays. What we recommend: All of it – although we may be a bit biased! Hot Colour fabric paint would be one of our most versatile products. It is fixed by ironing and works on most fabrics. You can silk paint

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with it, do marbling, sun print, faux tie dye, colour washes on fabric as backgrounds for embroidery – the possibilities are endless. But if you are unsure where to start, don’t worry, we have kits that have clear step by step instructions and include all the basic ‘stuff' you need to get creating. Address: 3/11 Nevin Close, Gateshead, NSW 2290 Phone: (02) 4943 8808 Email: sales@dyeman.com Website: www.dyeman.com


6. Leura PICKLEMOUSE CORNER Where’s Leura: Approximately two hours from Sydney, just before Katoomba in the spectacular Blue Mountains. Leura has some amazing shops and cafes around, so it is definitely worth a full day-visit. Where in Leura: 1/152 Megalong Street. We’re in a sweet cottage behind Leura Mall (the main shopping strip). Just travel down Leura Mall, turn left at Megalong Street and then left into the car park and we are there opposite Woolworths, so there is plenty of parking right outside our door! Who plays host: Pamela Davis and her helpful and skilful team of Karlene, Di, Wendy and Natalie. Worth visiting because: We are a unique patchwork boutique, with something for everyone, no matter what fabrics you love, or need for your projects. As well as patchwork and quilting supplies, we stock a wide range of haberdashery and wool. People also travel far and wide to buy some of our delicious homemade fudge – you just can’t leave the store without some! What we recommend: Flannel fabrics, Australiana prints and our full Jinny Beyer Range are just a few of our favourites in store. Our novelty and reproduction prints are also popular and we have ranges from various fabric houses. Address: 1/152 Megalong Street, Leura, NSW 2780 Phone: (02) 4784 2854 Email: pam@picklemousecorner.com Website: www.picklemousecorner.com

7. Blackheath BLACKHEATH HABERDASHERY & FABRIC Where’s Blackheath: Blackheath is a village in the scenic Upper Blue Mountains of NSW, two hours west of Sydney. Where in Blackheath: 52 Govetts Leap Road. Turn off the Great Western Highway into Govetts Leap Road (the main shopping street – clearly sign posted). We are two blocks down on the left, just up from where the iconic Ribbons and Rainbows traded for many years. Who plays host: Karen Worth visiting because: We are an exciting new store with many unique and beautiful products and classes to delight and inspire you. Whether your passion is dressmaking, patchwork, embroidery or heirloom sewing, we have something for everyone. For patchworkers, we have Moda fabrics, Aurifil threads and Matilda’s Own templates, just to name a few, plus quilting classes with Chris Jurd. We offer a fresh approach to dressmaking with our range of independent pattern labels, and we’re bringing life back to the world of sewing with patterns from By Hand London, April Rhodes and the very well designed Tessuti house label, as well as Japanese pattern books and the evergreen Vogue patterns. We stock embroidery linens, DMC and hard to find Swiss-made heirloom fabrics. And as a Bernina sewing-machine dealer, our quality picture is complete. What we recommend: We are thrilled to offer customers Tessuti fabrics – silks, wool, cashmere, cotton, linen – all top quality so that you can create quality garments. Also taking pride of place in our range are Bernina sewing machines. Come in store for a demonstration and try one for yourself. And if you are already a Bernina owner, we carry accessories and offer service and maintenance by the legend himself, John Clapham.

Address: 2/52 Govetts Leap Road, Blackheath, NSW, 2785 Phone: (02) 4787 5200 Email: kadmason01@bigpond.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Blackheath-HaberdasheryFabric/531622440214622

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8. Orange HOBBYSEW ORANGE Where’s Orange: Head over the Blue Mountains and follow the Rhino Trail to Orange – the heart of the central west. Orange is approximately three and a half hours from Sydney. Where in Orange: Follow the main road in, cross over the railway line, turn right at the first set of traffic lights and we are on the left about fifty metres down, just opposite the SUPA IGA. Who plays host: Patricia is the shop owner and staff members Kate and Toni are always willing to help and are full of creative ideas. Worth visiting because: Our friendly and informative staff are always on hand to help with all of your creative projects. We have over three thousand bolts of patchwork fabric to choose from, a large range of haberdashery, quilting accessories, buttons, sewing and embroidery threads, ribbons for all occasions and much, much more. We also carry a full range of DMC embroidery threads and tapestry wool. Groups of ladies meet here on a regular basis for some stitching, and many friendships have been formed over the years. Twice a year, we organise quilting retreats and we have a wonderful and relaxing time. We are also proud to be the longest established patchwork business in Orange. What we recommend: We are agents for Bernina and Brother sewing machines. We also have some gorgeous fabrics including French General, Moda Solids and Me and My Sister, just to name a few. For real customisation, we can have rulers made to order to suit your specific requirements! Address: 221 Peisley Street, Orange, NSW 2800 Phone/fax: (02) 6361 7420 Email: patriciajcole@gmail.com

9. Orange BELLA PATCHWORK DESIGNS Where’s Orange: Travel west from Bathurst along the Mitchell Highway. Where in Orange: 201 Peisley Street. Cross the railway line, heading west from Bathurst, just turn left and we are on the left, opposite Robert’s Bakery and with plenty of parking at the rear. Who plays host: Owned and run by Delma Watts, with help from Mara Watters on Saturday mornings. Worth visiting because: A large part of our shop is filled with a gorgeous range of Kaffe Fassett fabrics, and we also have his laminated, home decorator and dress fabrics. Our shop is just bursting with colour from all of our wonderful fabric ranges, and we have accessories, books, patterns and batting – everything you need for patchwork, really! We run classes during the week and guest teachers come on the weekends throughout the year. Large groups and bus tours are welcome. What we recommend: Here at Bella, we really love Kaffe Fassett fabrics, and Delma has designed several quilt kits using 2½in strips. We also love Bali batiks and we use these in our advanced workshops, using the “Divine with Leaves” templates to create unique and beautiful designs. Address: 201 Peisley Street, Orange, NSW 2800 Phone: (02) 6361 3399 Email: sales@bellapatchwork.com.au Website: www.bellapatchwork.com.au

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10. Orange HIDDEN TALENT Where’s Orange: Three hours west from Sydney over the beautiful Blue Mountains and through Bathurst and then to colourful Orange. Where in Orange: 150 Lords Place. Coming from Sydney, turn left at Canobolas Hotel into Lords Place and we are just after the roundabout. Who plays host: Carolyn and Marilyn with the help of casuals Kate, Elizabeth and Karen. Worth visiting because: We have a very large range of patchwork fabrics including the Jinny Beyer Palette. We carry Husqvarna, Janome, Elna, Singer, Baby Lock and Handi Quilter machines and overlockers. We also have a nearly full range of Accuquilt Go fabric cutters. We offer machine repairs, which are mostly carried out on the premises. Classes are held every weekday between 10am and 3pm, no appointment necessary, and we have a quilting service available. All bus groups are welcome and we can open on Sunday by appointment. What we recommend: We have many kits already cut and ready to go, and we're happy to cut others if you require. We teach children from seven upwards, and some have even won several prizes at local shows, including grand champion. This year, one of our children Clare, won the AQC Shining Light award. She has been learning at our store for four years! Our tutors have many years of experience in many avenues including software classes for embroidery, so you will always be in the right hands when you visit. Address: 150 Lords Place, Orange, NSW 2800 Phone/fax: (02) 6362 0011 Email: carolyn_andra@optusnet.com

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Market Place Even the most experienced stitcher needs to stay up to date with what’s new, where the best shops are and the latest breakthroughs in craft technology. Let Homespun take the legwork out of the hunt for the ‘must reads’, ‘must haves’ and ‘must knows’. Put your feet up and browse through Emma Bradstock’s collection of top-quality craft temptations.

WHO: Echidna Sewing Products WHAT: We are one of Australia's leading sewing and embroidery machine retailers, shipping Australia wide. We specialise in quality embroidery software, designs and accessories. Our genuine commitment to the sewing and embroidery industry, competitive pricing, after-sales service and support, plus genuinely caring for our customers, have all contributed to the ongoing success of Echidna Sewing Products since 1995. WHY: We’re proud to offer the world-first revolutionary ScanNCut fabric-cutting machine with a built-in scanner from Brother. You can shop online via our secure website, call us or visit our showroom, which is open to the public. WHEN: Showroom open Mon–Fri 9am–5pm. Online store: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. WHERE: Address 1: 56 Neumann Road, Capalaba, Qld, 4157 Address 2: Shop 2, Hyde Park Centre, 36-48 Kings Road, Townsville, Qld, 4812 Phone: 1800 000 360 Email: sales@echidnaclub.com.au Website: www.echidnaclub.com.au

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WHO: L’uccello – Vintage Haberdashery & Fancy Goods WHAT: L’uccello is a specialist retail emporium stocking a wide variety of vintage and contemporary craft supplies and gifts. Our passion for the handmade and craft also extends to our own L’uccello brand line of in-house designed and handcrafted goods. WHY: With the middle of winter upon us, why not turn on the heat, get comfortable, and take this perfect opportunity to do some Christmas crafting? Celebrate Christmas in July with L’uccello and get a head start on hand making your festive decorations this year. With new stock of Dresden Papers available, beautiful German glass glitter, paper scraps and brilliantly hued premium crepe papers, you can make your own Victorian style Christmas decorations, or create divine garlands with our beautiful range of handmade wool-felt shapes. Winter at L’uccello also heralds the arrival of lovely Christmas fabrics from Moda, including designs by French General and a range of Christmas embellishments and hand-painted buttons by Theodora Cleave. Soak up the wintery atmosphere of Christmas in July at L’uccello and visit us in store to inspire some cold weather crafting. WHEN: Retail Store: Mon-Sat 10am–5.30pm. Online store: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. WHERE: The Nicholas Building, 2nd floor, Room 5, 37 Swanston Street, Melbourne, Vic 3000 Phone: (03) 9639 0088 Email: info @luccello.com.au Website: www.luccello.com.au


WHO: Bendigo Woollen Mills WHAT: We are Australia's largest hand-knitting and craft-yarn manufacturer, selling direct to the public. Our yarns are blended, spun, dyed and packaged at our mill in Bendigo. WHY: July is a great time to visit the mill shop and Bendigo in general. There are a lot of crafty, yarn and fibre events going on around town, and it’s our busiest month of the year. That means our bargain room is full of treasures just waiting to find a home! WHEN: Factory shop: Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat and public holidays 10am-3pm. We are also open on Sunday 20 July, 2014, 10am-3pm. Phone orders are taken Mon-Fri 9am-5pm. Online store: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. WHERE: 4 Lansell Street, Bendigo, Vic 3550 Phone: (03) 5442 4600 Email: info@bendigowoollenmills.com.au Website: www.bendigowoollenmills.com.au

WHO: Sew Easy – Australia’s Quilting Experts since 1985 WHAT: One of the world’s largest ranges of patchwork and quilting accessories, including Sew Easy Batting. Distributed by SSS Pty. Ltd. WHY: Sew Easy batting is available in a range of fabrications including cotton, cotton polyester, polyester, wool, wool blend, bamboo and bamboo/cotton blend, so you’re sure to find the perfect batting to suit your quilting needs. There is even a specialty thermal polyester for projects that require insulation. The latest addition to the Sew Easy range is Double Sided Fusible Cotton. It has a light fusible coating on either side of the batting. Imagine being able to press into position all three layers of your quilt in one step without the need for pins, tacking and basting sprays, producing your quilts in a fraction of the time! Sew Easy batting is available in a variety of take-away packs or most economically by the metre off the roll with a 100in width. WHERE: Available from all good quilting, sewing or craft stores Australia wide – just ask for Sew Easy batting by name. Phone: 1300 888 778 Website: www.sewingcraft.com/ seweasybatting

WHO: Brother Australia WHAT: Internationally renowned sewing-machine manufacturers, dedicated to encouraging quilters to reach their creative potential. WHY: The 14th Brother International Quilting Contest is now live! After an outstanding result during 2013, where an Australian quilter was crowned as the overall Asia Pacific winner, Brother has recently announced the launch of the 14th Brother International Quilting Contest. The Brother International Quilting Contest is a creative initiative from Brother Japan for the Asia Pacific region, designed to encourage participants to create an eco-themed quilt. The theme is inspired by Brother Earth, which is Brother’s commitment to play a part in building a society with better sustainable development. The contest is open to all quilters in the Asia Pacific region. Contestants are required to create a 70 x 70cm original quilt using different methods of construction such us decoration or embroidery. Quilts will be judged based on creativity only by a nominated panel of judges. A brand new Brother DreamWeaver VQ3000 valued at $4,499 will be awarded to the Australian entry judged best. The top 10 quilts will join Asia Pacific entries in Tokyo and be part of the International Quilting Contest. The competition package, including application form, conditions of entry, copyright compliance and awards, is available for download now at www.brother.com.au/quiltingcontest. Applications close on September 30. Pictured is the winner from 2013, Cradle of Life by Dale Robson. WHEN: Applications close September 30 WHERE: Phone: 1300 880 297 Email: quiltingcontest@brother.com.au Website: www.brother.com.au/quiltingcontest

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WHO: Tranquility Crafts ‘N Supplies WHAT: We are a retail store stocking a large range of patchwork fabrics, embroidery linens and threads and an extensive range of patterns and books. We also run a variety of classes in embroidery, patchwork, dolls and small craft/gift items. WHY: We’re sure you’ll love this fun, bright quilt, Kaleidoscopic Hounds, as much as we do! This quilt measures 67in square (171cm square) and uses Happy Days panel teamed with Happy Bones fabric from Loralie Designs. This original design is rotary cut and machine pieced, and our quilt has been machined quilted in the ditch, then hand quilted in the plain black squares with a bone pattern. A kit for the quilt is available for $105, which includes all the fabric for quilt top and binding and the pattern. This is a fun quilt, perfect for the dog lover in your family, and can be made by anyone with a little patchwork knowledge or experience. WHEN: Retail store: Tues–Fri, 10am–5.30pm, Sat 9.30am–1.30pm WHERE: 37 Holmes Road, Moonee Ponds, Vic 3039 Phone: (03) 9375 3575 Email: tranquilitycrafts@ bigpond.com.au

WHO: The Teddy Tree WHAT: We are a curious little retail store filled with an eclectic mix of patchwork fabrics, haberdashery supplies, extensive range of fur fabric and teddy bearmaking supplies, as well as a large range of soft toys and collectable bears. WHY: As well as our diverse range of products, we hold regular classes and workshops in bear making, suitable for all levels from beginner to the more advanced, and we also hold fun and achievable project-based patchwork and quilting classes. You can also find us on Facebook. WHEN: Retail store: Tue-Fri 9.30am-5pm, Sat 9.30am-3pm. WHERE: 226 Scarborough Beach Road (corner of Egina St), Mount Hawthorn, WA 6016 Phone: (08) 9201 1011 Email: sales@teddytree.com.au Website: www.teddytree.com.au

WHO: Blessington WHAT: Australian distributors of quality and well-known sewing-machine brands. WHY: Accuquilt are now distributed in Australia by Blessington. The AccuQuilt GO! fabric cutter allows quilters to cut fabric up to 90 per cent faster than with rotary cutters or scissors. To a quilter of any skill level, that’s the equivalent of being able to spend 54 more minutes of every hour quilting instead of cutting fabric. With most quilters struggling to find the time to indulge in their favourite craft, spending hours cutting fabrics can waste a lot of that time. The smoother rolling action will especially benefit those quilters who have a hard time with manual methods due to sore joints or muscles. The cutter includes the GO! Fabric Cutter, exclusive GO! Value Die featuring Square of 4½in (4in finished), Square of 2½in (2in finished) and Half Square 2in finished triangle (cuts two). You’ll also receive the GO! Cutting Mat (6 x 12in), a project idea GO! For It Quilt, Die Pick and user manual. You can trust

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AccuQuilt GO! with consistent, accurate and stable cutting of precise shapes with no slipping rulers or measuring to reduce fabric waste. The double-roller design provides clean cuts, and rubber feet grip and hold the cutter in place while cutting. It is also very lightweight and very portable – simply fold and it closes with a magnetic latch. The easy-lift handle also makes it easy to carry around to classes, on holidays or anywhere else you need it. The wide selection of GO! dies allows for the creation of unlimited projects. This innovative design is also easy to clean with a high-gloss exterior surface and a neutral, light-coloured work surface. WHEN: Contact Blessington for your local stockists. WHERE: Unit 23, 13 Gibbens Road, West Gosford, NSW 2250 Phone: (02) 4337 3737 Email: info@blessingtongroup.com.au


WHO: The Patchwork Box WHAT: Online store based in Newcastle NSW. WHY: Get creative with this new fabric line by Carolyn Friedlander for Robert Kaufman Fabrics. To sample the whole range is just $149 including postage (approximately $4.80 per fat quarter) for 31 fat quarters, each measuring approximately 50 x 55cm. Have some fun and mix and match or add some fabrics from your own stash to create your very own original fabric selection and projects. Also new this season are two more additions to our sock range – the Aster with fuchsia, sky blue and lime green and the Zephyr with turquoise and royal blue. WHEN: Online store: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. WHERE: Phone: (02) 4929 1141 Email: sales@patchworkbox.com.au Website: www.patchworkbox.com.au

WHO: Craft Depot WHAT: Australia's largest patchwork store. WHY: Take a look at the amazing new Elna Press range now available at Craft Depot! Now take a look at our limited time introductory prices. The EP120 is now only $499 (RRP $699), for a press that offers all the pleasure of quilt professional-quality ironing with a large ironing capacity. The EP520 is only $799 (RRP $999), and offers all the latest technology, including the vapojet system, integrated light, electronic temperature control and Peraluman heating shoe. Next is the EP720, now only $999 (RRP $1299), which is the top-of-the-range model featuring a non-stick heating shoe, vapojet system, integrated sleeve board, alarm with safety power cut-off, integrated light and a protective cover. An Elna Press will truly cut your ironing time in half, and all brought to you by the inventors of the Ironing Press. Pop into Craft Depot at 2 Railway Street Pennant Hills NSW, for a demonstration or view online at www.craftdepot.com.au, to see the fabulous new range of Elna Presses. WHEN: Retail store: Mon-Fri 9am5pm, Sat 9am-4pm, Sun 10am-2pm. Online store: 24 hours, 7 days a week. WHERE: 2 Railway Street, Pennant Hills, NSW 2120 Phone: (02) 9980 8966 Fax: (02) 9980 9497 Email: mailorders@craftdepot.com.au Website: www.craftdepot.com.au

WHO: True Blue Exhibition WHAT: WA Craft Show, 2014 WHY: Western Australia’s favourite annual craft event is back this August with the WA Craft Show 2014. See, learn and buy from craft experts from all over Australia in a variety of crafts, from quilts to embroidery and everything in between. Learn from international, multi-award winning quilter, Helen Godden (sponsored by Handcrafters House), browse through the WA Quilt Expo presented by the Southern Country Quilters, join in on workshops, watch some interesting demonstrations and have fun browsing through the stalls and exhibitions and you could be lucky enough to win the door prize thanks to Bernina. New for 2014 is the WA Teddy Bear Show, organised by The Teddy Tree (www.teddytree.com.au), where you can learn from local, interstate and international bear artists. WHEN: 1-3 August, 2014 WHERE: 1 Graylands Road, Claremont, WA 6010 Phone: (08) 9387 5979, 0417 969 126 Email: mareene@trueblue-exhibitions.com.au Website: www.trueblue-exhibitions.com.au

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WHO: Janome Australia WHAT: The Horizon MC8900QCP offers any sewer the precision, functionality and ease of use for which Janome's technology is renowned. Creativity is about unlocking possibility; this model is not only a quilting and sewing experience to explore, is it a dream come true. Do it bigger and bolder with the Horizon MC8900QCP. WHY: The obvious features that jump out at you straight away are the large 11in throat opening, which means that you can now handle those large bulky projects with ease. The 10in free arm means sewing those fiddly items like cuffs, pant legs, etc, will no longer be a hassle. Other features include 9mm stitches, capacity to sew up to 1000 stitches per minute, removable AcuFeed System, remote thread-cutter port, shadow-free lighting, bright backlit LCD touch screen, jog dial for fast and efficient stitch selections, huge storage compartments, cloth guide and large clear extension table which comes as standard. WHEN: Visit the Janome Australia website for your local Janome retailer. Phone: 1300 JANOME (1300 526 663) Email: vic@janome.com.au Website: www.janome.com.au

WHO: Birch Haberdashery & Craft WHAT: Wholesale distributor of high quality and value for money haberdashery and craft brands including Birch label products. WHY: The Mighty Bright Sewing Machine Light is a versatile energy-efficient and cool-to-the-touch LED light for use with sewing, embroidery and detail-intensive projects. It provides bright white pinpoint illumination in hard to see work areas and features an adhesive base for easy placement on any sewing machine. Two bases are provided to allow you to move the light between bases and the adjustable 14cm bendable neck holds the light in place – all powered by one AAA battery, which is included. The Lighted Seam Ripper, which integrates both an LED light and a magnifier into one cleverly compact unit, is an essential for your sewing. It is a 4x magnifier with an energy efficient LED light powered by three microcell batteries which are included. WHERE: Trade enquiries only. Phone: (03) 9450 8900. Fax: (03) 9450 8999 Website: www.birchhaby.com.au

WHO: Singer WHAT: Trusted maker of popular and high quality sewing machines since the 1850s. WHY: The Singer Heavy Duty 4423 is the all new sewing machine for all of your heavy duty sewing needs. When a standard home-sewing machine can’t handle your needs, the Singer Heavy Duty 4423 will look after you, with 23 built-in stitches, 40 stitch functions, extra high-speed sewing, stainless-steel bed plate, adjustable presser-foot pressure, extra high presser foot lift, a heavy duty metal frame, top drop-in bobbin system, built-in storage and much more. The Heavy

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Duty 4423 comes with the essential accessories including a generalpurpose foot, button sewing foot, buttonhole foot, zipper foot, edge/ quilting guide, bobbins, needles and more. There is also a bonus instructional DVD included. WHEN: Contact Singer for your local stockists. WHERE: Unit 17/167 Prospect Highway, Seven Hills, NSW 2147 Phone: (02) 9620 5922 Fax: (02) 9620 5933 Email: info@singerco.com.au Website: www.singerco.com.au


WHO: Designer Stitches WHAT: I design and manufacture kits and patterns, specialising in a simple handworked form of trapunto quilting. WHY: Introducing my Leafy Sea Dragon, which is a 14 x 21cm design, worked using two layers of fabric, which are hand quilted with a running stitch, then filled with coloured yarns and threads. The piece is then enhanced with some basic embroidery stitches and tiny mixed Delica beads to give a touch of embellishment. Once completed, it can be used however you wish – it looks lovely framed or can be pieced into a cushion top. A kit for this design is $57 (including p&h, overseas postage charges may apply) and comes complete with all notions, pattern, colour guide and easy-to-follow illustrated instructions. The kit may be purchased by credit card (Mastercard, Visa, Amex), or cheque/money order (Australia only) from Designer Stitches, Suite 108, 5-7 Redwood Drive, Notting Hill, Vic 3168. WHEN: Online store: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Studio visits are by appointment only – call for availability. WHERE: Suite 108, 5-7 Redwood Drive, Notting Hill, Vic 3168 Phone: (03) 9543 9411 Email: annielondon99@yahoo.com Website: www.designerstitches.net

WHO: Faeries in My Garden WHAT: House of design incorporating a retail store and comprehensive, worldwide, online business, run by Lesley and Kevin McConnell WHY: Aren’t these little mice the sweetest? The Mouse House is a wonderful little play set for those special little ones in your life. The simple embroidery house is home to Mother Mouse and her two little babies. The house is 12in high and the lid comes off so the little mice can be snug and warm inside the house. They are easy to make, for beginners to advanced, and will make an ideal birthday or Christmas gift. The project is made using template plastic and the kits use the fabrics as shown with simple embroidery. A pattern is available for $29 plus $3 p&h, kit (including pattern and fabrics) is $45 plus $7 p&h, threads are $12 extra. WHEN: Retail store: Wed–Fri 9.30am–4.30pm, Sat 9.30am–12.30pm Online store: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. WHERE: 70 Park Parade, Shorncliffe, Qld 4017 Phone: (07) 3869 0808 Email: shopatfaeries@bigpond.com Website: www.faeriesinmygarden.com.au

WHO: Pfaff WHAT: Producers of quality sewing, quilting and embroidery machines and accessories, with over 140 years of experience. WHY: The Pfaff Passport 2.0 is the ideal compact, portable and light sewing machine, perfect for taking to classes or other travel. You’ll find all of your favourite Pfaff features, including the original Pfaff Integrated Dual Feed, 70 stitches, including buttonholes, decorative and quilting stitches, and many optional accessories. You will have everything you need for your sewing travels. Use the appliqué pin stitch to easily achieve a beautiful result for your appliqué. You can also enjoy sewing at your own pace with the speed slider, and freemotion sewing is easy with the optional free-motion presser foot.

Illuminate your sewing area with the optimised bright LED lights, which eliminate shadows, and with the integrated needle threader, you can thread the needle fast and easily. For ultimate portability, the hard cover protects your sewing machine during transportation, and keeps it dust free, and weighing only 6.3kg, it has never been easier to carry your machine around. See your local Pfaff dealer for more information. WHERE: Locked Bag 40, Gosford, NSW 2250 Phone: (02) 4337 3737 Fax: (02) 4322 7231 Email: australia.info@blessingtongroup.com.au Website: www.pfaff.com/au

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WHO: Colours Down Under WHAT: Run by Jo Bright, Colours Down Under specialise in a wide range of threads, ribbons and cross stitch samplers. Our range of threads include stranded cottons to silks and Pearls, DMC, Au Ver A Soie, Weeks Dye Works, and so much more. We will soon be adding lace making threads to our extensive range. WHY: So, what’s so special about Colours Down Under? We love to see more people embroider, so we offer classes for beginners, school children, workshops and group sessions in a wide selection of skills from cross stitch to ribbon embroidery and much more. Why not join one of our three social sewing groups during the week? It is so great to see like-minded ladies get together, have a great laugh and do what they love, so it is well worth joining up. If you still want more, we have two great clubs to join. Join the Thread Collectors Club, where each month you will receive a pre-arranged amount of threads (with a 10% discount and no postage costs within Australia) or, join The Alphabet Club, where each month, you will receive a letter of the Alphabet from The Sweetheart Tree Teenie Series. To find out more about these classes and clubs, give Jo a call. WHEN: Retail store: Mon-Fri 9.30am-4pm, Sat 10am-1pm. Online store: 24 hours, 7 days a week WHERE: Shop 12, Pioneer Village, Cnr Albany and Southwest Highway, Armadale, WA 6112 Phone: (08) 9498 0073 Email: jo@coloursdownunder.com.au Website: www.coloursdownunder.com.au

WHO: Natures Library Pty Ltd WHAT: Mail-order book supplier. WHY: We’re all increasingly aware of the harm that household chemicals can do to our health and the environment, so there has never been a better time to start using more natural methods of cleaning. Who remembers their Grandmother’s house always being so spotless and clean? Chances are she used baking soda and vinegar for many of her home cleaning, cooking, beauty and health remedies. With these simple, safe and environmentally friendly household products, you’ll be amazed how clean you can make your home; you’ll never want to buy a toxic cleaning product again. In this unique collection, Grandma’s 1001 Uses For Baking Soda and Vinegar, you’ll find all of the household tips and remedies you need, with simple, easy-to-follow instructions on how to mix these ingredients with other household items like lemon, sugar, and more. Discover the wonders of baking soda and vinegar today with this handy little book for $24.95 plus $7.95 p&h, (total $32.90) or two books for $50 with free postage. WHEN: Phone only: Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm WHERE: (Mail only) C/o Health Pride Pty Ltd, 3/81 Bassett Street, Mona Vale, NSW 2103 Phone: (02) 9997 5400 Website: www.natureslibrary.com.au

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WHO: Bernina WHAT: Producers of high-quality and internationally trusted sewing and embroidery machines. WHY: The Bernina Quilt Frame will have you whipping up professional quality quilting projects both large and small in next to no time at all. The Bernina Quilt Frame in combination with your favourite machine provides the space to make even the most complex quilting projects achievable. As a leader in the quilting industry, Bernina knows and understands the features that are most needed and appreciated by quilters around the world. The stylized steel construction of the quilt frame withstands extended use with minimal vibration and the dual track wheel system provides accuracy, enhanced stitched quality and smooth carriage motion. Your carriage glides effortlessly giving you excellent control over the movement of your machine. The Bernina Quilt Frame offers different setup sizes, created with a modular system. The main frame is 10ft (3.1m) with the optional extra 2ft (0.7m) extension allowing the frame to be set up a 5ft (1.6m), 7ft (2.3m), 10ft (3.1m) or 12ft (3.8m) frame. These variations allow you to set up your quilt frame for a small cot quilt up to a large King size quilt. WHEN: See your local Bernina dealer. WHERE: Contact address: Unit 10, 15 Carrington Road, Castle Hill, NSW 2154. Phone: 1800 237 646 or (02) 9899 1188 Email: bernina@bernina.com.au Website: www.bernina.com.au

WHO: Australian Machine Quilting Festival WHAT: AMQ Festival is dedicated to providing inspiration, education and encouragement to all machine quilters who own a longarm, midarm and/or domestic sewing machine. WHY: Our 2014 Festival sees even more classes to celebrate quilting, patchwork and stitching of all disciplines, not to mention some amazing star tutors joining us for classes. There is a three-day masterclass on thread painting from world-renowned textile artist, designer, illustrator, author, photographer, judge and videographer, Pam Holland. Or if you love quick and easy piecing techniques, then why not join Jenny Doan of Missouri Star Quilt Co in her mystery classes? Jenny has recently been featured in the Wall Street Journal and on NBC News TV for her amazing success with her business in rural Missouri that now employs 85 people. She also has over 150,000 YouTube subscribers with 28 million hits! All skill levels are covered, with classes for beginners to more experienced sewers, where you can learn all about machine quilting, computerised quilting skills, appliqué, piecing, thread painting and much, much more! If that wasn’t enough, visit our Vendor mall with a fantastic array of product to try, see and buy. Then wander over to the International Quilt Show presented by the Australian Machine Quilting Association, which invites quilt entries from all over the world. Online registrations are simple, secure and available now! Download our Class Catalogue to peruse 90+ classes and events to attend. WHEN: 1-6 October, 2014. WHERE: Adelaide Convention Centre, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA 5000 Phone: 0411 268 924 Email: info@amqfestival.com.au Website: www.amqfestival.com.au


WHO: Craftee Cottage WHAT: We are a retail store specialising in knitting yarns and embroidery supplies. WHY: One of our specialised areas are "sock wools" and they are especially wonderful self-striping and Fair Isle style sock yarns. They are perfect yarns for socks, baby jackets, scarves and cowls. We stock many different brands including Patons Patonyle Magic, Heirloom Jigsaw, Silk Garden Sock Wool, Serenity, Regia and Zauberball. Visit our website to see our sock yarns and all the other yarns we have available. WHEN: Retail store: Mon-Thurs 9am-5pm, Fri 9am-6pm, Sat 9am-3pm. Online store: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. WHERE: Shop 5, 52 - 54 Atherton Rd, Oakleigh, Vic 3166 Phone: (03) 9568 3606 Email: info@crafteecottage.com.au Website: www.crafteecottage.com.au.

Annie’s Cottage Crafts PO Box 2, St Helens TAS 7216 P: (03) 6376 2727 F: (03) 6376 2789 M: 0428 882 563 E: info@anniescottagecrafts.com.au

www.anniescottagecrafts.com.au

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STOCKISTS & CONTACTS THIS MONTH’S DESIGNERS’ CONTACTS PROJECT 1: EVERY WHICH WAY Jemima Flendt Tied with a Ribbon Website: www.tiedwitharibbon.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/ Tiedwitharibbon Etsy Store: www.etsy.com/shop/ tiedwitharibbon Carol Brady The Quilting Cottage Website: www.thequiltingcottage. com.au PROJECT 2: ROBBIE THE RACCOON Jennifer Goldsmith Frazzy Dazzles Email: jenny@frazzydazzles.com Website: www.frazzydazzles.com Etsy: www.etsy.com/shop/ frazzydazzles PROJECT 3: FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS Bronwyn Hayes Red Brolly PO Box 756 Mawson ACT 2607 Email: bronwyn@red-brolly.com.au Blog: www.red-brolly.com PROJECT 5: BONBON, TRÈS BON Leanne Harvey Mount Vincent Quilts Email: mtvincentquilts@yahoo.com Blog: leanneharvey.blogspot.com.au PROJECT 6: CANDY CAROL Debra Gardiner Wattlebee Designs Ph: (07) 3260 7672 Email: info@wattlebee.com.au PROJECT 8: HEAVEN SENT Nicole Stark Hobbysew, Figtree, NSW 2525 Email: n_watson84@hotmail.com Email: figtree@hobbysew.com Ph: (02) 4229 8188 PROJECT 9: SANTA’S LITTLE HELPER Claire Turpin Claire Turpin Design Email: claireturpindesign@gmail.com Website: www.claireturpindesign.com BLOCK OF THE MONTH Monica Poole MoonShine Designs Email: Monica@MoonShineDesigns.com Email: gpo18539@bigpond.net.au Website: www.moonshinedesigns.com

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Quilters Hive Georgetown, NSW. Ph: (02) 4968 0864, email: aquiltershive@optusnet.com.au. Annie’s Cottage Crafts St Helens, Tas. Ph: (03) 6376 2727, website: www.anniescottagecrafts.com.au. Asia Discovery Tours Sydney, NSW. Ph: (02) 9267 7699, website: asiadiscoverytours.com.au. Australian Country Spinners Toll Free: 1800 337 032, ph: (03) 9380 3888, website: www.auspinners.com.au. Australian Machine Quilting Festival Ph: 0411 268 924, website: www.amqfestival.com.au. atik Oetoro Gateshead, NSW. Ph: (02) 4943 8808, website: www.dyeman.com. Bella Patchwork Designs Orange, NSW. Ph: (02) 6361 3399, website: www.bellapatchwork.com.au. Bendigo Woollen Mills Bendigo, Vic. Ph: (03) 5442 4600, website: www.bendigowoollenmills.com.au. Bernina Australia Castle Hill, NSW. Ph: 1800 237 646, (02) 9899 1188, website: www.bernina.com.au. Birch Haberdashery & Craft Ph: (03) 9450 8900, website: www.birchhaby.com.au. Black Possum Fabrics Tea Gardens, NSW. Ph: (02) 4997 0866, website: www.blackpossumfabrics.com. Blackheath Haberdashery & Fabric Blackheath, NSW. Ph: (02) 4787 5200, email: kadmason01@bigpond.com. Blessington West Gosford, NSW. Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@blessingtongroup.com.au. Bowerbird Fabrics Email: nick@bowerbirdfabrics.com, website: www.bowerbirdfabrics.com.au. Brother Australia Ph: 1300 880 297, website: www.brother.com.au. harles Parsons & Co See Craft Project — Charles Parsons & Co. Colours Down Under Armadale, WA. Ph: (08) 9498 0073, website: www.coloursdownunder.com.au. Constantine Quilts Agery via Kadina, SA. Ph: (08) 8825 6214, website: www.constantinequilts.com. Country Hart Designs Port Pirie, SA. Ph: (08) 8632 3172, website: www.countryhart.com.au. CraftAlive South Melbourne, Vic. Ph: (03) 9682 5133, website: www.craftalive.com.au. Craft Depot Pennant Hills, NSW. Ph: (02) 9980 8966, website: www.craftdepot.com.au. Craftee Cottage Oakleigh, Vic. Ph: (03) 9568 3606, website: www.crafteecottage.com.au. Craft Project — Charles Parsons & Co Ph: (toll free) 1300 364 422, website: www.craftproject.com.au. esigner Stitches Notting Hill, Vic. Ph: (03) 9543 9411, website: www.designerstitches.net.

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Dewdrop Inn Patchwork & Craft Hervey Bay, Qld. Ph: (07) 4124 9320, website: www.dewdropinn.com.au. Dragonfly Fabrics Alawa, NT. Ph: (08) 8948 0691, website: www.dragonfabric.com.au. chidna Sewing Products Capalaba, Qld. Ph: (07) 3390 3600, website: www.echidnaclub.com.au. aeries in My Garden Shorncliffe, Qld. Ph: (07) 3869 0808, website: www.faeriesinmygarden.com.au. lenora Weaving & Wool Gerringong, NSW. Ph: (02) 4234 0422, website: www.glenoraweaving.com.au. idden Talent Orange, NSW. Ph/fax: (02) 6362 0011, email: carolyn_andra@optusnet.com. Highgate Needlenook Highgate, SA. Ph: (08) 8271 4670, website: www.needlenook.com.au. Hobbysew Orange Orange, NSW. Ph/fax: (02) 6361 7420, email: patriciajcole@gmail.com. Husqvarna Viking Sewing Machines Gosford, NSW. Ph: (02) 4337 3737, website: www.husqvarnaviking.com/au. anella Alpacas Bathurst, NSW. Ph: 0419 484 589, website: www.janella.com.au. Janesco Travel Australia North Sydney, NSW. Ph: (02) 9438 3856, website: www.janesco.com.au. Janome Moorabbin, Vic. Ph: (toll free) 1300 JANOME; website: www.janome.com.au. John Watts Sewing & Quilting Booval, Qld. Ph: (07) 3282 4711, website: www.johnwattssewing.com.au. ily Lane Rosedale, Vic. Ph: (03) 5199 2777, website: www.lilylane.com.au. L’uccello – Vintage Haberdashery & Fancy Goods Melbourne, Vic. Ph: (03) 9639 0088, website: www.luccello.com.au. Lyn’s Fine Needlework Baulkham Hills, NSW. Ph/fax: (02) 9686 2325, website: www.lynsfineneedlework.com.au. acs Crafts Wholesalers and Distributors Seven Hills, NSW. Ph: (02) 8824 1111, email: mailorders@macscrafts.com.au. Magic Patch Quilting Tyabb, Vic. Ph: (03) 5977 3332, website: www.magicpatchquilting.com.au. Millhouse Collections Eumundi, Qld. Ph: (07) 5449 1936, website: www.millhousecollections.com. ature’s Library Pty Ltd Ph: (02) 9997 5400, website: www.natureslibrary.com.au. live Branch Quilts Mysterton, Qld. Ph: (07) 4755 2336, email: shop@janometsv.com.au. Onpoint Patchwork & Needlecraft Waratah, NSW. Ph: (02) 4968 0094, website: www.onpointpatchworkandneedlecraft.com. atches ‘N’ Things Esperance, WA. Ph: (08) 9072 1760, email: PnThings@westnet.com.au.

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Patchwork By Sea Brighton, SA. Ph: (08) 8377 3942, website: www.patchworkbysea.com.au. Patchwork By The Lake Boolaroo, NSW. Ph: (02) 4965 8418, Facebook: www.facebook.com/ patchworkbythelake. Patchwork on Parade Gulfview Heights, SA. Ph: (08) 8285 4709, website: www.patchworkonparade.com.au. Patchwork with Busyfingers Eumundi, Qld. Ph: (07) 5449 1936, website: www.busyfingerspatchwork.com. Pfaff Sewing Machines Gosford, NSW. Ph: (02) 4337 3737, website: www.pfaff.com/au. Picklemouse Corner Leura, NSW. Ph: (02) 4784 2854, website: www.picklemousecorner.com. ew Many Stitches Campbelltown, NSW. Ph: (02) 4628 4437, email: sewstitches@bigpond.com. Singer Seven Hills, NSW. Ph: (02) 9620 5922, website: www.singerco.com.au. Somethings Country Kingaroy, Qld. Ph/fax: (07) 4162 2040, website: www.somethingscountry.com. SSS Sewing & Craft Supplies Ph: 1300 888 778, website: www.sewingcraft.com. he Patchwork Angel Forest Glen, Qld. Ph: (07) 5477 0700, website: www.patchworkangel.com.au. The Patchwork Box Newcastle, NSW. Ph: (02) 4929 1141, website: www.patchworkbox.com.au. The Rivendale Collection Ph/fax: (03) 5562 2041, email: sally@therivendalecollection.com.au. The Stitcher’s Cupboard Camden, NSW. Ph: (02) 4655 8348, website: thestitcherscupboard.com.au. The Teddy Tree Mt Hawthorn, WA. Ph: (08) 9201 1011, website: www.teddytree.com.au. The Uralla Wool Room Uralla, NSW. Ph: (02) 6778 4226, website: www.urallawoolroom.com.au. The Village Patch Maldon, Vic. Ph: (03) 5475 2391, website: www.villagepatch.com.au. The Wollombi Wool Store Wollombi, NSW. Ph: (02) 4998 3153, website: www.wollombiwoolstore.com.au. Tijuana Alpacas Wool Shop Narellan, NSW. Ph: (02) 4647 1155, website: www.tijuana-alpacas.com.au. Tranquility Crafts ’N Supplies Moonee Ponds, Vic. Ph: (03) 9375 3575, email: tranquilitycrafts@bigpond.com.au. True Blue Exhibitions Claremont, WA. Ph: (08) 9387 5979, website: www.trueblue-exhibitions.com.au. Two Green Zebras Taren Point, NSW. Ph: 1300 760 510, website: www.twogreenzebras.com. SM Australia See Husqvarna Viking Sewing Machines or Pfaff Sewing Machines. ay! For Yarn Ph: (07) 3264 7384, website: www.yayforyarn.com.au.

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QUILTS U.S.A. 2015 An amazing 23 day tour to the outstanding

American Quilt Society Quilt Show in PADUCAH

2015

together with a visit to the Amish Annual Quilts Show in Arthur. Our tour will also visit Chicago, Washington DC, Bird-in-hand, Intercourse, New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, the Grand Canyon, Yosemite National Park and San Francisco. And of course you will visit shops along the way dedicated to the interest and needs of quilters.

Tour price $8,570 including taxes (currently $890) per person, twin share departs SYDNEY 19th April 2015.

Call 1300 789 252 for itinerary and information QUILTS USA is only available from Asia Discovery Tours, 370 Pitt Street, Sydney

An amazing and unique 19 day tour to the great Quilt Show in Houston together with the Pacific International Quilt Show in Santa Clara, CA. Our tour will also visit San Francisco, Monterey, Yosemite National Park, Grand Canyon, Las Vegas and Los Angeles. This tour will be led by Lisa Walton, an experienced quilter, textile artist, dyer and teacher from Sydney.

Tour price $7,280 including taxes (currently $890) per person, twin share.

Asia Discovery.indd 1

Call 1300 789 252 for itinerary and information

Asia Discover Tours Suite 1302, Level 13, 370 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000

www.asiadiscoverytours.com.au

5/21/2014 2:43:48 PM


Homespun#15.07  
Homespun#15.07  
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