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AUSTIN FIT MAGAZINE

AUSTIN FIT MAGAZINE

Dog tested. Dog approved. Charity Dog Walk

the

Sunday, March 18 at 12 noon at the Hill Country Galleria d by

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Austin subAru MARCH 2012 + AUSTIN’S FITTEST DOGS

NEW FIT KIDS SECTION IS THIS SPORT FOR YOU OR YOUR KID?

Austin’s

Dog Walk benefiting 15 local area dog rescue groups. To register or find out more information, go to wagathonwalkathon.com.

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A Subaru Forester is the perfect way for you and your dog to get around.

Fittest Dogs

YOUR KID’S FIRST TRIATHLON

PLUS AFM WEB EXCLUSIVES

AFM 10 FITTEST CHALLENGE REGISTRATION OPENS MARCH 1

MARCH 2012


CONTENTS #MARCH

10 Tests to Help Find Austin’s FITTEST Athletes [page 24] Learn the specifics for each of the 10 Fit Tests

Swim. Bike. Run. Fun! [page 31] Kid-friendly fun with triathlon

AFM selects Austin’s Fittest Dogs photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

[page 46] Eleven of the best workout pawtners in Austin

CONTENTS

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CONTENTS #MARCH

Do’s and Don’ts of Working out with your Dog

FIT KIDS

How Do We Get Our “Groove” Back? [page 29] Finding fitness after a baby…or three

Parenting Your Athlete

[page 60] Tips for taking your dog on its first run

Roasted Beet and Goat Cheese Salad

[page 35] Separate coaching from parenting your growing athlete

[page 66] Beets brighten up a tasty salad FIT AFTER 40

Senior Olympics

AFMDC Comes to a Close: What’s Next?

[page 39] Texas Senior Games

[page 69] Taking the challenge beyond the AFMDC

Nutrition, Aging, and the Masters Athlete [page 42] Managing weight and metabolic needs as an older athlete

Mommy Makeover [page 45] Dr. Robert Clement explains surgical options for post-pregnancy figures

[page 90] Mo lights up her life with the women of iGnite

Don’t Resist the Resistance

MUSCLE MOVEMENT OF THE MONTH

[page 94] Three dynamic exercises to improve speed and acceleration

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ASSISTANT EDITOR Leah Fisher Nyfeler COPY EDITOR Carson Hooks ART DIRECTOR Weston Carls ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Sarah Schneider VP, SALES & MARKETING Alex Earle ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Emily Nash, Amity Ponsetti DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Carrie Crowe

EDITORIAL INTERNS Ben Kendall, Ryan Noonan GENERAL INQUIRIES info@austinfitmagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES ads@austinfitmagazine.com

[page 74] Getting held back can move you forward in your swims

STORY IDEAS ideas@austinfitmagazine.com

Finding your Proper Fit

EVENT LISTINGS events@austinfitmagazine.com

[page 78] Sitting pretty on the bike can solve your cycling woes

Efficiency Makes All the Difference [page 80] First steps towards an improved running form

64 Fit Finds 84 Events Calendar

SUBSCRIPTIONS austinfitmagazine.com/subscribe 1905 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 105 Austin, TX 78705 P 512.407.8383 F 512.407.8393 Austin Fit Magazine assumes no responsibility for the content of articles or advertisements, in that the views expressed therein may not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or any magazine employee or contributor. This publication and all of its contents are copyrighted.

EVERY ISSUE 14 From the Publisher 18 Moore Fit Musings

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Melanie P. Moore

CONTRIBUTORS Carmen Ayala-Troncoso, Monica Brant, Maurice Culley, Brian Fitzsimmons, Kevin McCree, Stephan Schwarze, Alexa Sparkman, Diane Vives, Anne L. Wilfong

[page 72] Stephan Schwarze shares his secrets for balancing it all

Training Hip Drive for Your Best Scores

PUBLISHER/CEO Louis M. Earle

KICK MO’S BUTT!

A Workout in the Park

Prioritization in Triathlon Training

photo by Brian Fitzsimmons

THE TEAM

86 Rides & Races 98 By the Numbers

Austin Fit Magazine is the assumed name of its publisher, Louis M. Earle, who has no interest in the business of Denis Calabrese who operates an exercise program under the assumed name of Austin Fit, which trains individuals to improve their jogging or running skills to participate in marathons. The views, opinions and other representations published in Austin Fit Magazine are not those of Austin Fit or any of its directors, officers, employees or agents. PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE


Letter from the Publisher

Going to the Dogs! by Lou Earle, Publisher | photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

Y

ep, this is the time of the year when AFM “goes to the dogs,” and we love it as much as you do. But selecting the fittest dogs in all of Austin is not an easy task. The competition is fierce, and the campaign is long and tough. The candidates must really be fit to make it all the way, and the stakes are high. Of course, you know how this goes. We ask our readers to submit pictures and stories about their fittest dogs. Then the entire staff at AFM spends days reviewing the entries. Emails fly back and forth as each of us postures for our picks. Secret meetings ensue, delicate negotiations are conducted, and deals are made, all in the name of doing what is best for the dogs. Only days before the selection, there are at least two debates in which each dog represents why they should be chosen for this unique honor. Of course, no negative attacks are permitted, and we don’t recognize doggie Super PACs. Finally, at the AFM Dog Convention, each dog’s delegation votes, and the rest is history. Seriously though, at AFM we really love dogs. They give so much more than they get and are the epitome of fun. Ask anyone how he feels about his dog and be prepared for a long and glowing exposition. Almost every one of our candidates was characterized as his owner’s best friend and fitness buddy. Many of our fittest dogs trained with their owners, who were hardcore folks. But what is so cool about dogs is that they are multi-discipline fitness fanatics. They will jump, swim, dive, jog, sprint, do heavy lifting, or pull stuff without complaint. And when the routine is over, they are ready for more. They are indeed canine decathletes of the highest order. And the best of it is that they are so much fun to play and work out with. Their enthusiasm is totally unbridled and contagious. They make us laugh and make fitness fun. At AFM, we are all about health, fitness, and fun for all ages. While everyone loves dogs, they are especially appreciated by the young and the old. Images of a child playing fetch with Fido or a grandfather walking serenely down a gently wooded path in spring with his trusted companion trotting by his side remind us of this special bond. These gracious creatures help keep us young at heart and healthy and fit. To all of them we say thanks for being our friends. Now let’s all get out there, show our appreciation, and help all of Austin “go to the dogs!”

#TwitFIT Question: How does your DOG or KID help you stay #FIT? @kjsouthernbelle 9:42 a.m. via iPhone Ha! My dog has to run 6 x's a week or else I go insane. He forces me out the door when I really want to be lazy! Thanks, Bronco! @TriciaMinnick 9:29 p.m. via Web My 4 year old keeps me fit because he is always running AWAY from me :) @TheMoveItMomma 9:35 p.m. via Web My kids tell me, "run faster" as I push them in the jogging stroller...or 'mommy you run too slow"...ha @ThinkTink 9:38 p.m. via Echofon I run with my dog and GE forces me to increase my pace! And he's older than me in human years! @MikeGalante 9:26 a.m. via Web My dog Hazel makes it impossible to skip a run. if i want to sleep in, she'll get me up to get at least 5 miles in. @Half_The_Girl 9:29 a.m. via iPhone I only own a cat, but I borrow my best friend's dog and take him out with me at Town Lake and McKinney Falls! @BrianLeib 9:55 a.m. via iPhone My dog is my kid. And the slippery little sucker is a wicked fast runner. And fan of the bicycle. @RyanHaring 3:16 p.m. via iPhone By chewing up the house if she doesn't get to run town lake daily! TwitPic

Keep Austin Fit,

JOIN US! @AUSTINFIT 14

AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012


Moore Fit Musings

On being fit to cherish our dogs and our children by Melanie P. Moore, Editor-in-Chief | photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

"I

wish I were the person my dog thinks I am,” is a bumper sticker that should more likely read, “I wish I were the person I think my dog thinks I am.” We love our dogs—and our children. In each case we are responsible for everything from basic needs to self esteem to economic advantages. In both cases we are given unconditional love, absolute loyalty, and perfect trust. Those invaluable gifts are ours to cherish or to trash. In Austin and the rest of the United States, dogs are integrated into our lives. We live with them, sleep with them (apparently 42 percent of dog owners let their dogs sleep in the bed with them), feed them premium quality foods, buy fancy and functional collars, leashes, sweaters, and flotation devices among other accoutrement, spending $51 billion a year on our pets. I must agree with a 2007 Businessweek article that the most extreme expense seems to be “Neuticles, a patented testicular implant that sells for up to $919 a pair. The idea, says inventor Gregg A. Miller, is to ‘let people restore their pets to anatomical preciseness’ after neutering, thereby allowing them to retain their natural look and self-esteem.” Can anyone say “anthropomorphism”? Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia-Marquez rendered a more eloquent and poignant aspect of anthropomorphism in his story “Maria dos Prazeres” from the Strange Pilgrims collection (Vintage, 2006). Maria, a prostitute with many regrets, has a vision of her death and so invests time teaching her dog, Noi, first to cry and then to take the two-hour pilgrimage from her apartment to the cemetery plot she has purchased so that, upon her death, the dog may cry over her grave. Dogs were first domesticated 15,000 to 20,000 years ago but most breeds date back only a few hundred years. Adam Boyko, a Cornell post-doc now at the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine whose work researching the “village vagrant” dogs was featured in National Geographic (Feb. 2012), has discovered that most village dogs are equally closely related to both wolves and fully domesticated dogs. His study suggests that African village dogs were just as diverse as the East Asian ones and that the Middle East is the likely cradle of dogs. Various cultures evolved to regard dogs in radically different ways. Both the Islamic and medieval European cultures historically held black dogs to be ominous. In Saudi Arabia, dogs could be used for guarding or hunting but were otherwise considered unclean. There are some differences we may find unbearable. While Koreans seem to have a reputation for

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eating dog meat, the Korea Animal Rights Advocates, who fight for its abolition, claim it is “a Chinese tradition that was copied by Koreans at some stage.” Most sources say the Chinese have eaten dogs for about 7,000 years. But in September 2011, Chinese people cheered when, according to the New York Times, officials ended “a 600-year-old local custom: the slaughter of thousands of dogs to be eaten at an autumn festival. … The Jinhua Hutou Dog Meat Festival, as it is called, was abruptly canceled.” The recent growth in China includes pet ownership and an increased consciousness of animal rights. If only Afghanistan and other less-developed countries could make similar leaps in human rights. Female children in Afghanistan today are the tokens of punishment for the crimes of their adult relatives in the form of justice known as “baad.” A recent New York Times piece illuminated the harrowing ordeal of an eight-year-old girl who was taken as property and beaten for misdeeds her uncle had perpetrated against a fellow (male) Afghan. The more chilling part of the story is that her father was angry, not that his daughter was punished for his brother’s actions, but because he had already promised her in marriage to someone else. These international examples (Michael Vick notwithstanding— again voted the most hated athlete in America for his dogfighting ring) stand in stark contrast to our privileges of loving and spoiling our canine companions and our children. How fortunate we are to live in a culture where animal and human rights are honored and defended. This is the vital foundation of a “fit” culture.


Letters to the Editor

photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

KMB Correction

In our Generations of Fitness issue, February 2012, Monica Brant included her mom in the Kick Mo’s Butt feature, but the photos of Mo and Mom were not included. Here are the photos. We regret the oversight.

Checking Heart Rate Ranges

I've read my February issue of Austin Fit Magazine and believe there is a significant mistake printed on page 68-69 under the title "Love Your Heart". In calculating heart rate ranges, I believe the following to be true: 1. Calculating Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) is well established as taking 220 less your current age. This is fine. 2. Subtracting your Resting Heart Rate (RHR) from your MHR to calculate your

Heart Rate Reserve (HRR) is also generally accepted and fine. 3. However the error occurs when you take your HRR and multiply by the .6 or .7 (60% or 70%) to calculate your lower and upper limits as the article and chart state. This yields a totally unrealistic number as a key step was omitted. As an example by your article, I'm a 52 year old male with a resting rate of 60. By these calculations I would: MHR - 220-52=168 HRR - 168-60=108 .6 and .7 of the HRR yields 65 and 75bpm

as my range according to the article and table. This I believe is incorrect. What I believe the article left out was to take the 60% and 70% figures and ADD the Resting Heart Rate back in to those calculated numbers. In my case, that would yield a 60% number of 125 and a 70% number of 135 as my true range. In simple terms, the last step was left out of the article to add RHR back in to the calculated totals. Sincerely, Scott Strance, Austin

PAUL CARROZZA BIO CORRECTION

In the February 2012 issue, an outdated bio for Fit x 3 contributor Paul Carrozza was printed. A revised bio appears below: Paul Carrozza is a former All-American runner from Abilene Christian University. In 1988, he founded RunTex, which was at one time the nation’s largest retail store solely devoted to running. Carrozza also founded RunTex U (a training division of RunTex) and RunTex Events (which has produced as many as 120 events and raised over $5 million for local charities per various years). Among his many services and positions, Carrozza has been the Footwear Editor of Runner’s World Magazine and served as a member of the Texas Department of Aging, the Governor’s Fitness Council, the Mayor’s Fitness Council, and the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.

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Nelo Responds

That seems to be right. Here's a link to a more clear way of doing it: www.wikihow.com/CalculateYour-Target-Heart-Rate

photo by Eric Cullipher


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AFM FITTEST

10 Tests to Help Find Austin’s Fittest Athletes photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

In the search for Austin’s fittest athletes, we have chosen ten tests that measure various aspects of speed, endurance, strength, and power. These tests are safe, appropriate, and duplicable for several age groups. To register, go to www.afmfittest.com.

2. Standing Broad Jump (Lower Body Power) Start in a standing position with toes just behind the start line, then jump out as far as possible. Distance is measured from the heel closest to the start line or the closest body part if the athlete falls to the ground. Best of two attempts is recorded.

3. 40-Yard Dash (Sprint Speed) Athletes start in a static position behind start line in whatever position they choose, though three-point stance is recommended. As soon as a motion is made, time starts and is stopped as any part of the athlete crosses the finish line. Best of two attempts is recorded in seconds and to two decimal points.

4. Agility Run Arrow Head Left/Right (Agility and Athleticism) 1. Standing Medicine Ball Throw (Upper Body Power) Stand with feet planted behind designated start line. Hold an eightpound medicine ball with both hands at chest level, and perform a chest pass for maximum distance. You may use your hips, back, and knees, but feet must remain planted at all times, and the ball must be released with both hands together. Distance from the start line to where the ball has made contact with the ground is recorded. Best of two attempts is scored.

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Start in static stance behind cone on opposite side of the direction of the first cut (left of cone if doing the right side agility test). Clock starts on first movement, and athlete cuts on topside of the first cone, weaves under and around outside cone, over top of farthest cone, then sprints back to start. Average the right and left times for the final score, which is recorded in seconds and to two decimal points.


5. Precision Throw (Accuracy, Coordination, and Skill) Athletes start and must remain behind line at all times. Using whatever throwing technique, athlete gets five throws to get the softball through the center of the designated tire. Best out of five scored.

6. Pull-Ups/Chin-Ups (Upper Body Strength) Start in hanging position with arms fully extended and body in a vertical line. Athlete pulls body upward until chin crosses the bar without kipping, swinging, or kicking the legs, and returns to fully extended position for each good repetition. Repetitions are counted until athlete releases hands from bar.

Pull-up Video

7. Burpees (Total Body Strength Endurance and Overall Work Capacity) Start in push-up position and place hands on the start line. Distance is measured to the bottom of the kneecap where a cone is placed to mark “extended position.� Athlete then stands up and starts in a static position. When judge signals start, the athlete squats, places hands on the start line, kicks legs (together) back in one motion, then pulls legs back in together in one motion, and stands fully upright reaching hands over head, arms fully extended. Each kick back of legs must cross the back cone measured from the start to count as a good rep. Judge counts total reps achieved in one minute. Burpee Video

8. Hand Grip of Dominant Hand (Hand and Forearm Strength) Hold hand dynamometer in dominant hand and extend arm straight out from shoulder. Athlete squeezes dynamometer with consistent maximal effort (no jerking or pulsing allowed). Score is listed in pounds with no decimal points. Highest number of two attempts is recorded.

9. Interval Test (Tests Speed Endurance and Conditioning) Start at designated start line. Cones are marked at 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, and 34 yards from start line. Begin run on the sound of the whistle. Run to the first level distance, touch line with foot, then return by crossing the start line with some part of body. Each interval must be completed in ten seconds and has a designated ten-second recovery to return to start position. Athlete repeats the three runs at each interval level until they cannot finish in the designated time. The athlete is then scored by the level reached (1-10).

Scan these QR codes with your smartphone to see the pull-up and burpee how-to videos. Download the free AFM app at the iTunes store.

10. 1 Mile Run (Long Distance Speed and Aerobic Endurance) Start from behind start line. Athlete must stay on marked path of the designated running area and complete the one-mile distance. Time is recorded as any part of the body crosses the finish line. Time is recorded to two decimal points. afm

AFM FITTEST 10 TESTS TO HELP FIND AUSTIN'S FITTEST ATHLETES

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Fit Kids

HOW DO WE GET OUR GROOVE BACK?

Navigating “your” fitness territory with toddlers—and a newborn by Carson Hooks | photo by Sheila Ellwood

EDITOR’S NOTE: This month we introduce expanded coverage of fitness among kids and families with kids. In addition to more articles on the topics important to children and parents, we are featuring a first-person column from a young father of three—who, with his professionally fit wife, used to have an exercise routine they could call their own.

L

et’s start at the beginning. Newborn beginning. My wife, Julia, and I recently welcomed into the world our third child, a beautiful baby girl. But her new life and the new phase of life that she initiated together create a state of controlled chaos. Our routine and the nice family groove we had established went out the window with her arrival. We are confident that we’ll be able to slip into a new groove in the not-too-distant future (after all, we found a new groove when we jumped to one child and then again to two children). There are basic needs that must be met, processes that are repeated daily (we make sure to consistently feed our dependents and usually ourselves). But for now there’s no longer much in the way of a true routine, and that means there’s no longer dedicated time for exercise. Julia loves to exercise. LOVES to exercise. Julia is a personal trainer, and very appropriately so. She loves to run (sometimes she drags me along); she loves to swim; she loves almost every form of cardio workout, along with fast-paced weights sessions. The “runner’s high” is Julia’s drug of choice. She has run several half marathons, including a

win in the 2009 Austin Women’s Zooma Half Marathon, right in the middle of our onechild groove. Her new goals are to complete a marathon and to foray into triathlons. Julia doesn’t have to try to make exercise a priority. It already is one. And that wasn’t necessarily a huge deal when there was always plenty of time for a workout before the kids came along. But it definitely matters once the kids arrive and there are several pursuits vying for a much smaller slice of personal time. Julia recognizes not only the incredible health benefits of regular exercise, but also the immense mental and emotional benefits. She knows she needs regular exercise to stay sane. The fact that Julia loves to exercise allows her effectively to prioritize her sanity. I, on the other hand, only enjoy exercise when there’s a game involved. At the gym, I’ll play basketball alone for a half hour, rationalizing that I can then spend less time on the stationary bike. I like to play tennis. Pre-kids, I would fit in two or more matches a week (either with Julia or a friend). Postkids, I’m fortunate to get on the court once a week (and Julia and I are never out there

at the same time unless my parents or the in-laws are in town holding down the fort during nap time). When we’re in the midst of a family groove, I pretty consistently get some kind of exercise 4 or 5 times a week. But even then it doesn’t occur to me that I need to exercise until my sanity has already begun to crumble. During this newborn phase, we see yet again that lack of exercise coupled with mild sleep deprivation can very quickly usher our collective sanity out the door. I, for one, get depressed or very short-tempered. But I don’t necessarily know why I’m tanking. That enlightenment often only comes when Julia elbows me out of my funk: “You have got to go get some exercise. I know you’re tired, but get out of here. You’re not doing us any good when you’re acting like that. Just go. We’re fine.” That kind of blunt communication is vitally important for each of us to get out and get our heart rates up. But even more vital is flexibility—flexibility with our time and flexibility as to what constitutes a workout. One thing we know in our world of three-under-the-age-of-four is that exercise can’t always be a trip to the gym, a run, or a tennis outing. Sometimes other things have to temporarily suffice – like a wrestling smackdown with our two boys in the playroom, or a round of tackle-the-man/boywith-the-football on the trampoline. Family walks disguised as bear hunts with pop-guns are definitely on that list of new and different workouts. As are family trips to the playground for climbing and games of tag, or to the middle school fields and track to chase scooters and bikes with training wheels or to practice our soccer goal-scoring skills. These placeholder workouts can be the most gratifying of them all. Our boys need to burn their over-abundance of energy. It’s a bonus if we can get the new little lady outside to soak up some vitamin D and the whole family out of the house to combat the onset of cabin fever. These alternative forms of exercise help our sanity to remain shakily intact as we try to guide our newest family member from the alien infant phase toward the crazy realm of the toddler, all while seeking to find our new family groove. afm FIT KIDS HOW DO WE GET OUR GROOVE BACK?

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Fit Kids

SWIM. BIKE. RUN. FUN!

by Tracy D. Nelson

K

ids love to go swimming, ride their bikes, and run. So it makes perfect sense to put all three together and offer triathlons for kids. What kinds of kids participate in kids’ triathlons? They can include children of triathletes, swimmers, athletic kids, and kids who like adventure. The atmosphere at kids’ tris is very open, supportive, and fun. Kids of all ages and abilities are encouraged to participate and have a good time. Just like adult triathlons, the kids will swim, bike, and run. Unlike adult triathlons, there are different distances for different ages; Juniors (ages seven to ten) compete at one distance while Seniors (ages 11 to 16) typically compete at double those distances. A few events feature an even smaller mini-race for five to six-yearolds. Awards are given to the top three girls and boys in two-year age groups. Like adult triathlons, the transition area features bike racks,

albeit with shorter racks. But most of the bikes belonging to younger kids are too small to be hung on the racks, so kids simply stand their bikes up under the rack with the kickstand or lay them on the ground. There is a plethora of bike styles at a kids’ tri: tiny pink Barbie bikes with pom-poms on the handlebars and a basket on the front, little macho tough bikes with superhero decals, and cruiser bikes, mountain bikes, and hybrids. For the older kids, there are road bikes and even a few sweet rides—multi-thousand-dollar tri-specific bikes, a miniature version of what the serious adult triathletes ride. Before the race, parents can come into the transition area and help their children set up, and there are plenty of volunteers on hand to help answer questions. Most kids’ tris feature a pool swim rather than an open water swim. Distances range from 25 yards for the youngest competitors

FIT KIDS SWIM. BIKE. RUN. FUN!

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to 200 yards for tweens and teens in the Senior category. To reach the longer distances, swimmers start at one end of the pool and then snake their way up and down each lane until they've swum the appropriate distance. After the swim, the kids hop out of the pool, dash to the transition area, and complete their T1 (transition from swim to bike) just like adults do. And just like adult transition zones, no one except athletes and volunteers is allowed in the transition area. Parents cannot enter to help their children during T1 or T2 (transition from bike to run), but there are plenty of volunteers on hand to assist as needed. Parents get to watch and cheer (and some will coach) from outside the fence surrounding the transition area. After transition, children ride the bike course, which can range from a half-mile to six miles in length, depending on age range. Courses usually feature multiple loops to accommodate the older age groups who are riding the longer distance. At the end of the bike section, children return to the transition area for T2, just as adults do. The run course may feature multiple loops as well. For the youngest kids, this can be as short as 500 yards. For those 11 and older, the course may be as long as two miles. The finish line is a festive area, with joyous kids, proud parents, and usually a finisher’s medal for each child who crosses the finish line. Since the distances are short, the courses are usually very compact, which makes it easy for parents to cheer and take pictures at several spots along the way.

With such young participants, it is imperative for each race to have plenty of volunteer support. The volunteers are wonderful with the kids – supportive, helpful, and enthusiastic – and they are part mother hen, part traffic cop, part cheerleader, and all smiles. They often say it’s the most fun they’ve ever had volunteering at a race because it’s so exciting to see the pint-sized triathletes with their ear-to-ear smiles. There is no shortage of kids’ tris in the Austin area. Leading the charge is 1379 Family Sports Shop, which has coordinated 1379 Kids Tri Series for the last three years. 1379 Family Sports provides prizes and giveaways for race participants, finish line activities and games, packet pickup at their stores, and broader exposure to other sponsors. “1379 is awesome at encouraging families to participate in sports,” said series director Kathy Ladner. Whether you have children who would like to “give it a tri” or you’d like to volunteer to help the next generation of triathletes, we encourage you to get involved with the Austin area kids’ triathlon community. afm Tracy D. Nelson is a head coach and cofounder of Tri Zones Training. She has trained beginner and intermediate runners and triathletes since 2003. She has enjoyed supporting her daughter’s athletic endeavors, including Steiner Stars swim team, Stallion Stampede, Soaring Eagles, Cedar Park Swim Team, several kids’ triathlons, and CRMS Cross Country and Track.

For a list of Austin-area kids’ triathlons in April through September, go to WWW.AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Read AFM’s web exclusive “Run Like a Kid!” about elementary school running groups at WWW.AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM

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Fit Kids

Parenting Your Athlete by Dr. Keith Bell, Ph.D

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our child is destined to be the next Tom Brady, Derek Jeter, Maria Sharapova, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Mary Lou Retton, or Michael Phelps. He’ll be world famous, make gazillions of dollars, buy you a new house, and take care of you in the style you want to become accustomed to. Then again—maybe not. Very few do. Of course, there’s more to sports than the seldom-traveled road to fame and riches. Sports can help to keep your child fit, healthy, looking good, learning and developing life skills, and having fun. But, whether they will is considerably up to you and to your child. Here are some of the things you can do to help your kiddo thrive throughout his (hopefully) lifelong journey through the world of competitive sports.

Provide your child with the best opportunity available

Do your research. Make sure your child will be safe and not abused in any way. Find a program that will do the best job of teaching the skills. Put him in a group whose mission supports your values, purpose, and goals for your child. Find a program for him that is filled with athletes who are busy pursuing excellence. Support your child’s participation

Most sports require a strong commitment from parents: financial, transportational, nutritional, and emotional. You need to help him get to practices and competitions; feed him well, often, and at odd times; encourage him; cheer him on; listen to his disappoint-

ments; boost his excitement; comfort him, and help him stay on track. Let your child own his sport; it’s his, not yours

Do you want your child to get and stay fit and healthy, learn life skills, have fun, and derive all of the value from his competitive sport experience? Or, are you looking to recapture lost experiences, make up for your mistakes, or bask in the glory of your child’s successes? It’s his sport, his experience, his time. They are his successes, his failures, his challenges, his mistakes. You are his support group, his fan club, his financier, and his parent. His performance is his. It’s not yours. It’s his sport, not yours. Let him own it. FIT KIDS PARENTING YOUR ATHLETE

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Fit Kids

10 Rules for Parenting Your Athlete

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Criticize the act, not the child

What he did is what he did. It’s not who he is. He’s not a good person when he performs well. He’s not worthless when he plays poorly. Better yet, stay out of it. He knows when he did well. He knows when he messes up. And, his coach will let him know. Let the coach coach

Unless you are coaching your child yourself, you aren’t the coach. Let the coach coach. Sure you want to help. But if you did a good job of helping to find a good opportunity, most times it’s best for you to sit back and let the coach coach. The coach is not your child’s parent. He’s not your child’s friend. He’s an expert resource person, from whom your child has an opportunity to learn. Sure you might approach things differently, but there is more than one way to climb a tree. And one of the best ways to excel in a team environment is to buy into the program. Don’t confuse your child. If your child needed surgery, you wouldn’t go find the best surgeon you could, then do the surgery yourself. You pay for the coach to coach. Let him do the job.

1

Provide your athlete with the best opportunity available.

2

Support your athlete.

3

Create and maintain a positive environment at home.

4

Love and accept your child unconditionally. Criticize the act, not your athlete.

5

Let your child own his sport. It’s his sport, not yours.

6

Make a contribution. Support the team.

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Make his sport a collaborative pursuit between athlete, coach, and parent.

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Let the coach coach.

Tell your child to “have fun”

When you send your child off for practice, tell him to “have fun.” When he returns from practice, ask him, “Did you have fun?” If he says yes without elaborating, ask him what was fun about it. If he says, “no,” ask him why he didn’t make it fun. Do the same thing when you send your child off to compete. If you do nothing more than that, you’re probably doing a great job of parenting your athlete. afm Dr. Keith Bell is the author of “The PARENT’S GUIDE to the Proper Psychological Care & Feeding of the Competitive Swimmer” and nine other books on Sports Psychology and Human Performance Psychology. He is the parent of two girls and two boys, all of whom played sports.

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012

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Demonstrate your value for competitive excellence. Encourage your athlete to play to win, but remember it is just a game whereby most of the value stems from playing to win, not from having won.

Tell your athlete to “have fun."

Adapted from The PARENT’S GUIDE to the Proper Psychological Care & Feeding of the Competitive Swimmer. www.KeelPublications.com


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Fit After 40

Senior Olympics Sara Sievert

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by Michael Madison | photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

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ocal Austin athletes will be traveling south on I-35 this spring for the Texas Senior Games (TSG)—an eleven day competition featuring 20-plus events for individuals who are 50 years or older. In its 21st year, the TSG provides athletes the opportunity to qualify for the National Senior Games held in Cleveland, Ohio over the summer. “We plan to host at least 1,500 to 1,600 people in San Antonio,” said Cathy Pottorf, Director of TSG. In her 16th year on the job, Pottorf is excited to showcase all that is San Antonio. This will mark the first time the state games have ever been held in the Alamo City. The events include staples such as swimming, track and field, volleyball, and cycling. But also on the docket are horseshoes, badminton, bocce ball, and shuffleboard. In total, 24 events make up the 11-day schedule, and the top three of each age group division qualify for the 2013 National Games. Age groups are divided in five-year increments beginning at 50 years old, and medals are awarded to the top three. Full details for the TSG are available at www.tsga.org, and registration is open until Friday, March 16. Participants are allowed to sign up for as many events as they desire, and no pre-qualification is necessary.

ost women her age spend their time at the retirement home socializing and playing bridge, but at 86 years young, Sara Sievert is still thriving in her Senior Games career. Moving to Austin from New York in the late 90's, Sievert saw an ad in a newspaper about a competition in Kerrville. She jumped in the car with her late husband Guy and headed west, beginning an illustrious 16 years that led to multiple national championships as well as being inducted into the Texas Senior Games Hall of Fame. In San Antonio, Sievert will be competing in 3-on-3 basketball, swimming, horseshoes and shuffleboard. As defending national champion in the 100 meter backstroke, she is determined to not let an on-the-mend broken ankle slow her down. “My adrenaline is just so high when I’m out there,” the Hall of Famer responded when questioned on how she sustained the energy to compete is so many different events over just a few days. “It gives me a lot of get-up-and-go, and I get excited.” Sievert's weekly training regimen includes visiting the gym four times per week, swimming, aerobics, and dance classes. She also serves as the President of the TSG, presiding over the board and representing the association at meetings across the country.

FIT AFTER 40 SENIOR OLYMPICS

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arion Coffee Carney can still recount the day her PE teacher told her girls were too feminine to play basketball or any other sports as if it were yesterday. That was 58 years ago in Dallas, Texas, well before any implementation of Title IX and only a few decades removed from a Constitutional Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote. She contributes these slights from society as motivation to not just her but many female participants in the Senior Games. "I'm a fan of the Games and what it has done for women," said Coffee Carney. "Most didn't get to play when we were younger, and now we finally have an opportunity." Now 73 years of age, Coffee Carney is a multi-time National Champion and a 20-plus year veteran of the Games. She's a regular on the podium no matter the competition in both the 100-meter and 200-meter dash. "I first got started with 5Ks and 10Ks but quickly decided I didn't like them," Coffee Carney said when discussing her foray into competitive running. "Then one day during training for Cap 10K, the coach told me I should be a sprinter because I looked like one and had speed." That was all it took for her to drop the distance and head to the track—a decision that she remains very happy about.

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Gerry King

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r. Gerry King was a casual cyclist until age 53. That was 22 years ago when the former leisurely spinner was prodded by a few of his new friends at the Austin Cycling Association to enter a race, and he finally succumbed to peer pressure. Less than two years later, he won his first event and has been addicted to the thrill of competition ever since. While he's in his twilight years of his psychology profession, King doesn't see himself slowing down on the roads any time soon. He'll be competing in the Senior Games this year for the tenth time and wants to keep going until he’s at least 80, if not longer. Should he qualify for Nationals (he has at every Senior Games), King plans to make the trip to Cleveland. His reason? "I felt it's time," he said. King will be traveling to San Antonio with three other members of his Velocity Cycling team. They're a group for all ages who train together and travel across Texas competing in various races. afm


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Fit After 40

Nutrition, Aging, and the Masters Athlete by Jess Kolko RD, LD illustration by Jordan Golembeski

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et’s face it: getting older is not the most fun part of life. Lots of “cute” euphemisms are used to describe our bodies and a time in our lives that we never dreamed would happen to us as young adults: the middle-aged spread, over the hill, spare tire, muffin top, and beer belly. But these phrases don’t have to define us as we age. Something can be done to prevent and reverse weight and body composition changes that we used to think were inevitable. The human body changes physiologically during aging. As we age, shifting hormones in both men and women impact our nutritional needs. For women, decreased levels of estrogen and progesterone generally mean an increase in cholesterol,

abdominal fat accumulation, and an increased risk for conditions like osteoporosis. Men generally tend to have decreased testosterone and thyroid hormone levels beginning in their 40s, which can lead to weight gain as well as fatigue and loss of lean muscle. We have all heard that our metabolism declines as we age. While this is true to some extent, it is not as significant as many of us believe. Our basal metabolic rate (BMR)—the number of calories we use daily just to maintain basic body functions like breathing—declines about one to two percent per year in older adults. BMR is at its highest when we are born and decreases as we age. The greatest decrease in our metabolism actually occurs from infancy

to childhood. Let’s take a look at what that one percent change per year in BMR actually means. A 50-year-old woman who is 5’2” and 135 pounds has a BMR of approximately 1,300 calories per day. One year later, at 51, her BMR would decline by 13 calories per day to approximately 1,287 calories. Over time, this change can add up if our intake does not decrease as much as our BMR; on a more acute level, the change is fairly insignificant. BMR also declines as we lose lean body mass. Lean body mass (muscle mass) is lost as we decrease the amount of physical activity we do and – most significantly – as we decrease weight-bearing activity in our older years. A decrease in muscle mass results in a reduction in

The following artist’s renderings show a typical quadriceps MRI scan of a 40-year-old triathlete compared with quadriceps MRI scans of a 70-year-old triathlete (see below) and a 74-year-old sedentary man (at right).

40-year-old triathlete

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012

70-year-old triathlete


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mass even in the most sedentary individual. One need not train like an Olympic weight lifter to increase muscle tone and lean body mass. Check with your local gym or recreation center to get a personalized plan that takes into account your activity level and your goals. While these tips may help the casual athlete, there has been very little research on the needs of the vigorously active masters athlete. Some studies have suggested that the calorie needs of older, very active individuals do not differ much from their younger counterparts. Aging is not the main factor for figuring out calorie needs; instead, caloric intake is more closely related to the volume of activity. If you are staying active, working out with weights, or doing other weight-bearing activities and still battling with your weight, it’s time to take a good, hard (and honest) look at your diet. As you age, you can continue to be active, participate in weightbearing exercise, and maintain lean muscle mass. If you do this, you will be better able to maintain your weight and keep your metabolism humming. The more we maintain our activity levels, the less our chronological age matters—an active baby boomer can outperform a sedentary young adult. afm

ICY

CL E S

P OR T S

HO P

overall calorie burn of about five percent per year, which impacts our weight more significantly. Our 51-year-old woman’s BMR would drop to 1,235 calories. The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass is what your doctor may call sarcopenia. Lean muscle mass is the most metabolically active tissue in our body—it burns the most calories at rest than any other tissue. The more muscle mass that we maintain, the more our metabolism stays active and stable. The most significant reduction in BMR as we age happens from loss of lean body mass. So what does this mean to the masters athlete and the weekend warrior? It’s essential for us to stay just as active in later adulthood as we did as young adults. Even if we have to trade short, fast runs for longer, slower runs (or even trade running for a jaunt on the elliptical trainer), we need to maintain our physical activity levels as we age. Some recent studies have shown that a decrease in aerobic capacity was the result of a decrease in training volume in older adults, not purely a result of the aging process. More importantly we need to make sure that we maintain or even increase the amount of lean muscle mass we carry. Training with weights for as little as ten weeks can significantly impact lean body

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Health

Mommy Makeover by Dr. Robert Clement, M.D.

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fter childbirth, women look at their bodies with amazement at the changes that occurred due to the pregnancy. Many people will tell you that if you just work hard enough and diet, your body will be restored to its 18-year-old status. This will never happen. There is no series or set of exercises that can correct the stretching in the breasts or abdomen that occurs with pregnancy. Following pregnancy, many mothers ask the questions, "Should I do something to regain my shape? If so, what, and when should I do it? What if I am planning another pregnancy?" My answer is to wait until you have had all your babies. If you get pregnant after you have a surgical correction, you will come back to have at least a portion of your breast or tummy redone due to the changes with that pregnancy. It’s also important to wait an appropriate amount of time after pregnancy before undertaking a procedure. Your tissues require a minimum of six months after delivery to shrink and regain their prepregnancy status, and intervention prior to that time can lead to unsatisfactory results. During pregnancy, four things can happen to the breasts: they can shrink, they can sag, they can sag and shrink, and (ever so rarely) they may not change. Changes are due to the thickening of the glandular

and ductal tissue in the breast associated with weight gain during pregnancy. Following pregnancy and/or breastfeeding, the glandular tissue and ductal tissue may resume their pre-pregnancy status or even shrink to smaller than their pre-pregnancy status. The skin has been stretched because of the massive increase in ductal tissue and additional weight during pregnancy, and this leads to sagging of the breast (ptosis). There are basically three types of breast surgery (mastopexy) that can be used to correct sagging. 1. A circumareolar mastopexy results in a scar just around the areolar complex, the pigmented portion around the nipple. 2. A “lollypop” mastopexy results in a scar that circles the areolar complex and then goes down to the inframammary fold or crease on the breast. 3. The third type of mastopexy results in what many people know as the “anchors” scar, which is around the areolar complex down to the fold and then in the fold itself. Unfortunately, there is no way to raise the breast with a mastopexy of any kind that does not leave some scar. However, the quality of the scar in most cases is very good, and it often becomes essentially a small white line after six to twelve months. Some have suggested inserting a large

implant will lift the sagging breast to its original status. I have both seen and experienced many of these procedures where the placement of the implant results in fullness at the top with skin sagging off the bottom of the implant, worsening the condition. Recovery from a mastopexy of essentially any type is approximately the same time duration. You can usually do most normal activities such as daily driving, household duties, and work (if it does not require heavy lifting) within one or two weeks. Hard, vigorous activity should be postponed for at least four weeks, and at that time, you should wear a very strong, supportive bra. The risks that can occur with mastopexy are similar to any other operation. If the mastopexy includes placement of an implant, there is an additional risk of capsular contraction. A capsular contraction means that a pocket has been created around the implant which can shrink down, causing the implant to feel either slightly firm or very firm. This can also change the configuration and shape of the breast. This occurs about three to four percent of the time. afm FOR THE FULL BREAST AND TUMMY MAKEOVER, GO TO

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AFM SELECTS

AUSTIN'S

FITTEST DOGS YOU SUBMIT! WE PRINT! PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN FITZSIMMONS

NASH 4 YEARS OLD MALE, BOYKIN SPANIEL

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ash has been Will Hardeman’s companion for three years now. He enjoys going hunting, hiking, and paddle boarding. Nash also loves being with his family, and he’s very loyal and persistent. He has been trained to retrieve birds when he goes hunting with Hardeman. Nash has been on hikes ranging from the Barton Creek greenbelt to 12,000foot peaks in Colorado. While Nash has not won any formal contests, he was the only dog to ride the entire 22 miles of the Dam That Cancer charity paddle board race on Lake Austin. Hardeman says that Nash may be slow, but he is relentless and has never given up on even the longest of treks.

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MOUSE 9.5 YEARS OLD MALE, GREATER SWISS MOUNTAIN DOG

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CHARLIE 15 MONTHS OLD MALE, CHIHUAHUA-DACHSHUND MIX

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ouse has been owned by Jennie Chen since he was just 8 weeks old, and now at almost 10 years old, he still acts like a young puppy. Jennie says that Mouse has never had a bad day in his life and that he loves people and kids. Mouse has competed in many obedience contests throughout the years with a lot of success, including being awarded in the top five performing Swissies in competitive obedience in 2010. He also gives rides in his sulky draft cart at events, where he carries up to 300 pounds. Despite Mouse’s size and strength, he is still more of a lover than a fighter. One time when an oatmeal cookie was thrown into the yard, Mouse tried to take it from a cat that was already eating it and lost the fight.

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harlie is a 15 month old Chihuahua-Dachshund mix owned by Finn and Carolina Staber. They have had him since he was 8 weeks old. Charlie likes to go running, swimming, and kayaking with his owners. He is described as being smart, friendly, obedient, and really active. When he was only 8 months old, Charlie finished second in the Doggie Du Dash in the 20 pounds and under class. His speed and energy had Finn and Carolina wondering just how fast Charlie could run a mile, so they brought him to the track and timed him. Finn rode his bike around the track while Carolina held the stopwatch, and Charlie kept up with Finn the entire time, finishing the mile in 4:12. It’s not just Charlie’s dedication to fitness that makes him such a special dog, he also eats healthy foods. He loves to eat fruits and vegetables, and his favorites are watermelon, carrots, and bananas.

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RILEY 3 YEARS OLD FEMALE, YELLOW LABRADOR RETRIEVER

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iley was given to Sarah Richardson as a Christmas gift when Riley was only 6 weeks old. Riley likes to go running, swimming, and anything involving a tennis ball. She is being trained for bird hunting and gets taken on hunting trips by John, Sarah’s fiancé. Riley is described as loyal, well-behaved, and very fast. In fact, she is currently the reigning “Fastest Dog in Austin” title holder from the Austin Dog Fair at Brentwood Park, where she beat about 80 other dogs. Riley was integral in helping Sarah meet John, and she will be serving in their wedding in March as both the ring bearer and the flower girl.


FRANK 4 YEARS OLD MALE, GIANT SCHNAUZER

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im Gregory received Frank as a gift when she was in remission from Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and she says he was the best gift she has ever received. Frank was only 8 weeks old at the time and about the size of his head; now he weighs 100 pounds. Kim wanted a dog that she could run with and take everywhere, and that is exactly what Frank does. He likes to run, play Frisbee, and fetch the tennis ball. Kim says that Frank is a lot like Scooby Doo the way he’s a silly dog that does goofy things but he’s also a smart dog who learns quickly. She entered Frank into a dog show when he was just a puppy in 2008, and he finished with an award for Best in Breed and was the runner-up for Best in Show. The best memories Kim has of Frank are how he stayed by her side when she was on her journey to recovery. He’s her best friend, and they plan to run the Doggie Du Dash together in May.

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DEXTER 1.5 YEARS OLD MALE, MINIATURE RED POODLE

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oe and Heather Stan bought Dexter in November of 2010, the same year their daughter Madeleine was diagnosed with cancer. They got Dexter for her as a birthday present, and the two instantly became sidekicks. Dexter would pull Madeleine around in a wheelchair before she passed away in late September at 9 years old. Joe and Heather say that Dexter is like Max, the dog from “The Grinch,” but he’s also an extension of Madeleine in the way he is sweet, kind, and playful. Dexter likes to go on threemile runs about five days a week and play with his dog buddies at Cedar Bark Dog Park. He participates in CureSearch Pediatric Cancer walks and will soon receive his certification as a Pet Therapy Dog for Dell Children’s Hospital.

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Heather Stan with Dexter


MO 3.5 YEARS OLD FEMALE, BEAGLE

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hen Samna Chheng bought Mo as a 9 month old puppy, the four-pound Beagle almost didn’t make it. She had severe malnutrition complicated by pneumonia and looked like a skeleton compared to the rest of the puppies. After a month of medication and a new diet, Mo got better and much chubbier. In fact, Mo got up to 34 pounds and transformed from a skeleton to an overweight pooch. Samna says that Mo’s favorite activities used to be competitive eating and sleeping marathons, but now she enjoys swimming and kayaking. Mo is great at learning new tricks. She can beg, play dead, rollover, high five, act shy, and give kisses. Samna describes how easily Mo makes her laugh, likening her to a mix between Oprah and Ellen DeGeneres raised by Snoopy and Woodstock.

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ROOSTER

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2 YEARS OLD MALE, GREAT DANE

t took Ben Lasseter about a year to find the right dog, but he found one when he got Rooster from a breeder/rescuer when he was 8 weeks old. Rooster is very people-oriented and loves to socialize. He gets antsy when Ben is not around, but when he is, Rooster never leaves his side. He loves to hike at the Barton Creek Greenbelt and run alongside Ben while he mountain bikes. He also likes to swim and play with other dogs at Auditorium Shores. One of Rooster’s most impressive skills is that he can hike while carrying a 50-pound backpack all day.

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ona and Red Tripp found each other when Red was training for the 2009 Austin Marathon. A collarless Kona saw Red running during mile six of her 13mile run and ran with her all the way home. Red describes Kona as fun, sweet, and “the most expensive free dog.” Kona likes to go running on the trail and is known to get “cabin fever” if he doesn’t run three-to-five times a week. Despite Red’s placement in the many 5Ks they have run together, Kona has almost always finished “First Dog” in the race. Kona tore his ACL during an early morning run last year but he is now back to running his three-to-five miles every week.

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CHARLIE 3 YEARS OLD FEMALE, BLUE LACY

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enny Hardeman got Charlie when she was just a puppy from a ranch in Fredericksburg. Not only is she one of the fittest dogs in Austin, but she’s also one of the happiest. Charlie is loving to all humans and will greet you with a big smile on her face when she sees you. Genny says that Charlie is a loyal dog but sometimes can be too protective when other dogs come into her territory. Charlie loves to run around the neighborhood, fetch tennis balls in Lake Austin, and hike up the mountains of Colorado. Aside from being able to fetch, Charlie has the unique ability to open doors to let herself in. Charlie can also herd other animals. One time when she and Genny were at their ranch, Charlie hopped a fence full of exotic animals and started to run around and direct the animals around the area. She then leaped the fence and jumped back into the bed of a truck with the tailgate still closed.

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STELLA 6 YEARS OLD FEMALE, GERMAN SHORT HAIRED POINTER

S

tella was bought by RuthAnn Lobos and Dean Caramanidis when she was one year old from a breeder in Kansas. She likes running, fetching, and pointing at birds and squirrels. Stella is not an only child. She has two brothers, Drake, a chocolate Lab, and D’Artagnan, a French bulldog. She’s described by her owners as “ready to run”, but she is also good at curling up in her favorite chair and relaxing when she’s exhausted. She’s a very accomplished dog, too, with her first place finish in the Snoopy Division at the Doggie Du in 2011 and finishing “First Canine” in the Thundercloud Turkey Trot in both 2010 and 2011. One of Stella’s favorite things to do is play a game with D’Artagnan where she points out a squirrel and he goes and flushes it out. afm

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Fitness

DO'S and DON'TS of WORKING OUT with YOUR DOG by Marla Briley

I

t's the 5:30 a.m. reminder that it's time to get up and run. I leave the warmth of my bed to pull on my running clothes and check my phone to see who is still on for this morning’s run. Sure enough, somehow or another both my running partners have found something else to do this morning, and I am on my own. The temptation to crawl back into my warm bed is so great I almost give in except for one thing; on the other

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012

side of the bedroom door are my pups, tails wagging, oblivious to the cold outside. They know what the alarm clock means and, come rain or shine, cold or hot, they are always ready to go. They never have early morning meetings to make, sick kids to tend, or late nights that turn into even later nights. There truly is no better running partner than a running “pawtner”! I’ve been running with dogs for over 15 years. I have trained for numerous marathons, running long runs, short runs, and

speed work, with dogs at my side. I have fostered for numerous organizations around Austin. I have always found the best way to socialize dogs, give them confidence, and wear them down, all at the same time, is to get them out running. If you are interested in running with your dog, there are a few things you should consider. First, some breeds are just not equipped to run. I hesitate to say this because most breeds, purebred or mutts, are completely capable of running with their


TxHarmony is dedicated to providing quality Chinese healthcare in a relaxing and tranquil environment for conditions such as: people, as your average runner will not run more than three to five miles at a time. My very first running buddy was a West Highland terrier. His short little legs had no trouble keeping up with me for my two- to three-mile jog. One of my current running “pawtners” is a Lab/whippet mix. She had a broken leg at some point in her life, is almost blind, and was so overweight when

build yourself—no more than 15 percent over each week. Of course, your dog will not want to start out slow. Dogs are like children; they’d rather take off running fullthrottle, risking exhaustion too early. You have to be in control. One of the most common excuses I hear people give for not running or giving up on running with dogs is that they can’t control them. When I start a new dog running, I like to start, FIRST either really early (pre-7 a.m.) when there are fewer dogs and people on the trail or on a portion that is less travelled. Your neighborhood should be fine unless it has a high population of dogs who bark at you from their side of the fence. As I start, if my new running “pawtner” tries to greet another dog, I tug firmly on his leash and say “leave it” while moving forward. I either run up on him (be ready for this so you don’t trip) or run past him, never stopping, while he gets pulled along. Eventually he learns that when we are running, we are all about the business of running and not meet and greet. Only once have I ever had a dog who would always stop to bark at every passing dog. The answer ended up being a gentle leader, which is basically a head halter for dogs. I could control his head and so could control who he looked at or tried to bark at. The key is patience. Be ready to spend the first month of running teaching “leave it,” deciding which halter works best for your dog, and getting it used to the different sights and sounds of the roads and trails. My first month of running with my German short-haired pointer (GSP), Bella, she shied at every single car and bike and was terrified of buses. Now, she hardly blinks, even when a loud truck or bus whooshes past us. If you are still uncertain if you can control

THE KEY IS PATIENCE.

BE READY TO SPEND THE MONTH TEACHING. I adopted her she had rolls. The first time she ran was at a 5K, where my boyfriend was instructed to run with her until she seemed tired, and then walk her in. She ran the whole way, no problem, and took fourth place overall. That said, there are some dogs, like bulldogs and boxers—the snub nose dogs as I call them—that cannot pant properly (one of the main ways dogs cool themselves) and I recommend should not run at all. Also, larger breed dogs, like mastiffs and Great Danes, are prone to knee injuries, and the threat of an ACL tear is only heightened if you run with them. Second, you need to consider the age of your dog. You should not run your dog before it is at least a year old. Before then, their joints are not formed and are more prone to knee or other injuries. If you have any questions about whether or not your dog should run with you, consult your veterinarian. IF YOU'VE GOT THE RIGHT BREED AND THE RIGHT AGE, YOU ARE READY TO RUN!

Start slow and short. When you began to run, you didn't take off for a five-mile run on your first day. Start with a slow, ten-minute jog. From there, build like you would

FITNESS DO'S AND DON'TS OF WORKING OUT WITH YOUR DOG

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your dog out on the trail, you should seek help from a dog trainer. Another item to consider is the running surface. If you are on asphalt, make sure to watch your dog's pads. If they start to crack or bleed, stop. Try to run some on the greenbelt or Lady Bird Lake and some on asphalt. Their pads will normally toughen over time. Another thing you can try, especially in the summer when the asphalt is hot and more likely to tear your dog's pads, is Musher's Secret. It's a waxy cream that mushers in Alaska originally used to protect their dogs' pads from the sharp ice. Works just as well on the hot, sharp asphalt. Speaking of “hot” in the summer, you have to be extra careful about keeping your

In the winter, my dogs can run 12-to-18 miles. However, in the summer, when the temperatures are soaring into the upper 90s, I rarely take anyone over five miles, and that is with frequent water and dips in the lake. I always say a tired dog is a happy dog and a happy dog is a dog who has just gone on a run. Some of the behavioral issues your dog has will work themselves out once you begin running with it. The chewing, digging, and barking at nothing will go away once you have a happy, tired pooch. Dogs that are nervous when getting out of the house will become more confident with other dogs, people, and places. Maybe you have that dog that goes ballistic every time

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dog hydrated and cool on your runs. Let them drink a little before they go out and then let them drink a small amount when they get home but not too much all at once or else they are likely to get sick and throw it all back up. After they have cooled off, they should be fine to drink as much as they like. In the summer, I like to run at Lady Bird Lake where Austin has been kind enough to provide dog fountains for our doggies to drink from and where I can let my dogs hop into the water to cool themselves. Unlike us, dogs do not sweat, so they are not as efficient at cooling themselves as we are.

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another dog passes. Run on the trail, and your dog will grow accustomed to numerous dogs passing by it. I foster for Texas GSP Rescue and have brought home dogs who have a history of escaping by digging out or jumping the fence. I start running with them, and I’ve seen that behavior completely disappear. Why leave home? They might miss out on a fun run. Right now, it is cool and a great time to get started running with your four-legged buddy. So, get out the leash, strap on the running shoes, and hit the trail/road. You will never find a more excited, appreciative running partner than your own dog. afm

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012


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OTOACTV™ is the world’s first GPS tracker and smart music player - all in one - that allows you to shatter personal records and pushes you to your training limits. Sync MOTOACTV with your PC, so you can check out the music you perform to best, track your workouts over extended time periods, set goals and even create workout competitions with your friends or via the MOTOACTV Web Portal. Using Motorola AccuSense™ technology and precision GPS, MOTOACTV tracks the details of your every workout inside and outside the gym, including time, distance, speed, heart rate and calories burned, so you can keep a precise measurement of your progress. WHAT MAKES IT COOL: MOTOACTV’s smart music player feature learns what songs motivate you by tracking your performance against your music. It determines which songs help you perform better and then compiles them in a high-performance playlist. It’s like having a personal trainer and a DJ right in your ear.

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012


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Recipe

Roasted Beet and Goat Cheese Salad

DID YOU KNOW? Beets are a good source of folate, manganese, and potassium. Roasted, unpeeled beets will keep for up to five days covered in a refrigerator.

by Anne Wilfong, RD, LD & Alexa Sparkman, MA, RD, LD photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

WHAT YOU NEED

NUTRITION

SERVING SIZE: 1 SALAD

1/2 tablespoon olive oil

Calories 202 Protein 6 g

1 tablespoon pesto

MAKES APPROXIMATELY 4 SALADS (2 CUPS ROMAINE EACH)

1 large beet, green stems removed

Carbohydrates 19 g Fat 12 g

Sodium 393 mg Fiber 4 g

2 cups sourdough bread, cut into 1-inch cubes 8 cups romaine lettuce, rinsed and torn into pieces 1/4 cup goat cheese, crumbled 3 tablespoons balsamic vinaigrette

PRICE PER SERVING: $1.88 RESTAURANT PRICE: $8.00

This recipe is brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

HOW YOU MAKE IT 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 2. For roasted beet: Wash outside of beet. Place beet in baking dish and bake for about 45 minutes or until easily pierced with a fork. 3. For croutons: In a bowl, combine pesto with cubed bread and toss until well coated. Heat olive oil in a non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add cubed bread to pan and toast bread on all sides until lightly brown. Set aside. 4. Peel roasted beet and slice into rounds. 5. Assemble salad: Combine romaine lettuce, goat cheese, croutons, and balsamic vinaigrette. Toss to combine, and then gently add roasted beet slices so as not to bleed and tint the salad red.

Registered and licensed dietitians Alexa Sparkman and Anne Wilfong can provide reliable, objective nutrition information, separate facts from fads, and translate the latest scientific findings into easy-to-understand nutrition information. For more information about their nutrition counseling practice, contact Alexa or Anne at 512.257.0898 or SparkmanNutrition.com

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012


2011 Austin Fit Magazine Distance Challenge

AFMDC Leaderboard C

ongratulations go out to all the Austin runners who completed this year’s Austin Fit Magazine Distance Challenge. The final race, the Austin LiveStrong Marathon, was run on February 19, and those on the half track found success in a hilly, challenging 13.1-mile course; those competing in the full track added a marathon (26.2 miles) to the progress of race distances. Whatever the division, a large

AFM DISTANCE CHALLENGE

part of the challenge is successfully making it to all of the races, and AFM salutes you for your accomplishment. The results shown below are current through the 3M Half Marathon. Race results from the Austin LiveStrong Marathon were not available when the magazine went to print; final standings will be printed in our April issue.

AFM DISTANCE CHALLENGE

FULL TRACK LEADERS

HALF TRACK LEADERS

Name

Name

Total Race Time

Total Race Time

Overall Female

Lisa Buckley

4:58:04

Overall Female

Deb Hilton

5:11:15

Female Masters

Rose Martinez

5:09:20

Female Masters

Deena Fullwood

5:23:19

Overall Male

Scott Rantall

3:43:23

Overall Male

Tony Orozco

4:19:57

Male Masters

Jim Moore

4:33:27

Male Masters

Gordon Alexander

4:37:15

WOMEN’S AGE GROUP LEADERS

MEN’S AGE GROUP LEADERS

WOMEN’S AGE GROUP LEADERS

MEN’S AGE GROUP LEADERS

Age Group

Name

Time

Age Group

Name

Time

Age Group

Name

Time

Age Group

Name

Time

15-19

Courtney Reich

5:09:15

10-14

----

----

20-24

10-14

20-24

Erica Stoltenberg

5:02:39

----

Sutton Lindslet

8:43:50

----

Brittany Capps

5:56:52

15-19 20-24

Kyle Higdon

4:00:30

25-29

Erin Smith

6:11:09

20-24

Mike O'Keefe

5:21:51

25-29

Nancy Larson

5:50:32

25-29

Chris White

4:29:06

30-34

Ashley Butler

5:12:36

25-29

4:52:16

30-34

Erin Johnston

5:59:17

30-34

Scott Rantall

3:43:23

35-39

Jennifer Phillips

6:09:40

Michael Galante

30-34

David Kinton

5:06:41

35-39

Lisa Buckley

4:58:04

35-39

Scott Merritt

4:13:53

40-44

5:23:19

35-39

Tony Orozco

4:19:57

Angelica Kelley

5:21:10

40-44

Jim Moore

4:33:27

Deena Fullwood

5:11:15

5:10:55

4:35:03

Deb Hilton

Craig Durr

Marvin Hope

45-49

40-44

45-49

45-49

Rose Martinez

5:09:20

4:41:52

Michelle Reeb

6:44:48

Farshid Parandian

4:41:46

John Potts

50-54

45-49

50-54

50-54

Cynthia Burton

6:16:36

55-59

Kenneth Russell

5:13:52

55-59

Barbara Fellman

6:08:15

50-54

Gordon Alexander

4:37:15

55-59

Robin Hulsey

8:21:25

60-64

Don Barlow

7:49:40

60-64

Mary Stoner

8:09:34

55-59

Dan Wood

4:51:59

60-64

Reenie Smith

6:57:25

65-69

Walt Tashnik

5:53:10

65-69

Judith Reader

7:47:55

60-64

----

----

70-74

----

----

70-74

9:14:27

70-74

----

----

75-79

Keith Mason

8:07:29

Margene Beckham

Frederick Taylor

6:24:58

65-69

65-69

Dick Wilkowski

5:58:21

70-74

----

----

40-44

68

AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012


K Karen Knight D.D.S.

Advanced Dentistry for

AFMDC Comes to a Close: What’s Next? by Leah Fisher Nyfeler

H

ow better to celebrate finishing the Austin Fit Magazine Distance Challenge (AFMDC) than with a party? It’s a chance to see all of those runners in “real clothes” minus sweat and Body Glide. The Austin Runners Club (ARC) is hosting an awards dinner on March 9 for those who completed the challenge. The location and specific details will be announced on the ARC’s website, austindistancechallenge. com. Each finisher in both tracks (full and half) will receive a custom-printed finisher’s jacket and a completion certificate. In addition, trophies will be awarded to the overall leaders, Masters leaders, and top age group finishers. Austin Fit Magazine will be there to take photos, which will be printed in the April issue along with the final standings. For some, the Austin LiveStrong Marathon marks the end of running’s distance season. After a well-deserved rest, what’s next? Jack & Adam’s Bicycles has the answer for many: a triathlon (actually, a whole series of triathlons—the Texas Tri Series). Similar in concept to the AFMDC, there are seven races (plus one “extra,” the new Republic of Texas Triathlon in Corpus Christi, April 14-15). Like the AFMDC, athletes sign up for each event individually. But with the Texas Tri Series, volunteering counts toward completion of the series. With that in mind, athletes can pick distances (everything from a super sprint to a Half Ironman) and a schedule to race and/or help. The Republic of Texas Triathlon can act as a stand-in for any of the races.

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It’s possible to actually volunteer for all the races and complete the series. However, only finish results will be presented in the standings. Those athletes who would like to see how they stack up to the competition need to register for and participate in events at the longest distance offered (for example: while there is both an Olympic and sprint distance at TriRock Austin, the competitive triathlete must register for the Olympic event). That means the series ends with a Half Ironman at the Kerrville Triathlon Festival on September 30 for those who opt to be listed in the competitive standings. Many runners find that a change in activities helps them come back to running as stronger, better athletes. Swimming can loosen tight runner muscles and build better lung capacity; cycling provides a way to work on leg speed and foot turn-over; and running less may be refreshing after the miles of marathon training. The Republic of Texas Triathlon will be a world-class event. Dan Carroll, of High Five Events, the Austin-based multi-sport event production company behind the new tri, said that “Corpus Christi offers a venue with fantastic spectator opportunities, and the city’s infrastructure is ideal for hosting a large triathlon.” There’s a sprint distance for those who are new to the sport or fond of short distance events. More seasoned triathletes can choose between Olympic and the Half Ironman. For the families, there are area attractions in beautiful Corpus Christi and the chance to see their favorite athletes in action. afm

Triathlon Distances: Sprint:

.5 mile swim, 12.4 mile bike, 3.1 mile run

Olympic:

.93 mile swim, 24.8 mile bike, 6.2 mile run

Half Ironman:

1.2 mile swim, 56 mile bike, 13.1 mile run

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#fit3

SWIM, BIKE, RUN

FiT

PHOTO BY TYR SPORT, INC.

3

FiT 3 TRI

FiT 3 SWIM

PRIORITIZATION IN TRIATHLON TRAINING

DON'T RESIST THE RESISTANCE

BY STEPHAN SCHWARZE

BY MAURICE CULLEY

pg. 72

pg. 74

FiT 3 BIKE

FiT 3 RUN

FINDING YOUR PROPER FIT

EFFICIANCY MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE

BY KEVIN MCREE

BY CARMEN AYALA-TRONCOSO

pg. 78

pg. 80 FIT(X3) SWIM, BIKE, RUN

71


FiT 3 TRI

1) ADD TRIATHLON TO YOUR LIFE – DON’T PLAN YOUR LIFE AROUND TRIATHLON

PRIORITIZATION IN TRIATHLON TRAINING

BY STEPHAN SCHWARZE

I

t’s 5:15 a.m. The alarm goes off. First thoughts… I have this big meeting at work, kids need to be picked up early, and I have to get a 90-minute ride and one-hour tempo run in, plus do my stretching. How can I fit this all in? Not an uncommon scenario for triathletes who juggle family life, a fulltime job, and training in three sports. The following suggestions are based on experience from my own training and from working with other athletes.

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012

STAYING IN SHAPE in three sports is challenging. Don’t try to give it the same importance all year. I try to plan my weeks (and also vacation time and travel) so that everything at work is taken care of. Family time and visits have priority, and then I work on fitting in workouts and races. • It helps me to have my weekly task lists set up ahead of time. On top of a full time job, I coach several athletes and work on their training schedules. I always have some non-training-related activities planned each week as well as the workouts that I want to fit in. Laying out a plan at the beginning of each week helps. For example: Wednesdays, I often take an easier and shorter workout day and know I can find some time to work on training schedules or go out with my wife. On most days I avoid lengthy lunch breaks and take that time to get a swim or gym workout in or work on some training schedules, even if that means eating at the desk or in the car. • Picking a fun destination for a race is a good way to combine family time with triathlon. The week before and after an Ironman I hardly do any training. Last year my wife and I spent two weeks in South Africa. Two of those days were dedicated to the Ironman race there, but the rest of the time we enjoyed safaris, touring the South African wine country, and visiting Capetown and the Cape peninsula. • Combine your training with family time. Some athletes I coach who have kids often do their easy runs with baby strollers, or they spend a weekend afternoon with family at the lake and get an open water swim in. My wife, Illiana, often does a one-hour run on Sunday morning. We can do that together, and then I add on if I want to make it a long run during Ironman training.

2) BLOCK TRAINING THROUGHOUT THE YEAR THERE will always be weeks with more time for train-


3) WORKOUT PRIORITIZATION - KEY WORKOUTS AS A TRIATHLETE YOU WILL have more than one workout on your schedule for several days per week. For some serious athletes “doubling up” every time, or even having three workouts on certain days, is common. When I start the week I always think of key workouts I must not miss. Usually these are three quality workouts (swim, bike, and run) and the long ride and long run when I get ready for an Ironman. Those workouts are the key pillars in my training week, so I schedule them for days and times where I know I won’t get stuck at work or on days where I don’t have plans to go out with my wife. I often prefer to do these workouts in the morning. By doing this, if I have to shorten or miss a workout it will not be one of the key workouts that move my training forward. afm

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Stephan Schwarze has been active in triathlon for over 20 year as an athlete and coach. He raced his first triathlon in college in Germany in 1988. Since 1990, he has finished 45 Ironman races, winning his age group seven times. Stephan has raced at the World Championships in Hawaii eight times, finishing on the age group podium there twice. Over the last ten years, Stephan has worked as a coach with many Austin-area athletes. He passes on his experience, sets up training schedules, and works with them towards specific goals and target races. Stephan is married to Illiana and has lived in Austin since 1996. As an amateur athlete, he has a full-time job with a local technology startup company.

St.

STEPHAN'S BIO

Ja

ing. Use these phases as block training periods. Two types of training blocks work well: • Volume Blocks—over the course of seven to ten days, “overload” your training schedule. Some of the athletes I coach take advantage of the start of Daylight Savings time in March and of spring break where work gets a bit slower. They are then able to increase their training volume by up to 50-75 percent compared to a normal training week. We are planning these weeks at lower intensity so there is no risk for injuries, which we then follow with a few recovery days. • Sport-specific Blocks - with a full time job, family, and other obligations it is challenging—sometimes impossible—to continuously focus on and improve in three sports. When I feel that I plateau in the spring and want to get my performance back up to race level, I focus just on one sport for a ten-day period. In early March when it’s still cold, a “run block” with running every day for ten days to two weeks works well. Later in March or in April when there is more daylight after work and time for two hours of riding is a good time for a “bike block” where you get in the saddle every day. I alternate hard and easy days but always make sure not to skip a ride (or run) during a block.

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FIT3 SWIM

DON’T RESIST THE RESISTANCE

BY MAURICE CULLEY

T

riathletes and adults looking to improve in swimming later on in life struggle with the issue of not having done the sport very much as a kid. They also struggle with the fact that they do not practice swimming more than a few times per month unless they are a dedicated “masters swimmer.” So how does someone improve in a sport like swimming knowing they are only going to swim a few times per month?

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OBVIOUSLY WE HEAR THE WORD “technique” when talking about stroke efficiency and good form. We also hear that “drills” are used for getting the stroke correct. But RESISTANCE WORK is done to get stronger and develop the muscles that will make a huge difference when training time is limited. Resistance work also makes a big difference with keeping the muscle memory when not swimming consistently. There are simple ways to work on resistance and, like many sports, things can get very complex by adding equipment and tools. Maximizing time spent swimming is key for busy adults or triathletes splitting time over three different sports. Adding resistance in your swimming is like adding “functional” or “sport specific” strength work, so it is important to have proper form before starting a lot of resistance work.


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equipment you see at all the swim/tri shops like paddles and fins is the first step. Paddles and fins add surface area to your hands and legs, which helps move more water than normal. Due to the density of water, adding this surface area to your limbs is like adding weight to the machines at the gym. TAKE IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL: adding drag and using resistance equipment (paddles/fins) augments the resistance work. Good form is especially crucial at this stage of strength work because you can be developing bad form or developing improper muscles. Items that are used to add resistance are drag suits (a bathing suit worn on top of your swimsuit), t-shirts, shoes, pull buoys, and small inner tubes. GOING TO THE EXTREME: buying special gadgets is the third step once you have used the first two levels of resistance work to develop muscle memory and strength. Good examples of these gadgets are resistance bands, power racks, ergo-trainers and parachutes. Some high level varsity and

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Continued on page 76

SWIM FINS ($20-$50): plastic webbed fins worn on bare feet. There are a variety of shapes and sizes, but swim fins are different (shorter) than scuba diving fins. Variety of sizes and types.

SWIM PADDLES (UNDER $20): thin, hard plastic pads that fit on the palms of hands and extend past the fingers. Rubber bands threaded through holes hold the paddles to the hands. Variety of sizes and types.

POWER RACK (APPROXIMATELY $1,600): a set of weights (five to 100 pounds) in a stand by the pool, attached to aircraft cable. Swimmer wears a belt with the cable attached and pushes off as in a normal sprint, raising the weight while swimming. Can be used with all strokes.

FIT3 DON'T RESIST THE RESISTANCE

75

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FIT 3 SWIM

Continued from page 75

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youth club programs along with collegiate programs invest in this type of equipment because they are competing at the highest level of swimming. An experienced coach needs to be available to assist with the use of these gadgets so that swimmers are not prone to injury. The proper game plan is essential when adding resistance work to swim training, and it needs to be periodized just like any other type of training so that muscles don’t adapt to the resistance work. After some early season endurance build, resistance work should be the next step in adding strength to see huge improvement gains to maximize training time. Be sure to consult an experienced coach to see if adding resistance work is the next step to your swimming. afm

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ERGOMETER (APPROXIMATELY $1,900): like a treadmill for swimmers. Swimmers lie on a bench; strokes are simulated using variable wind resistance from a blower. A screen provides electronic feedback on time, distance, pace, stroke rate, right and left arm force, and watts. No pool is necessary.

RESISTANCE BANDS (APPROXIMATELY $30 TO $50, DEPENDING ON SIZE): heavy-duty rubber tubing attached to a belt. The tubing is tethered to the side of the pool (or can be attached to another person); as the swimmer moves, the tube stretches (the ten-meter belt stretches our to approximately 75 meters).

PARACHUTES (APPROXIMATELY $30): a mini-parachute attached to a waist belt. Smaller or larger size is determined by swimmer's size. Parachute tows behind the body while swimming, creating drag for total body resistance.

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MAURICE'S BIO Maurice Culley is the owner and director of Austin T3— Team Triathlon Training, one of the largest triathlon training programs in the country, serving athletes in all three sports and at all levels. Maurice has an extensive swimming background; he was a member of the University of Texas Longhorns from 1992-1996, which included membership on a National Championship team (1996). Maurice went on to coach and took Austin ISD’s Bowie High School’s varsity team to a state championship and won a National Championship with the Circle C swim team. As a triathlete, Maurice was a qualifier for the World Championships in 2007 (IM70.3) and 2009 (ITU) in the half Ironman distance. In 2009, he was also a member of Team USA (3539) at the World Champs in Perth, Australia.


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FIT 3 BIKE

FINDING YOUR PROPER FIT

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T

here is no dispute that a proper bike fit is the most important factor in getting an athlete in the most comfortable, efficient, and aerodynamic position on a bike. Whether the rider is a cyclist, triathlete, young or old, competitive or commuter, a proper bike fit is something that every rider should have. Considering that most avid cyclists spend more time on their bikes each week than almost any other place, it is important to have a great fit to reduce (or even eliminate) the risk of injury. As cyclists progress through their careers, they can become more fit, lean, and flexible. As the riders’ physical looks—and even their goals—change, so should the fit of the bike. IF YOU HAVE BEEN RIDING for a couple years and are still riding the same fit that you had when you first started, it is probably time to have your fit reevaluated or even optimized. It is not uncommon for a cyclist to develop a different pedaling

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style; for example, if the rider starts to develop more plantar flexion (toe-down) through the pedal stroke, an increase in saddle height might be required. Even if a person is new to cycling, it is important to have a proper bike fit to keep the rider


PRIMO Performance & Rehabilitation

in the sport and to not develop bad habits early on. Cycling by nature requires continual repetition of the same motion over a prolonged period of time. An average cadence of 90 rpms over an easy onehour ride comes to 5,400 pedal strokes. Extrapolate that over a six-hour ride and you can see how easy it is to get an overuse injury. Your legs extend and flex at the same angle every pedal stroke. Your knees track in the same plane every pedal stroke. If any part of your fit is off by even just a few millimeters, causing a tilted pelvis, leg length discrepancy, or even handle bars that are not at the correct height, problems can arise over time. Lower back pain, tightness between the shoulder blades, pain in the knees, numb toes, saddle sores—these can all be symptoms of a poor bike fit. In our shop, we see customers who suffer from knee pain (mostly anterior). These problems can stem from something as simple as a saddle being too low or from something more complicated, such as a leg-length discrepancy or twisted pelvis that has never been addressed in previous fits. It is possible to “Band-Aid” problems by taking a pain reliever or icing the troubled spot, but these issues usually stem from a bad marriage between rider and bike. That is why it is important to address the origin of the problems and fix it or point the rider in the direction to get the problem solved, whether it be visiting a physical therapist or a simple stretching routine. In order to help cyclists with these problems, we offer two levels of fits: a basic static fit and a Retül dynamic fit. Our basic fit is something that we do with every new bike purchase as well as for people coming in with bikes they already own. It is great for riders just getting into the sport or wanting to have their fit rechecked. Our Retül dynamic fit has many advantages over a static fit in that it measures a multitude of the rider’s movements in all three dimensions. With this system, we are able to measure not only knee extension angles but ankle angles, knee lateral travel, hip vertical travel, back angle, forearm angles and more, all while the rider, on his/her own bike, is riding at different effort levels just

as they would out on the road. With our dynamic fit we can measure every movement down to the millimeter and every angle to the degree while moving, instead of having the rider stop pedaling to take measurements with a plum-bob or angle finder (which allows for a degree of human error). The system is beneficial for competitive road cyclist and triathletes. Since the camera is able to capture data that we simply cannot see with the naked eye, we can get the athlete in the most aerodynamic position without sacrificing pedaling efficiency. The technology is not limited to helping just the elite athlete, but even the most recreational cyclist as well as cyclists with injuries and limited range of motion, even amputees. Although this technology allows for objective and data-driven decisions it does not do the fit on it’s own. The fitter is still the most important factor for a precise fit. Having a qualified and experienced fitter can allow you to get the most out of your fitting session. Before you go in for a fit make sure that you take mental notes if anything is bothering you while you ride (i.e. knee pain, numb toes, etc.). This information will help the fitter learn more about your biomechanics. Be sure to ask questions and give the fitter your feedback on changes. It is also important to go into the process with an open mind and know that small changes, even just a few millimeters, can feel unfamiliar and require an adaptation phase. afm

KEVIN'S BIO Kevin McRee has been practicing bike fitting for over five years. After suffering severe trauma to both legs in 2006, he developed an interest in biomechanical limitations and how they relate to cycling. He has lived in Austin and worked at Jack & Adam’s Bicycles for the last two years. Kevin is certified for BG Fit and Retül Motion Capture fits. He is an avid cyclist and races across Texas.

FIT3 FINDING YOUR PROPER FIT

79

Jessica specializes in the treatment & prevention of injuries with the combination of the use of Physical Therapy, Active Release Techniques® (A.R.T) and The Kinesio Taping Method®. She has an “athlete” frame-of-reference as she has raced competitively for 12 years.

Testimonial “Jessica literally saved my race season with her ART magic (something 5 other PTs and many years struggling with the same injuries could not do). She is also crazy positive & so energetic all the time.” –Tai B, HI

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We are located in Texas Running Company 1011 W 5th St Ste #110 • Austin TX 78703

512.228.1411 • www.primorehab.com


FiT 3 RUN

EFFICIENCY MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE

BY CARMEN AYALA-TRONCOSO | PHOTOGRAPHY BY ADOLFO ISASSI

O

ne of the questions I get asked most as a coach is, “I’m a new runner and I was thinking about working on my running form, but I’m not sure—should I do it now or wait until I get better or faster?” THERE IS NO EASY ANSWER to that question as there are no easy, general, “one size fits all” answers to any questions that involve individuals since each of us are a “whole universe” with different backgrounds and different genetics, to state only two variables. My answer to that question is that you should do both. It would be very helpful to learn the general and basic ideas of running form (biomechanics) as you embark on your new adventure. And as you improve and learn more about your strengths and weaknesses, you should go back and learn what YOU can do to improve YOUR specific biomechanics in order to improve your efficiency and thus your performances. The most important reason to learn about biomechanics in general is injury prevention. The second most important reason is to

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improve your athletic performance. If you've ever run at Lady Bird Lake, you've noticed that there are a million ways (running form-wise) of getting from point “A” to point “B.” No two runners are alike. So how do we go about correcting their running form? Is it necessary? Let me get the boring definitions out of the way… Mechanics is the branch of physics concerned with the behavior of physical bodies when subjected to forces or displacements and the subsequent effects of the bodies on their environment. Biomechanics, “life” and “mechanics,” is the study of the structure and function of biological systems (in the case of this article, “humans”) by means of the method of mechanics.

Sports biomechanics applies the laws of mechanics to gain a greater understanding of athletic performance and to reduce sport injuries as well. Is it necessary to change your running form? If it is not broken, you don’t need to fix it. But I do think you need to know how to fix it in case it breaks, so below are a couple of general rules to keep in mind the next time you go for a jog. Where do I land? (Not to be confused with “How do I land?”) My golden rule, THE “if you remember one thing, this is it” rule, is where you should land, where your foot lands in relation to the rest of your body and to the ground. Your foot should strike the ground right below your hips and your hips should be right below your shoulders and your shoulders right below your head. “Running tall” is an expression that comes to mind. If you can master this, you will prevent many unnecessary injuries and general muscle imbalances. Of course running tall requires a great deal of coordination, general strength, and core strength. It is important to take your time when trying to change a running pattern. This definitely is easier said than done, as we spend too much time seated at desks or in our cars, so all our core, abdominal, back, and hip areas become tight and shortened, making it hard for us to “run tall.” After a short warm up, I always stop and stretch my midsection, hips, and upper legs. I do some high knee drills so I can visualize “running tall” and then carry on with the rest of my run. To make the above rule harder, here is a sub-rule, which has to do with timing. The moment your foot hits the ground should


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FIT 3 RUN

be right about the time it starts it’s backward movement. Confusing? Let’s go back for a second. Look at one single stride; visualize your right leg leaving the ground slightly bent at the knee, ankle extended, with your big toe last to leave the ground. Now your leg is moving forward due to two things: pushoff (momentum) and actively engaging your core and hip flexors to swing your leg forward. Now your right leg (swing leg) is crossing your midsection. If your core and hip flexors are actively engaged, your knee will continue to move forward and up as your foot passes the support leg. Once your knee is as high as it’s going to be, you can unfold your secret weapon—your lower leg. Yes, you can still get an inch or two on that stride by fighting gravity for a split second and letting your lower leg swing forward softly. Then, as your lower leg starts to come down and back…THAT’S when you land, as your foot starts its backward motion. This will help with a smooth transition into the next stride. Land too soon, and you will shorten your stride by a few inches (not very efficient, my friend), but more importantly, your risk of injury increases because your chance of landing behind your center of mass is more likely. My next article will be in three months; between now and then, I want to encourage you to think about the above and practice “running tall.” Improve your core. Look for some running drills, like “high knees” and “paw back” (running specific drills will be best at this point), and lastly, look at videos of elite runners running and racing. Pause and use slow motion to see where they land. Where are their feet when they cross the support legs? Where are yours? Focus on one or two things at a time, and take enough time to let it all sink in. After a good warm-up, go to a track and do just a few strides focusing on “running tall.” Don’t be in a hurry; don’t sprint. Walk back so you can re-group. Doing this four to six times for 20 seconds is a good start. Bonus tip: the above rule applies to running uphill and downhill. To be continued… afm

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CARMEN'S BIO Carmen Ayala-Troncoso is a nationally known athlete who has been coaching Austinarea runners since 1987. Carmen received her Masters of Exercise Physiology (minor in Kinesiology) from the University of Texas in 1985. She has been running competitively for 30 years; during that time, she has qualified for three Olympic trials (1992, 1996, and 2000) and represented the United States at four World Cross Country Championships (1994, 1995, 1999, and 2000). As a Masters runner, Carmen made the United States Cross Country open team in 1999 and 2000 and qualified for the Olympic Trials in the 5,000 meter in 2000. She has won numerous Masters and age group championships. She is currently coaching a small group of elite runners at Rogue Running.


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LIFESTYLE MARCH 9 – 18

MARCH 4

South By Southwest Whether you’re into music, film, or the interactive experience, South by Southwest has it all. With hundreds of bands and dozens of films, enjoy everything it has to offer at various locations all around Austin. And don’t let the prices scare you away; many bands also play free parties (usually accompanied by free beer/food). Austin, TX www.sxsw.com

Zilker Kite Festival Gigantic kites, homemade kites, makeshift kites, crazy kites – Zilker Park will have them all. Enjoy the beautiful Austin weather while watching kites fill the skies, dodge the trees, and attempt to avoid the inevitable tangled mess as they soar through the air. It’s sure to be a good time and it’s free. Sunday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at Zilker Park www.zilkerkitefestival.com

MARCH 9 – 24

MARCH 18

Rodeo Austin This nonprofit event provides scholarships to Texas students and fun for everyone. It features bull riding, rodeo clowns, music, and “mutton bustin.” Also, come kick off the event with the Cowboy Breakfast, a free buffet with live entertainment. Cowboy Breakfast is Friday, March 2 from 6 a.m. – 9 a.m. at Auditorium Shores. Rodeo Austin begins the following Friday at the Travis County Expo Center. www.rodeoaustin.com

Wagathon Walkathon A 2-plus mile dog walk around the Hill Country Galleria on their hike and bike trail. There will be multiple water stations and rest stops along the way, along with a refueling area at Jamba Juice. Come enjoy the dogtastic event and remember to pick up after your pets! Sunday, 12 p.m. – 3 p.m. at the Hill Country Galleria www.wagathonwalkathon.com

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OUTDOORS

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012


AustinFitMagazine.com/events

CAPITOL 10K // PHOTO BY JOHN ROGERS, VISUALIST IMAGES

FITNESS MARCH 25

Capitol 10K Now in its 35th year, the Capitol 10K is the largest 10K in Texas and the 5th largest in the nation. Whether you are walking, running, or jogging, this race is suitable for the entire family. Sunday, 8:30 a.m. Start at the Congress bridge www.statesman.com/cap10k

KEEP AUSTIN GREEN MARCH 31

Earth Hour Hundreds of millions of people around the world unite each year to support the largest environmental event in history. Help improve our planet and join the cause by turning out the lights for an hour. Saturday, 8:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. • www.earthhour.org

Get the word out!

jazzercise.com (800)FIT-IS-IT

Submit your event for listing in the Austin Fit Magazine calendar. Enter details at austinfitmagazine.com/events

Cheryl Burke Two-time Champion Dancing with the Stars

CAMPUS LIFE MARCH 3

Explore UT “The biggest open house in Texas.” With fun activities happening all around campus and a chance to see everything the University of Texas has to offer, let out your inner kid and immerse yourself in longhorn country. You don’t even need to bring your wallet. Friday, 11 a.m. University of Texas Campus • www.utexas.edu/events/exploreut

FREE Fridays That’s right

EVERY FRIDAY in March is free! Offer valid at participating locations for new customers. Other restrictions may apply.

EVENTS AROUND AUSTIN

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620 & Pecan Park - Lakeline Mall Mopac & 2222 - Northwest Recreation Center 12th & Lamar - Austin Recreation Center Mopac & 2244 - McBeth Recreation Center


Rides & Races Around Austin

MARCH

APRIL

MARCH 3

APRIL 5

8th Annual RRISD Project Graduation 5K & Kids’ K

Dell Diamond, Round Rock, TX • site.runtex. com/index.php/2011/10/8th-annual-rrisd-projectgraduation-5k-kids-k/

FIVE55 Series

Lake Pflugerville, Pflugerville, TX www.five55series.com APRIL 7

ASH Dash 5K Bunny Run

Austin Crop Hunger Walk

Austin, TX • site.runtex.com/index.php/2012/01/ ash-dash-5k-bunny-run/

MARCH 5

Agape PRC 5K

MARCH 4

Austin, TX • austincrophungerwalk.org

APRIL 14

Texas Independence Day 5K Run

Congress Avenue Bridge in Austin, TX www.celebratetexas.org/5krun05.html

Round Rock, TX • site.runtex.com/index. php/2011/08/agape-prc-5k/

APRIL 14-15

Urban Dare Austin

ARR Pace Bend

401 E 6th St. Austin, TX urbandare.ticketsocket.com/Austin&Tickets

Austin, TX www.tmbra.org/calendar/tcalendar.htm

MARCH 17

The Republic of Texas Tri

Vern’s No Frills 5k – Race #36

Corpus Christi, TX • www.republicoftexastri.com

Berry Springs Park, Georgetown, TX site.runtex.com/index.php/2011/10/verns-no-frills5k-race-36/

Casis Fun Run

APRIL 15

Ultifit St. Patty’s Day Challenge

Austin, TX • site.runtex.com/index.php/2011/06/ casis-fun-run/

Reveille Peak Ranch, Burnet, TX www.ultifitchallengeseries.com/index.html

APRIL 21

Vern’s No Frills 5k - 3rd Anniversary Race

MARCH 18

Wagathon Walkathon

Hill Country Galleria www.wagathonwalkathon.com

Berry Springs Park, Georgetown, TX • site.runtex. com/index.php/2011/10/verns-no-frills-5k-3rdanniversary-race/ SHAPE Diva Dash

MARCH 24

Spunky Shaylah 5K & 1K Inspiration Walk

Round Rock, TX • www.roundrocktexas.gov/ home/index.asp?page=1889

Austin, TX divadash.com/city-austin/austin-race-info/ APRIL 28

Walk Like MADD

Rosedale Ride

Samsung Austin Semiconductor, Austin, TX rosedaleride.blogspot.com/p/ride.html

Camp Mabry, Austin, TX • support.madd.org/ site/TR?fr_id=2762&pg=entry The Mighty San Gabriel Adventure Race

MARCH 25

Statesman Capitol 10K

Downtown, Austin, TX www.statesman.com/10K

Lake Georgetown, Georgetown, TX www.toocoolracing.com/san_gabriel.html APRIL 29

Tour De Pure

Rogue Trail Race #1: the MAZE

Austin, TX • www.pureaustin.com/activity. aspx?id=1333

Walnut Creek, Austin, TX www.roguerunning.com/events/172.html

Austin 10K Plus

MARCH 28

MARCH 31

Jailbreak Adventure Run

Lake Walter E. Long Metropolitan Park, Austin, TX • runthejailbreak.com Texas Independence Relay

Bastrop, TX • www.texasindependencerelay.com

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AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM MARCH 2012

Dell Diamond, 3400 E. Palm Valley, Round Rock, TX • austin10Kplus.com


MAY MAY 5

Shiner G.A.S.P.

7551 Metro Center Dr., Austin, TX www.shiner.com/shinergasp/ Austin Great Strides 5K Walk

Austin, TX • www.cff.org/Great_Strides/ The Money Box Cap 2K Open Water Race and Pledge Swim

Lady Bird Lake, Austin, TX • www.cap2k.com

5K Mission Charity Run/Walk

Fighting Blood Cancer 5K

Lake Pflugerville, Pflugerville, TX www.5kmission.org

Austin, TX • www.fightingbloodcancer5k.org

MAY 13

Georgetown Classic

MAY 19-20

Georgetown, TX • www.txbra.org/events/event. asp?EventID=2330

The LOOP

Emma Long Park, Austin, TX www.roguetrailseries.com/index.php

MAY 28

Capital of Texas Triathlon

MAY 19

Vern’s No Frills 5k - Race #38

Berry Springs Park, Georgetown, TX • site.runtex. com/index.php/2011/10/verns-no-frills-5k-race-38/ Spartan Sprint Texas

MAY 6

Rookie Triathlon

Burnet, TX • events.austin360.com/burnet-tx/ events/show/224083904-spartan-sprint-texas

MAY 12

Austin, TX • site.runtex.com/index.php/2012/01/ congress-avenue-mile/

Decker Lake, Austin, TX • www.usatriathlon.org/ events/sanctioned/2012/05/rookie-triathlon.aspx Armadillo Hill Country Classic

Austin, TX • www.captextri.com USA Paratriathlon National Championship

Austin, TX • www.captextri.com Race to the Toyota Cup

Austin, TX • site.runtex.com/index.php/2011/12/ race-to-the-toyota-cup/

Congress Avenue Mile

Liberty Hill, TX • www.armadilloclassic.net

Marketplace

Center for Foot & Ankle Surgery

2012 SafePlace Denim Day There is never an excuse for rape. Join us, make a statement, take the pledge and wear your denim! 512.356.1690 /// www.SafePlace.org/DenimDay

Have a Running or Sports Related Injury? Sports Injuries • Heel Pain • Ankle Sprains Charles Jason Hubbard, DPM, AACFAS Jose A. Rivera, DPM, FACLES 477.8853 /// myaustinfoot.com

$300 off LASIK Call to schedule your appointment for a free LASIK consultation. Please mention Austin FIT ad to receive discount. 512.452.1343 /// www.DrMillerEyeCare.com

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472.9393 | www.greatertexaswater.com RIDES & RACES AROUND AUSTIN

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What will you commit to do? Before: 370 lbs.

Now: 220 lbs.

Struggling to Lose Weight? Introducing a Fitness program that Gets Results! Human Machine’s comprehensive fitness and nutrition program was created for men and women of all ages and fitness levels that are struggling to lose weight and keep it off.

Week l 12- des: a i c e p u Our s ram incl sions ing ses prog al train

In May 2008, Jeremy Sapp committed to transforming his life and health. He and his wife, Valerie, started off slowly, walking around the neighborhood in the evenings enjoying good quality time together. Then Jeremy began walking on his lunch hour and on the weekends. That lead to jogging and running. “I quickly found out how important good shoes were! I found Karavel Shoes and my excellent sales associate, Joe Fenwick, who got me into a pair of New Balance shoes. Thirteen pairs later and 150 pounds lighter, I am still running in New Balance and still relying on the outstanding customer service and the proper fit provided to me by Karavel Shoes.”

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THE ROOKIE TRI


KICK MO’S BUTT! monicabrant.com

WORKOUT: CARDIO CORE

iGNITE YOUR LIFE with Neissa Springmann www.igniteyourlifenow.com Warm up: Part 1 30 sec - Alternating lunge and reach 30 sec - Alternating side lunge with reach 30 sec - Alternating back lunge with torso twist 30 sec - Squat to alternating front kick Part 2 - *place exercise band around ankles for outer thigh resistance* 30 sec - High Plank step out/in (place exercise band around both ankles) 2 x10 - Low Back Extension - Opposite arm/leg stretch 30 sec - Alternating High Plank to Forearm Plank (with exercise band around ankles) 1 x 20 - Superman Back Extensions (with exercise band around ankles) 30 sec - High Plank plyo hops (with band around ankles) 1 x 30 - Full Locust Pose w/outer thigh pulses (with exercise band around ankles) Part 3 20 sec - Down Dog stretch 30 sec - Hip Drivers (Up dog/down dog combo) Walk hands to feetstanding stretch 10 sec - Right Split Down Dog Stretch

1 x 10 - Right knee to right elbow high plank 1 x 5 - Regular Pushups Walk hands to feetstanding stretch 10 sec - Left Split Down Dog Stretch 1 x 10- Left knee to left elbow high plank 1 x 5 - Wide Pushups Walk Hands to FeetStanding stretch 1 x 5- Stagger Stance Pushup (rt hand high/ left hand low) 1 x 5 - Stagger Stance Pushup (rt hand low/ left hand high) 1 x 5 - Tricep Pushup Cardio Core 2 Min - Jog/Power Walk 45 sec - Alternating Lunges 15 sec - Jog 30 sec - Sprint 30 sec - T-Plank 45 sec - Scissor Jumps 30 sec - Jog 30 sec - Squat Jump or Traveling Broad Jump 15 sec - Jog 45 sec - T-Plank 30 sec - Traveling Butt Kick 30 sec - Sprint 2 min - Jog/power walk Cardio Core Circuit 1 min - Medicine Ball Sit up and Throw against wall 30 sec - Rest 1 min - Box Jumps

READ THE FULL WORKOUT AT

AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM

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A Workout in the Park by Monica Brant | photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

T

he day before my iGnite KMB workout was cold, rainy, and icky, leaving much to be desired for an outdoor workout. However, the next morning opened up to be sunny and warm as I arrived at the beautiful park in Rollingwood—a perfect day for an outdoor picnic OR WORKOUT! As I walked up to the group of close to 15 ladies, I noticed how friendly everyone was (I never cease to be amazed at how friendly people in Texas can be!). I later learned the iGnite group has a real “family feeling” and this particular group of ladies supports each other in more ways than just working out. To warm us up, Neissa (iGnite’s founder) led us through some fun movements on a yoga mat that ignited the upper and lower body. After 15 minutes or so, she sent us on a little run to a very nice, flat, grassy area where she continued to give us some plyometrics and sprinting tasks, modifying for those ladies who needed it. We moved back to our original spot, where we went through a boot campstyle series of timed exercises. I was paired up with an amazing gal ten years my junior who was in TIP TOP shape; she just happened to be one of the other instructors. Apparently, the instructors attend workouts on the days they aren’t coaching to give extra support or just to

get a great workout in, or maybe even a combination of both! I enjoyed the workout and felt it was something any “body” (from beginner to more advanced) could do. These instructors have a serious passion for their clients and want to give them more benefit to their lives than just a great workout. If you ladies are looking for a workout group that cares about your entire wellness package, iGnite is for you! I’m looking forward to joining them in one of their future sessions. As we finished up the workout and stretched, I learned that iGnite has respected the rules for fitness-related businesses and public parks usage and has permits to meet in both Austin and Rollingwood’s public, outdoor spaces; in other words, they are legal to use the parks! afm Special thanks to Hair Goddess (hairgoddess. net) for great hair design and to Rogue American Apparel (www.rogueamericanapparel.com) for my fun t-shirt supporting the Brothers in Arms Foundation (brothersinarmsfoundation.org).

KICK MO’S BUTT

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Muscle Movement of the Month

WATCH THE WORKOUT VIDEO ONLINE! www. AustinFitMagazine .com

Training Hip Drive for Your Best Scores by Diane Vives, MS, CSCS | photography by Brian Fitzsimmons

O

ne of the most exciting new events for challenging the true heart of Austin athletes is the Austin FITTEST coming up in June. Some of the tests in the challenge involve speed and acceleration to achieve your best times and scores as one of the challengers. One of the important steps to training for running efficiency and explosive quickness is hip drive, which allows for the most transfer of power from the lower body through the upper body. In order to train for hip drive or power, we can establish stronger hip extension,

core strength, and single leg stability. By first establishing good loading patterns with full hip extension with a two-leg structured stance, we can really focus on strengthening the hip drive. Then, by moving to a single-leg stance exercise, we can focus on single hip control and stability, which is a key factor in transferring body weight efficiently through the running motion with each step. And this is especially true when trying to accelerate from a starting position to initiate a great takeoff in a sprint or agility run. Lastly, we have popu-

lar movements to train full body power that safely allow you to practice loading the body and get explosive extension of the ankle, knee, and hip, which is also referred to as triple extension in performance and strength training. A popular exercise to do this is the box jump, which when properly executed will allow triple extension and a safe, low impact landing on top of the box. So let’s take a look at an example of these three key movements in order to train the hip drive:

Kettle Bell Swing The purpose is to strengthen and master the movement of a hip hinge position to improve the hip extension strength for powerful lower body movements. a. Start in a “hike” position with your feet shoulder-width apart, slight bend in the ankle and knee, and with hips flexed, creating a good hip hinge position. b. Maintain neutral trunk position by pressing chest out and maintaining a flat back. c. Initiate movement by focusing on the hip extension (hip drive) followed by full ankle

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and knee extension for a fully extended body, and use a twohanded grip on the kettle bell. d. The arms act like ropes allowing the kettle bell to swing with the ball of the kettle bell out away from the body, and the movement should peak at eye-level. e. Very important to fully extend hips at the top of swing and squeeze the extensor muscles of the hips. f. Guide the kettle bell to back into downward swing as you re-hinge the hips and allow kettle bell to swing between legs. Forearms should brush the inside of the upper thigh.


shot on location at Human Machine

Single Leg Dead Lift Purpose is to improve strength and stability strength of the single leg hip extension movement that will improve running economy and initiate acceleration. a. Start in an upright single-leg stance with a dumbbell in the opposite hand to your stance leg. b. Lower your upper body and the single dumbbell by hinging at the hips and reaching back with the heel of the free leg until there

Box Jump The purpose is to train the explosive triple extension of the lower body with low impact or stress on joints. (For safety, always start with a low box and master the technique and height before advancing to a medium or high box jump) a. Start in a standing position about 6-12 inches from the box

J

b. Begin loading the jump with a counter movement by flexing the ankles, knees, and hips with the most emphasis on hip flexion. c. Do not pause, but immediately use the elastic quick loading to then quickly extend the lower body into triple extension through the jump. d. Land softly and controlled on the box in an athletic stance with just slight hip, knee, and ankle flexion.

ust remember that powerful speed and total-body acceleration depend on the power of the hips. So start preparing for your best sprint and agility scores for the Austin FITTEST

is a straight line from the head to the heel close to parallel with the floor. Also use slight bend in the knee and ankle as you lower your body. c. Keep both sides of hips parallel with ground and avoid side-to-side movement with the free leg. d. Push through the heel of planted-foot; extending the hips, knee, and ankle until fully upright on the single leg and you have reached full hip extension to finish each repetition strong and with the most benefit.

e. KEY is to gently step off the box to avoid dropping with impact and landing with impact on the floor. The point of the box jump is to train the jump with a low impact, safe landing on the box. It defeats this purpose if you dismount box with a jump to floor or dropping to the floor from the height of the box. And this also can add considerable stress to the joints.

by practicing the actual tests and cross training with these movements to improve hip drive and power. afm

Diane Vives, MS, is an Advisory Member of the Under Armour Performance Training Council. An internationally recognized fitness expert, she has appeared in several publications such as Women’s Health, Shape, and Muscle & Fitness Hers.

MUSCLE MOVEMENT TRAINING HIP DRIVE FOR YOUR BEST SCORES

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BY THE NUMBERS: DOG AND KIDS Between the fittest dogs in this issue and our expanding coverage of kids and families, we found some numbers that are worth howling about.

3 billion

70

10

5

Amount in dollars that fast food outlets spend in television advertisements targeted to kids

Number of dog parks in Austin with leashfree areas

80

Percentage of dogs that sleep in the same bed with their owners, up from 34 percent in 1998

30

Percentage of children and adolescents who were overweight or obese in 2008

40

Percentage of dogs considered obese or likely to become obese

6

Hours the average kid spends on all forms of screen media combined every day

60

Minutes of exercise per day recommended for children two years old and older

5

Ways pets can improve your health: decreased depression, stronger immune system, lower blood pressure, heart health, and a more social life

41 billion

Amount in dollars that Americans spend on their pets per year

21

Percentage of kids who eat the recommended five or more servings of fruits and vegetables each day

14

The age that 70-75 percent of kids will stop playing an organized sport

75

Percentage of parents with an obese child who could not identify that their child was overweight

10

Number of times larger fast food portions are now than when they were first introduced

1,500

Amount in milligrams of sodium per day recommended by the Institute of Medicine

3,436

Amount in milligrams of sodium per day consumed by Americans age two and up

40

6

Number of main sources of empty calories consumed by children (soda, fruit drinks, dairy desserts, pizza, and whole milk)

38

Grams of sugar in an eight-ounce juice drink

12

Recommended grams of daily sugar intake for children

98.6

Average body temperature in humans

100-102.5

Average body temperature in dogs

Percentage of daily calories consumed by children, which are considered empty calories from added sugars and solid fats

Percentage of parents who express concerns that their child is underweight and should gain more, when in fact the child had proper bodyweight

27

Grams of sugar in an eight -ounce soda SOURCES LISTED ON WWW.AUSTINFITMAGAZINE.COM

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PHOTOS BY RACHAEL TOMSTER

42

Percentage of commercials aired during Saturday morning children’s television programs that are related to junk food products

Percentage chance that an obese child will continue to be obese into adulthood


March 2012 - The Fit Dog Issue