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BASS, BATH & BODY WORKS, BELLA VITA SALON (opening soon), BONWORTH, BOOK WAREHOUSE, CARTER’S CHILDRENS WEAR, CHRISTOPHER AND BANKS, CLAIRE’S BOUTIQUE, COUNTRY GOODS, DRESSBARN, DRESSBARN WOMAN, EDDIE BAUER, FAMOUS FOOTWEAR OUTLET, GAP OUTLET, GYMBOREE, I ZOD, J.JULES, JUSTICE, KITCHEN COLLECTION, L’EGGS/HANES/BALI/PLAYTEX, LANE BRYANT, MAURICES, NATURALIZER, NIKE FACTORY STORE, OLD NAVY, OSHKOSH B’GOSH, PACSUN, PAYLESS SHOESOURCE, PENDLETON, RUE21, THE CHILDREN’S PLACE, THE PAINTED PORCH ANTIQUES, TOYS R US EXPRESS, VANHEUSEN, WILSON’S LEATHER


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EDITOR’S NOTE The first time I played outside in my yard was a nice summer day. My family lived in an apartment for most of my childhood, but my mother and father decided to buy a house when I was 14, just after my eighth-grade year. We decided to move on what seemed like the hottest June day possible, which made our trips carrying things down from our second-story apartment into a moving truck feel a lot more like work instead of a fun new adventure. But we got to the house in good spirits, and after a day or two of unpacking I was ready to go outside and play a little soccer with my siblings. Our yard wasn’t meant for a big soccer match — my parents live on a hill — but the important thing was the space we had to run and play. We lived near several parks, which are a summer requirement.It doesn’t feel like summer when you’re young until you play a little basketball at the park, climb on the jungle gym or go on a long bike ride.

While basketball and bike rides are still important, summer changes for adults. As we get older, we find joy in cookouts, in getting out of the house and in improving ourselves in the summertime. Summer offers the perfect opportunity for a new home project, a nice garden, an adventure on the water, or a new hobby to explore. Of course, Austin residents really know how to make the most out of summer, from outdoor concerts to lots of exercise opportunities and a few volunteer efforts to match. So remember to get outside this summer and enjoy the sun. There’s a plethora of summer adventures to find around here, so make sure you Trey Mewes discover some Austin LivEditor ing this year.

PUBLISHER Dave Churchill EDITORIAL Editor Trey Mewes Contributing Writers Kevin Coss Adam Harringa Matt Peterson Jason Schoonover Rocky Hulne Photographer Eric Johnson ART Art Director/Story Layout Colby Hansen Graphic Designers Susan Downey Colby Hansen Kathy Johnson Kristin Overland SALES & PROMOTION Sales Representatives Jana Gray SUMMER 2013 Volume 1, Number 2 EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE: Editors, Austin Living, 310 2nd Street NE, Austin, MN 55912. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reprinted or reproduced without written permission. For comments, suggestions or story ideas call 507-434-2230. To purchase advertising, call 507-434-2220 © A Minnesota Publishers Inc. publication

CONNECT WITH US ON FACEBOOK!

Whitney Velasco-Aznar has added a lot of her own tastes and likes to make her remodeled home a personal experience. Page18

VISIT WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ AUSTINLIVINGMAGAZINE Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 3


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features

A GOOD BURGER

on the cover

WHAT’S INSIDE

AQUATIC ADVENTURES

Austin has great food and even better culinary artists

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The local owners of three beautiful boats swap stories and give advice on enjoying the water this summer

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AUSTIN LIVING | SUMMER 2013

FROM DREAM TO HOME One area couple designed their perfect home

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departments

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36 SEEN 8

HOME & HEARTH POWER OF THE PALATE The first Power of the Palate fundraiser was a success.

10 BLACK AND WHITE TIE BALL The annual fundraiser for Relay for Life had its best year yet.

12 WEDDINGS & ENGAGEMENTS Celebrating love and Austin Living.

OUT & ABOUT

18 HOME IMPROVEMENT One area woman put an international spin on a classic Austin home.

An area aficionado shares his love of the hunt — for geocaches.

22 PLATE LICKIN’ GOOD Two local sisters share great summer recipes and cooking advice.

34 A VOLUNTEER’S VISION One Vision 2020 organizer has made it his mission to improve Austin homes.

24 THE RIGHT PAINT A local interior designer guides you through your next room project.

14 TASTE OF NATIONS Hundreds of people gathered to share a bit of food and culture at Oak Park Mall.

30 TRACKING FOR TREASURE

36 WORK ON YOUR WORKOUT Here’s five big workout mistakes you may not know you’re making.

26 LETS PLAN YOUR LANDSCAPE The Dolan Landscaping Center staff has a few landscaping ideas for you.

Six Mile Grove headlined a spectacular show for downtown Austin.

extras

16 DOWNTOWN AUSTIN CONCERT 54

BOOK REVIEW: “ORDINARY GRACE” BY WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER

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TRAVEL: A TRIP TO MAINE

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AREA HAPPENINGS: UPCOMING EVENTS

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AREA GUIDE: RIDING YOUR BIKE IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA

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FINAL WORD: TIME TO VOLUNTEER Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 5


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SEEN | Power of the Palate More than 100 people came to the first Power of the Palate fundraiser hosted by the Women’s Leadership Initiative at the Austin Country Club on May 3. The event marked the first big push by the WLI to help feed children across Mower County through weekend food backpack programs and personal care closets at area elementary schools. Organizers say they raised more than $12,000 at the event.

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(1) Maegan Wells, Victoria Filippini, Jamie Zielke, Dan Zielke and Sarah Maas enjoy a little downtime before sampling food. (2) Kelsey Field and Mike Walker arrive at the party. (3) Sue Maus and Julie Kremin take time out for a photo. (4) Heather Vossler, Jaime Annis, and Nathan Annis chat in front of a dessert table. (5) Taylor Lady, Kelly Lady and Samantha Eslinger enjoy some family bonding time. (6) Jeremy Schmidt, Jaynee Sherman, Mandi Lighthizer-Schmidt and Tim Toliver share a few laughs. (7) Jim and Connie Leichtnam stop to chat with Sheila Berger and Karla Dooley. (8) Annette Mueller, Tina Gleisner and Cindy Fuhrman talk about the Women’s Leadership Initiative. 8 | Austin Living | Summer 2013


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(9) Yesenia Masood and Nancy Orwick peruse the silent auction. (10) Allison Garey and Amy Hajek stop in between visiting friends. (11) Evan Larson and Sarah Unverzagt discuss education. (12) Tammy Boverhuis and Amy Ramsey join the party. (13) Gary and Vicky Vogt swap wine stories with Brett Harris. (14) Mark and Annemarie Vaupel pass the time with Diane and Jeff Baker. (15) Kari Bain, Jessica Cabeen and Diane Wangsness spend some time catching up. (16) Kay Middlebrook and Jill Hart chit-chat for a bit. (17) Keith and Mary Kleis arrive at the fundraiser. (18) Merrilyn Berg and Joelle Voth stop to visit. (19) Ann and David Forland stop at a table for a bit. (20) Steven and Brenda Orcutt talk vacations with Jeff Ettinger. Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 9


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SEEN | Black and White Tie Ball The fourth annual Black and White Tie Ball was a huge success this year. The Relay for Life fundraiser organized by the IBI Data team and Holiday Inn of Austin brought in more than $11,000 through a raffle, silent auction and live auction, almost $2,000 more than in 2012. The night kicked off with the Austin High School jazz band, followed by a little dinner and dancing. More than 200 people attended this year’s ball, and more than 150 businesses donated items for the auction.

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(1) Karen Krones, Patsy Maas and Erica Frank run the front desk at the silent auction. (2) Matt Steiner, Anthony Davis and Wendy Davis enjoy a few appetizers. (3) Mike Simmons stops to talk with Hunter Strawn and Tracy Simmons. (4) Linda Baier and Barb Nason enjoy the music. (5) Heidi Johnson and Karla Kubesh peruse silent auction items. (6) Xiong and Jennipher Khang arrive just in time for the dance. (7) Jasmine, Ariel and Snow White of Enchantertainment grace the ball with their presence. (8) Curtis Schoppers and Sara Gunneson enjoy the ball. (9) Miss Junior Teen Minnesota Savannah Cordle helps auction off a Mall of America gift basket. (10) Ryan and Emily Pennington stop by a few booths. (11) Jen Honetschlager and Deb Schulz socialize with the crowd. (12) Tracy Hansen, and Bernie and Angela Sturgis help with the silent auction. (13) Mike Smith and Tom Schulz have a quick chat at the silent auction.

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SEEN | Area Weddings & Engagements

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(1) Miranda Vogt and Nathan Olson (2) Ashley Dooley and Patrick Symmonds (3) Laura Berens and Ethan Simonson (4) Katelyn Stephanie and Jason Branstrom (5) Mandy Lane and Jammie Jessen (6) Adam and Heather Norris (7) Zach and Jessa Johnson (8) Cassie and Erik LaRock (9) Matt and Katie Hinderaker (10) Nathan and Laura Dahlke (11) Curt and Jenny Schmit (12) Jess and Alan Mayer (13) Jodi and Pat Nelsen (14) Chad and Nicole Jehoich (15) Crystal and Zach Peterson 6 & 7 courtesy of Whitnei Photographei and 8-14 courtesy of Mary Landherr Photography 12 | Austin Living | Summer 2013


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SEEN | Taste of Nations Hundreds of people found an international flavor from around Austin at this year’s Taste of Nations festival on April 13. From good food and dancing to interesting programs and lots of music, area residents discovered plenty of things to see, smell and taste at Oak Park Mall. More than 40 countries were represented at this year’s festival. 1

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(1) Gretchen Ramlo and Laura Helle talk to people about Vision 2020 projects. (2) Alexis Johnson and Nodir Boymatov represent Riverland Community College’s Amnesty International chapter. (3) JuanPablo Ramirez and Joham Medina are hard at work. (4) Walter Schwartz and Bernardo Reinoso serve up delicious treats. (5) Emilia and Juan Felix show off their dancing skills to the crowd. (6) Lidia Montano, Cesar Chavez, Christhian Chavez, Miguel Garate and Jazmin Chavez visit for a minute. (7) Snow White, Cinderella, Peter Pan and Belle share a little magic with the crowd. (8) Xin Wang and Enja Rao enjoy some food. (9) Shanice Gozali and Suyeon Kim stop for a photo. (10) Elida Soto poses for a photo in between clients. (11) Lizbeth Ceballos and Francisco Marceleno stop to enjoy their drinks. (12) Elliot and David Wolff wait to sample several dishes. (13) Marwa Abubaker and her son Xamir Zaki take a break from watching several Mexican folk dances. Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 15


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SEEN | Your Summer Destination Many Austinites got the summer started right with the “Downtown Austin — Your Summer Destination!” kickoff concert on May 31 in downtown Austin. Hundreds showed up to hear headliner Six Mile Grove and Cosmic, as well as play a few outdoor games, stop by a few downtown shops and the Austin Jaycees beer garden, and visit several street vendors. The event was put on by Vision 2020 and the Austin Downtown Alliance to start the second annual Tuesdays on Main events, which will run every Tuesday from 3:30 to 8 p.m. throughout the summer.

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(1) Six Mile Grove frontman Brandon Sampson sings during the Vision 2020 sponsored “Downtown Austin — Your Summer Destination” concert. (2) Joe Peine, Erin Peine, and little Alexis Peine chat with Jill and Brian Andrews. (3) Tony Bowe and Jen Dao enjoy the Austin Jaycees beer garden. (4) Molly and Mary Bissen take a break from the concert. (5) Tim Ruzek, Matt Taylor, Angie Taylor and Heather Ruzek stop for a photo. 16 | Austin Living | Summer 2013


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(6) Janet Anderson and Brenda Ide watch as Six Mile Grove performs. (7) Naomi Thompson and Jake Vela visit for a bit. (8) Mary Anne and Jerry Wolesky take a short walk during the Six Mile Grove concert. (9) Jeanne Poppe and Bob Vilt take in the Six Mile Grove concert. (10) Tony Mudra and Colleen Murphy duck under some awnings to escape a little rain. (11) Lorena and Rosa Narvaez take a break from the concert. (12) Dave and Angela Skahen take a stroll before arriving at the concert. Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 17


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HOME & HEARTH

A worldly touch BY TREY MEWES • PHOTOS

Whitney Velasco-Aznar knows style. As a former marketing executive with Hormel Foods Corp., Velasco-Aznar has toured the globe, gathered souvenirs and absorbed interior design inspiration along the way. Those ideas came in handy when Velasco-Aznar added a worldly touch to a well-known Austin home.

BY

ERIC JOHNSON

Many longtime residents know the white house with red awnings at 211 Second St. NW as the longtime office and home of Belita Schindler, a retired interior designer. Before that, many older residents went to the house when John Hockett ran his successful photography studio to get high school portraits taken in the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s. Continues on 20

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Whitney Velasco-Aznar has added a lot of her own tastes and likes to make her remodeled home a personal experience.


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Continued from 18 The more than 100-year-old house has a long history in Austin, but Velasco-Aznar found ways to modernize it. Over a three-month period in 2011, Velasco-Aznar oversaw a massive renovation project that transformed the first floor of the former business from an empty space to a dazzling abode. “It’s a big improvement,” Velasco-Aznar said. Velasco-Aznar turned an L-shaped showroom into two rooms and a first-floor bathroom — much-needed as the only bathrooms were on the second floor — while improving other parts of the

house, as well. Velasco-Aznar knew she wanted a home office for the times when she had to take work home, so she designed a smaller room to suit her needs. She kept her office sparse, taking cues from the Asian influences she picked up while living overseas. She also painted the walls a dark blue, noting the color had a peaceful influence on her work. “I went minimalistic and kind of calming,” she said. That blue spread into the first-floor living room, where Velasco-Aznar organized several couches, a table, a TV and more

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(1) Whitney Velasco-Aznar’s off ice is open with cool, blue tones. (2) A second living room-type area on the main floor has an almost retro feel to it. (3) An upstairs bathroom features a large vanity mirror over the sink and plenty of room. (4) With plenty of windows letting in light, the kitchen/dining area is inviting and warm. 20 | Austin Living | Summer 2013


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for a space meant to entertain company. She had a bathroom built into the center of the building, providing a practical solution to the house. Velasco-Aznar made her mark elsewhere throughout the home. She added a flatscreen TV to the kitchen to follow the food and cooking shows she enjoys, along with granite countertops. She also restored the original fireplace next to the dining room, first built in 1915, to add a touch of country to the modern wonder she created. Yet her proudest addition is a $45,000 sound system. With

more than 20,000 Internet radio stations from all over the world, Velasco-Aznar can listen to music from anywhere in the threebedroom, three bath home, even out on the second-story deck. “It’s the best part of the house,” Velasco-Aznar said. Though she is putting it on the market, Velasco-Aznar takes pride in the home she remade. She left her mark on a piece of Austin history, after all. Contact the Fawver Agency at 507-433-1111 for more information on this home, located at 211 Second St. NW.

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(5) The living room of Whitney Velasco-Aznar makes use of warm colors that set a soft mood. (6) An upstairs den anchors the top floor. (7) Whitney Velasco-Aznar’s style throughout the home makes use of new and old elements including this old barber’s chair in a downstairs reading room. (8) Whitney Velasco-Aznar’s upstairs master bedroom. Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 21


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HOME & HEARTH

BY CHERYL HOWARD

AND

LINDA MULLENBACH

brand products are gluten free, which makes shopping much Welcome to Plate Lickin’ Good’s summer column! easier. Products used in this issue’s recipes can be found at Summer gives gluten-free eaters a wonderful variety of fresh Austin’s Hy-Vee. foods to choose from and means spending more time Grilling also adds variety to the menu, so fire up the grill outdoors camping, biking, gardening or just sitting on the for this issue’s recipes. We are featuring Honey Lime Grilled porch enjoying the warmer temperatures. Whatever your Chicken with Strawberry Salad, Parmesan choice of activities, there’s plenty of good, Potatoes and Pot de Crème Chocolat. A gluten-free food to eat. New Age White Wine pairs nicely with this. Summertime also means farmers For something a bit different, try the New markets are in season. They’re great places Age White over ice with a twist of lime. to shop for a variety of fruits and Our Make Ahead Meal this time is a vegetables, and add a close-to homedouble batch of the Honey Lime Grilled freshness to your gluten-free menu. Chicken. While you are grilling up one half Organically grown produce is a of the recipe, place the other half, with healthy benefit and can be a great topic of marinade, in a Ziploc bag, take out the air conversation during your next trip to the and place in the freezer. Then all you have market. Now might be the perfect time to to do is take it out a day ahead, thaw in the try a new vegetable or fruit as well. Pick up refrigerator, grill and enjoy. a jar of local honey or a dozen farm-fresh We hope you enjoy your summertime eggs, or maybe try some fresh herbs for Sisters Cher yl Howard, left, and grilling with family and friends. Until your salad or marinade. Linda Mullenbach often spend Of course, HyVee has a good choice of time together in Cher yl’s kitchen next time, may all your meals be Plate preparing gluten-free meals. Lickin’ Good! gluten-free products and many Hy-Vee-

Honey Lime Grilled Chicken — — — — —

⁄2 cup hon ey ⁄3 cup glu ten free soy sau ce (S an -J brand ) 1 ⁄4 cup lime ju ice 1 g a r l ic c l o v e , m i n c e d 4 b o n e l e s s s k i n le s s c h i c k en b r e a s t h al v e s 1 1

Mix all ingredients in a sealed storage bag. Add chicken, and get as much air out of bag as possible. Marinate overnight in the refrigerator (or at least 30 – 45 minutes, also in refrigerator). Drain and discard marinade and grill chicken over medium heat until juices run clear. 22 | Austin Living | Summer 2013


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Parmesan Potatoes — 4 p o ta t o e s ( 2 p o un ds ) — 3 t e a sp o o ns c a no l a o i l ( se p a r a te d ) — 1⁄2 cu p grated Parm esan cheese — 1 t s p d r i e d ba s i l — 1 t sp se a s o ne d sa l t — 1⁄4 ts p on ion p ow der — 1⁄4 ts p g arlic p owd er — 1⁄4 ts p p epp er

Cut each potato into six wedges. In a sealed storage bag, sprinkle potatoes with 2 tsp oil; toss to coat. Combine the remaining ingredients and add to potatoes; toss to coat. Arrange potatoes in a single later on a 15 in. x 10 in x 1 in baking pan lined with foil and coated with 1 tsp oil. Sprinkle with any remaining coating. Bake at 350 degrees for 45-55 minutes or until golden brown and tender. Yield 6 servings.

Pot de Crème Chocolat Yield: Four ½ cup servings, or eight ¼ cup servings — 2 c u p s [ 12 ou n ce s ] s em is w ee t chocolat e ch ips , e.g ., Gu it tard or N est le’s. — 1⁄3 cup un s if t ed p owd ered su gar — 1 cu p w h ole m ilk — 1⁄4 cup but ter Place chips and sugar in blender container. Heat milk and butter in small saucepan over low heat while stirring, just until mixture begins to boil. Immediately pour hot liquid in blender container. Cover and blend at high speed until smooth, about 1 minute. Pour into dessert dishes or small juice glasses and chill at least 3 hours, until set. To use milk chocolate chips instead of semi-sweet, omit sugar and use only ¾ cup of whole milk. Process as directed. Chill overnight before serving. Serve with a dollop of fresh whipped cream. This dessert is very rich so you probably don’t need a ½ cup. (We usually use Dixie cup size glasses ½ full and it is plenty.)

Strawberry Salad — 1 ba g o f y o u r f a v o r i t e s a l a d g re e n s — 2 c u p s s l i ce d s t r a w b e r r i es — 1⁄3 cup s un flow er seed s – roas ted an d s alted , no s hells — 1 cup Marzett i’s Popp yseed Dres sing – you can add more or l e ss to t a st e Mix greens, strawberries and sunflower seeds. Add the dressing just before serving to avoid the lettuce wilting. Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 23


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HOME & HEARTH

A local interior designer shows the right way to paint your rooms. BY JASON SCHOONOVER Krisi Lillie knows that when it’s time for a change to a home’s atmosphere, one of the easiest ways to make an improvement is to pick a new paint color for your rooms. She has helped enough people as an area interior decorator to know better than to follow the latest fad, like only painting one wall of a room a different color. Repainting rooms may seem daunting, but there’s a few key ideas to follow. “It’s your home and you should love the space that you live in,” Lillie said. Lillie serves the Austin, Blooming Prairie, Rochester, Owatonna and surrounding areas at her business, Lillie le Chic. She has some great advice for picking the perfect color and type of paint for your space. Don’t get too caught up in trends When people aren’t sure where to start when painting a room, Lillie tells people to avoid popular trends. Trends come and go fast. A few years ago, one trend was for people to paint one wall red. Now, Lillie helps many customers repaint that one wall. Lillie urges her clients not to be shy or too stressed out with the process. If a color turns out to be a mistake, people can always repaint later. “I just encourage people to have fun with it,” she said. Go with what you love Instead of focusing on the Krisi popular, Lillie tells people to focus on what they love. Lillie encourages people to use things items like family heirlooms and personal collectibles to build colors and decorations around. Even if those heirlooms and collectibles don’t perfectly match everything in the room, Lillie said to use them anyway to personalize the space. “Your home is not meant to be a museum,” she said. Pick for your space Lillie tells people to avoid starting their quest for the right paint in the isles of a large store. “It’s just really overwhelming when looking at it like that,” she said. Instead of starting in a store, Lillie tells people to focus on a single space or room for the project and then to look at magazines, books, or Internet articles for inspiration. She also recommends people take samples into their

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homes. Lillie comes armed with color decks of various paint, so people can see it at home in their own lighting. Lighting plays an important role, so people must consider what a color will look like during the day and the night. Along with looking at color wheels, people can paint a test patch on the wall before painting an entire room to see the color see with natural and artificial light. Pick the right type of paint For Lillie, the quality and type of paint can make a big difference. Lillie recommends Benjamin Moore Paints, which has more than 3,500 colors. “It’s just really high quality paint, it goes on very well,” she said. “It’s very durable.” Lillie suggested people pick a highquality paint, as new paint is typically one of the least expensive things you can do in your home. “For just a few dollars more, you’re going to get something that lasts so much longer,” she said. No matter the brand, people should pick the right gloss and sheen for the space. A flat paint doesn’t reflect light, so it’s good to use on walls with imperfections, but it’s more difficult to wash. The paint will show scuffs, meaning it’s not a good choice in high traffic areas. One of Lillie’s favorite types of paint Lillie is eggshell, which has a slight sheen and a little shine. It holds up well, can be lightly wiped down and is a good choice for a living room, bedroom and some hallways. Satin paints have a bit more gloss than eggshell and is good for bathroom, kitchen and anywhere with moisture. Satin is also a good, durable paint in a hallway or a mud room. Do prep work Regardless of the color or type of paint, Lillie said it’s important to do prep work like patching holes and cleaning the walls. She recommended using a tinted primer, which can be purchased at most stores, and then two coats of paint. People should also remove outlet and light covers and use painters tape when necessary. Krisi Lillie can be reached at 507-251-5318 or at krisi@lillielechic.com


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Discover Lake City

June 28 - June 29 The Prim Barn - Summer Celebration The Prim Barn Occasional Market will be holding their Summer Celebration. Join us for Primitives, Junk Market, Vintage, Rustic, Home Décor, Garden Art, Old Stuff, and Farm Fresh Finds all in our century old barn. 9am - 5pm, 37183 County Road 3, Lake City, MN 55041. From Lake City, Hwy 63 south 11 miles, right on County Road 3. For more information: http://www.theprimbarn.com June 28 - June 30 42nd Annual Water Ski Days Celebrating the invention of water skiing on Lake Pepin! Best entertainment on Lake Pepin! Arts & Crafts Show, grand parade on Sunday, live music each night in the beer tent, water ski show, carnival rides, bingo, 5K & 10K runs, classic car show, and so much more! Contact the Lake City Chamber of Commerce: 651-345-4123 or http://www.lakecity.org/waterskidays.html for more information. June 28 - June 30 Wild Wings 3-Day Tent Sale Featuring Catalog Samples & Overstocks, Candles, Framed Prints, Scratch & Dent Products and more! Over 70% off retail prices! Located one mile south of downtown Lake City, MN on Hwy 61 For more information call: Jennifer White, 651-345-5355 Friday & Saturday 9 - 5 • Sunday 10am - 5pm • http://www.wildwings.com July 4 Fourth of July Fireworks Celebration Fireworks at dusk over Lake Pepin. Music and Food July 6 115th annual LCFD Fireman’s Dance Outdoor dance with live music, beer, and food booths. Proceeds go to the Fire Hall for equipment, etc. “The Polka Dots”, and dance band “Pop Rocks”, happening at Ohuta Park. July 27 - July 28 Sail for Leukemia The 17th annual “Go Sailing for Leukemia” event at the Lake City Marina. Suggested donation is $15 per adult and $10 per child. All proceeds from the event go to the Leukemia Society. For more information: www.lakecityyachtclub.com. 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Across the street from the shores of Lake Pepin & the beautiful Lake Pepin River Walk. • Electric & Full Hookups • Shower, Flush Toilets & Dump Station • Playground Service Your Boat At Smittyʼs Marine!

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HOME & HEARTH

Assistant garden center manager Tina Cox shows ways to utilize fair y gardens and enhance trees.

BY KEVIN COSS • PHOTOS

Container gardening adds a versatile nature to landscaping your home. An outdoor grilling station is perfect for making your backyard the center of an enjoyable evening.

Brian Dolan is a master at making a landscape stand out. The general manager of Dolan‘s Landscaping Center has a knack for helping homeowners get properties clean and looking good. He has even coordinated ornamental trees and perennials plantings on homes up for sale, which turned potential buyers’ heads. Dolan and his staff are glad to share a few pointers on making your yard the talk of the neighborhood and your new favorite place.

Curb appeal The first step is to boost your curb appeal — the way your yard strikes people. Start with foundation planting, as small plants and shrubs liven up the base of your house. The key is to not let your lawn run all the way up to the exterior walls, according to Josh Kern, Dolan’s landscape designer and estimator. Dwarf varieties of plants and shrubs 26 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

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ERIC JOHNSON

make good candidates for curb appeal; try barberry, spirea, evergreen or ninebark, for example. Different grasses, like feather reed grass and blue oat grass, serve the same purpose as they grow easily and require little water. “There’s low to no maintenance, so you’re not a slave to it,” Kern said. You should also think about color when planning out your landscape. Contrasting types of perennials can make the area more attractive. Container gardening Container gardening is a practical concept that works all over the yard. Move pots around to see where they fit best, and consider decorative designs. “They’re portable,” Dolan said. “You can put them in for the winter and bring them out for the summer.” Containers offer some options, and can be in, on or above the ground. Hanging baskets are a tasteful addition, especially when you get creative with the container.


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Think of other objects that could serve the same purpose but draw a bit more attention or play into an outdoor theme, like a watering can. “It doesn’t have to be a ceramic pot,” said Cindy Lippert, assistant manager at Dolan’s garden center. Some fixtures even have running fountains built in and add the peaceful sound of trickling water to the yard. Use a soil mix in the container instead of a heavier top soil, and try a time-release fertilizer to keep your plants healthy. Containers help a plant grow strong if you know how to handle them. “It keeps [the plant] a little more contained and it’s easier to keep water in,” said Tina Cox, another assistant manager with the garden center. Smaller pieces are more prominent than large ones, Dolan said. “I think they’re just easier for people,” he said. A backyard recreation room With all the planting done, it’s time to take advantage of your backyard space. Outdoor fireplaces and fire pits are popular

attractions, and work well surrounded by seat walls — fixtures that give the fire both a sense of space and built-in seating. Light pillars create decorative edges to each seat wall and make the area more welcoming after daylight fades. Another common feature is a grill island. The countertop space, featuring a compartment for a grill, lets you serve drinks and cook up food in your backyard. Place a few stools along it so friends and neighbors can sip a cocktail while they enjoy the weather. Pergolas go hand-in-hand with outdoor furnishings to tie the whole space together, as do dining tables and smaller pub tables for sit-down meals. There are nearly endless options, so Dolan recommends backyard projects be customized to best fit the space. “There are no two alike,” he said. Bounce ideas off a landscaping designer and have a site analysis done to figure out how to approach your dream project. Remember: A project doesn’t need to happen all at once. “You could do it in phases,” he said. “It kind of depends what your budget is.”

Brian Dolan, general manager for Dolan's Landscape and spa goes through some ways to enhance a home's curb appeal using examples of trees and flowers in Dolan's greenhouse. Items like this can spruce up not only the curb appeal of a home, but more localized landscape options including containers.

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MONDAY Wing it Mondays - 40¢ Each Choose traditional or boneless in one of our six great signature sauces.

TUESDAY Steak Dinner - $7.99 8oz. hand-cut sirloin cooked to choice; served with baked potato and lettuce salad.

WEDNESDAY Gyro & Fries - $7.50 Not at the county fair, but just as good!

THURSDAY Philly & Fries - $7.50 Everyone’s favorite served on a toasted hoagie bun with pipin’ hot fries.

FRIDAY 1/2 Priced Appetizers 4pm-6pm SATURDAY Saturday Salad - $7.99 Our great taco salad, so good you’ll even eat the bowl... No worries, it’s a fresh fried tortilla, so DO IT!

SUNDAY Slider Basket - $6.99 Two quarter pound sliders served with fries.

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OUT & ABOUT

BY MATT PETERSON • PHOTOS

Trom p in g t hrou gh t he w oods w ith a GPS in h and , f e a t h e r h an g in g f r o m h i s h a t , J e r r y I b b e r s o n s e a r c h e d f or treasures. The items he sought weren’t worth much. T h e h u n t i t s e l f w a s t h e t re a s u r e . I bb e r s o n i s a n a t u r a l i s t , v o l u n t e e r a n d w o o d s m a n f ro m E l l e n d a l e — a n d a g e o c a c h i n g a f i c i o n a d o . H e t a kes h is h obb y t o t h e n ex t lev e l by t e ach i n g y o u n g s t ers h o w t o g eoc ach e at t h e J ay C . H o rm el N a t u re C e n t e r i n A u s t i n . “ Je rr y’s been in v ol v ed i n t h e N at u re Ce n t er f or m a n y y ea rs , bu t I d i d n ’t kn ow h e w as s u ch a g e oca ch in g kin g u n t il h e beca m e a boa rd m e m ber,” N a t u r e C e n t e r a s s i s t a n t J u l ie C h a m p l i n s a i d . A s I b b e r s o n s ea r c h e s f o r a c ac h e, s o m e o n e h a l f w a y a ro u n d t h e w o r l d i s l i k e l y d o i n g t h e s a m e t h i n g , p e r h a p s o p e n in g a c a c h e w i t h i t e m s I b b er s o n h im s e l f s to r e d. B u t o f a l l t he th i ng s he e nj o y s a b o ut t he ho b b y — t r a d i n g p r i z e s , s i g n i n g l o g b o o k s a n d s e n d i n g i t e ms a ro u n d t h e w o r l d — I b b e rs o n h a s f o u n d a n o t h e r w a y t o u s e g e o c a c h in g : f o r e d u c a t i o n . Co n t i n u e s o n 3 2 Jerr y Ibberson walks through the woods of the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center on the hunt for caches. Ibberson is a geocaching enthusiast who holds classes for kids at the Nature Center.

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Jerr y Ibberson checks out the contents of a geocaching site at the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center. Often a log will be included for people who find the caches to sign.

Continued from 30

Jerr y Ibberson shows off the website geocaching.com, where geocaching enthusiasts can get cache coordinates, see what others have found and record their progress. 32 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

“We’re trying to get the kids thinking about what’s happening around the Nature Center and then tying it to geocaching,” Ibberson said. By that, Ibberson means youngsters not only find caches at the Nature Center, they answer questions about plants, animals and other nature topics. They learn while having fun. Ibberson wants to give kids a reason to enjoy nature as he does. “Last fall I approached Larry [Dolphin],” Ibberson said. “Do you want me to put some caches out, get things going again?” Ibberson asked the Nature Center director. Nature Center employees like what Ibberson is doing. “Instead of just making it a treasure hunt, we kind of wanted it to be a little more nature oriented,” Champlin said. Out on the trail, Ibberson hiked to his first location. In a tiny crux of a tree, a microcache was tucked out of view. Ibberson opened it and only discovered a logbook with coordinates to the next cache. He signed the log and moved onward, up the trail to the next cache. This one was much more appealing. “This is one of the largest geocaches I’ve ever seen,”


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Geocaching enthusiast Jerr y Ibberson shows off the contents of a cache at the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center.

Ibberson said as he opened up the five-gallon pail hidden behind a mound of dirt where some sort of critter — perhaps a groundhog — appeared to live. Inside were prizes, a logbook and a guide to Austin and the Nature Center. “You can take it as serious as you want, but it’s ‘have fun,’” Ibberson said. One could say Ibberson takes it seriously, but still has fun. He’s found a geocache in Denali National Park in Alaska. He started a traveling cache, called a travel bug. His toy Ford Mustang has been found in Iowa, Arizona, Idaho, Jamaica and now in Madrid, Spain. But GPS users need not visit national parks or nature centers to find geocaches. Ibberson finds them all over the place. By using geocaching.com Ibberson uploads area caches to his GPS and searches for them. A menagerie of caches dot the Austin map, perhaps more than a hundred. Those looking to get into geocaching can do so easily. With either a low-cost GPS or smartphone, anyone can find treasure, fill out logbooks and begin their own adventures. Who knows? He or she may be just a few minutes, a few steps behind Ibberson.

Jerr y Ibberson checks his location after f inding a cache at the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center during a recent trip. There are plenty of kinds of GPS locators to use in geocaching and even apps that are available for various cellphones. Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 33


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OUT & ABOUT

BY ROCKY HULNE • PHOTO If Geoff Smith has his way, Austin will sparkle with many freshly rejuvenated homes when the year 2020 comes. Smith, the project leader of Vision 2020’s Community Home Improvement Program, is ready to start improving homes along with Habitat for Humanity this summer. Smith found his passion for keeping homes from going to waste when he and his wife bought a foreclosed home next door to them, and fixed it up with help from friends and neighbors. The new look house made the neighborhood a better place and Smith wants to give that same feeling to other homeowners. “Helping a single family stay in their home or just one retiree from feeling helpless would mean a lot to me and them, and as meaningful as that would be, it’s just the tip of the iceberg for what we’ll be doing,” Smith said. “At the end of this first year we’re going to all stand back and be amazed at what we’ve done.” The first group of CHIP homes selected for improvements — which will be primarily outside work done by volunteers — is at the 900 to 1000 blocks of Second, Third and Fourth Avenue Northeast. Smith said the project is looking for volunteers for the project, and some of those who step up could have work done on their own neighborhoods in the coming years. “If you want your neighborhood chosen, you need to kind of be a block champion,” Smith said. “You need to get other people in your area to sign up and volunteer for this year’s project. It’s not a handout. It’s about sweat equity and what you’re willing to put into it.” The CHIP project is getting a boost from Tom Egan, the Brush with Kindness coordinator at Habitat for Humanity; 34 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

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Brigitte Campbell, the executive director of Habitat for Humanity; and the Austin Housing Redevelopment Authority. “Brush with Kindness and the Vision 2020 project are both community based projects,” Campbell said. “We want the community to rally around this and take part and help our neighbors. The vision of Habitat for Humanity is a world where everybody has a decent place to live.” Volunteers will do everything from painting houses to fixing shingles on roofs. Organizers look to work on as many as eight homes over the summer, making large and small improvements. Smith said sometimes a small fix can make a big difference in the long run when looking at the value of a home. Egan has seen some incredibly positive reactions from people while working with Habitat Humanity and fixing up homes. He also said the CHIP project will help those who otherwise couldn’t afford to make improvements on their home. “From the looks of the houses that we’re working with now, the people that are living in them are stumped by what they need done on the outside,” he said. “The volunteers coming in and doing it takes a big chunk of cost away. The real stumbling block is costs and we’ve addressed that to the point where they don’t have to worry about it.” There is no exact timeline for the CHIP project, but Smith hopes by the time the year 2020 rolls around, the program will at least help Habitat for Humanity gain volunteers and Austin will have a few improved neighborhoods. Anyone interested in volunteering for the CHIP project can call Habitat for Humanity at 507-433-1349.


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OUT & ABOUT

BY ADAM HARRINGA • PHOTOS

BY

ERIC JOHNSON

It’s YMCA Fitness Director Kristi Stasi’s job to guide many Austin residents with long-neglected New Year’s workout resolutions through their workouts once more now that summer has arrived. Before you spend a lot of time, money and energy on your workout, though, let Stasi guide you through five key DON’Ts. 1 . D O N ’ T b e u n re a l i s t i c Stasi said one of the biggest problems people starting new training regimes encounter is they set the bar too high, or don’t define their goals. When you set workout goals, you should be specific and reasonable. Losing weight isn’t a goal, it’s the result. Figure out how much you want to lose over what period of time, then set weekly goals to achieve it. It doesn’t happen overnight, so make sure you stick with it and be patient.

working out five or six times per week or for an hour and a half each session, and soon end up quitting. To start, come in two or three days per week for a half hour of cardio work, and gradually progress from there. You can add strength training a few weeks later, Stasi said. This also greatly helps to reduce the risk of injury, and helps make it part of a lifestyle, Stasi said. 4 . D O N ’ T k e e p d o i ng wh a t y o u’ r e d o i n g Now that you know how to ease into your training, it’s time to mix up your exercise sessions. Some people come to the YMCA every day, work out on the same stationary bike or treadmill and wonder why they aren’t losing weight, Stasi said. It’s because your body adapts to what you throw at it, and it can take less than 21 days for your body to know how to respond to your routine. You need

2 . D O N ’ T s t re t c h b e f o re y o u w o rk o u t This might sound counterintuitive, but you don’t want to stretch cold muscles. Stasi recommends people hop on a treadmill or the nearest cardio equipment, or take a brisk stroll down the block or on the track. After 5 to 10 minutes, your blood should be flowing, your heart rate should be elevated, and you should be good to go.It’s easy to pull or strain a muscle if you stretch too far before you’re warmed up. 3 . D O N ’ T t h i n k o f i t a s a ll o r n o t h i n g Killing yourself once or twice a week isn’t going to give you the same benefits as steady, moderate workouts three, four or five times per week. Stasi said many try to start by 36 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

Haley Meyer, right, and Cathy Leuer work out on stationar y bikes at the YMCA. Use a stationar y bike for 5-10 minutes to get ready for a workout instead of simply stretching.


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A Pilates class at the YMCA in Austin. Experts suggest mixing up types of training when working out, including working in Pilates.

to fool your body by working out in different ways, she said. And there’s less chance of boredom or fatigue, so mix it up. Bike or run a couple times per week, but sprinkle in a day of pilates, yoga, interval work or even boxing or lifting weights. Speaking of lifting weights, Stasi points out it isn’t just for men. She said many women are timid about lifting weights and are afraid they will bulk up, but she said that simply isn’t the case unless they take major amounts of protein and bodybuilding supplements. And, the “after burn” from lifting is actually one of the best fat-burning tools out there. 5 . D O N ’T n e g le c t t h e d i e t Working out is only half of the equation. Stasi recommends talking to a dietician like Jen Haugen at the Austin Hy-Vee, who is happy to provide some assistance. Stasi said most people looking to lose weight overestimate the amount of calories they burn, and underestimate the number they consume. Someone like Haugen can sit down with you, figure out what you’re eating now, and make a plan for improvement. “You can do all the exercise you want, but if you’re not eating a healthy meal, it’s not going to show,” Stasi said. A B O N U S T I P : D O N’ T s k i p t h e a q u a Make sure you drink plenty of water before, during and after any workout. It’s easy to become dehydrated, Stasi said, without even feeling thirsty. She said always bring a water bottle, even for those working out in the pool. Most people don’t realize how much water they lose even in a pool. The Austin YMCA is at 704 First Drive NW. Call 507433-1804 for more information. Contact Jen Haugen at Austin Hy-Vee by calling 507-437-7625. Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 37


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BY KEVIN COSS, TREY MEWES

AND

MATT PETERSON • PHOTOS

Austin loves great food. Our community has long had a passion for good eating, and it shows. Again and again, we find delicious meals in Austin's many diners and restaurants. Summer is always a time for good burgers, and our city has some of the best burgers around.

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Yet behind every good burger is an even greater chef, ready to share their secrets of culinary success and showcase their work to a hungry audience. While Austin Living only has a small sample of the great food available here, we're proud to showcase the people behind Austin's great burgers. Continues on 40


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Randy Qualey, coowner of The Windrift, has brought many unique burgers to Windrift diners.

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The Farm Burger from The Windrift which features cheddar cheese, bacon, egg, lettuce, onion and tomato.

From The Windrift to the farm Windrift Lounge owners Randy and Larry Qualey know never to turn down a good burger idea, specially if it includes succulent breakfast favorites, like eggs and bacon. The Qualey brothers, who bought the establishment nine years ago, have styled themselves burger afficionados. They found a great addition to the Windrift in a farm burger, designed after a similar burger they found earlier this year. “We were over in Rochester and stopped at a bar and grill over there,” Randy said, adding it looked worth a try. The two quickly became fans, and resolved to cook up a burger at The Windrift that would combine eggs and

The latest Kenny’s creation

Kenny Knutson has created the beer-batter bacon burger with egg.

40 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

Kenny Knutson has spent the past 48 years creating good burgers whenever he has a spare moment. As the owner of longtime Austin staple Kenny’s Oak Grill, he is responsible for dozens of delicious sandwiches and food items, some of which people still buy today. Knutson and his loyal customers are excited over his latest, perhaps greatest, concoction yet: A beer-batter bacon and egg burger. “We’ve had just tremendous response,” Knutson said. The burger was inspired by similar “Hangover” burgers Knutson has seen over the years, but none have the added kick Knutson came up with. He placed a patty in a specialized chili cheese sauce he created to give it an extra zip. On top of that, he placed two pieces of bacon soaked in a beer batter, topped off with a soft egg to create one of the best burgers he has tasted in some time. It’s not the first, nor the last of Knutson’s signature burgers, however. “I like to play around with stuff,” he said. “I’ve created a lot of burgers over the years, and some of them we still sell.” Knutson hasn’t given an official name to the beerbatter bacon and egg burger, however. He’s leaving that up to his customers. Kenny’s Oak Grill will seek names for the new burger throughout June and July, or until Knutson finds a name he likes. The person with the winning name will get a $25 gift card to Kenny’s, which means they can enjoy several savory beer-batter bacon and egg burgers.


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bacon. The first bite into The Windrift’s Farm Burger reveals two worlds of taste. There’s juicy, flame-charred beef embodying the pub food taste, combined with the flavorful mix of eggs and bacon, reminiscent of a hearty breakfast. Condiments on top give the whole burger a satisfying crunch. With meat, eggs and so much flavor, the burger makes for a filling meal. “Everybody that has had it said they like it,” Randy said. Randy starts his farm burger assembly with a half-pound beef patty and bacon on a hot grill. After a while, he gets an egg frying on the pan, and cooks it to a hard or soft yolk, depending on what customers prefer. He leaves the grill for

A tender classic A hamburger that doesn’t change in 75 years clearly has something going for itself, as Sara White knows too well. “It hasn’t changed in ever,” White, owner of Tendermaid, said about the loose-meat burgers at her little red-and-white restaurant on Fourth Avenue Northeast in Austin. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Tendermaid’s original burger, created by Mildred and Jerry Thatcher in 1938, may never deviate from the triedand-true creation that earned many longtime fans. But White thinks there’s nothing wrong with taking an awardwinning burger that comes with a spoon and piling a few more extras into a mouth-watering delight. That’s what many have done over the years, with variations such as the chili cheese burger, the western burger or the Tender Island. Try one of White’s favorite burgers, the bacon and ranch burger: Simply swap out American cheese for pepper jack, and pile jalapenos on top. “Jalapenos are like the new pickle,” White said. Along with ketchup, mustard and onions, the pepper jack cheese and jalapenos give the burger a spicy kick, but not too much as the ranch cools the menagerie of ingredients and keeps the heat under control. Don’t worry, burger fans, this one is not dangerous. Of course, diced bits of bacon add a little more texture to the sandwich, along with a little salty sweetness. Like any Tendermaid, this one’s going to require napkins and a spoon. A glass of milk or malt complements this sandwich well and brings back the tastebuds to a more neutral state — or primes them for another bacon, ranch pepper jack and jalapeno adventure.

a moment to get the remaining components ready: two slices of cheese, lettuce, onion, tomatoes and pickles. When the patty is nearly set, Randy tops it with cheese, bacon and eventually the egg. The burger is served with a side of fries. The Farm Burger is the newest in a collection of burgers and sandwiches The Windrift has added over the years. Other specialty burgers include the spicy Firehouse Burger and the best-selling mushroom swiss, which were each brought onto the menu three to four years ago. The other new burger, dubbed the Elvis Burger, hasn’t quite caught on with customers. Randy said many people are hesitant to try its unusual combination of peanut butter and bacon.

Tendermaid owner Sara White with one of the popular restaurant's burgers. In this case the Bacon and Ranch burger.

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DESIGNING YOUR DOMAIN O n e A u s t i n c o u p l e t u r n e d h o m e b u i l d i n g e x p e r i e n c e i n t o a d re a m h o u s e f i t f o r t w o . BY MATT PETERSON • PHOTOS

Snow Pogones looked out her kitchen windows to a muddy mess in the backyard. The ground was devoid of grass, saturated, and plenty of landscaping was left to finish. Yet the property’s gorgeous setup and potential was apparent, just beginning to show through. “It’s always a process,” said Pogones, who three months ago moved into the house northwest of Austin she and her husband recently built.

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While Snow gazed out the window and described the home, the gentle pattering of rain echoed in from a large, screened porch with elegant patio furniture and a grill, nestled up to the woods. Deer and turkey live just beyond the treeline. There’s never a shortage of scenery. Lance and Snow have finally found tranquility, inside and outside of their home. “This is our favorite room,” Snow said. “We will just live out here.”


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Fo urt h t ime ’s a cha rm Lance and Snow know a few things about building houses. This home — the fourth they’ve built — is an especially exciting chapter in their lives. It could be a long one, too, as the Pogoneses really knew what they wanted this time. The last of their three children moved out of the previous Pogones home. After that, Lance and Snow were ready to create a new house, a change from the large home they used to have. “I guess we wanted to go smaller,” Snow said. “And then I wanted to simplify it.” The 2,200-square-foot house features — apart from the peaceful, screened patio — a wide-open kitchen and family room, a “man cave” for Lance, three bedrooms, 3 1⁄2 bathrooms, a 2 1⁄2-car garage and the best features of the country. It was Snow who found the property to build her new home, as if she had a homing beacon. On a quiet drive to get her mind off of life’s stress, Snow found the best spot for the Pogoneses on the outskirts of Austin. “One day I was driving down this dirt road,” she said. “[The property] said for sale.” That was nearly 20 years ago, with much different landscape and no houses. The Pogoneses bought the property, moved from inner Austin to the countryside lot and built a house, where they lived for 18 years. That home is just north of the new home, on the same original lot. “I thought we’d always be in that house,” said Lance, who owns Turtle Creek Construction, the company that built several houses in the same area. “But it just got too big after our kids were gone.”

The dining room table is open to large windows facing south into the front yard.

Snow and Lance Pogones in their favorite room of the house, an enclosed patio open to the outside through screen doors.

Tou gh de cisions Creating a space such permanence as a home involves precarious decisions, as Lance and Snow knew well. However, the couple knew how to set up a comfortable, warm home that retains their style. Snow looked to other experts as well for design tips and a little inspiration. “I found it in a house planning book,” Snow said. “I really liked our old house next door. I went back to this original design, and we’re so happy we did.” Continues on 44

The Pogones used white as a base color for much of the house, including the kitchen.

The Pogones home features a rock f ireplace built by Lance.

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A large island anchors the Pogones kitchen.

The Pogones' master bedroom continues the couple's do-ityourself style, including the bed's headboard built by Lance. The Pogones’ master bathroom is an example of the elegance displayed throughout the house.

Continued from 43 Without children in the house as often, the Pogoneses decided to use wooden floors throughout the layout, except for the basement. Snow chose white colors for the base with intermittent mixtures of light earth tones throughout. “I love color,” Snow said. “I’m an art major.” Snow wanted to keep the house open and bright, which builders accomplished through high ceilings, plenty of windows and light colors. That, she said, helps offset the harsh feeling of Minnesota winters. If something is wrong, it can be easily fixed. “You can change your color scheme now and then,” Snow said. The Pogoneses saved on space by incorporating unique ideas. A children’s guest room features bunk beds built into a closet. A clean, modern computer station lies in a diagonal cutout in the wall, just between a dining room and hallway. In the living room, a fireplace built by Lance sits tucked in the corner, diagonally facing the room. Yet the new home seems large, as it’s open and spacious. The family room and kitchen on the main floor bleed into each other. An art studio is the only upstairs room, just

A guest bedroom in the home of Lance and Snow Pogones.

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This enclosed patio acts as a pleasant place to spend the evening and is the Pogoneses’ favorite place in the house.

above the garage, where Snow paints with the pleasure of the afternoon sun beaming through the window. Extra space in the basement was enough for a room just for Lance, with a treadmill, weights, big-screen television, full bathroom and storage room. The layout is practical, based on their needs. “‘Functional’ was a big thing in this house,” Snow said. The master bedroom contains a laundry room, large closet, open view of the backyard and a spacious bathroom. The shower is enormous, with a large ledge for sitting. Snow thought the shower would be too big, but it holds steam quite well, she said. The couple topped off the bathroom’s design with a tall, antique tub meant for a long soak. The Pogoneses still have some work to do, including seeding, landscaping and decorating. They’re wrapping up the home’s stucco exterior finish, and Snow wants to include as much of the property’s natural landscape as possible. But Lance and Snow have already blended comfort with style, old with new and outdoor with indoor. Like any new house, the Pogoneses home is clean and clear of clutter — except for a few bird books and a pair of binoculars on a big window sill that overlooks the backyard. It seems to be a much more fitting spot than tucked inside a drawer.

The Pogones kitchen is large, open and simple in its layout. A hallway on the main floor has space that is also used for a computer station.

Windows off the kitchen give a sparkling view of the pond behind the Pogones home.

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BY TREY MEWES • PHOTOS

BY

ERIC JOHNSON

Steve and Chris Bartley may have a home in Austin, but they live by the water whenever they can. They own a 26-foot pontoon boat with Steve’s sister Cheryl Cheek, and her husband Bill. You can often find the Bartleys in La Crosse, Wis., on any given weekend, just as you can find many current and former Austin residents with a passion for boating. From small boats to a house on the water, plenty of native Austinites have ties to the region’s rivers and lakes. Austin Living stopped by several piers in La Crosse for a look at the leisurely life on the waves. Continues on 48-53

Steve and Chris Bartley stand next to the pontoon they share with Bill and Cher yl Cheek of Rochester at a camp ground along side the Mississippi River at La Crosse, Wis. 46 | Austin Living | Summer 2013


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John and Jackie Flor outside their house boat, “Eufloria,” on the Mississippi River in La Crosse, Wis.

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John and Jackie Flor are well-acquainted with the nautical life. Boat owners since 1991, the Flors have owned 15 boats, trading up and down in size according to their wants and needs. They’ve toured around the country’s rivers, gulfs and part of the Atlantic Ocean in what’s known as the Great Loop. “We actually fell in love with the adventure of the river,” Jackie said. The Flors were longtime Blooming Prairie residents, and Jackie worked at St. Olaf Hospital (now Mayo Clinic Health Systems in Austin) in the 1980s. Nowadays, the couple live on a 55-foot houseboat on the Black River in La Crosse. With two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a smaller guest room for grandchildren, a second-level deck and a full kitchen/living room, the Flors are ready for life on the water. Taking care of a boat that large is a fulltime job, according to John, the couple enjoys the nautical life. “It really forms your identity,” Jackie said. The Flors aren’t quite done with the water, yet. They have plans to sell their houseboat, along with a winter boat they keep in Florida, to buy a troller they can use to sail around the Bahamas for the next few years. For the Flors, the adventure never ends.

John and Jackie Flor enjoy a spacious living area aboard their boat.

The upper deck of “Eufloria” allows for a pleasant space to enjoy sun and water while on the Mississippi River.

The kitchen on board the “Eufloria”could well be that of many houses.

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Doran Schroeder talks about boating on the Mississippi River from his own boat, “Sounds Good,” in La Crosse, Wis.

Doran Schroeder’s boat is moored and ready at a marina in La Crosse, Wis.

The motor of Doran Schroeder’s “Sounds Good,” out of the water. 50 | Austin Living | Summer 2013


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Doran Schroeder loves the calm of the water. The owner of Central Heating & Cooling, this longtime Austin resident gets down to La Crosse often during the summer to take out his prized 26-foot speedboat and go for a cruise. Schroeder is a boating veteran, as he bought his first boat in 1988. It didn’t take much for him to get into boating, however. He went out on the Mississippi River one day on a whim with his friend, and found himself drawn to a boat shop when he stopped in Rochester the following week. “We bought a little boat, and about a month later we took it back and got a bigger one, because we found it was too small on the river,” Schroeder said. He’s on his sixth boat, a 1997 Signature model, which he keeps in practically pristine condition. “They just keep getting bigger and bigger,” he said with a smile, noting his boats over the years. Schroeder has plenty of advice for potential boating enthusiasts. He knows from personal experience that a bigger boat is preferable on the river “so you don’t get bounced around too bad.” Of course, safety is important, and an attentive boater should always keep on the lookout for debris in the water. If you want to keep your boat as pristine as Schroeder does, make sure to often clean the sides, and hoist the boat out of the water when you’re not using it, as aluminum boats like Schroeder’s can get warped or torn up with too much exposure. The helm of Doran Schroeder's "Sounds Good."

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Steve Bartley guides his family’s pontoon out onto the Mississippi River at La Crosse, Wis.

Steve and Chris Bartley make the campgrounds in La Crosse a weekend home in the summer. Along with their RV at Pettibone Campground, the 25-foot pontoon they own ensure plenty of fun times for the Schroeders, their friends and family. While Steve grew up boating, Chris was new to the hobby until she married Steve more than 30 years ago. With a pontoon — practically a moving party deck — the Bartleys can take their sweet time enjoying the sights and sounds of the Mississippi. “We’re old folk, so we like to putt-putt,” Chris said with a smile. They bought their pontoon with the Cheeks about four years ago, after finding it in Milwaukee. After stripping and refurbishing it, the pontoon looks as good as new. The Austin couple make as much time as possible to come down, though Chris works at Mayo Clinic Health System in Austin every other weekend. Steve, a senior electronic technician with Hormel Foods Corps corporate engineering department, comes down every weekend in the summer, however. “We love it out here,” he said. The Bartleys embrace the river life as much as possible, and aren’t afraid to take friends new and old out on the water. “The river is an adventure,” Chris said.

Steve Bartley and Bill Cheek, left, take the tarp off the family pontoon as they prepare to launch it into the Mississppi River at La Crosse.

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Chris Bartley enjoys a quick trip onto the Mississippi River at La Crosse, Wis. on a pontoon driven by her husband Steve. Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 53


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BOOK REVIEW

E X T R A O R D I N A RY READING BY PEGGY BENZKOFER A s th e A us tin Page Tu rn ers com mit tee p lans f or t he 2014 Page Tu rn ers au th or, co mmit tee members are t akin g tim e ou t of t heir s ch ed ul e t o s hare s ome of t hei r f av orit e Min n es ota boo ks w it h A u st in Livin g . Pegg y B en zkof er is a Pag e Tu r ne rs com mitt ee member, an d William Ken t K rueg er w as t he Page Tur ners au t hor in 2010. “Ordinary Grace” by William Kent Krueger is a departure from his popular Cork O’Connor series, but it still sings with Krueger's strong characterizations and ability to invoke time and place. Set in the fictional New Bremen, Minn., in 1961, the story is told by 13-yearold Frank Drum, the son of a Methodist minister. Frank and his brother, Jake, and their friends spend a lazy summer along the Minnesota River until events begin to happen which change their lives forever. Frank’s father, Nathan, is a veteran of the second World War and has come away from the war with a great change of attitude about life. He went into the war as a striving young attorney and came out convinced he needs to become a minister. This has caused conflict with his wife, who finds her life far different than she anticipated when she married. It also has brought Gus into the lives of the family. Gus is a veteran who served with Nathan. He is an alcoholic who lives in the basement of the church and does odd jobs 54 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

around town when he isn’t drunk and disorderly. The family has lived in New Bremen for several years, as it is Frank's mother’s hometown. There is a history with many of the characters, including the wealthy Brandt family. Frank sister, Ariel, a high school senior is dating the son and Frank’s mother had a history with Emil Brandt, also a New Bremen native and famous composer. Those interactions will greatly affect events as the book progresses. Frank is a smart, scrappy kid who often seems wise beyond his years. He is continually challenging authority and often on the edge of trouble. One of the delights of the books is seeing how he manages to extricate himself from hopeless situations. It does seem difficult to believe he is the one who finally realizes some large truth and moves to bring offending people to justice. All in all, this is an excellent read and a good way to spend a summer afternoon.


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VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 3532 Hwy 63 South • Rochester, MN 55904

Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 55


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TRAVEL

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The

MaineVoyage BY JASON SCHOONOVER • PHOTOS

BY

ERIC JOHNSON

On the surface, Judy and Malcolm McDonald’s trip to Maine last year was a little slow and inconvenient. They drove more than 4,000 miles on back roads across the country, up and down the hills, valleys and crags of the U.S. heartland and parts of New England. They slept in bunk beds while sailing for a week. Yet Judy and Malcolm McDonald never minded the leisurely pace of their last big vacation. In fact, that’s the one word they use to describe their New England experience: leisurely. The Austin couple drove to Camden, Maine, in September 2012 as part of a long vacation, the highlight of which was to sail on the Windjammer Angelique — a ketch propelled by three heavy-duty canvas sails. “It was a fun experience,” said Judy, a Maine native who has fond memories of the sea during her childhood. Her family commonly drove about 50 miles for Bar Harbor, where they would help pull in lobsters from the sea, buy lobsters, or dig a hole on the beach, fill a pot with sea water, cook and eat lobsters right on the beach. Judy still remembered many of those boating skills when she and Malcolm, a former Austin Public Schools administrator, stayed on the Angelique. “Oh, it never left,” she said. The ship didn’t boast as many conveniences as a cruise. Judy and Malcolm slept on bunk beds in their cabin, and shared a bathroom with about four other rooms, but it was pleasant — minus one brief bout with seasickness on rough waters. “It was all very comfortable, normal, no stress — just that one day when we were hanging over the edge of [the boat],” Judy said with a laugh. Passengers were not strictly tourists on the Angelique. They could help in the kitchen and around the boat to feel what it’s like to run the ship. “The passengers could do whatever they wanted; they could help raise the sails or they even had some steering the boat,” Judy said.

56 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

Judie and Malcolm McDonald took a trip to Maine last October that had them spending time on a Maine Windjammer named the “Angelique.”


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That was not on Malcolm’s to-do list, however. “I was strictly a man of leisure,” Malcolm said with a wry smile. The organizers planned activities every two to three hours, like talks, films and more — most about sailing, fishing or Maine’s tourism industries. “We were kept busy,” Malcolm said, who joked the guests would get into trouble if left too long to their own resources. Judy and the other passengers still had plenty of time to visit on the deck, read and take in the scenery. “It was leisurely,” Judy said. The crew members and 29 passengers shared family-style meals at four tables, but Malcolm assured the meals were “consistently fattening.” Bathing was “an hour, hour and a half project,” according to Malcolm, as you’d have for the shower to open up and

then adjust to the limited stream of water on the boat. “You get a real taste of the sea, I think,” said Malcolm. The Angelique sailed through Penobscot Bay off the coast of Maine and stopped at many small towns and islands, though the highlight of the trip was the lobster, according to Judy. Passengers caught fresh lobsters from lobster pots and cooked them over fires, similar to her childhood. “It’s fantastic,” she said. The McDonalds planned the trip in September to see the famed fall colors of the east, but they were glad to follow them all the way home. “We traveled all the way to Maine to see the fall colors, and they were absolutely spectacular,” Malcolm said. “But, when we got to Iowa and started coming up along the west side of the Mississippi, the colors were just as spectacular.”

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INSIDE AUSTIN LIVING

Behind the scenes

58 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

Austin Living Magazine staff had a great time putting together this issue, as we toured the Mississippi River by boat, hunted for treasure and sat down to a tasty meal among other things. The highlight of the magazine for editor Trey Mewes was the beautiful boat photoshoot in La Crosse, Wis. We visited with several current and former Austin residents and took a nice boat ride into the Mississippi River with Steve and Chris Bartley, which resulted in some of the best photos we’ve ever taken. Speaking of photos, photographer Eric Johnson once again showed his prodigious skill in every magazine shoot thus far. Johnson thought the shoot was a pleasant day out on the water, but couldn’t deny almost every photo shoot for this issue has been “an interesting tour to get around the obstacles of a messy spring.” That didn’t stop him from taking his own BehindThe-Scenes photo, however. Speaking of a messy spring, writer Matt Peterson got a little messy when interviewing Jerry Ibberson, a geocaching instructor at the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center. Here’s a photo of Peterson hunting for a practice geocache with Ibberson on the nature center trails. Of course, we tend to get a little hungry around the office working on so many good stories. Kevin Coss got to mix work with fun when he interviewed Randy Qualey at the Windrift Lounge over their scrumptious Farm Burger. Coss thought the burger was delicious.


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June 4 - August 27

I Tu esd ay s o n Mai n W hen: 5-8 p.m. every Tuesday. W here: Main Street. For more information, visit www.austindowntownalliance.com.

June 6 - September 26

I J u ni o r M a s t e r G a rde n e r s W hen: 10 a.m. to noon Thursdays. W here: 4-H building at the Mower County Fairgrounds. Cooking and gardening classes for youth in the third grade and older. Free to the public. Call 507-437-9552.

June 20

I

Douglas Woo d : Nat u ralis t, s t o r y t e l l e r a n d m us i c i a n

W hen: 9 a.m. senior program, 1:30 p.m. family, 7 p.m. evening. W here: Hormel Nature Center. Call 507-437-7519 or visit hormelnaturecenter.org to RSVP. Free to the public.

June 21-22

I S u m m e r S o l s t ic e E c o b l it z W hen: 8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. W here: Hormel Nature Center. Family day of nature-related outdoor activities. Free to the public. Call 507-437-7519 to register. Visit hormelnaturecenter.org for details.

June 22

I

Second annual Reichel Foods/Aust in All Stars tourney

W hen: 10 a.m. W here: Todd Park North Ages 11 and younger. Free to the public. Call Mike Holtorf at 507-433-6715 for more information.

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June 27

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T h e Ho r m e l I ns t i t u te o p e n h o us e

W hen: 4 to 6 p.m. W here: The Hormel Institute. 801 16th Ave. NE The Hormel Institute hosts the first of three public open houses of the worldrenowned medical/cancer research center. Free to the public. Call 507-433-8804.

June 27

I

Lu nc hb o x H i s t o r y S e r i e s : F r a nk Br i dg e s

W hen: Noon. W here: Mower County Historical Society. Call 507-437-6082 or visit www.mowercountyhistory.org. Free to the public, but donations are accepted.

June 28-30

I

35 t h a n nu a l A u s t i n A l l S t a r /L o c a l 9 /R e i c h e l F o o d s You t h I n ter n at io nal B ase ball to ur n ey.

W hen: Opening ceremony at 10 a.m. on June 28. Other times W here: North diamond Todd Park. A wood bat tourney for ages 12 and younger. Gate fee is $8 for a weekend pass or $5 daily; seniors and children 18 and younger are free. Call Mike Holtorf at 507-433-6715 for more information.

July 3-7

I Fre e d o m F e s t W hen: Times vary based on events. W here: Throughout Austin. Austin’s annual celebration of community and country. Parade, fireworks, live music, carnival games and more.

July 4-7

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M e d fo r d C r a z y D a y s E v e n t

W h ere: Medford Outlet Center, Medford, Minn. Open to the public. For more information visit www.medfordoutletcenter.com

July 6

I 3 1s t- a n n u a l Y H o g Jo g When : Race starts at 8 a.m. Where: East Side Lake. A 5-mile run sponsored by the Austin YMCA. $25 before June 19, $30 after. The race is chip timed and PR certified. Call 507-433-1804 or visit www.ymca-austin.org.

July 9-13

I S te e l M a g n o l i a s When : 7:30 p.m. Where: Frank W. Bridges Theatre on Riverland Community College campus. Second performance of the Summerset Theatre season. Tickets are $12 adult, $8 student 16 and younger. Call 507-433-0595 or visit www.riverland.edu/tickets. Season information at www.summersetaustin.org.

July 12

I “ P o w e r o f 10 ” When : 7:30 p.m. Where: Paramount Theatre The 10-piece Twin Cities-based band returns to the Paramount. Power of 10 combines keyboard, horn, drums and vocal lines for a big sound. Tickets are $15 adult, $5 student, $2 higher at door. Call 507-434-0934 or visit www.paramounttheatre.org.

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Ok e e D o ke e Br o th e r s c o nc e r t

When : Senior program 9 a.m., family concert 1:30 p.m., evening concert 7 p.m. Where: Hormel Nature Center. Call 507-437-7519 or visit hormelnaturecenter.org for details or to RSVP. Free to the public.


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It ' s s um me r t im e, w h i ch m e an s i t ' s t he be st t i me o f y e a r t o g et o u t s id e ! T he r e' s pl e nt y t o d o in A us t i n a n d so ut he r n M i n ne s o t a . All dates, times and other event details are subject to change.

July 25

July 27

When: 4-6 p.m. Where: The Hormel Institute, 801 16th Ave. NE Tour the world-renowned medical/cancer research center. Free to the public. Call 507-433-8804 or visit www.hi.umn.edu.

W here: Medford Outlet Center, Medford, Minn. Music, Chocolate Crawl and Progressive Shopping Event...Earn $10 gift cards. Open to the public. For more information visit www.medfordoutletcenter.com

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T h e Ho r m e l I ns ti t u te op e n h o u s e

July 26-29 I

M e d fo r d C r a z y D a y s E v e n t

Wh ere: Medford Outlet Center, Medford, Minn. Open to the public. For more information visit www.medfordoutletcenter.com

July 27 I

13 t h a n n ua l B OS S (B i ke r s o f S tu de nt S uc c e s s ) R i d e fu n d r a i s e r

When: Registration at 9:30 a.m., daylong ride begins at 10 a.m. Where: Riverland Community College Austin east parking lot. The ride raises money for Riverland Community College student scholarships. Riders will follow a route that heads up to the Mississippi and returns to Austin, ending at Torge’s Live. Registration is $25 per bike. All motorcycle enthusiasts are welcome. Call Laurie Minehart at 507433-0630 or visit ww.riverland.edu/foundation/boss_ride.cfm.

July 27 - September 27 I

Minn es ota H o mefron t tr a v e l i ng e x h i bi t

When: Tuesday through Friday, 10 to 4 p.m. Where: Mower County Historical Society. Display hosted by Austin Public Library & Mower County Historical Society. Free to the public, but donations are accepted.

I

L a d i e s Da y O u t

July 31 - August 4, 7-10

I “ Mo nt y Py t h on ’s S p amal o t ” Wh en : 7:30 p.m. Wh ere: Frank W. Bridges Theatre on RCC campus. Third performance of the Summerset Theatre season. Retells the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. Ages 12 and older. Tickets are $15 adult, $10 students 16 and younger. Call 507-433-0595 or visit www.riverland.edu/tickets. Season information at www.summersetaustin.org.

August 1 I

A m b e r D ol p h i n a n d t h e P e c a t on i c a S t r i n g Q u a r t e t

Wh en : Senior concert 9 a.m.; family 1:30 p.m.; evening 7 p.m. Wh ere: Hormel Nature Center. Call 507-437-7519 or visit hormelnaturecenter.org for details or to RSVP. Free to the public.

August 15 I

J i m J ay es, mag i ci an an d pu p pe t e e r

Wh en : Senior program 9 a.m., family 1:30 p.m. Wh ere: Hormel Nature Center. Call 507-437-7519 or visit hormelnaturecenter.org for details or to RSVP. Free to the public.

August 22

I

To m P ease, s in g e r a n d m u s i c i a n

W hen: Senior concert 9 a.m., family concert 1:30 p.m. W here: Hormel Nature Center. Call 507-437-7519 or visit hormelnaturecenter.org for details or to RSVP. Free to the public.

Saturday, August 24

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P r og r e s s i v e B a c k t o S c h o o l S h op p i n g E v e n t

W here: Medford Outlet Center, Medford, Minn. Open to the public. For more information visit www.medfordoutletcenter.com

August 24-25

I A us t i n A rt w o rk s F e s t i v a l W hen: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. W here: Downtown Utilities building. Displays the works of fine artists, musicians and authors with Austin ties. Includes demonstrations, readings and performances. Visit austinartworksfestival.org for more information. Free to the public.

August 24

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M a rt i n Z e l l a r a nd C l o ud C u l t

W hen: 7:30 p.m. W here: Marcusen Park. Part of the Austin Artworks Festival. Tickets are $20 if purchased before Aug. 1, and available at www.austinartworksfestival.org.

August 31 - September 2

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M edfo rd Cra zy Days Even t

W here: Medford Outlet Center, Medford, Minn. Open to the public. For more information visit www.medfordoutletcenter.com Summer 2013 | Austin Living | 61


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Riding your bicycle around southeast Minnesota BY ADAM HARRINGA • PHOTO

Avid biker Chad Burma knows all about the best paved trails, the favorites for mountain biking and everything in between. Burma, Rydjor Bike store manager and a 15-year veteran of the well-known bicycle hot spot, has tried many of them and has his favorites. No matter if you’re looking for a smooth ride or a rugged course, if you’re a novice or pro, avid bikers like Burma and groups like Rydjor can guide you to the perfect path in Austin, Mower County and beyond.

Step out your front door Bikers don’t have to look far for myriad in-town paths: There are 14.4 miles of existing trail within the Austin city limits connecting city parks, waterways and many homes and businesses, and there are many more miles in the works. For example, you could start pedaling at Marcusen or Driesner Park in the southeast, loop around Mill Pond or East Side Lake and make it to Todd Park north of town without leaving the path.  Grab a map of existing and future Austin trails at Rydjor Bike, 219 N. Main St. (or visit www.rydjor.com and click on “Rides & Trail Maps”), or the Austin Daily Herald, 310 Second St. NE.

BY

ERIC JOHNSON

Shooting Star Trail in southern Mower County travels from Rose Creek to Adams, Taopi and LeRoy, and the Blazing Star Trail in Freeborn County starts in Albert Lea, winds around Albert Lea Lake and snakes through Myre Big Island State Park. Plans are also in the works to connect both trails to Austin with the help of Vision 2020.  Check out maps of the Shooting Star and Blazing Star at rydjor.com under “Rides & Trail Maps.”

Off the beaten path Looking for a rough ride? Burma recommends the trail system north of Rochester. He says they are well traveled, so they’re taken care of. He says they’re also the closest to Austin for that sort of terrain.  Visit www.rochestermn.gov/ departments/park/trails for more.

A bit of a drive, but worth it

Burma’s favorite paved trails are the Root River and HarmonyPreston Valley State Trails, which goes through Lanesboro. He calls them the perfect mix of scenery and distance. Burma also recommends the Cannon Valley Trail, with trail heads in Red Wing, Cannon Falls and Welch Station. Grab a map of existing  Visit rydjor.com and and future Austin trails at Rydjor Bike, click on “Rides & Trail Maps” 219 North Main Street, or the Austin for the Root River trail. Or stop Daily Herald, 310 Second Street NE by their shop and ask for a comprehensive, 90-page 2013 Minnesota Bike/Hike Guide. A hop, skip and a pedal  Two more handy resources for many trails in If you’re a long-distance cyclist or willing to take a 5- or Minnesota: www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_trails/list.html, and 15-minute car ride to your favorite path, there are several www.dot.state.mn.us/bike/maps.html options throughout Mower and Freeborn County. The 62 | Austin Living | Summer 2013


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A biker waves as he departs from the Rose Peddler while taking part in the 14th annual Shooting Star Trail Bike Ride.

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FINAL WORD

Make time to volunteer BY YESENIA MENDOZA,

MULTICULTURAL COORDINATOR AT

Volunteering is more than sharing your “free time.” As a youth in high school I never thought volunteering could mean so many things. I had in mind that volunteering was something that we just “had to” do to show our community that we cared about contributing. Besides, I always thought, “What do I have that can be useful to someone else? How are my skills going to make things better for this community?” Therefore, I never got involved in much of anything. I always kept to my paid part-time job and continued to do well in my academics. My thinking was, as long as I work and I can help my family by providing some extra financial help, I’m doing my part. It wasn’t until I went to college at Mount Mercy University, where I was surrounded by a “service learning” environment, that I realized volunteering was not only about using our skills to help others. Volunteering is more about helping others in order to gain skills, and this is truly what makes volunteering a rewarding activity. What I find rewarding is improving my skills by helping others. I find I become more educated about other people’s perspectives and challenges, which increases my patience and sensitivity toward others. Even though there

64 | Austin Living | Summer 2013

RIVERLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE

is no financial gain, I treat it as if it is my job to know my community. Plus, I know I’ll do a much better job wherever I work, and I will better help my family if I know the resources and people that are available. As a young professional, I’ve been blessed with the opportunity to participate on various steering committees and boards because I have learned many useful things to help me with my own job and personal goals. I’ve learned more about grassroots organizing and how so many community leaders — regular residents like you and me — work together to make great projects happen to benefit the community as a whole. Once again, the most powerful thing about volunteering is the people you meet. Once again, volunteering is more than helping others. It’s helping yourself understand your community, and in that sense educating yourself to better serve your community, whether at your job or in your free time. Yesenia Mendoza is a Vision 2020 Steering Committee member, youth soccer coach and organizer for the Latino rights group Pa’Delante, among other volunteer efforts.


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We don’t just love bacon because it’s trendy right now. We’ve been in a state of bacon mania for over  \HDUV :H EXVW RXU EXWWV RYHU WKH SHUIHFW EOHQG RI ÀDYRUV VPRNH DQG LQJUHGLHQWV :H DOZD\V JR ZLWK RXU JXW DQG RXU JXW ORYHV EDFRQ :H¶UH +RUPHO® %ODFN /DEHO® Bacon and we’re bacon to the core. Join us at facebook.com/hormelbacon ‹ +RUPHO )RRGV //&


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North Iowa Area Community College is a great place to start your future, no matter what your age. We have a beautiful campus atmosphere, on-campus housing, recreation center, music and athletic programs, performing arts series and more. Consider these important points: • We offer a high quality education with small class sizes so students know their instructors. • Students who come to NIACC right after high school can save their families more than $7,000 by starting at NIACC — and their credits easily transfer to four-year schools. • 95% of NIACC career and technical graduates get jobs! Contact our Admissions Office today and schedule a campus visit!

Call 641-422-4245 or toll free at 1-888-GO NIACC www.niacc.edu


Austin Living Magazine  

Summer 2013 Issue

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