Australian Dance Theatre Annual Report 2019

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A N N UA L REPORT 2O19


Australian Dance Theatre respectfully acknowledges the traditional lands of Kaurna people and we pay respect to their spiritual relationship with their Country. We also acknowledge the Kaurna people as the traditional custodians of the Adelaide region and that their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Kaurna people today.


contents 4. Chair’s Report

34. Reach & Statistics

6. Artistic Director’s Report

36. Awards & Media

9 - 10. The Company

40 - 46. Performance against goals

14 - 20. Productions

48. Corporate Governance Statement

22. Other activities

50. Partners

24. Development

53 - 54. Company Directors

27 -28. Learning Program

30. International Centre for Choreography

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CHAIR’S REPORT D AV I D S T O B B E Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr has been credited with the phrase “the more things change, the more they stay the same” and upon reflection this seems to summarise 2019 quite well. During the year there were a number of new faces replacing familiar ones but what didn’t change was Australian Dance Theatre’s ability to continue to create and tour award-winning work which was both ingenious and distinctive.

The company recognises Eira Swaine for her four years with the company, most recently as Executive Director. Eira made an outstanding contribution to the company, successfully strengthening philanthropic and corporate partnership programs and overseeing new collaborations with other South Australian arts and cultural institutions.

I will start my first report as Chair of Australian Dance Theatre thanking, Kim Boehm, for his outstanding service which spanned a decade. The company has come such a long way under his guidance and only now, after undertaking the role of Chair, do I have a full appreciation of the amount of time and effort he put in.

Upon Eira’s departure the company sought an interim Executive Director whilst we undertook a thorough process in finding a permanent replacement. Ann Tonks was approached and agreed to join the organisation. Although Ann was only with us for a short period of time, she had a significant, positive, impact on the company.

In 2019 Garry Stewart continued to engage and amaze audiences with work which included touring The Beginning of Nature in New York, the world premiere season of North/South at the Adelaide Festival Centre and Anthology, which celebrated 20 years of Garry’s artistic leadership at the company. Over this period Garry has established and cemented the company’s position on the world stage and his passion for the company and his work is extraordinary.

At the start of 2020 we welcomed Nick Hays as our new Executive Director, coming to us most recently from The Australian Ballet. The board and Garry are looking forward to working with Nick as we seek to build on the momentum of the company.

The company received four nominations at the 2019 Helpmann Awards and won the Best Dance Production award for The Beginning of Nature. Through these nominations we were recognised for our regional touring, choreography and quality of our dancers. Further details on the aforementioned and other highlights are contained throughout this annual report. Without the ongoing support of our partners and sponsors we could not continue to thrive and exist. We are grateful for the support of the South Australian Government through Arts South Australia/ Department of the Premier and Cabinet and the Australian Government through Australia Council for the Arts. Our thanks also goes to SA Power Networks, Adelaide Airport, Novatech Creative Event Technology, Tanja Liedtke Foundation, Henschke, National Storage, Enoki, Freerange Future, Adelaide Hills Distillery and Out in the Paddock.

In addition to Kim’s resignation earlier in the year Tricia Walton resigned from her position on the board after a lengthy tenure with the organisation. Thank you, Tricia, for your counsel and valuable contributions. Belinda Jefferys joined the board in the second half of 2019 and her skills and expertise have already been drawn upon. I would like to also thank the remaining board members Nathan Bennett, Chloe Benton, Anita Ewing, Deborah Kingsbury, Jeff Meiners, Ruth Rentschler and Peter Seltsikas for all their efforts over the year. Along with those board members previously mentioned who have contributed to the ongoing success of this proud company. On behalf of the board I would like to relay our gratitude and thanks to all staff and dancers. As an organisation we have finite resources and what you have been able to accomplish is truly remarkable.

In 2019 the Commissioning Circle was launched which resulted in many generous donations from the public. I would like to personally welcome and thank our Founding Patron, Sarah Rohrsheim, as well as Patrons Andrew Nunn and Alexandra Dimos of The Nunn Dimos Foundation for their significant support. I would also like to welcome Professor Barbara van Ernst AM as our Learning Program Ambassador.

DAVID STOBBE CHAIR

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ARTISTIC DIRECTOR’S REPORT G A R RY S T E WA R T


Artistically and creatively ADT had a tremendous year in 2019. For me it was momentous occasion as I celebrated my 20th year at the helm of this great company. Fittingly, we commenced the year with Anthology - an evening of excerpts from a number of the most memorable works we’ve created over this time. For the dancers of the company it presented an exciting challenge as they grappled with the manifold choreographic approaches underpinning these hugely varied and diverse works. Following this season we toured The Beginning of Nature to the Joyce Theater in New York City. We were so proud to take this work to such a highly regarded, landmark venue, particularly as it includes singing in Kaurna – the aboriginal language of the Adelaide plains. The dancers were rewarded with standing ovations after each performance from enthusiastic New York audiences and South Australian Premier, the Hon Steven Marshall attended the final performance. Immediately after we travelled to Jacob’s Pillow, the renowned and historic dance centre in Massachusetts. The company participated in ‘Pillow Lab’, a one-week residency where we developed material towards a major new work. After rehearsing in their stunning, cathedral-like main studio we gave a presentation for the staff and supporters. We further developed this work back at our studios with the support of the Major Festivals Initiative. One of the other highlights was North/South, a new production created as an artistic response to climate change at the extremes of the planet: the North and South Poles. For this project I invited lauded Norwegian choreographer Ina Christel Johannessen to create North, which reflected on her experience living in the Arctic Circle and witnessing daily the increasing impacts of globalwarming. My work, South, referenced the ill-fated journey of explorer Sir Douglas Mawson to Antarctica. This journey was presented as an allegory for our current era where humans struggle in the face of the changing forces of nature. 2019 also saw the completion of a new short film The Circadian Cycle. This 15-minute film charts a day in nature with our dancers in various South Australian locations including Remarkable Rocks at Kangaroo Island, the expansive salt flats of Lake Gairdner, the stark, rocky landscapes of Maslin Beach, the lush forest in Mount Lofty National Park as well as the rugged and ancient terrain of Alligator Gorge. We also commenced work on a new video installation The Choreography of Emotions, to be completed in 2021. The visual arts component of the company’s activities have grown over the past few years and we are very proud and excited by the possibilities this domain affords us.

I would like to thank Kurt and Gerlinde Liedtke for the ongoing and enthusiastic support providing manifold opportunities for young choreographers to develop their craft. Their support also assists in our substantial Artist-in-Residence program where we provide free rehearsal space for local independent choreographers. This year we supported seven choreographers through this initiative. In 2019 we were able to appoint an Associate Artist for the first time. Matt Shilcock will spend his time in this role over 2019 and 2020, developing his own choreographic methodology which he refers to as ‘Osteogenuine’. This approach is a response to a medical condition Osteogenesis imperfecta which Matt has been dealing with since childhood. I am excited by what will unfold over the course of Matt’s time with us and look forward to the development of his unique choreographic practice. ADT continues to partner with the Dance Department of the Adelaide College of the Arts. In honour of my 20th year as Artistic Director of ADT, the college remounted my work, G. This work, which has toured the globe, premiered in 2006 and is a deconstruction of the classical ballet Giselle. It is a work that is highly challenging for dancers both technically and performatively. The students acquitted themselves very well and I look forward to seeing them take on more ADT repertoire. The company also performed at a number of events including a meeting of the Council of Australian Governments at the Art Gallery of South Australia. For this event we collaborated with the celebrated Adelaide-based electronic music duo Electric Fields. Finally, our ADT Youth Ensemble had a wonderful year working with a number of local choreographers as well as our dancers. This culminated in an annual showcase at The Odeon, which was a stunning tribute to their hard work and tenacity over the year. It is an initiative I’m very proud of and I would like to thank Associate Artistic Director Sarah-Jayne Howard and our Program Coordinator Tamara Wheeler for their diligence and passion in making the ADT Youth Ensemble such a success. I’d also like to thank our stunning ensemble of exceptional dancers, our indefatigable production team and other dedicated and passionate company members. I’d also like to thank our various supporters and funders who help keep us moving forward, as well as our enthusiastic audiences in Australia and around the globe.

Rough Draft is our annual showcase of nascent works by independent choreographers and company dancers. This important initiative provides a small but vital forum for artists to place new creative ideas in front of, and in dialogue with, an audience. Rough Draft falls within the ambit of ADT’s International Centre for Choreography. The activities of the Centre are generously supported the Tanja Liedtke Foundation, and also includes a biennial residency at the Ada Studios in Berlin alongside the esteemed dance festival, Tanz im August. This year the Fellowship was won by Melbourne-based choreographer Geoffrey Watson who spent three weeks in Berlin developing an audacious new work. The Foundation also funds an annual residency at ADT for a young international choreographer, facilitated in partnership with the Hannover Competition for Choreography; This year I awarded it to South African choreographer Oscar Buthelezi who will join us in 2021.

GARRY STEWART ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

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> the company


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

MANAGEMENT

David Stobbe, Chair Nathan Bennett Chloé Benton Kim Boehm (to May 2019) Anita Ewing (leave of absence from May 2019) Amanda Harkness (May 2019 to August 2019) Belinda Jefferys (from May 2019) Deborah Kingsbury Georgina McGuinness (to January 2019) Jeff Meiners Ruth Rentschler Peter Seltsikas Lorraine Sheppard (May 2019 to August 2019) Tricia Walton (to November 2019)

Artistic Director, Garry Stewart Executive Director, Eira Swaine (to September 2019) Interim Executive Director, Ann Tonks (September to December 2019) Production & Operations Manager, Paul Cowley Associate Artistic Director, Sarah-Jayne Howard Finance Manager & Company Secretary, Bev Majda Development Manager. Rosie Riggir (from March 2019) Marketing Manager, Madison Thomas (to November 2019) Production Administrator & Stage Manager, Lucie Balsamo Venue & Program Coordinator, Tamara Wheeler The Odeon Technician, Johnathon Edwards Stage Manager, Françoise Piron International Producer, Niels Gamm (Kulturconsulting)

CORE DANCERS

CONTRACT DANCERS

Jana Castillo Zoe Dunwoodie Harrison Elliott Thomas Fonua Christopher Mills Matte Roffe Rowan Rossi Kimball Wong

Natalie Allen Jana Castillo Zoe Gay Daniel Jaber Gabrielle Nankivell Zoe Wozniak

CONTRACT ARTISTS/CREATIVES Shauntai Batzke Vincent ‘Jack’ Buckskin Damien Cooper Zoe Dunwoodie Koenraad Ecker Matthew Gibbs Thomas Fonua Georgia Hall Ina Christel Johannessen

Ruth Little Jonathan Mendez Heru Pinkasova Cinzia Schincariol Matthew Shilcock Wendy Todd Brendan Woithe Zephyr Quartet

PRODUCTION CONTRACTORS Christyana Bambacas Andrew Clarkson Billie Cook Johnathon Edwards Madeline Edwards Dee Gallasch Alexander Hatchard Samuel Hoare Freddy Komp Cameron Lane Katrina Lucas Mammal & Co.

Larissa McGowan Lucy Mitchell Carolyn Obst Danny Phillips Alexander Ramsay Adrianne Semmens Jordan Scheer Oliver Taylor Damien Tregenza Lachlan Turner Daniel Voss

Anthology Supernature creative development Epic Flight event Anthology and North/South The Beginning of Nature, Cunard and USA Tour North/South


DANCE CLASS TEACHERS COMPANY CLASS

PUBLIC CLASSES

Christie Anderson Janet Bridgman (Ballet) Chylie Cooper (Ballet) Michael Getman Sarah-Jayne Howard (Contemporary) ilDance (Contemporary) Niv Marinberg Gabrielle Nankivell (Contemporary) Poe One (Breaking) Simi Roche (Yoga) Maura Vergara (Yoga) Catherine Wells (Ballet) Yogafusion (Yoga)

Liana Barletta Lana Barone Tobiah Booth-Remmers Anthony Bridgman Janet Bridgman Mary Allyson Chymz Angeles Chylie Cooper Courteney Cox Ruby Dolman Harrison Elliott Erin Fowler Lulu Lafaele Lewis Major Diane Malet Christopher Mills

Eliza Payze Tanya Voges Carol Wellman Kelly Kialea-Nadine Williams

YOUTH ENSEMBLE Tobiah Booth-Remmers Paulo Castro Lewis Major Gala Moody Joanne Stone Kialea-Nadine Williams

IN-SCHOOL WORKSHOPS Carlie Angel (Teaching Artist) Katrina Lazaroff (Teaching Artist)

THE ODEON Lana Barone Emily Crosby Johnathon Edwards Harrison Elliott Dee Gallasch Alexander Hatchard Jordan Hart Brenton “BJ” Jordans

Saeesha Krishnan Saskia McGrane Lucy Mitchell Aspen Palmer Eliza Payze Alexander Ramsay Jordan Scheer James Smith

Tamara Wheeler Kimball Wong Timothy Willett

CONTRACTORS Wayne Psaila – Freerange Future (Web hosting/maintenance) Meaghan Coles – Now and Then Photography Daniel Boud Photography Closer Productions Michael Heynen – Mitcham Rehab (Physiotherapist) Georgina McGuinness – McGuinness Media (Publicist)

Novatech Creative Event Technology PKF Adelaide – Chartered Accountants Sam Roberts Photography Seb Szocinski – Rockethouse (Web hosting/maintenance) Oliver Toth – Accent Photography

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> productions



SPECIAL EVENT

ANTHOLOGY “This was a program which highlighted his innovative invention, and a reminder of the excellence of the dancers” - THE ADELAIDE REVIEW

Celebrating 20 years under the artistic direction of Garry Stewart, ADT presented Anthology – a program showcasing excerpts of Stewart’s most beloved and revered works. Stewart is now the longest serving director in the company’s history. In his time with ADT he has created over 18 original works for the stage, screen and public spaces which have toured extensively to some of the most prestigious theatres in the world. This truly special season revisited the works which catapulted Stewart to international acclaim, featuring highlights from Birdbrain, G, Proximity, Devolution, Be Your Self, The Age of Unbeauty and The Beginning of Nature.

CREDITS

All works conceived and directed and choreographed Garry Stewart Remount Director - Sarah-Jayne Howard Technical Director – Paul Cowley Stage Manager – Lucie Balsamo Lighting Design and Operator – Daniel Voss Sound and AV Operator – Johnathon Edwards Assistant Stage Manager - Françoise Piron Head of Wardrobe - Tamara Wheeler

LIMITED SEASON (APRIL) The Odeon, Norwood, Adelaide # PERFORMANCES 3 TOTAL ATTENDANCE 401

Dancers - Natalie Allen, Zoë Dunwoodie, Harrison Elliott, Thomas Fonua, Sarah-Jayne Howard, Daniel Jaber, Christopher Mills, Matte Roffe, Rowan Rossi, Kimball Wong

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WORLD PR EMIER E

NORTH/SOUTH Responding to the polar regions of our planet – the Arctic Circle and Antarctica – North/South is an extraordinary double bill from two acclaimed choreographers, Ina Christel Johannessen and Garry Stewart. When humans seek refuge in an enclosed space how is their behaviour shaped when lethal weather forces rage all around them? Ina Christel Johannessen’s North sees a collection of characters trapped in a shelter amidst an Arctic blizzard. As an artist living and working in the Arctic Circle, Johannessen has witnessed first-hand the rapid changes wrought by global warming and its emotional and psychological impacts on the people that live there. North explores the intimate and powerful exchange that plays out between humans and their environment. Garry Stewart’s South depicts Sir Douglas Mawson’s fateful and dramatic journey to Antarctica as an allegory for our current predicament in the era of rapid global warming. Travelling from Adelaide in 1913, Mawson’s story is one of loss and vulnerability in an alien and forbidding landscape. This unique collaboration saw two legendary contemporary choreographers united to create a powerful new work of tragedy, loss and emotion.

“South is one of the most memorable and exciting theatrical works in recent memory” - DANCE AUSTRALIA CREDITS

North Conceived and Directed - Ina Christel Johannessen Choreography - Ina Christel Johannessen Composer - Koenraad Ecker Designer - Wendy Todd Lighting Designer - Damien Cooper

South Conceived and Directed - Garry Stewart Choreography - Garry Stewart with the dancers of ADT Dramaturgy - Ruth Little Composer -Brendan Woithe (KLANG) Designer - Wendy Todd Lighting Designer - Damien Cooper

WORLD PREMIERE (SEPTEMBER) The Dunstan Playhouse, Adelaide Festival Centre, Adelaide # PERFORMANCES 4 TOTAL ATTENDANCE 1,285

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INTERNATIONAL TOUR

THE BEGINNING OF NATURE Weaving together music and astonishingly powerful contemporary dance, The Beginning of Nature is a compelling and ritualistic work. Exploring life cycles and themes of metamorphosis and transformation within nature, the spellbinding score combines electronica, strings and a libretto sung in Kaurna language, the first language of the Adelaide Plains. The Beginning of Nature travelled to New York as part of The Joyce Theater’s inaugural “Australia Festival”, the return of ADT to North America after 15 years. In early 2018, luxury cruise brand Cunard announced a series of partnerships with leading Australian companies: fashion icons R.M. Williams and Akubra, boutique whisky distillery STARWARD and ADT. These partnerships were designed to embrace Australian products and culture during Queen Elizabeth’s 2019 Australian season. ADT performed bespoke performances as well as workshops and discussion panels on board Cunard’s Queen Elizabeth from Melbourne to Hobart.

CREDITS

Conceived and Directed - Garry Stewart Assistant to Garry Stewart – Sarah-Jayne Howard Choreography - Garry Stewart and the dancers of ADT Original Lighting Design – Damien Cooper Composer - Brendan Woithe (KLANG) Costume Design - Davis Browne Indigenous Language and Culture Consultant – Vincent ‘Jack’ Buckskin Technical Director – Paul Cowley Stage Manager – Lucie Balsamo Head Lighting – Daniel Voss Re-light for Cunard – Daniel Voss

PERFORMANCE ON CRUSIE SHIP (MARCH) Royal Court Theatre, Queen Elizabeth Ship, Cunard, Tasmanian Voyage (AUS) USA (MAY) Joyce Theater, New York (USA)

Head Sound and Staging – Dee Gallasch (Cunard), Oliver Taylor (New York) Prop Construction – Marshall Tearle Singers – Georgia Hall & Heru Pinkasova Dancers – Jana Castillo, Zoë Dunwoodie, Harrison Elliott, Thomas Fonua, Christopher Mills, Gabrielle Nankivell, Matte Roffe, Rowan Rossi, Kimball Wong Recorded Strings - The Zephyr Quartet: Belinda Gehlert (Violin), Emily Tulloch (Violin), Jason Thomas (Viola), Hilary Kleinig (Cello)

# PERFORMANCES 7 TOTAL ATTENDANCE 2,696

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FILM

THE CIRC A DI A N CYCLE A day in nature as told by the dancing body.

The Circadian Cycle is a short film conceived and directed by Garry Stewart, with cinematography from renowned director and film maker Cordelia Beresford. Filmed within the stunning South Australian landscape, The Circadian Cycle draws upon choreography from ADT’s award-winning mainstage work The Beginning of Nature. This film was first presented on the external screens of the Adelaide Festival Centre during the North/South season. Using the dancing body as a metaphor, The Circadian Cycle examines morphology, biological rhythm and animal behaviour. The film charts a day from sunrise to evening, moving through cycles of nature, from nascence and awakening to predation and death. The film was shot in stunning locations across South Australia including: Flinders Chase National Park, Lake Bumbunga, Lake Gairdner, Maslin Beach, Mount Lofty Botanic Garden and Mount Remarkable National Park.

CREDITS Written and directed - Garry Stewart Choreographed - Garry Stewart and the dancers of ADT Cinematography - Cordelia Beresford Edited - Mark Bennett Produced - Garry Stewart and Eira Swaine, ADT Composer - Brendan Woithe Vocals - Sarah Belkner Sound Design and Mix - Declan Diacono and Brendan Woithe at KLANG Drone Operator and assistant to the Cinematographer - Jared Nicholson Colourist - Andrew Clarkson Flame Artist - Heather Galvin Conform and Titles - Danny Phillips Production Coordinator - Katrina Lucas Rehearsal Director - Sarah-Jayne Howard Design Consultant and Construction - Wendy Todd Costume Construction - Tamara Wheeler and Emma Brockliss Costume Design and Construction - Davis Browne Design, Georg Meyer-Wiel, Wendy Todd Prop Construction - Marshall Tearle Production Assistants - Madison Thomas and Lucie Balsamo

Makeup - Zoë Dunwoodie & Thomas Fonua Runner - Raphael Rivera Dancers - Jana Castillo, Zoë Dunwoodie, Harrison Elliott, Thomas Fonua, Christopher Mills, Gabrielle Nankivell, Matte Roffe, Rowan Rossi and Kimball Wong Thanks to David Gregan and Picture Hire Australia

The Circadian Cycle has been produced by Australian Dance Theatre and was made possible by the generous support of Adelaide Airport, Adelaide Festival Centre and the South Australian Film Commission.

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DEVELOPMENT In 2019 ADT implemented a new Development Strategy, including creating a dedicated position to drive this area of organisational support and create strong links between the company and lovers of dance around the country. The company delivered its inaugural fundraising gala, Anthology, celebrating Garry Stewart’s artistic leadership of the company. This event changed the way the company engaged with philanthropists and set the year up for successful fundraising campaigns. The company established new levels of giving and received significant donations from Sarah Rohrsheim, Alexandra Dimos of The Dimos Nunn Foundation and Professor Emeritus Barbara van Ernst AM, who became who became the Learning Ambassador. COMMISSIONING CIRCLE

In mid-2019 ADT launched the Commissioning Circle, and with it a number of events enabling supporters to get closer to the company and the artistic process. Members directly support the creation of new work by the end of the year the Commissioning Circle had attracted 31 enthusiastic members. The 2019 Commissioning Circle: Karen Barrett, Chloé Benton, Susanna Bilardo, Diana Cameron, Samantha East, Fiona Fisher, Kathryn Fuller (Fuller Brand Communication), Peter Fuller (Fuller Brand Communication), Heather Richmond and Chris Hall, Amanda Harkness, Sam Harvey, Andrew Henderson, Prue Henschke, John High, Susan Hillier, Belinda Jefferys, Deborah Kingsbury, Lise-Lotte Kruuse, Paul Leadbeter, Dr Boram Lee, Georgina McGuinness, Werner Neumann, Lyn Stansall and Douglas Petherick, Sue Raymond, Ruth Rentschler, Gosia Schild, His Honour Judge Rauf Soulio, Jane and Daryl Stillwell, David Stobbe and founding member Adam Wynn. DONATIONS

ADT also received donations from generous supporters across the year which were attributed to the major choreographic work North/South. Nathan Bennett, Dr Elizabeth Cameron Dalman OAM, Ian Gibbons, Ann Gorey, Sam Harvey, John High, Kathleen Keech, Jessica Kenyon, Lise-Lotte Kruuse, Min Li Chong, Mara Mastins, Georgina McGuinness, Carrie Radzevicius, Ruth Rentschler, Zoe Sawyer, Keith Simpson-Lyttle, Judy Sykes, Maggie Tonkin, Lachlan Walmsley, Tricia Walton, Phyllis Whisker. The Tanja Liedtke Foundation continued support for the International Centre of Choreography and the Tanja Liedtke Studio. PARTNERSHIPS

By the end of 2019 ADT’s partnership portfolio grew to include 13 businesses. The year also finished with the South Australian Premier, the Hon Steven Marshall, hosting the inaugural Corporate Cocktails event, a celebration of our dedicated corporate supporters. 2019 corporate partnerships: SA Power Networks, Adelaide Airport, Novatech Creative Event Technology, Enoki, National Storage, Henschke, JumpgateVR, Out In The Paddock, Woodside Cheese Wrights, Adelaide Hills Distillery, Kwik Kopy Norwood and Bluize.

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LEARNING SECONDMENT WEEK Secondment week at ADT grows each year in popularity with The Odeon barely able to accommodate the huge amount of keen young dancers flooding in its doors, eager to learn repertoire from ADT ‘s incredible dancers and immerse themselves in company life. ADT is committed to providing opportunities for young dancers who are passionate about a career in dance. As part of the Learning Program we host Secondment Week for tertiary and vocational dance students. In a week-long intensive, 33 young dancers from local, interstate and international universities and schools came to ADT to spend time working alongside the company. Secondment Week is an opportunity for these young dancers to learn from their peers and get an intimate and realistic understanding of company life and the demands of a professional dancer. The week also includes lectures on the business side of running professional dance company including aspects such as grant-writing, audition applications, marketing and publicity. Following 2019 secondment week ADT selected Darci O’Rourke to join the full company. Darci begins her contract in 2020 alongside fellow Secondment Week participant Sophie Carter who was asked to join the company in 2018. In 2019 ADT invited two young dancers from NAISDA in Sydney to participate free of charge. WORKSHOPS + PUBLIC CLASSES ADT had an exciting year conducting workshops at home, and while on tour, both nationally and internationally and this year on the high seas! Aboard the Queen Elizabeth, the ADT dancers taught workshops and classes to a whole range of people from all age groups and backgrounds. Using repertoire from The Beginning of Nature, our dancers conducted workshops with participants across universities, high schools and vocational training institutions. Teaching Artists as well as company dancers bring their expertise in dance teaching to all workshops as well as teaching through demonstration to young dancers in high schools throughout the country. From our studios in Adelaide, school students were invited to open rehearsals and observe the dancers in their daily routine, including company class and tumbling training. We shared insights into the daily life of the company and students and teachers observed the dancers undertaking their unique training and an open rehearsal. Our public dance classes are guided by some of Adelaide’s best and most encouraging teachers. ADT’s dance classes offer physical, social and creative benefits to adults of all ages and levels in a friendly and relaxed environment. The classes focus on enjoyable exercise, designed to increase fitness, flexibility and coordination. Our 2019 program included a range of class styles including Contemporary, Ballet, Jazz & Hip Hop. “The students were amazed and loved watching the tumbling practice. The question and answer session with the dancers was also very insightful, especially for the students interested in pursuing a career in dance. Thank you so much for the opportunities you have provided to our school.” - Dance Teacher, King’s Baptist Grammar School “You probably hear this all the time, but I wanted to let you know, how much I am enjoying the classes so far. Thank you so much for opening this great program to absolutely inexperienced and probably entirely talent-free beginners! I have not done any form exercise for 15 years, and it was a really great start into get moving again ... can’t wait for Saturday to do it all again!” - Steffi “Always a great class with ADT beginner ballet. Lots of guidance on correct technique but still a lot of fun.” - Jade


PROGR A M YOUTH ENSEMBLE In 2019 the ADT Youth Ensemble were exposed to a fantastic line up of local choreographers, teaching them valuable skills in improvisation, creation of movement vocabulary and performance. The Ensemble had the opportunity to learn the choreography of Garry Stewart. This was an absolute highlight for the young dancers, with the Youth Ensemble remounting a section of Garry Stewart’s iconic work Birdbrain. The beginning of the year saw the Youth Ensemble remount “Three Pieces for Pina” by Lewis Major. Originally choreographed in 2018, the work was re-created on the new group of dancers, and performed in February for Rich Mix - an Adelaide Festival Fringe production at The Odeon. For the third year, the Youth Ensemble were invited to perform as part of the Art Gallery of South Australia’s ‘Neo Teen Takeover’. At this year’s Teen Takeover, the Youth Ensemble performed a newly devised piece by Lewis Major in response to the art work of Ben Quilty. The choreography was performed with the art work in the background; Ben Quilty loved this performance as did the teenage audience. Following this the Youth Ensemble worked with Tobiah Booth-Rimmers on a new work Last Dance which they performed at Rough Draft alongside the ADT dancers and other independent dancers and choreographers. Last Dance was a wonderful piece of choreography, challenging and complex with a great sense of energy and joy, perfect for the young performers. At the end of the year the Ensemble returned to The Odeon for their final performance - a showing of the different works they had accomplished during the year, performed for friends, family and invited guests of the company. At this intimate event they were able to demonstrate their newly taught skills and showcase their development throughout the year. An absolute highlight was their performance of Birdbrain. The Youth Ensemble was outstanding. Garry Stewart was very impressed with how the dancers took on such challenging choreography which was initially created for the country’s most prolific dancers. The audience were amazed with the Youth Ensemble’s skill and maturity. The company were thrilled that many of our Youth Ensemble have been accepted into some of Australia most respected vocational dance institutions. We send our congratulations to Aspen Palmer who is now studying full-time at Ev and Bow in Sydney and Liam Herron, who is studying at Transit Dance in Melbourne. We congratulate and thank our 2019 Youth Ensemble on a fantastic year representing Australian Dance Theatre. E-RESOURCES In 2019 Australian Dance Theatre was successful in receiving funding from Arts South Australia for the development of new ADT Education Resources. This online resource will have the potential to significantly extend the reach of the company across the. A steering committee has been appointed to oversee the content of the e-resource so that it aligns with the current school curriculum, writers have commenced working on the resource after consultation about the themes and methodology of Garry’s current repertoire The Beginning of Nature and South.

Workshops 5

ADT Youth Ensemble audiences 800

Participants 410

Public dance class attendees 2,902 (82% increase from 2018) 28



INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR CHOREOGRAPHY ADT’s International Centre for Choreography (ICC) facilitates support for local, interstate and international dance artists in the creation of dance through workshops, exchanges and residencies, and professional development initiatives. ICC ASSOCIATE ARTIST Thanks to the generous support of the Australia Council’s Arts and Disability Mentorship grant we announced Matt Shilcock as the inaugural ICC Associate Artist. Garry and the artists of ADT will further develop Matt’s choreographic practice, Osteogeniune. HANNOVER CHOREOGRAPHIC COMPETITION The winner of the annual Hannover Choreographic Competition wins the opportunity to take up residency at Australian Dance Theatre’s home, The Odeon. The residency is generously funded by the Tanja Liedtke Foundation, and we look forward to welcoming Oscar Buthelezi to The Odeon soon. ROUGH DRAFT Rough Draft supports emerging and established choreographers, providing a platform for independent dance makers and our own company dancers to create and show works in development. Congratulations to the dancers and to the choreographers featured in the 2019 program: Yasmine Amber, Sue Hawksley, Motus Collective, Tobiah Booth Remmers (performed by the ADT Youth Ensemble), Tiarna Linke, Chris Dyke, Françoise Piron and Zoë Dunwoodie. RESIDENCIES As part of its Residency Program, ADT provides space for creative and professional development for local artists at no cost. The residency includes access to the Tanja Liedtke Studio, Main Theatre (depending on the company’s touring schedule), meeting room, break-out space, Green Room, a ‘hot-desk’, as well as free access to wifi. Artists and organisations who received free studio space in 2019 included: Erin Fowler, Lewis Major Projects, Cayleigh Davies, PoeOne, Tobiah Booth-Remmers, Motus Collective, Ben Hur Winter, Carlie Angel, Daniel Jaber, Thomas Fonua, Narelle Benjamin & Marlo Benjamin, Jessie McKinlay and Petra Szabo. OPEN CLASSES ADT opens its doors to professional dancers to attend our professional company classes on weekday mornings, free of charge. TANJA LIEDTKE FELLOWSHIP The Tanja Liedtke Fellowship is offered by the Tanja Liedtke Foundation in partnership with Berlin’s Ada Studio and ADT’s ICC. In 2019 the ICC managed the Fellowship application process in partnership with the Foundation. Open to dancers and choreographers who have not had extensive experience in Europe, this is an incredible opportunity for creative development, artistic exchange, study and international networking. The winner of the Fellowship for 2019 was Geoffrey Watson.

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> reach & statistics



ATTENDANCE

16 performances 4,422 audience members

ONLINE 63,595 likes 301,320 minutes of videos viewed 1,988 followers

16,889 followers 1,100 hours viewed 34



AWA R DS & M E DI A Helpmann Awards Best Dance Production - The Beginning of Nature Other nominations: Best Regional Touring - The Beginning of Nature Best Choreography in a Ballet, Dance or Physical Theatre Production Garry Stewart for The Beginning of Nature Best Male Dancer in a Ballet or Physical Theatre Work - Kimball Wong for The Beginning of Nature Drover Awards 2019 Tour of the Year Finalist “It has to be said that never have the dancers looked stronger, tackling this marathon with superhuman attack, energy and precision. It was a huge pleasure to see.” -Maggie Tonkin on Anthology, Dance Australia

“This was a program which highlighted [Stewarts] innovative invention, and a reminder of the excellence of the dancers.” -Alan Brissenden on Anthology, The Adelaide Review

“I have always been proud of Australian Dance Theatre and North/South is an exquisite piece that would be at home on any stage in the world” -Fiona Talbot-­Leigh on North/South, Broadway World

“Stewart has once again produced a new, innovative work, the cubes almost becoming characters in themselves and Mawson a charismatic leader but also an Everyman figure” -Alan Brissenden on North/South, The Adelaide Review

“So, so exquisitely extraordinary. A epic visceral journey ... a must see!” -@thombuchanan on North/South

“Such an incredible and innovative piece of theatre” -@kate.alice22 on North/South

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CORPOR ATE GOVER NA NCE STATEMENT IT IS THE AIM OF ADT TO MEET BEST PRACTICE IN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, WITH A FRAMEWORK DESIGNED TO:

• • •

Enable the board to provide strategic guidance for ADT and effective oversight of management Clarify the respective roles and responsibilities of board members and senior executives in order to facilitate board and management accountability to ADT and its stakeholders Ensure a balance of authority so that no single individual has unfettered powers

ROLE OF THE BOARD AND ITS MEMBERSHIP

ROLE OF MANAGEMENT

The board is responsible for the corporate governance of ADT. It oversees the business and affairs of the Company, approves the strategies and financial objectives to be implemented by management, and monitors standards of performance against those plans in achieving the Company’s goals.

The role and responsibility of management is to:

The membership of the board will be directed by the following requirements: •

• • •

The constitution of ADT specifies that there must be at least three directors and no more than twelve. The board may determine the size of the board within those limits The board must consist of a majority of independent directors who satisfy the criteria for independence adopted by the board The Chair of the board must be an independent director who satisfies the criteria for independence adopted by the board The board should, collectively, have the appropriate level of personal qualities, skills, experience and time commitment to properly fulfil its responsibilities or have ready access to such skills where they are not available

• • • • • • • •

Recommend the strategic direction, plans and options for the board’s consideration and translate the board’s approved strategic direction into the operations of the business Assume the day to day responsibility for ADT’s conformance with relevant laws and regulations and its compliance framework Achieve the performance targets set by the board Develop, implement and manage ADT’s risk management and internal control frameworks Develop, implement and update ADT’s policies and procedures Be alert to relevant trends in the industry and ADT’s operating environment and respond accordingly Provide sufficient and relevant information to the board to enable the board to effectively discharge its responsibilities Act as a conduit between the board and ADT Manage ADT’s human, physical and financial resources to achieve ADT’s objectives

The board may also establish committees to assist it in carrying out its responsibilities. The board will adopt charters setting out the membership, administration, purpose, responsibilities and functions appropriate to each committee. In 2019, committees in operation were the Governance Committee, Learning Committee and Fundraising Committee.

48


COMPANY D D AV I D S T O B B E

ANITA EWING

David has a Bachelor of Business (Accounting), completed the Australian institute of Company Directors course, is a member of CPA Australia and has 20 years finance experience gained in the private sector. David has a strong business acumen and sound accounting proficiency in the areas of management reporting, budgeting and forecasting. Through his other board appointments David has accumulated expertise in governance, sponsorship and fundraising with a community focus.

Anita is a senior solicitor at the Crown Solicitor’s Office with 15 years legal experience and brings her legal acumen to the Board. Anita works in both an advisory capacity and also has strong litigation experience both as instructing solicitor and as counsel.

David joined the board in 2014 and previously chaired the Governance & Nomination Committee.

Outside of the Public Service, Anita has worked in the commercial section of a private law firm providing strategic business advice and complex commercial documentation. She has also worked in-house as a taxation consultant in a business advisory firm which experience has furnished her with strong business understanding.

Chair

NATHAN BENNETT Non-Executive Director

Nathan Bennett has been Executive Director of Perth Festival since February 2017. Having worked for leading arts companies in Australia and overseas for nearly 20 years, Nathan has a proven track record of success in executive management, audience engagement, marketing, corporate partnerships, private philanthropy and new technology in the arts. He has held roles as Deputy Executive Director at Belvoir, General Manager at Griffin Theatre Company, Company Manager at Bell Shakespeare and Director of Development at Philadelphia’s Pig Iron Theatre Company. Nathan joined the board in 2018.

CHLOE BENTON Non-Executive Director

Chloe is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and the Australia-Italia Association. Chloe also sits on the board of WorldSkills Australia, as well as having served with PLAN International, The Communications Council of Australia, ICON, The Oaktree Foundation and Youth With A Mission. Primarily Australia-based and having worked with clients in North and South America, Hong Kong, Macau and Vietnam, Chloe has managed marketing and communications programs for global aid agencies, universities, government departments, and the private sector across 32 countries. Chloe has studied in the USA, UK and Australia, and holds a Masters in International Business and a Masters in Marketing from the University of South Australia, and was awarded a scholarship to University of Oxford. As a musician and performer, Chloe is passionate about the arts and has spent extensive time overseas in music education and volunteering in Brasil, Mozambique, Nigeria, Nepal, India, Bangladesh and Thailand. Chloe joined the board in 2017, and also sits on the Fundraising & Sponsorship Committee.

Non-Executive Director

Formerly, Anita was a Ministerial Advisor to the Minister for Health which, saw her manage all legislation within the health portfolio through Parliament.

Anita joined the board in 2015.

BELINDA JEFFERYS Non-Executive Director

Belinda has over 30 years of HR management experience in a range of organisations and has held senior executive positions within the finance and agribusiness sectors. She has a passion for enabling people’s potential in the workplace and building constructive, ethical workplace cultures. She values the use of robust policy and good governance in shaping culture and guiding business performance. In addition, Belinda brings her strategic focus and experience, having been a member of senior leadership teams that have reshaped business strategy to respond to shifting market and social trends. She is also a member of the UniSA HRM Advisory Committee, and works with emerging HR professionals to support their development and professional growth. Belinda joined the board in 2019.

DEBOR A H K INGSBU RY Non-Executive Director

Deborah has over 30 years of experience in marketing and business strategy. She founded and managed one of South Australia’s most innovative and successful wine marketing and distribution companies. Working for a number of high-profile wine companies. Deborah holds a Bachelor of Arts, Masters of Teaching and Graduate Diploma of French (Sorbonne) and is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. She has directorships in property management and development, franchise and telecommunications businesses. Deborah has been on the board of the Carrick Hill Trust and is Chair of the Scotch College Performing Arts Association. Deborah joined the board in 2018, and chairs the Fundraising & Sponsorship Committee.


DIRECTORS JEFF MEINERS

PETER SELTSIK AS

Jeff Meiners is a lecturer and researcher at the University of South Australia’s Division of Education, Arts and Social Sciences. He has taught extensively, directed movement for children’s theatre, and works with government arts and education organizations, dance companies and international dance projects. Jeff was Australia Council for the Arts Dance Board Community Representative (2002–2007), 2009 Australian Dance Award winner for Outstanding Services to Dance Education and dance writer for the Australian Arts curriculum Shape paper. He was convenor of Panpapanpalya 2018 in Adelaide, an international dance congress with over 900 intergenerational participants. Jeff is Chair Elect of Dance and the Child International, represents Ausdance with the National Advocates for Arts Education and from February to July 2020 is visiting professor at the School of Dance, Taipei National University of the Arts. He has been a board member of The Birmingham Royal Ballet, Tasdance and Carclew, and established Australian Dance Theatre’s Learning Committee.

Peter is currently the Senior Manager, Asset Management for SA Water. In this role he leads the strategic, operational and capital investment planning for the Corporation’s $14bn of infrastructure assets. Peter has 20 years experience in the utility sector and has held many senior leadership roles driving business through significant change. Peter holds an Engineering Degree with Honours, Masters In Business Administration, a fellow of the Governors Leadership Foundation and a Graduate of the AICD.

Non-Executive Director

Jeff joined the board in 2013, and also chairs the Learning Committee.

RUTH R ENTSCHLER Non-Executive Director

Ruth Rentschler OAM is Head School of Management and Professor Arts and Cultural Leadership at the University of South Australia. She previously held such roles as Associate Dean: Research Education, Research Centre Director, Chair Academic Board, Discipline Leader and Head and Associate Head of School. She is a DAAD, St Hilda’s College and University of Melbourne scholar. She completed her PhD at Monash University. Ruth has over 20 years’ service on non-profit boards including in health (VicHealth), the arts (Art Gallery of Ballarat, Multicultural Arts Victoria and the Duldig Museum and Sculpture Garden), and in education (Deakin University Council, Chair Academic Board Deakin University). She has conducted governance research in Australia for various visual and performing arts organisations and arts ministries and has spoken internationally on the topic in the UK, Europe and Asia as a key note speaker.

Non-Executive Director

Peter joined the board in 2015, and also chairs the Governance Committee.

T R I C I A WA L T O N Non-Executive Director

Tricia has 25 years’ experience in arts administration, management and governance mainly in small-to-medium youth arts, adult education and publishing organisations. She is experienced in strategic leadership, organisational change and policy development. Currently, Tricia is Chief Executive of Carclew, which delivers a multi-art form program for South Australia children and young people. She has managed regional arts program delivery for Country Arts SA, run Kurruru, an Aboriginal youth performing arts organisation, and edited Artwork Magazine for CommunityArts Network SA. Tricia chairs A>R>T a collective of artists and educators committed to arts rich learning environments in SA primary schools. Tricia has a BA Degree (Literary Studies), a Grad Dip (Education and Training of Adults), is a fellow of the South Australian Governor’s Leadership Foundation and a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors (GAICD). Tricia joined the board in 2015.

Ruth joined the board in 2017, and also sits on the Fundraising & Sponsorship Committee and Governance Committee.

52



PARTNERS ADT acknowledges the support of the following organisations and thanks them for their commitment and generosity.

GOVERNMENT

Arts South Australia

SUPPORTING

PARTNERS

Images : Cover - South, Harrison Elliot, Daniel Jaber © Daniel Boud Page 3- North, Jana Castillo © Daniel Boud Page 5- South Rehearsal, FRONT: Garry Stewart, BACK: Christopher Mills, Daniel Jaber, Jana Castillo, Harrison Elliot © Sven Kovac Page 7-Supernature Development, Zoe Wozniak, Harrison Elliott, Rowan Rossi, Christopher Mills, Leo Mendez, Matte Roffe, Jana Castillo, Kimball Wong © Sam Roberts Photography Page 11 & 12 – South, Harrison Elliot, Daniel Jaber, Matte Roffe, Zoe Dunwoodie, Zoe Wozniak, Kimball Wong, Rowan Rossi © Daniel Boud Page 13 – Anthology, Sarah-Jayne Howard, Christopher Mills, Zoe Dunwoodie, Matte Roffe © Oliver Toth, Accent Photography Page 15 – TOP: North, Christopher Mills, Jana Castillo, Zoe Dunwoodie, Harrison Elliot © Daniel Boud. BOTTOM: South, Daniel Jaber, Kimball Wong, Harrison Elliot, Rowan Rossi © Danien Boud Page 17 – The Beginning of Nature, Christopher Mills, Harrison Elliot, Zoe Dunwoodie, Kimball Wong, Matte Roffe © David James McCarthy Page 19- The Circadian Cycle (Stills from film), TOP: Zoe Dunwoodie, MIDDLE: Kimball Wong, BOTTOM: Matte Roffe, Thomas Fonua, Rowan Rossi Page 21 – Supernature Development, Leo Mendez © Sam Roberts Photography Page 23 & 24 – North, Matte Roffe, Zoe Wozniak © Daniel Boud Page 25 – Supernature Development, Jana Castillo, Kimball Wong, Zoe Wozniak, Rowan Rossi, Christopher Mills © Sam Roberts Page 27 & 28 – ADT Youth Ensemble performing at the AGSA NeoTeen Takeover © Nat Rogers Page 31 - South Rehearsal, Garry Stewart, Harrison Elliot, Daniel Jaber, Jana Castillio © Sven Kovac Pages 33 & 34 – South, Zoe Wozniak, Matte Roffe, Christopher Mills, Harrison Elliot, Jana Castillo, Kimball Wong, Daniel Jaber, Rowan Rossi ©Daniel Boud Page 35 – Supernature Development, Kimball Wong, Harrison Elliot © Sam Roberts Photography Page 37 – South, Zoe Dunwoodie, Kimball Wong, Rowan Rossi, Christopher Mills, Jana Castillo © Daniel Boud Pages 39 & 40 – Anthology, Rowan Rossi, Thomas Fonua, Zoe Dunwoodie, Kimball Wong, Harrison Elliot (C) Daniel Boud Page 49 – North, Zoe Wozniak © Daniel Boudzzz Page 51- South, Zoe Dunwoodie, Chirstopher Mills, Rowan Rossi, Kimball Wong © Daniel Boud Page 55 – South, Harrison Elliot © Daniel Boud

50


AUSTRALIAN DANCE THEATRE


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Contents For the Year Ended 31 December 2019 Page Financial Statements Directors' Report Auditors Independence Declaration under Section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001 Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income Statement of Financial Position Statement of Changes in Equity Statement of Cash Flows Notes to the Financial Statements Directors' Declaration Independent Audit Report

1 5 6 7 8 9 10 25 26


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Directors' Report 31 December 2019 The directors present their report on Australian Dance Theatre Ltd for the financial year ended 31 December 2019. 1.

General information Directors No other directors have received or become entitled to receive any benefits by reason of a contract made by the company or a related body corporate with the director or with a firm of which she/he is a member or with a company in which she/he has a substantial financial interest, except for the beneficial interest disclosed under Note 17. No other directors had any interest in contracts or proposed contracts with the company. The names of the directors in office at any time during, or since the end of, the year are: Names

Position

Appointed/Resigned

David Stobbe

Non-executive director Chair of the Board

Appointed May 2014

Jeffrey Meiners

Non-executive director Chair Learning Committee

Appointed October 2013

Peter Seltsikas

Non-executive director Chair Governance Committee

Appointed October 2015

Chloe Benton

Non-executive director Member Sponsorship & Fundraising Committee

Appointed January 2017

Ruth Rentschler

Non-executive director Member Governance Committee

Appointed November 2017

Nathan Bennett

Non-executive director Member Sponsorship & Fundraising Committee

Appointed July 2018

Deborah Kingsbury

Non-executive director Chair of the Fundraising & Sponsorship Committee

Appointed February 2018

Belinda Jefferys

Non-executive director

Appointed May 2019

Directors have been in office since the start of the calendar financial year to the date of this report except for the directors below: Names

Position

Appointed/Resigned

Kim Boehm

Non-executive director Chair of the Board

Resigned May 2019

Anita Ewing

Non-executive director Member Governance Committee

Leave of absence from May 2019

Georgina McGuinness

Non-executive director Member Fundraising & Sponsorship Committee

Resigned January 2019

Tricia Walton

Non-executive director Member Governance Committee Member Learning Committee

Resigned November 2019

Lorraine Sheppard

Non-executive director

Resigned August 2019

Amanda Harkness

Non-executive director

Resigned August 2019

1


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Directors' Report 31 December 2019 1.

General information continued Directors continued During the calendar financial year, seven (7) meetings of directors, including the Annual General Meeting were held. The Executive Director and the Artistic Director attended these Board meetings to report formally to the directors. SubCommittees of directors held in 2019 were as follows: the Governance Committee met five (5) times, the Fundraising and Sponsorship Committee met five (5) times, and the Learning Committee met five (5) times. In 2019 a Code of Ethics Policy and Respectful Behaviour Policy were endorsed by the Board and implemented by the Executive Director. Attendances by each director during the year were as follows: Directors' Meetings Number of eligible to attend

Number of meetings attended

David Stobbe Jeffrey Meiners Peter Seltsikas Chloe Benton Ruth Rentschler Nathan Bennett Deborah Kingsbury

7 7 7 7 7 7 7

7 7 5 7 6 5 6

Belinda Jefferys Kim Boehm Anita Ewing Amanda Harkness Tricia Walton Lorraine Sheppard

4 3 7 2 6 2

4 3 4 1 5 2

The Board proposes and discusses potential candidates as and when required, and actively seeks input from a range of sources including Australian Dance Theatre funding bodies. Australian Dance Theatre Board members are not appointed by the State Government. Australian Dance Theatre Board members do not receive sitting fees. State of affairs In 2019 Australian Dance Theatre continued to engage and amaze audiences with work which included touring the Beginning of Nature in New York, the world premiere season of North/South at the Adelaide Festival Centre and Anthology, which celebrated 20 years of the Artistic Directors’ artistic leadership at the company. The company also received four nominations at the 2019 Helpmann Awards and won the Best Dance Production award for the Beginning of Nature. Through these nominations Australian Dance Theatre were recognised for regional touring, choreography and for quality dancers. 2019 also saw the completion of a new short film The Circadian Cycle and the commencement of a new video The Choreography of Emotions which is to be complete in 2021. In 2019 Australian Dance Theatre continued to strengthen philanthropic and corporate partnership programs and worked with other South Australian arts and cultural organisations on collaborations. At the conclusion of 2019 Australian Dance Theatre began recruiting for a new Executive Director to build on the momentum of the company. Nick Hays was appointed to the Executive Director role at the start of 2020.

2


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Directors' Report 31 December 2019 1.

General information continued Principal operations and outcomes Australian Dance Theatre Ltd is Australia’s pre-eminent contemporary dance company and has produced consistently outstanding repertoire since it was formed in Adelaide in 1965. The principal activities during the company in the course of the calendar financial year were the local, regional, national and international promotion and presentation of contemporary dance. No significant changes to the nature of the company’s activity occurred during the calendar financial year.

2.

Operating results and review of operations for the year Operating results The profit of the company amounted to $235,666 (2018: $11,135). The financial statements have been prepared on an ongoing concern basis, and the directors have received an indication of continued financial support from the State Government to 2022, and the Federal Government to 2024 in the form of recurrent operating grants. The directors believe that such support will continue to be available. A review of operations for the period ended 31 December 2019 has been detailed elsewhere in this report. The company’s Constitution and Board Charter preclude the payment of dividends. Accordingly, the directors do not recommend the payment of dividends. No dividends were paid or declared since the start of the calendar financial year.

3.

Other items Significant changes in state of affairs There have been no significant changes to the state of affairs of the company other than what has been outlined above.

3


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Directors' Report 31 December 2019 3.

Other items continued Events after the reporting date The directors do not anticipate any further developments in the operations of the company which affect the results of subsequent financial years. However, the company's viability depends upon the continuing support of the State government (through Arts South Australia / Department of Premier and Cabinet) and the Federal government (through the Australia Council), in the form of recurrent operating grants. Covid-19 There is increasing disruption to normal economic and business activity, as a result of the COVID 19 pandemic announced by the World Health Organisation in March 2020 and the subsequent Federal Government’s announcements of protocols that have already been instigated and the potential for others. This creates a level of uncertainty about the future trading outlook for all organisations in Australia and the company is no exception. It is not possible to reliably assess the potential impacts at the present time. Other than the matter mentioned above, no other matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the calendar financial year which significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the company, the results of those operations or the state of affairs of the company in future financial year. Indemnification and insurance of officers and auditors The company has not, during or since the financial year in respect of any person who is or has been an officer or auditor of the company or a related body corporate: (a) indemnified or made any relevant agreement or indemnifying against a liability incurred as an officer, including costs and expenses in successfully defending legal proceedings; or (b) paid or agreed to pay a premium in respect of a contract insuring against a liability incurred as an officer for the costs or expenses to defend legal proceedings with the exception of the following matter. During the calendar financial year, the company paid a premium under a contract insuring all directors, officers and executive employees against liability incurred in that capacity. The amount of the premium was $9,128 (excluding GST). The company has not provided any insurance for an auditor of the company. Auditor's independence declaration The lead auditor's independence declaration in accordance with section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-forprofits Commission Act 2012 and section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001, for the year ended 31 December 2019 has been received and can be found on page 5 of the financial report. The financial statements are made in accordance with a resolution of the directors pursuant to s295(2) of the Corporations Act 2001. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors:

Director: ............................................................... DAVID STOBBE

Dated 4


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Auditors Independence Declaration under Section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and Section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001

In accordance with section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and the Corporations Act 2001, I am pleased to provide the following declaration of independence to the Members of the Australian Dance Theatre Ltd. As lead audit partner for the audit of the financial statements of the Australian Dance Theatre Ltd for the financial year ended 31 December 2019, I declare that to the best of my knowledge and belief, there has been no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

PKF Adelaide

STEVEN A RUSSO RCA Audit and Assurance Partner Level 9, 81 Flinders Street, Adelaide SA Dated this 20th day of May 2020

5


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

Note INCOME Income

4

TOTAL INCOME EXPENDITURE Utilities expenses Advertising and promotion Administration expenses Depreciation expenses Salaries and wages Production expenses

5 5

TOTAL EXPENDITURE NET OPERATING (DEFICIT)/SURPLUS OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS)/INCOME FOR THE YEAR

2019 $

2018 $

2,612,187

3,455,418

2,612,187

3,455,418

(193,721) (45,454) (122,804) (148,716) (1,360,389) (505,437)

(243,774) (128,012) (159,400) (59,476) (1,661,984) (1,191,637)

(2,376,521)

(3,444,283)

235,666

11,135

-

-

235,666

11,135

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 6


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Statement of Financial Position 31 December 2019

Note ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Prepayments

6 7 8

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment Right of use asset

9 13a

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables Grants received in advance Employee benefits Operating lease liability

10 11 12 13b

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Long service leave Operating lease liability

12 13b

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES TOTAL LIABILITIES

2019 $

2018 $

902,345 398,888 60,619

626,412 689,924 16,323

1,361,852

1,332,659

335,222 249,327

372,688 339,991

584,549

712,679

1,946,401

2,045,338

299,450 688,731 115,301 92,863

374,029 796,923 178,690 90,664

1,196,345

1,440,306

162,510

3,825 249,327

162,510

253,152

1,358,855

1,693,458

NET ASSETS

587,546

351,880

EQUITY Retained surpluses

587,546

351,880

TOTAL EQUITY

587,546

351,880

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 7


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Statement of Changes in Equity For the Year Ended 31 December 2019 2019

Note

Retained surpluses $

Total $

Balance at 1 January 2019 Operating profit/(loss) for the year

351,880 235,666

351,880 235,666

Balance at 31 December 2019

587,546

587,546

2018

Note

Retained surpluses $

Total $

Balance at 1 January 2018 Operating profit/(loss) for the year

340,745 11,135

340,745 11,475

Balance at 31 December 2018

351,880

351,880

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 8


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Statement of Cash Flows For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

Note CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATIONS: Receipts from government, members and others Interest received Payments to suppliers and employees

2019 $

2018 $

2,749,474 1,261 (2,454,217)

2,927,217 2,448 (3,481,445)

296,518

(551,790)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING: Purchase of property, plant and equipment

(20,585)

(191,110)

Net cash used by investing

(20,585)

(191,110)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

275,933 626,412

(742,560) 1,368,972

902,345

626,412

Net cash provided by/(used in) operations

Cash and cash equivalents at end of financial year

19

6

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 9


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

1

Basis of Preparation These general purpose financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board ('AASB'), the Australian Charities and Not-forprofits Commission Act 2012 and the Corporations Act 2001. These financial statements and associated notes also comply with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB�). Historical cost convention The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention. Critical accounting estimates The preparation of the financial statements requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in the process of applying the company's accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements, are disclosed in note 3.

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (a)

General Information This financial report includes the financial statements and notes of Australian Dance Theatre. The functional and presentation currency of Australian Dance Theatre Ltd is Australian dollars. Foreign currency transactions are translated into Australian dollars using the exchange rate prevailing at the dates of the transactions. Foreign exchange gains and losses resulting from the settlement of such transactions and from the translation at financial year-end exchange rates of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are recognised in profit or loss. Comparatives are consistent with prior years, unless otherwise stated.

(b)

Income Tax The company is exempt from income tax under Division 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. The company holds deductible gift recipient status for the "Australian Dance Theatre Donations Fund".

(c)

Leases The company recognises right-of-use assets and corresponding lease liabilities in the statement of financial position. The right-of-use asset is reduced with a depreciation charge based on the useful life of the lease. The lease liabilities are reduced when the payments are made and an interest expense is recognised at the same time.

10


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies continued (d)

Revenue recognition The company recognises revenue as follows: Revenue from contracts with customers Revenue is recognised at an amount that reflects the consideration to which the company is expected to be entitled in exchange for transferring goods or services to a customer. For each contract with a customer, the company: identifies the contract with a customer; identifies the performance obligations in the contract; determines the transaction price which takes into account estimates of variable consideration and the time value of money; allocates the transaction price to the separate performance obligations on the basis of the relative stand-alone selling price of each distinct good or service to be delivered; and recognises revenue when or as each performance obligation is satisfied in a manner that depicts the transfer to the customer of the goods or services promised. Variable consideration within the transaction price, if any, reflects concessions provided to the customer such as discounts, rebates and refunds, any potential bonuses receivable from the customer and any other contingent events. Such estimates are determined using either the 'expected value' or 'most likely amount' method. The measurement of variable consideration is subject to a constraining principle whereby revenue will only be recognised to the extent that it is highly probable that a significant reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognised will not occur. The measurement constraint continues until the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved. Amounts received that are subject to the constraining principle are recognised as a refund liability. Grant revenue The company's activities are supported by grants received from the federal, state and local governments and overseas entities. Grant revenue is recognised in the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income when the entity obtains control of the grant, it is probable that the economic benefits gained from the grant will flow to the entity and the amount of the grant can be measured reliably. When grant revenue is received on the condition that specified services are delivered or conditions are fulfilled, this is considered a reciprocal transaction and the grant revenue is recognised in the statement of financial position as a liability until the service has been delivered to the contributor, otherwise the grant is recognised as income on receipt. Australian Dance Theatre Ltd receives non-reciprocal contributions of assets from the government and other parties for zero or a nominal value. These assets are recognised at fair value on the date of acquisition in the statement of financial position, with a corresponding amount of income recognised in the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income. Donations Donations and bequests are recognised as revenue when received, and are appropriated to a designated "Donation Fund". The donations received are used to fund the performance activities of the company. Interest revenue Interest is recognised using the effective interest method. Sponsorship Sponsorship revenue from general activities is recognised when received, and sponsorship income for specific performances is recognised when the performance is completed. 10


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies continued (d)

Revenue recognition continued Performance revenue Performance revenue is recognised when the performance is completed. Gain on disposal of non-current assets When a non-current asset is disposed, the gain or loss is calculated by comparing proceeds received with its carrying amount and is taken to profit or loss. Other income Sundry sales revenue from the sales of goods and services is recognised upon delivery of goods and services to customers.

(e)

Borrowing costs Borrowing costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying asset are capitalised as part of the cost of that asset. All other borrowing costs are recognised as an expense in the period in which they are incurred.

(f)

Goods and services tax (GST) Revenue, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST), except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). Receivables and payable are stated inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows in the statement of cash flows are included on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as operating cash flows.

(g)

Property, plant and equipment Each class of property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or fair value less, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment. Where the cost model is used, the asset is carried at its cost less any accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses. Costs include purchase price, other directly attributable costs and the initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and restoring the asset, where applicable. Plant and equipment Plant and equipment are measured using the cost model. Cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the asset. The carrying amount of plant and equipment is reviewed annually by directors to ensure it is not in excess of the recoverable amount from these assets. The recoverable amount is assessed on the basis of the expected net cash flows that will be received from the asset's employment and subsequent disposal. The expected net cash flows have been discounted to their present values in determining recoverable amounts.

12


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies continued (g)

Property, plant and equipment continued Depreciation Property, plant and equipment, excluding freehold land, is depreciated on a reducing balance basis over the assets useful life to the company, commencing when the asset is ready for use. Leased assets and leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight line basis over the shorter of either the unexpired period of the lease or their estimated useful life. The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable asset are shown below: Fixed asset class Depreciation rate Motor Vehicles 25% Production Equipment 15 - 80% Computer and General Equipment 5 - 80% Building Improvements 12.5% At the end of each annual reporting period, the depreciation method, useful life and residual value of each asset is reviewed. Any revisions are accounted for prospectively as a change in estimate.

(h)

Impairment of non-financial assets At the end of each reporting period the company determines whether there is an evidence of an impairment indicator for non-financial assets. Where this indicator exists and regardless for indefinite life intangible assets and intangible assets not yet available for use, the recoverable amount of the asset is estimated. The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of the fair value less costs of disposal and the value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from an asset. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss is recognised in profit or loss. Reversal indicators are considered in subsequent periods for all assets which have suffered an impairment loss.

(i)

Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprises cash on hand, demand deposits and short-term investments which are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value.

(j)

Employee benefits Provision is made for the company's liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting period. Employee benefits that are expected to be wholly settled within one year have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled. Employee benefits expected to be settled more than one year after the end of the reporting period have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. In determining the liability, consideration is given to employee wage increases and the probability that the employee may satisfy vesting requirements. Cash flows are discounted using market yields on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match the expected timing of cash flows. Defined contribution schemes Obligations for contributions to defined contribution superannuation plans are recognised as an employee benefit expense in profit or loss in the periods in which services are provided by employees.

16


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies continued (k)

Provisions Provisions are recognised when the company has a legal or constructive obligation, as a result of past events, for which it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will result and that outflow can be reliably measured.

(l)

New or amended Accounting Standards and Interpretations adopted The company has adopted all of the new, revised or amending Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board ('AASB') that are mandatory for the current reporting period. Any new or amended Accounting Standards or Interpretations that are not yet mandatory have not been early adopted. The adoption of these Accounting Standards and Interpretations did not have any significant impact on the financial performance or position of the company. The following Accounting Standards and Interpretations are most relevant to the company: AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers The company has adopted AASB 15 from 1 January 2019. The standard provides a single comprehensive model for revenue recognition. The core principle of the standard is that an entity shall recognise revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers at an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The standard introduced a new contractbased revenue recognition model with a measurement approach that is based on an allocation of the transaction price. This is described further in the accounting policies below. Credit risk is presented separately as an expense rather than adjusted against revenue. Contracts with customers are presented in an entity's statement of financial position as a contract liability, a contract asset, or a receivable, depending on the relationship between the entity's performance and the customer's payment. Customer acquisition costs and costs to fulfil a contract can, subject to certain criteria, be capitalised as an asset and amortised over the contract period. AASB 16 Leases The company has early adopted AASB 16 from 1 January 2018. The standard replaces AASB 117 'Leases' and for lessees eliminates the classifications of operating leases and finance leases. Except for short-term leases and leases of low-value assets, right-of-use assets and corresponding lease liabilities are recognised in the statement of financial position. Straight-line operating lease expense recognition is replaced with a depreciation charge for the right-of-use assets (included in operating costs) and an interest expense on the recognised lease liabilities (included in finance costs). In the earlier periods of the lease, the expenses associated with the lease under AASB 16 will be higher when compared to lease expenses under AASB 117. However, EBITDA (Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Depreciation and Amortisation) results improve as the operating expense is now replaced by interest expense and depreciation in profit or loss. For classification within the statement of cash flows, the interest portion is disclosed in operating activities and the principal portion of the lease payments are separately disclosed in financing activities. For lessor accounting, the standard does not substantially change how a lessor accounts for leases. Impact of adoption AASB 15, was adopted using the modified retrospective approach and as such comparatives have not been restated. There was no impact on opening retained profits as at 1 January 2019.AASB 16 was early adopted and as such no change is required in the comparatives.

16


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

3

Critical Accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions The directors make estimates and judgements during the preparation of these financial statements regarding assumptions about current and future events affecting transactions and balances. These estimates and judgements are based on the best information available at the time of preparing the financial statements, however as additional information is known then the actual results may differ from the estimates. The significant estimates and judgements made have been described below. Estimation of useful lives of assets The company determines the estimated useful lives and related depreciation and amortisation charges for its property, plant and equipment and finite life intangible assets. The useful lives could change significantly as a result of technical innovations or some other event. The depreciation and amortisation charge will increase where the useful lives are less than previously estimated lives, or technically obsolete or non-strategic assets that have been abandoned or sold will be written off or written down. Impairment of non-financial assets other than goodwill and other indefinite life intangible assets The company assesses impairment of non-financial assets other than goodwill and other indefinite life intangible assets at each reporting date by evaluating conditions specific to the company and to the particular asset that may lead to impairment. If an impairment trigger exists, the recoverable amount of the asset is determined. This involves fair value less costs of disposal or value-in-use calculations, which incorporate a number of key estimates and assumptions. Employee benefits provision As discussed in note 2, the liability for employee benefits expected to be settled more than 12 months from the reporting date are recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the reporting date. In determining the present value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account.

4

Revenue and Other Income Revenue from continuing operations 2019 $ Sales revenue - box office, performance fees & royalties Finance income - bank deposits Other revenue - venue hire & catering - grants received - donations received - fundraising - sponsorship - foreign currency gain/(loss) - asset disposal gain/(loss) - general operations

Total Revenue

2018 $

253,536

685,966

1,261

2,448

132,948 1,938,054 65,995 4,325 130,000 2,238 (68) 83,898

164,610 2,374,221 11,595 146,965 3,292 (2,702) 69,023

2,357,390

2,767,004

2,612,187

3,455,418 17


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019 5

Results for the Year The result for the year includes the following specific expenses: 2019 $

2018 $

1,145,305

1,367,087

25,730

27,482

127,657

144,637

61,778

122,778

1,360,389

1,661,984

148,716

59,476

Employee benefit expenses Wages & allowances Workers compensation insurance Defined contribution superannuation expense Movements in provisions Total Employee benefit expenses

Other expenses: Depreciation expenses 6

Cash and Cash Equivalents 2019 $

2018 $

Cash in hand

2,339

1,753

Cash at bank

900,006

624,659

Total cash and cash equivalent

902,345

626,412

Reconciliation of cash Cash and Cash equivalents reported in the statement of cash flows are reconciled to the equivalent items in the statement of financial position as follows: 2019 2018 $ $ Cash and cash equivalents 902,345 626,412 7

Trade and other receivables 2019 $

8

2018 $

CURRENT Accounts receivables Accrued revenue

398,611 277

601,167 88,757

Total trade and other receivables

398,888

706,247

Prepayments 2019 $ CURRENT Accounts receivables

60,619

2018 $ 16,323

18


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019 9

Property, Plant and Equipment 2019 $

2018 $

Production equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation

392,881 (320,942)

415,718 (336,354)

Total plant and equipment

71,939

79,364

Motor vehicles At cost Accumulated depreciation

7,727 (7,727)

7,727 (7,727)

-

-

38,640 (27,191)

41,258 (30,699)

Total office equipment

11,449

10,559

Website upgrade At cost Accumulated depreciation

6,290 (6,290)

6,290 (6,290)

-

-

32,492 (16,305)

23,840 (14,994)

16,187

8,846

Building improvements At cost Accumulated depreciation

306,180 (70,533)

306,180 (32,261)

Total improvements

273,919

273,919

Total property, plant and equipment

335,222

372,688

Total motor vehicles Office equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation

Total website upgrade Capital improvements At cost Accumulated depreciation Total Capital improvements

10

Trade and other payables 2019 $ CURRENT Accounts payable Accrued expenses GST payable Other creditors Total trade and other payables

2018 $

43,586 73,202 85,770 96,892

266,444 27,785 79,800

299,450

374,029

All amounts are short term and the carrying values are considered to be a reasonable approximation of fair value.

19


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019 11

Grants received in advance

2019 $ CURRENT Government and Community grants (a)

2018 $ 688,731

796,923

Grant Income

Australia Council for the Arts Key Organisation Catalyst Grant Other Federal Grants

Grants in Advance 2018 $

Grants Received 2019 $

Grants Recognised as Income 2019 $

Grants in Advance 2019 $

232,658 208,265 -

307,560 68,470 29,999

307,560 152,470 14,191

232,658 124,265 15,808

440,923

406,029

474,221

372,731

266,000 90,000 -

1,227,000 66,832 68,000 50,000

1,227,000 66,832 68,000 90,000 -

266,000 50,000

356,000

1,411,832

1,451,832

316,000

State Arts Funding Arts South Australia Core Grant Arts South Australia Grant The Odeon Arts South Australia Grant Project Arts South Australia Makers/Presenters Arts South Australia Dance Festival

Community Grant Community Grant

12

-

12,000

12,000

-

-

12,000

12,000

-

796,923

1,829,861

1,938,053

688,731

Employee benefits 2019 $ Current liabilities Provision for long service leave Provision for annual leave

Non-current liabilities Provision for long service leave

2018 $

53,431 61,870

99,916 78,774

115,301

178,690

-

3,825

-

3,825

20


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

13

Right of use assets and lease liabilities (a)

Right of use assets 2019 $ Right of use assets At cost Accumulated depreciation

(b)

2018 $

339,991 (90,663)

339,991 -

249,327

339,991

2019 $ 7,478 247,895

2018 $ 10,197 484,137

255,373

494,334

Operating lease liabilities

Photocopier Leasing of premises

Operating leases have been taken out for building and office equipment. There are no restrictions placed upon the leasee on entering these leases. The lease of the photocopier has a term of five years with a non-renewal option included in the contract. The lease of the premises has a term of five years with a renewal option of one time three years. 14

Financial Instruments The company is exposed to a variety of financial risks through its use of financial instruments. The company‘s overall risk management plan seeks to minimise potential adverse effects due to the unpredictability of financial markets. The Company does not speculate in financial assets. The most significant financial risks to which the Company is exposed to are described below: Specific risks • • •

Liquidity risk Credit risk Market risk - currency risk, interest rate risk and price risk

Financial instruments used The principal categories of financial instrument used by the company are: • • • • •

Trade receivables Cash at bank Trade and other payables Bills of exchange Forward currency contracts

The main risks Australian Dance Theatre Ltd is exposed to through its financial instruments are credit risk, liquidity risk and market risk consisting of interest rate risk, foreign currency risk and equity price risk. The company's financial instruments consist mainly of deposits with banks, short-term investments, accounts receivable and payable, and forward exchange contracts and leases. The totals for each category of financial instruments, measured in accordance with AASB 139 as detailed in the accounting policies to these financial statements, are as follows: 21


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

15

Financial Risk Management continued

2019 $ Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss Trade and other receivables Prepayments

6

902,345

626,412

7

398,888 60,619

689,924 16,323

1,361,852

1,332,658

335,222

374,029

335,222

374,029

Total financial assets Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities at amortised cost Trade and other payables

2018 $

10

Total financial liabilities Objectives, policies and processes

Risk management is carried out by the company’s Risk Management Committee under the delegated power from the Board of Directors. The Finance Manager has primary responsibility for the development of relevant policies and procedures to mitigate the risk exposure of the Company, these policies and procedures are then approved by the Risk Management Committee and tabled at the Board meeting following their approval. Reports are presented at each Board meeting regarding the implementation of these policies and any risk exposure which the Risk Management Committee believes the Board should be aware of. Specific information regarding the mitigation of each financial risk to which the company is exposed is provided below. (i)

Financial instrument composition and maturity analysis

The company's exposure to interest rate risk, which is the risk that a financial instruments value will fluctuate as a result of changes in market interest rates and the effective weighted average interest rates on classes of financial assets and financial liabilities, is as follows:

Floating Interest Rate

Non-interest Bearing

2019 $

2019 $

2018 $

2018 $

Total 2019 $

2018 $

Financial Assets: Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Prepayments

902,345

626,412

-

-

902,345

626,412

-

-

398,888 60,619

689,924 16,323

398,888 60,619

689,924 16,323

Financial Liabilities: Trade and other payables

-

-

299,450

374,029

299,450

374,029 22


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

15

Financial Risk Management continued Liquidity risk Liquidity risk arises from the company’s management of working capital and the finance charges and principal repayments on its debt instruments. It is the risk that the company will encounter difficulty in meeting its financial obligations as they fall due. The company’s policy is to ensure that it will always have sufficient cash to allow it to meet its liabilities as and when they fall due. The company maintains cash and marketable securities to meet its liquidity requirements for up to 30-day periods. Funding for long-term liquidity needs is additionally secured by an adequate amount of committed credit facilities and the ability to sell long-term financial assets. The company manages its liquidity needs by carefully monitoring scheduled debt servicing payments for long-term financial liabilities as well as cash-outflows due in day-to-day business. Liquidity needs are monitored in various time bands, on a day-to-day and week-to-week basis, as well as on the basis of a rolling 30-day projection. Long-term liquidity needs for 180-day and a 360-day period are identified monthly. At the reporting date, these reports indicate that the company expected to have sufficient liquid resources to meet its obligations under all reasonably expected circumstances and will not need to draw down any of the financing facilities. Credit risk Credit risk refers to the risk that a counterparty will default on its contractual obligations resulting in a financial loss to the company. Credit risk arises from cash and cash equivalents, derivative financial instruments and deposits with banks and financial institutions, as well as credit exposure to outstanding receivables. Exposure to credit risk also arise from the potential non-performance by counterparties of contract obligations that could lead to a financial loss to the company. The company has adopted a policy that all customers who wish to trade on credit terms undergo a credit assessment process which takes into account the customer's financial position, past experience and other factors. Credit limits are then set based on ratings in accordance with the limits set by the Board of Directors; these limits are reviewed on a regular basis. Market risk (ii) Foreign currency sensitivity Most of the company transactions are carried out in Australian dollars. Exposures to foreign exchange risk may result in the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument fluctuating due to movement in foreign exchange rates of currencies in which Australian Dance Theatre Ltd holds financial instruments which are other than the AUD functional currency of Australian Dance Theatre Ltd.

16

Contingencies In the opinion of the Directors, the company did not have any contingencies at 31 December 2019 (31 December 2018: None).

17

Related Parties (a)

The company's main related parties are as follows: (i) Key management personnel: An arm’s length lease for the Odeon Theatre has been entered on 12 May 2017 in which Deborah Kingsbury is one of the directors. The liability as at 31 December 2019 is $247,894 (2018: $484.137). Directors of the company in office during the year are disclosed in the Director's Report that accompanies these financial statements. Other than the lease mentioned above, no director has entered into a material contract with the company since the end of the previous year and there were no material contracts involving director's interest existing at year end. 23


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

17

Related Parties continued (ii) Other related parties include close family members of key management personnel and entities that are controlled. Other related parties include close family members of key management personnel and entities that are controlled or significantly influenced by those key management personnel or their close family members. No such transaction was noted with the company since the end of the previous and current year.

18

Remuneration of auditors During the financial year, the following fees were paid or payable for services provided by PKF, the auditor of the company: 2019 2018 $ $ Audit of the financial statements Bookkeeping and advisory

19

6,223

6,409

Cash Flow Information (a)

Reconciliation of result for the year to cash flows from operating activities Reconciliation of net income to net cash provided by operating activities: 2019 $ Profit / (Loss) for the year Cash flows excluded from profit attributable to operating activities Non-cash flows in profit: - depreciation - Net loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment Changes in assets and liabilities, net of the effects of purchase and disposal of subsidiaries: - (increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables - (increase)/decrease in prepayments - increase/(decrease) in income in advance - increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables - increase/(decrease) in grants in advance - increase/(decrease) in lease liabilities - increase/(decrease) in long service leave - increase/(decrease) in employee benefits Cash flow from operations

2018 $

235,666

11,135

148,716 -

59,476 -

291,036 (44,296) (2,131) (72,448) (108,192) (84,618) (50,310) (16,905)

(318,341) 60,688 (154,500) 70,036 (268,441) (14,541) 2,698

296,518

(551,790)

24


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 31 December 2019

20

Events Occurring After the Reporting Date The financial report was authorised for issue on 20 May 2020 by the Board of Directors. Covid-19 There is increasing disruption to normal economic and business activity, as a result of the COVID 19 pandemic announced by the World Health Organisation in March 2020 and the subsequent Federal Government’s announcements of protocols that have already been instigated and the potential for others. This creates a level of uncertainty about the future trading outlook for all organisations in Australia and the company is no exception. It is not possible to reliably assess the potential impacts at the present time. Other than the matter mentioned above, no other matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the company, the results of those operations, or the state of affairs of the company in future financial years.

21

Company Details The registered office of and principal place of business of the company is: Australian Dance Theatre Ltd 57a Queen Street Norwood SA 5067

24


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Directors' Declaration

The directors of the company declare that: 1.

the financial statements and notes for the year ended 31 December 2019 are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 and: a. b.

2.

The Chief Executive Officer and Chief Finance Officer have each declared that: a. b. c.

3.

comply with Accounting Standards, which, as stated in basis of preparation Note 1 to the financial statements, constitutes explicit and unreserved compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS); and give a true and fair view of the financial position and performance of the company;

The financial records of the company for the financial year have been properly maintained in accordance with section 286 of the Corporations Act 2001; The financial statements and notes for the financial year properly comply with the Accounting Standards; and The financial statements and notes for the financial year give a true and fair view.

In the directors' opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Director ................................................................................................................................................ DAVID STOBBE

Dated

25


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd Independent Auditor’s Report to the members of Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Report on Audit of the Financial Report Opinion We have audited the financial report of Australian Dance Theatre Ltd, which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 December 2019, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies, and the responsibly entities’ declaration. In our opinion the financial report of Australian Dance Theatre Ltd is in accordance with Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: (a) giving a true and fair view of the registered entity’s financial position as at 31 December 2019 and of its financial performance for the year ended; and (b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards to the extent described in Note 1, and Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013. Basis of Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the registered entity in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 (ACNC Act) and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Emphasis of matter – Covid-19 We draw attention to the director’s report and to Note 20 in the financial statement, which discloses the director’s assessment regarding Covid-19 and the likely impact on the company's ability to continue as a going concern. The company is economically dependent upon State and Federal government funding which at the date of this report, the directors and management have represented that the funding is continuous in accordance with the respective funding agreements. Our opinion is not modified in respect of this matter. Responsibility of the Responsible Entities for the Financial Report The responsible entities of the registered entity are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair presentation of the financial report in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards, Corporations Act (2001), and the ACNC Act, and for such internal control as the responsible entities determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, responsible entities are responsible for assessing the registered entity’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the responsible entities either intends to liquidate the registered entity or to cease operations, or has no realistic alternative but to do so. Those charged with governance are responsible for overseeing the registered entity’s financial reporting process. Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial report. 26


Australian Dance Theatre Ltd Independent Auditor’s Report to the members of Australian Dance Theatre Ltd

Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report continued

As part of an audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: •

• • •

Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control. Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the registered entity’s internal control. Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the responsible entities. Conclude on the appropriateness of the responsible entities use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the registered entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the registered entity to cease to continue as a going concern. Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

We communicate with responsible entities regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit.

PKF Adelaide

Steven A Russo CA, RCA Audit and Assurance Partner Lvl 9, 81 Flinders Street, Adelaide SA Dated: 20 May 2020

27