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mcwhorter school of building science

vol. 29

// spring 2018

magazine

// BUILDING CONNECTIONS Service Learning Projects Here and Abroad


//QUOIN Spring 2018

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MESSAGE FROM THE SCHOOL HEAD RICHARD BURT

ALUMNI PROFILE ROSS DOYLE

RESEARCH LARGEST HUD GRANT IN AUBURN UNIVERSITY HISTORY

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FACULTY NEWS

PROGRAM UPDATES

IAC HIGHLIGHTS

NEW FACULTY MEMBERS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION RECEIVES PROVOST ASSESSMENT EXCELLENCE AWARD

DONALD HELLEN

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SERVICE LEARNING

CAREER EXPO

HOUSTON AND QUITO

SPRING 2018 CAREER EXPO

CENTER FOR CONSTRUCTION INNOVATION AND COLLABORATION STATE OF THE CENTER

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UNDERGRADUATE UPDATES

CAREERS IN CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION JOBS ON THE UPSWING IN THE UNITED STATES

ALUMNI NEWS WHALEY FAMILY ENJOYS

AGC CONVENTION

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A SPECTACULAR 2018

//QUOIN Richard Burt, Head and McWhorter Endowed Chair Colleen Bourdeau, CADC Communications and Marketing Director

ALUMNI NEWS AMY CARLSON

Marcelo Blanco, CADC Graphic Designer Brandon Clarke, Lead Administrative Assistant

//CONTRIBUTORS Latha Bhavnani, writer & editor / Stephanie Bond, writer & editor Paul Holley, Director, Center for Construction, Innovation and Collaboration Miranda Nobles, Office of Communications and Marketing / Morgan Smothers, writer & editor Karen Rogers, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research, and Associate Professor


// MESSAGE FROM the school head

At the school’s fall industry advisory council meeting it was

unanimously decided to review the structure of how the school seeks advisement and assistance from industry and alumni. Currently the school has an Industry Advisory Council (IAC) that consists of two officers, 26 members and 7 emeritus members. The objective of the IAC is to advance the educational, service, and applied research opportunities of the McWhorter School of Building Science. At the IAC meeting it was agreed that there was a need to widen the opportunities for alumni to provide advisement and assistance to the school. The following re-structuring was agreed.

Welcome to the Spring 2018 edition of Quoin. As we end

the spring semester, we would normally be approaching a calmer time in the academic cycle as we move into the summer. Graduates begin their first full-time job and students head out around the country on internships. This summer however will be different and much more busy and exciting! As reported in the last edition of Quoin, we are responding to intensified demand for our students by increasing our summer admissions and providing more students the opportunity to graduate from Auburn with a Building Construction degree. We also have two major construction projects in Gorrie this summer. In February we began construction on the renovation of the Demonstration Lab on the first floor

1. Establishing an Industry Executive Board which would have the same composition and members and objectives as the current IAC. 2. The establishment of an Industry Advisory Council that would have a much larger and possibly regional membership and would have different but complementary objectives to the new Industry Executive Board. Following meetings in Atlanta, Birmingham and Auburn a draft structure for the two groups has been agreed and this summer BSCI Alumni will be given the opportunity to sign up to be part of our new advisory and advocacy process.

of the Gorrie Center.

The plans for this project were described in the last edition of

Quoin and we are all excited to be moving into this space later in the year. Also during the summer we will start and complete work on the conversion of a traditional teaching space to a state-of-the-art Engaged Active Student Learning (EASL) classroom. This space will be operational by the start of

Richard Burt

the fall semester and we will start teaching classes in the project controls

War Eagle!

sequence in this room. Our final construction project that will begin later this year, is the redevelopment of our outdoor field laboratory on Samford Avenue. Thanks to a significant gift from Robins & Morton, we will begin the process of redeveloping the field lab to support both our class laboratories and be a hub for our service learning activities in the community. This is indeed a busy and exciting time to be in The McWhorter School of Building Science!

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Photo: Derek Morrow

ALUMNI PROFILE

// RUSS DOYLE NAMED TOP 40 UNDER 40 by Birmingham Business Journal

The Birmingham Business Journal recently unveiled its Top 40

Harris Doyle Homes in 2008. Since that time, the company has grown each

under 40— a distinguished group of up-and-coming business leaders

year. Harris Doyle currently builds in the Birmingham and Auburn/Opelika

who will shape Birmingham and their industries for years to come. This

markets. The company has been consecutively named in the Birmingham

group comprises of individuals who have compiled a list of impressive accom-

Business Journal as "One of the Largest and Fastest Growing Companies."

plishments before their 40th birthdays. “This award is really a great honor,” said

Doyle served a 3-year term on the Board of Directors for the Greater

Russ Doyle’03. “However, I owe all the credit to our team at Harris Doyle Homes.

Birmingham Association of Home Builders as well as the Parade of Homes

The energetic and entrepreneurial culture fosters an ownership mentality that

Committee and Land Developers Council, and is an active member of a

allows our company to jump quickly over hurdles. Our recent growth and

nationwide Builder 20 group. He also volunteers with the Children’s Hospital

acquisition would not have been possible without everyone striving to a

of Alabama and UAB Athletics.

common focused goal.”

Doyle's fascination with construction started from a very early age

said. “To graduate, one had to have determination, perseverance, and a little

“Completing the Building Science program was tough,” Doyle

when he was “hand-digging” footings for his dad’s custom home-building

‘smarts’. Just knowing that I had made it through the program gave me the

company, DKM Homes, Inc. After graduating from Auburn University with an

confidence to tackle any project or issue that came my way,” he added.

undergraduate degree in building science, he decided to put his education to work

and came home to Birmingham to be a superintendent for his father’s company.

going mainstream in the construction industry. “Technology is the obvious

According to him, Auburn prepared him for the innovations that are

“I thought I would go the commercial construction route during college, but

change, and the building science curriculum prepped us with a solid techno-

ended up in the residential sector, and am glad that I took that route,” he added.

logical base to learn on. Another major change is the consumer’s value

“My dad is and will always be my mentor, and I am fortunate that he taught

perception of sustainable building. This was starting to become popular

me the ropes.”

when I was at Auburn, but I did not expect this to become the new normal

for building practices.”

In the summer of his junior year (2002), Doyle landed an internship

with Bailey Harris Construction in Auburn, as an assistant superintendent.

In 2017, he sold Harris Doyle Homes to Clayton Properties Group, a

His main job was to replace deteriorating bricks on Dudley Hall. In 2005, he

Berkshire Hathaway company. “We will continue to operate under the Harris

started his own building company, Fireside Homes in Birmingham. After

Doyle name and all of our leadership team remains in place. This partnership

meeting Brooks Harris in 2005, the two residential builders began working

combines the capital strength of Berkshire Hathaway with our energetic team

on projects together in Pelham, and developed a strong working relationship.

to continue our innovative approach to home building,” he said.

They ultimately decided to capitalize on each other’s strengths and launched

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RESEARCH

// CADC INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM AWARDED Largest HUD Grant in Auburn University History

Auburn University`s College of Architecture, Design

and Construction was awarded a $635,000 grant by the U.S.

Collins will be involved throughout the research but will focus

mainly on constructability and cost estimating related to the designs

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to

being developed. According to Collins, the research which started

develop housing solutions for people with vision and mobility

in the fall of 2017, has three key objectives as its goal. “The goal

disabilities, and for individuals to age in place. This is the

driving the research team will be our determination to move beyond

largest HUD grant ever awarded to Auburn University and the first in

study and design to real change in home design and construction

over a decade.

practices,” he said.

The grant is exceptional in part because it relies on interdisci-

Their main objective is to develop designs for new construction

plinary collaboration. Faculty from all three schools in CADC are involved

of affordable, energy-efficient in 2-, 3-, and 4-unit single-family homes that

in the project, as well as faculty from the College of Education’s Center for

will utilize universal design principles and based upon usability testing. The

Disability Research and Policy Studies, or CDRPS, and an industry partner,

plan is to incorporate new strategies to enable the homes to adapt to meet

Smart Solutions/Smart Home Automation. An advisory panel for the project is

the needs of those aging in place, and prepare designs to address a range of

comprised of representatives from organizations including AARP, Volunteers

family size and affordability.

for America, Habitat for Humanity, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind,

Accessible Alabama and Home Builders Association of Alabama.

rooms, such as kitchens and bathrooms, in existing homes to meet the need

Key team members include, Justin Miller, principal investigator and

The second objective of the project is to help in the renovation of

of different types of disabilities.

chair of the Architecture Program; co-principal investigators include Rusty

Dissemination of information through various channels is the focus

Smith, associate director of Rural Studio; Wesley Collins, assistant professor

of the team. They include websites and/or apps produced for home modifica-

in the McWhorter School of Building Science; and Christine Fleming, director

tion, articles with website and app access codes in stakeholder publications

of CDRPS. Other team members include David Hill, chair of the Landscape

such as AARP The Magazine, and displays on disability-related remodeling

Architecture program, and Jerrod Windham and Shu Wen Tzeng, faculty from

products and approaches targeting contractor outlets such as Home Depot,

the Industrial Design program.

appropriate policy makers, and architecture and disability-related conferences.

The outcomes will include housing design solutions and prototypes,

“This transdisciplinary team of Auburn researchers is uniquely

applications and smart home technology design and policy and implementa-

positioned to assist HUD in addressing the complex issues related to the

tion guidelines, as well as instruction manuals for anticipated stakeholders.

design and construction of affordable, sustainable, accessible housing

The project extends longstanding, ongoing work by faculty in CADC, that

for people with special needs and circumstances,” said CADC Dean and

engages issues related to assistive technologies and affordable and accessible

McWhorter Chair Vini Nathan. “The expected outcomes of this project have

housing in rural and urban environments.

the potential for transformative impact in this domain.”

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ALLEN CONRADI

DIANNE KIM

KELLEY PENNINGTON

ROGER RICE

AMNA SALMAN

FACULTY NEWS

// NEW FACULTY MEMBERS

With larger than expected enrollments, the McWhorter

DIANNE KIM graduated with an undergraduate degree

School of Building Science added five new adjunct faculty members

from Auburn's building science program in 1994. Starting her career

Allen Conradi, Dianne Kim, Kelley Pennington, Roger Rice and Amna

as a cooperative education student with Turner Construction Company,

Salman to its teaching team. Adjuncts are an important piece of the

she spent 26 years with the company working in the Nashville and Atlanta

professoriate and are heavily used, especially in professional programs.

business units, and finally for Turner’s headquarters in New York City

At Auburn University, only 11.0% of the teaching staff are part-time

before her retirement.

non-faculty or non-tenure track faculty, and this use of adjuncts is far

below the national average of 50.8%.

management working on jobsites. She transitioned from the jobsite to work

Kim spent the first 12+ years of her career at Turner in project

An adjunct faculty member, like a full-time faculty member,

with the national group responsible for standardization and implementation

enriches the educational experience. As outside professionals teaching

of Turner’s project management software, and that work led to her next

in applied and specialized career fields, adjuncts bring the latest exper-

role as the Operations Manager for the Information Technology team.

tise to the classroom. In this role, they can be effective mentors and

During her tenure within IT, Turner implemented an Enterprise Resource

models to students, and often bring a level of professional experience

Planning (ERP) system, and Dianne was responsible for preparing the IT

and perspective that transcend traditional academic instruction.

organization for the implementation. Subsequent to the implementation, she was appointed to lead the company wide ERP software adoption

ALLEN CONRADI, a third generation graduate from Auburn

effort. Upon completion of that assignment, Dianne was asked to lead a

University, graduated from AU in building science in 2015. He brings

new company wide effort for Continuous Improvement and Organizational

several years of experience educating and training apprentice electri-

Change Management. That work led to her next assignment as the

cians in a work place setting. As an adjunct, he teaches two sections

Business Manager of Turner’s Global Sourcing Solutions team, responsible

of Electrical Systems in buildings.

for global procurement of materials for many of Turner’s jobsites.

In addition to teaching, Conradi also helps with student compe-

Kim is confident that she can transfer her mentoring experience

tition teams. He cites his own experience with student teams as his

at Turner to her teaching position at Auburn. She is teaching Construction

“best learning opportunities” while attending Auburn. He helped prepare

Documents (BSCI 2200) this spring and fall semester. Kim collaborates

the Electrical team for Spring 2018 ACS Open competitions in Reno with

with Professors Tom Leathem and Lauren Redden on the material for the

Professor Mark Tatum. In the fall of 2017, through his business (Thalamus

class and lab. “We aim to bring a nice blend of theoretical and practical

LLC), he sponsored the BSCI competition teams and observed the teams’

application into the learning situation,” she added.

practice presentations. “I hope to continue to get opportunities to give back to the school through competition teams,” Conradi added.

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FACULTY NEWS

KELLEY PENNINGTON graduated from Auburn University

with a B.S. in building construction and received his Juris Doctorate degree from T.G. Jones School of Law. As an adjunct professor in the

program, he is teaching Construction Law and Risk Management.

An operational expert, Pennington works as a project director

and owner representative with TCU Consultancy. Prior to joining TCU, he had a successful career culminating as the Vice President of BaileyHarris Construction. He has over 25 years in the construction industry

AMNA SALMAN received an undergraduate degree

and acts as Owner’s Representative, developing project scope and

in Architecture from the School of Architecture, University of

managing education and mixed-use projects, as well as coordinating all

Engineering and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan in 2008. She received

construction management efforts to include architecture, engineering

two master degrees from Auburn University in 2013, in Community

consultants, general contractors, and procurement agents. Pennington

Planning (MCP) from APLA, and in Public Administration (MPA) from the

provides dispute management consulting services for members of the

College of Liberal Arts.

construction industry.

teach structures I and II, and sustainability. Prior to this instructional job,

His past experience as a tradesman, superintendent and

construction manager managing multi-million dollar general construc-

Salman, who has been teaching since 2016, is assigned to

she was an employee in the Office of University Architect, Division of

tion and design build projects provides a wealth of knowledge to the

Facilities Management at Auburn University, and worked extensively on

building science program. Pennington has been a long time member of

the Campus Master Plan.

the Industrial Advisory Council.

In addition to teaching, Salman is focusing her research on

sustainability and building information modeling (BIM). As a Graduate

ROGER RICE brings an array of academic background to

the program. After graduating with a degree in Building Construction

in 1973 from Auburn University, he received a master’s degree in civil engineering and structural mechanics in 1975, from the University of California-Berkeley, and a Master of Management from Northwestern University in 1990. He also held his professional engineers license for civil engineering and surveying from 1977 until 2002.

Research Assistant, she worked with Professor Salman Azhar on a Capacity Building Construction Safety Project funded by the USAID. She was responsible for data collection, analysis and report writing. She has coauthored three papers that were presented in International Conference, one of which won a best paper award at the 8th Engineering, Project, and Production Management Conference held in Amman, Jordan in September 2017.

“My Auburn education prepared me for many roles in the

Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry, something I will always be grateful for,” said Rice. After graduating from Auburn, Rice worked for Fluor Corporation, a global engineering and construction company. He moved to USG Corporation, and finally to Domtar Gypsum, a producer of building materials. In 1990, as Vice President of Quality at Domtar, his team taught Total Quality to nearly 3000 employees through their Employee Involvement program. “In 1996, I left Domtar to run my own small firm,” Rice added.

After working in the AEC industry for over 40 years, Rice returned

to Auburn teaching three courses to date: Construction Documents (BSCI 2200), Construction Materials and Methods (BSCI 2300), and Structures I (BSCI 2400). In summer, he will add structures III (BSCI 3450) to his repertoire.

Professor Rice likes to be involved in as many CADC functions

as possible. For example, on request from Professor Mike Hosey, he helped coach a student competition team with their presentation. He is also helping the student chapter of AGC (Associated General Contractors) with their membership drive. He attends all CADC Career Fairs, and when time permits, he audits classes in the program.

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PROGRAM UPDATES

// UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION RECEIVES Provost Assessment Excellence Award The undergraduate building construction program in the

Exemplary Assessment reports, including this year’s award

McWhorter School of Building Science was selected as the winner

winner can be found on www.auburn.edu/academic/provost/academi-

of the Provost`s Program Assessment Excellence Award. The award

cassessment/reporting/reports/ “This a great honor for the school,” said

is given to one program each year that employs especially strong and

Richard Burt, McWhorter Endowed Chair and head of The McWhorter

innovative assessment practices.

School of Building Science. “The school has worked diligently toward

The Office of Academic Assessment, a unit within the

making assessment part of its culture. Our team has risen to this challenge

Provost’s Office, was formed in July 2015. To support programs in their

and has put together an assessment plan that has been recognized by

assessment work, Dr. Megan Good, director of Academic Assessment,

our peers as the best in the university. The school is immensely proud

created a system to provide feedback to programs on the quality of

of our achievement.”

their assessment work. “Specifically, 20 trained faculty raters evaluated program assessment reports using the Quality of Assessment Rubric over the summer,” said Good. The rubric includes 11 elements, and quality can range from 1.0 (Beginning), to 2.0 (Developing), 3.0 (Mature),

“The school has worked diligently toward making

or 4.0 (Exemplary).

assessment part of its culture. Our team has risen

to this challenge and has put together an assessment

The Provost’s Program Assessment Excellence Award is given

to one program each year that scores at least a 3.0 (Mature) on every

plan that has been recognized by our peers as the

element of the Quality Assessment Rubric, and employs an especially

best in the university. The school is immensely

strong and innovative approach to their assessment work. A 16-member Auburn University Assessment Council, made up of representatives from schools and colleges in the university, reviewed the 25 programs that met the award criteria and selected the Building Science, BS program to be the winner of this award for 2017.

“The Provost’s Program Assessment Excellence Award has

been awarded twice—last year to the MBC program and this year to the undergraduate program. The Department of Building Science has implemented an incredible assessment infrastructure that is worthy of recognition across campus.”

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proud of our achievement.” Richard Burt


ALUMNI PROFILE

// IAC HIGHLIGHT Donald Hellen Q & A with Donald Hellen What changes have you seen in the program since you graduated? I am impressed by the program’s direction towards software innovation. It covers tools that are currently impacting the market. The expansion of the program to

“I believe transparency and open communication

include a deeper emphasis on

are fundamental to success

superintendence and estimating

and prosperous results.”

is both appreciated and

Richard Burt

encouraging to the industry. What is the philosophy that

Donald Hellen graduated with an undergraduate degree in

guides your professional life?

Building Science in 1987. Employed at Turner Construction Company in

My business philosophy has

the southeast region, he is the manager of preconstruction departments

adjusted over the phases of my

in Nashville, Memphis, and Huntsville, Ala.

career, but it continues to center

on continuous improvement and

He obtained his LEED Accredited Professional (Building Design

+ Construction) certification to help him in the design and construction

the development of team members.

phase of green buildings serving the commercial, residential, education

I believe transparency and open

and healthcare sectors. “Since a large percentage of projects use design

communication are fundamental

build or design assistance agreements, companies need to have LEED

to success and prosperous results.

accredited professionals on staff,” he added.

Hellen credits his father’s profession for his choosing a career

in building. His father was a superintendent at Mosler Safe Company. Hellen was introduced to construction at an early age. He assumed a

trends in construction today? The era of bidding on completed plans has shifted to contractors competing on a qualifications and fee basis. The market sees value in a collaborative project approach because contractors can provide input during design, offering component concepts that save

What do you see as the role

the client money—and ultimately,

of the Industry Advisory

an interactivity that enables the

Council (IAC)?

identification of potential project

variety of roles: as a laborer, a welder, and as a concrete foreman, when

An important value of the IAC is

he worked summers and breaks through high school and college with

exchanging information to guide

Atlanta based concrete subcontractor Reeves & Wagner. His ambition

the curriculum to better prepare

was to be part of Auburn University’s innovative and progressive culture.

and train the students to excel

Hellen achieved his goal, a degree in construction.

and effect our industry. Spirited

“Auburn Building Sciences (BSCI) graduates are well prepared

discussion between the collection

to contribute upon entering a career-field thanks to the school’s focus on

of companies, and the experience

teaching relevant practical construction practices. I believe the greatest

represented by the board, offer an

value I obtained from Auburn, aside from the technical knowledge of my

encompassing perspective on

concentration, was my ability to effect and influence the company of my

future construction needs being

initial hiring,” he added.

desired by the employers.

What are the biggest

challenge before they arise during construction. This helps contractors meet client expectations and stay within a specified budget. Buyers have become more cognizant and are using builders’ knowledge on cost and methods to obtain more value.

The first in his family to graduate from Auburn, Hellen is joined

by his wife and sister who graduated from Auburn, and most recently by his son, who earned an engineering degree in 2014.

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SE RVIC E LE A R NING

// BUILDING CONNECTIONS: Service Learning Projects Here and Abroad Connecting classroom instruction with the real world takes

many forms, and one ideal engagement for students is the potential to apply this learning to service. Service learning enhances and

deepens students' understanding of an academic subject, develops leadership and life skills, and engages them in critical reflection about individual, institutional, and social ethics. “Although the application of academic skills is a necessary corollary to the service, empathy that emerges as a consequence of that experience is immeasurable,” says Scott Kramer, professor in charge of service learning at the McWhorter School of Building Science.

According to Kramer, the school has more than 30 years of

experience performing service projects. Historically, projects were often undertaken as part of the concrete structures class where students poured concrete slabs for non-profit organizations. These concrete projects, were started by Professors Michael Hein and Steve Williams to provide hands-on experiential learning for the students.

In order to build on that history of service, starting Fall semester,

Building Science will offer a Service Learning Field Lab as a requirement in the fourth year of the professional program. Student teams will work with

“ Service learning enhances and deepens students'

non-profits to conduct a service learning project and integrate all compo-

understanding of an academic subject, develops

nents of the construction process. During the spring semester, non-profit

leadership and life skills, and engages them in

organizations will present project opportunities, and the teams will choose

critical reflection about individual, institutional,

the project they will work on in the fall semester. Students will have to come up with a plan in the first three weeks of the semester, have ten weeks to work on the project, two weeks to make a completion video/class assessment, and wrap it all up during final exams with a presentation to the class and client.

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and social ethics.” Scott Kramer


SERVICE LEARNING

INTERNATIONAL SERVICE PROJECT SERVICE LEARNING in Haiti

In Haiti, Kramer, working with Professor Robert Finkel

and his students in the School of Industrial and Graphic Design, is developing medical and public health posters for use in medical clinics for people that can't read or write. A combined service and

research project, it involves students and faculty working from the campus in Auburn. In addition, Professor Chris Arnold and David Gowan are designing a canopy shade system to be built outside the medical clinic to provide shade for patients waiting to see the doctor. The design will use water-permeable fabric, a tube-steel pole, and pulley system to raise and lower the shades.

Professor Randy Bartlett and his Industrial Design students

are engaged in developing a “medical lab in a backpack” for medical missionary workers in Thoman and Gallet Chambon, Haiti. The backpacks will hold diagnostic devices for testing patients in very remote hillside villages. “We are hoping to have a working prototype by the end of spring semester,” added Kramer. “It may be something that we could leverage into a seed grant that would support phase 2 or 3 of design and field testing. Our belief is that if it works in Haiti, it can work anywhere, in Africa, India, China, Ecuador.”

Professor Randy Bartlett and his Industrial Design students are engaged in developing a “medical lab in a backpack” for medical missionary workers in Thoman and Gallet Chambon, Haiti.

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SERVICE LEARNING

INTERNATIONAL SERVICE PROJECT CONSTRUCTION IN CULTURE: Ecuador

When the school expanded the program to the interna-

tional arena in 2010, projects were undertaken as joint ventures with a non-profit group called SIFAT (Servants in Faith and Appropriate Technology) located in Lineville, AL. The class, Construction in Culture-Ecuador, is in high demand and seats fill early, often there is a waiting list for the next semester. Teams taking

this class have travelled to the suburbs of Quito—Calderon and Aida Leon. This is the ninth year that students have gone to Quito, Ecuador. Professors Alan Bugg, Wes Collins, Ben Farrow, Junshan Liu,

year that work on various aspects of the project at any given time.

Darren Olsen, Bruce Smith and Robert Finkel (Graphic Design) have

“There are also several ongoing design projects in Ecuador,” said Kramer.

traveled with the teams. Construction projects are typically a small church

The project in Aida Leon, Ecuador, organized by Professor Junshan Liu,

or an addition to an existing church in poor urban areas. These buildings are

will map the area around the construction site with LiDAR laser scanning

used as after-school programs during the week, giving children from poor

equipment. Liu and his students will use the data to create a point cloud

families a safe place to meet. One of the joint-venture partners, Compassion

of the area and then create a BIM computer model of the new church.

International, provides meals, uniforms and tutoring services to the children.

Graduate and undergraduate students that work on their MBC capstone

A project typically runs for two years and is sponsored by a

or undergraduate research thesis usually work on these types of design

SIFAT graduate. The Auburn team has been referred to as the Point

projects. Students have taken existing building designs and provided

of the Spear because it is the first team to venture into the new

SIFAT and the church with value engineering, constructability analysis,

construction project, often digging footings for the foundation. SIFAT

cost estimates and construction schedules.

and the church typically host 20 different volunteer teams during the

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SERVICE LEARNING

A WEEK IN THE SERVICE OF OTHERS: Ecuador

In Spring 2017, 15 Building Science students registered

in Construction in Culture — Ecuador, traveled to Quito, Ecuador.

Auburn University partnered with SIFAT to build an extension to an existing church, a narrow three-story Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) structure envisioned to function as an afterschool center for underprivileged children.

Students Erin Allee, Justin DaValle, Mitchell Davis, Grant

Dohrenwend, Charlie Esskuchen, Trent Huffines, Richard King, Sam McMath, Chase Merrill, Scott Osborne, Trey Phillips, Francisco Santiago, William Speaks, Cameron Waddle, and Mark Walsh assisted local builders and used technology common to developing countries.

Their time in Ecuador began with a historical tour of the area.

These tours were the beginning of their connection to the culture and to the people with whom they would be working. The group learned about the cultures surrounding this unique spot on the globe during an excursion to the “Middle of the World” at two different locations for the Equator. They climbed 14,000 feet during a hike in the Andes mountains, followed by an architectural tour of various churches and statues learning how they were built. They visited the Basílica del Voto Nacional, a gothic cathedral that took more than 400 years to build.

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SERVICE LEARNING

“The architecture tour of the Basilica was incredible,” said

done according to local standards, because the superintendent and the

William Speaks. “The trip was structured not only to serve the people

project engineer instructed them about the process. “They made sure

of Quito, but also to teach us differences in construction practices and

we knew exactly how to tie rebar, how to prepare the right mixes for

allowed us to learn even more about the culture.”

concrete and mortar, and how to lay the blocks. It was very easy to learn

The team spent five days at the construction site. They learned

the thought process behind it.”

quickly that construction practices in the United States may not always be

the best solution to problems for other countries. Without the luxury of

work for thinking about service and what it meant to be civically engaged

any machines, they learned to mix everything by hand. In place of cranes,

on an international stage. “The goal of the service learning program is to

For many students, the experience provided them with a frame-

they created assembly lines up and down the stairs to move supplies.

plant the seed of service in the students’ hearts and minds,” said Kramer. Along with mixing concrete and mortar, they bent rebar and tied it by hand. “Once completed, the hope is that they will carry on this mission in their For many, it was definitely a learning experience realizing that technology professional careers too.” common for third world countries was very different from what they were

used to stateside.

from the Allison and Jim Gorrie Foundation. The Foundation promises

Soon, four columns, a staircase, and four layers of block for

an enhanced educational experience for students in the program. It

the outside walls emerged. They learned to build the formwork for the

will also develop a new generation of students who think beyond their

four columns. The teams began pouring concrete into the columns using

borders, and use service as a way to help improve the lives of people

Service Learning classes and projects are supported by a gift

their assembly line of concrete buckets. The next couple of days saw

in the world.

people spreading stucco on the second floor walls, while others laid

block on the third floor for the exterior walls. The maestro checked to

in place, but Kramer hopes to replicate that experience in Panama

see if the spacing between the blocks were correct. Once the block was

and Cuba. Working with Third Lens (a non-profit ministry, led by Brian

Currently, Quito is the only international service learning class

correctly placed, mortar was used to fill in the cracks. They had teams

O’Neil, and Caroline Garner, an MBC alum) and Keith Foster with the

of two working on different sides of the building, laying block and filling

Auburn United Methodist Church, Kramer hopes students can partic-

cracks, while others were mixing and keeping the mortar from getting dry.

ipate in building 50 homes, over the next five years, made using

tube steel in the northwest corner of Panama where the indigenous

“It was an amazing opportunity to combine academics and

culture,” said Allee. The students felt confident that the job was being

14 \\

Gnobe People live.


SERVICE LEARNING

HELPING HOUSTON RECOVER

Professor Lauren Redden created the service program in

Houston after the natural disasters in 2017. The objective was

to provide an opportunity for students to impact a community during spring break. Scott Kramer and Redden worked together to develop a low cost program for students to serve outside Lee and Macon County, but within the United States.

SERVICE LEARNING STATESIDE

Since this was the first program of its kind, Redden organized

a small group of seven students, three graduate and four undergraduate

Stateside, the school has been working with other

students. The team partnered with Keith Foster of Auburn United Methodist

non-profit agencies like But God Ministry (BGM), Jackson, Miss.,

Church to identify and vet the families in the greater Houston area. Foster

and Third Lens. BGM is building a Hope Center (fashioned after

also joined the team in Houston and helped with logistics associated

Haiti«s Thoman Hope Center) in Jonestown in the Mississippi Delta.

with maximizing the team’s time to help as many families as possible.

CADC was the first university team to stay at the new Mississippi Hope

“We aided in the recovery effort that is estimated to continue for several

Center. Professor Bugg and ten DBIA students worked on the design of

more years. Our team’s main work scope was drywall. We performed

the medical clinic and life center over a three-day weekend.

various tasks to prep each space for this work as well. Our students

The school is working with another non-profit, Samson’s

were ready to do whatever it took to help. Our team was able to knock

Strength Sustainable Veterans Project (SSSVP) located in Lineville, Ala.,

out work on four different homes during our time there,” added Redden.

which is working with veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq

wars with PTSD. Professors Alan Bugg, Mike Hosey, Kramer, Lauren

us to see outside of our normal lives, and it is moving to donate your time

Redden and April Simons are looking at the possibility of students building

to do good for other people. By interacting with others, it offers oppor-

small ADA compliant homes for the veterans group. Once completed,

tunity to grow socially, individually and as a community. This program is

According to Redden, service learning is important. “It allows

these houses will be donated to the veterans and used at the 175 acre

purely service, because the students are not receiving any class credit

SSSVP campus.

for their participation.”

Q U O I N MAG A ZI N E 20 1 8

// 15


FALL 2018 CAREER EXPO

// INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES AND STUDENTS interact during Spring Career Fair

The spring 2018 Career Fair and Interviews were held in February at the

Beard-Eaves Memorial Coliseum. The event spanned two days with the

Career Fair on February 20 and the Interviews scheduled for the following day. “Nearly seventy companies participated in the fair,” said Brandon Clarke, Lead Administrative Assistant-Academic. “More than 250 students attended the fair. We thank all the participants for making this event a success.” COMPANIES REPRESENTED

16 \\

ABG CAULKING CONTRACTORS

HENSEL PHELPS-SE DISTRICT

AJAX BUILDING CORPORATION

HOAR CONSTRUCTION

ALABAMA RURAL MINISTRIES

HOLDER CONSTRUCTION

AMERICA’S HOME PLACE

INTEGRA CONSTRUCTION

ANNING-JOHNSON CONSTRUCTION

JE DUNN CONSTRUCTION

ARCO-DESIGN/BUILD

JOHN W MCDOUGALL COMPANY, INC.

AUSTIN COMMERCIAL, LP

JUNEAU CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

BATSON-COOK CONSTRUCTION

KEVIN PRICE CONSTRUCTION

BATTEN-SHAW CONSTRUCTION

KIEWIT-TIC

BHATE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSOCIATES, INC.

LAYTON CONSTRUCTION

BL HARBERT INTERNATIONAL, LLC-DOMESTIC

M.J. HARRIS CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, LLC

BRASFIELD & GORRIE, LLC

MARINE CORPS OFFICER PROGRAM

BUILDERS FIRSTSOURCE

MCCARTHY BUILDING COMPANY

CADDELL CONSTRUCTION

METROPOWER, INC.

CARROLL DANIEL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

MILL CREEK CONSTRUCTION

CATAMOUNT CONSTRUCTORS

MONTGOMERY MARTIN CONTRACTORS, LLC

CBG BUILDING COMPANY

NABHOLZ CONSTRUCTION SERVICES

CBRE GROUP, INC.

PCL

CLAYCO

PULTE HOMES-GEORGIA

CONSTRUCTION ENTERPRISES, INC.

RA-LIN & ASSOCIATES, INC.

CORTLAND PARTNERS

REEVES YOUNG

D.R. HORTON

RK-OPERATIONS

DAVID WEEKLEY HOMES

ROBINS & MORTON

DOSTER CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC.

SIGNAL ENERGY CONSTRUCTORS

DPR CONSTRUCTION

THE BECK GROUP

EMJ CONSTRUCTION

THE CONLAN COMPANY

EVANS GENERAL CONTRACTORS

THE NASSAL COMPANY

EVERGREEN CONSTRUCTION

THE

FLOURNOY CONSTRUCTION

COMPANY

FULCRUM CONSTRUCTION, LLC

TURNER CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

G.A. WEST & COMPANY, INC.

VCC, LLC

GILBANE BUILDING COMPANY

WARREN-HANKS CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

GMF STEEL GROUP

WHITE SPUNNER CONSTRUCTION

GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION, LLC

WINTER CONSTRUCTION

WHITING -TU RNER

CONTR AC TING


FALL 2018 CAREER EXPO

Q U O I N MAG A ZI N E 20 1 8

// 17


CCIC UPDATES

// STATE OF THE CENTER Paul Holley Director of the Center for Construction, Innovation & Collaboration

The 2017-2018 academic year saw many changes and insights,

both in the construction industry and here at Auburn. As the Center for

Construction Innovation & Collaboration (CCIC) continues its endeavors and developments, I thought I’d share some perspectives with you, our ‘clients.’

This past year, Auburn University welcomed a new President,

a Provost, an Athletic Director, and a Chief Legal Counsel, and there are several other ‘key’ positions primed to be assumed by new individuals soon. As in industry, change presents opportunities and a promise of different energy and points of view.

The CCIC has now formally been active for eight years, the

Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas, to get a better idea of how

first five of which were under the leadership of Steve Williams. After

current and future products in the marketplace have the potential to

a subsequent external review and assessment, we’ve spent the past

influence or assist the construction industry. We were stunned at the

two years supporting the research of a new cadre of faculty in Building

range of technologies on the horizon; it does not take much imagination to

Science. We continue to foster practical interdisciplinary efforts, and are

envision how technologies like LiDAR scanning, holograms, 360-degree

preparing to develop a new strategic plan aligned with both industry and

imagery, headset-based document access, and many others are and will

the university mission. Changes are afoot in the construction industry

be commonplace on the jobsite in short order. A far cry from the ‘latest

as well as in construction education, and the CCIC plans to be relevant

technologies’ when I entered the industry, like Vernier theodolites, HP

and instrumental in innovative and collaborative efforts. This past Fall,

calculators, and the fax machine. The CCIC looks forward to exploring

the Center underwrote several projects in its annual grants program that

potential future research on the technology front.

In January, Professor Anoop Sattineni and I attended the

illustrate this. Soon you’ll see the results of Professors Wes Collins, Jeff VIRTUAL DESIGN + CONSTRUCTION WORKSHOP

Kim, and Lauren Redden’s efforts to develop standards and practices for educating our students on practical applications of mobile technologies.

Professor Collins is also pursuing an analysis and the development of a

in California best known for GPS, LiDAR, and construction software

future research agenda on healthcare construction that I suspect would be

solutions) to host a two-day event that highlighted a variety of virtual

of interest to many of you. Collins and I recently attended the 2018 ASHE

design and construction (VDC) presentations and workshops. Guest

Conference in Nashville to better understand the national landscape on

speakers from Trimble and SketchUp (3D modeling software) representa-

this front, and saw many AU BSCI graduates there. Professors Leathem

tives as well as industry end-users from Turner Construction and McCarthy

and Wetzel are currently working on best practices to connect the design

Construction made presentations and conducted workshops with classes,

and construction disciplines in contextual work in school projects—an

labs, and studios across all three Schools in CADC. Their visit was part

obvious opportunity, but often a ‘unicorn’ in pragmatic logistics.

of Trimble’s Visiting Professionals Program, and also included an open

In this issue, you’ll also read about an applied undergraduate

lecture by Trimble Vice President Roz Buick on the current technologies

research project undertaken by Eric Lynn. His study on concrete and

and anticipated future of VDC in the design and construction industries.

slurry waste and contamination, and his partnership with Industrial Design

faculty member, Professor Ben Bush, is an outstanding example of how

Dietzen (SketchUp), Renzo Di Furia (Turner), Leighton Kellet (BuildingPoint

our College can take on problem solving as a practical matter across

Gulf Coast), Shannon Lightfoot (McCarthy), Allyson McDuffie (Trimble),

disciplines. If you have industry ‘problems’ or ideas that might be good

Eric Schimelpfening (SketchThis) and Jonathan Stoner (Trimble), connected

subjects for Center-sponsored research, please let us know.

with a variety of audiences across the college.

18 \\

CCIC recently partnered with Trimble (a major manufacturer

Speakers—Chris Brashar (SketchUp), Roz Buick (Trimble), Aaron


CCIC UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

// A RESEARCH PROJECT: TACKLING ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS — Concrete Slurry

People working in the construction industry constantly

deal with concrete waste as well as associated slurry as part of the placement process with pumps, mixers, and other related equipment. The disposal of the washout residue is regulated by

According to Holley, the process of collaborating between BSCI

and INDD was natural. “Bush generated the initial range of really thoughtful concepts, to which Eric and I contributed refinement,” he added. “By working with industry professionals, we produced a prototype and

the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and local jurisdic-

several designs covered under a provisional patent,” Lynn added. The

tions, each imposing their own sanctions on violating contractors.

first prototype was presented to industry and will be used for testing.

BSCI IAC member Wayne Bylsma (President, Cherokee Pumping, “Hopefully, this study created a foundation to allow many solutions to be pursued in the future.”

Inc.) brought the problem to the Center for Construction Innovation

& Collaboration (CCIC) to help him find ways to better handle the collection, relocation and removal of concrete waste and slurry “By working with industry professionals, we produced

from construction sites.

The project became the subject of undergraduate student Eric

Lynn’s alternative BSCI Research Thesis. Lynn worked in partnership with

a prototype and several designs covered under a provisional patent...

CCIC Director Paul Holley, INDD faculty member Ben Bush (co-investigator), and Bylsma. The study was conducted mainly through interviews and

Eric Lynn

construction jobsite visits in Auburn and at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

According to Lynn, the most crucial part of the project was

the Site Observation phase. These visits were crucial to the design process by providing accurate dimensions, limitations and other logistical requirements. They were able to break down underlying problems in current practices in order to design a product specifically targeted to industry needs. Lynn worked on developing concepts and identified the most promising solutions.

Q U O I N MAG A ZI N E 20 1 8

// 19


UNDERGRADUATE UPDATES

// BUILDING SCIENCE STUDENTS attend AGC Convention

The Associated General Contractors of America (AGCA),

Guild provides students with activities that complement the curriculum

the nation«s largest and oldest construction trade association,

and enhance classroom learning and social networks including service

held its annual convention in New Orleans recently. Students and

projects, student socials, attendance at industry events, field trips, and

faculty from the McWhorter School of Building Science at the convention

student competitions. The Auburn student chapter of the Alabama

received some exciting news: Eddie Stewart, a Montgomery executive

chapter of the AGCA is open to all undergraduate and graduate BSCI and

and president of Caddell Construction, was named president of the AGCA.

Pre-BSCI students.

In the 100-year history of Alabama AGC, Stewart is the first national

president from Alabama to lead the AGCA.

the community. Throughout the year, several initiatives and projects are

An important aspect of the student chapter is its involvement in

Richard Burt, Head of the McWhorter School of Building

undertaken to give back to the community. “By being involved, we are

Science, considered it a great honor for the program to be involved in

providing a tangible help to people in need and are helping to develop an

the installation of Alabama’s first ever National AGC President. “What

attitude of service among our members,” added Jackson.

makes this news extraordinary is that Eddie is a big supporter of the

AU program, and serves on the school’s Construction Industry Fund

ship skills and the opportunity to network with industry leaders are two

Administrative Committee,” he said.

important perks of the membership,” added Burt, faculty advisor to the

At the convention, Auburn’s AGC student chapter and the

chapter. “Having Eddie in the position of National President, and Alex

distance graduate education programs, showcased the McWhorter

Whaley II as Alabama AGC President, serves as a great motivation for our

School of Building Science. According to student chapter president,

AGC student chapter members. It shows what can be achieved through

Jarrett Jackson, the AGCA seeks to connect Auburn University students

exceptional leadership and sustained dedication to the industry.”

with construction industry professionals who are committed to the next generation of construction, business and community leaders. We met many AGC member company executives and learned about new products, technologies and practices in the construction industry," he said. “We had the great privilege of being with Mr. Stewart as he was inducted to be the president of AGC of America.” The AGC Builders

20 \\

“The chapter provides many benefits, but developing leader-


CAREERS IN CONSTRUCTION

// CONSTRUCTION JOBS ON THE UPSWING in the United States INDEED BEST JOBS OF 2018

When people are asked what makes their job ideal, common

responses probably include salary or work environment. A few other

JOB TITTLE

factors such as job security and satisfaction, culture and career potential

% GROWTH IN NUMBER OF POSTING 2014-2017

AVERAGE BASE SALARY

may also figure in the responses.

1

COMMERCIAL PROJECT MANAGER

277 %

$81,023

To identify the best jobs in America in 2018 researchers at

2

FULL STACK DEVELOPER

198%

$111,640

Indeed (a U.S. Job and Recruitment website) focused on two factors:

3

COMPUTER VISION ENGINEER

169%

$131,297

salary (jobs with a baseline salary of at least $75,000) and abundance of

4

MACHINE LEARNING ENGINEER

166%

$136,241

opportunity (jobs which have seen the most growth on Indeed since 2014).

5

PRECONSTRUCTION MANAGER

126%

$95,337

Overall, 16 jobs appeared in the results that didn’t make it in

6

CONSTRUCTION SUPERINTENDENT

122%

$85,170

2017. And as for which job came first, it was commercial project manager

7

OPTOMETRIST

118%

$131,692

which leapt from #19 in 2017 to the number one spot this year. It was

8

DATA SCIENTIST

106%

$132,915

propelled by an average base salary of $81,023 and an impressive 277%

9

CHIEF ESTIIMATOR

131%

$116,848

10

DEVELOPMENT OPERATIONS ENGINEER

128%

$125,714

11

AGILE COACH

113%

$120,142

12

CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATOR

112%

$78,052

13

SENIOR TALENT ACQUISITION MANAGER

98%

$85,076

on last year’s list to 6th place in 2018, with an overall 122% growth in

14

PLUMBING ENGINEER

85%

$82,063

postings since 2014.

15

PROJECT SUPERINTENDENT

82%

$83,326

The reason for this uptick may be due to the fact that construc-

16

STAFF PHARMACIST

79%

$107,584

tion spending is soaring, and three-quarters of employers in the sector

17

HEAD OF SALES

74%

$78,675

reported plans to add staff in 2018. Office construction in particular is

18

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE AGENT

64%

$85,655

experiencing a revival. Managerial level construction jobs vary when it

19

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

63%

$77,931

comes to education requirements, many companies preferring at minimum

20

PROJECT ARCHITECT

62%

$85,655

a bachelor’s degree in a construction-related field or equivalent experience

21

PRODUCT OWNER

79%

$77,931

working in construction. However, some jobs require only a high school

22

SENIOR CLINICAL SPECIALIST

74%

$77,931

diploma plus experience.

23

USER EXPERIENCE RESEARCHER

64%

$99,551

24

RIGISTERED NURSE-INFUSION

63%

$79,952

25

PARTNERSHIP MANAGER

62%

$76,628

growth in job postings between 2014 and 2017.

Not only are construction jobs booming, but many of them are

making their debut on Indeed’s best jobs list. Preconstruction manager (#5), construction estimator (#12), and construction manager (#19) are newcomers. Meanwhile, construction superintendent moved from #24

Q U O I N MAG A ZI N E 20 1 8

// 21


ALUMNI NEWS

// WHALEY FAMILY ENJOYS a spectacular 2018 “The apple does not fall far from the tree” is a very apt idiom

Whaley Sr. maintains a demanding work schedule. He participated in

for the Whaley family. Alex Whaley, Sr. and Alex Whaley II shared a

Leadership Alabama Program, and served as the chairman of the Pike

special distinction in 2018. Whaley Sr., of Whaley Construction Company

County Chamber of Commerce. He currently serves as chairman of the

(Troy, Ala.), was one of three leaders recently inducted into the 2018 Alabama

Alabama Licensing Board for General Contractors, Chairman of the Pike

Construction Hall of Fame. His son, Alex Whaley II, was named the chapter

County Vocational Technical Advisory Board, a member of the Rotary

president of the Alabama Associated General Contractors (AGC) in 2018.

Club, the Alabama Concrete Industries Associate Board, and on the

a business and improve construction industry in Alabama. He devoted his

board of directors of Troy Bank and Trust since 1979. A third-generation Auburn University graduate, Alex

energy to make Whaley Construction what it is today.

Whaley II earned a degree in building construction in 1990.

Although he started as a business major, he moved to building

According to AGC, Alex Whaley Sr. has worked tirelessly to build

Whaley Construction Company Inc. was established in 1931

as Whaley Lumber Company by Alex Whaley’s father, L.E. Whaley.

science at the end of his freshman year. His interest in building began

The company got its start during the depression when a bonding agent

early on when, as a youth, he started work on simpler projects. “Growing

asked the elder Whaley, who at the time was making windows and

up I worked at Whaley Construction in the field,” said Whaley. “I contin-

doors in the lumber company, to finish failed school jobs. Ultimately,

ued this during the summers and holidays throughout my college career. I

the company built schools all over south Alabama. Alex Whaley was

have always enjoyed working with my hands, and at the core is what I love

7 years old when his father passed away in 1952. He worked his

about our business.”

way through Auburn, graduating with a Building Construction degree

in 1967, and bought Whaley in 1971. He was successful in turning

credits the building science program with teaching him the

the business around from a slump. Whaley Construction has grown

theory behind the structures that he worked on. It was a class

In addition to the social skills he honed in Auburn, he

from a “steam-powered” sawmill to a modern, computerized, indus-

that sparked the lifelong interest that enhanced his career.

trial and commercial construction firm specializing in design-build,

Today, his interest encompasses the industry’s more advanced

construction management and conventional construction operations.

systems. “Electronic distribution of data, has radically changed and contin-

ues to evolve. BIM, drones, and robotic surveying continues to improve our

While working hard building his business, Whaley Sr. also

worked hard to build the construction industry. He became involved

industry and we are learning how to better utilize these technologies daily.

in the Alabama AGC in 1972 and served multiple roles before becom-

As our industry embraces these tools to make our jobsites more efficient,

ing Chapter President in 2008. Whaley currently is a national AGC life

we should not forget that it takes skilled craftsmen to get the project built.

governor, past-chairman of the Alabama AGC state PAC Committee,

and serves on the AGC of America PAC Committee. His son, Alex

2018. As president, he believes that the industry owes a debt of grati-

Whaley II, joined the company in 1997 and became president in 2007.

tude to the hardworking people that have built the industry. “My goal as

He assumed the role of President of Alabama AGC in January

president is to honor that legacy by continuing the hard work and focus on improving our industry.” 22 \\


ALUMNI NEWS

// BSCI ALUM AMY CARLSON «89 ADVOCATES for Parkinson«s Funding, Understanding and Cure

Amy Carlson `89 figures the American economy was

federal funding for Parkinson’s research programs at the Centers for

robbed of 20 years of her productivity as a construction program

Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the

manager by Parkinson«s Disease. During her years in construction,

Department of Defense (veterans make up a disproportionate number of

she worked for Brice Building Co., USPCI, McDonald’s Corporation,

Parkinson’s patients).

and Jacobs. Her last project for Jacobs was as a Construction Program

Manager for the Giant Magellan Telescope project that will be constructed

Parkinson’s community. I am thrilled to attend the 2018 Parkinson’s

“Every day I am inspired by the people in the Los Angeles

in the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.

Policy Forum to take our message to Capitol Hill,” said Amy. “I want to

Amy was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease in 2012 when

show our Senators and Representative that mine is just one face behind

she was 44 years old. She had to stop working when she was 48. As

some of the emails and phone calls and that there are so many more

she describes it, her thriving career in construction management along

like me,” she added, “The chance to come together with hundreds of

with her marriage and family “was shanghaied by Parkinson’s.” Going

people who also live with Parkinson’s Disease, to share our journey and to

from being a contributor to the economy to being a dependent was a

show our nation’s leaders what it means to live with Parkinson’s disease

blow to her identity. As she points out, Parkinson’s Disease, along with

is so powerful.”

other neurological disorders, is robbing our nation’s labor force of some

of our best and brightest at the height of their ability to contribute to our

worldwide, Parkinson’s disease is the second-most common neurode-

Affecting an estimated 1 million Americans and 10 million

nation’s economy.

generative disease after Alzheimer’s and is the 14th-leading cause of

She re-purposed her skill set to one of policy advocacy and to

death in the United States. It is associated with a progressive loss of motor

educating the public about how much Parkinson’s and other neurologi-

control (e.g., shaking or tremor at rest and lack of facial expression), as

cal disorders are affecting our world. Amy was recently in Washington

well as non-motor symptoms (e.g., depression and anxiety). There is no

DC with 300 other “off balance, tremoring sleepless Parkies to wake

cure for Parkinson’s, and 60,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the

up Congress” at the Parkinson’s Policy Forum that was co-hosted by

United States alone.

the Parkinson’s Foundation and The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

As one of the delegates, Amy’s goal was to educate lawmak-

ers on the need for federal funding for research toward a cure for Parkinson’s and for policy support for those living with the disease. She met

with Senator Dianne Feinstein, Senator Ron Johnson,

Representative and Speaker of House Paul Ryan, and Representative

“Every day I am inspired by the people in the Los Angeles Parkinson’s community. I am thrilled to attend the 2018 Parkinson’s Policy Forum to take our message to Capitol Hill”

Grace Napolitano and the staff of each to talk about the need to provide

Q U O I N MAG A ZI N E 20 1 8

Amy Carlson

// 23


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