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Signatures A NDERSON U NIVERSITY ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Alum uses her MBA on the farm PAGE 14

Books to add to your list PAGE 20

See 2018 Homecoming schedule PAGES 16-17


Signatures FALL 2018 VO LU M E 97 / I S SU E 1

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MBA students compete to have the top business plan.

10 | The AU Shark Tank Every spring, graduating MBA students combine everything they have learned in graduate school to create a competitive business plan.

19 | Must Reads Anderson University English professors offer suggestions for your reading list.

News

Alumni

6 | From the President

22 | The Raven Family

7 | Unlikely Pair

28 | Always Connected

8 | Across the Valley

29 | Class Notes

14 | Raven Athletics

30 | Remembering Our Friends

15 | Homecoming Schedule

S

ON THE COVER: Kerra Armstrong, recent MBA grad, was part of the team to create a business plan for a confined feeding operation for swine.

Editor — Deborah Lilly BA ’90, MTS ’11; Design/Illustration — Larry Stuart BA ’84; Editorial Assistants — Elizabeth Murray, Marissa (Phillips) Johnson BA ’13, Scott Tilley BA ’86; Contributing Writers — John S. Pistole BA ’78, Faith Sayles BA ’18; Student Writers — Tyler Bradshaw, Wesley Davidson, Lindsey Hrinowich, Faith Middleton BA ’18, Maria Neathery; Photographers — Dale Pickett, Sally Wolf. Signatures is the official alumni periodical of Anderson University, published three times a year (April, August, December) and printed by Progress Printing Plus. Editorial offices are located in Smith House on the AU campus. The mailing address is Anderson Univeristy, ATTN: Signatures magazine, 1100 E. 5th St., Anderson, IN

1100 E. 5th St., Anderson, IN 46012-3495 www.anderson.edu

46012. Signatures and the Anderson University logo are registered trademarks of Anderson University.

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

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A SINGLE FRAME 2018 Anderson University graduates Thitina Moges Asrat (far left) and Mistre Sereke Kebede (far right) celebrate their accomplishments with Christa Welty (middle), assistant professor of library science at AU. Nearly 500 students graduated from the university’s undergraduate and graduate programs on May 5.

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ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Summer/Fall 2018 

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FROM the PRESIDENT

(Photo courtesy of the The Herald-Bulletin)

In the last year, three new members have joined Anderson University and the President’s Cabinet. They are (from left to right) Ryon Kaopuiki, vice president for enrollment and marketing; Jim Ragsdale, vice president for finance and chief financial officer; and Jen Hunt, vice president for advancement.

Enrollment rising for fall AU faculty, staff prepare for new year

As the summer winds down I’m excited about the new academic year. We anticipate strong enrollment numbers — an increase of 20-25% from last year’s entering class. This is attributable to a number of factors, particularly the outstanding work by Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing Ryon “WE KNOW who we are as Kaopuiki, Director of Admissions Kynan a Christ-centered liberal arts Simison, Director of Student Financial school, which is distinctive, Services Chaunta Redfield, and the compelling, and relevant, Admissions and Student Financial Services staff. They worked with faculty, coaches, and we’re communicating and staff campuswide to bring a “whole that directly to prospective university” approach to recruitment and students and their families.” retention of students. —PRESIDENT PISTOLE Another factor is our clarity of message. We know who we are as a Christ-centered liberal arts school, which is distinctive, compelling, and relevant, and we’re communicating that directly to prospective students and their families. Your support by recommending potential students to AU is invaluable. Word-of-mouth, personal recommendations are the best tools in sharing our core values | 6

of excellence, integrity, servant leadership, generosity, and responsibility. I’m also excited by a new Ethos Statement we’ve developed that better communicates who we are and whose we are. You will find it at anderson.edu/ethos. I’d welcome your thoughts. On the athletic side, I eagerly anticipate our inaugural seasons of women’s and men’s lacrosse. We have more than 26 student athletes committed, with many high school juniors expressing interest for 2019-20. We’re bringing back golf and tennis after a year’s hiatus, which allowed us to assess interest and support for these two sports. And we’re all looking forward to our football season under new coach Steve Rock. Jim Ragsdale had joined the Cabinet as vice president for finance and chief financial officer. He is a 1983 alum and married to Lisa (Helvering) Ragsdale BA ’83, who directs our conference and performance events. Jim comes to us from Ascension IT services and has worked previously at Church of God Ministries. He joins Cabinet members Dr. Marie Morris, provost; Jen Hunt, vice president for advancement; Kaopuiki; and Dan Courtney, former AU trustee who works on special projects for us. We continue to move forward with our Real Life. Transformed. Christian spiritual transformation initiative, helping students connect their career and calling. We strive for excellence in all things and seek to be distinctive, compelling, and relevant in a world needing compassionate Christ followers. Won’t you join us in our journey? Blessings, John S. Pistole


U N L I K E LY PA I R

U N L I K E LY RO O M M AT E S :

Marissa Cisneros and Sophia Rolph AU juniors Marissa Cisneros (right) and Sophia Rolph (left) could not be more opposite, yet they share the same love of attending AU. / / / M A R I A N E AT H E RY

Describe each other’s personalities?

“I would say Marissa is a very loud, outgoing person who loves to win others over with her personality.” MARISSA: “Sophia is a major sweetheart and is sensitive, soft-spoken, and reserved.” How did you decide to room together for your sophomore year? SOPHIA: “It seemed obvious out of our friend group because we would be the only ones staying up late, having life talks together.” MARISSA: “I would definitely say we are different, but we really bonded our freshman year.” Individual involvement on campus? SOPHIA: “I’m the Student Peace Initiative student coordinator on campus, and I work at a food pantry every Tuesday.” SOPHIA:

“I try to go to everything, like all the CAB events. I am also a part of College Mentors for Kids.” Favorite activities? SOPHIA: “My favorite activities include photography, being involved with church, and hanging without friends.” MARISSA: “Hanging out with friends, I am a Netflix addict, and I like to do bold, exciting things.” What’s one thing that you love about the other? SOPHIA: “I love how real she is. She tells it how it is and doesn’t sugar coat anything.” MARISSA: “My favorite thing about Soph is that she is a very passionate person. She is super loving.” What is it like rooming together? SOPHIA: “We both have busy schedules, so we are not always together; MARISSA:

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

therefore, we are able to avoid fighting or having disagreements.” MARISSA: “Sophia is a very chill, relaxed person.” Who is the messy/clean one? SOPHIA: “We are both messy people!” Favorite thing about AU? SOPHIA: “I have learned so much from the professors here.” MARISSA: “I love the people here and the community of AU is so loving.” What’s a weird quirk or habit that you notice about your roommate? SOPHIA: “She will often get back late and not change into her pajamas. She will not even take her shoes off to go to bed!” MARISSA: “Our beds are mid-lofted, and Soph will always try to jump on her bed from the floor.”

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News ACROSS the VALLEY

Back on Schedule After hiatus, golf and tennis teams look forward to new seasons /// WES DAVIDSON AND KYLIE OSBORNE

Every school year comes with new challenges, opportunities, and possibilities. This certainly will be the case for the 2018-19 school year for Bryant Beard and Jeff Brunnemer, coaches of the Anderson University tennis and golf teams. The two programs are back at Anderson University after being cut for one year. The news that golf and tennis would be removed from AU’s athletic program devastated the men’s and women’s teams. Mandy Meserve, a member of the women’s tennis team, recalled, “We found out before our season was even | 8

over, and it really affected how we played in conference.” Brodie Hough, captain of the men’s golf team, reported a similar reaction. “The team was absolutely crushed. Every single player took it hard and we all reacted differently, but for me personally, I was heartbroken.” When Brunnemer learned the golf teams were reinstated, he began to plan for next season right away. “I immediately started contacting recruits who had contacted me,” he said. Beard was ready to get back in the game as well. “I was elated for our

returning players but I quickly shifted my focus to what we could do differently. We have a very good opportunity in front of us to not only continue the stories that our tennis alumni have made before us, but to reshape and redefine what this tennis program looks,” he explained. In a strange way, Beard says that the year off prepared the team well. Without teams to coach this year, he focused on preparation and recruitment. “Our returning athletes have really stepped up their leadership and welcomed this challenge. They deserve a lot of credit for their attitudes.” Brunnemer has great things to say about his players and the possibilities that the upcoming season holds. “I have high expectations and I hope we will adjust well to the one-year absence.”


FALL CLASSES begin

AU G U S T 2 7 DR. DWIGHT GRUBBS MDIV ’71, MRE ’73 and his granddaughter, HANNAH GRUBBS-OECHSLE BA ’16, MTS ’18, shared a special moment in May when he participated in her hooding at the Anderson University School of Theology and Christian Ministry. Dr. Grubbs is a professor emeritus of the SOTCM, teaching applied theology from 1978-95. Grubbs-Oechsle has been accepted into the PhD program at Marquette University in Milwaukee. She is the daughter of Mindy (Starr) BA ’88 and Jonathan Grubbs BA ’89.

NEWS BRIEFS DESIGNING WITH JUSTICE Anderson University’s first art exhibition of the 2018-19 academic year will feature the work of Luba Lukova. Lukova is an internationally renowned, New York-based artist and designer. Lukova’s work will be featured in The Wilson Gallery from Sept. 7 to Oct. 11. The exhibition is free and open to the public. Alumni are invited to view the exhibit during Homecoming.

2018 REITHMILLER AWARD HEARD AT BACCALAUREATE

“Life is not about competing for a spot or vying for position or beating someone else out for a promotion. But this life — this Christian life — is about my personal walk with God, my pursuit of his plans for me, and the running of the race that he has given me to run.” —THE REV. DR. MELISSA PRATT BA ’91, senior pastor at Teays Valley Church of God, addressing Anderson University graduates at the 2018 baccalaureate service

Dr. Lawrence Allen and Mrs. Renee Hull-Allen were awarded the William P. Riethmiller Community Partnership Award at the Anderson University President’s Appreciation Dinner in April. Dr. and Mrs. Allen are advocates and champions of Anderson University, the Boze Lyric Theatre, and the university’s music, theatre, and dance program.

Keep up with ANDERSON UNIVERSITY between issues of SIGNATURES. ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Spring/Summer 2018 

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THE AU SHARK TANK

MBA students merge their education into a final business plan |

Deborah Lilly

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After two years of juggling academic work, a full-time job, and often, a family, Anderson University MBA students were on the cusp of graduation. Before they took their final class, they had one big project left to complete. This project required all of the resources they learned in their quest for an MBA, and it could very well determine their future. Their goal was to create a business plan to catch the interest of investors. The project is an ongoing part of the program’s next-to-last class Competition and Strategy. The competition was added to the curriculum in 2011 thanks to a Falls Departmental Initiative Grant. Dr. Emmett Dulaney, professor of marketing at AU, oversees the cohorts during the 15-week class to ensure information shared is consistent among their MBA cohort locations — Anderson, Fishers, and Speedway. | 10


Either alone or in teams, students in each cohort develop a business plan. The first round of competition takes place within their cohorts, as they compete against other business plans with their instructors serving as judges. The final competition brings the winning team or individual from each of the cohorts to have their business plan judged by a panel of entrepreneurs from the Indianapolis area. The public is also welcome to attend. While the idea of the competition is similar to the popular reality television show Shark Tank, this was the first year the competition used the Shark Tank theme. According to Dulaney, from the beginning of the MBA competition, students quickly associated it with a the television show, and since most people in the public were familiar with the concept of Shark Tank, it became an easy way to explain the competition and create excitement for potential audience members. During an evening in April, a crowd of FSB professors and students, area business leaders, and the general public watched as three team finalists presented their ideas to the 2018 judging panel of Pete Bitar, CEO of XADS; Tammy Rimer, CEO of Element 212; Stan Horner, GM of Myers ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

Autoworld; and Bruce Kidd, former head of the Indiana Economic Development Council: • Anderson cohort — business plan for a confined feed operation for hogs in Blackford County. • Fishers cohort — a business plan for a consulting company to assist hospitals with issues concerning sterilized instruments. • Speedway cohort — a business plan offering financial advising services to the underserved middle-class market. As a professor, what Dulaney enjoys the most about this competition is the enthusiasm behind each pitch. “They are all interesting ideas because there is always someone with a passion behind them,” he explained. Not only was it an exciting night for Dr. Dulaney and the presenting MBA teams. Evan Dulaney BA ’18 was also approaching the end of his time at AU and preparing 11  |


“As an entrepreneur, we have so many creative and innovative ideas but lack the fundamental business knowledge needed to thrive in a competitive marketplace. That’s how my MBA has been beneficial for me.”

to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Evan minored in event planning, and his final project was to plan and execute this year’s business plan competition. “Every few weeks, the faculty team and I would meet to work out what we wanted some aspect of the event to look like. For examSPARKLE LOCKETT ple, we met to decide what we wanted the venue to be and what we wanted to do for prizes,” Evan explained. “It was my job to get those things done. Then we would meet again, I’d go over what I had done, and we’d start over on another aspect of the night.” Finally, the night arrived, and at the end of the evening, the Anderson cohort team members each earned the judges’ nod along with a 5-ounce silver bar in a display box unique to the AU competition. Dr. Dulaney added, “All three of the competing teams this year are actually following through with their businesses. That is unusual.” Winning the business plan competition isn’t the only benefit of the Competition and Strategy class. The course focuses on researching, writing, and getting advice from

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business faculty to determine if an idea is viable, Dr. Dulaney explained. That process may be more important than winning the competition, and teams or individuals from past competitions have used the feedback they received to better their business plans and continue forward with their businesses. One such person is Sparkle Lockett MBA ’11. Her company, MakeUp By Sparkle, already existed when she began her MBA degree. She created MakeUp By Sparkle, “to meet a growing need of a quality cosmetics line for women of color.” When it came time for her to create a plan for her company, she said, “I hoped to gain the knowledge for writing a more effective business plan not only for my own vision and goals for the business but to have clear objectives to present to potential investors, employees, and functional business partners.” Lockett’s company has continued to succeed since her time at AU. “As an entrepreneur, we have so many creative and innovative ideas but lack the fundamental business knowledge needed to thrive in a competitive marketplace. That’s how my MBA has been beneficial for me,” she explained. Kerra Armstrong BA ‘08, who shared in the Anderson cohort’s success this spring, first attempted to write a business plan for a confined feeding operation for pigs while she was an undergraduate student.


Both Armstrong and her husband grew up on farms. Farming is, in fact, a family tradition on both sides, with their grandparents making their living farming as well. Today Kerra and her husband farm with his family and hope to develop their own farming operation to pass along to their two sons, now ages 7 and 3. Armstrong believes diversification is necessary to have a sustainable income in farming. She explained when the price of crops goes down, the trend is for the price of livestock to rise, and vica versa. So to add diversity to their farm, the couple hopes to add a confined feeding operation to Armstrong Family Farms, which would allow them to contract with food companies for a salaried income over the course of the contract. Since Armstrong wrote her first business plan, both technology and regulations have changed, so it was due for an update. She was grateful for her other four team members who took on different aspects of the plan: Lauren Mowrey, marketing; Pete Heuer, compliance and regulations; Kris Jones, financing, business flow, and profitability; and Duane DeTar, facilities. For Armstrong and her husband, farming is more than a business. It is another way to share life lessons with their sons. She wants them to understand how farming works and see it as a responsibility to provide food for other people. “It’s hard work. There are a lot of sleepless nights, but ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Spring/Summer 2018 

“[Farming is] hard work. There are a lot of sleepless nights, but there is also a lot of joy. You really have to put your faith in God.”

there is also a lot of joy,” said Armstrong. “You really have to put your faith in God.” Armstrong and her family still have a lot of work to do before fully realizing their plan KERRA ARMSTRONG of a confined feeding operation, but thanks to her team’s business plan, they are one step closer. Evan Dulaney will also be able to use his experience planning this year’s competition as a step toward his career goal. He will be attending IUPUI this fall to study for a master’s degree in museum studies. “History has always been a passion for me,” he explained. “I plan to become a museum curator — the person in charge of the artifacts but also the jack-of-all-trades at smaller institutions. Museums, like any not-for-profit institution, constantly have to fundraise and have events to keep the public interested. The business plan competition and my event planning minor have given me the skills to put on a successful event, from the months of planning to the frantic few minutes beforehand. I’m incredibly thankful to AU and the FSB for giving me ... a real-world project for practical experience.”

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RAVEN ATHLETICS

A U

R A V E N

A T H L E T I C S

RAVENS AT HOME FA L L S P O R T S S C H E D U L E

Ausmus and Cooley top AU athletes, scholars Anderson softball standout Samantha Ausmus BA ’18 and men’s track and

F O OT B A L L

9/12 @ 5 p.m. vs. Thomas Moore

9/8 @ 1:30 p.m. vs. Indiana Wesleyan

9/15 @ 5 p.m. vs. Albion

9/15 @ 1:30 p.m. vs. Franklin

9/21 @ 3:30 p.m. vs. Ohio Northern

9/29 @ 1:30 p.m. vs. Hanover

9/21 @ 3:30 p.m. vs. Transylvania

10/27 @ 1:30 p.m. vs. Bluffton

10/10 @ 3:30 p.m. vs. Defiance

11/10 @ 1:30 p.m. vs. Manchester

10/20 @ 3:30 p.m. vs. Hanover

starter, a three-time academic All-HCAC

VOLLEYBALL

10/24 @ 3:30 p.m. vs. Rose-Hulman

selection, a first team All-HCAC choice

9/4 @ 7 p.m. vs. Goshen

10/27 @ 3:30 p.m. vs. Bluffton University

in 2017, and an honorable mention all-

9/11 @ 7 p.m. vs. Albion

W O M E N’ S S O CC E R

9/29 @ 12 p.m. vs. Mount Saint Joseph

9/5 @ 5:30 p.m. vs. St. Mary’s of the Woods

10/11 @ 7 p.m. vs. Manchester

9/15 @ 1 p.m. vs. Wilmington

10/16 @ 7 p.m. vs. Bluffton

9/29 @ 1 p.m. vs. Transylvania

10/20 @ 12 p.m. vs. Earlham

10/3 @ 3:30 vs. Manchester

10/24 @ 7 p.m. vs. Defiance

10/17 @ 3:30 vs. Earlham

M E N’ S S O CC E R

10/20 @ 1 p.m. vs. Hanover

8/31 @ 5 p.m. vs. St. Mary’s of the Woods

10/27 @ 1 p.m. vs. Bluffton

Indoor Track and Field All-American. He

9/1 @ 2 p.m. vs. UC Clermont

W O M E N’ S T E N N I S

placed fourth in the long jump in 2018.

9/4 @ 4 p.m. vs. Depauw

8/31 @ 4 p.m. vs. Taylor

9/5 @ 5:30 p.m. vs. St. Mary’s of the Woods

9/7 @ 4 p.m. vs. St. Francis

9/7 @ 5 p.m. vs. Blackburn

10/3 @ 4 p.m. vs. Manchester

9/8 @ 2 p.m. vs. Baldwin Wallace

10/6 @ 11 a.m. vs. Earlham

field record-holder and All-American Garrett Cooley BA ’18 were named the 2017-18 Anderson University Senior Student-Athletes of the Year. Ausmus was a four-year varsity

conference selection in 2016. She was named a team co-captain in 2018 and finished her college career second in the university’s career fielding percentage at .985, third in season fielding percentage (.994, 2016), and eighth in career putouts (880). Cooley is a two-time NCAA Division III

He is a 15-time HCAC champion, eight indoor and seven outdoor, and a 12-time conference runner-up with performances in the long jump, high jump, 100 Meter Dash, 200 Meter Dash, 4x100 Relay and 4x400 Relay. He is also a three-time recipient of All-Great Lakes Region honors and a three-time school record holder. From Indianapolis, Cooley mentored numerous student-athletes at AU about navigating the pressures of balancing sports and studies.

F o r b o t h h o m e a n d away d at e s , v i s i t

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at h l e t i c s . a n d e r s o n . e d u .

/// S T E V E N H E A T H


G O D B L E S S , G O R AV E N S !

HOME COMING 2018 S e p t e m b e r 2 8-30

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Spring 2018 

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ENGAGE

GATHER

F R I D AY, S E P T E M B E R 2 8 8:30–pm

$ISCOVERY$AY

York

3!452$!9 3%04%-"%2 8am–Noon

Anderson City Market, including AU artisans Park Place Community Center

12:30–3:30pm Raven Career Fair

Reardon Lobby

8:30–9:30am Affinity Breakfast $5 per adult

4–6pm

Wilson Galleries

8:30–9:30am 1960’s & All African American Alumni Groups Breakfast, $5

6–7:30pm

Reunion dinner for 1974–1978 Baseball alums

7–9pm

Helios Reception in the Valley

Dusk

Campus Illumination

Krannert Fine Arts Building Kane Dining Room

Helios

7:30pm

the Valley, weather permitting

Homecoming AU Music Concert Park Place Church

8:30–9:15pm Alumni Worship led by various alums

steps of Wilson Library

9:30pm

Cheap Thrills

Reardon Auditorium

Olt Student Center

Heritage Dining Room

9–10am Café con Pan with HLSA/ Cultural Resources Center

2nd floor Decker

9–11am

Biology Reception Celebrating Dr. Blake Janutolo & Welcome for Katelyn Butler

9–10am

Boosters Breakfast- $5 per adult

Biology Dept. in Hartung Hall Kane Dining Room

9:45–10:15am Bates Locker Room Dedication

O.C. Lewis Gym

10–11am

Reception for Art & Design Alumni

10:45am

Athletic Hall of Fame Meet & Greet with program beginning at 11 a.m.

Wilson Gallery, Krannert Fine Arts Center

Fair Commons

10:30am–1pm Street Fair

University Boulevard

11am–1pm

AU Baseball alumni & family cookout

12:30pm

Lifeguard reunion and water polo game

5–6:30pm

Women’s Soccer Reception, after soccer game

7pm

Men’s Soccer Program Reception

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lawn area near Kids activities Bennett Natatorium Fair Commons

York Performance Hall Lobby


ENJOY

CHEER

S AT U R D AY A F T E R N O O N / E V E N I N G , S E P T E M B E R 2 9

S AT U R D AY, S E P T E M B E R . 2 9

1pm

Centennial Prayer Labyrinth dedication

8:15am

1980’s-2002 Men’s Alumni Soccer Game

2:30pm

Fall Musical: Violet

9:30am

Women’s Alumni Soccer Game

Byrum Hall

7:30pm

Fall Musical: Violet

10:45am

2003-2017 Men’s Alumni Soccer Game

7:30pm

Alumni Showcase production, featuring film, comedy and music

Noon

Volleyball vs. Mount St. Joseph

1pm

Women’s Soccer vs. Transylvania

1:30pm

Football vs Hanover

3pm

Volleyball Alumni Game

3:30pm

Men’s Soccer vs. Transylvania

10pm

Site of old Warner Auditorium

Byrum Hall

Reardon Auditorium

Encore

Reardon Auditorium

S U N D AY A F T E R N O O N , S E P T E M B E R 3 0 2:30pm

Fall Musical: Violet Byrum Hall

Soccer Field Soccer Field Soccer Field

O.C. Lewis Gymnasium Soccer Field

Macholtz Stadium O.C. Lewis Gym Soccer Field

Register online for Homecoming 2018 anderson.edu/homecoming ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

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Must Reads

The next book idea for your reading list

Looking for a good book to read? It’s no surprise that a university is full of readers, but we thought we’d ask the faculty in the English Department what have been some of their favorite books over the years. Here is what they told us.

/// TYLER BRADSHAW

D r. Scot t B o rd e rs

D r. Jason Parks

Remains of the Day By Kazuo Ishiguro Remains of the Day offers a portrayal of a dutiful English butler, Mr. Stevens, who invested his life in his profession by serving in a great house. He comes to a late point in his career only to realize that it has consumed him, leaving him without a personal life. The first-person narrative details the butler’s slowly developing awareness of the cost of his choices.

Juvenescence By Robert Pogue Harrison “I chose Juvenescence because it offers a thoughtful, contemporary perspective on the age-old question of the role of genius

was a novelty and travel by anything other than horse and buggy was unheard of,” says Elliot. “Larson does an excellent job of explaining how the fair, particularly when illuminated at night, created an iridescence that was unfathomable at the time.

P rof. D e bo ra h Fox

All the Light We Cannot See By Anthony Doerr “This novel earned Doerr a Pulitzer Prize. I recommend this book because it is an example of literary storytelling at its very best,” explains Fox. It tells the story of two teenagers during World War II — one a blind girl in Nazi-occupied France and the other a German orphan boy pressed into service by the Nazi army.

versus wisdom in society. Harrison is a professor of comparative literature and a strong advocate of the role of the humanities in higher education,” says Parks.

D r. E l i z a be t h I m a fu ji

Little Fires Everywhere By Celeste Ng This novel takes place in a quiet Midwestern suburb suddenly gripped by a controversy. A well-to-do white family has adopted an Asian-American baby, but the impoverished birth mother wants the baby back. The town takes sides, with households divided in their loyalties.

P rof. Pete r Elliot

The Devil in the White City By Erik Larson This book is an engrossing read about the mystery surrounding America’s first well-known serial killer interwoven with the wonder of the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago. “I grew up in the Chicago area and found it fascinating to hear how the city was described at a time when electricity

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

Set against this fantastical backdrop is the savagery of H.H. Holmes.” Dr. Kevin Radaker

Books for Living: Some Thoughts on Reading, Reflecting, and Embracing Life By Will Schwalbe In this collection of essays on the joy of reading, Schwalbe ponders a particular book in each chapter and considers how it relates to concerns we all share. The books span centuries and genres. “I highly recommend it, especially if you read it slowly, savoring each chapter one at a time,” says Radaker. 19  |


A NDERSON U NIVERSITY 2018 2019

Performing Arts Events SEMESTER I

All music performances are FREE and take place at York Performance Hall unless otherwise noted.

SEPTEMBER

AU CHORALE

WIND ENSEMBLE

WOMEN'S CHORUS

THURSDAY, NOV. 15, 7:30 PM

RICHARD SOWERS, CONDUCTOR

A MENU OF ARIAS THROUGH THE AGES KARRI YORK, SOPRANO

ADAM WALLER, CONDUCTOR

JOANI SOMPPI BRANDON, CONDUCTOR THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 7:30 PM

THURSDAY, SEPT. 13, 7:30 PM

ANDERSON SYMPHONIC CHOIR RICHARD SOWERS, CONDUCTOR

MONDAY, NOV. 19, 7:30 PM

FACULTY RECITAL

GERT KUMI, VIOLIN LORI RHODEN, PIANO

COMMUNITY CONCERT BAND LES TAYLOR, CONDUCTOR

THURSDAY, SEPT. 20, 7:30 PM

HOMECOMING CONCERT

AU WIND ENSEMBLE, ORCHESTRA, AND JAZZ ENSEMBLE FRIDAY, SEPT. 28, 7:30 PM

TUESDAY, NOV. 27, 7:30 PM

FACULTY RECITAL HEAVEN FAN, HARP DANIEL QUINN, GUITAR

THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 7:30 PM

*PARK PLACE CHURCH OF GOD

HONORING OUTSTANDING MUSIC ALUMNUS

JON MCLAUGHLIN

NOVEMBER JAZZ ENSEMBLE

CANDLES & CAROLS

FRIDAY, NOV. 30, 7:30 PM *REARDON AUDITORIUM

ADAM WALLER, DIRECTOR

THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 7:30 PM

OCTOBER GUEST ARTIST

MIHOKO WATANABE, FLUTE

THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 7:30 PM

ORCHESTRA

GERT KUMI, CONDUCTOR

THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 7:30 PM

FRITZ ROBERTSON, TENOR

STUDENT COMPOSER'S RECITAL SUNDAY, NOV. 11, 5 PM

GUEST LECTURER

TUESDAY, OCT. 16, 7:30 PM

THURSDAY, NOV. 15, 4 PM

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ADVENT MUSIC SUNDAY, DEC. 2, 2:30 PM

CONCERT BAND

LES TAYLOR, CONDUCTOR

DECEMBER

DR. PETER BURKHOLDER

Questions or for additional information: call (765) 641-4542 or visit the website at anderson.edu/arts-events.


Dance Productions

2018 2019

TICKETED EVENTS

HOW TO ORDER YOUR SEASON SUBSCRIPTION Online

anderson.edu/season-tickets Printable order form also available online By Phone 765.641.4140 (Mon.-Fri., noon-5 p.m.) Questions 765.641.4145 View the full Arts & Performance calendar at anderson.edu/arts-events. Individual tickets may be purchased at the Reardon Auditorium Box Office or online at ticketmaster.com.

REARDON AUDITORIUM

FALLINTODANCE 12 FRIDAY, NOV. 9, 7:30 PM

SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 2:30 PM

From ballet to modern, jazz to musical theatre dance, lyrical to liturgical, this concert of student choreography has something for everyone.

SPRINGINTODANCE 14 FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 7:30 PM

SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2:30 PM

Our season concludes with this concert featuring choreography by faculty and guest artists.

THE BOZE LYRIC THEATRE PRESENTS 2018-19 Theatre Season BYRUM HALL

VIOLET a gritty, poignant musical BOOK & LYRICS BY BRIAN CRAWLEY MUSIC BY JEANINE TESORI STAGE DIRECTOR: DAVID COOLIDGE MUSIC DIRECTOR: FRITZ ROBERTSON

SAT., SEPT. 29, 2:30 PM SAT., SEPT. 29, 7:30 PM SUN., SEPT. 30, 2:30 PM

FRI., OCT. 5, 7:30 PM SAT., OCT. 6, 7:30 PM SUN., OCT. 7, 2:30 PM

Set during the early days of the Civil Rights Movement, Violet follows the inner journey of a young, disfigured woman. In hopes that a TV evangelist can cure her, she embarks on a bus trip from North Carolina to Oklahoma.

ROSE AND THE RIME a cautionary fairy tale BY NATHAN ALLEN DIRECTOR: KENNY SHEPARD

THURS., DEC. 6, 7:30 PM FRI., DEC. 7, 7:30 PM

SAT., DEC. 8, 2:30 PM SUN., DEC. 9, 2:30 PM

A young orphan lives contentedly with her uncle until she discovers what actually happened to her parents and the reason that perpetual winter envelops the town.

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO a classic opera LIBRETTO BY LORENZO DA PONTE MUSIC BY W. A. MOZART STAGE DIRECTOR: DAVID COOLIDGE MUSIC DIRECTOR: FRITZ ROBERTSON

FRI., MARCH 8, 7:30 PM SAT., MARCH 9, 7:30 PM

SUN., MARCH 10, 2:30 PM

Based on a scandalous play banned for its threat to the political and socioeconomic status quo, Mozart’s most beloved opera is revolution disguised as comedy.

BOEING, BOEING a French farce PLAY BY MARC CAMOLETTI ENGLISH EDITION BY BEVERLY CROSS DIRECTOR: RICK VALE

THURS., APR. 11, 7:30 PM FRI., APR. 12, 7:30 PM

SAT., APR. 13, 7:30 PM SUN., APR. 14, 2:30 PM

It's the swinging 60s, and bachelor Bernard couldn't be happier with his flat in Paris and three stewardesses who are engaged to him without knowing about each other. What could go wrong? 21  |


T h e R AV E N FA M I LY

Looking back

AU alumnus invested himself in the music program. / / / D E B O R A H L I L LY

William Hazelbauer’s BA ’60 life is an example of how kindness can impact someone William Hazelbauer else’s future. Hazelbauer BA 1960 grew up in Chicago and had ambitions of attending the University of Illinois after graduation. But his home life wasn’t ideal, college was going to take money he didn’t have, and as his friends left for school, he became more discouraged. But Hazelbauer also had an amazing couple in his life. Len and Deema Earnest owned The National Tea Grocery Store in Oak Lawn and, at | 22

Deema’s insistence, hired Hazelbauer as a stock boy and check-out clerk when he was only a sophomore in high school. They invited Hazelbauer to live them while he saved up money for college, and when Hazelbauer began to drift away from the idea of continu-

finally agreed. That Sunday service led to a Wednesday evening service that led to his introduction to Anderson University. “I was sure that God wanted me to be a minister, so I registered for first semester Bible study,” said Hazelbauer.

“I KNEW THAT the more we played in front of an audience, the more we would be challenged. The more we served the college needs, the more we would be seen and appreciated.” W I L L I A M H A Z E L B A U E R ing his education, they would gently guide him back on track. The Earnests also attended a Church of God congregation and often invited Hazelbauer, who had been raised Catholic, to come to church with them. One Sunday morning, he

“I also registered for band to keep up my trumpet.” Hazelbauer had been an active musician in high school, and he soon realized that God’s calling on his life was in music. Music was a calling that lended itself to ministry, too. Once at


Anderson, Hazelbauer quickly made friends with Harry Nachtigall BS ’59 and Dean Schield BS ’58, who also played trumpet. “We were so compatible that we decided to form a trumpet trio, called The Anderson College Trumpeteers,” Hazelbauer explained. “Dean and I did special arrangements, and we traveled two summer tours — 1957 and 1958 — promoting Anderson College. Bob Asel BS ’61 played piano in 1957, and Don Gilkison ’57 was the pianist in 1958.” Hazelbauer added, “The Trumpeteers was also instrumental in attracting some of the finest young musicians who contributed to the success of the Anderson College Concert Band.” When the concert band faculty conductor left the university administration asked Hazelbauer to be the new student band director. “With great enthusiasm, I jumped at the opportunity,” he said. Hazelbauer cannot say enough about the quality of the musicianship in the Anderson College Concert Band in the late 1950s. “Even though the band was small, the parts were played extremely well, and we sounded fuller and bigger than we were. The dedication of the band members and its work ethic was fantastic. I knew that the more we played in front of an audience, the more we would be challenged. The more we served the college needs, the more we would be seen and appreciated.” In his final semester at Anderson, Hazelbauer connected with trumpet instructor from Chicago, Don “Jake” Jacoby, whom Hazelbauer referred to as “the number one trumpet player

0)#452%$ PAGE 22, The Anderson College Band performs in the State Theater in downtown Anderson. PICTURE$ ABOVE are the Trumpeteers — Hazelbauer, Nachtigall, and Schield — with their accompanist, Gary Mitchener. PICTURED LEFT, Hazelbauer receives the Outstanding Senior Award from the Rev. Robert E. Williams of the Anderson College Alumni Association.

for radio and TV in Chicago” and the “first-call trumpet for all of the Chicago recording sessions when the big artists came to town.” Jacoby agreed to be the guest performer at the Anderson College Concert Band spring concert. The concert was titled “Dimensions in Music” and was held at the State Theater in downtown Anderson.

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

Hazelbauer went on to a career in music but still remembers his days on the Anderson campus fondly. “It’s not the size of the school that counts but the quality and purpose of the education you receive,” said Hazelbauer. “[At Anderson] every student had something to learn and something to offer.”

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T h e R AV E N FA M I LY

A Life Committed to Church of God

Alum collects history of university, church /// FAITH SAYLES

Dale Stultz BA ’65 was born into the Church of God, and as an adult, he has Dale devoted many Stultz years to preservBA 1965 ing the legacies of people within the Church of God. After 15 years, Stultz continues to serve as the vice president for the Church of God Historical Society. He has worked on several projects for the Historical Society including the books Old Main, which details the history of the building that once housed nearly every aspect of the Anderson University campus, and The Gospel Trumpet Years, which covers the history of the Church of God. Anderson University Roots: The Workers Home Years, 1906-1918 is a movie, available | 24

on YouTube, that Stultz helped create for the Church of God Historical Society. As one of his newest personal projects, Stultz has started compiling his own history and involvement with the Church of God. Stultz’s family has been active in the Church of God movement for more than 100 years. He can trace their activity in the church as far back as his mother’s birth in 1907. From childhood to today, Stultz has attended 6 different Churches of God with his family, and recently, these six congregations have become the focus of his research. As for his connection to Anderson University, Stultz was not planning to attend college. His brother’s friend convinced him to stay in Anderson and work for the Gospel Trumpet, so he applied and started working for

the publication. He was persuaded to take an evening art class and play in the band so he could attend ball games for free. Though he originally took the classes for fun and not meaning to attain a degree, some friends helped him pass the GED so that he could attend Anderson College. He graduated with a degree in art education and went on to earn a master’s degree from Ball State University. One of Stultz’s goals in studying the history of the Church of God is to help people see how things used to be — churches, people, and the university. He enjoys discovering Church of God people who have been forgotten. He wants to tell the stories of these forgotten people, people whose life stories continue to have something important to say to us today.


T h e R AV E N FA M I LY

Providing hope

Seminary alum shares her story for his glory

/// LINDSEY HRINOWICH

After her future professor literally opened the door to invite her to Anderson Emily University, Shanahan Emily Shanahan MACM 2017 MACM ’17 was inspired to create a lasting legacy for people similar to her. Shanahan came to the Anderson University School of Theology and Christian Ministry at the end of her rope; she was struggling to find a school that could accommodate her nonprofit dreams. When she was offered a specialized graduate opportunity, it paved the way for her to establish Empowering the Differently Enabled. This nonprofit organization showcases individual’s spiritual experiences

through speaking engagements and written word. Shanahan often speaks on college campuses and closes large events to highlight what God has done in her life. “I like to ask people, what’s your story for his glory? Everyone has struggles and things they need to overcome. You never know what struggles you share,” says Shanahan. Empowering the Differently Enabled has four cornerstones. The first, naturally is to offer speaking and writing opportunities for members to share their stories. Secondly, volunteers will work with a client to create a “roadmap to hope.” This comes from a personal achievement counsel in order to support them medically, socially, and spiritually. Third, their facility will have an equipment showroom to

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

offer clients insight into what kind of resources are available to them. The fourth and final cornerstone is called Harriets Hospitality House — an opportunity for an alternative living situation offered to selected clients looking for assistance. Her upcoming blog is going to be a welcoming space that offers a platform for stories to be told. It will begin with Shanahan’s personal anecdotes and move on to feature her friends and clients. Although she is filling her plate quite high, blogging isn’t the only place her writing is going to be available to the public. Shanahan is in the process of writing her first novel. It’s inspired by her passion for learning from her own trials and her decision to make a positive impact while here on earth. 25  |


T h e R AV E N FA M I LY

AU grad thrives in entertainment industry Stafford is living out his dreams on stage /// LINDSEY HRINOWICH

Since graduating Anderson University, Luke Stafford BA ’16 has quickly risen Luke to stardom. Stafford Earlier this BA 2016 year, Stafford wrapped up his Broadway debut in the show Home for the Holidays. The performance featured Josh Kaufman, Candice Glover, and Bianca Ryan, and was hosted by The Bachelorette’s Kaitlin Bristowe. It ran for seven weeks and served as a Christmas production during the holiday season. Stafford was the youngest person cast in the show and the freshest in the profession. “I can’t tell you how much I learned. How much growth I’ve been able to find and, even then, I’ve been finding out how much there still is to learn,” says Stafford. Being that this was his first time | 26

on a stage of that magnitude, Stafford found that his peers were able to teach him how to succeed in the industry. After receiving a featured solo on his coveted saxophone, he was able to understand how much work it truly

“YOU CAN’T QUIT, and you’ve got to rely on your faith,” says Stafford takes to become a household name. He mentions that the standout reason he has been able to endure the hills and valleys has been his faith. “You can’t quit, and you’ve got to rely on your faith,” says Stafford. It is no secret that the entertainment business is cutthroat, and his education at Anderson University adequately prepared him for it. The university’s core values played a key role in how he continues to become a business professional and man of God.

Specifically, he learned from his years at Anderson how desperately people need to have solid relationships. Being able to connect with one another and understand his colleagues on a deeper level is essential for Stafford. “Before I go out anywhere, I seek out alumni and relationships. AU taught me so well how to build those relationships,” says Stafford. A key reason his career has taken off has been due to the work of the AU Alumni Office. Stafford raves about how the staff has helped open doors for him that would not have been possible without their help. He has made appearances from the west to east coasts; each time he has looked for direction from the alumni office to guide him toward life-changing opportunities.


T h e R AV E N FA M I LY

A global business Alum uses education to run online business /// FAITH MIDDLETON

Eva Tan BA ’12 has used her education to become an entrepreneur in Fishers, Ind. After Eva Tan graduating from BA 2012 AU with a degree in math and finance, she earned her MBA at Northwestern University. She started her jewelry company, Rosa Vila, three years ago while also working fulltime in corporate finance and strategy. Hailing from Beijing, China, Tan values her education, saying it helped to jumpstart her career. “The finance classes at AU helped on a foundational level as well as from a mathematics perspective, which really expanded my way of thinking,” says Tan. Tan also appreciated her global business class. “It introduced me to how connected we are as a globe. I always

look for ways I can get into the international business side because I know that it’s the future of any business.” As the founder and CEO of Rosa Vila, Tan’s schedule is “flexible,” but she says that being an entrepreneur

and discipline to figure that out.” Tan also wants the company to grow into a socially impactful business. “Not only can we give value to our customers by offering unique, great designs that inspire people, but I

“I THINK THAT Rosa Vila could be a catalyst in the jewelry industry to really push people to think about more sustainable ways of running a business, rather than just taking from the market,” says Tan. also requires discipline to “make sure that you are on the trajectory for financial success.” “Given this flexible schedule, I am able to make a lot of progress because I can prioritize based on what I think is important and needed for the business,” Tan says. “You have to decide what is urgent and what is just a distraction, and it requires reflection

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

think we can also channel our profits into something that as a company, as a founder, as a team, we see as important,” Tan says. “I think that Rosa Vila could be a catalyst in the jewelry industry to really push people to think about more sustainable ways of running a business, rather than just taking from the market.”

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HOMECOMING

Alumni

SEPTEMBER 28-29

A LWAY S C O N N E C T E D

CONNECTING

Please be sure to mark your calendars for this year’s homecoming on Sept. 28-29! We are excited to announce that amidst all of the events and activities occurring at this year’s Homecoming, a few of our Los Angeles area alums have produced a short film, ITINERARY, that will premier during an Alumni Showcase event on Saturday evening.

“Before I go out anywhere, I seek out alumni and relationships. AU taught me so well how to build those relationships,” says Luke Stafford BA ’16.

AU

The Anderson University Alumni Office offers regular email updates and newsletters specifically for alumni.

If you are not on our list and would like to be, go to anderson.edu/alumni/subscribe and choose which updates you would like to see in your inbox.

JON MCLAUGHLIN

will be in concert with Anderson Symphony Orchestra on Dec. 8 at the Paramount Theater in Anderson at 7:30 p.m. There will be an alumni reception prior to the concert across the street at the Shelter Insurance lobby from 6-7:15 p.m.

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Let the Anderson University Alumni Office help you make connections. Read how Luke has benefited from alumni connections as he has moved forward in his career (page 26).

Alumni Reception Join us for a gathering of Anderson University alumni at the regional Church of God Convention in Fairfax, Va., on Wednesday, Sept. 19, at Fairfax Community Church, 11451 Braddock Road. For more details, go to anderson.edu/alumni/events.


CLASS NOTES

Barry Callen MDiv ’66 has shared the news of recently released books. In May, Cascade Books published his book The Jagged Journey. The book discusses suffering as a major theme defining the heart of God and the calling of Christians. Also in May, Emeth Press released his book God in the Shadows about questions, doubts, fears, and strains on our lives of faith. Barry adds, “Meanwhile, I am privileged to be laboring with co-editor Curtiss Paul DeYoung to bring into being Views from the Mountain, the prophetic voice of our dear brother James Earl Massey. It will be published by Aldersgate Press of the Wesleyan Holiness Connection where I am privileged to serve as editor.”

1966

Dennis Morgan — see 1971. Lucinda “Cindy” (Traister) Morgan BA and her husband, Dennis Morgan ’66, published A Pictorial History of the Redbank Valley. Cindy explains, “It is a book of the New Bethlehem, Pa., area and includes 400 pictures, ranging from 1890 to recent times.” She continues her work as stock market game coordinator of Butler County Community College, Butler, Pa.

1971

Tim Coppess BA and Joy (Williams) Coppess BA ’80, AA ‘80 are serving their first term as career missionaries to Botswana, Africa. They work alongside the church in Botswana in discipleship and leadership development, as well as church planting and outreach efforts.

1980

Julie (Pfennigwerth) Luekenga BA works at Aims Community College as executive director of the Fort Lupton, Colo., campus.

1986

Susan (Rapp) Britton BA graduated from Ashland Theological Seminary in May with a Master of Divinity. She was commissioned as a provisional elder in the United Methodist Church June 5 and appointed as pastor of St. Paul UMC and Salem UMC near Circleville, Ohio.

1989

Jill (Janavice) Clay BA and 1991 Brian Clay BA ’92 have been married for 25 years. “Our daughter, Sidney, is a senior at AU. Our son, Keaton, attends Taylor University, and our son, Trenton will be a senior in high school in the fall. I published my second book,

2018 Athletic Hall of Fame

Anderson University will induct former student-athlete standouts into the Athletic Hall of Fame during Homecoming weekend. Jennifer Ferguson BA ’05 competed in AU’s women’s soccer program. Ferguson is the program’s all-time leader in game-winning goals with 15. She still holds the record for most goals in a game, scoring five against St. Mary’s of the Woods on Sept. 28, 2004. Tim Fox BA ’82, MA ’88 is a former track and field star. He has held the school indoor high jump record (6-10 ¼) since the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships in 1979. He is a three-time All-American. Jeff Howard BA ’08 played for the men’s basketball team from 1981-86. He was named an NCAA All-American for the 1985-86

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

Nudges...A Daily Push in April. It is available on Amazon along with my first book, Standing Firm on Feet of Clay.

1992

Brian Clay BA — see 1991.

John VanNorman BA has been named deputy chief counsel for the Supreme Court of Ohio.

1997

Matt Ladewski BA has authored and published a book, You Ask...I Answer, which is now available through elitefts.com.

2000

Jenny Mihsill BA and Bobby Mihsill MAIS ’10 serve as missionaries in Cote d’Ivoire, West Africa. “We welcomed our second child, Rease Jean, on June 22, 2017. Both Bobby and I were ordained on Oct. 1, 2017,” she writes.

2003

Kyle Robinson BA gradu2009 ated from the University of Rochester in May with a Ph.D. in early modern European and British history. His dissertation, Body and Soul of Enlightenment: John Wesley, Methodism, and the Age of Reason, was awarded the Commendation in

Have you moved to a new address or finally decided to tackle Twitter? If you have any changes to your mailing address, email address, Twitter handle, Instagram name, or phone number, please send your new information to the Anderson University Office of Alumni, 1100 E. Fifth St., Anderson, IN 46012. You can also send us your updated information by email to alumni@anderson.edu.

the Humanities by the University of Rochester. He was also awarded with Rochester’s Edward Peck Curtis Award for excellence in graduate teaching.

2010

Bobby Mihsill MAIS — see 2003.

Jessica (Carter) Waters BA is a licensed clinical social worker and a first responder with the Salt Lake City Police Department.

2015

season. He ranks No. 6 on the school’s all-time scoring list with 1,615 points. Howard returned to AU to complete his degree in 2008. Al Jones BA ’99 was a three-time all-conference soccer selection and three-time team MVP. He is the school’s all-time leader for intercepts (222). The former goalkeeper is also the program’s all-time leader in shutouts (18) and saves (444). The 1993 football team went 10-0 in the regular season and won the ICAC (Indiana Collegiate Athletic Conference). It was AU’s firstever undefeated regular season. The Heritage Era recognizes female student-athletes that participated prior to having association with a conference. AU will celebrate those that represented various sports from the years 1975 to 1979. S T E V E N H E AT H

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REMEMBERING our FRIENDS

Dr. James Earl Massey, dean emeritus of the Anderson University School of Theology and Christian Ministry, passed away June 24, 2018. He was also a Distinguished Elder-at-large for the National Association of the Church of God. Growing up in Detroit, Massey heard the call to ministry at the age of 16. “In all the years which Anderson University, have transpired since that holy Church of God lose hour, I have never had any reason formidable leader to reinterpret what happened to me during that great listening moment of grace,” he wrote in his autobiography, Aspects of My Pilgrimage. “The voice that called me was so clear, and its bidding, though gentle, bore the unmistakable authority of a higher realm. Since that

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time of encounter during worship, I have known the work to which my head, heart, and hands were to be devoted.” Massey earned his bachelor’s degree from William Tyndale College, master’s degree from Oberlin Graduate School of Theology, and doctorate from Asbury Theological Seminary. He came to Anderson in 1969 to serve as the university’s first campus pastor, a role he held until 1976. He returned to AU in 1989 to lead the seminary, retiring in 1995. During his ministry, Massey also served as senior pastor of the Metropolitan Church of God in Detroit, missionary educator in Jamaica, and dean of the chapel of Tuskegee University. He preached and lectured at more than 100 colleges, universities, and seminaries in the United States and on four continents. A prolific writer, Massed authored 18 books and provided editorial leadership for the magazine Christianity Today as well as The New Interpreter’s Bible.

BILLIE ROY SMITH B.TH. ’49 died Nov.

HERBERT RAY WILLARD BA ’58 died

12, 2017. An Alabama native, he was the first in his family to attend and graduate from college. He married Pearl Toon on Sept. 14, 1940. Together, they raised two children. A lifelong member of the Church of God, he was ordained the day he graduated from college. In addition to serving as a pastor, he was a veteran of World War II and a CPA, owning his own practice from 1963 until his retirement in 1984. He established a Christian education lecture series — and later a scholarship — at Anderson University in memory of his wife, who died in 1995. He is survived by his daughter, Christie Smith Stephens BA ’65, wife of AU Professor Emeritus Stanley Stephens BA ’65; a son, Rick Smith; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Jan. 26, 2018. He married Polly Ann Stultz ’58 Jan. 2, 1960. They had two daughters, Lisa and Gina. In 1988, he married Pat O’Laughlin Mills. He worked 35 years as a computer specialist for the federal government in St. Louis and was a volunteer for St. Louis County Older Resident Programs for 20 years. In addition to his wife and daughters, he is survived by one grandson; sisters Ethel Willard ’77, Lola Bixler, and Mary Ellen Downing; and a brother Ralph Willard. DAWN (MASSLOFSKY) SWICK BA ’92 died Feb. 27, 2018, at her home in

Pennsylvania. She was the secretary for Aldersgate United Methodist Church. She enjoyed riding motorcycles, working with the elderly, and arts and crafts. She is survived by her husband, Larry B. Swick; parents, Joseph Masslofsky

and Christina Niessen; a son Larry C. Swick; a daughter, Megan Swick; and one grandson. CURTIS E. BEOUGHER BA ’88 died

on June 15, 2018. He traveled to St. Petersburg, Russia, to teach English as a second language. It was there he met the love of his life, Amy Nishihira. They were married on July 1, 1999, and served together as missionaries for World Partners. Eventually, they moved back to the United States, settling in Arizona, where they were foster parents in a group home, and then moving on again to Celina, Ohio, where Curt worked for the U.S. Postal Service. Curt is remembered by those who were fortunate enough to cross paths with him by his gentle spirit, kindness, dry sense of humor and passion for playing board games with friends and family.


REAL LIFE. TRANSFORMED.

Reflecting upon their time at Anderson University, many alumni refer to taking a trip through the Tri-S (Study, Serve, Share) program as a highlight of their AU experience. However, a lack of funds is the reason many students opt out of taking a transformational Tri-S trip. Your gift to Anderson University can provide the additional resources necessary for a student to thrive at AU and serve across the United States and around the world.

Join us in transforming lives today at anderson.edu/give!

A percentage of your gift today will offset the cost for incoming students to be transformed by a stateside mission trip through the Tri-S program in destinations such as Appalachia, New York City, Miami, and Oklahoma. ANDERSON UNIVERSITY Alumni Magazine, Fall 2018 

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