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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE AMALGAMATED TRANSIT UNION | AFL-CIO/CLC

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2014


INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS LAWRENCE J. HANLEY International President JAVIER M. PEREZ, JR. International Executive Vice President OSCAR OWENS International Secretary-Treasurer

INTERNATIONAL VICE PRESIDENTS

NEWSBRIEFS ATU wins ILCA media awards For excellence and distinction in communications ATU was honored to receive six 2014 Labor Media Awards from the International Labor Communicators Association (ILCA). ILCA says winners represent some of the best and most inspired work in labor communications and that the awardees are to be congratulated in promoting the highest standards of labor journalism.

LARRY R. KINNEAR

Ashburn, ON – lkinnear@atu.org

RICHARD M. MURPHY

Newburyport, MA – rmurphy@atu.org

BOB M. HYKAWAY

Calgary, AB – bhykaway@atu.org

WILLIAM G. McLEAN

Reno, NV – wmclean@atu.org

JANIS M. BORCHARDT

Madison, WI – jborchardt@atu.org

PAUL BOWEN Canton, MI – pbowen@atu.org KENNETH R. KIRK Lancaster, TX – kkirk@atu.org GARY RAUEN Clayton, NC – grauen@atu.org MARCELLUS BARNES Flossmore, IL – mbarnes@atu.org RAY RIVERA Lilburn, GA – rrivera@atu.org YVETTE SALAZAR Thornton, CO – ysalazar@atu.org GARY JOHNSON, SR. Cleveland, OH – gjohnson@atu.org ROBIN WEST Halifax, NS – rwest@atu.org JOHN COSTA Kenilworth, NJ – jcosta@atu.org CHUCK WATSON Syracuse, NY – cwatson@atu.org CLAUDIA HUDSON Oakland, CA – chudson@atu.org BRUCE HAMILTON New York, NY – bhamilton@atu.org MICHELLE SOMMERS Brooklyn Park, MN – msommers@atu.org

INTERNATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES ANTHONY WITHINGTON

Sebastopol, CA – awithington@atu.org

DENNIS ANTONELLIS Spokane, WA – dantonellis@atu.org STEPHAN MACDOUGALL Boston, MA – smacdougall@atu.org ANTHONY GARLAND Washington, DC – agarland@atu.org ANTONETTE BRYANT Oakland, CA – abryant@atu.org

CANADIAN DIRECTOR MICHAEL MAHAR

Rexdale, ON - director@atucanada.ca

“The ATU is honored to receive these prestigious awards,” says International President Larry Hanley. “With the fast moving, changing and ever expanding media world, we recognize the importance of effectively and creatively communicating with our members and the public. I’d like to commend our communications staff, writers, graphic designer and cartoonist for their excellent work.” The awards included: • 1st Place: Best Design Internet, “ATU International Website” • 1st Place: Best Cartoon, “Struggle Against Austerity” In Transit Jan/Feb 2013 • 1st Place: Saul Miller Award / Political Action, “What Works - ATU Members Shaking Things Up All over U.S. and Canada” In Transit May/June 2013 • 2nd Place: Best Design Magazines, “Struggle Against Austerity” In Transit Jan/Feb 2013 • 2nd Place: Best Editorial or Column, “Atlanta Transit Bill Harkens Back to the Days of Jim Crow” • 3rd Place: Best Front Page/Cover, “Struggle Against Austerity” In Transit Jan/Feb 2013

INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS EMERITUS International President Jim La Sala, ret. International President Warren George, ret. International Executive Vice President Ellis Franklin, ret. International Executive Vice President Mike Siano, ret. Subscription: USA and Canada, $5 a year. Single copy: 50 cents. All others: $10 a year. Published bimonthly by the Amalgamated Transit Union, Editor: Shawn Perry, Designer: Paul A. Fitzgerald.Editorial Office: 5025 Wisconsin Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20016-4139. Tel: 1-202-537-1645. Please send all requests for address changes to the ATU Registry Dept. ISSN: 0019-3291. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40033361.RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO:APC Postal Logistics, LLC, PO Box 503, RPO, West Beaver Creek, Richmond Hill ON L4B 4R6.


CONTENT

N OV/ D E C

2014 Vol. 123, No. 6

12 Terror boards bus in fatal Texas shooting

Driver assaults up in Edmonton

13 Citizens getting wise to outsourcing predators

International observes moment of silence in memory of slain Canadian soldier

14 Boston operator returns wallet containing $1,700

VICTORIES IN ATLANTA

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Poor job access compels people without cars to drive

Sprawl, bad transit increase unemployment

15 NOLA retirees’ benefits jeopardized in pension dispute

Portland Local hits ‘reset’ with TriMet

16 How They Do It: Locals active everywhere 17 Toronto Local: ‘Stop begging - start demanding federal transit funding’

WHOPPER OF A DEAL... WHY YOU’RE PAYING BURGER KING’S TAXES

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2 International Officers & General Executive Board

NEWS Briefs

3 Index Page 5 Commitment + Coalition = Victory 6 She loves her job, but won’t work for just anyone

Strong election night for public transit

7 Expect more attacks on Labor

18 ATU Heroes 19 Dallas members complain unfair pay, poor conditions

Mayor Rahm brings the hammer down on CTA workers

State fines Metro for restroom violation for Seattle bus drivers

20 New Sudbury Handi-Transit policies ignore persons with mental disabilities

Paratransit survey: Ridership, ‘travel training’ increasing

21 Report: Millenials’ shift to public transit is permanent

8 Legislative Report: Long Live Disco!

9 International President’s Message: Richer than you’ll ever be

23 Movement to raise minimum wage gains momentum

10 International Executive Vice President’s Message: Restructuring plan succeeding in the trenches

24 New York Local mourns loss of recording secretary

11 International Secretary-Treasurer’s Message: This is the fight we trained for

28 Translations (Spanish)

12 Kelowna members hold moment of silence for slain passenger

Poll: More Americans prefer public transit to road building

25 Legal Notice 31 In Memoriam 32 Cartoon: Ten Reasons We’re Against Unions!

IN TRANSIT

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Victories in Atlanta

It’s been a good month for Atlanta transit workers. After eight years without a raise, a year and a half without a contract, and two months of an aggressive campaign for economic justice by MARTA workers and their allies, Local 732-Atlanta, GA, has a new contract.

commissioned while he was with Metropolitan Transit in San Antonio, TX.

In addition, the MARTA Board voted to table their decision on outsourcing their Mobility paratransit service in response to a cost-saving alternative proposed by a coalition of Local 732, riders with disabilities, and transit advocates.

MARTA workers also challenged Georgia’s thenDemocratic gubernatorial candidate, Jason Carter, to take a stand against MARTA’s outsourcing scheme. Carter, a close friend of Ashe refused to support the workers. Local 732 members picketed two of his events, chanting, “You stand with us – then we’ll stand with you!”

The icing on the cake was a victory in Clayton County where citizens overwhelmingly voted to bring MARTA back to the county. (see page 5). “These aren’t victories just for MARTA workers, but for all working families, and our community,” says Local 732 President Curtis Howard. MARTA workers ran an intense campaign, engaging riders, rallying with then locked-out ASO symphony workers, running radio and newspaper advertisements, and demonstrating outside of MARTA headquarters and the law office of MARTA Board Chair Robbie Ashe.

Reliance on a discredited report MARTA CEO Keith Parker and Ashe’s scheme to outsource paratransit has been based on a discredited report by hired consultant to support its contention that parts of the agency’s service should be privatized. Dr. Elliot Sclar, an authority on the economics of public services, says KPMG’s conclusions are “based on false comparisons, illegitimate cost measures, and incomplete data.” In addition the agency has not explained how CEO Keith Parker could support privatization in Atlanta, having opposed it based on another KPMG study

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Going political

Muzzling members Recognizing that the workers’ message was gaining traction, Parker and Ashe attempted to silence them through transit police who ordered leafleting Local representatives to leave MARTA property or face arrest. MARTA employees were threatened once again at MARTA’s Family Fun Day and Fall Festival, where transit police told ATU members handing out balloons that read, “Respect Working Families” to leave the event. Subsequently, members of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO) who had been locked out since September 6, fast food workers, and clergy joined ATU at a “Rally for Atlanta: A City Worth Saving,” organized by Local 732 to highlight the struggle that they share with workers at some of Atlanta’s most cherished institutions. “We have truly shown what can be accomplished when working together. But there’s more work to be done and we remain committed to working toward that goal for the future of our community,” says Howard. v


Commitment + Coalition = Victory ‘Clayton County: Open for Business Again!’ That’s the new welcome sign, which was “posted” by an overwhelming majority (73%) of Clayton County, GA, voters, November 4, when they increased their own taxes to bring public transit back to an area that has struggled without it for four years. Atlanta’s Local 732 members played a major role in getting there.

For transit only The ballot initiative adds one percent onto the county sales tax, to raise $45 - $50 million per year exclusively for public transit. The outcome follows a recent trend in America of voters approving tax increases for transit. “This is a victory for all the citizens of Clayton County,” says International President Larry Hanley. “The voters understand the importance of a robust public transit system and are willing to dig deeper into their pockets to pay for it. It will invigorate local business, create jobs, increase mobility, fight pollution, and improve health in the region.”

‘Over the moon!’ There was an air of excitement on Election Day as supporters of the Initiative knocked on those last few doors, made last minute calls, and arranged rides to the polls. Reggie Davis, a Local 732 board member who was assigned full time to the campaign, said people realized

that adding service “was a win-win all around.” Coalition members were “over the moon,” celebrating the resounding success of the coalition of Labor, activist, environmental, and religious groups that campaigned for the Initiative. Even Mayor Kassim Reed gave Local President Curtis Howard a big hug, thanking him for the union’s work.

How they did it For the past several months, a battalion of volunteers knocked on doors, canvassed, leafleted, and phone banked to secure passage of the Initiative. ATU bought full-page ads in local newspapers highlighting the reasons to vote YES. Howard says he was heartened by the turnout of his fellow unionists, which culminated in a rally attended by 200 of his members and their families. “This was huge, not just for Clayton, but for the South,” he exclaimed. “It shows that with the right message and the commitment of our members, we can carry the day.”

Powerful message carries the day The transit initiative recorded nearly 12,000 more votes than Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter. The rookie candidate ran away from his Democratic base, while Clayton voters pulled together a diverse coalition, which proved that organization and a powerful message carry the day. v

IN TRANSIT

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She loves her job, but won’t work for just anybody Natoya Walker, 732-Atlanta, GA, loves her job. In fact, she spent five years trying to get it.

But that stability and her future seem less secure now that the MARTA board is considering outsourcing Mobility to a private company.

She was managing a popular local electronics store, and had job offers from other places, but when her name came to the top of MARTA’s waiting list, she jumped at the chance.

That’s not something she wants to see happen. “I won’t work for just any ‘fly-by-night’ company,” she says. “That’s not me.”

Walker is a driver with Mobility, the paratransit arm of Atlanta’s transit agency – MARTA. She wanted the job, she says, “because MARTA was a reputable ‘company’ – I thought.”

Stability Natoya wanted the stability that a job with MARTA would give her – including a pension and good benefits. As a mother, she says she “has to think about the future.”

It took two years for Walker to get full-time hours at MARTA. She’s worked a split shift from 6:15 – 10:15 a.m., and 1:00 – 5:00 p.m., since 2010. That’s not an easy schedule for a mother of young children, but she enjoys it. She acknowledges that this type of work is “not for everyone,” and that it takes training to know how to responsibly transport people with “visual, mental, and physical disabilities.” It’s hard work. Natoya is the type of person Atlanta stands to lose if MARTA ultimately decides to outsource Mobility. v

Strong election night for public transit Public transit made a strong showing with key victories in the midterm elections. State ballot initiatives and millages calling for more public transit passed, reaffirming that Americans support and will pay for more public transportation. “This is the result of riders, workers and transit advocates mobilizing to fight for more, better and safer public transit.” said International President Larry Hanley. Some of the places citizens voted for public transit: In Clayton County, GA, voters passed a referendum to expand MARTA to the county with a one percent sales tax increase by a 73% - 27% margin. The MARTA tax is expected to generate revenue of about $45 million per year.

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November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT

In Seattle, WA, Proposition 1 passed overwhelmingly to fund additional King County Metro Transit bus service. The initiative, which had failed in a previous election, calls for increasing the City’s sales tax by a 0.1% and hiking car tab fees by $60. In San Francisco, Alameda County and Monterey County, CA, voters backed ballot measures to raise billions through taxes for transportation improvements that put an emphasis on transit, bicycles and pedestrians. In Bay City and Wexford County, MI, two tax millages passed that will fund public transit in these communities. In Rossford County, OH, voters defeated a ballot initiative that would opt the county out of Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority service. v


Expect more attacks on Labor Political observers are expecting wide and various attacks on workers’ rights from a totally Republican-run 114th Congress; attacks that ATU will be fighting. GOP lawmakers have led assaults on the rights of Labor throughout the six years of the Obama Administration. Now that the midterm elections have strengthened Republican control of the House of Representatives and handed them the leadership of the Senate, as well, no one will be surprised to see more attacks upon the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), Davis-Bacon prevailing wage laws, and overtime pay. The president will also run into trouble getting judicial nominations through a GOP-controlled Senate. This is a problem for Labor because judicial decisions – particularly in the federal appeals court – can overturn pro-worker legislation, contract settlements, and more.

Immigration President Obama’s determination to take executive action to reform immigration policy after a year of congressional foot-dragging threatens to become the first “flash-point” in the GOP’s war on the chief executive. Unilateral action by the president to defer deportation of certain categories of undocumented individuals will be called unconstitutional by the Republicans in Congress. The GOP, however, might consider moderating its response, as the harder it fights immigration reform, the more Hispanic votes it will lose in 2016. In 2013, a bipartisan Senate reform bill was buried as a result of pressure from Tea Partyists and GOP “nativists”

who strongly oppose any changes in the law. The Senate bill would have benefited all workers by furnishing many currently unauthorized workers with “blue cards,” authorizing them to work while waiting to become fully documented. Work authorization would bring these workers under the protection of U.S. labor law, which would prevent employers from mistreating and paying them less than minimum wage. The downward pressure on all workers’ wages and benefits would be subsequently reduced. But legislation such as that is unlikely to survive consideration by the next Congress.

Tax reform Lawmakers might try tackling tax reform with measures that benefit big business rather than individuals. Extremists might even try to freeze funding for the Labor Department – particularly money for enforcing wage and hour, and health and safety laws.

Veto power Labor leaders will rely on the threat of a presidential veto to chill congressional enthusiasm for anti-labor legislation. But don’t underestimate the ability of the Tea Party to find ways to hold America hostage to their nonnegotiable demands. The last six years may end up looking like a skirmish compared to the all out hand-to-hand combat yet to come. v IN TRANSIT

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LEGISLATIVE AGENDA

“At first I was afraid, I was petrified.” This is the first line to a huge 1978 hit by Gloria Gaynor. The tune? I Will Survive. It should be the new theme song for ATU members and all working families.

bargaining rights and job rights for transit workers. The result? After a massive grassroots lobbying campaign by ATU members, more than 30 Republicans joined Democrats in defeating the measure.

Yes, the 2014 midterm elections were rough. A wave of extreme right candidates got elected at all levels of government because President Obama is not very popular and turnout among progressives was extremely low. True, Labor rights are now threatened all over the map – a very RED map. And, increasing transit funding is not at the top of the agenda in Congress or the state legislatures. Without question, our work is cut out for us.

Would the result be the same today? It’s hard to tell.

Time to turn out the lights?

Newt Gingrich would be considered a moderate in today’s Congress, and there are far fewer centrists in both major parties. But Senate rules still require 60 votes to move forward on anything substantial, and current House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chair Bill Shuster, R-PA, is by all accounts trying to steer clear of controversy, reaching out to Democrats on key issues, including those that are important to organized labor. With the surface transportation bill likely to see action in 2015, this is welcome news.

But is it time to turn out the lights and call it a day? No way. Throughout our Union’s history – which goes back to 1892 – we have seen many, many political shifts, both left and right. In 1994, after the GOP took control of the U.S. Congress for the first time in 40 years by winning 54 House seats and nine Senate seats, the Republicans offered a “Contract with America,” a controversial proposal to shrink the size of government and annihilate organized labor. In fact, the very first bill that Republicans brought to the floor under the Contract would have repealed collective

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November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT

We ‘will survive’ Without question, this is “All Hands on Deck” time for ATU members. Our recent efforts to build coalitions with passengers must accelerate and deepen if we are to succeed in getting a bill with increased funding for transit, critical safety measures, and without any privatization incentives. We will survive. All we need to do is roll up our sleeves on those old double knit polyester shirts with the matching pants. Who ever said the ’70s were dead? v


LARRY HANLEY, INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT

Richer than you’ll ever be: We are not perfect. Nobody is. But, the heart of the ATU is the belief that we are stronger together than apart. That’s a value. We value people over profits and care about our larger family: the Union. Easy for me to say. As one year ends and another begins, I want to salute the people in the ATU who make it worth being called a union. I often ask Local officers, “Are we running a union or a mailing list?” And all over our Union officers and members have risen to the occasion and answered that question this year in a way that should make us all proud. In St. Louis and Saskatoon, most recently, and in Atlanta ATU members took to the phones and the streets, and in fighting for themselves and their community they made the world a better place. Our work requires courage. Robert Kennedy said, “Few men are willing to brave the disapproval of their fellows, the censure of their colleagues, the wrath of their society. Moral courage is a rarer commodity than bravery in battle or great intelligence. Yet it is the one essential, vital quality of those who seek to change a world which yields most painfully to change.” Somewhere in the ATU tonight a steward or officer will question themselves about the sacrifice they made in 2014 for their coworkers. Was the time they lost with their family even noticed? Does anyone know even how hard it can be to lead others? Somewhere reading this I hope there are some members who took on their leaders in a harsh or unfair way who might realize that although we might have differences, we are all on the same side. And I hope our officers will rededicate themselves to trying more to understand that they are leading in the toughest of times. Again, our Local and International officers are not perfect. But they are the group who have the courage to enter the moral conflict, and to sacrifice and to lead. They are willing to risk the censure of their colleagues and to make the world a better place. They seek to change a small portion of events, and in their pursuit of ideals, remind us how difficult it is to sail against the wind. They are the young at heart, blessed with a mixture of idealism, grace under pressure and

persistence. In a world that too often resembles a hurricane watch, they are sunshine and roses. The next time you see them, thank them for not giving up, give them a big hug and a smile and remember that –if it weren’t for them, we’d be at the mercy of the bankers, the brokers and those who seek to divide and exploit us all. In 2015 our message to the Koch brothers and the politicians who don’t share our values will mimic those of George Bailey in “It’s a Wonderful Life”: George Bailey: “Just a minute... just a minute. Now, hold on, Mr. Potter. You’re right when you say my father was no businessman. I know that. Why he ever started this cheap, penny-ante Building and Loan, I’ll never know. But neither you nor anyone else can say anything against his character, because his whole life was... why, in the 25 years since he and his brother, Uncle Billy, started this thing, he never once thought of himself. Isn’t that right, Uncle Billy? He didn’t save enough money to send Harry away to college, let alone me. But he did help a few people get out of your slums, Mr. Potter, and what’s wrong with that? Why... here, you’re all businessmen here. Doesn’t it make them better citizens? Doesn’t it make them better customers? You... you said... what’d you say a minute ago? They had to wait and save their money before they even ought to think of a decent home. Wait? Wait for what? Until their children grow up and leave them? Until they’re so old and broken down that they... Do you know how long it takes a working man to save $5,000? Just remember this, Mr. Potter, that this rabble you’re talking about... they do most of the working and paying and living and dying in this community. Well, is it too much to have them work and pay and live and die in a couple of decent rooms and a bath? Anyway, my father didn’t think so. People were human beings to him. But to you, a warped, frustrated old man, they’re cattle. Well in my book, my father died a much richer man than you’ll ever be!” Thanks to all of you who make me proud. That’s what the ATU is about. Happy Holidays………and Onward! v IN TRANSIT

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JAVIER PEREZ, JR., INTERNATIONAL EXEC. VICE PRESIDENT

Restructuring plan succeeding in the trenches In the states, the election is behind us, yet still we hear the noise from the talking heads about the gloom and doom of the Democrats and the euphoria of the Republicans. We, the ATU, have much to be thankful for, cause to celebrate, and accomplishments to be proud of. Seventy percent of ballot initiatives supporting public transit were successful. Our members spoke out against ill-conceived streetcar plans that would take work away from members and gouge the public. Those plans were defeated. ATU members and staff, through our mobilization actions and alliances, not only saved the pension for our Local 788 members in St. Louis, but also laid the groundwork for a contract ratification after many years of spinning wheels. Our Local 732 members in Atlanta ratified their contract by approximately 88% of the vote, achieving an agreement that once seemed unlikely. Our members at Local 615 in Saskatoon, SK, are back to work and fighting for a fair contract and pension, after an unwanted lockout. This all came on the heels of a fight and eventually a successful contract effort for our Local 1287 members in Kansas City, MO.

Experiencing restructuring success Prior to our Convention I referred to our restructuring plan as being “Amazon-like.” Meaning one can surf the online giant’s web pages and see an item, but still have the urge and need to touch and see the product in person. Now we have seen, felt, and lived through the struggles and success of our convention-approved restructuring program. Members see the results first hand and the benefits are tangible.

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November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT

The process has energized the membership. What ATU is doing has been called not only a gain for ATU, but for all of the working class. We in the ATU are leading the way for all of Labor.

Fight for transit will be won in the trenches While we are proud to be ATU, and of our recent accomplishments, our efforts in part have been firehouse emergencies and resuscitation campaigns. One thing the elections made clear – the fight over public transit projects and the dollars needed to support them will be won or lost in the trenches of our communities. In calendar year 2015, we have many contracts coming up for renewal in addition to lingering negotiations still underway. We have learned from our recent efforts. We need to plan, educate and fight smarter, and become more proactive. Plans are well under way to expand our capacity to provide training and assistance as well. How do you cost out a contract? What effect does Obamacare have on insurance provisions? What does it mean to be an expert in transit in our home community, and are we willing to go the extra mile with our transit allies? Every local must commit to a culture of learning and follow through. Our members deserve no less. Let’s enjoy the holiday season while knowing that 2015 is the year we move our restructuring to the next level. v Please visit www.atu.org for more information and the latest ATU news.


OSCAR OWENS, INTERNATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER

This is the fight we trained for I’m sure you’ve heard it said that when “things get tough – the tough get going.” Well, ATU and all of Labor in the United States can expect things to get tough over the next two years as a result of the GOP rout of the Democratic Party in this year’s midterm elections.

An all-out war on the president Despite all of the pro forma conciliatory speeches they gave after the election, you can expect the Republican leadership in Congress to ratchet up their animus against President Obama to fever pitch. It will start with whatever action the president takes on immigration – which the majority will use as an excuse to declare all-out war on the president’s ability to govern. In the meantime, the corporate-sponsored Members of Congress and those now controlling many statehouses will use their new power to hammer away at federal and state labor law, and to de-fund public transit. While this is not what any of us wanted, it is the fight we have been training for. And, no union is better prepared for this fight than ATU. So, U.S. members, it’s time we “get going.” We’ll be fighting as hard as anyone for what we believe in, and continue to train more of our members to do so, as well.

This was no more true than it was in Toronto, where residents elected the Progressive Conservative candidate, John Tory, to succeed Rob Ford as mayor. Tory’s election was enthusiastically welcomed by Ontario’s Liberal Premier Kathleen Wynne, who can be expected to work with Tory on fixing the City’s and the province’s public transit system. What is not clear is whether or not these former opponents plan to extend, and re-build the system with public/private partnerships that usually require that they be allowed to run what they build with non-union labor. No matter what the premier and the mayor say, there will be powerful interests, just as there are in the United States, that will see this as an opportunity to increase their profits by rolling back the rights of Labour in Canada. So, we have our work cut out for us in both countries. Let’s get to work. v P.S: Happy holidays to you and your family during this lovely time of the year. May peace and joy be yours now, and throughout 2015. Please visit www.atu.org for more information and the latest ATU news.

Public transit needs recognized in Canada We have the same threats in Canada as we have in the United States, but there are some reasons to be optimistic about the future. Most candidates in all of the Canadian elections this fall recognized the need for more and better public transit. IN TRANSIT

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Kelowna members hold moment of silence for slain passenger

Terror boards bus in fatal Texas shooting

“Kelowna transit lost its innocence last night.” That’s how Local President Les Milton, 1722Kelowna, BC, above, described the city’s reaction to the apparently random stabbing and death of Caesar Rosales, 55, a business systems analyst on board a Kelowna bus. The alleged assailant has been apprehended. At the Local’s request, all city buses pulled over for a minute of silence to pay respect to Rosales who was well known to ATU members. “Caesar’s death is a tragic thing,” explained Milton, “so we wanted to do something to show our respect and it will allow us to have some closure.”

Drivers want bus taken out of service Drivers feel so strongly about the tragedy that they’ve asked that the bus be taken out of service in Kelowna. “It’s been a big process for us. Regular drivers know more about their passengers than they know their spouses,” says Milton.

‘Never had anything like this happen before’ “We’ve been running since 1977, and we’ve never had anything like this happen before,” says Milton. “It’s very new to us, but it brought us into the fold with Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver.” v

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Photo by John Davenport, San Antonio Express-News Terror boarded a bus in the form of a passenger who became hostile with several riders after getting on a VIA bus in San Antonio, TX, on Veterans Day. Fellow passengers say that after taking a seat the belligerent challenged the man sitting across from him demanding, “What are you looking at?” That’s when the other bus patrons say the alleged assailant pulled out a gun and shot the man dead. The suspect then demanded that the operator stop, and bolted the bus with a woman who was with him. Neither the driver nor any other passengers were hurt. As of press time the police had not caught the suspect. v

Driver assaults up in Edmonton Bus driver assaults are up in Edmonton, AB, as they are all across North America. There were 50 assaults in Edmonton in 2013, including incidents in which drivers were spat upon, attacked, or threatened. That represents an increase from 2012, and 2011. Eighty percent of the occurrences were instigated by a dispute over fare. In a lesser percentage of cases riders appeared to be taking their personal frustrations out on a driver. Local President Steve Bradshaw, 589-Edmonton, AB, would like to see some proactive measures taken to stop the violence, as well as the “reactive” enforcement that prosecutes assailants after the fact. The local president is hoping that the City’s new smart card system, which will take fare collection totally out the hands of operators will reduce the violence. Reduction of assaults on drivers will not only make drivers safer, but provide added protection for passengers, other drivers, and pedestrians in Edmonton. v

November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT


Citizens getting wise to outsourcing predators throughout Pennsylvania fighting outsourcing attempts. The Altoona City Council voted unanimously to  abandon a water privatization proposal. In October, the Philadelphia City Council  killed a proposal to sell the Philadelphia Gas Works, the municipally owned gas utility. And last year activists and community members pressured Allentown leaders away from leasing the city water system to a private company.

Community-led campaign Citizens are finally following ATU’s lead and getting wise to privatizing predators. Reading, PA, residents voted in the midterm election to amend the city charter to guard against future attempts to outsource the City’s municipal utilities and infrastructure, approving a ballot measure that will require a public referendum before any sale or lease of City assets valued at $10 million or more. The Reading vote adds to a string of victories in communities

Reading voters affirmed the proposed charter amendment by a margin of three to one. Our Reading, Our Water, a community-led campaign, collected 1,800 signatures from Reading residents to put the question to the ballot and then made more than 4,000 attempts to contact voters in the weeks before the election to educate them about the need to pass the ballot measure. Communities looking to safeguard their public assets against the threat of privatization can  use the Reading victory as a model. v

International observes moment of silence in memory of slain Canadian soldier ATU international headquarters staff joined their sisters and brothers in Canada in a minute of silence at 9:30 a.m., October 23, in memory of Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, 24, the soldier who was slain by a terrorist gunman the previous day while guarding the National War Memorial in Ottawa, ON. v

IN TRANSIT

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Boston operator returns wallet containing $1,700

Poor job access compels people without cars to drive Many people without cars are opting to carpool, or borrow vehicles to get to work, rather than riding public transit, the most recent Census numbers show. The study observed the commuting habits of the 6.3 million workers who own no private vehicles at home, which accounts for 4.5% of all workers. The issue stems from an environment that promotes vehicle usage over transit. Thanks to a lack of job clustering, people in zero-vehicle households tend to find they’re only connected to 40% of jobs within a 90 minute commute. And although cities like New York, San Francisco, and Chicago have a larger number of zero-car households, people in areas such as Dallas or Detroit have much larger percentage of zero-car driving rates. The study proves that we need to keep fighting for larger public transit investments, along with purposed urban development in order to fix the issue. v

Richard Cooper, 589-Boston, MA, above, made quite a discovery while driving his MBTA route, October 23. A passenger had left behind a wallet, containing $1,735. Cooper, a 28-year T employee, immediately contacted MBTA Bus Dispatch about the discovery. He delivered the wallet and money to the inspector at the Sullivan Station, who turned it over to a supervisor at the Charlestown bus garage. Next step: connecting the wallet with its rightful owner. A day later, on Friday, a Charlestown resident called the T to report her wallet missing. After she verified her name and the contents of the wallet, a bus supervisor reunited the woman with her wallet and its contents.  Not surprisingly, she had been taking the T to make a deposit at her bank when she lost the money.

Sprawl, bad transit increase unemployment The 1960’s theory of job sprawl and “spatial mismatch” is no longer a theory. A “recipe for unemployment,” says the Economist in its coverage of a new study, combines ingredients like job sprawl, suburban zoning, lack of affordable housing near job centers, and inadequate transit. The study, proves with pinpoint accuracy that these issues are indeed connected. With carefully controlled factors, the study shows that a 50% increase in neighborhood accessibility led to a 4.2% shorter period of unemployment overall, which rose to 7% for job-seekers who earned at least 90% of their former wage. People able to commute long distances by car before being laid off found new jobs sooner, and were more likely to find a job that nearly replaced their previous income.

Boston honesty another ATU.”

Carman Richard Cooper’s and responsibility give us reason to be “proud to be v

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Transit workers may not find any of this information surprising, but at least now the the issue can no longer be ignored. v


NOLA retiree benefits jeopardized in pension dispute The benefits of New Orleans, LA, members who retired or were vested in their agency’s pension plan before 2008, are in jeopardy as a result of a dispute between their former employer and the Regional Transit Authority (RTA). The Transit Management of Southeast Louisiana Inc. (TMSEL) pension plan has sued the RTA, alleging that the agency has failed to make $27.5 million in payments to the plan over the past 22 months. TMSEL agreed to take responsibility for the pension when RTA was created in the 1980s, as long as it operated the transit system for the agency. RTA agreed to make the payments should that relationship ever be dissolved.

Left with no way to make payments Essentially, that’s what happened in 2008, when RTA contracted its bus and streetcar service out to French multinational operator Veolia, which took most of TMSEL’s former employees with it. Left without a contract, TMSEL had no way to make the pension payments. RTA agreed to pick up the payments – but insisted that it be allowed to appoint its own representatives to the TMSEL pension board. The pension board voted to do so.

They were supposed to begin their terms in October 2012, but the pension plan’s attorney and board rescinded the 2011 vote and voided the agreement with RTA. RTA subsequently sued for representation in state court in February 2013, but the case was moved to federal court because the dispute fell under the national Employee Retirement Income Security Act. Shortly before that lawsuit, the RTA stopped its payments to the pension plan, jeopardizing the retirement benefits of almost 2,000 retirees and their families. In Transit will continue to follow this story . v

Portland Local hits ‘reset’ with TriMet For the first time in ten years, Portland, OR, transit workers have voted for a new contract. The members of Local 757 ratified a six-year deal with TriMet, which covers around 2,000 workers and 1,200 retirees. Hansen says the settlement hits the “reset button” on the Local’s relationship with the agency. “We’ve had a very contentious battle for quite some time now,” he said, “and we’ve been able to settle and draw a line in the sand and hopefully move forward.” Local President Bruce Hansen praised his bargaining team and the state conciliator for mediating the settlement as both sides moved forward to resolve long-outstanding issues. The deal includes wage increases and other improvements. Hansen noted that there is still one big hurdle, but remains optimistic after reaching this new contract. “The gigantic elephant in the room is TriMet’s 44 years of failing to fund its promises to its current and future retirees. That is the issue that needs to be addressed in the next two years. It is my hope that the new trend towards cooperation will make that happen.” Stay tuned to www.atu.org for future development on this issue. v IN TRANSIT

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localS active HOW THEY DO IT everywhere Winnipeg students join workers to push for transit

Toledo transit workers protest plans to outsource paratransit

Transit workers and university students in Winnipeg, MB, joined hands to demand adequate public transit service for their city. Many students rely on buses to get to and from school each day.

The Toledo Area Regional Paratransit Service (TARPS) is looking to outsource the weekend portion of their service to private companies, claiming that outsourcing will solve the problem of a shortage of drivers.

Local 1505 members marched with “We Are One” signs, and students wore bus-shaped costumes as both groups spoke at the rally. They called for expanding bus rapid transit, and the purchase of more buses to improve the quality, reliability and safety of public transit for both drivers and riders.

Local Financial Secretary/Business Agent Carly Allen, 697-Toledo, OH, vows to fight the outsourcing efforts, citing 30% turnover as the reason for the shortage in drivers, and low pay as the underlying cause of the turnover. TARPS drivers are paid considerably less than their TARTA counterparts, despite that fact that operating paratransit equipment arguably requires more work. v

“It’s more than just riding the bus, it breaks down social barriers,” says Local President John Callahan. “Invest in public transit and watch our city grow.”

ATU camel in Cleveland for transit worker demonstration ATU’s now famous 15-foot camel traveled to Cleveland in November to join transit workers at a demonstration outside the headquarters of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority. The members of Local 268-Cleveland, OH were out in force calling on management to address concerns about bathroom breaks, safety violations, assaults on transit workers, coaches without working radios and horns, and failure to bargain in good faith. Stay tuned for updates about the fight.

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Toronto Local:‘Stop begging – start demanding federal transit funding’ LOCAL 113 ISSUES MAJOR REPORT ON STATE OF TORONTO TRANSIT AND WHAT MUST BE DONE TO FIX IT

Report recommendations include the following:

Having heard every possible idea about how to improve transit from all manner of politicians running for office, it was about time that Toronto heard from the real public transit professionals, the workers who operate the system – the members of Local 113-Toronto, ON. The 10,000 operations and maintenance workers at the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC), presented a 160-page report – Toronto’s  Transit Future  – analyzing in detail the many challenges facing the TTC that provides dozens of specific and costed-out recommendations for addressing them. “Toronto’s transit crisis is worse than most people realize,” warns Local President Bob Kinnear. “It’s time to stop begging and start demanding.”

Spend $2.7 billion over the next 10 years to keep the system in a state of good repair

Allow fares to increase with inflation.

Increase service and reduce wait times and overcrowding on surface routes.

Expand overnight bus and streetcar service in 2015.

Undertake a “serious advocacy campaign” for a national transit strategy before the 2015 federal election.

Provide better service for people with mobility challenges.

‘We must speak with one voice’ “Whatever our different political allegiances may be, we must speak with one voice to all federal parties: ‘Don’t try to distract us with a multitude of tax breaks, regional rivalries and socially controversial hot buttons. Tell us exactly what you are going to do to help fix transit in Canada’s  largest city, right now and into the future,” Kinnear asserted. ATU has launched a special website: TorontoTransitFuture.ca, which contains the full report, a separate 32-page summary, a short introductory video, and social media feedback features. v

Mayor-elect John Tory called the report, “a very constructive contribution to the discussion,” adding, “This was a very well thought out piece of work….” IN TRANSIT

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ATUHEROES ATU’S EVERYDAY HEROES ARE HEROES EVERY DAY Are ATU members braver and more compassionate than most people? Judging from the stories people send us every month that would seem to be the case. Here are the latest we’ve received:

Local 627-Cincinnati, OH Bus operator Jontay Love, 627Cincinnati, OH, was driving late one night, when he heard gunshots. Then, spotting an injured man on the ground calling for help, he alerted the authorities and stayed with the victim until police and an ambulance arrived. “I wanted to help keep him calm. I didn’t want him to panic or go into shock,” Love said. SORTA presented Love with its STAR Award, which acknowledges employees who demonstrate exemplary service to Metro and the community.

Local 618-Providence, RI ATU is proud of three of our Lime Rock firefighters, members of Local 618-Providence, RI, who recently saved an 86-yearold Pawtucket man who suffered a heart attack at the Twin River Casino. They were honored by their fellow firefighters, local officials, and the man they saved.

Local 842-Wilmington, DE It’s not always easy to tell the difference between someone who is sleeping and a person who is having a medical emergency, but Jackie Herbert, 842-Wilmington, DE, took the time to find out. Herbert was operating his route when a passenger informed him that he had a “sleeper” in the back. Herbert attempted to wake the man without success, called “911” and waited with the rider until EMTs arrived. Herbert received a certificate of recognition for saving the life of a rider in cardiac arrest.

Local 819-Newark, NJ Rasahida Davis, 819-Newark, NJ, was driving her bus when she noticed that one of her regular passengers was having trouble breathing. She called the control center and likely saved the woman’s life by performing CPR. Davis was presented with a NJ Transit Distinguished Service Award for her quick action. v

There’s a big wide world out there, and it’s tough to keep up with all the events which can affect your profession and your livelihood. One of the easiest ways to stay informed is by visiting: www.atu.org.

Don’t stay in the dark! Find out what’s going on. Visit www.atu.org. 18

November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT


Dallas members Mayor Rahm brings the hammer down complain of unfair on CTA workers pay, poor conditions It’s been well documented that Chicago Mayor Rahm

Emanuel has been no friend of Chicago Transit Authority workers and working families. Rahm has had his stool pigeon CTA President Forrest Claypool doing his dirty work by firing a record number of employees. Claypool sacked over 900 transit workers between 2011 and mid-2014.

However the agency’s reasons and process have been inconsistent, causing serious concerns for workers. With the Chicago mayoral election set for February 2015, many workers question the political motivation behind the crackdown.

148 reinstated so far Transit workers hit the streets outside of Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) headquarters and a recent Board meeting to protest the misuse of cameras on buses, inequitable working conditions and other issues. Adding fuel to the fire, the Board recently approved a $100,000 retention payment for DART CEO Gary Thomas and made undisclosed changes to the contracts of other top officials. DART claims the cameras are meant to keep riders and drivers safe, but DART management has been using the video to harass and spy on operators. In addition, DART pulled a fast one on the members of Local 1338 by increasing their health care costs by 7% and refusing to carry spouses if their job offers insurance. “How long will you try to make DART look good off the backs of your employees and treat us like dogs?” asks one driver. It’s time for justice at DART. v

Not all of those dismissals have been justified. 148 of the fired drivers have been reinstated through arbitration and area locals are in the process of getting more people back to work. Many of the cases involve rail operators making an error by not berthing the train properly at the platform and other minor offenses. One operator with more than 25 years’ experience and a spotless record was fired for stopping a train at the wrong spot, opening the doors, then quickly closing them. v

State fines Metro for restroom violation for Seattle bus drivers As reported in last month’s In Transit, lack of bathroom breaks for Seattle, WA, bus drivers is causing them to resort to extreme measures like wearing adult diapers while driving in urine soaked seats. After complaints for many years by Local 587, the Washington Department of Labor and Industries finally took notice and fined King County Metro Transit for failing to provide bus drivers enough locations and time to adequately use the restroom. The department called the violation a serious breach of worker protection laws. Drivers have resorted to urinating in water bottles and the “potty dance” to keep their composure, which causes serious traffic and safety hazards, as well as longterm health issues to the kidneys and digestive system. King County Metro has to submit an improvement plan to the state before the end of the year. v IN TRANSIT

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New Sudbury Handi-Transit policies ignore persons with mental disabilities

Paratransit survey: Ridership, ‘travel training’ increasing

Could you imagine sending your child with a brain injury or mother with dementia to walk down the road, through your town and to the far-corner of the city and catch several buses to reach a destination?

Sixty-six percent reported an increase in their 2013 ridership numbers, averaging 13%. The largest ridership increase reported was 60%.

Paratransit ridership is up as 14.8 million riders were transported in 2013, according to a new survey of U.S. and Canadian paratransit providers by METRO magazine.

More than half of respondents (55%) reported having a “travel training” program in place, and 13% said they are looking into creating one. Reasons given in favor of the program include providing better customer service and alleviating customers fears about riding public transportation.

66% use taxis Sixteen percent of respondents reported using taxis to supplement their fleets. Less than half of those said the service was helpful in accommodating riders that didn’t qualify for paratransit, but have special needs.

44% use outside contractors Unfortunately that’s the new reality that people are facing because of a new Sudbury Handi-Transit policy in Ontario. Until recently, people qualified for Handi-Transit by having a doctor fill out a twopage form saying they required it. Concerned that the system was being abused, Sudbury completely changed the policy. The process now includes a sixpage application, a determination of eligibility by city employees, and an assessment by a physiotherapist. The new parameters only measure physical disability, not mental. This leaves Alzheimer’s patients, terminally ill people in their 80’s, the developmentally challenged, those suffering from traumatic brain injury, and all others with similar disabilities without public transport. v

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With efforts to outsource paratransit in Atlanta, Toledo and other cities, it’s no surprise that 44 percent of survey participants use private contractors to deliver rides, with the top two companies being MV Transportation and First Transit. Fifty-four percent of operators claim their programs have helped cut costs  by moving more riders to their fixed route system. A total of 12,028 vehicles are represented in the survey, with the smallest fleet coming in at one vehicle and the largest comprised of 6,000. The average fleet size is 151 vehicles, and the median is 30. While buses still had the largest piece of the overall fleet pie at 69%, this appears to be a downward trend continuing from last year. Vans accounted for 23% of the fleet breakdown, a significant drop from last year’s 43%.

Surprise: Money is biggest problem It will come as no surprise that operators say costs and funding remain the top challenges. Demand was the second-highest challenge with regard to providing service. Limited resources, customer expectations and service area issues were also listed. Some less-cited issues included lift maintenance, issues with maneuvering vehicles or mobility devices safely within a restricted space, and lawsuits. v

November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT


Report: Millenials’ Shift to Public Transit is Permanent Mounting evidence is showing that the Millennial generation’s dramatic shift away from driving is more than temporary. While the 2000s saw a marked decrease in the average number of transit miles traveled by young Americans, a new study explains that those trends appear likely to continue even as the economy improves in light of the consistency of Millennials’ preferences of not driving to work, and the continued decrease in per-capita driving among all Americans.

Big implications for policymakers “Millennials are different from their parents, and those differences aren’t going away,” says a U.S. PIRG co-author of the report. “After five years of economic growth with stagnant driving, it’s time for federal and state governments to wake up to growing evidence that Millennials don’t want to drive as much as their parents did. This change has big implications and policy makers shouldn’t be asleep at the wheel.” The report  includes many findings that suggest that Millennials’ shift away from driving over the last decade is continuing:

Census data shows that the share of 16 to 24 year-olds traveling to work by car declined by 1.5 percentage points between 2006 and 2013, while the share of young people getting to work by public transportation, on foot or by bicycle, or else working from home, had increased. Millennials consistently report greater attraction to less driving-intensive lifestyles — urban living, residence in “walkable” communities, and openness to the use of nondriving modes of transport — than older generations.

Fewer getting driver’s licenses Fewer young people are getting their driver’s licenses than even a few years ago. The percentage of high school seniors with driver’s licenses declined from 85 percent to 73 percent between 1996 and 2010. Millennials are the largest generation in number and they will be the chief users of the transportation investments that get made over the coming decade. If this trend continues, it will be the most monumental shift in travel trends since the 1950s. v

Poll: More Americans prefer public transit to road building Public transit ridership is at record levels and it’s been well documented that Millennials are forgoing cars and riding public transit in record numbers. Now a new poll shows more Americans favor government expansion of public transit over road building to reduce traffic congestion. Conducted by ABC News and the Washington Post, the poll found stronger support for public transit among urban residents than suburbanites, however both still prefer transit. Public transit was a key issue in many of the midterm elections. v IN TRANSIT

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WHOPPER OF A DEAL... WHY YOU’RE PAYING BURGER KING’S TAXES What’s tax inversion and why do ATU members need to be concerned about it?

fair share of taxes. ...My attitude is, I don’t care if it’s legal. It’s wrong.”

Tax inversion, or corporate inversion, is the relocation of a corporation’s headquarters to a country with a lower tax rate while it retains its material operations in a higher-tax country of origin. Bottom line, it’s a company finding a way to avoid paying higher taxes. The most recent example of this legal tax avoidance scheme took place August 26, when U.S.-based Burger King merged with the Canadian coffee and donut chain Tim Hortons, in a deal that will create the third-largest fast food restaurant company in the world. Burger King will move its headquarters to Canada, which has a corporate tax rate of 15 percent, while the top U.S. corporate marginal tax rate is 35 percent. Since 2013, nearly 20 companies have or are in the process of completing a merger with a foreign corporation to avoid paying U.S. taxes.

‘I don’t care if it’s legal. It’s wrong.’ President Obama questioned the patriotism of inverted companies, calling them “corporate deserters” who are abandoning their country “just to get out of paying their

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Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has been examining ways the Administration can deter companies from fleeing the U.S. for lower tax nations and in September took steps to curb the process. Acting on behalf of the Administration the Treasury Department enacted new rules on inversion. Senator Bernie Sanders, I-VT, spoke out after the Burger King merger was announced saying that corporate inversion “shows the disdain that corporations have for the American public.” v


Movement to raise minimum wage gains momentum All workers have a stake “Black Friday” may eventually become better known as a day of protest than a day of spending frenzy. That’s because U.S. Walmart employees again chose that day to demonstrate against their employer. ATU members across the nation joined the massive protest against the retail giant.Walmart workers, many who earn poverty-level wages and have irregular and part-time hours, are calling on the company to end retaliation against employees who are asking for $15 an hour and a full-time schedule. Like all workers, ATU members have a big stake in this campaign, as the low wages paid by the nation’s largest employers create a downward pressure on all employee compensation in America. Walmart’s employees are among the millions of low-wage workers who have seen little or no improvement in their real wages over the last 40 years – years in which the wealth of the richest Americans soared to unprecedented heights. In fact, average salaries adjusted for inflation, have dropped since the 1970s, while the hours worked by fulltime employees have steadily climbed.

Inequality highest since 1928 Income inequality today is the highest it’s been since 1928 – the year before the stock market crash that caused the Great Depression. Corporate profits, today, are at an alltime high, just as they were before the Depression.

American workers’ productivity continues to climb, but wages are at their lowest point since 1948.

Minimum wage today less than 1969 $15,080 – that’s the yearly income of people earning the U.S. federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour – which is $3.70 less per hour than the buying power of the minimum wage in 1968. Even more startling – the average minimum wage worker today is 35 years old. McDonald’s employees have joined Walmart workers at the forefront of the movement to establish the $15 minimum wage. The burger chain knows that it pays its workers so little that many of them qualify for public assistance (52% of fast-food workers do). The company actually runs a “McResource” help hotline, which provides its employees with information on how and where to apply for food stamps, Medicaid and other programs for the poor. Taxpayers spend about $7 billion a year on public assistance for fast-food workers whose employers make $7.4 billion in profits a year.

Overtime? What overtime? Big business has not only flattened base wages in the United States, it has lowered the wages at which employees can legally claim overtime pay.

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Nick Hanauer, a Seattle-based entrepreneur writing in Politico Magazine, says that “fair overtime standards are to the middle class what the minimum wage is to lowincome workers: not everything, but an indispensable labor protection that is absolutely essential to creating a broad and thriving middle class.”

lift the exemptions from paying overtime to teachers, federal employees, doctors, and computer professionals, and push Congress to remove the section of the Fair Labor Standards Act that exempts interstate bus operators from paying overtime wages to over-the-road drivers. But that’s unlikely to happen in the current political climate in which any attempt to improve the standard of living of American families opens a legislator up to relentless Right Wing attack and accusations of socialism.

Voters in states take action

Over 65% of American workers earned overtime in 1975. But, because the value of the legal threshold at which employers are required to pay overtime has been allowed to erode, only 11% of American workers qualify for overtime pay today.

Stranglehold The president could restore the 1975 standards on his own, raising the overtime cut-off to wages over $69,000 per year, but like his predecessors he has not done so. Such is the stranglehold the corporate monoliths have on government, that even Democratic politicians are afraid to use the legal power at their disposal to raise the income of over 10 million middle class workers. And that number would increase if the president would

Voters have decided to take matters into their own hands by passing ballot initiatives to increase the minimum wage. Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, and Washington, DC, had all raised their minimum wages before the midterm elections. And on November 4, ballot measures to raise the minimum wage were passed in Nebraska, South Dakota, Arkansas, and Alaska, but none to reach $15 - the goal of minimum wage advocates. Only Seattle and San Francisco have decided to gradually raise their minimum to that threshold. This struggle is likely to continue for a long time. Workers can expect the moneyed class to fight tooth and nail to retain the hammerlock of restraints they’ve imposed on the wages of working poor and middle class families. But, the battle for dignity and livable wages has been joined by countless citizens of both red and blue states, and ATU will be fighting with them for as long as it takes. v

New York Local mourns loss of recording secretary Local 1181-New York, NY, is mourning the loss of Recording Secretary Tommy Jemmott who passed away on September 22, at the age of 58. Jemmott, a 32-year veteran of the school bus local, came up through the ranks as a driver, assistant shop steward, shop steward, executive board member, and delegate to the International Convention. In addition to his work as recording secretary, Jemmott served Local 1181 members as a member of the ATU New York State Legislative Conference Board and Trustee of the Local’s Welfare and Pension Funds. Jemmott helped negotiate many contracts with New York City’s Department of Education, the MTA, and the Long Island and Westchester school districts. v

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LEGAL NOTICE

TO: Employees Represented by ATU Locals in U.S. Bargaining Units Who Are Subject to Union Security Arrangements Employees working under collective bargaining agreements which contain a union security clause are required, as a condition of their employment, to pay monthly dues or fees to the union. Formal union membership, however, is not mandated. Those who are members of the ATU pay monthly union dues. Nonmembers, or “agency feepayers,” meet their obligation through the payment of an equivalent “agency fee.” Nonmembers subject to a union security clause have the additional legal right to file objections to their funding of expenditures which are “unrelated to collective bargaining, contract administration, or grievance adjustment” and/or are otherwise “nongermane to the collective bargaining process.”

travel services, prescription drug cards, and life insurance.

Union security clauses are negotiated and ratified by your coworkers based upon the principle that everyone who benefits from the collective bargaining process should share in its costs. The wellbeing of all bargaining unit employees is improved immeasurably when the union obtains higher wages, better health care and retirement benefits, fairness in the discipline system, and the many other improvements realized in contract negotiations. But it would be difficult to provide such effective representation at the bargaining table without the influence earned through the “nongermane” political and ideological activities of the trade union movement.

It remains our opinion that all of our organizing and all the legislative, litigation, and similar activities undertaken by the ATU – some of which tribunals have indicated may in part be ideological and, therefore, nonchargeable – are essential to improving the working conditions of all the employees we represent.

There are considerable benefits of being a member of the ATU. Only members have the right to attend and participate in union meetings; the right to run in local union elections and to otherwise nominate and vote for any candidates for union office; the right to participate in the formation of ATU bargaining demands; the right to vote on contract ratification questions; and the right to enjoy the many benefits of the Union Privilege Benefits Program, which offers low-interest credit cards, legal and

The following ATU Statement of Law and Procedures concerning union security objections applies only to the International per capita tax charged to objectors as part of local union fees (unless a local union exercises the option of presuming that the International percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union). 1. Any ATU-represented nonmember employee employed in the United States, whether publicly or privately employed, who is subject to a union security clause conditioning continued employment on the payment of dues or fees has the right to become an objector to expenditures not related to collective bargaining, contract administration, grievance adjustment, or other chargeable expenditures. A current ATU member who chooses not to tender the full periodic dues and assessments paid by members of the union, but who instead opts to become an objector, must assume nonmember status prior to filing an objection through these procedures. An objector shall pay reduced fees calculated in accordance with Section 5. 2. To become an objector, an ATU-represented nonmember employee shall notify the International Secretary-Treasurer in writing of the objection within thirty (30) days of receiving this notice via the November/ December issue of InTransit, within thirty (30) days of resigning from membership, or within thirty (30) days after first becoming subject to union security obligations and receiving notice of these procedures. The objection shall be signed and shall specify the objector’s current home mailing address, name the objector’s employer with which the applicable union security arrangements have been entered into, and identify the ATU local union number, if known. All objections should be mailed to the International Secretary-Treasurer, 5025 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016-4139 or transmitted by facsimile to 202-244-7824 with a separate cover page directing such to the attention of the International Secretary-Treasurer and specifying the subject thereof to be the “Election of Fee Objector Status.” 3. The following categories of expenditure are chargeable to the extent permitted by law: a. All expenses concerning the negotiation of agreements,

The Notice of Statement of Law and Procedures applies to the International Union expenditures and to the per capita tax portion of local union dues. Because the portion of local union expenditures which are spent on “chargeable” activities is at least as great as that of the International Union, in calculating the amount of local union dues to be paid by objectors, local unions may exercise the option of presuming that the International Union’s percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union.

Lawrence J. Hanley International President

practices and working conditions; b. All expenses concerning the administration of agreements, practices and working conditions, including grievance handling, all activities related to arbitration, and discussion with employees in the bargaining unit or employer representatives regarding working conditions, benefits and contract rights; c. Convention expenses and other normal union internal governance and management expenses; d. Union business meeting expenses; e. Publication expenses to the extent coverage is related to otherwise chargeable activities; f. Expenses of litigation before the courts and administrative agencies related to contract administration, collective bargaining rights and internal governance; g. Expenses for legislative, executive branch and administrative agency representation on legislative and regulatory matters closely related to contract ratification or the implementation of contracts; h. All expenses for the education and training of members, officers, and staff intended to prepare the participants to better perform chargeable activities; i. All strike fund expenditures and costs of group cohesion and economic action, e.g., general strike activity, informational picketing, etc.; j. All funeral or dismemberment benefits; and k. A proportional share of all overhead and administrative expenses. 4. Each December, the International Union shall publish these policies and procedures in the InTransit to provide to ATU-represented employees notice of their right to object and of the procedures for objecting.

5. The International retains an independent auditor who submits an annual report for the purpose of verifying the percentage of expenditures that fall within the categories specified in Section 3. Similarly, if the local union has adopted these procedures but has not exercised the option of presuming that the International Union’s percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union, the local union will arrange for the audit of the records, enabling the local union to verify annually the percentage of its total expenditures other than the International per capita tax that is chargeable to objectors. The amount of the International and local union expenditures falling within Section 3 made during that fiscal year which ended in the previous calendar year shall be the basis for calculating the reduced fees that must be paid by the objector for the current calendar year. For each objector, an amount equal to the reduced fees paid by the objector shall be placed in an interest-bearing escrow account. 6. The report(s) of the independent auditor(s) shall be completed prior to the publication of these policies and procedures in December. The report(s) shall include verification of the major categories of union expenses attributable to chargeable and nonchargeable activities. Local unions which have not exercised the option of presuming that the International Union’s percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union shall provide a copy of their independent auditor’s report to each nonmember employee represented by the local union. 7. In the absence of an exclusive statutory review procedure, each objector may challenge the legal and arithmetical bases of the calculations contained in the independent auditor report(s) by filing an appeal with the International Secretary-Treasurer. Any such appeal must be made by sending a signed letter to the International SecretaryTreasurer postmarked or transmitted via facsimile no later than thirty (30) days after the International SecretaryTreasurer has sent a letter to the objector acknowledging receipt of the objection, or thirty (30) days after the International Union has sent a copy of the policies and procedures to the objector.

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8. Except where state law provides an exclusive statutory review procedure as discussed in Note 3 below, all such appeals received by the union within the time limits specified above shall be determined by expeditious referral to an impartial arbitrator appointed by the American Arbitration Association (AAA) under its rules for impartial determination of union fees and these procedures. The International Union will notify the AAA that challenges of its fees, which have been received from one or more individual employees, are to be determined by an impartial arbitrator and will include the names and addresses of the individuals who have filed the appeals challenging the union’s fees and who should be notified of the proceedings. a. All appeals shall be consolidated for submission to the arbitrator. The presentation of evidence and argument to the arbitrator shall be either in writing or at a hearing, as determined by the arbitrator. The arbitrator shall receive and consider the evidence of witnesses by affidavit, giving it such weight as seems proper after consideration of any objection made to its admission. If a hearing is held, it shall be scheduled as soon as the arbitrator can schedule the hearing, and shall be at a location selected by the arbitrator to be the most convenient for those involved in the proceeding. b. Each party to the arbitration shall bear its own costs. The challengers shall have the option of paying a pro-rata portion of the arbitrator’s fees and expenses. The union shall pay the balance of such fees and expenses. c. Challengers may, at their expense, be represented by counsel or other representative of choice. Challengers need not appear at any hearing and shall be permitted to instead file written statements with the arbitrator no later than the beginning of the arbitration hearing. Post-hearing statements may be filed in accordance with the provisions of Section 8(g). If a hearing is not held, the arbitrator will set the dates by which all written submissions will be received and will decide the case based on the evidence and arguments submitted. d. If a hearing is held, fourteen (14) days prior to the start of the hearing, challengers shall be provided with copies of all exhibits or a list of all such exhibits intended to be introduced at the arbitration by the union and a list of all witnesses the union intends to call, except for exhibits and witnesses the union may introduce for rebuttal. Where a list of exhibits has been provided, challengers shall have a right to receive copies of such exhibits by making a written request for them to the International Secretary-Treasurer. Additionally, copies of all exhibits shall be available for inspection and copying at the hearing.

in favor of the challenger will be made from the escrow account. 9. Under Section 18.1 of the ATU Constitution and General Laws, each local union will be responsible for collecting and transmitting to the International Union each month from those who have made an objection the amount of the per capita tax certified as due under these procedures. In addition, each local will be responsible for developing a system covering local union fees that will meet the legal requirements relative to the objectors in the local. If the local union adopts the International procedures concerning fee objections on an integrated basis, no multiple notice (other than providing its independent auditor’s report to nonmember employees represented by the local union if the local union has not exercised the option of presuming that the International Union’s percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union), objection, challenge or appeal procedures will be necessary. If, however, the local union adopts an independent system covering local union expenditures other than per capita tax, such arrangements must, by law, be included in the local’s procedures. 10. The provisions of this procedure shall be considered legally separable. Should any provision or portion hereof be held contrary to law by a court, administrative agency or arbitrator, the remaining provisions or portions thereof shall continue to be legally effective and binding. If, after consultation with each other, the International President or the local union business agent determines that modifications in this procedure are necessary to maintain compliance with applicable law, such modifications may be made in accordance with the Constitution and General Laws of the International Union or the bylaws of the local union, as applicable.

2. In accordance with applicable state laws, the reduced per capita tax owed by nonmember public employee objectors in Minnesota and New Jersey (except those working for New Jersey Transit or NJT-Mercer) shall be computed utilizing either the percentage of chargeable expenditures as verified by the report of the independent auditor retained by the International or eighty-five (85%) percent, whichever is lesser. 3. State statutes covering public employees in Minnesota and New Jersey (again, other than those workers employed by New Jersey Transit or NJT-Mercer) require that any person wishing to challenge the fees file an action with the state public employment board (Minnesota) or with a three-member board appointed by the governor specifically to hear fair share challenges (New Jersey). Where these statutes are applicable, any local union procedure must provide that the binding expeditious review be through the applicable state process.

NOTES 1. ATU-represented public employees in Illinois, Minnesota, Montana, or Oregon who are not members of the union are automatically considered objectors and are not

Amalgamated Transit Union Analysis of Objectors’ Expenses (Modified Cash Basis) - Year Ended June 30, 2014

e. A court reporter shall make a transcript of all proceedings before the arbitrator. This transcript shall be the only official record of the proceedings and may be purchased by the challengers. If challengers do not purchase a copy of the transcript, a copy shall be available for inspection by challengers at the International headquarters during normal business hours. f. The arbitrator shall have control over all procedural matters affecting the arbitration in order to fulfill the dual needs of an informed and an expeditious arbitration. The arbitrator shall set forth in the decision the legal and arithmetic bases for the decision, giving full consideration to the legal requirements limiting the amount objectors may be charged. g. If a hearing is held, the parties to the arbitration shall have the right to file a post-hearing statement within fifteen (15) days after both parties have completed submission of their cases at the hearing. Such statements may not introduce new evidence nor discuss evidence not introduced in the arbitration. The arbitrator shall issue a decision within forty-five (45) days after the final date for submission of post-hearing statements or within such other reasonable period as is consistent with the applicable AAA rules and the requirements of law. h. The decision of the arbitrator shall be final and binding on all findings of fact supported by substantial evidence on the record considered as a whole and on other findings legally permitted to be binding on all parties. i. Upon receipt of the arbitrator’s award, any adjustment

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required to make a filing under the provisions of Sections 2 and 4 of this Statement of Law and Procedures. The collective bargaining statute applicable to New Jersey public employers (with the significant exceptions of New Jersey Transit and NJT-Mercer) has the same impact. Similarly, except where a more stringent union security arrangement was in place on January 1, 1970, and has been continued in accordance with the “grandfathering” provisions of state law, the Pennsylvania public employee bargaining statute only permits a fair share union security clause under which every nonmember is obligated to pay only a reduced fee based upon prior chargeable expenditures. Local unions representing such members shall forward the names of all such nonmember objectors to the International SecretaryTreasurer, including the objector’s current home address and employer.

November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT


Amalgamated Transit Union - Analysis of Objectors' Expenses (Modified Cash Basis) - Year Ended June 30, 2014

To the Chair and Members of the General Executive Board of the Amalgamated Transit Union. We have audited the accompanying Analysis of Objectors’ Expenses (modified cash basis) (the Analysis) of the Amalgamated Transit Union (the Union) for the year ended June 30, 2014 and the notes to the Analysis. Management’s Responsibility for the Analysis Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the Analysis in accordance with the modified cash basis of accounting, as described in Note 1 and the factors and assumptions discussed in the notes; this includes determining that the modified cash basis of accounting is an acceptable basis for the preparation of the Analysis in the circumstances. Management is also responsible for the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of an Analysis that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Analysis based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the Analysis is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the Analysis. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the Analysis, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the Analysis in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of that entity’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the Analysis.

1. Chargeable expenses include:

Intended Use of This Letter This report is intended solely for the information and use of the Amalgamated Transit Union and its fee objectors and is not intended to be and should not be used by anyone other than these specified parties.

All expenses concerning the negotiation of agreements, practices and working conditions;

All expenses concerning the administration of agreements, practices and working conditions, including grievance handling, all activities related to arbitration and discussion with employees in the bargaining unit or employer representatives regarding working conditions, benefits and contract rights;

• NOTES TO ANALYSIS OF OBJECTORS’ EXPENSES YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2014

Convention expenses and other normal Union internal governance and management expenses;

Social activities and Union business meeting expenses;

Note 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Publication expenses to the extent coverage is related to chargeable activities;

Expenses of litigation before the courts and administrative agencies related to contract administration, collective bargaining rights and internal governance;

Expenses for legislative, executive branch and administrative agency representation on legislative and regulatory matters closely related to contract ratification or the implementation of contracts;

Bethesda, MD November 14, 2014

Method of Accounting - The Analysis is presented using a modified cash basis of accounting. Generally, expenses are recognized when paid rather than when the obligation is incurred. However, accruals of expenses are recorded for certain transactions with local unions, funeral benefits and other items. Depreciation - Depreciation of property and equipment is charged to operations over the estimated useful lives of the assets using the straight-line method. Benefit Payments - The Union’s Constitution and General Laws provide for the payment of a $1,000 funeral or dismemberment benefit on behalf of members and fee payers in good standing with one or more years of continuous membership or fee payment at the time of their death or dismemberment. An expense is recognized for the benefit for life members at the time they become life members. The costs associated with this benefit for other members and fee payers are accounted for upon disbursement of the benefit.

Note 2. Purpose of Analysis of Objectors’ Expenses and Significant Factors and Assumptions Used in Determining Chargeable and Non-Chargeable Expenses (continued) •

All strike fund expenditures and other costs of group cohesion and economic action, e.g., demonstrations, general strike activity, informational picketing, etc.;

Estimates - The preparation of this Analysis requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. Actual results may differ from those estimates.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion

All expenses for the education and training of members, officers and staff intended to prepare the participants to better perform chargeable activities;

Note 2. Purpose of Analysis of Objectors’ Expenses and Significant Factors and Assumptions Used in Determining Chargeable and Non-Chargeable Expenses

All funeral and dismemberment benefits; and

Opinion

The purpose of this Analysis is for the determination of the percentage of fee objector dues (or their equivalent) expended by the Union for chargeable activities. Expenses for chargeable activities are those deemed “necessarily or reasonably incurred” to execute the representational duties of the Union. The percentage of Union expenses deemed not chargeable is used for determining advance dues (or their equivalent) reduction for fee objectors for the subsequent calendar year.

An allocable amount of all net building expenses.

In our opinion, the Analysis referred to above presents fairly, in all material respects, the includable expenses of the Amalgamated Transit Union for the year ended June 30, 2014, and the allocation between chargeable and non-chargeable expenses, on the modified cash basis of accounting described in Note 1 and significant factors and assumptions described in Note 2. Basis of Accounting As described in Note 1, the Analysis was prepared on a modified cash basis of accounting, which is a comprehensive basis of accounting other than generally accepted accounting principles. Our opinion is not modified with respect to that matter. Other Matter We have audited, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, the financial statements of the Amalgamated Transit Union as of and for the year ended June 30, 2014 and our report thereon dated November 6, 2014, expressed an unmodified opinion on those financial statements. The total net (U.S.) includable expenses presented in the Analysis agree to the expenses in the audited financial statements of the Union for the year ended June 30, 2014, modified as discussed in Note 3. The allocations of expenses between chargeable and non-chargeable are based on the descriptions and the significant factors and assumptions described in Note 2. The accompanying Analysis was prepared for the purpose of determining the amount of the Union’s expenses that are chargeable or nonchargeable to fee objectors. The accompanying Analysis is not intended to be a complete presentation of the Union’s financial statements.

The procedures followed in the preparation of this Analysis include categorization of each classification of expenses by chargeable and non-chargeable activities. This is accomplished by analyzing each classification of expenses and identifying amounts which are either chargeable or non-chargeable. Note 2. Purpose of Analysis of Objectors’ Expenses and Significant Factors and Assumptions Used in Determining Chargeable and Non-Chargeable Expenses (continued) The Union engaged professional assistance to determine criteria for identifying chargeable and non-chargeable expenses. The procedures and significant factors and assumptions used in this Analysis in determining these expenses are as follows: A.

All expenses are identified by fund and reconciled to the Union’s annual financial statements.

B.

Canadian expenses within each fund are eliminated.

C.

Certain interfund transfers are recorded to more accurately reflect the Union activity for which certain expenditures were made.

D.

Expenses are analyzed to identify chargeable and non-chargeable amounts using the following criteria:

2. Non-chargeable expenses include all other expenses. A.

For those expenses which have both chargeable and non-chargeable aspects, allocations are made using certain ratios. Significant ratios used for these allocated expenses include ratios based on salary costs supported by time records and other ratios such as printed line ratios for allocation of certain publication costs.

Note 3. Reconciliation of Analysis to Audited Financial Statements The expenses included in this analysis are based upon the total expenses of $27,681,270 reported in the audited financial statements of the Amalgamated Transit Union modified for the following: $2,421,528 in Canadian expenses has been excluded from this analysis. $213,592 relating to various expenses which have been offset by corresponding revenue items have been excluded from this analysis. Note 4. Subsequent Events Review Subsequent events have been evaluated through November 14, 2014, which is the date the Analysis was available to be issued. On July 30, 2014, the Union purchased approximately 45 acres of land and buildings in Silver Spring, Maryland for approximately thirty one million dollars. No other new material events or transactions which would require an additional adjustment to or disclosure in the accompanying Analysis was noted in this evaluation.

IN TRANSIT

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Más rico de lo que usted nunca será: No somos perfectos. Nadie es perfecto. Pero el corazón de ATU es la creencia de que somos más fuertes juntos que por separado. Eso es un valor. Nosotros valoramos a la gente por encima de los ingresos y nos preocupamos por nuestra familia más grande: el sindicato. Es fácil para mí decirlo. En el momento en el que un año termina y otro empieza, quiero saludar a la gente de ATU que hace que sea digno llamarle un sindicato. A menudo les pregunto a los oficiales de los Locales, “¿estamos dirigiendo un sindicato o una lista para envíos por correo?” Y todos nuestros dirigentes sindicales y miembros del sindicato se han mostrado a la altura de las circunstancias y han contestado a esa pregunta este año de una manera que nos debería llenar de orgullo a todos nosotros. En St. Louis y en Saskatoon más recientemente, y en Atlanta, miembros de ATU se pusieron a llamar por teléfono y salieron a las calles, y luchando por ellos mismos y por sus comunidades, hicieron del mundo un lugar mejor. Nuestro trabajo requiere coraje. Robert Kennedy dijo: “Unos pocos hombres están deseando enfrentarse a la desaprobación de sus compañeros, la censura de sus colegas, la ira de su sociedad. El coraje moral es una materia prima más rara que la valentía en la batalla o que una mayor inteligencia. Aun así, es la cualidad esencial, vital, para aquellos que buscan cambiar un mundo que grita de la forma más dolorosa por el cambio.” Esta noche en algún lugar en ATU, un delegado sindical o un oficial del sindicato se preguntará a si mismo sobre el sacrificio que hicieron por sus compañeros de trabajo en el 2014. ¿Se notó al menos el tiempo que perdieron de estar con sus familias? ¿Sabe alguien, por lo menos, lo duro que puede ser liderar a otros? En algún lugar en el que se esté leyendo esto, yo espero que haya algunos miembros que trataron de forma ruda e injusta a sus líderes y que puedan darse cuenta de que, aunque podamos tener diferencias, todos nosotros estamos del mismo lado. Y espero que nuestros oficiales vuelvan a dedicarse ellos mismos a intentar entender mejor que ellos están liderando en los momentos más difíciles. De nuevo, nuestros oficiales sindicales del Local e Internacionales no son perfectos. Pero ellos son un grupo que tiene el coraje de meterse en el conflicto moral y de sacrificarse y liderar. Están deseando arriesgarse a la censura de sus colegas, y hacer del mundo un lugar mejor. Buscan cambiar una pequeña parte de las cosas que ocurren, y en su

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November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT

persecución de Ideales, recordarnos qué difícil es el navegar contra el viento. Son jóvenes de corazón, bendecidos con una mezcla de idealismo, gracia cuando están bajo presión y persistencia. En un mundo que demasiado a menudo se parece a una alerta de huracán, ellos son la luz del sol y las rosas. La próxima vez que les vea, deles las gracias por no darse por vencidos, deles un gran abrazo y una sonrisa, y recuerde que –si no fuera por ellos, estaríamos a merced de los banqueros, los agentes de bolsa y de aquellos que buscan dividirnos y explotarnos a todos. En el 2015, nuestro mensaje a los hermanos Koch y a los políticos que no comparten nuestros valores será una imitación de los de George Bailey en “Es una Vida Maravillosa”: George Bailey: “Sólo un minuto... sólo un momento. Ahora, espere Señor Potter. Usted llevaba razón cuando decía que mi padre no era un hombre de negocios. Eso lo sé. Porqué él comenzó este negocio barato de Construcción de Edificios y Préstamos. Nunca lo sabré. Pero ni usted ni nadie puede decir nada en contra de su carácter, porque toda su vida fue… porque en los 25 años desde que él y su hermano, el Tío Billy, comenzaron esta cosa, él nunca pensó en sí mismo. ¿No es verdad, Tío Billy? Él no hizo suficiente dinero para enviar a Harry fuera a la universidad, y menos todavía a mí. Pero ayudó a unas cuantas personas a salir de sus barrios pobres, Señor Potter, y, ¿qué está mal con eso? Porque... aquí, ustedes son todos hombres de negocios aquí. ¿No les hace eso ser ciudadanos mejores? ¿No les hace eso ser mejores clientes? Usted... usted dijo... ¿qué dijo usted hace un minuto? Ellos tienen que esperar y ahorrar dinero, antes incluso de que debieran pensar en un hogar decente. ¿Esperar? ¿Esperar para qué? ¿Hasta que sus hijos hayan crecido y se hayan ido de su lado? ¿Hasta que sean tan viejos y fracasados que…? ¿Sabe usted cuánto tiempo le lleva a un hombre trabajador ahorrar $5,000? Sólo recuerde esto, Señor Potter, que este populacho del que usted está hablando... ellos hacen la mayoría del trabajo y de los pagos y del vivir y del morir en esta comunidad. Bueno, ¿es demasiado pedir, el dejarles que tengan trabajo y que paguen y que vivan y que mueran en un par de cuartos decentes y un baño? Bueno, en cualquier caso, mi padre no lo creía así. Para él, a gente eran seres humanos. Pero para usted, un hombre viejo frustrado, retorcido, ellos son bueyes. Bueno en mi opinión, mi padre falleció como un hombre ¡mucho más rico de lo que usted nunca llegará a ser!” Gracias a todos ustedes que me hacen sentirme orgulloso. Esto es de lo que trata ATU. Felices Fiestas………y ¡Adelante! v Visite www.atu.org para obtener más información sobre las últimas novedades de ATU.


El plan de restructuración está teniendo éxito en las trincheras Las elecciones en los estados han quedado atrás, y aun así todavía escuchamos el ruido de las cabezas parlantes acerca de la oscuridad y muerte de los Demócratas y de la euforia de los Republicanos. Nosotros, el ATU, tenemos mucho por lo que estar agradecidos, razones para celebrar, y tenemos logros de los que estar orgullosos. El setenta por ciento de las iniciativas de voto que apoyan el transporte público tuvieron éxito. Nuestros miembros dieron su opinión en contra de los planes mal concebidos para el tranvía, que habrían quitado trabajo a los miembros y habrían defraudado al público. Esos planes fueron rechazados y derrotados.

La lucha por el transporte público se ganará en las trincheras Aunque estamos orgullosos de ser ATU y de nuestros logros recientes, nuestros esfuerzos han sido en parte campañas de emergencias por “fuego en el hogar” y de resurrección. Una cosa que las elecciones dejaron bien claro - la lucha sobre los proyectos del transporte público y los dólares que se necesitan para apoyarlos se ganarán o se perderán en las trincheras de nuestras comunidades. En el año de calendario de 2015, tenemos muchos contratos que llegan para su renovación, además de las negociaciones lentas y persistentes que aún están en progreso. Hemos aprendido de nuestros esfuerzos recientes. Necesitamos planificar, educar y luchar de forma más inteligente, y hacernos más proactivos.

Los miembros y el personal de ATU, mediante nuestras acciones de movilización y de alianzas, no sólo han salvado la pensión para los miembros de nuestro Local 788 en St. Louis, sino que también han sentado las bases para la ratificación de un contrato, después de muchos años de haber estado dándole vueltas y vueltas.

Los planes están bien en camino para expandir nuestra capacidad de proporcionar formación y ayuda también. ¿Cómo calcula usted los costos de un contrato? ¿Qué efecto tiene Obamacare en las estipulaciones del seguro? ¿Qué significa ser un experto en transporte en nuestra comunidad local? y ¿Queremos ir aún más allá de donde estamos con respecto a nuestros aliados para el transporte público?

Nuestros miembros del Local 732 en Atlanta ratificaron su contrato por aproximadamente un 88% del voto, consiguiendo un acuerdo que en cierto momento parecía poco probable.

Cada local debe comprometerse con una cultura de aprendizaje y de seguimiento hasta el final. Nuestros miembros no se merecen menos.

Nuestros miembros en el Local 615 de Saskatoon, SK, están de vuelta en el trabajo y luchando por un contrato y una pensión justa, después de un cierre patronal que no se quería.

Disfrutemos de estas fechas festivas mientras sabemos que el 2015 es el año en el que vamos a mover nuestra restructuración al siguiente nivel. v

Todo esto se produce justo después de una lucha, y al fin un esfuerzo exitoso, por el contrato por parte de los miembros de nuestro Local 1287 en Kansas City, MO.

Visite www.atu.org para obtener más información sobre las últimas novedades de ATU.

Experimentar el éxito de la restructuración Antes de nuestra Convención, me referí a nuestro plan de restructuración como si fuera “Tipo-Amazon”. Con esto quería decir que uno puede navegar en internet por las páginas del gigante (Amazon) y ver un producto, pero aun así tener la urgencia y la necesidad de tocar y ver el producto en persona. Ahora hemos visto, hemos sentido y hemos vivido a través de luchas, esfuerzos y éxitos del programa de restructuración aprobado en nuestra convención. Los miembros ven los resultados de primera mano y los beneficios son tangibles. El proceso ha revitalizado a las membresía. Lo que está haciendo ATU, se ha dicho que es no sólo una ganancia para ATU, sino también para toda la clase trabajadora. Nosotros en ATU estamos liderando el camino para toda la fuerza laboral.

Esta es la lucha para la que nos hemos formado Seguro que ha oído decir que cuando “las cosas se ponen duras, difíciles - los duros se ponen en marcha.” Bien, ATU y toda la Fuerza de Trabajo en los Estados Unidos de América pueden esperar que las cosas se pongan difíciles en los próximos dos años, como resultado de la derrota del Partido Demócrata por el GOP (Partido Republicano) en las elecciones de mediados de este año.

Una guerra total contra el presidente A pesar de todos los discursos conciliadores puramente formales que dieron después de las elecciones, usted puede IN TRANSIT

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esperar que el liderazgo Republicano en el Congreso intensifique al rojo vivo su animosidad, su antipatía contra el Presente Obama.

Esto no fue más cierto de lo que lo fue en Toronto, donde los residentes eligieron al candidato Conservador Progresista, John Tory, para suceder a Rob Ford como alcalde.

Va a comenzar con cualquier acción que el presidente tome sobre la inmigración - lo que la mayoría lo va usar como una excusa para declarar una guerra total contra la capacidad del presidente para gobernar.

La elección de Tory fue recibida de forma entusiasta por la Presidenta Liberal de Ontario Kathleen Wynne, de quien se puede esperar que trabaje con Tory para arreglar el sistema de transporte público de la provincia y de la Ciudad.

Mientras tanto, los Miembros del Congreso patrocinados por las corporaciones y aquellos que ahora controlan muchas legislaturas del estado, usarán su nuevo poder para machacar en las leyes laborales del estado y federales, y para quitar la financiación al transporte público. .

Lo que no está claro es, si estos antiguos oponentes planean o no extender y reconstruir el sistema con las asociaciones privadas/públicas, que normalmente requieren que se les permita ejecutar lo que quieren construir con fuerza de trabajo no sindicalizada.

Aunque esto no es lo que ninguno de nosotros quería, ésta es la lucha para la hemos sido entrenados. Y ningún sindicato está mejor preparado que ATU para esta lucha.

No importa lo que la presidenta y el alcalde digan, habrá intereses poderosos, tal y como los hay en los Estados Unidos, que verán esto como una oportunidad para incrementar sus beneficios mediante hacer retroceder los derechos de los Trabajadores en Canadá.

Así pues, miembros de USA, es la hora de que nos “pongamos en marcha”. Nosotros vamos a estar luchando tan duro como cualquiera por aquello en lo que creemos, y continuaremos formando a nuestros miembros a que hagan eso, también.

El transporte público necesita reconocerse en Canadá Nosotros tenemos las mismas amenazas en Canadá que tenemos en los Estados Unidos, pero hay algunas razones para estar optimistas sobre el futuro. La mayoría de los candidatos en todas las elecciones Canadienses de este otoño han reconocido la necesidad de más y mejor transporte público.

Así que tenemos nuestro trabajo para el que estamos hechos en ambos países. Pongámonos a trabajar v Nota: Felices Fiestas a usted y su familia durante esta época hermosa del año. Que la paz y la alegría estén con usted ahora, y a lo largo del 2015. Visite www.atu.org para obtener más información sobre las últimas novedades de ATU.

STAY CONNECTED For the latest ATU News and Action Alerts please check out the ATU’s social media network

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Facebook: facebook.com/ATUInternational

YouTube: youtube.com/user/stpatuorg

Twitter: twitter.com/ATUComm

Flickr: flickr.com/photos/atuinternational/

November/December 2014 | IN TRANSIT


In Memoriam

Death Benefits Awarded September 1, 2014 - October 31, 2014 1- MEMBERS AT LARGE RAYMOND H ETHERIDGE ALBERT P JOSSI ELMER KUSSRO GEORGE LEGORIUS MYRON WOODSO NICHOLLS JOSEPH ROGALA WILLIAM EARL STEPHENS WILMER TURNER

VIOLA PASCHAL EARL R RICKMON LUIS A RIVERA ERVIN G SCHULTZ ALBERT WILLS ROBERT L ZIRKLE

22- WORCESTER, MA FRANCIS HEBERT

265- SAN JOSE, CA ADRIENNE C CAMPBELL IRVIN J DAVIS THOMAS W HOGGS RICHARD R MARTIN

26- DETROIT, MI TOMMIE L BALDWIN GREGORY COTTON WILLIE JOHNS 85- PITTSBURGH, PA HERBERT L BLAND REED A DAVIDSON HERMAN H DE SHANTZ FRANK JOSEPH DI FIORE ANDREW J KRYZOSIAK DONALD H LYNCH ROBERT E RIHS SANDRA STRADER 89- NEW CASTLE, PA EDWARD EZZO 107- HAMILTON, ON GABRIELE GAGLIARDI 113- TORONTO, ON JOHN BORTNIKAS CLEVELAND CARACCIOLO THOMAS CHARLES CHILD LEONARDUS DEROOY VICTOR GEORGE DEVEAU ROGER J DICKIN CANIO GRIESI GEORGE HADDEN PETER P KILKENNY MICHAEL LEE NICHOLAS MARANGOS JOHN MARSHALL HAROLD W MC CLEAN ROBERT OLENCHUK GEORGE ALLEN SPICER HUGH W SUMMERFIELD JASON WILSON 174- FALL RIVER, MA TODD C PEREIRA 192- OAKLAND, CA CONNIE C BAILEY JOHN D BRUMFIELD TYREE JONES JR JOHN B PURCELL GROVER A STEPHENS HUEY P WILLIAMS 241- CHICAGO, IL ROBERT M BRACKEN LEON A DAVIS DAVID EATMON ROBERT J HAMILTON EDWARD M IGNACEK EDWARD L LOVE JOHN MURRAY BEZELL NICHOLSON

256- SACRAMENTO, CA RAYMOND GLENN

268- CLEVELAND, OH EMIL V DI CHIRO JEAN SURACE 272- YOUNGSTOWN, OH ROBERT RAPONE 276- STOCKTON, CA DEBORAH A PRIDE 279- OTTAWA, ON JEAN P ARCHAMBAULT RICHARD LATOUR DONALD J LOYER DONALD SCHWARTZ ANGELO VILELA 282- ROCHESTER, NY CARL F LEEGE 308- CHICAGO, IL WAULENE GEORGE LEONARD A JOYCE JOHN H STOKES JR MC ROY TIMMONS JOSEPH L WASHINGTON 425- HARTFORD, CT JAMES D TEMPLE 569- EDMONTON, AB MICHELLE M MCLEAN WALTER L TURLOCK 583- CALGARY, AB GUY J DESCHATELETS CARY A MC AMMOND DENNIS ALVIN NATE TERRANCE SMITH GILBERT H TERLSON 587- SEATTLE, WA ERIC S HANSEN JOHN W SEPOLEN 588- REGINA, SK ALEXANDER J PARLEY 589- BOSTON, MA JAMES A BARRY FREDERICK T CHASE JOHN J DOHERTY LOUIS J FORTE GEORGE H HARVEY JAMES F MAC LELLAN STANLEY V STEARNS RUBEN TOLEDO

BRANDON K VALENTINE RICHARD W WHELAN RICHARD L ZEWIEY 591- HULL, QC MARCEL CAYER PAUL-EMILE VILLENEUVE 615- SASKATOON, SK ROY RADFORD 618- PROVIDENCE, RI CORA E ARUDA ANTHONY CONTI 689- WASHINGTON, DC WILLIE ANTRUM JOSEPH J BROWN JAMES R CARTER ROBERT A CARTER LIN C CHANG BURNETT CLARK RUSSELL CRUM JOAN C JURADO ANTHONY MASON DAVID S MONK KERMIT L PULLUM GEORGE W REXRODE JAMES E ROMICK SR JAMES UTHEL SMITH LEE A TOWNS JOHN A TRAYNHAM MARVIN H VANN FRANCIS J WILSON JR 694- SAN ANTONIO, TX PAUL S FOGEL DENNIS J NARENDORF

825- ORADELL, NJ JAMES MC ALISTER 842- WILMINGTON, DE HARRIET L DEPUTY PHAEDRA THOMAS 880- CAMDEN, NJ MARTIN J EGAN JR MICHAEL PANICO GERALD SMITH 998- MILWAUKEE, WI GEORGE V DONALD ROBERT E DOWDEN THOMAS A EWERT VICTOR FISHER THOMAS MIKORSKI RAYMOND R STROINSKI 1001- DENVER, CO WILLIAM L COBB ROBERT H RALEIGH THOMAS A SUMMERS WILLIAM G VALENTINE KEITH G WEISSE 1005- MINNEAPOLIS & ST. PAUL, MN DENNIS M HILL CHARLES J LAKE JR RICHARD A MILLER RODNEY R PEDERSON DENNIS D ROSE JOHN L SENIOR 1037- NEW BEDFORD, MA LAWRENCE G MARSHALL

697- TOLEDO, OH MILTON S WITTENBERG

1039- LANSING, MI JASON BARAGAR

713- MEMPHIS, TN CLORENE J SMITH

1056- FLUSHING, NY WILLIAM BENJAMIN ARTHUR P BIAZZO LEROY S CAMPBELL ERROL L GARNETT ROBERT HEINSSEN MAURICE V HODGSON KENRICK D LEWIS SIDNEY R LUKE FRANK V PHILLIPS LASCOE R RICHARDSON EDWIN L STOLLER WILLIAM SUMAZA GERALD L WOLLASTON

725- BIRMINGHAM, AL RALPH M COLLINS CALVIN LEVERT JR JOHN R MASHBURN 732- ATLANTA, GA MICHAEL K CARNES VELMA OUTLAW MONTEEN C STEWART 757- PORTLAND, OR LLOYD FRED COUTURE WILLIAM F DIST GLADYS R GIVENS JAN W SENTEN 788- ST. LOUIS, MO JAMES BONO RICHARD A BUECKER CARL GORDON 819- NEWARK, NJ ANGELO DI PRENDA THEODORE J MONETTI 823- ELIZABETH, NJ WILLIAM R SCHUMACHER MICHELE STANCIL

1091- AUSTIN, TX AMOS UNDERWOOD 1177- NORFOLK, VA MAVIS HINTON 1179- NEW YORK, NY FRED FLYNN JOHN F MAJOR ROBERT F ZIMMERMAN 1181- NEW YORK, NY SHARYN GELLER CONNIE GUGLIARO YVAN KINSSEC PASQUALE LAURELLI

IN TRANSIT

PAUL A LAWRENCE LOUISE E MURDAUGH MARY A QUARTIERI EDWARD RICE PATRICIA WHITE DAVID YOUNG 1235- NASHVILLE, TN STEVEN C SCHULTHEIS 1300- BALTIMORE, MD WILLIAM E MOSLEY MC RAYMOND D NORRINGTON NELSON A ZOLLICOFFER 1309- SAN DIEGO, CA OSCAR H CHAVEZ WENDY TRUJILLO 1317- CLIFTON, NJ HELDER DA SILVA 1328- RALEIGH, NC JOSEPH A STRICKLAND 1342- BUFFALO, NY HENRY T BEAMAN EUGENE COSTON LOUIS G FERRO ROBERT J MOORE CAROL A WILDE 1374- CALGARY, AB RALPH T WALSH 1433- PHOENIX, AZ JOHN TUCKER 1464- TAMPA, FL APRIL L BOYETT 1505- WINNIPEG, MB GUSTAVE BOGASKI LOUIS DUTCHAK 1512- SPRINGFIELD, MA ARTHUR H ALDRICH 1603- BETHLEHEM, PA DENNIS W WIBLE 1700- CHICAGO, IL HAROLD J ASHMORE DONALD FISH HERBERT T HICKS MICHAEL ANDREW KOLEK 1729- PITTSBURGH, PA PHILIP MC KAY JOHN SALAK 1760- OTTAWA, ONT MICHEAL V COADY 1764- WASHINGTON, DC JOHNNY SMITH 1767- SAULT STE. MARIE, ON RALPH P FOGGIA

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