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Student journalist, connected

WINTER 2013 | ATPE.org

How high school journalism gives students the 21st-century skills they need (and we’re not just talking social media) PAGE 16

in this issue:

6 ways to improve parent/educator relationships Page 8

Who introduced you to ATPE? Page 22

S U P P O R T I N G YO U R F R E E D O M TO T E AC H


Earn rebates when you purchase gifts

through the ATPE ConnectionPlus® Mall Shop the ATPE ConnectionPlus® Mall—a portal that offers ATPE members special deals and limited-time promotions at more than 800 participating online retailers—before you make your purchases this holiday season, and you could earn up to 15 percent in cash rebates. \

The ATPE ConnectionPlus® Mall features leading merchant websites, including: Barnes and Noble • Guitar Center • Target • Sears • Macy’s • Wal-Mart • and many more!

Access the ATPE ConnectionPlus® Mall at www.atpe.org/Resources/ ServicesandDiscounts. To log in, you’ll need the Member ID found on your ATPE membership card.


W i n t e r

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V O L U M E

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special sections

The “connections” issue

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his edition of ATPE News is loosely themed the “connections” issue. Throughout the magazine, you’ll find stories related to the many connections educators form each day: with students, with parents and with colleagues. You’ll also learn how high school journalism classes are connecting students with 21st-century skills—and how your students are shunning Facebook in favor of lesser-known social networks. Finally, in our new department Extra Credit, you’ll find out how you can strengthen your connection with your professional association.

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Your Association Upcoming ATPE award deadlines · Spring 2014 Teacher Support Program webinars · Savings on holiday travel · ATPE Foundation Golf Tournament success · Foundation news and grant opportunities · Tenet focus: Leadership · ATPE-PAC Honor Roll · Kudos · Family Album

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Your protection benefits Save this claims procedure information  and summary of the professional liability insurance policy.

departments

features 16 Student journalist,

connected

E xtra, extra! Today’s student journalists are learning far more than reporting, writing and editing; they’re also learning how to ethically tell stories in the world of 24/7 communication. ATPE News visits DeSoto ATPE President Steve Baker’s journalism classroom to see 21st-century skills in action.

22 Each One, Reach One

photo by john kilpper

winter 2013

 t the 2013 ATPE Summit, new ATPE Executive Director A Gary G. Godsey challenged us to “Each One, Reach One”: Every ATPE member recruits another new member. In honor of this challenge, many ATPE members shared the stories of their introductions to the association.

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4 5 6 8 10 12 47

Director’s Message Calendar News Briefs In the Classroom Education Curation Tech Support Extra Credit

columns 13 

Legal Opinions  Why do educators cross the line with students?

14 Capitol Comment  Tweet all about it: ATPE’s advocacy communications

atpe.org | 3


president’s director’s message

The official publication of the Association of Texas Professional Educators

STATE OFFICERS Ginger Franks Richard Wiggins Cory Colby Julleen Bottoms Deann Lee

President, Pineywoods (7) Vice President, Boerne (20) Secretary, Willis (6) Treasurer, Corsicana (12) Past President, Paris (8)

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Roger Gutierrez Jackie Hannebaum Andy Erdelt Ron Fitzwater Bill Moye Judi Thomas Janie Leath Rita Long Kristi Daws Jackie Davis David Williams Jason Forbis Jayne Serna Tonja Gray Darlene Kelly Shane Whitten Lynette Ginn Teresa Griffin Socorro Lopez Tina Briones

Weslaco (1) Corpus Christi (2) Palacios (3) Alvin (4) Warren (5) Willis (6) Nacogdoches (7) Mount Vernon (8) Jacksboro (9) Garland (10) Keller (11) Midway (12) Leander (13) Abilene (14) Ballinger (15) Amarillo (16) Hale Center (17) Stanton (18) San Elizario (19) San Antonio (20)

ATPE STAFF

Gary G. Godsey Executive Director Alan Bookman Deputy Executive Director

ATPE NEWS STAFF

Gary G. Godsey Executive Editor Kate Johanns Communications Director/Editor John Kilpper Senior Graphic Designer Mandy Curtis Senior Copy Editor/Writer Erica Fos Graphic Designer Alexandria Johnson Copy Editor/Writer Jennifer Tuten Communications Specialist/ Advertising Coordinator

ATPE News contains legislative advertising contracted for by Gary G. Godsey, Executive Director, Association of Texas Professional Educators, 305 E. Huntland Dr., Ste. 300, Austin, TX 78752-3792, representing ATPE.

photo by john kilpper

Connections: That’s the theme of this issue of ATPE News, so it’s fitting that this is my first opportunity to connect with you through our magazine. Since joining the ATPE staff, I have had the pleasure of meeting many of our members at the ATPE Summit, new-teacher orientations and region meetings. In working with our volunteers and our staff, I have been consistently impressed by the ATPE work ethic, as well as the commitment to our mission: providing superior services to our members, the public educators of Texas. Throughout my travels, I’ve been outlining what I believe to be a logical and sequential approach to moving ATPE forward and taking our success to the next level. I’ve identified some cornerstone activities that will be critical to our success: • Adopting a comprehensive strategic plan that clearly defines goals, strategies, tactics, timelines, measures and responsibilities. The development of this plan was started by an amazing team of staff members and continued by your elected ATPE Board of Directors. The board will put the finishing touches on this plan in February. • Increasing volunteer engagement by providing clear objectives and enhanced opportunities, as well as better aligning state, region and local unit operations. • Better outreach to more populations within the Texas public education community—for example, the growing number of educators who enter the profession through alternative certification programs. Did you know that three of our five state officers were alternatively certified? • Crystal-clear messaging that articulates why ATPE is the best choice for public education professionals. • A laser focus on strategically growing our membership and turning around recent declines. • Embracing and growing our capacity to provide quality professional learning opportunities to educators. • Expanding the ATPE Foundation. Its potential hasn’t even been tapped. These are ambitious goals, and I am committed to this journey. I need you to be committed as well. You are more than a dues-paying member who relies on ATPE for liability insurance. You are first and foremost an expert on the needs of Texas public educators and schoolchildren. So, if you have an idea for helping ATPE achieve our goals, I want to hear it. Connect with me at ggodsey@atpe.org.

ATPE News (ISSN 0279-6260) is published quarterly in fall, winter, spring and summer. Subscription rates: for members of the association, $3.32 per year (included in membership dues); non-members, $10 per year. Extra copies $1.25 each. Published by the Association of Texas Professional Educators, 305 E. Huntland Drive, Suite 300, Austin, TX, 78752-3792. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, Texas and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ATPE News, 305 E. Huntland Dr., #300, Austin, TX, 78752-3792. Advertising rates may be obtained by sending a written request to the above address. Opinions expressed in this publication represent the attitude of the contributor whose name appears with the article and are not necessarily the official policy of ATPE. ATPE reserves the right to refuse advertising contrary to its purpose. Copyright 2013 in USA by the Association of Texas Professional Educators ISSN © ATPE 2013 0279-6260 USPS 578-050

Gary G. Godsey ATPE Executive Director

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atpe news


calendar

December 23–31 ATPE state office closed for winter break

January School board members can be a part of ATPE for only $10 with a public membership. atpe.org

School Board Recognition Month

1–3 ATPE state office closed for winter break 6 Region 9 meeting (Wichita Falls) 8 TCEA webinar: Administrators’ PLN (free for ATPE members) 16 ATPE/TAGT Differentiated Learning webinar 18 Region 1 meeting (McAllen) 20 Martin Luther King Jr. Day (state office closed) 25 Region 10 meeting (Garland); Region 18 meeting (Odessa); Region 20 meeting (San Antonio)

31 Last day to join ATPE via payroll deduction

Miss a webinar? Check out the archived version— you’ll still receive continuing professional education credit. atpe.org

February © HAND HOLDING CARD, WOODTYPE, BOY READING, TROPHY/ISTOCKPHOTO/THINKSTOCK; MARTINTOWN PUBLIC SCHOOL/LLCULLEN/WIKIMEDIACOMMONS

3 Beth Ann Rogers Literacy Initiative application deadline; Region 9 meeting (Wichita Falls)

5 Preparing for STAAR/EOCs webinar Apply for one of five $1,500 grants for Texas public school libraries.

12 TCEA webinar: Gaming in Education (free for ATPE members)

17 Educator of the Year nomination deadline

21–22 ATPE Board of Directors meeting

atpefoundation.org

March 1 Region 9 convention (TBD); Region 12 convention (Killeen); Region 17 meeting (Lubbock)

3 Entry deadline for the Ben Shilcutt Plus Club, Educator of the Year, Local Unit

Nominate a colleague for Educator of the Year by Feb. 17. atpe.org

of the Year, Campus Representative of the Year, and the Sam Houston Award for Political Involvement

3–7 Texas Public Schools Week

15  State officer nominations and proposed bylaws amendments and resolutions due in state office

22  Region 1 convention (McAllen)

Did you know? This tradition was first celebrated in 1950! www.celebratetps.org

winter 2013

call (800) 777-2873 to be put in touch with your region officers red dates indicate atpe deadlines

atpe.org | 5


news briefs

by Alexandria Johnson, copy editor/writer

Texas organization aims to end hunger in schools Seventy-three percent of teachers see hunger as a serious issue in their classrooms, according to the 2013 Hunger in Our Schools: Share Our Strength’s Teachers Report. On average, those teachers spend $37 per month purchasing food for hungry students. Yet, Baylor University’s Texas Hunger Initiative (THI) has found that nearly 1 million Texas students who qualify for free/reduced lunch do not participate in a school breakfast program—and in 2010 alone, more than $6 billion designated for hunger programs went unused. THI is working to connect the dots between research, policy and local outreach to bring food security to all Texans. The organization believes communities, churches and schools have a tremendous grassroots opportunity to alleviate hunger. For example, THI works with schools to increase breakfast participation by making school breakfast more accessible and less stigmatized. THI can help schools accomplish this by serving breakfast to every student during the first 10 minutes of class, offering grab-and-go breakfast, or equipping schools with vending machines that offer reimbursable meals. Source: bit.ly/reporthunger; www.baylor.edu/texashunger

Hallsville teachers flip the classroom Two Hallsville Intermediate School teachers—ATPE member Nona Meissner (right) and Rachel Hilchey (left)—made the news after they started flipping their fifth-grade math classrooms. This school year, the teachers are singing, dancing, rapping and teaching math concepts in five-minute YouTube videos. The videos not only allow them to flip their classrooms once a week, but also to assist absent students and keep parents in the know. Students are expected to watch the videos for homework—at home, during enrichment period or even on their smartphones while on the bus. Meissner says she tracks the clicks on each video to know how many students have watched it. Flipping the classroom doesn’t have to be a huge technological commitment—the teachers use a simple Flip Video camcorder to record their videos and only flip once per week. Source: www.news-journal.com

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You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backward. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.

—Steve Jobs


How students ask for help Middle-class elementary students are more likely than working-class elementary students to ask for—and feel entitled to—their teacher’s attention and assistance, according to the study, “‘I Need Help!’ Social Class and Children’s HelpSeeking in Elementary School.” Researcher Jessica McCrory Calarco observed 56 students at an elementary school as they progressed from third through fifth grade. She spent two years monitoring their requests for assistance, clarification, information and checking-of-work. Middle-class students were more proactive and insistent in asking for help— blurting out in class and approaching the teacher directly, even during tests. Working-class students were more timid and patient—waiting minutes at a time (or going unnoticed) with their hands raised and listening in the background as teachers helped other students. The study indicates that working-class students feel more comfortable asking questions when a teacher offers her unsolicited support. Calarco also noticed a lack of clear classroom rules and guidelines on when and how to ask for help. Often, an educators’ pause for “any questions” lasted only 2–3 seconds—not enough time for students to process.

HALLSVILLE PHOTO COURTESY OF NONA MEISSNER; ©PANCAKES, WATERCOLOR BACKGROUND, HAPPY CHILDREN, WRISTBANDS/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/THINKSTOCK

Source: http://bit.ly/classhelp

Putting a label on success Land O’ Lakes High School, an International Baccalaureate school in Land O’ Lakes, Fla., has a new incentive program that involves “tagging” its successful students, reports the Tampa Bay Times. Students who are scheduled to graduate on time with appropriate GPAs, attendance and discipline records receive a yellow, Livestrong-style wristband labeled “On track” or a blue wristband labeled “Highly on track.” The bracelets aren’t just a label of success—each level comes with perks such as discounted prom tickets, automatic access to the school’s media center and lunch line fast-passes. The school says the program works because the faculty consulted with student focus groups to find an incentive program that would be popular. Critics believe schools should focus efforts on intrinsically motivating students to graduate on time and succeed. Source: www.tampabay.com

winter 2013

Students design their learning As the backlash to excessive testing continues, some educators and administrators are placing learning in the hands of their students by adopting Google’s workplace policy of “20 percent time.” Although Google didn’t invent the concept, the company is famous for its policy that allows employees to spend 20 percent of their work time on a work-related project of their choosing. Gmail, Google’s email service, is said to have come out of an employee’s 20 percent time project. Educators who have adopted 20 percent time believe it’s effective because students can choose a topic that already interests them and then use inquiry-driven learning to increase their depth of knowledge. Although each teacher uses a different format, most educators structure the project requirements so that students: • Pitch their idea to the class. • Journal about their progress throughout the semester. • Request feedback from the class. • Present their final product. Some educators suggest that teachers grade students on effort rather than on their end product. To learn more, check out educator A.J. Juliani’s blog post at www.educationismylife.com/ designing-20-time-in-education.

atpe.org | 7


in the classroom

by Alexandria Johnson, copy editor/writer

Meet them where they’re at 6 ways to connect with your best allies: parents

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© Parents with teacher /liquidlibrary/thinkstock

P

arents play a powerful role in education. When they are engaged, they can shape schools and students faster than just about any new idea in education reform. A 2008 study, “Parental Effort, School Resources, and Student Achievement,” found that schools would have to spend $1,000 more per pupil to equal the positive effects that parents have on their children’s learning. Many organizations focus their parental engagement efforts at the preschool level so that children are ready for kindergarten. Such efforts help parents understand the magnitude of their role in their child’s development. But, as their children grow older, parents might need guidance in order to continue those initial efforts. As an educator, you can empower parents to effectively support their children. You might feel like you don’t have time to strengthen your relationships with parents, but what would you do to bring the effects of an extra $22,000 to your classroom? To start a dialogue about the best ways to reach out to and bond with parents, the ATPE Teacher Support Program hosted a parental involvement and outreach webinar in September with featured speakers Colleen Frerichs, a Round Rock ISD English and social studies teacher; Rick Tuten, a high school environmental science teacher; and ATPE Professional Learning Manager Kris Woodcock. This article includes some of their tips and advice for working with parents; to watch the full webinar, visit http://bit.ly/tspparent. Whether you are dealing with overly involved parents or under-involved parents, it’s important to try to understand

their perspective. Parents might be underinvolved because they feel unequipped or intimidated by parent-teacher conferences. “This is especially true for parents who had a less-than-successful school experience,” Frerichs says. “They might carry feelings of insecurity and stress when they come to school.” And, overly involved parents might need assurance: “When an effective parent-teacher communication method is established and parental trust gained,

children will often settle into daily routines that alleviate parental concerns,” Frerichs says. As author and educator Allen Mendler, Ph.D., said in a blog post on Edutopia: “An angry parent is better than an absent parent.” With proper communication and motivation, involved parents can become valuable volunteers and advocates for the school. And remember, it’s highly likely that, whatever their involvement style, parents are doing the best they can.

atpe news


Book review: Opening lines of communication A good relationship starts with good communication.  S  urvey parents to learn their contact preferences, and, if needed, request updated contact information every month.  T  o separate your work and personal life, one webinar participant suggests using Google Voice, an online phone service. With Google Voice, educators can call parents from home (when they are more likely to be available) while keeping their personal phone number private.  H  elp make technology as accessible to parents as it is to students. ATPE Professional Learning Manager Kris Woodcock says educators can do this by welcoming parents to use their classroom computers. If students will be using a particular app or website, Woodcock says educators can demonstrate how to use it in a flipped-classroom-style video that they then email to parents.  I nvolve parents in their child’s work in an appropriate way. More than 50 percent of parents struggle to help their children with their homework, according to a National Center for Family Literacy survey. The biggest reason is that parents don’t understand the material. Be explicit in explaining how parents can help students academically. If parents are unable to (or shouldn’t) directly assist with their child’s homework, show ways they can provide encouragement

and support. For example, share statistics with parents about the academic benefits of reading for pleasure. Or, Frerichs says: “Even if parents can’t solve the math problems, they can steer their child to helpful resources. There are many online tools that help students review concepts, practice problems and view tutorials.”

The power of positive connections Begin and end every communication on a positive note, but also reach out to parents with good news so that your communications don’t always address concerns.  Call parents with a brief account, but tell them that you will let their child elaborate on the details. This encourages a conversation between parent and child—strengthening the parent-child relationship—and saves you time while strengthening the parent-teacher relationship.  Another technique that’s becoming increasingly common is a home visit. Many educators visit the homes of impossible-to-reach parents, sending a message that they are serious about the child’s education. Other educators have started partnering with co-teachers or counselors to visit all of their students’ homes. A home visit can help parents feel more relaxed as they meet on their own turf; it can help an educator build trust and understanding; and it shows a willingness to make a connection. A

What are your best parental involvement tips? Send your strategies to comm@atpe.org for possible inclusion in a future ATPE publication.

winter 2013

The evolution of an ed reformer In The Death and Life of the Great American School System, author Diane Ravitch, once a resolute champion of public education reform through the implementation of standardized testing and essentially the privatization of our nation’s school system, shares “compelling evidence that prompted [her] to re-evaluate the policies [she] had endorsed over the previous decades.” Her “views changed as [she] saw how these ideas were working out in reality.” Ravitch writes: “This book is my opportunity to explain what I have learned about school reform and also to suggest … what is needed to move America in the right direction.” In this national bestseller, Ravitch offers her suggestions for reform, which are significantly anti-standardized testing and pro-public education. This book is the focus of the next ATPE Book Circle study, which begins Jan. 17. Participants will delve into and discuss Ravitch’s views about issues and reforms currently taking place in public schools, as well as her ideas for the future. All educators are welcome to take part in this free professional learning opportunity and earn nine hours of continuing professional education (CPE) credit upon program completion. Visit www.atpe. websitetoolbox.com to view a course syllabus and to sign up. —Kris Woodcock, ATPE professional learning manager

atpe.org | 9


education curation

by Mandy Curtis, senior copy editor/writer

Celebrate the seasons and subjects http://bit.ly/fallphysed

Board by Shelley Grimes; Photo from PE Central

Highlight how-tos for tests or assignments http://bit.ly/testinstructions

Board by Melissa Burnham

SPICING UP THE HALLWAYS

Keep it simple, with a twist http://bit.ly/attitudeart

Board by Katie Callis and Julie Staehling

Bulletin boards add life to beige hallways and cinderblock walls

Make history relevant http://bit.ly/mlkjrinstagram

Board by Lindsey Fuller

Welcome your students to your class

Remind students to be kind, always

http://bit.ly/ poppinginto

Board by Hayley Mullins

http://bit.ly/socialthink

Board by Karen Weideman

FIND US ON PINTEREST

10 | atpe.org

For more great bulletin board ideas, check out our Pinterest board at www.pinterest.com/ atpe/bulletin-board-ideas. Do you have a great bulletin board in your classroom or on your campus? Send a photo to comm@atpe.org, and we’ll include it on our Pinterest board.

atpe news


ADVERTISEMENT


tech support

by Mandy Curtis, senior copy editor/writer

Beyond Facebook and Twitter How are your students connecting?

According to Teens, Social Media, and Privacy, a study conducted in early 2013 by the Pew Research Center (http://bit.ly/ PEWsocialmedia), the top social networks among teens are: • YouTube • Tumblr • Google+ • Pinterest

• Facebook • Twitter • Instagram • MySpace

You’re likely familiar with most of these; you might even have a Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest account for personal use. But even though these are the top networks, they’re not the only ones your students are using. As more adults become users of these top networks, teens are seeking out new avenues of connecting. The following is by no means a comprehensive list of the social media services available to and being used by kids, but it is a good place to start learning about how your students are connecting online. Please note: As with any website, use of any of these services can have potential drawbacks and privacy concerns. Heed all of the usual warnings about using such tools and resources appropriately.

Meet the networks Instagram (instagram.com)—Instagram, a photo sharing and editing application, was created initially for iPhones. Now, the app is available through both the App

TECH TERM

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GIF:

Store and Google Play and has an online site that’s essentially just an in-browser version of the app. Instagram users can edit and post both photos and videos to share with their followers. The app also connects directly to a variety of other services, such as Facebook and Twitter, enabling users to post photos to multiple sites at once. Tumblr (tumblr.com)—Tumblr is a media-sharing site that takes the short-form idea of Twitter and mixes it with blogging. Tumblr posts are generally short and media-filled with little or no text. The main idea is to craft a post that can then be “reblogged” by other users. Animated GIFs (see Tech Term below) are extremely popular among the Tumblr crowd. Users connect with one another by “following” each other’s blogs and sending messages via the site’s messaging service or adding comments to posts. When users log in, they are taken to a “dashboard” where the most recent posts from the users they follow are housed (similar to Facebook’s news feed). Google+ (plus.google.com)—Google+ is Google’s version of Facebook. Users can create profiles and share links, photos and videos with other users. You connect with other users by adding them to various user-defined “circles.” Vine (vine.co)—Think Instagram, but purely for videos. Vine users create and post 6-second videos—“vines”—to share with their followers or through connected social networks such as Twitter and

Facebook. Users can connect with one another by “following,” which means that a person’s vines will show up in your home feed, or by commenting on someone’s posted vine. Reddit (reddit.com)—Reddit is a massive online news and entertainment forum organized into subreddits (or categories) that cover a myriad of topics. Users can post text, links or images to the site; the posts can then be “voted” on by other users. Connections are made on Reddit through forums; users converse on a variety of topics by commenting in specific subreddits or sending each other private messages. Kik (kik.com)—Kik is a smartphone application that acts much like the native messaging systems that come with most smartphones, but it has better capabilities for sharing videos and images. Kik users choose specific usernames and can then “kik” someone else, provided they know the other person’s username. Snapchat (snapchat.com)—The Snapchat app enables the sharing of photos, videos and messages that only last a matter of

continued on page 44

Popularly refers to animated images shared on the Web. Officially, GIF stands for Graphics Interchange Format, which is a form of image file that has been compressed to reduce the amount of time it takes to load on the Internet.

atpe news

© SMART PHONE WITH SOCIAL MEDIA ICONS/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

It’s pretty clear that social media and online networking have become an integral part of education today—but even more, they’re an integral part of your students’ lives.


by Paul Tapp, ATPE Member Legal Services managing attorney

legal opinions

The cautionary tale of Ms. B and Angelo Educators must remain ever-vigilant about where their actions might lead

All humans are capable of making very bad decisions in the heat of emotion, and educators are no different.

Sandra looked up from her grading and saw Angelo in her classroom doorway. He was clearly upset. She was about to pack up for the day, but Angelo had been going through a rough patch at home this year, and Sandra had been talking him through his personal problems, trying to keep him on track—at least at school. Angelo was 16—a tough age for any kid, even ones who weren’t dealing with family issues like Angelo’s—but he was bright and precocious, and he was responding to her help. She liked his street-smart attitude; she was always amazed at how old he seemed for his age; and she liked that helping him made her feel good. That’s why she had gotten into teaching, after all; it was exciting to make a difference in a student’s life. Sandra smiled, and Angelo sauntered in. “Hi Ms. B; can I talk to you about something?” “Sure Angelo, pull up a seat.” As expected, another family crisis. Like the times before, Sandra knew that, despite her lack of experience in counseling, Angelo was listening to what she had to say and was taking her seriously. She could feel a connection. They had talked for two hours when Sandra realized that it was late and that she was hungry. She knew Angelo had to be, too, but their conversation was going so well that she hated to end it abruptly. Then she had an idea. “Angelo, how about I treat us to dinner and we can talk some more?” Angelo’s eyes lit up. “Sure, Ms. B!” As she drove home after dropping Angelo off, Sandra thought back on their conversation. She was excited. She had really gotten through to him that there were people, like her, who cared about him and wanted him to be successful. He had seemed so much happier. She had been surprised when he leaned over and hugged her before hopping out of the car, but she had happily hugged him back. The next morning, Sandra woke up happy about the idea of going to school—and looking forward to seeing Angelo.

Behind the headlines Hardly a month goes by without another news story detailing the arrest or conviction of a teacher for engaging in a romantic/sexual relationship with a minor student. When you get behind the headlines that scream of years behind bars, you usually do not find an educator-predator who consciously set out to seduce an unwitting student. Although that does occur, the story usually describes a teacher who slid into the illegal relationship slowly, and, based on the educators we talk to, the first chapter of the story often begins much like the fictional account of Sandra B. and Angelo—a teacher initially becomes personally involved with a student for all the right reasons. Unfortunately, the ATPE Member Legal Services Department regularly receives desperate calls from educators who have found themselves under investigation and even under arrest for allegedly engaging in romantic/sexual relationships with their students. Although many allegations prove to be unfounded, sadly this is not true for all. We have done our best to publicize the dangers of engaging in a romantic/sexual relationship with a student. The media coverage has done the same. Quite honestly, it is impossible for an educator not to know that this kind of relationship will lead to both professional and personal devastation. This has caused us to ask what kind of mechanism could cause intelligent, sophisticated adults to do something that they know has such devastating consequences. One answer, we think, is in the story behind the news stories, the story of Sandra B. and Angelo. Educators do not enter their profession for the money and prestige. They enter it because they want to help kids. Unfortunately, students bring their private lives to school, and educators are forced to deal with those private lives. Sometimes, even well-meaning teachers can become personally involved with their students, and sometimes that personal involvement crosses the line into romantic and sexual involvement. Finally and critically: The educator might have already become so emotionally involved with a student that continued on page 44

winter 2013

atpe.org | 13


capitol comment

by Kate Johanns, ATPE Communications director

Put down your smartphone and read this Then retweet it, share it and shout it from the rooftops

I’ve been a part of the ATPE team since 2003. Although our goals haven’t changed in 10 years—being your go-to source for Texas education news and your means of communicating with lawmakers —our methods have.

“Where’s Brock?” is what you’re probably thinking right now. Brock and the rest of the lobbyists—in between meetings with policymakers and candidates—are traveling the state to get you and your fellow members fired up to “Teach the Vote” in the March 2014 primaries. So I offered to step in and write a Capitol Comment about one of the lesserknown components of ATPE’s advocacy efforts: our communications with you. I always tell Brock that we make a good team: He and the lobbyists are in the halls of the Capitol, delivering your message, day in and day out. The in-house governmental relations and communications staffs are back at the office, explaining what’s happening with education policy and alerting you when your action is needed. As much as I enjoy hearing about the lobbyists’ adventures and negotiations with lawmakers, I know that career path is not for me. But taking their raw content and packaging it in various media to reach ATPE’s constituents— well, that gets me out of bed in the morning when the alarm goes off. I’ve been a part of the ATPE team since 2003. Although our goals haven’t changed in 10 years— being your go-to source for Texas education news and your means of communicating with lawmakers—our methods have. So has our audience. And that’s made our job a) more exciting; b) more complicated; and c) more real-time.

Not quite smoke signals, but … Let’s travel back in time to the long-ago world of 2003, when few of us had even heard of the iPod—and the iPhone was still a glimmer in Steve Jobs’ eye. ATPE sent its members a paper legislative newsletter (Straight Talk), recorded a phone update once a week (and as needed during legislative sessions), and sent Legislative Alert Network (LAN) updates and alerts to a small but growing email list. That was it. When we discontinued Straight Talk in fall 2004 and introduced the e-newsletter Essentials, it was a huge deal. We kept on keeping on, and in the meantime, the world sped up. Mark Zuckerberg invented

Facebook. Twitter was introduced. And many of us put down our newspapers and picked up our smartphones. Suddenly the number of opportunities we had to engage ATPE members exploded. Not only could we reach people via paper and email, but also we could publish Facebook statuses, tweets and blog posts. Plus—thanks to the magic of Google maps—we could create a website on which you can enter your home address and receive candidate comparisons specific to your precinct. (Have you visited TeachtheVote.org?)

Hindsight is 20/20 The 83rd legislative session during spring 2013 was our first session using TeachtheVote.org as our primary means of communicating advocacy information to members. It was bumpy. Two things collided: shifting our focus to TeachtheVote.org and the overhaul of the Teacher Retirement System. In hindsight, we fumbled a bit when we switched to Teach the Vote, and we didn’t do a good job of explaining our plans to members and especially ATPE leaders. Instead of sending LAN updates, we published blog posts, which we shared on Facebook and Twitter. We sent LAN alerts when your action was needed—and we sent them to every ATPE member. Lobbying strategy complicated this switch. The ATPE lobby team made a conscious decision not to ask for your phone calls and emails as often as usual. ATPE lobbyists were involved in extremely fragile negotiations to preserve the defined benefit structure of TRS. We send a powerful message anytime we rally the ATPE troops and ask more than 100,000 educators to call the Capitol. Such a strong message would have crushed the negotiations, which were ultimately successful. But suddenly members weren’t receiving regular emailed updates, and we weren’t asking for their action. Even though we were producing more content than ever before (and even live-tweeting key debates), our message wasn’t getting through. We’ve learned our lesson. Moving forward, here is the ATPE advocacy continued on page 44

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Our children don’t care about political endorsements, media bias or mudslinging. But, for them, our choices at the polls become realities in the classroom. TeachtheVote.org, ATPE’s nonpartisan advocacy website, makes it easy for Texas voters, educators and parents to: H Read the education news that matters most. H Research the education platforms of political candidates and elected officials. H Decide which candidates will make public education a top priority. H Receive email updates; sign up at www.TeachtheVote.org/news.

No endorsements, no media bias—just education. TeachtheVote.org Contains Pol. Ad. Paid For By the Association of Texas Professional Educators.


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By Alexandria Johnson | Photos by John Kilpper

Student journalist, connected How high school journalism gives students the 21st-century skills they need (and we’re not just talking social media) “Powderpuff football is made for YouTube,” says DeSoto High School journalism teacher Steve Baker.

DeSoto High School journalism teacher Steve Baker’s newspaper class is discussing editorial content and assignments for homecoming week activities. Brandy Reeves, a senior and editor-in-chief of the newspaper, leads the discussion alongside Baker. Reeves points out that Vine, one of the newest social media sites, designed for posts of 6-second videos, might be better suited for the powderpuff game, so viewers could see just the funny highlights. Baker and Reeves assign social media sites to students—Twitter, Facebook and Instagram—as though they were newspaper beats, like sports, culture and student life. Baker tells students it’s essential to keep Facebook and Twitter updated with the news of the homecoming game because both DeSoto and its opponent are undefeated. Reeves urges the photographers, who often edit photos at school until midnight after football games, to take notepads so they can prepare their own captions and headlines while at the game. Today’s student journalists are connected to the real world. Their work isn’t just a grade: Accountability and responsibility are musts as they manage hard deadlines and practice one of the most difficult skills required in workplaces—teamwork. Students are reaping the benefits of project-based learning as they write and design for an audience, experiment with new technologies and, these days, responsibly use social media as a

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form of communication. Even lessons in ethics are learned in a hands-on setting, while students still have the opportunity to receive guidance from their teachers. Students are gaining the skills to succeed in the 21st century—not necessarily even as journalists—but as informed citizens. They are learning how ethical standards should guide the journalism industry and how to analyze and think critically about news and information. “It’s important to the future of our communities and to the future of democracy that we have citizens who are news literate and that we have well-trained journalists,” says Le Anne Wiseman, director of the American Society of News Editors’ Youth Journalism Initiative. “The beauty of scholastic journalism programs is that they do both.” The ASNE Youth Journalism Initiative started in 2000 to teach all students why news matters and to help them develop 21st-century skills. Its website, www. schooljournalism.org, provides students and educators with resources and training in journalism and nonfiction writing, news and media literacy, and civic literacy and engagement. “Journalism is an interdisciplinary opportunity,” Wiseman says. “And, the skills can also transfer to virtually any profession. Every profession needs someone who can research, write well and edit. In so many of today’s professions, photography, multimedia, video and design skills are really important.”

Multidimensional learning Reeves, who wants to be a graphic artist, was introduced to the journalism department two years ago when she was asked to design the cover of the yearbook. Before that, Reeves had no idea graphic design was a viable career option. “Mr. Baker told me there’s graphic design in yearbook and newspaper,” she

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Steve Baker and Brandy Reeves lead the newspaper class in planning homecoming week coverage. As the newspaper editor-in-chief, Reeves determines each week’s content, assigns stories and collaborates with the photo editor. says. “Writing is one of my passions, and graphic design is one of my passions. When you put that together in one facility, it elates me.” Anyone can look to social media, blogs and the 24/7 online news cycle and realize that the journalism industry is and will continue changing. We don’t know exactly where this faster-paced, ever-moreconnected society will take it, but Reeves is exactly the type of journalist it needs. Reeves can think—or act—in a writer’s, photographer’s and designer’s shoes. She already has the capability to juggle the Web, social media and print, a requirement of today’s journalism careers. “In the past, someone might have been just a copy editor, a writer or a photographer, but today, employers want journalists to use all of those skills and social media skills as well,” Wiseman says. “Most job descriptions expect the journalist to be multidimensional.”

Interactive web articles, such as the New York Times’ Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek, which had more than 3.5 million page views (www.nytimes.com/ projects/2012/snow-fall), give a glimpse of journalism 2.0. The piece weaves together text, audio elements, animated simulations, photos and videos. Interactive projects require extensive collaboration and an understanding of colleagues’ goals and limitations. Reeves’ favorite part of working on the newspaper is interacting with her staff. “I love helping them with their stories. I love having that connection with them,” she says. Perhaps in college, Reeves will learn how to code, so that she can apply her graphic design skills to websites and digital books. She might take statistics courses so that she can become a data journalist, telling stories graphically with numbers. If she changes paths to become a reporter and writer, she will be able to produce her

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own visuals, GIFs, charts and graphics. Wiseman believes that as educators take into account the future of journalism, they should encourage their students to expand their skill sets. “Be sure to encourage the student who’s really skilled at writing to learn photography and videography,” Wiseman says. “And encourage students to learn Web skills as well, even coding.”

Connected for the future Baker says that his journalism curriculum is possible because of the school’s BYOD (bring your own device) policy. “Students are computer- and social media-savvy, but teachers are not,” Baker says. “Teachers need to get social media involved in the classroom.” Today’s student journalists are ready to adapt, to test new technology and to continually acquire new skills in order to take on jobs not yet invented. Most of Baker’s lessons on social media are about responsible use. He also reiterates the permanence of social media and how inappropriate social media use can literally ruin a person’s life. But still, Baker gives his students the freedom to try new things. “It’s just like Photoshop,” Baker says. “I don’t teach Photoshop anymore. I start them off, and three days later they’re beyond what I was trying to teach them. They adapt to it.” Reeves says Baker was very open to the students’ suggestion that the newspaper launch a Twitter page: “If we give him a good reason to do it, he will agree to it.” Journalism teachers can encourage students to experiment with new tools and apps—a list is available on www.schooljournalism.org—so that they learn the best ways to incorporate technology as a journalist, Wiseman says. “Today’s journalists have to be able to determine the best way to tell a story,” Wiseman says. Wiseman recommends teachers ask

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their students questions such as: “How would this story be told differently online? How could we use multimedia? Would an infographic help us tell this story?” But even with social media’s bells and whistles, journalism still boils down to storytelling. “Basic journalism is the same; great reporting never changes,” Baker says. “Just the technology has changed. And, it’s faster paced.” Technology is a tool. For example, when teaching news gathering, Wiseman says, “You can teach students how to use Twitter and Facebook to crowdsource news leads.” Or, when interviewing, teach students to capture photos and videos with a smartphone.

Writing and the digital age “There are a lot of great ways teachers can integrate technology into the curriculum, but be mindful that a good story

is still a good story, a fact is still a fact, and good news gathering and good interviewing are still good news gathering and good interviewing,” Wiseman says. Unfortunately, Baker says he finds himself beginning each school year covering basic lessons in grammar and writing. He apologizes to his students on the first day of class, telling them: “It’s not fair. We failed you. When you get to college, you’ll have to take a remedial English course. But if you stick with me, I will help prepare you.” As for the question, “Is social media destroying students’ writing skills?” Baker doesn’t think so. He’s found that technology helps students explore different areas of writing. And, thanks to technology, students are getting more writing practice. DeSoto High School’s newspaper runs once a month, but the students treat the online version more like a daily newspaper. To maintain it, Baker says students must become adept in producing stories

Baker’s newspaper students take an open-iPad current events quiz . A new superintendent opened DeSoto High School to BYOD two years ago.

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at a faster pace; hence, they must write more. The key to preventing social media lingo from infiltrating a student’s writing is to make sure that students understand how to code-switch from “text speak” to a more formal style when appropriate. “Students need to know there’s a place for different types of communication,” Wiseman says. “How we communicate via social media is different than how we communicate in print, in an email or in a press release.”

Connected to the ideals Today’s journalists also need a strong foundation in character and ethics. “If they have character, integrity and honesty, they’re going be good journalists,” Baker says. Almost anyone can run a blog or be a

“citizen journalist” today, Wiseman says: “But a trained journalist aspires to the highest standards of excellence.” With entertainment shows blurring the line between news and comedy, and screaming pundits on major news networks opting for drama rather than just the facts, it’s more important than ever that students have the ability to discern between fact, opinion, assertion and “infotainment.” “Journalism is about the general welfare of people,” Wiseman says. “True journalists don’t exploit the ability to provide news.” Trained journalists are expected to abide by a code of ethics: check facts, remain impartial and fair, avoid conflicts of interest, respect the rights of those involved in the news, observe common standards of decency and be accountable.

High school journalism courses help students intrinsically grasp these principles as they go about their own work, but they also teach students to think critically and analyze the credibility of news reports. This empowers them to hold other news organizations to these standards as well. With roots in journalistic principles, student journalists won’t let shiny new technology or society’s entertainment culture get in the way of the true purpose of journalism. “There will always be a place for journalists in our society, as long as we’re a society that wants to be informed,” Wiseman says. “And I believe we are, because our future of being a democracy depends on having good information.” In the hands of Baker’s students, the future of democracy is looking bright. A

Meet the teacher Steve Baker, DeSoto ATPE When asked what it’s like to have Mr. Baker, 71, teach her about social media, DeSoto High School senior Brandy Reeves says: “He’s so vintage; he’s so retro. It’s really funny, but he has a very good understanding, and I’m surprised.” Baker initially got into writing because it was his only form of communication: He was born legally deaf. He began his career as an English teacher, but he’s also managed a newspaper, a public relations agency and a photography studio. Now, he’s back in the classroom, teaching newspaper, journalism, photojournalism, yearbook and literary magazine classes. “After my son died, I decided I really needed to be a teacher,” Baker says. “I’m having fun!” Baker tries to impact his students simply by making them feel wanted and by telling them they can excel. This comes from a place of genuine understanding: In high school, he was in the principal’s office on a daily basis, and his counselor even told him not to go to college.

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“I had three teachers who believed in me,” he says. “That’s why I want to encourage these kids. I’ve been there. I know what it’s like.” Baker strongly believes that schools cannot cut their fine art budgets because such classes are those that motivate students to go to school each day. Also the president of DeSoto ATPE, Baker uses his ATPE recruiting skills to actively recruit students to the journalism department. “I’m building this up, because one of these days, I’m going to walk out. I want a good journalism department for someone to walk into. I’m building it for the future.”

atpe news


Plug in and power up through ATPE leadership training, the House of Dele-

LEVEL

THE NEXT

JULY 9–11 • AUSTIN CONVENTION CENTER

the 2014 atpe summit

gates and professional learning

Plug in and power up through ATPE leadership training, the House of Delegates and professional learning.


Each One, During the 2013 ATPE Summit, Executive Director Gary G. Godsey issued a challenge to each and every ATPE member: Each One, Reach One. Think back to the person who first asked you to join ATPE and the difference ATPE membership has made in your career. You can have that same impact by simply asking someone to join ATPE. Each One, Reach One: Every ATPE member recruits at least one new member. To kick off the 2013-14 membership year, we asked all ATPE members to share their own Each One, Reach One stories—the stories of their introduction to ATPE membership. We’ve published a selection of these stories here, and you can read more on the Each One, Reach One blog at http://each1reach1atpe.blogspot.com. (We’re still collecting stories, too; you’ll find a submission form on the blog.)

Charlie Anderson | Hutto ISD

Melissa Fortenberry | Community ISD

“I first learned about ATPE while attending the mandatory preparatory meetings at Texas State University for student teaching. There was an entire day dedicated to professional organizations that are beneficial to teachers. Representatives from various groups spoke about their organization, including ATPE. As a student teacher, we were required to have liability coverage, which ATPE offered. The university and organizations were partnered to shuffle pre-service teachers into the organizations that offered liability insurance, but that wasn’t the only benefit to joining ATPE. During my student teaching, I took advantage of my free membership and took part in various webinars to gain some continuing professional development credits. I was thinking ahead, and I knew this would be an important component when it came time to renew my teaching certificate(s). I don't think I took full advantage of my membership during that time, but I learned about the organization, gained insight, experience and resources, and renewed my membership after that year to more fully explore the benefits available to me to continue my educational journey and growth as a teacher.”

“I was introduced to ATPE through Region 10 as a professional going through the teacher preparation and certification program. I joined although I was not in the classroom, but I discovered a lot of valuable information I would use. ATPE’s partnership with TCEA last year provided another facet of information on integrating technology in the classroom through the free Lunch and Learn webinars. I am going into my first year of teaching, and I am already registered for the Teacher Support Program, which I know will enhance my experience and success.”

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Sherri Ledford | Schertz-CiboloUniversal City ISD “I was new to the area and accepted a paraprofessional job at one of our high schools. Actually, it was the only high school at the time. We have grown so much we now have two in our district! MaryAnn Litt, a paraprofessional I worked with at the time, gave me an application packet and asked me to look it over. She told me that after I read what ATPE had to offer, she was pretty sure I wouldn’t want to look elsewhere. She was correct! I am now a teacher, but I continue to be an ATPE member with pride.”

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Reach One Roger Gutierrez | Weslaco ISD “I got my start in ATPE 17 years ago during my second year of teaching. I was approached by then-Weslaco ATPE President Aggie Aguirre about the benefits of being a part of a professional organization. She stressed the liability insurance and the member discounts and did so with a real passion for ATPE. To this day, I still believe that taking the time to have a heartfelt discussion with potential members is the best recruiting tool of all. Thank you, Aggie!”

Michael O’Gea | Alvin ISD “In 2009, I finally followed my calling into education. I started as a paraprofessional in our district. My wife, Julie—known to many around Alvin ISD as the ‘ATPE Lady,’ discussed with me the importance of being ‘protected’ by ATPE. She explained to me that it was better to ‘have protection and not need it than to need protection and not have it.’ Ahhh, the logic of our spouses. It is because of that kind of one-on-one conversation that I have been a member of ATPE and will continue to share the philosophy of ‘Each One, Reach One’ with others to get them to join ATPE.”

Amanda Peeler | Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD “I joined ATPE because in college one of my projects was to research the different professional educator associations and report on which one was better and why. I joined then ‘just because I should’ and because it was free. I didn’t learn until coming to CFBISD how many benefits there are to being involved in this great organization and all of the reasons there are to be an active member!”

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TAKE THE CHALLENGE Are you ready to take ATPE Executive Director Gary G. Godsey’s Each One, Reach One challenge? Here are five ideas to get you started: 1 Like ATPE on Facebook, and share posts from our page. 2 Post a link to the ATPE Virtual Brochure (http://bit.ly/ATPE) on your Facebook page. 3 When you finish reading an issue of ATPE News, pass it on to a colleague. Each issue contains a membership application! 4 Ask your local unit president how you can help your local unit. Volunteer tasks are often as simple as placing fliers in faculty boxes. 5 Ask the person in the classroom next to you or the bus driver you see every day which professional association he or she belongs to. If your colleague is not yet a member of ATPE, say, “I choose ATPE, and I think you should, too.” Then explain why.

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Gayle Galloway Sampley | Humble ISD

Jayne Serna | Leander ISD

“My mother, Frances Duff Galloway, was the one who insisted I join ATPE when I started teaching more than 20 years ago. Mom was a homemaking education teacher who had taught in Santa Rosa ISD alongside ATPE’s first president, Alafair Hammett. When that district made unfair choices in the 1980s about how the first career ladder money would be distributed, ATPE’s attorney Jay Brim successfully represented Mom and the vocational agriculture teacher, getting them the share they deserved of that merit pay. Being a member of ATPE is a family tradition. My sister Mary Kay Erben is an elementary GT teacher in Comal ISD, my sister Carol Galloway Hagler is an elementary instructional coach in Dallas ISD, and my sister Susan Galloway Bitts is an elementary school nurse in Dallas ISD. My daughter Stephanye Sampley was a kindergarten teacher in Goose Creek ISD, and until just recently, my niece Laura Erben Pfister was a middle school math teacher for Alvin ISD. We are all proud members of ATPE. Mother Teresa said: ‘Love begins by taking care of the closest ones—the ones at home.’ My mom did that by teaching us about the protection ATPE provides. Mother knows best!”

“Our student teaching coordinator suggested that we all join ATPE, and I did so, mostly as an afterthought. My first full-time teaching position (not in my current district) was quite challenging, to say the least, and without the guidance of ATPE’s legal services, I would have been in quite a spot. Since then, I would never educate without ATPE!”

Julie Lewis | Irving ISD "I joined ATPE 16 years ago as a new teacher. Little did I know how much safer I would feel knowing I had answers to my questions any time I needed them. After attending the summit for the first time this year, I became excited all over again about the benefits of belonging to a great professional organization. My goal as campus representative is to make every teacher feel special, supported and appreciated during the first few weeks of school, letting them know ATPE provides that [support] year-round for its members!"

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Stephanie Stoebe | Round Rock ISD "As an Army wife, I have had the experience of teaching in five different states. I looked at each new teaching position as an opportunity to learn more about education. It wasn't until we retired here in Texas that I realized I wanted to grow even more as a teacher. “ATPE has not only helped me meet inspirational leaders and provided me with some of the best professional development in my career, but also it has helped me fulfill other roles as an educator. “Thanks to ATPE, I have spoken to senators and representatives in Austin, I have taught my peers about legislative issues, and I have even reached out to help new teachers. “With ATPE, I can stay focused on my freedom to teach."

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Ronald Sursa | Killeen ISD “I had the opportunity to be introduced to the ATPE Summit as a college student with Texas A&M–Central Texas in 2011. Tonya Miller and I were welcomed with warm, open arms by Region 12 and the Killeen ISD ATPE chapter. We enjoyed the professional development classes, the college breakout session, and finally receiving the tools to go back and show others how ATPE is helpful. I was able to use the tools I was given to return in 2012 and win the University Local Unit of the Year. I have been hooked since day one. ATPE is one big family and supports those who educate our Texas youth.”

Eileen Walcik | Killeen ISD “I started out as a paraprofessional at my campus. A close friend, Syd Armistead, had been elected as the local president of Killeen ATPE, and he asked me to join. I had been a member of another organization, but saw the advantages of ATPE. As I tell new teachers, I started as a paraprofessional, then became a teacher. I also have my master’s in educational administration. With ATPE, I have an organization that grows with me, and I don't have to change organizations as I change positions. ATPE is there for all of us.”

Vivian Warren | Mt. Pleasant ISD “I was one of those teachers who didn’t feel like I needed a ‘union.’ I work so hard at doing everything right, and I didn’t feel I was a troublemaker. I had taught for 15 years

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when Gene Baxter talked to me about how ATPE is not a union and showed me all of the benefits available, as well as the training available. Because training has always been one of my biggest things, I was impressed and joined. I am so glad I did. It has been so worth it. Great support, advocacy, benefits and training.”

Roseann Webb | Paint Rock ISD “I was getting ready to start my education classes in college. My mom never asked me to join ATPE ... she told me I had to join. I knew what ATPE was and what they did for teachers because both of my parents were educators and members of ATPE. My mom had always talked about ATPE. She told me that I had to join ATPE because they had the best coverage, they would always take care of their members, and the members got to vote on the issues. She told me that you never know what will happen in the classroom and you always have to be prepared. So I signed up as a college student. I have been an ATPE member since then, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Marisela Yanez | Rio Hondo ISD “The first time I was asked to join ATPE it was by a teacher in the district. I was hired to be a paraprofessional, and they asked me if I had heard about the ATPE organization. They were very nice and took the time to explain all the benefits that were available and also about the discounts. The best part is the peace of mind, knowing you have someone taking care of us while we do what we love best: teaching.”A

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your association

atpe news

Upcoming ATPE award deadlines While you’re enjoying your hard-earned time off this holiday season, consider nominating a colleague for the ATPE Educator of the Year Awards or applying for one of ATPE’s other award programs.

Feb. 17 is the nomination deadline for the ATPE Educator of the Year Awards, which are presented in five categories: Administrator, Associate, Elementary Teacher, Secondary Teacher and Special Services Educator. Recipients will each receive $5,000. Selfnominations are not accepted. Find more information and a nomination form at www.atpe.org/Resources/ Awards&Grants/edofyearinfo.asp.

▸ March 3: Application deadline March 3 is the application deadline for the Ben Shilcutt Plus Club, Local Unit of the Year, Campus Representative of the Year and the Sam Houston Award for Political Involvement. • The Ben Shilcutt Plus Club recognizes ATPE’s top recruiters. Those who recruit five or more new members are honored and receive a special gift; those who recruit 10 or more are also entered in a drawing for $1,000. www.atpe.org/Resources/BenShilcutt/ benShilcutt.aspx

• The Local Unit of the Year award honors exceptional local units in four categories: 1–200 members, 201–500 members, 501-plus members and university. Each winning local unit will receive a check for $500. www.atpe.org/LeaderCentral/ Awards/localunitinfo.aspx • The Doug Rogers Campus Representative of the Year awards recognize volunteers in three categories: 1–200 members, 201–500 members and 501plus members. Each winner will receive $1,000, and their local units will each receive $250 for future activities. www.atpe.org/LeaderCentral/Awards/ campusrepinfo.aspx • The Sam Houston Award for Political Involvement honors one member for excellence in the growth and development of individual grassroots political involvement. The winner is presented with a special gift and a stipend (up to $1,250) to attend a political involvement event. www.atpe.org/ Resources/Awards&Grants/samHoustonMbr.asp

© female teacher holding a tablet computer/istock/Thinkstock

▸ Feb. 17: Nomination deadline

The ATPE vision ATPE is the preeminent public educator association in Texas and makes a difference in the lives of educators and schoolchildren. In partnership with all stakeholders, we are committed to providing every child an equal opportunity to receive an exemplary public education.

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Next semester’s

ATPE Teacher Support Program webinars ATPE’s newest professional learning program is the Teacher Support Program, which provides educators who are in their first through third year of teaching or who are new to their content area or grade level with resources, networking opportunities and continuing professional education (CPE). The program continues during the second half of the 2013-14 school year with additional webinars:

teacher support program Webinar dates Jan. 16—Differentiated Learning Feb. 5—Preparing for STAAR/EOC March 20—Integrating Technology Into the Classroom April 3—Working with Children from Varying Socioeconomic Statuses June 12—Reflection and Planning for Next Year: What Worked, and What Didn’t?

All educators are invited to participate, even if they aren’t in the Teacher Support Program. Each webinar is free to ATPE members and $25 for nonmembers. CPE credit will be issued upon webinar completion. Learn more about the program and register for webinars at www.atpe.org/teachersupport.

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your association

atpe news

Meet your PAC Diplomat

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TPE’s newest volunteer role is that of PAC Diplomat. Each of ATPE’s 20 regions has selected a member to be the “face” of the ATPE Political Action Committee (ATPEPAC) at the regional level. PAC Diplomats will help raise awareness of ATPE-PAC and encourage members to donate. A political action committee, or PAC, is a way for a group of individuals to pool their resources in support of candidates or officeholders who support their philosophies. ATPE-PAC is nonpartisan and supports candidates who share ATPE’s positions on public education issues. Questions about ATPE-PAC or the PAC Diplomat program? Please contact ATPE Governmental Relations at (800) 777-2873 or government@atpe.org.

Region 1: Michael Balderas, Edinburg Region 2: Monica Gonzalez-Rios, Corpus Christi Region 3: TBD Region 4: Cathy Duvall, Fort Bend Region 5: Glen Rabalais, Beaumont Region 6: Donna Ward, Willis Region 7: TBD Region 8: Sandra Patterson, North Lamar Region 9: Sam Spurlock, Olney Region 10: Kim Kriegel, Waxahachie Region 11: Casey Moore, Lewisville Region 12: Ron Sursa, Killeen Region 13: Jayne Serna, Leander Region 14: Maria Murillo, Snyder Region 15: Cheryl Buchanan, Ballinger Region 16: Linda James, retired member Region 17: Brenda Bryan, Hale Center Region 18: Laura Miller, Andrews Region 19: Jennifer Adams, Ysleta Region 20: David de la Garza, Northside (20)

© Austin, Texas/ISTOCK/Thinkstock

Many thanks to all ATPE members who have volunteered to assist their region’s diplomat or be a PAC Diplomat at the local unit level.

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atpe news

your association

Save big down the holiday road No matter where your holiday travels are taking you, be sure to pack your ATPE membership card or download the ATPE Mobile App. You won’t want to miss member-only savings on: • Auto rentals at Alamo®, Avis®, Enterprise Rent-A-Car and National Car Rental. • Hotel stays at Comfort Inn®, Comfort Suites®, Quality®, Sleep Inn®, Cambria Suites®, Clarion®, MainStay Suites®, Econo Lodge®, Suburban Extended Stay®, Rodeway Inn® brands and Ascend Collection® properties, La Quinta Inns and Suites, Baymont Inns and Suites®, Days Inn®, Hawthorne Suites by Wyndham®, Howard Johnson®, Knights Inn®, Microtel Inns and Suites®, Ramada®, Super 8®, Travelodge®, Wingate® by Wyndham and Wyndham Hotels and Resorts®.

Log in to the Services and Discounts page at www.atpe.org/Resources/ ServicesandDiscounts for access codes and reservation links.

Enroll in the Texas Legal Protection Plan

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o you need assistance with personal legal issues not related to your employment? Enroll in the Texas Legal Protection Plan today! TLPP is a group legal services plan established by the State Bar of Texas and is designed to assist members with personal legal issues. Enrollment is available year-round, and members can begin using services on the first day of the month following enrollment.

© Gift Box/istock/Thinkstock

ATPE members who enroll in the program receive comprehensive coverage for qualifying legal services through participating attorneys. TLPP’s participating attorneys are located in more than 140 cities throughout the state and provide legal services ranging from simple estate planning to civil and criminal actions, consumer protection, juvenile matters, divorce and adoption. The monthly fee is $16.25 for individual coverage and $24.50 for family coverage. For detailed information or to enroll, log in to the Services and Discounts page at www.atpe.org/Resources/ServicesandDiscounts.

Correction: The Fall 2013 ATPE News incorrectly listed Region 20 ATPE Director Tina Briones’ local unit. Briones is a member of San Antonio ATPE. ATPE News regrets the error.

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your association

foundation news

Teeing up the formula for success

Public schools are the winner at the ATPE Foundation Golf Tournament

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he ATPE Foundation raised more than $60,000 in cash and inkind donations during its fourth annual golf tournament Oct. 18 at Teravista Golf Club in Round Rock. Nearly 100 players participated, making this year’s tournament the largest to date. One hundred percent of the money raised at the golf tournament goes toward the foundation’s mission of enhancing literacy, technology, and educator recruitment and retention programs in Texas public schools. Specifically, the money raised will fund the foundation’s seven Beth Ann Rogers Literacy Grants and two Technology Grants, which will be given to educators and public schools during the 2013-14 school year, as well as $1,500 scholarships for 10 university education students.

Presenting Sponsor Brim, Arnett, Robinett & Conners P.C.

Platinum Sponsor Avid

US Trust/Bank of America Willis of Texas

ATPE State Office Mesquite ATPE The Lungwitz Law Firm

Closest to the Pin Sponsors

In-kind Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Atchley & Associates Region 10 ATPE

CSI Freeman Audio Visual Solutions Frost Bank

Longest Drive Sponsor

Silver Sponsors

Tee Box Sponsors

Cushman & Wakefield/Oxford Commercial How Frels Rohde Woods and Duke P.C. McQueary, Henry, Bowles, Troy Region 4 ATPE Region 6 ATPE Texas Legal Protection Plan Trend Offset Printing

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Aspire Lending ATPE Board of Directors Region 1 ATPE Region 6 ATPE Region 7 ATPE Region 8 ATPE Region 9 ATPE Region 11 ATPE Region 12 ATPE Region 13 ATPE Region 17 ATPE Region 20 ATPE

Region 2 ATPE Region 5 ATPE Region 14 ATPE Austin Marriott North Blackfinn Ameripub BuildASign.com Costco Golfsmith La Quinta Inns and Suites Nationwide Insurance Randolph Brooks Federal Credit Union Round Rock Express Round Rock Premium Outlets Schlitterbahn Waterparks SeaWorld San Antonio The Golf Ranch

First-place team, Ector County Lisa Foster, Frost Bank Second-place team, Ideal Mechanical Third-place team, CSI Mesquite ATPE volunteers Norman Witcher and Dennis Northington, Frost Bank Hector Cruz, Mike Sweet and Roger Gutierrez, Region 1 ATPE Friends of the late Robert Corley

atpe news

photos by erica fos

Special thanks to our sponsors


foundation news

your association

Apply for $1,500 literacy grants Through the Beth Ann Rogers Literacy Initiative, the ATPE Foundation provides $1,500 grants to Texas public school libraries to purchase literacy materials and modernize literacy resources. Seven grants will be awarded during the 2013-14 school year. View the grant criteria, guidelines and application at atpefoundation.org. Applications must be submitted online by Feb. 3, 2014.

© Rosette Ribbon/Elementary learner/istock/Thinkstock

A gift that keeps on giving Baffled about the best way to say thanks to colleagues or administrators this holiday season? How about donations in their honor to the ATPE Foundation? All donations are taxdeductible, and the money benefits a tremendous cause—supporting literacy, technology, and educator recruitment and retention programs in Texas public schools. Please visit atpefoundation.org to donate. The ATPE Foundation is registered in Texas as a nonprofit corporation and is a public charity exempt from federal income tax under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Foundation introduces donor recognition program

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n order to express its gratitude and appreciation, the ATPE Foundation is introducing a new program to recognize those individuals, corporations and organizations that contribute $100 or more during the foundation’s fiscal year (Aug. 1–July 31). Donors will be listed on the foundation’s annual Honor Roll of Donors. Additionally, the ATPE Foundation will also recognize the ATPE local unit and region that donate the most money to the foundation during the fiscal year. To recognize its most committed donors, the ATPE Foundation will annually recognize donors when their cumulative lifetime donation totals reach significant levels. Donors will be listed on the Honor Roll of Donors and on the foundation’s website and receive additional recognition.

Recognition levels for cumulative lifetime donations: Supporter

Leader

Champion

Benefactor

Visionary

$2,500– $9,999

$10,000– $24,999

$25,000– $49,999

$50,000– $99,999

$100,000plus

“Like” us on Facebook Stay up-to-date on the latest news from the ATPE Foundation by liking the foundation’s Facebook page. www.facebook.com/ATPEFoundation

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ATPE was founded in April 1980 with a distinct set of philosophies. In this ATPE News series, we’re taking an in-depth look at each of ATPE’s 10 tenets and explaining how they act as the building blocks of the association.

ATPE TENETS

LEADERSHIP

PROFESSIONALISM

ATPE members believe they have an obligation to be effective, proactive leaders in the field of education while representing themselves and their profession.

MEMBER-OWNED/ MEMBER-GOVERNED

If you’re an ATPE member, you’re a leader—regardless of your position in your local unit or in your schools. As you do your job each day, you represent ATPE and Texas public education. Some ATPE members have taken this leadership to the next level through public service.

RIGHT TO WORK/ OPPOSE STRIKES

SUPERIOR SERVICES TO MEMBERS

ALL-INCLUSIVE

LEADERSHIP

COLLABORATIVE

ISSUES-ORIENTED ADVOCACY

INDEPENDENT ASSOCIATION

LOCAL CONTROL OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS

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Ginger Franks 2013-14 ATPE State President During her tenure as ATPE vice president, Franks, who currently teaches special education in Martinsville ISD, was asked to be a part of the Texas Teaching Commission, a group established by the public-private initiative Educate Texas. Over the course of a year, the commission—composed of 12 current and former classroom teachers, a former U.S. secretary of education, two former Texas commissioners of education, two former school board presidents, and a former state senator and university chancellor— discussed how to improve the status of the teaching profession in Texas. Franks ultimately left the commission due to a difference in philosophies, but she feels that her time spent on the commission wasn’t wasted. “I was told that some of my stories had impact in [helping other commission members] see things in a different way,” she says. “Anytime a teacher gets a chance to share with others who are involved in making education changes, it is a great benefit to public schoolchildren. Many times educators feel like they may not have anything to offer. We all do if we are working daily with students. We are all leaders and representatives of the education profession.” Richard Wiggins 2013-14 ATPE Vice President Wiggins, a special education teacher in Boerne ISD, currently serves on the Teacher Practice Standards Steering Committee, a committee organized by the Texas Education Agency. The members of the committee—25 educators and administrators from across Texas—have been tasked with providing input for new Texas Teacher Practice Standards, which haven’t been revised in more than 15 years.

atpe news

PHOTOS BY ERICA FOS AND JOHN KILPPER

10

Exploring ATPE’s 10 tenets


tenet focus

“It is extremely important that we hold ourselves to the highest standards as professionals,” Wiggins says. “We are responsible for educating the current generation of K–12 students and preparing them for the most challenging world any generation has had to face. Our students will have many choices, opportunities and challenges in their lives. It is critical that we prepare them to make the best decisions that they can make in order to preserve and protect their freedoms and our way of life … The one way we can make sure that happens is to have educators who set and are held to high standards by the community. Service on committees like the Teacher Practice Standard Steering is one way of accomplishing that objective.” Stephanie Stoebe 2012 Texas Secondary Teacher of the Year When she was named Texas Secondary Teacher of the Year in 2012, Stoebe, a Round Rock ISD educator, realized that there was more to education than what happens on campus. “After I was awarded TOY, my professional lens changed,” she says. “I realized that the role of the educator extends beyond the four walls of the classroom and even the school. Educational leadership does not solely refer to a teaching certificate with which one is able to be hired as an administrator. I have served on several panels and committees for the state; I have taken part in nearly every ATPE leadership opportunity that has been offered; I have lobbied at the Capitol and voted at the House of Delegates, and I am currently mentoring new teachers. When I participate in projects like these, I feel that I am truly leading the profession of education. “Some of my peers ask why I do some of the activities with the state or with ATPE when there is already so much to do as a teacher. I tell them that the leadership roles I seek out help me to prioritize in the classroom and inspire me to be a better teacher. What I have found out is that from Dime Box to Dallas, preschool to high school, we have the educational leaders right here in Texas to solve any problem that may arise.” Jeremy Wagner 2013 Texas Teacher of the Year Wagner, a science teacher in Frenship ISD, was awarded the state’s top honor the year after Stoebe. He, too, had his eyes opened once receiving the award. “Throughout my year as the Texas Teacher of the Year, I had many opportunities to travel the

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nation and represent our state and education,” Wagner says. “Many of these trips involved collaborating and receiving training with other teachers of the year from other states. [At] the Education Commission of the States held in St. Louis earlier this summer, I was given the opportunity to sit in on roundtable discussions and provide input on the realities of education … I was able to meet with many officials to discuss funding ideas and state-level testing challenges and provide feedback on the most pressing issues in education. “Within the state of Texas, I have been able to serve as a spokesperson for public education at several events … I was asked to provide input on a major bill sent before the Senate over the summer. I am currently on a committee helping to revise the teaching standards for the State of Texas (hopefully going out to the public for review in December of this year). I’ve also been privileged to help provide a number of professional development opportunities at the Region 17 Education Service Center, within my own district and with ATPE’s Teacher Support Program. At each of these trainings, I help provide insight into education, classroom management and teaching strategies both specific to my subject and universal to all educators.” Kim Kriegel Waxahachie ATPE President Kriegel, who retired this past summer after 31 years in education, spent two terms while an active educator on the Teacher Retirement System’s Retiree Advisory Committee (TRS-RAC). While on the committee, she represented active educators’ interests in discussions on health insurance for educators. Kriegel has also spent a lot of time advocating for education; during the 82nd legislative session, she spoke to the Texas House Appropriations Committee about public education funding, and she has also volunteered for the campaigns of several pro-public education candidates and officeholders. In addition, Kriegel is a passionate proponent of the ATPE Political Action Committee (ATPE-PAC); she will be Region 10 ATPE's first PAC Diplomat. “I believe with all my heart that [advocacy] is absolutely necessary [because] public education is at risk,” she says. “Teachers need to know what is happening and to be informed. They need to know that [all decisions made by the Legislature] affect them.”

Look to the next issue of ATPE News for information on ATPE’s professionalism tenet.A

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your association

kudos

Bravo, ATPE members

Congratulations to all ATPE members who go the extra mile to achieve great heights in their field. ALVIN Donna Pauley, a language arts teacher and department head at Alvin High School, received a 2013 Outstanding Teaching of the Humanities Award from Humanities Texas. Pauley received $5,000 and an additional $500 for her school to purchase humanities-based instructional materials.

BOERNE Susan Bowers, the social studies department chair at Boerne Middle School North, received the 2013 Linden Heck Howell Outstanding Teaching of Texas History Award from Humanities Texas. Bowers received $5,000 and $500 for her school to buy instructional materials supporting Texas history.

CARROLL Sheryl Sides, a seventh-grade science teacher at Dawson Middle School, was named the 2014 Region 11 Educational Service Center (ESC) Secondary Teacher of the Year.

CHINA SPRING Gina Goldman, a language arts, Spanish, fine arts and electives teacher at China Spring High School, was recognized as the 2014 Region 12 ESC Secondary Teacher of the Year.

CONROE In October, Elisa Carranza-Sagrera, a fourth-grade bilingual teacher at Milam Elementary School, was named the school’s Teacher of the Year. Rebecca Pickett, a seventh-grade math teacher at Moorhead Junior High School, was one of two educators honored in October as the school’s Teachers of the Year.

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The Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented (TAGT) recognized three ATPE members for their support of gifted and talented education in Texas: •D  ianne Fowler, an educator in Temple ISD, received the 2013 Teacher of the Gifted award, one of TAGT’s top five recognitions in the state. •K  aren Green, coordinator of K–12 gifted and talented programs in McKinney ISD, was honored as TAGT’s 2013 Administrator of the Gifted for the Piney Woods/Prairie area, which covers ESC regions 7, 8, 10 and 11. •P  amela Cartagena, an elementary connections educator in El Paso ISD, was selected as TAGT’s 2013 Rising Star Teacher of the Gifted for the Mountains and Basins area, which covers ESC regions 15, 18 and 19.

DEL VALLE

JASPER

Emily Anderson, a social studies teacher at Del Valle Middle School, received the Outstanding Teacher of the Humanities Award from Humanities Texas. Anderson received $5,000 and an additional $500 for the purchase of humanities-based instructional materials.

Rebecca Dougharty, a third-grade teacher at Parnell Elementary School, was one of 15 recipients of the 2013 Wayne A. Reaud Excellence in Education Award. As part of the award, Dougharty received $10,000 from the Beaumont Foundation of America.

EL PASO

KATY

Amanda Bowser, a kindergarten through fifth-grade literacy coach at Powell Elementary School, was named the 2014 Region 19 ESC Elementary Teacher of the Year.

Amanda Schulte, a sixth-grade science teacher at Beck Junior High School and a Sam Houston State University alumna, was recognized as the Student Teacher of the Year by the Texas Directors of Field Experience.

HALLSVILLE Stacey Perkins, a special education teacher at Hallsville East Elementary School, was selected as the 2014 Region 7 ESC Elementary Teacher of the Year.

JACKSBORO Elizabeth Spears, Ph.D., a math teacher at Jacksboro High School, was named the 2014 Region 9 ESC Secondary Teacher of the Year.

NACOGDOCHES Several Nacogdoches ATPE members received awards for their work during the 2012-13 school year: •C  arol Barham, a third-grade teacher at Thomas J. Rusk Academy of Fine Arts, received the school’s Elementary Teacher of the Year award. •W  endy Barnhill, a special education instructor at Brooks Quinn Jones Elementary School, was recognized as Nacogdoches ISD’s Elementary Teacher of the Year.

atpe news


kudos

•K  risten Jasper, a government teacher at Nacogdoches High School, received the school’s Secondary Teacher of the Year Award. •P  enny Long, a math teacher at Nacogdoches High School, received the Anne K. Wallace Excellence in Teaching Award.

NEW CANEY In October, Linda Azzollini, a seventhgrade math teacher at White Oak Middle School, was named the school’s Teacher of the Year.

NORTH EAST Robin Philbrick, an English teacher at Johnson High School, was recognized by the United Way of Bexar County for her program, Inspiring Miracles: Parents and Children Together (IMPACT). IMPACT, a group that coordinates activities at Fort Sam Houston for military children with special needs, was named the 2013 Military Service Organization of the Year.

NORTHSIDE (20) Christian DeBerry, a special education teacher at Hobby Middle School, was one of three secondary education finalists for the 2014 Texas Teacher of the Year award.

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PLANO

RICHARDSON

Marsha Cawthon, an English teacher at Plano Senior High School, was recognized by the Texas Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (TCTELA) as the 2013 High School Teacher of the Year.

Clark Good, a math teacher at Berkner High School’s STEM Academy, was one of 13 educators recognized by Texas Instruments at the Innovations in STEM Teaching Awards ceremony in October. Good won a $10,000 award, $5,000 of which is dedicated to the purchase of professional development and STEM instructional materials.

Kevin Ng, a physics teacher at Plano Senior High School, was recognized by Texas Instruments (TI) as one of 13 TI Foundation STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) Teaching Award recipients for 2013. Ng received a $10,000 award, $5,000 of which is dedicated to professional development and STEM instructional materials purchases. Kayla Olivas, an engineering teacher at McMillen High School, was one of 13 educators honored by Texas Instruments at the Innovations in STEM Teaching Awards ceremony in October. Olivas received $10,000, $5,000 of which goes toward professional development and STEM instructional materials purchases.

RALLS Melode Watson, a first-grade teacher at Ralls Elementary School, was honored as the 2014 Region 17 ESC Elementary Teacher of the Year.

SPLENDORA Beverly Ford, a first-grade teacher at Peach Creek Elementary School, was named the school’s Teacher of the Year in October.

WICHITA FALLS Lori Pitts, a fourth-grade reading teacher at West Foundation Elementary School, was one of 20 winners of the 2013 West Foundation Teaching Excellence Award. Pitts was also recognized in August as the 2014 Region 9 ESC Elementary Teacher of the Year. David Cavitt, an algebra teacher at Hirschi High School, was one of 20 recipients of the 2013 West Foundation Teaching Excellence award.

Be recognized for YOUR EFFORTS! If you know an ATPE member who deserves recognition (it could even be you!), let us know. Kudos covers awards, scholarships and other education-related achievements only; promotions, retirements and non-education-related personal achievements will not be included. E-mail Kudos to ATPE Communications at comm@atpe.org or send them to: ATPE News | 305 E. Huntland Dr., Ste. 300 | Austin, TX 78752-3792

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your association

family album

Supporting Your Freedom to Teach Week winners SM

PHOTO BY JUDY CURETON

PHOTO BY KIM GROSENBACHER

ATPE volunteers celebrated educators in their community and shared information about Texas’ leading educators’ association during ATPE’s eighth annual Supporting Your Freedom to TeachSM Week. Leaders who submitted photos of their efforts were entered in a drawing for $750 school library donations and faculty pizza parties. Congratulations to this year’s winners:

Deer Park

Boerne ATPE campus rep Kim Grosenbacher offered her colleagues goodies, ATPE applications and the chance to enter a $500 local unit giveaway. Grosenbacher is a social studies teacher at Champion High School.

Deer Park ATPE Past President and campus rep Judy Cureton supplied water bottles, candy and ATPE information in the teacher workroom. Cureton is an intervention specialist at San Jacinto Elementary School.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG ECKART

PHOTO COURTESY OF PHYLLIS CRIDER

Boerne

Leander

Waxahachie

Leander ATPE President and campus rep Phyllis Crider said she had fun stocking her teacher workroom with candy, applications, fruit and promo items throughout Supporting Your Freedom to TeachSM Week. Crider is a Vista Ridge High School special education teacher.

Thanks to the efforts of Waxahachie ATPE campus rep Tammy Hill, Clift Elementary School librarian Amy Clark and Waxahachie ATPE President Kim Kriegel accepted a $750 check for the library alongside Assistant Principal Katrina Lemons, Principal Christi Kubin, Hill and ATPE Field Representative Doug Eckart. Hill is a first-grade teacher.

atpe news


hello

PHOTO BY ALEXANDRIA JOHNSON

The ATPE Board of Directors chartered Region 15's PAINT ROCK ATPE at its November 2013 meeting. President Roseann Webb and Treasurer Donald Gibson lead the local unit, which has 23 members.

welcome back

After spotting their former student Dannie Woods (center) at a San Antonio ISD new-teacher orientation, Region 20 Past President Byron Hildebrand and San Antonio ATPE member Rose Rivas immediately recruited him as an ATPE member. Hildebrand was Woods’ basketball coach, and Rivas was his English teacher. Other than his height, Rivas says, Woods looks exactly the same to her.

highlights MIDWAY (12) ATPE partnered with the district’s Hunger Free MISD program to hold a district-wide food and snack drive Sept. 23–27. Midway (12) ATPE campuses collected thousands of food items, which will be sent home with students for weekends and holidays.

PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHERINE WHITBECK

<PHOTO/BYLINE CREDIT>

San Antonio

TORNILLO ATPE in Region 19 recently reactivated. President Alice Romero and Treasurer Elizabeth Cortez lead the local unit, which has seven members.

Nacogdoches Rep. Travis Clardy (R–Nacogdoches) provided a legislative update at Nacogdoches ATPE’s fall meeting. Pictured from left are: Nacogdoches ATPE President Laura Achterhof, ATPE Field Representative Max Deane, Clardy, campus rep Katherine Whitbeck, Region 7 ATPE President Kim Dolese and Nacogdoches Vice President Jordan Chipley.

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GRAPEVINE-COLLEYVILLE ATPE President Kelley Walker presented information about ATPE’s goals at a September school board meeting. The local unit gave each trustee a copy of ATPE News and a public membership to ATPE. REGION 8 ATPE Secretary Abby Rogers, a Paris ISD high school social studies teacher, testified before the State Board of Education regarding CSCOPE materials in September.

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your association

atpe-pac honor roll

THANK YOU FOR YOUR DONATION!

The following ATPE members donated $50 or more to ATPE’s Political Action Committee (ATPE-PAC) between June 8 and Aug. 7, 2013.

Mesquite Carol Davies Barbara Jo Green Diane Nix Laura Weed

Michael McClain

Crowley Steve Pokluda

Irving Connie Kilday Kristin Kilday Marilyn Mutchler Gary Schepf

Dallas Julie Fore Dianne Reed

Jacksboro Kristi Daws Jean Henderson

Mexia Galen Remmers

Spearman Sherry Boyd

Beaumont Suellen Ener Glen Rabalais Patrice Rabalais

Del Valle Dan Johnston

Kaufman Shane Huff

Monahans-WickettPyote Vicki Greenfield

State office Kate Johanns Amy White

Birdville Bill Monty

Ennis Pam Hendricks Carolyn Huebel Nanette Moyers

Killeen Steve Harris Eileen Walcik Melissa Walcik Ron Walcik

Nacogdoches Katherine Whitbeck

Tyler Betty Berndt

North East Lola Miller

Waco Sandra O’Connor Jane Sykes

Krum Betty Ann Plunkett La Vega Dennis Hataway

Northside (20) David de la Garza Sylvia Lopez Bobbye Patton Lynda Stark

Lackland Rosemary Carrion

Odessa Christy Fox

Leander Carol Rogers

Olney Sam Spurlock

Lewisville Samantha Montaño

Pasadena Irma Musallam

Lubbock Ranelle Baldwin Allyson Haveman

Pineywoods Melinda McGinnis Lori Pruitt

Have you met your region’s PAC Diplomat?

McAllen Twila Figueroa Dwight Smith

Retired members Mildred Bates Ann Bonner

Learn more about this new program on page 28.

Andrews Teresa Gross

Crawford Ted Lewis

Arlington Carole Lemonds Ballinger Cheryl Buchanan

Boerne Margie Hastings Pamela Wiggins Richard Wiggins Brownsville J.M. Garza Burleson Mary Bryan Carrollton-Farmers Branch Princess Ball Dana Carroll Stefani Johnson Coleman County Sarah Beal Conroe Shannon Ugo

Ferris Meredith Malloy Fort Bend Kathy Aaron Cathy Duvall Garland Jed Reed Jane Via Gatesville Skip Omenson Hale Center Cindy Chapman Houston Cindy Merka Cynthia Villalovos Humble James Ellis

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San Antonio Byron Hildebrand Randall Iglehart

Warren Sue Allen Waxahachie Kim Kriegel Weslaco Aggie Aguirre Roger Gutierrez West Janice Hornsby

atpe news


GOOD CALL YOU + ATPE = A BIG WIN Whether you joined ATPE for the first time this year or the 30th, you made a good call. ATPE members like you have peace of mind in knowing that ATPE is on the sidelines, ready to support you with superior protection, advocacy and resources. The details of your protection benefits are outlined in the following detailed summary of the 2013-14 Educators Professional Liability Insurance Policy. Please read the summary carefully, and save it for future reference.

POLICY* HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: • Up to $8 million per claim and aggregate in liability insurance, including a $2 million limit for civil rights claims plus defense costs. •U  p to $20,000 aggregate for employment rights defense with a $10,000 per-claim limit, win or lose. • Additional $5,000 per claim for favorable-outcome certification and termination claims. • Up to $15,000 aggregate for criminal defense. • Up to $5,000 per claim for bail bond reimbursement. • Up to $10,000 aggregate for successful appeals beyond the school board or commissioner of education. In addition to the above insured benefits, ATPE maintains a staff of 11 full-time attorneys who are available to assist eligible members with professional concerns. For assistance, members must call (800) 777-2873. For more information, visit www.atpe.org/protection.

CLAIMS PROCEDURE Except for situations necessitating immediate representation by a privatepractice criminal defense attorney, eligible ATPE members must contact the ATPE Member Legal Services Department at (800) 777-2873 from 8 a.m.– 5 p.m. Monday–Friday for legal assistance with employment concerns. In some cases, eligible ATPE members are referred to private-practice attorneys on the approved list (see right). Except for criminal defense, only fees from attorneys and law firms approved by National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa., may be covered. If members retain attorneys in private practice, they must comply with the claims procedure set forth by ATPE. To access benefits, you must be an eligible member at the time of the activity that leads to the action against you.

THE INSURANCE COMPANY APPROVES THE FOLLOWING ATTORNEYS AND FIRMS: • Birdsong and Armstrong P.C. • Brim, Arnett, Robinett & Conners P.C. • How Frels Rohde Woods & Duke P.C. • Langley & Banack Inc. • The Law Office of Daniel A. Ortiz • The Law Offices of Shane Goetz • The Law Offices of James Darnell • The Law Offices of Ruben Peña • The Lungwitz Law Firm P.C. • The McCormick Law Firm • Oscar Alvarez • Tritico & Rainey PLLC • Upton, Mickets & Heymann LLC • Watson, Caraway, Midkiff & Luningham LLP The approved list above is subject to change at any time and without notice.

ATTORNEYS AND LAW FIRMS ARE SELECTED USING THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA: • Experience in education and employment law. • Quality of services and responsiveness to clients’ and ATPE’s needs, as demonstrated by user feedback. • Efficiency, billing practices and compliance with claims procedures. • Competitive rates. • Availability and geographic location of practice. • Ability to constructively interact with all components of the program. • Cooperation with the claims administrator and insurance carrier. • Philosophy and approach compatible with those of ATPE. • Demonstrated sound judgment. • Adequate professional liability insurance as determined by the company.

ATPE members may submit recommendations for attorneys to be considered for approval to: AIG, Jorge Godreau, Mainstream Director, Errors & Omissions/Financial Lines Claims, 175 Water Street, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10038. *The Educators Professional Liability Insurance Policy is underwritten by National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa., with more than $14 billion in net surplus and more than $32.5 billion in total admitted assets as of Dec. 31, 2012. The insurer may not be subject to all insurance laws and regulations of this state. The foregoing notice is provided pursuant to Texas Insurance Code Article 21.54. ALL COVERAGE IS SUBJECT TO THE EXPRESS TERMS OF THE MASTER LIABILITY INSURANCE POLICY ISSUED TO ATPE AND KEPT ON FILE AT THE ATPE STATE OFFICE. Coverage applies to an insured’s activities within his/her professional capacity and does not apply to activities that predate the coverage period. View a detailed summary at atpe.org. Eligibility for ATPE membership benefits is contingent upon ATPE’s receipt of the entire annual membership dues amount for your appropriate membership category. A disruption in payments to an authorized payment plan may result in discontinuation of such benefits, including cancellation of insurance coverage for the entire membership year retroactive to Aug. 1 or your membership date. ATPE reserves the right to determine eligibility for the appropriate membership category. The membership year runs from Aug. 1–July 31.

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IMPORTANT NOTICE

AVISO IMPORTANTE

To obtain information or make a complaint: You may call the Company’s toll-free telephone number for information or to make a complaint at: 1-800-553-6938

Para obtener informacion o para someter una queja: Usted puede llamar al numero de teléfono gratis de la compania para informacion o para someter una queja al: 1-800-533-6938

You may contact the Texas Department of Insurance to obtain information on companies, coverages, rights, or complaints at: 1-800-252-3439

Puede comunicarse con el Departamento de Seguros de Texas para obtener informacion acerca de companias, coberturas, derechos o quejas al: 1-800-252-3439

You may write the Texas Department of Insurance: P.O. Box 149104 Austin, TX 78714-9104 Fax: (512) 475-1771 Web: http://www.tdi.state.tx.us Email: ConsumerProtection@tdi.state.tx.us PREMIUM OR CLAIM DISPUTES: Should you have a dispute concerning your premium or about a claim you should contact the agent first. If the dispute is not resolved, you may contact the Texas Department of Insurance. ATTACH THIS NOTICE TO YOUR POLICY: This notice is for information only and does not become a part of the attached document. 94396 (4/07)

Puede escribir al Departamento de Seguros de Texas: P.O. Box 149104 Austin, TX 78714-9104 Fax: (512) 475-1771 Web: http://www.tdi.state.tx.us Email: ConsumerProtection@tdi.state.tx.us DISPUTAS SOBRE PRIMAS O RECLAMOS: Si tiene una disputa concerniente a su prima o a un reclamo, debe comunicarse con el agente primero. Si no se resuelve la disputa, puede entonces comunicarse con el departamento (TDI). UNA ESTE A VISO A SU POLIZA: Este aviso es solo para proposito de informacion y no se convierte en parte o condicion del documento adjunto.

ASSOCIATION OF TEXAS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATORS EDUCATORS PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE Underwritten By National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, Pa.* This insurance is only available to eligible members of the Association of Texas Professional Educators (ATPE) through a Purchasing Group. All coverage provided under the terms of the Educators Professional Liability Insurance Policy in the event of a loss or occurrence is subject to the express terms of the Master insurance policy issued to ATPE by National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, Pa. (NUFIC) and kept on file with ATPE, including all terms, conditions, exclusions and endorsements. The following is a summary provided by ATPE of the policy issued to ATPE.** The endorsements and/or provisions that form a part of the policy but which are not reproduced herein include: Rate and Premium, Policy Holder Notice 91222(12/09), ATPEDIV(2/99), Notice 53365, Choice of Counsel.

DECLARATIONS POLICY NUMBER: 22018741 ITEM 1. NAMED INSURED: ASSOCIATION OF TEXAS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATORS MAILING ADDRESS: 305 E. HUNTLAND DRIVE SUITE 300 AUSTIN, TX 78752-3792 ITEM 2. POLICY PERIOD: From: August 1, 2013 (12:01 A.M. standard time at the address stated in Item 1. above) To: August 1, 2014 (12:01 A.M. standard time at the address stated in Item 1. above). ITEM 3. LIMITS OF LIABILITY: Coverage A $ 8,000,000 per Insured per occurrence subject to $ 2,000,000 per Insured per occurrence for civil rights claims $ 8,000,000 aggregate per Insured Coverage B $ 10,000 per claim per Insured under B(1)(a) $ 20,000 aggregate per Insured under B(1)(a) $ 10,000 per claim and aggregate per Insured under B(1)(b) $ 5,000 per claim per Insured under B(1)(c) $ 10,000 aggregate per Insured under B(1)(c) $ 15,000 per claim and aggregate per Insured under B(2) $ 200,000 aggregate for any class action suit subject to the limit per claim and aggregate limit per Insured under B(1a) Coverage C $ 5,000 per Bail Bond per Insured. Coverage D $ 2,500 per claim per Insured. Coverage E $ 2,500 per claim per Insured subject to: $ 2,500 aggregate per Insured The Company agrees with the Insured, named in the Declarations made a part hereof, in consideration of payment of the premium and subject to the limits of liability, exclusions, conditions and other terms of this policy;

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INSURING AGREEMENTS Coverage A - Liability Coverage  To pay on behalf of the Insured all sums, in excess of any other valid and collectible insurance, including but not limited to, the Insured’s employers general liability or errors and omissions coverage, which the Insured shall become obligated to pay by reason of liability imposed by law for damages resulting from any claim made against the Insured arising out of an occurrence in the course of the activities of an Insured in his/her professional capacity [as set out in definition (b)] and caused by any acts or omissions of the Insured or any other person for whose acts the Insured is legally liable, and the Company shall defend any suit seeking damages on account thereof which are payable under the terms of this policy, even if such suit be groundless, false or fraudulent; but the Company may make such investigation, negotiation and settlement of any claim or suit as it may deem expedient. In the event no other valid and collectible insurance exists this policy shall pay on behalf of the Insured all sums which the Insured shall become obligated to pay by reason of liability imposed by law for damages resulting from any claim made against the Insured arising out of an occurrence in the course of the activities of an Insured in his/her professional capacity [as set out in definition (b)] and caused by any acts or omissions of the Insured or any other person for whose acts the Insured is legally liable, and the Company shall defend any suit seeking damages on account thereof which are payable under the terms of this policy, even if such suit be groundless, false or fraudulent; but the Company may make such investigation, negotiation and settlement of any claim or suit as it may deem expedient. Coverage B - Reimbursement of Attorney Fees (1) To reimburse an Insured on account of such attorney fees for services as are reasonable and necessary which the Insured is legally obligated to pay to an attorney approved by the Company to whom the Insured has been referred by the Named Insured for the defense of any action brought against such Insured arising out of the following activities, but without obligation to furnish such attorney: (a) Incurred in the defense of any action or proceeding involving such Insured’s salary, dismissal, contract nonrenewal, change of assignment, tenure, leave of absence, resignation or other

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professional rights, duties and responsibilities, allegations of intentional or negligent sexual conduct and arising within the scope of employment; involving the issuance, suspension, cancellation or revocation of such Insured’s credential, life diploma or certification document issued by the State Board of Education, State Board of Educator Certification or Commission on Credentials; based upon an alleged violation of such Insured’s civil rights guaranteed by the Constitution or civil rights statutes of the United States or any state arising out of activities of an Insured in his/her professional capacity and not otherwise covered; as a result of an Insured’s service on an appraisal and/or a career ladder select committee. (b) Incurred in the appeal of a decision by the governing board of a school district or the commissioner of education resulting from defense of an action or proceeding under Coverage B (1)(a), provided, however, final judgment is rendered in favor of the Insured. (c) in addition to any amount reimbursed pursuant to Coverage B(1)(a), incurred in the defense of any action or proceeding involving dismissal, contract renewal, or suspension, cancellation or revocation of any credential, life diploma or certification document issued by the State Board of Education, State Board of Educator Certification or Commission on Credentials, provided that the final outcome in such action or proceeding is in favor of the Insured. (2) To reimburse an Insured on account of such attorney fees for services as are reasonable and necessary which the Insured is legally obligated to pay to an attorney for the defense of any criminal action or proceeding brought against such Insured, but without obligation to furnish such attorney, arising out of the Insured’s activities in his/her professional capacity on the property of an educational institution while performing duties of employment or during an event to which the Insured is assigned by the educational institution. The reimbursement of attorney fees shall be according to the following schedule and subject to the limit of liability stated under Coverage B(2) of the Declarations: 1. U p to $10,000 (including an initial amount of up to $5,000 for a retainer), regardless of the final outcome of such criminal action or proceeding; and 2. U p to an additional $5,000, but only if the Insured is found not guilty or otherwise acquitted of all charges in such criminal action or proceeding, or if all criminal charges in such criminal action or proceeding are withdrawn or dismissed with prejudice. Deferred adjudication, a plea of no lo contendre, or a plea to or conviction on lesser charges in such criminal action or proceeding shall not constitute a not-guilty finding, acquittal, withdrawal or dismissal. Coverage C - Bail Bonds To pay the premium for Bail Bond required of the Insured arising out of activities of the Insured in his/her professional capacity, as hereinafter defined, not to exceed $5,000 per bail bond, but without obligation to apply for or furnish such bond. For purposes of this coverage, a series of continuous or similar actions by the Insured shall constitute a single claim regardless of the number of indictments. Coverage D - Assault-related Personal Property Damage To pay an Insured up to $2,500 for damage to or destruction of the Insured’s personal property which is caused by an assault upon the Insured arising out of an occurrence in the course of an Insured’s authorized course of activities in his/her professional capacity to the extent that such damages exceed the coverage provided by any Homeowners, Personal Property Floaters or other similar valid and collectible insurance. This coverage does not apply to damage or destruction of a vehicle of any kind, or to damage to or destruction of leased or loaned property. Coverage E – Personal Identity Theft Coverage To reimburse the Insured up to $2,500, for reasonable and necessary attorney fees which the Insured is legally obligated to pay to an attorney, as a result of a Stolen Identity Event occurring during the policy period but without obligation to furnish such attorney, to the extent that such fees exceed the coverage provided by any other benefit, program or policy available to the Insured. SUPPLEMENTARY PAYMENTS The Company will pay, in addition to the applicable limit of liability for Coverage A: a. a ll expenses incurred by the Company, all costs taxed against the Insured in any suit defended by the Company and all interest on the entire amount of any judgment therein which accrues after entry of the judgment and before the Company has paid or tendered or deposited in court that part of the judgment which does not exceed the limit of the Company’s liability thereon; b. premiums on appeal bonds required in any such suit, premiums on bonds to release attachments in any such suit for an amount not in excess of the applicable limit of liability of this policy, but the Company shall have no obligation to apply for or furnish any such bonds; c. e xpenses incurred by the Insured for first aid to others at the time of an accident for bodily injury to which this policy applies; d. reasonable expenses incurred by the Insured at the Company’s request in assisting the Company in the investigation or defense of any such claim or suit, including actual loss of earnings not to exceed $50.00 per day.

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DEFINITIONS a. The word “Insured” wherever used shall mean a person who is a professional, associate, teacher trainee or life member of the Named Insured. If the policy is a renewal, the word “Insured” includes members covered under the expired policy who reapply within sixty days of the inception of this policy. b. The phrase “activities of an Insured in his/her professional capacity” wherever used shall mean activities of an Insured in the course of his/her duties of employment with an “educational institution” or activities of an Insured in the course of his/her duties as a student in a teacher education program in an accredited college or university. With respect to Coverage A, “activities of an Insured in his/her professional capacity” shall not include services rendered in the practice of law, construction, accountancy, financial or other similar professionally licensed services. c. The term “occurrence” only applies to Coverage A. It means an event, which results in damages to someone other than the Insured. An occurrence can involve a single, sudden event or the continuous or repeated exposure to the same conditions. If a Claimant or Claimants allege to have sustained damages caused by repeated exposure to the same conditions caused by the Insured during different policy terms, then the exposure shall be deemed to have occurred as of the most recent exposure to said conditions, and shall be covered only by the last of all policies issued by the Company to the Insured and not by more than one policy issued by the Company. d. The term “membership date” means the date on which a person becomes a professional, associate or teacher trainee member of the Named Insured. e. The term “membership year”, for purposes of use in this policy, means the period for obtaining membership in the Named Insured, beginning August 1st and ending on August 1st, twelve months following. f. The term “educational institution” means a public school district, institution of higher education, Regional Education Service Center, or the Central Education Agency. g. The term “attorney fees” means costs incurred by an attorney approved by the Company in accordance with policy terms and the claims reporting procedures as set forth by the Named Insured. h. The term “civil rights claims” where used shall mean any claim against an Insured alleging a violation of any person’s civil rights, as protected by: the Constitution of the United States or of any state; The Civil Rights Acts of 1866 and 1964, as amended; the Americans with Disabilities Act; and any state or federal statute, regulation or executive order. i. The term “Stolen Identity Event” means the theft of non-public information about the Insured (including, without limitation, the Insured’s social security number) which has resulted or could result in the wrongful use of such information. j. The term “criminal action or proceeding” means any: (1) criminal proceeding against an Insured which is commenced by the return of an indictment or receipt or filing of a notice of charges in a court of law and alleges one or more violations of any federal or Texas criminal laws; or (2) investigation by a law enforcement agency or other authorized governmental entity, including an educational institution, of one or more alleged violations by an Insured of any federal or Texas criminal laws. EFFECTIVE DATES OF INSURANCE The effective date as respects an “Insured” is the “membership date” in the “membership year” except as follows: 1. If this policy is a renewal, the word “Insured” includes members covered under the expired policy who reapply within sixty (60) days of inception of this policy, and coverage for such members is effective on the inception date of this policy. 2. As respects new and renewal members who join after the annual enrollment period (August 1 to September 30) and who were otherwise eligible for membership during the enrollment period, the effective date of coverage under Coverage B, C, D and E of this policy shall be thirty (30) days after the “membership date”, and coverage is not provided for actions resulting from activities of an Insured which begin prior to the effective date of coverage. POLICY PERIOD 1. As respects Coverage A, this policy applies only to occurrences (as defined) during the policy period. 2. As respects Coverage B, C and D, this policy applies only to actions resulting from activities of an Insured (as defined) which begin during the policy period. 3. As respects Coverage C, this policy applies only to any bail bond required as a result of an event or series of events which happen or are alleged to have happened during the policy period. 4. As respects coverage E, this policy applies only to Stolen Identity Events occurring during the policy period. This policy period shall begin August 1, 2013 and end August 1, 2014 (12:01 A.M. standard time at the address stated in Item 1., of the declarations) POLICY TERRITORY Anywhere in the world with respect to an occurrence arising out of the covered activities of any Insured permanently domiciled in the United States of America though temporarily outside the United States of America, its territories and possessions or Canada, provided the original suit for damages because of any such injury or damage is brought within the United States of America, its territories or possessions or Canada. Anywhere in the world with respect to a Stolen Identity Event, but only attorney fees incurred in the United States of America. Payment of loss under this policy shall only be made in full compliance with all United States of America economic or trade sanction laws or regulations, including, but not limited to, sanctions, laws and regulations administered and enforced by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”).

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EXCLUSIONS This policy does not apply: a. To activities of an Insured that are not activities of an Insured in his/her professional capacity, as defined above. b. To activities of an Insured that are carried on in a private business, private professional endeavor or private school, other than an Institution of higher education, except this exclusion does not apply to activities of a teacher trainee doing practice teaching in a private school. c. To the ownership, maintenance, operation, use, loading or unloading of (a) vehicles of any kind, other than farm tractors not operated on public highways, (b) watercraft, (c) aircraft, except, however, coverage would apply to: (1) a driver training instructor while riding as a passenger in the course of duties as an employee of a school system and (2) a vocational education instructor in the course of regular instruction carried on in a shop provided by the school and (3) an Insured while supervising students entering or exiting a school bus. The coverage afforded herein does not apply when the Insured has any other Insurance of any kind, whatsoever which affords coverage as to such liability. d. To liability assumed by the Insured under any contract or agreement. e. To injury, sickness, disease, death or destruction due to war, whether or not declared, civil war, insurrection, rebellion, or revolution, or to any act or condition incidental to any of the foregoing. f. To any obligation for which the Insured or any carrier may be held liable under worker’s compensation, unemployment compensation, disability benefits or similar laws. g. To the rendering, teaching or supervising of medical, surgical, dental, nursing, or other similar services of the omission thereof; except however, coverage would apply to: 1. F irst aid and regular nursing services rendered by a school nurse employed for the purpose of rendering such services; 2. F irst aid and regular nursing services rendered by a certified health aide employed for the purpose of rendering such services under the supervision of a school nurse; 3. P hysical therapy rendered by a licensed physical or occupational therapist, or licensed athletic trainer, employed for the purpose of rendering such services; 4. The administration of oral prescription medicine to a student by an Insured, provided the Insured has advance written authorization for such administration from the parent or guardian of the student; 5. E mergency first-aid services rendered by the Insured when a school nurse or other medicallytrained person is not readily available; or 6. P sychological therapy or treatment rendered by a licensed practitioner employed for the purpose of rendering such services. h. Under Coverage A. to criminal acts other than corporal punishment. i. Under Coverage A. to the defense of any civil suit for criminal acts other than corporal punishment. j. To liability in respect of claims brought by any employee or former employee of any educational institution against an Insured, as defined by the policy, except to the reimbursement of attorney’s fees as provided under Coverage B. The following three exceptions apply to this exclusion: 1. This exclusion shall not apply to any claim made or suit brought against an Insured by or on behalf of another employee of an institution of higher education if the claim or suit arises out of an occurrence in the course of activities of the Insured in his/her professional capacity as a participant in the peer review system of an Institution of higher education; however, this exclusion shall apply to an assault upon an Insured by another employee of an Institution of higher education if the assault arose out of an occurrence in the Insured’s aforementioned peer review activity. 2. This exclusion shall not apply to any claim made or suit brought against an Insured by or on behalf of another employee of an educational Institution if the claim or suit arises out of an occurrence in the course of activities of the Insured in his/her professional capacity as a member of a board of commission, established by the Insured’s state government, which has as its purposes the licensure or certification of educators, or the setting of standards for the licensure or certification of educators. 3. This exclusion shall not apply to any claim made or suit brought against an Insured by or on behalf of a minor or incompetent child of an employee of an educational Institution, if the claim or suit arises out of an occurrence in the course of activities of the Insured in his/her professional capacity. k. To punitive damages in excess of $5,000. l. Except as provided under Coverage B, this policy does not provide coverage to claims arising out of occurrences in which the Insured intentionally causes damage of any nature to another person or entity, except for claims arising from corporal punishment of any student or pupil administered by, or at the direction of, the Insured in his/her professional capacity. m. To the defense of any action of declaratory judgments, injunctive relief, or other similar proceeding, except as provided in Coverage B, unless the relief prayed for therein also seeks damages which are covered under Coverage A.

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n. To activities of any Insured while acting as a member of any school board or similarly constituted body. o. E xcept as provided under Coverage B, this policy does not provide a defense or coverage to damages resulting from any claim for actual sexual action or conduct or harassment. p. To any claims, accusations or charges brought against any Insured, and to any obligation or duty of the Company to afford defense for such claims, accusations or charges, which are made because of any damages or injury arising out of Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV) Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), no matter how transmitted, except to reimbursement of attorney’s fees as provided under Coverage B. q. Under Coverage B, to any claim involving health, disability, unemployment or retirement benefits including such benefits payable, under any Workers Compensation law whether payable by an insurance company, trust, self insurance benefit plan of any school district, any similar carrier or provider or device arranged to handle such benefits, or to any action involving the payment or refund of premium(s) for such benefits. Neither the term “salary” nor the phrase “other professional rights, duties and responsibilities” under Coverage B(1)(a) shall be inclusive of such benefits. This exclusion shall not apply to claims involving the continuation of the insured’s group health coverage solely as provided in Texas Education Code §22.004, subsections (k) and (l). r. To bodily injury, property damages, personal injury or advertising injury arising out of the removal, transport, storage, installation or use of asbestos for any purpose whatsoever. This includes any loss, cost or expenses related to asbestos. s. With respect to Coverage E, to any dishonest, criminal, malicious or fraudulent acts if the Insured personally participated in, directed, or had knowledge of such acts. t. Under Coverage A, to any claim, defense or activity whatsoever involving a firearm, explosive weapon or device, stun gun or other device. u. To misuse, embezzlement, misappropriation, or breach of fiduciary duty, in the handling or managing of public and/or private monies, investments, securities or other funds held in a trust capacity, except as provided under Coverage B. v. U nder Coverage A, to employment practices liability, including without limitation, wrongful dismissal, discrimination, harassment, retaliation or any activity of an Insured in connection with an educational institution’s employment, discharge or termination of any individual. w. Under Coverage A, to any claim against an Insured whose position requires administrator certification, or who is acting in a supervisory capacity, where such claim arises out of the Insured’s supervision or employment of any individual, the conduct of the Insured’s subordinate, or any alleged failure to report, prevent, address or remediate such subordinate’s conduct. x. U nder Coverage B, to any action against an Insured arising out of the Insured’s actual or alleged activi- ties in a supervisory capacity, or relating to the Insured’s role in the creation or interpretation of any employment policy or procedure.

CONDITIONS 1. Limits of Liability The limits of liability stated in the Declarations are the limits of the Company’s liability for all damages, including damages for care and loss of services, arising out of one occurrence. 2. Notice of Occurrence When an occurrence takes place written notice shall be given by or on behalf of the Insured to the Company or any of its authorized agents as soon as practicable. Such notice shall contain particulars sufficient to identify the Insured and also reasonably obtainable information respecting the time, place and circumstances of the occurrence, the names and addresses of the injured and of available witnesses. 3. Notice of Claim or Suit If claim is made or suit is brought against the Insured, the Insured shall immediately forward to the Company every demand, notice, summons or other process received by him or his representative. 4. Notice of Stolen Identity Event When a Stolen Identity Event occurs, a report shall be filed by the Insured or on the Insured’s behalf with the appropriate police authority. Any claim for attorney fee reimbursement shall contain particulars sufficient to identify the Insured and also reasonably obtainable information respecting the time, place and circumstances of the Stolen Identity Event. 5. Assistance and Cooperation of the Insured The Insured shall cooperate with the Company, and upon the Company’s request, shall attend hearings and trials and shall assist in effecting settlements, securing and giving evidence, obtaining the attendance of witnesses and in the conduct of suits. The Insured shall not, except at his/her own cost, voluntarily make any payment, assume any obligation or incur any expenses other than for such immediate medical and surgical relief to others as shall be imperative at the time of the occurrence. 6. Action Against Company No action shall lie against the Company, unless as a condition precedent thereto, the Insured shall have fully complied with all terms of this policy, or until the amount of the Insured’s obligation to pay shall have been finally determined either by judgment against the Insured after actual trial or by written agreement of the

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Insured, the claimant and the Company. Any person or organization or the legal representative thereof who has accrued such judgment or written agreement shall thereafter be entitled to recover under this policy to the extent of the insurance afforded by this policy. Nothing contained in this policy shall give any person or organization any right to join the Company as co-defendant in any action against the Insured to determine the Insured’s liability. Bankruptcy or insolvency of the Insured or of the Insured’s estate shall not relieve the Company of any of its obligations hereunder. 7. Other Insurance If other insurance, excluding policies issued by the Company, is available to the Insured covering a loss also covered by this policy, then this policy shall apply in excess of, and shall not contribute with, such other insurance. If any other policy issued by the Company also applies to a loss which would be covered by this policy then this policy will pay its share of the loss based on the percentage this policy’s limit of liability bears to the total limits of liability of all insurance available to pay the loss. Other Insurance includes but is not limited to: (a) Insurance, coverage or benefits provided by school boards, school districts or any similar entity including, without limitation, the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB); (b) Insurance, coverage or benefits provided by the National Education Association or any other national or local professional association or similar organization; (c) Insurance, coverage or benefits provided by self-insurance, trusts, pools, risk retention groups, captive insurance companies, or any other insurance plan or agreement of risk assumption; and (d) Insurance, coverage or benefits provided by an Insured’s homeowner’s, renter’s or personal umbrella policy. 8. S ubrogation In the event of any payment under this policy, the Company shall be subrogated to all the Insured’s right of recovery therefor against any person or organization and the Insured shall execute and deliver instruments and papers and do whatever else is necessary to secure such rights. The Insured shall do nothing after loss to prejudice such rights.

9. Changes Notice to any agent or knowledge possessed by any agent or by any other person shall not effect a waiver or a change in any part of this policy or estop the Company from asserting any right under the terms of this policy; nor shall the terms of this policy be waived or changed, except by endorsement issued to form a part of this policy. 10. Cancellation This policy may be canceled by the Named Insured for any reason by surrender thereof to the Company or any of its authorized agents or by mailing to the Company written notice stating when thereafter the cancellation shall be effective. This policy may be canceled by the Company only for non-payment of premium by mailing to the Named Insured at the address shown on the policy, written notice stating when not less than fortyfive days thereafter such cancellation shall be effective. The mailing of notice as aforesaid shall be sufficient proof of notice. The time of surrender of the effective date and hour of cancellation stated in the notice shall become the end of the policy period. Delivery of such written notice either by the Named Insured or by the Company shall be equivalent to mailing. If the Named Insured or the Company cancels the policy, earned premium shall be computed on a pro rata basis. Premium adjustment may be made either at the time cancellation is effected or as soon as practicable after cancellation becomes effective. Any other premium adjustment or return premium as would apply had cancellation not been affected shall be computed substituting the date of cancellation for the expiration date of this policy. 11. Terms of Policy Conformed to Statute Terms of this policy, which are in conflict with the statutes of the state wherein this policy is issued, are hereby amended to conform to such statutes. * NUFIC is located at 175 Water Street, New York, New York 10038-0150 **The description of coverage herein is a summary only. It does not include all provisions of the policy issued to ATPE by NUFIC. Please refer to the master policy kept on file with ATPE for complete details of coverage.

United States Postal Service Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation 1. Publication Title: ATPE News 2. Publication Number: 578-050 3. Filing Date: September 23, 2013 4. Issue Frequency: Quarterly (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer) 5. Number of Issues Published Annually: 4 6. Annual Subscription Price: $10.00 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: 305 E. Huntland Drive, Suite 300, Austin (Travis), Texas 78752-3792 Contact Person: Katherine Johanns Telephone: (512) 467-0071 x 329 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher: 305 E. Huntland Drive, Suite 300, Austin (Travis), Texas 78752-3792 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor and Managing Editor: Publisher: Gary G. Godsey, 305 E. Huntland Drive, Suite 300, Austin (Travis), Texas 78752-3792 Editor: Katherine Johanns, 305 E. Huntland Drive, Suite 300, Austin (Travis), Texas 78752-3792 Managing Editor: Amanda Curtis, 305 E. Huntland Drive, Suite 300, Austin (Travis), Texas 78752-3792 10. Owner: Association of Texas Professional Educators, 305 E. Huntland Drive, Suite 300, Austin (Travis), Texas 78752-3792

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11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages or Other Securities: None 12. Tax Status: The purpose, function and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months. 13. Publication Title: ATPE News 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: Fall 2013 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months a. Total Number of Copies: 108,223 b. Paid Circulation (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: 105,473 (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: 0 (3) Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS: 0 (4) Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS: 0 c. Total Paid Distribution: 105,473 d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution

(1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541: 2,125 (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541: 0 (3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS: 37 (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail: 159 e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution: 2,321 f. Total Distribution: 107,794 g. Copies not Distributed: 429 h. Total: 108,223 i. Percent Paid: 97.85% No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date a. Total Number of Copies: 116,554 b. Paid Circulation (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: 113,988 (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: 0 (3) Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS: 0 (4) Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS: 0 c. Total Paid Distribution: 113,988 d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution

(1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541: 2,066 (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541: 0 (3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS: 51 (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail: 163 e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution: 2,280 f. Total Distribution: 116,268 g. Copies not Distributed: 286 h. Total: 116,554 i. Percent Paid: 98.04% 16. Total circulation DOES NOT include electronic copies. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership: Required. Will be printed in the Winter 2013 issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Date: Katherine Johanns, Communications Director, September 23, 2013 I certify that all information furnished in this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits materials or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

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continued from page 12—Tech Support seconds, depending on a user-set time limit. After the set time, the “snaps” are hidden from the recipient’s device and deleted from the company’s servers. Once the app has been downloaded, Snapchat users can create accounts and usernames, which they can then share with others in order to connect. Pheed (pheed.com)—Pheed is an all-encompassing digital media-sharing app that allows users to share texts, photos, videos, audio tracks, voice-notes and live broadcasts with their followers. Pheed users connect by following other users via their unique usernames. Users can also create private channels other users have to pay to access.

Previously in Tech Support In previous editions of Tech Support, we’ve covered ways social networks can be useful to educators. In one of the earliest Tech Supports, in the Fall 2009 issue of ATPE News, we provided a primer on how to use Twitter in “It’s Neat to Tweet” (http://bit.ly/NeattoTweet). In the Winter 2009 issue, “Learning and Growing through Ning” (http://bit.ly/ LearningThroughNing) discusses the benefits of user-created, content-specific networks. In Spring 2012, we highlighted how educators are using Twitter to search for education topics in “The Rise of the Hashtag” (http://bit.ly/RiseoftheHashtag). In Summer 2012, “Creating a Life More Pinteresting” (http://bit. ly/aLifemorePinteresting) delved into the educational value of Pinterest. And in Winter 2012, we talked about the benefits of LinkedIn as a professional network in “Linking Up with LinkedIn” (http://bit.ly/LinkingupwithLinkedIn).A

continued from page 14—Capitol Comment communications plan: • You will receive an email every time your action is needed. That’s why we’ve changed the name of the LAN to the Legislative Action Network. When you see a LAN message, it’s time to act. • Every member has the opportunity to receive every Teach the Vote blog post by email. Sign up at http://eepurl.com/ y2RSb. You can also subscribe to the blog via your favorite RSS reader (Feedly, Bloglovin, etc.). • Every Teach the Vote blog post is posted to ATPE’s Facebook page (www.facebook.com/OfficialATPE), tweeted on @TeachtheVote and retweeted on @OfficialATPE. • We’ll provide in-depth analysis and wrap-ups through ATPE publications. In the “old days” of the early 2000s, politically involved ATPE members helped us spread the word by forwarding LAN messages. Please keep doing that—and please forward your Teach the Vote emails, share our Facebook posts and retweet us. See, the thing is, I am rather attached to my smartphone—and I receive alerts when you share our posts and retweet us. I smile every time.A

Psst … If you follow ATPE on Pinterest, you can call “pinning” professional research.

continued from page 13—Legal Opinions when that romantic/sexual line is reached, the educator proves unable to make the sound or objective decision he or she would otherwise make. All humans are capable of making very bad decisions in the heat of emotion, and educators are no different. Unfortunately, for the educator, that bad choice is devastating— as the headlines prove over and over again. The moral of the story is that it is important for all educators to remember that they are human and that they must remain constantly aware not only of what they are doing now but also where their current actions are leading. Educators cannot let themselves get in over their heads. It is up to educators to recognize where things are headed, before emotion and excitement cloud judgment and they find themselves crossing lines they would never have imagined themselves crossing. Unfortunately—we have seen it. A The legal information provided in ATPE News is for general purposes only. It is not intended as a substitute for individual legal advice or the provision of legal services. Accessing this information does not create an attorneyclient relationship. Individual legal situations vary greatly, and readers should consult directly with an attorney. ATPE members should call (800) 777-2873 or access the Member Legal Services Intake System (MLSIS) at www.atpe.org/protection.

44 | atpe.org

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atpe news


Questions YouATPE MightMembership Have About ATPE Membership 2013-14 Application

1 Are ATPE membership 3 Waysdues Youtax-deductible? Can Join ATPE:

4

When is myapplication ATPE membership effective? 1 Mail this completed to the ATPE state office. ATPE membership dues are not deductible as charitable contributions2 Give For this paper applications, your membership date is established completed application to your ATPE campus rep. for income tax purposes but may be deductible as miscellaneous when your application is received in the state office, or when your 3 Join at atpe.org (and pay by credit card). itemized deductions, subject to IRS restrictions. It is estimated that application is received, signed and dated by a designated local unit 4.6 percent of your dues dollar is used for lobbying activities and is representative. For online applications, your membership date is (MM) thereforeProvide not deductible. established at 12:01 a.m. CST on the date following successful your contact information. Select your membership category. transmission of your online application and payment at atpe.org. This information helps us maintain your unique member record, a tool that

1

2 How ATPE spend membership Last 4does digits of your Soc. Sec. my #: XXX-XX-__ __ __ __ dues?Female

2

allows us to provide member services more efficiently.

• $3.32 pays for a subscription to ATPE News (published four times per Yes, I have been an ATPE member in the past. year) and includes all state and local sales taxes.

Refer to the chart on the back of this application to find your appropriate category.

categories 5 When Insured is coverage effective? Male

*

*

*See back.

$145.00 $ ______ * Coverage beginsProfessional on the later of 8/1/13 or your Membership Date and expires on 8/1/14 except for the following: COVERAGE IS EFFECTIVE Member _______________ (Optional—If you don’t know First-time • Up to $26 of ID# Professional and Associate member dues and upit,tono$6problem.) ON 8/1/13 IF YOU RENEW MEMBERSHIP ANYTIME AUGUST OR $ ______ Professional $80.00 DURING of Teacher Trainee member dues pays for the Educators Professional Name ________________________ _______________________ _________ I have never been a SEPTEMBER 2013, AND EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS DEFENSE INSURANCE IS Liability Insurance Policy.* Professional member. Last First Middle initial NOT EFFECTIVE UNTIL 30 DAYS AFTER YOUR MEMBERSHIP DATE IF YOU JOIN AFTER 9/30/13 AND WERE ELIGIBLE FOR MEMBERSHIP $ ______FROM Associate ISD ___________________________ Campus __________________________ $70.00 Paraprofessional and AUGUST 2013 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 2013. Eligibility for membership What does the Liability and Employment Rights classified positions Home address ____________________________________________________ benefits is contingent upon receipt of the entire membership dues Defense Insurance* for the 2013-14 membership amount for your Teacher appropriate membership category. AFREE disruption in Trainee year cover? City/State ____________________________________ ZIP _______________ Student teacher payment in Texas payments to an authorized plan may result in discontinua* Coverage your activities as a Professional or )Associate categories Homeapplies ( ____ )to _____________________ Cell ( ____ ____________________ tion of suchUninsured benefits, including cancellation of insurance coverage for member in the course of your duties of employment with an educaRetiredyear, retroactive to$10.00 ______ the entire membership Aug. 1 or$ your membership email or____________________________________________________ tionalSchool institution, to your activities as a Teacher Trainee member in former date. For further Retired information, call (800) 777-2873. school employee the course of your duties as a student in a teacher education program Home email _____________________________________________________ in an accredited college or university. Coverage is underwritten by College Student FREE Submit your email addresses to receive the latest news on member benefits. National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, Pa. ALL What doesNon-teaching ATPE-PAC do? college student Yes, me information aboutTERMS volunteering ATPE! COVERAGE IS send SUBJECT TO THE EXPRESS OF THEforMASTER The ATPE Political Action Committee (ATPE-PAC) accepts voluntary INSURANCE POLICY ISSUED TO ATPE AND KEPT ON FILE AT THE STATE Public to advocate for$10.00 $ ______ donations from members ATPE’s legislative priorities. Friend of public OFFICE. View a detailed summary at atpe.org. The policy applies only ATPE-PAC does not endorse political candidates. Donations to ATPEeducation to activities that begin during the period when coverage is effective PAC are not a condition of employment or membership. A member and does not apply to activities that predate the coverage period. Invest public education. may donate more or lessinthan the suggested amount or may choose not to make a donation without it affecting his or her membership Local unit dues $ ______ status, rights or benefits with ATPE. are not deductible for Support ATPE in your school Donations district. federal income tax purposes. ATPE Political Action Committee $ ______

3

6

3

Support Texas candidates and officeholders who prioritize public education. Suggested donation: $12.

ATPE Membership Categories

4

You must join in the appropriate insured category in order to qualify for coverage. ATPE reserves the right to determine eligibility for Select a payment method. the appropriate membership category. Commissioned peace officers are eligible for public membership only. Check enclosed. Professional and Associate membership is open to persons employed in Texas by a public school district, institution of higher education, Payroll deduction Regional Education Service Center, State Board for Educator Certification or the Texas Education Agency. Complete the authorization below. Arrangements for payroll

deduction are the responsibility of the applicant. If you have a question about the eligibility of job descriptions not listed below, call (800) 777-2873.

Insured Categories*

Uninsured Categories $ ______ TOTAL

PROFESSIONAL MEMBER ($145)/FIRST-TIME PROFESSIONAL MEMBER ($80) • Regional Service • Department Head/ Payroll Deduction Authorization

• Administrator/ Supervisor

Chair

Center Staff

ASSOCIATE MEMBER ($70) • Aide to position in Professional category

COLLEGE STUDENT MEMBER (FREE) • Educational Aide/ Technician

Payroll will not be accepted afterCenter Jan.Aide 31, 2014. • School Psychologist/ • Diagnosticianfor 2013-14 • Maintenance Worker • Athletic Director/authorizations • Alternative Associate Coordinator • Instructional Officer • Nurse (LVN) • Bus Driver

• Non-teaching college student

RETIRED MEMBER ($10) • Retired former school employee

I, ______________________________________________ , authorize the _____________________ ISD to deduct the total amount of $ _______________ over • Social Worker Intern Teacher • Regional Cafeteriaaction Workerdonations. PUBLIC MEMBER ($10) ______ payments• in order to pay for ATPE state dues, local dues and •political I furtherService authorize the Association to notify the ISD of changes in • Superintendent/Asst. Center Aide • At-Risk Coordinator • IT Director/ • Clerk–General the annual dues amounts and the ISD to deduct the new amounts. If my employment with the district ends, I authorize any• unpaid to be deducted from Friend ofbalance public education Supt. Coordinator • Secretary • Audiologist • Computer my final check. This authorization for the deductions referenced above will be effective until I give notice to the ISD that I want to revoke it. • Athletic Trainer

• Band/Choral Director

• Librarian

• Coach

• Nurse (RN)

• Teacher

• Security Guard Programmer/Entry • Therapist/ (Unarmed) • Custodial Worker Pathologist ____________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _______________ • Substitute Teacher • Parent/Community • Counselor • Deaf Interpreter Applicant’s signature Coordinator Applicant’s Social Security number or employee ID number Date of signature • University Professor • Curriculum Director TEACHER TRAINEE MEMBER (FREE) • Visiting Teacher • Principal/Asst. Prin. • Dean________ of Instruction TCTA TSTA UEA Other • Student teacher in Texas Texas AFT Initial Here 2013-14 AP8

I wish to cancel deduction of membership dues for:


Questions You Might Have About ATPE Membership

1 Are ATPE membership dues tax-deductible?

4 When is my ATPE membership effective?

ATPE membership dues are not deductible as charitable contributions for income tax purposes but may be deductible as miscellaneous itemized deductions, subject to IRS restrictions. It is estimated that 4.6 percent of your dues dollar is used for lobbying activities and is therefore not deductible.

For paper applications, your membership date is established when your application is received in the state office, or when your application is received, signed and dated by a designated local unit representative. For online applications, your membership date is established at 12:01 a.m. CST on the date following successful transmission of your online application and payment at atpe.org.

2 How does ATPE spend my membership dues? • $3.32 pays for a subscription to ATPE News (published four times per year) and includes all state and local sales taxes. • Up to $26 of Professional and Associate member dues and up to $6 of Teacher Trainee member dues pays for the Educators Professional Liability Insurance Policy.*

3 What does the Liability and Employment Rights

Defense Insurance* for the 2013-14 membership year cover?

Coverage applies to your activities as a Professional or Associate member in the course of your duties of employment with an educational institution, or to your activities as a Teacher Trainee member in the course of your duties as a student in a teacher education program in an accredited college or university. Coverage is underwritten by National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, Pa. ALL COVERAGE IS SUBJECT TO THE EXPRESS TERMS OF THE MASTER INSURANCE POLICY ISSUED TO ATPE AND KEPT ON FILE AT THE STATE OFFICE. View a detailed summary at atpe.org. The policy applies only to activities that begin during the period when coverage is effective and does not apply to activities that predate the coverage period. *

5 When is coverage effective? *

* Coverage begins on the later of 8/1/13 or your Membership Date and expires on 8/1/14 except for the following: COVERAGE IS EFFECTIVE ON 8/1/13 IF YOU RENEW MEMBERSHIP ANYTIME DURING AUGUST OR SEPTEMBER 2013, AND EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS DEFENSE INSURANCE IS NOT EFFECTIVE UNTIL 30 DAYS AFTER YOUR MEMBERSHIP DATE IF YOU JOIN AFTER 9/30/13 AND WERE ELIGIBLE FOR MEMBERSHIP FROM AUGUST 2013 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 2013. Eligibility for membership benefits is contingent upon receipt of the entire membership dues amount for your appropriate membership category. A disruption in payments to an authorized payment plan may result in discontinuation of such benefits, including cancellation of insurance coverage for the entire membership year, retroactive to Aug. 1 or your membership date. For further information, call (800) 777-2873.

6 What does ATPE-PAC do? The ATPE Political Action Committee (ATPE-PAC) accepts voluntary donations from members to advocate for ATPE’s legislative priorities. ATPE-PAC does not endorse political candidates. Donations to ATPEPAC are not a condition of employment or membership. A member may donate more or less than the suggested amount or may choose not to make a donation without it affecting his or her membership status, rights or benefits with ATPE. Donations are not deductible for federal income tax purposes.

ATPE Membership Categories You must join in the appropriate insured category in order to qualify for coverage. ATPE reserves the right to determine eligibility for the appropriate membership category. Commissioned peace officers are eligible for public membership only. Professional and Associate membership is open to persons employed in Texas by a public school district, institution of higher education, Regional Education Service Center, State Board for Educator Certification or the Texas Education Agency. If you have a question about the eligibility of job descriptions not listed below, call (800) 777-2873.

Insured Categories*

Uninsured Categories

PROFESSIONAL MEMBER ($145)/FIRST-TIME PROFESSIONAL MEMBER ($80)

ASSOCIATE MEMBER ($70)

COLLEGE STUDENT MEMBER (FREE)

• Administrator/ Supervisor

• Department Head/ Chair

• Regional Service Center Staff

• Aide to position in Professional category

• Educational Aide/ Technician

• Athletic Director/ Coordinator

• Diagnostician

• Alternative Center Aide

• Maintenance Worker

RETIRED MEMBER ($10)

• Instructional Officer

• School Psychologist/ Associate

• Bus Driver

• Nurse (LVN)

• Retired former school employee

• Athletic Trainer

• Intern Teacher

• Social Worker

• Cafeteria Worker

• At-Risk Coordinator

• Superintendent/Asst. Supt.

• Clerk–General

• Regional Service Center Aide

• Audiologist

• IT Director/ Coordinator

• Band/Choral Director

• Librarian

• Teacher

• Computer Programmer/Entry

• Coach

• Nurse (RN)

• Custodial Worker

• Security Guard (Unarmed)

• Counselor

• Deaf Interpreter

• Substitute Teacher

• Curriculum Director

• Parent/Community Coordinator

• Therapist/ Pathologist

• Dean of Instruction

• Principal/Asst. Prin.

• University Professor • Visiting Teacher

• Secretary

TEACHER TRAINEE MEMBER (FREE) • Student teacher in Texas

• Non-teaching college student

PUBLIC MEMBER ($10) • Friend of public education


extra credit

How can you help ATPE reach the next level? Right now … ATPE is:

ATPE is:

ATPE is:

ATPE is:

ATPE is:

Accepting nominations for the 2014 ATPE Educator of the Year Awards.

Keeping educators up-to-date with timely webinars covering classroom management, education advocacy, technology in the classroom and more.

Asking members and nonmembers for feedback on ATPE programs and services through our executive director’s Facebook series, Gary Asks.

Growing the ATPE Foundation’s ability to provide literacy, technology, and educator recruitment and retention programs.

Prepping for the 2014 primaries by surveying candidates on their education views.

You can: Nominate exceptional colleagues for these awards by Feb. 17. Recipients in five categories (Administrator, Associate, Elementary Teacher, Secondary Teacher and Special Services Educator) will receive $5,000 each. Learn more at www. atpe.org/Resources/ Awards&Grants/ edofyearinfo.asp.

You can: You can:

You can:

Visit http://eventcall registration.com/reg/ atpeportal.html to sign up for these webinars and earn continuing professional education (CPE) credit.

Like ATPE on Facebook and comment on our posts—and share them with your friends.

Make a year-end taxdeductible donation to the ATPE Foundation at atpefoundation.org.

You can: Sign up to receive Teach the Vote blog posts at http://eepurl.com/y2RSb.

How can ATPE better serve you? Let Executive Director Gary G. Godsey know at ggodsey@atpe.org.

The ATPE Foundation is registered in Texas as a nonprofit corporation and is a public charity exempt from federal income tax under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

winter 2013

atpe.org | 47


Each One, Reach One

Have you asked a colleague to join ATPE? ATPE members like you—the professional educators of Texas—are our best ambassadors. So once you’ve finished reading this issue of ATPE News, please share it with a colleague, and ask him to fill out and mail in the ATPE membership application on page 45.

Thank you for everything you do for Texas public education—and for ATPE.

Winter 2013 ATPE News  

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