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NEXT WEEK: EDUCATION

VOL. XCIII NO. 48

DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 29 KISLEV 5779

BUSINESS & FINANCE

Community ‘Shark Tank’ Spotlights Female Innovators

ISRAEL BONDS

LOVE AND ADMIRATION FOR RABBI HELLER FILL THE ROOM AT THE DINNER.

FORBES' 30 UNDER 30

TWO LOCAL WOMEN LAND ON FORBES' 2019 LIST FOR MARKETING & ADVERTISING, FOR THEIR BRAINCHILD, OUT OF OFFICE MEDIA.

CHAI STYLE ART

BUSINESS MOGUL MARK SILBERMAN AND HIS ARTISTIC WIFE, LINDA, INSPIRE LEADERSHIP, WITH GLAMOUR.


2 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


THIS WEEK PUBLISHER

MICHAEL A. MORRIS michael@atljewishtimes.com

MANAGING PUBLISHER & INTERIM EDITOR KAYLENE LADINSKY

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EDITORIAL Associate Editor

RONI ROBBINS roni@atljewishtimes.com Staff Writer

LOGAN C. RITCHIE lritchie@atljewishtimes.com Contributor & Proofreader

LEAH R. HARRISON leah@atljewishtimes.com

Contributors This Week BOB BAHR DAVE SCHECHTER EDDIE SAMUELS JAN JABEN-EILON MARCIA CALLER JAFFE RABBI JOAB EICHENBERG-EILON SHAINDLE SCHMUCKLER

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BRENDA GELFAND

Taking Care of Business This week we highlight the Jewish movers and shakers in Atlanta business and finance. The tycoons we interview represent such industries as real estate, accounting and law, alongside standout companies from Israel. We also profile 11 female entrepreneurs of a new Israel-America women’s accelerator sponsored, in part, by the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta. These women will present their startup pitches next week to a panel of business leaders and prospective investors in Jewish Atlanta’s version of the “Shark Tank” reality show. Also reaching for the stars is a young Jewish woman from Marietta who made Forbes’ 2019 30 Under 30 List. There’s so much success to celebrate in the Atlanta Jewish community. Since it’s still Chanukah, we take you to holiday gatherings across the city, from the Atlanta BeltLine to the Consul General of India in Sandy Springs and fur-

ther north to Avalon in Alpharetta. In dining news, we review Fire Pit Pizza in Grant Park started by Leslie Cohen, who won a Food Network competition. Another novel concept in dining is Stop Think Chew, which focuses on healthy, locally sourced food. Our Chai Style Art this week features a couple who are top Federation leaders. They show off their Sandy Springs home filled with Western art and original paintings. Talking about nonprofits, we share how much some locally-connected Jewish organizations raised on Giving Tuesday. Another fundraiser, Israel Bonds Atlanta, honored Wendy and Rabbi Josh Heller at a dinner Nov. 29 with guest speaker, Israeli TV journalist Dana Weiss, who is often referred to as Israel’s Diane Sawyer. Whether it’s raising money or making money, those who make a difference

in our Jewish and business community can take pride in their accomplishments and the high standards they set. ■

CONTENTS LOCAL NEWS���������������������������������� 4 ISRAEL NEWS������������������������������� 10 COVER STORY������������������������������ 12 BUSINESS & FINANCE��������������� 16 DINING�������������������������������������������� 22 ARTS������������������������������������������������ 25 CALENDAR������������������������������������� 28 COMMUNITY��������������������������������� 30 KEEPING IT KOSHER������������������ 34 BRAIN FOOD���������������������������������� 35 MARKETPLACE���������������������������� 36 CLOSING THOUGHTS����������������� 37 OBITUARIES���������������������������������� 38

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kaylene@atljewishtimes.com The Atlanta Jewish Times is printed in Georgia and is an equal opportunity employer. The opinions expressed in the Atlanta Jewish Times do not necessarily reflect those of the newspaper. Periodicals Postage Paid at Atlanta, Ga. POSTMASTER send address changes to Atlanta Jewish Times 270 Carpenter Drive Suite 320, Atlanta Ga 30328. Established 1925 as The Southern Israelite Phone: (404) 883-2130 www.atlantajewishtimes.com ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES (ISSN# 0892-33451) IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SOUTHERN ISRAELITE, LLC 270 Carpenter Drive, Suite 320, Atlanta, GA 30328 © 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES Printed by Walton Press Inc. MEMBER Conexx: America Israel Business Connector American Jewish Press Association Sandy Springs/Perimeter Chamber of Commerce Please send all photos, stories and editorial content to: submissions@atljewishtimes.com

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 3


LOCAL NEWS Giving Tuesday Keeps on Giving By Bob Bahr

The Jewish National Fund was among the big winners of last week’s Giving Tuesday fundraiser. The one-day social media event raised $3.1 million for the organization and its Atlanta office. Giving Tuesday has grown since its inception in 2012 to become an international phenomenon that reaches 150 nations and generates 3.6 million gifts in a single day. It was started at the 92Y, a major Jewish community center in Manhattan, with the support of the United Nations Foundation. This year, total contributions for Giving Tuesday were expected to top $400 million. According to JNF’s national spokesperson, Adam Brill, the campaign's success has increased in the six years it has been participating, particularly among younger donors. “It’s very popular among millennials and what we call JNF Futures, who are our fastest growing demographic. Those are young people between the ages of 22 and 40 and that’s a key audience for many folks in this country. You want to go where they are.” As an example of how online fundraising activities like Giving Tuesday can inspire a new generation of motivated young people, Brill points to the new Sababa Society that debuted last month at a special media event in Sandy Springs and on the JNF website. It was inspired by the work of Ziv Zusman, a 13-year-old Sandy Springs resident, whose bar mitzvah program became a national JNF fundraiser. He suggested the new Sababa special donor program to the JNF’s national leadership as a way to involve tweens and teens in their local communities, while learning about Israel and support-

Giving Tuesday raised an estimated $400 million in a single day.

ing Jewish National Fund. Participants choose from a variety of activities and participate in their own communities, earning points towards prizes, badges and special recognition. In the local community, at least 19 organizations participated in last week’s event. It is all part of the last-minute drive to encourage charitable donations before the tax year ends on Dec. 31. Some organizations raise as much as 50 percent of their annual donations during the last month of the year. According to Nancy Weissman, executive director of the Jewish Interest Free Loan of Atlanta, the nonprofit opted out of Giving Tuesday to concentrate, instead, on a campaign tied to the Chanukah holiday. “We have never done one before,” Weissman commented, “so we are giving it a go.” But for a larger organization, it can

be an opportunity to encourage new donors or to increase contributions among those who don’t usually respond to direct mail or phone solicitations. For Atlanta’s Jewish Family & Career Services, a major social services organization that hired a new chief development officer earlier this year, it’s one way to help raise over $3 million in annual donations. “Giving Tuesday is a chance for JF&CS to be a part of the Atlanta nonprofit community and to be part of an international movement," according Chantal Spector, marketing manager. “It is a chance to expand our donor base. It also is an opportunity to engage the next generation of donors, since most of it is social media driven.” In the Jewish community, philanthropy is a major economic engine and

American Jews, about 5 million people, are generous givers. Several years ago, The Forward newspaper reported that, not including synagogues and other religious institutions, the Jewish community’s federations, schools and other such organizations had net assets of $26 billion. The publication estimated that in 2014, when the report was published, American Jews contributed $12 billion to $14 billion to these charities. That was more than the U.S. government’s entire budget for the Department of the Interior, which runs, among other programs, all the national parks, and oversees Guam, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands. American Jewish charities employ, according to The Forward, more people than the Ford Motor Company. ■

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LOCAL NEWS

Etz Chaim Kicks Off $4 Million Investment in Future By Roni Robbins In what is being billed as its single-largest capital campaign, the 40-year-old Congregation Etz Chaim recently launched its #Renewal2020 effort. The Conservative Marietta synagogue plans to raise an estimated $4.3 million to renovate its social hall, kitchens, sanctuary and education wing. So far, about 40 families have donated more than $2 million, about half of the campaign’s goal. The renovation, announced Nov. 19, sets the synagogue up for the future, and is an effort to meet the needs of all members, from the youngest families to those with hearing or mobility issues, said David Miller, who chairs the campaign with his wife, Cheryl, a former synagogue president. Among the biggest fixes is making the lower bimah accessible to all congregants – there are just under 600 members – and improving the synagogue’s lighting, heating, ventilation, air, and sound systems. Renovation of the education wing “reflects our commitment to education and our younger families.” The beautification of the social hall and kitchen upgrades “offer congregants an improved and lower-cost option to hold simchas in the shul.” And updates to the sanctuary make the synagogue more inclusive, from wheelchair accessibility to the lower bimah to an enhanced sound system, he said. “Everything we are doing will update the aesthetics of the facility, while improving its operational efficiencies and reducing maintenance costs,” said Bob Bachrach, a past president and the project’s manager. Many of the updates are needed because of the age of the building, erected in 1981, and its original equipment, he said. Among the renovation items: • Install a hearing aid-compatible system to help those who are hearing-impaired. • Update current sound system by installing new speakers. • Replace six HVAC systems and add two new systems, one in each kitchen. • Replace all lighting in the sanctuary and social hall with an LED system. • Reconfigure the roof in the social hall and install an attractive, sound-absorbing ceiling. • Replace floor in the social hall as well as windows with broken seals. • Install stained glass windows flanking the upper bimah. Construction should begin in June 2019 with the sanctuary and kitchen renovations completed in time for the High Holidays. Work will resume with the social hall renovation after the holidays and the project should be complete in the spring of 2020, Bachrach said. Etz Chaim is working with Collins Cooper Carusi Architects to complete the initial construction drawings, and chose Gay Construction as its general contractor following a competitive bid process. The synagogue will work with Ascalon Studios of New Jersey on the stained-glass design and installation. “We met with a few key donors to be sure we had a strong start and have continued to meet with other

Etz Chaim’s $4.3 million renovation will include refurbished pews and wheelchair accessibility to the lower bimah. As part of its renovation, the Etz Chaim social hall will be updated to make it more appealing for simchas.

families, who traditionally give to the synagogue, in small group settings, to get their commitments,” Cheryl Miller said. The project is based on feedback the synagogue received from focus groups last summer, according to a Nov. 19 letter members received about the project. “This amazing endeavor poises us for the future, allowing us to be more inclusive, more energy-efficient, and more cost-effective on a daily basis,” the Millers

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wrote in their letter to the congregation. Just last year, the synagogue updated its library. In 2015, the chapel was renovated, and in 2012, the lobby. Some of the aesthetic finishes from the lobby will be incorporated into the sanctuary and social hall “for a fresh, cohesive look,” the Millers wrote to congregants. “We like to call the entire construction undertaking ‘purposeful and pretty,’ updating many of our critical and essential behind-the-wall operations.” ■

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LOCAL NEWS

Hellers and Weiss Boost Bonds By Marcia Caller Jaffe Congregation B’nai Torah hosted more than 330 for the Israel Bonds Atlanta Tribute Dinner honoring Wendy and Rabbi Josh Heller on Nov. 29. The keynote speaker was Israeli TV journalist Dana Weiss, who has reported on nine elections and hosts one of the most watched news shows in Israel. During the cocktail hour, warmth and admiration radiated as the Hellers worked the room with greetings and hugs surrounded by family such as Josh’s mother, Lynne, who came from Boston, and Wendy’s parents, Ellen and Ed Betel, traveling from Detroit. Eve and Brian Frist are original B’nai Torah members. “We are grateful for Rabbi Heller’s ability to grow the congregation and continue to attract younger people.” The rabbi’s assistant, Sarah Woelz, said, “He is challenging and interesting – exactly as a rabbi should be, ‘above and beyond.’” To kick off the program, B’nai Torah president Michael Siegel said the

6 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Wendy Heller, honoree, was delighted that her parents came from Detroit to celebrate. She is pictured here with her father, Ed Betel.

full room was a testament to the Hellers’ leadership. In addition to the Hellers, the focus of the evening was Israel. One of the country’s most visible journalists, Weiss is a reporter and legal expert for Channel

Enjoying the cocktail hour are, from left, Merrie Edelstein; Ron Lipsitz; Ed Goldberg, Israel Bonds Southeast chair; and Sarah Woelz, Rabbi Heller’s assistant.

2, the largest television station in Israel, who has earned the nickname ‘Israel’s Diane Sawyer.’ Over her 20-year career in broadcast journalism, she has moderated Israeli prime minister debates and covered every war in the past two decades, as well as Rabin’s assassination. Today, she anchors the prime-time evening news, “Saturday Night with Dana Weiss,” the top-rated news program in Israel. Weiss was both optimistic and gutsy, giving perspective and not succumbing to Trump-bashing. She answered the provocative question, “Is time working for or against Israel?” She concluded that Israel is making good use of passing time for the following reasons: The Palestinian conflict doesn’t appear to be solvable. People are starting to realize “that there is no one there to talk to.” Israel has solutions to a better way of life, Weiss said.

Trump is the most influential player in the Middle East today. He is adored by Israelis, who feel he has their back. Trump and Netanyahu together have engendered relationships with Russia, Jordan, Chad, Saudi Arabia and Egypt, underscoring a common foe – Iran, she said. Netanyahu has his political troubles but has provided 10 years of stability. He will face a nasty election, but the center/ left has no viable candidate. The contest will be between the right and the far right, she said. Weiss concluded by quoting her 98-year-old grandfather, “Each day is better than the day before.” Weiss said, “After all, we have brought the world cherry tomatoes, movie star Gal Gadot, and hair removal systems. … I chose optimism.” After Weiss concluded, Ed Goldberg, Southeast chair for Israel Bonds, related his 11 visits to Israel over the years as a

Congregant Stewart Greenberg congratulated Rabbi Heller prior to the program.

Aprio’s Richard Kopelman delivered the award presentation to the Hellers.


LOCAL NEWS

Dana Weiss is known as the Diane Sawyer of Israel. Her talk was well-organized, real and optimistic.

witness to bonds paving the way for the impressive buildings and highways lining Israel today. More than $1 billion in bonds sales have been raised in the past six years, said Executive Director Bradley Young. “We have a perfect repayment record.” (As noted by Warren Buffet in a video shown at the event). Young ended by thanking Fifth Third Bank for sponsoring the evening. Bonds advocate Richard Kopelman made the award presentation to the Hellers. Having traveled together as families, he said, “Rabbi Heller has flawless conversational Hebrew and a photographic memory, but not so adept at driving directions.” He praised Wendy Heller’s tenacity and honesty. Noting the Chanukah season, Rabbi Heller related the bravery of the Israel Defense Forces to that of the Maccabees in their defining struggles. He noted the day as the 71st anniversary of the United Nations voting to establish the State of Israel and said, “Bonds allows Israel to grow with dignity, not charity.” Wendy Heller remembered her grandparents as Holocaust survivors, and that her grandfather fought in the Haganah. She recognized the congregation for becoming “like family” for more than 14 years. Lowell Fine closed the evening by encouraging everyone to buy at least one bond, saying “Israel’s good record enhances our ties to the Jewish homeland.” ■

Congregation B'nai Torah president Michael Siegel chats with Brad Young, Israel Bonds executive director. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 7


LOCAL NEWS

The American Jewish Committee co-sponsored the third annual Chanukah celebration with the Indian Consulate.

Ritesh Desai, co-founder of the Global Indian Jewish Relations Institute, now on Governor Elect Brian Kemp’s transition committee, brought good Ambassador Shorer sang Rock of Ages with Lavina and wishes to the standing-room-only ceremony. Nissim Reuben, assistant director of the Asia Pacific Institute.

Beautiful Lights Illuminate India-Israel Relations By Marcia Caller Jaffe For the third year, the Consul General of India, Vijay Jayant Kulkarni, sponsored a program and dinner to celebrate Indian-Jewish tradition for the first night of Chanukah. Located on Glenridge Drive in Sandy Springs, the consulate hosted an overflowing crowd, including former Atlanta mayor Sam Massell; Ambassador Judith Shorer, consul general of Israel to the Southeast; Dov

Wilker, regional director of American Jewish Committee Atlanta; and a variety of Indian diplomats. Nissim Reuben, assistant director of the Asia Pacific Institute, and wife, Lavina, led prayers in Hebrew and English and spoke of Jewish heroism vis-a-vis the story of Israel today. Ritesh Desai, representing Gov. Nathan Deal and Gov. Elect Brian Kemp, spoke of the unity of the HinduJewish relationship as powerful. He recalled Ghandi,

who taught peace by example. AJC’s Wilker took a somber note by recalling the anti-Semitic attack in Mumbai 10 years ago. He also spoke of the constant vigilance in remembering religious rights of minorities in peril like the Jews in Europe, Copts in Egypt, and minorities in North Korea and Iran. The program concluded by noting the daily El Al flight to Tel Aviv from India, the closeness and large volume of mutual trade partnerships, and the frequent visitations between the two countries, who share the vision and victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, and good over evil. A bounteous, traditional vegetarian Indian meal lined the lower level. ■ As a new tradition, all candles were lit on the chanukiyah.

Photo by Deborah Herr Richter // The exterior of the

consulate was as festive as the mood inside.

8 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


LOCAL NEWS

Photos by Eddie Samuels // Amy Sacks Zeide

poses for a portrait in the toy room.

Kids let loose on bouncy slides and castles.

Children enjoy games and activities led by volunteers in the carnival room.

Amy’s Holiday Party Delivers Joy, Toys to Children in Need By Eddie Samuels For the 23rd year, Amy’s Holiday Party, put on by Creating Connected Communities, provided fun and toys for children in need. The party was Sunday at the Ramada Plaza Atlanta Capitol Park Hotel. This year, more than 1,000 children were recipients of more than 2,500 toys, 3,000 books and an afternoon of entertainment and joy. Amy’s Holiday Party started when a 12-year old Amy Sacks Zeide heard about gifts that were stolen from a local homeless shelter. The next year, she decided to do something about it. “It actually started as my bat mitzvah project in 1995 when I was 13 years old,” Sacks Zeide said. “Every year after that, the agencies would keep asking us to be involved and more and more teens would like to be involved.” A far cry from the 25 kids at the first holiday party, the event is now a massive undertaking, requiring hundreds of volunteers, including more than 400 teens, many of whom are involved in planning the event. “We were finding that all these teen-

agers between eighth and 12th grade are looking for meaningful opportunities to give back and feel like they were impacting their communities, so we bring these two groups together,” Sacks Zeide said. Jeremy Weiner first volunteered for the holiday party in eighth grade, and now, as a senior at North Atlanta High School, is one of the 80 Jewish teens on the Leadership Development Program who help to organize the event. “In LDP, we have monthly meetings and monthly events,” Weiner said. “We learn about the poverty line, about underdeveloped communities, and the people right outside our own door who are struggling to make it day-to-day.” Weiner explained that the holiday party, in particular, was always a special event. “Yes, it feels really good to do something for someone else, but I’ve also learned a lot about myself, and I’ve learned what I want to do when I get older,” Weiner said. The most popular room at the party was, without a doubt, the toy room, where children take turns pairing up with a volunteer and combing their way through tables stacked high with differ-

A teen volunteer paints a child’s face and hands. For more photos, visit AJT's website.

Volunteers help children select gifts in the toy room.

ent choices. Options range from dolls and action figures to footballs, headphones and everything in between. Beyond the toy room were games galore, activities like face-painting and cookie decorating, and bouncy castles and slides, as well as a dance floor and DJ, and rooms for moms and dads as well as babies and teens. A parent who brought her daughter to the event, Anna Grant, explained that she was astounded by the size of the par-

ty and that the biggest issue she was having was convincing her daughter to leave. “I’m looking for her right now. She was with two other girls and her [teen volunteer], so I know she’s having an amazing time,” Grant said. Rita Philson, who brought five grandchildren with her, agreed. “I’m really surprised; I’ve been in Atlanta forever and did not know this existed,” Philson said. “They’re in heaven. I would definitely come back again.” ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 9


ISRAEL PRIDE

News From Our Jewish Home

Israel brings solar to Angola.

Angola Benefits from Israel’s Cutting-Edge Technology Israel has allocated $60 million to invest in the construction of a solar power plant in the coastal Benguela province in Angola to upgrade the provision of power in the area and boost its industry. Israeli ambassador to Angola Oren Rozenblat told journalists on Nov. 14 after a meeting with the provincial Governor Rui Falcão that the Israeli program was a response to a request from the local government, according to several media reports. Rozenblat explained that the province of Benguela suffers from irregularities in the production and distribution of electricity, and the project aims to rectify

this problem, with an emphasis on powering its industrial park. The solar plant, capable of producing 50 megawatts, will be built by an Israeli company as part of a project that Israel has developed in the last five years for sustainable growth in African countries. Rozenblat also emphasized that Israel’s primary focus in Benguela is the agricultural sector. Israel has invested $300 million in agriculture in Angola since 2014. The United States and Israel in December 2017 pledged to work together to reduce energy poverty in Africa. Israel has developed some of the world’s most advanced solar energy equipment and enjoys a nearly endless supply of sunshine. Israel was named the leading force in 2014 in the development of clean technologies, beating 40 other countries. Israel has a long history of sharing its expertise with African countries, and Jerusalem hopes that stronger ties will lead to a shift in voting trends at the U.N. and other global forums, reversing what Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has labeled the “automatic majority against Israel.”

Photo courtesy of Mark Eidelman

Professor Mark Eidelman, seated center, surrounded by the African trainees.

Israeli Trains African Doctors to Treat Orthopedic Birth Defects Dozens of pediatricians from Ethiopia and neighboring countries recently participated in an Israeli course that trained them to heal common pediatric orthopedic deformities. The course, held for the first time in Africa, was led by Professor Mark Eidelman, director of the Pediatric Orthopedics Unit at Rambam’s Ruth Rappaport Children’s Hospital in Haifa. Some 50 local doctors participated in this four-day course, which included lectures about different treatment types, practical workshops and surgeries. The Black Lion Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, hosted the course, which was sponsored by CURE International, a

nonprofit organization that helps children in third-world countries suffering from medical issues, in cooperation with POSNA, the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America. The Ethiopian hospital’s pediatric orthopedic services are directed by two doctors from England who relocated to Ethiopia several years ago and dedicated their time to improving treatment conditions for the local population. They started the course to give treatment tools to local medical teams dealing with one of the most common problems in the country. “In Israel, like in many other western countries, they know how to diagnose problems … and treat them in a timely manner,” Eidelman said. “This helps these patients to enjoy a higher quality of life and prevent their conditions from deteriorating. Now, for dozens of local doctors, there are tools and knowledge to help their patients.” Eidelman was joined on this important mission by two doctors from the U.S. The Israeli doctor believes the main problem is the difficulty of African doctors traveling to the U.S. to receive training there, so he decided to bring the training to them. ■

Today in Israeli History

Hadassah founder Henrietta Szold poses with the first graduating class of the Nurses’ Training Institute on Dec. 7, 1921.

Dec. 7, 1921: Twenty-two women graduate from the Nurses’ Training Institute at Rothschild Hospital in Jerusalem, making them the first nurses to receive their degrees in the Land of Israel. Hadassah opened the institute in 1918. The graduates, who represent the diversity of the Yishuv, go to work at Hadassah-run hospitals in Jaffa, Jerusalem, Safed, Tiberias and Haifa. Dec. 8, 1885: Joseph Sprinzak, the first speaker of the Knesset and a twotime interim president of Israel, is born in Moscow. He and his Zionist family settle in Warsaw after Jews are expelled from Moscow in 1891. He starts the Zeirei Zion (Youth of Zion) youth group in 1905, makes aliyah in 1910, and helps establish many of the institutions that form Is10 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

rael’s foundation, such as the Histadrut labor federation, the Assembly of Representatives and Bank Hapoalim. Dec. 9, 1914: Shmuel Katz, a leader of Revisionist Judaism and a founder of Menachem Begin’s Herut party, is born in Johannesburg, South Africa. Known as “Mookie,” he makes aliyah in 1936 and joins the Irgun militia the next year. He spends World War II in London, raising money for the Irgun and editing a weekly magazine, The Jewish Standard, then returns to the Land of Israel in 1946. He arranges for arms to be shipped to the Irgun from France in 1948 aboard the Altalena, which David Ben-Gurion orders sunk. Katz is elected to the first Knesset.

Knesset Speaker Joseph Sprinzak swears in Yitzhak Ben-Zvi as president on Dec. 10, 1952.

Dec. 10, 1952: Yitzhak Ben-Zvi is inaugurated as Israel’s second president after a 30-day mourning period for his predecessor, Chaim Weizmann, and two

days after being elected on the third ballot by the Knesset against Rabbi Mordechai Nurock and Yitzhak Gruenbaum. Ben-Zvi, a signer of the Declaration of Independence in 1948, serves three terms until his death in April 1963.

British Colonial Secretary Arthur Creech Jones (left) speaks with Moshe Sharett, the Jewish Agency’s representative to the United Nations, in March 1948.

Dec. 11, 1947: Arthur Creech Jones, the British colonial secretary, opens a debate in the House of Commons about the end of the British role in Palestine by revealing that the British Mandate will end May 15, 1948, and that all British troops will be withdrawn by Aug. 1. He expresses the hope that “Palestine and the Arab world … can now proceed to play a larger part in the general pattern of mankind’s march” despite mounting violence between the Jewish and Arab communities. Dec. 12, 1920: The General Federation of Jewish Labor, known as the Histadrut,

A 1950 poster declares that an immigrant worker’s place is in the Histadrut.

is founded in Haifa to serve as a neutral, independent trade union representing all the Jewish workers in Palestine. David Ben-Gurion is elected its secretary-general in 1921, and by 1927 it has 25,000 members, or 75 percent of the Jewish workforce in Palestine. The Histadrut remains a major force in the Israeli economy. Dec. 13, 1961: After the two-day reading of a 100,000-word verdict finding Adolf Eichmann guilty of 15 charges, including murder, crimes against the Jewish people and crimes against humanity, Israeli prosecutor Gideon Hausner pleads with the three judges overseeing the trial to sentence the Nazi to death. The court condemns Eichmann to death Dec. 15, and he is hanged May 31, 1962. ■ Items are provided by the Center for Israel Education (www.israeled.org), where you can find more details.


ISRAEL NEWS

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Dikembe Mutombo gives the No. 1 signal while visiting Sheba Medical Center.

Mutombo autographs basketballs for sick children at Sheba Medical Center.

NBA Legend Makes Historic Visit to Israel NBA all-star Dikembe Mutombo recently made his first trip to Israel’s Sheba Medical Center in the hopes of bringing Sheba’s cutting-edge medical care to the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2019. Sheba is the largest and most comprehensive hospital in Israel and the Middle East. Mutombo met with Sheba’s world-renowned medical experts to discuss this potential collaboration. He also visited with sick Israeli and Palestinian children, signed basketballs and gave away T-shirts to patients and fans. He even got to experience firsthand the virtual reality technology at Sheba Rehabilitation Hospital. The shared goal between the partners is to bring Sheba’s advanced medical knowledge to the Biamba Marie Mutombo Hospital – named after Mutombo’s mother – which the NBA star founded in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2007 as a project formed from his long-time passion for healthcare. “I believe that healthcare is a human right. It doesn’t matter where you come from. I believe that everyone who is born, that is living on this earth, should have access to healthcare,” Mutombo said. “I have been greatly inspired by my visit to Sheba Medical Center and have seen

some amazing technology. I believe that Sheba’s humanitarian mission staff will be a great help to my people at the hospital I built in the Democratic Republic of Congo. I’m sure I will be coming back for more meetings in the future.” Sheba’s leadership team is honored by the future partnership, as it reflects its mission to provide healthcare to the Middle East and the entire world. Sheba has a long history of humanitarian efforts, such as its work in Zambia amidst a devastating cholera outbreak. Mutombo met with senior members of Sheba Medical Center’s staff, including professor Arnon Afek, associate director general and acting director of Sheba General Hospital, Dr. Itai Pessach, director of the Edmond and Lily Safra Children’s Hospital, and professor Elhanan Bar-On, who serves as director of Israel’s Center for Disaster Medicine and Humanitarian Response. Bar-On affirmed Sheba Medical Center’s excitement to work with another hospital and the NBA player: “We feel that there’s a lot in common in what we do and what is done by Mr. Mutombo, and I think we can definitely collaborate and take this to very beautiful places.” ■

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BUSINESS & FINANCE Community ‘Shark Tank’ Spotlights Female Innovators A woman feels her sweaty palms, notices a tremble in her knees and smooths her jacket. Walking on stage, the bright lights and jam-packed audience cause a squeak in her speech but there’s no looking back now. It’s pitch day. Like the fast-paced TV Logan C. hit “Shark Tank,” 11 female entrepreneurs in the Atlanta Ritchie Jewish community are set to present their innovative startup pitches next week to a panel of business leaders and a couple hundred prospective investors and partners. The women, chosen from a pool of 20 applicants – whose businesses range from wellness and sports to education tools and jewelry – will appear on Dec. 12 at The Temple. Pitch day (called The Exchange) is the culmination of the Federation’s five-

week crash course for the first-of-its-kind, Women’s Accelerator Israeli-Style. While the panelists won’t choose which business concept wins a contract, as on the reality TV show, the audience will vote on the best pitch, according to Jori Mendel, Federation’s vice president of innovation. One of the objectives of the accelerator is to teach the participants to present themselves and their products effectively. “You have to be bold and take a risk,” Mendel stated. “Be clear about what you are asking for, your needs. The product may be exactly what someone wants. That’s the magic.” The Federation accelerator is a partnership with Hub Central ATL, Hadassah of Greater Atlanta and the Jewish Women’s Connection.

During the past away, the innovators two months, the class are putting on the fingathered for threeishing touches and hour sessions to depracticing their prefine, sharpen and map sentations. business plans; meet A panel of local Israeli mentors; hear experts from law, real from experts; and estate, finance and learn how to promote technology sectors a business. will present insights, Orna Sharon, then listen to the infounder of Hub Cennovators’ rapid-fire tral and the driving pitches. Jori Mendel, Jewish Federation’s force behind the acThe panelists are: vice president of innovation celerator, is passionRobert Arogeti, CEO ate about innovation, women in business of Aprio; Tal Postelnik, owner of Bellina and the Atlanta-Israel connection. Alimentary; Garrett Van de Grift, CEO of To build an “innovation ecosys- Red Wizard Group; and Brad Ruffkess, tem,” experts from Georgia Pacific, Geor- CEO and founder of BoxLock. gia State University, Goizueta Business School at Emory University, the UniverAJT interviewed each innovator sity of Georgia, as well as private compa- about their experience, their companies nies participated. and the long road to overnight success. Now that The Exchange is just days

ish families in Decatur and Intown Atlanta, and her app fits right into that realm. Callen said it was at a meeting with her former boss, Howie Marcus, past program director of the Marcus JCC, when her idea became a reality. “I told him about my idea and he said, ‘What are you waiting for? You’re not getting any younger,” she laughed. “He knows me well. He gave me the push and encouragement I needed to move forward.” About the accelerator, she said, it’s like a fasttracked business school. Classmates share books, podcasts, authors and experts and the impetus is on each person to take what she needs and delve deeper.

Mozi Karen Callen, 43, developed Mozi, an app that connects families seeking to socialize through an activity, either previously scheduled like a sporting event, or spontaneous like a playdate at the park. “If a parent is interested in an activity, like visiting the new exhibit at the children’s museum, and wants to see who is joining, it can be posted, and others can join. On [school break], we are going swimming at the MLK pool. People can see we will be there. Or, if we want to do something and nothing really comes to mind, I can see what the folks in my contact list are planning.” Callen is a passionate community organizer of Jew12 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Botanic Springs A native of Israel, Jamie Drummer Fox, 29, used Israeli technology to develop a countertop device for creating essential oils from herbs and other botanicals. The essential oils still, believed to be the first and only one of its kind, is as simple to use as a coffeemaker. Consumers place herbs into the patented still and

fill the jug with water. In just 10 minutes, two products are condensed and ready to use in various ways. The hydrosol (herb-infused water) can be poured into a diffuser or added to cooking, while the essential oil can be added to soaps, candles or lotion. Leftover pulp is compostable. Being new to Atlanta, Fox enrolled in the accelerator to make connections. “I wanted to meet people. I’ve already learned so much about how to raise funds and find strategic partners,” said Fox, who holds an MBA from Bar Ilan University. “It’s a long road, so there’s a lot of starting over with each new session. Every time I go back to the beginning and tweak my pitch, I see that every stage is leading to a better result. It takes years to achieve overnight success,” she added. “I am very excited about building a wellness brand, employing more people and spreading the idea of using herbs as part of day-to-day living,” she said, adding that home chefs to massage therapists have a need for her cutting-edge technology.

Botanic Springs is a countertop device that creates essential oils from herbs and botanicals.


BUSINESS & FINANCE

Gurvitch brought Catchball to the Marcus JCC.

Catchball Rachel Gurvitch, 43, who is from Israel, is responsible for bringing Catchball to the MJCCA. Similar to volleyball, Catchball has been attracting women – mostly moms – from as far as Alpharetta for the past two years. It also created hype in Atlanta’s Israeli Jewish community. The waitlist to join a Catchball league is so long that she could double the league. Her biggest challenge is to pro-

vide enough space for the number of participants. As a kinesiology and health professor and lifelong athlete, Gurvitch said Catchball connects all the dots. It is more than an international sport for women ages 35 to 55. It serves as a support group, a social community and a release for those who want to re-engage in athletics after having children. “Part of my job is to generate new knowledge. I saw Catchball as such a powerful, dynamic activity and decided to take it into public schools for teachers,” said the mom of three children. “Research indicates that teaching is one of the most stressful professions. Teachers don’t have time to take care of their own health and be active, … so I brought Catchball to schools and measured the stress levels of teachers, the motivation of physical activity and its contribution to the school’s culture.” Gurvitch’s goal through the accelerator is to identify more coaches and locations to play Catchball in Atlanta.

Platinum Platters Michele Weiner-Merbaum, who is in her mid50s, grew up cooking with her parents. About five years ago she became a caretaker for her father, who passed away after a battle with cancer, and immediately her mother was diagnosed with Alzheim-

Michele WeinerMerbaum of Platinum Platters sells homemade baked goods, snacks and other sweets.

er’s disease. She was taking care of everyone else. Cooking was her therapy. Platinum Platters became a reality after a tasting in her home last year. She asked friends to bring someone, stop by her home and taste a myriad of cakes, chocolate bark and goodies. “I stood back and let them taste. It was very quiet. A friend of a friend came over and asked, ‘Why aren’t you selling this?’ I started to cry. People really loved my food,” she said. Her specialty company makes baked goods, candies, chocolates, decorated cookies and chocolate dipped pretzels in any color and any theme. Her glutenfree and vegan line, perfect for Paleo diets, features dark chocolate cocoa nibs, vegan chocolate ganache coconut cups and “Best Dates Evahh” with organic coconut. Is she an entrepreneur yet? “Right now, I am one in training. There is so much more to learn. At first, I cooked for the love of it. I got overwhelmed with the business and marketing end because I just wanted to cook,” she said, noting her accelerator mentor helped break her out of her comfort zone.

Laura K. Schilling, J.D., CPA, CFP®, CSA® Financial Innovations, LLC and Estate Innovations, LLC

6111 Peachtree Dunwoody Road, Suite F101 Atlanta, GA 30328 Main 404-458-0065 laura@financialinnovations.biz www.financialinnovations.biz

BEST OF JEWISH ATLANTA

Laura K. Schilling, J.D., CPA, Certified Financial Planner (CFP®), Certified Senior Advisor (CSA®), is principal and founder of Financial Innovations, LLC and Laura K. Schilling, Esq, CPA, CSA, Estate Innovations, LLC. She is licensed to practice law in Georgia and Florida. Laura has been published in Forbes magazine as well as Best Self magazine. Clients benefit from Laura’s legal, accounting, and financial planning expertise. This diverse background enables her to review a client’s financial situation from many different perspectives. Laura began her professional career as a CPA at Habif, Arogeti, & Wynne, now Aprio, an Atlanta-based accounting firm. She later earned a law degree and established a legal practice in 1997 specializing in estates, wills, and trusts – now called Laura K. Schilling, Esq, CPA, CSA, Estate Innovations, LLC. As someone who is active in the Jewish community, she is so honored and touched to receive this prestigious award.

Securities offered through Triad Advisors, LLC. Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services offered through Financial Innovations, LLC. Financial Innovations, LLC is not affiliated with Triad Advisors, LLC. Over 4000 Jewish Atlanta voters participated in this year’s readers’ choice, to nominate and vote for their favorite business in a variety of categories. Laura Schilling won 4th place in the category of Best Investments & Financial Services in the Atlanta Jewish Times’ 2018 Special Edition: “Best of Jewish Atlanta: Readers’ Choice Awards.” ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 13


BUSINESS & FINANCE

Senior Select Seal
During a visit to Massachusetts, Alison O’Neil, 58, heard that an older friend had lost a severe amount of weight. She went to check on the 82-year-old. Down 30 pounds, she was standing in the kitchen struggling to open a bottle. “All I really wanted was some cranberry juice, but I couldn’t open the bottle,” her frail friend replied. Senior Select Seal was born of that moment. With a background in psychology, medical esthetics and aesthetic rehabilitation, O’Neil realized that products can be made easier to open for people with arthritis, lack of mobility and issues with motor skills. Her mission is to prevent failure to thrive syndrome in senior adults through a commitment to ease life as people age, by assuring that products and services meet standards that ensure a life worth living. One challenge O’Neil has faced with Senior Select Seal is society’s attitude about less capable consumers. One kitchenware company told her they were “not interested in the product looking like it is for old people” after testing a can opener prototype. However, O’Neil pushed forward because, if seniors can use a product, it will work for any person with a disability. Her company’s tagline: “A wise choice for any age,” includes all conditions such as loss of vision, taste, touch or smell. Loss of appetite, as she learned from her elderly friend in Massachusetts, is a safety issue. Israeli Charm Bracelets Conception to accelerator was a fast and furious road for Karen Zion, 39. When she spoke with AJT, her schedule was packed with long days at work followed by latenight chats with her husband; working through the weekend days; and skipping social events. One caveat to entrepreneurship, Zion warned, is the ability to become obsessed with a 14 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

business idea. “It can take over. Every waking minute you find yourself thinking about it. I need to maintain balance. All of [the innovators] are passionate and believe in what we are doing,” she said. Her passion for the Jewish homeland is the charisma behind Israeli Charm Bracelets. She witnessed how much her Israeli husband and 7-year-old daughter loved Israel during a visit in May; she also saw the memories fading in her daughter’s mind after their return. “The underlying philosophy is to ensure we keep building a connection to Israel with the next generation. When we create memories and family traditions, like a grandmother passing jewelry to her granddaughter, we strengthen ties back to Israel,” she said. With her Israeli sister-in-law, Zion hopes to produce an array of charms that will appeal to young girls at Jewish day camps as much as young adults returning from Birthright Israel. Charms are laser-cut images of Israeli landmarks, animals and maps. “The overarching themes are making memories and building bridges between Jewish Americans and Israel,” she said. Awareness Space Melding her business background and her personal

meditation practice is 47-year-old Liat Philipson’s dream. One year ago, she woke up with a vision for meditation studios that cater to the overwhelmingly stressful lives of working Americans, similar to a trend she witnessed in New York City. While working in advertising and marketing in Israel, putting in 60- to 70-hour work weeks, Philipson felt burned out. She turned to yoga and meditation. “My friends are miserable. They have no time for their families,” she related. “They like their jobs, but if they had emotional support, it would be better. Why not dedicate a beautiful room in every school, hospital and office to pause? A place to sit quietly and do a mindful meditation.” Companies are aware that employees need a wellness component, Philipson said, yet they seem to address only the physicality like losing weight or smoking cessation. Yet, companies like Google and Apple are offering on-site meditation instruction. Awareness Space dedicates a room for employees to recharge and reconnect, using a platform of mindfulness tools and on-site/online support. Being an entrepreneur is in Philipson’s blood. Both of her brothers are entrepreneurs, and she grew up with

a mother who broke the glass ceiling in Israeli architecture. “My mom always had unique ideas about the way she wanted to build her business. She was a woman in a man’s world. She pursued her vision to work with the biggest companies in Israel, which was unheard of 40 years ago,” she said, noting that both her parents inspired her to pursue her dreams. Through the accelerator, Hub Central’s Sharon served as Philipson’s mentor. “She’s available, has great ideas, she’s reliable and she pushes me in the right direction. If she doesn’t have the resource I need, she will find it. She brings a balance to the business side of my idea.” Her biggest takeaway from the accelerator is to stay flexible. While she believes in emotional wellness, Philipson understands she has to learn what clients want and potentially shift based on their needs. chick*u*do Parents today are navigating a complicated world

of device usage and increasing concerns around their children’s mental health, security and safety. For that reason, Lani Preis, 40, and Marla Zafft, 42, are on a mission to create well-designed products that help kids build communication skills and relationships, foster independence and encourage responsibility. Through their company chick*u*do, established in 2016, the pair developed an artsy technology contract to serve as a visual reminder and remove the element of parental nagging. Four categories keep kids on track: etiquette, health, security and privacy. The art-turned-contract is a reminder of the responsibilities that come with access to technology. Parents can use the contract to establish rules for tablets, cell phones or social media. Zafft said her goal for the accelerator was to re-energize ideas and structure to the business. She and Preis are self-employed consultants and busy moms, so adding a structured timeline forced them to think through steps and revisit ideas. “You don’t build a business plan in a vacuum,” Preis said. “We tend to plow ahead and not to revisit. When we go back to review, it gives us new energy and new focus. The accelerator has helped our business development,” she said. “A few months in I thought, ‘I can’t wait to show my kids that we can change paths.’ There’s something beautiful about being 40 and not having it all figured out.” Shira Books Galia Sabbag, 54, has witnessed the spiritual growth


BUSINESS & FINANCE of many children in her 20-plus years as a classroom teacher. Now at The Davis Academy, Sabbag tells these real-life, inspirational stories to her students every year. From oral tales to the pages of a book, Sabbag’s fictional main character, Shira, experiences Jewish holidays and traditions that are relatable to elementary-aged kids. “The stories are written in English and Hebrew to inspire grandparents, parents and educators to strengthen the Jewish future and L’Dor V’Dor,” she said, adding that the stories are about how children influence adults instead of the opposite. Since 2014, Sabbag has written eight Shira books; she has four more in the works about Simchat Torah, Purim, Shavuot and Lag B’Omer. Shira is a kindergarten-aged girl who Sabbag describes as “curious, creative, doesn’t take no for an answer and embraces her Jewishness.” The author chose a female main character because, as a mom of a daughter, she feels women should be empowered. Sabbag said the accelerator taught her how to scale her business, advertise, market and publicize. “I got so many introductions and fantastic expert advice,” she said. “Whatever this ends up being, I have enjoyed the journey.” Kick Can’t-cer When her brother was diagnosed at age 32 with

Sabbag has written eight Shira books and has four more in the works.

credibility. The accelerator is coming to a close, but the innova-

Tiah Tomlin (right) started My Style Matters after learning of her brother's cancer diagnosis ten years ago.

testicular cancer, Tiah Tomlin’s life came to a screeching halt. Tomlin, now 42, refocused on family and devoted herself to supporting her brother, his wife and their three young children. She moved to Atlanta and started My Style Matters with a friend. After partnering with American Cancer Society in 2015, Tomlin was diagnosed with stage 2 triple negative breast cancer. Along the way, she noticed several gaps in patient care, serving as a catalyst for Kick Can’t-cer. It’s an organization that holds the hands of cancer patients in Greater Atlanta from diagnosis to remission. After a patient is referred to Tomlin, she provides a care package, a wellness retreat, educational materials and coaching through lifestyle changes. “We also provide education on mental health. We want survivors to know that it’s OK to have a selfish moment,” she said. “We provide support services to make healthy choices to kick cancer — from transportation, haircuts, childcare, meals and companions to accompany patients during their treatment,” Tomlin said. “No one should fight alone.” Tomlin learned about the accelerator from Hadassah member and breast cancer survivor Debra Sharker, with whom she volunteers. The pair met through Hadassah’s Check It Out breast cancer awareness program. “Cancer doesn’t discriminate, and neither do we. Kick Can’t-cer is for all cancers, all people,” she said, recalling a recent visit to connect two survivors, thus expanding their support networks. With 20 years of experience in the corporate world through pharmaceutical sales, Tomlin wants to learn through the accelerator and its connections how to secure grant money, connect with corporations for donations and build

tors will continue to meet with their mentors and learn from each other. Galia Sabbag practiced yoga with Liat Philipson of Awareness Space prior to reuniting at the accelerator. She has already approached her massage therapist about Jamie Drummer Fox’s essential oils still. The accelerator proves two things: Jewish Atlanta is well-connected, and networking really does work. ■ For more information, visit www.jewishatlanta.org/ get-involved/the-exchange-2018.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 15


BUSINESS & FINANCE

Marietta Millennial Makes Forbes' 30 Under 30 By Logan C. Ritchie Two University of Georgia roommates from Atlanta, who moved to New York and started a company together, made Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list for 2019. Best friends Stephanie Pulido and Erin Abernathy run the new media, microinfluencer marketing company, Out of Office Media. Pulido grew up at Temple Kol Emeth in Marietta. Abernathy, who is not Jewish, is from Gwinnett. They are among 600 young innovators, entrepreneurs and risk-takers who are putting a twist on what it means to be a leader for the next generation, according to a Forbes release. More than 15,000 online submissions were received for the contest, so entrants have a 4 percent chance of making it to the final list of “youthful visionaries and disruptors.” The index “identifies the next generation of entrepreneurs, visionaries, and game-changers throughout the world,” Randall Lane, chief content officer for Forbes and creator of the Forbes Under 30 franchise, said in the release.

Stephanie Pulido and Erin Abernathy make Forbes’ 2019 list of 30 Under 30 for Marketing & Advertising.

Pulido and Abernathy started the company in late 2015 as a collaborative community for up-and-coming bloggers and influencers to meet, share information and make friends. “It got a very positive response, so

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we hosted a happy hour, which drew the attention of more bloggers,” Pulido said. Soon she was answering a call from Dunkin’ Donuts, discussing how the coffee and pastries giant could launch its newest cold-brew product to Pulido’s growing list of influencers. Out of Office Media now works with lifestyle brands such as the iconic donut maker and fashion and accessory designer Kendra Scott to help them reach a female, millennial audience through social media and blog posts. The company hosts parties for its more than 5,000 micro-influencer network and created a media property, My Life Out of Office, which reaches about 500,000 a month. Pulido said the parties are for 200 bloggers, typically featuring one product and one hospitality group. In turn, the bloggers write about the experience to generate attention. Out of Office Media holds smaller events for timely releases, like the new spring line for Scott. At UGA, Pulido and Abernathy studied public relations and marketing. After

graduation in 2013, they started careers in New York. Abernathy worked in entertainment and lifestyle PR and Pulido worked in digital sales at a few large publishers. Out Of Office Media began as a blog by Pulido and Abernathy, written while they adapted to living in N.Y. and worked at their full-time jobs. Sparked by a desire to meet new people and build community, Pulido arranged a networking brunch for other bloggers. As Out of Office Media grew organically, Pulido and Abernathy quit their jobs to work together. “Finding a business partner is harder than finding a spouse,” Pulido joked. “People ask us all the time, ‘Aren’t you sick of each other?’ But we’re not.” Pulido has heard that successful business partners excel in different areas, but she and Abernathy are both relationship-driven. “We like to be out networking, talking to people about what their interests are, making connections,” she said, noting cash flow and bookkeeping are challenges for the co-founders. Now that Out of Office Media has grown, Pulido is no longer writing. But being stuck behind a desk is not her idea of fun, either. “We are hoping to step away from being behind the desk and getting more into experiential planning. We want to plan big, fun millennial experiences we know our audience would love, like cruises and award shows. Instagram-able moments,” she said. One downside of all that time online? “It hurts your neck to always be looking at your phone. So, we treat ourselves to monthly massages.” Pulido added that she and Abernathy have their heads on straight. They are on social media because it is their job, not for an ego boost. “Social media is a marketing tool and a way to build authentic relationships online,” Pulido said. ■

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Out of Office Media has a mural in the East Village of Manhattan.


BUSINESS & FINANCE

Connecting Atlanta and Israel, One Innovation at a Time By Logan C. Ritchie

CEO and founder Hertzel Ozer explained how the busiIt was a banner ness began. He sought year for the America top-notch security for Israel Business ConHot Television Netnector known as Conwork in Israel, one of exx, the Southeast’s the country’s largest biggest relationship telecommunication booster with Israel. providers. He wanted The organization a guarantee, with 100 worked with 100 Ispercent certainty, that raeli companies in his network could not 2018 to increase ecobe hacked. nomic development, Until a few years promote products and Hertzel Ozer, CEO and founder of Cyber 2.0, started the tech company in 2015. ago, technology deidentify new markets. From cyber security to medical technol- fense systems were based on biological ogy, Israeli businesses flocked to the At- models, similar to how a human body is infected, identifies the foreign object and lanta tech scene this year. Two companies in particular, Cyber attacks the disease. This model causes 2.0 and Dune Medical, were major stand- vulnerability to new attacks, and sysouts, according to Conexx President Guy tems get hacked again and again. “You can take kids to get a shot Tessler. against the flu, but next year, you have to get another shot. The Coming to Atlanta flu changes biologiReady for a new cally every year and market, but unsure the virus is one step how to break into the ahead of the human United States, execubody,” Rozenfeld said. tives of Tel Aviv-based Ozer engaged Cyber 2.0 attended a Erez Kaplan, chief cyber conference in technology officer, Washington, D.C., sevand the pair began eral months ago. mapping a new techThe company nology based on math produces an impeninstead of biology. Cyetrable software to ber 2.0 was formed, isolate and stop cyberthe company secured attacks. Sneer Rozenfeld, sales vice nine patents and de“Delegates from president for Cyber 2.0, is looking forward to opening an Atlanta velopers started makevery state were telloffice with the help of Conexx. ing software. The ing us, ‘Come to our state,’” said Sneer Rozenfeld, Cyber 2.0 company formed in 2015 and completed sales vice president. “We met senators software testing in 2017. and diplomats who wanted to help us reIn collaboration with the University cruit for a U.S. office.” of North Georgia and Georgia Tech ReMetro Atlanta Chamber of Com- search Institute, Cyber 2.0 is hosting an merce and Conexx were inviting and open challenge to hack its site. Hackers “hungry” for Cyber 2.0’s business. It was from across the region plan to descend Southern hospitality that won over the on the city on Feb. 14, 2019, for a chance company, which attended Cyber Week at at $100,000. Ponce City Market in October and sealed the deal. Atlanta is set to be its next loca- Celebrating One Year in the Area tion. Israeli-owned Dune Medical Devices “They made us feel welcome,” Rozen- built two new facilities in metro Atlanta feld said of Conexx. “They promised to in the latter half of 2017. Specializing in work with us step-by-step, to recruit peo- oncology devices, the company immediple and open an office in Midtown. They ately increased its leadership team and showed us around Atlanta.” expanded advocacy and legislative efA flight attendant who has traveled forts. the world, Rozenfeld added, “I’ve been a Dune uses proprietary technology, lot of places and Atlanta is wonderful. I “Radio-Frequency Spectroscopy to idenwalked all around to get to know the city tify cancerous tissue in real time,” enon foot. People are warm and it’s a hum- abling a doctor to take immediate action. ble city, not like New York.” In Georgia, Dune is working with

nology Association of Margie Singleton, a SaGeorgia, and received vannah breast cancer Best Overall honors. survivor-turned-advo“These awards are cate, to pass a law that given to an elite group mammography reports of companies whose include information products and solutions about breast density, are not only changing one of the most comtheir respective indusmon reasons for failtries, but also putting ure of cancer detection. Georgia on the map as This is law in 36 states; a state where technolin Georgia, Margie’s ogy innovation can Law will not come to thrive,” Larry Williams, Congress before 2019. Lori Chmura is an Atlanta president and CEO of Dune CEO Lori native and former nurse, now TAG, said in a news reChmura was recogCEO of Dune Medical. lease earlier this year. nized by the Atlanta Conexx is constantly searching for Business Chronicle as a 2018 Health Care Heroes finalist for healthcare innova- more companies like Dune to do business tor and researcher. Chmura is a native in the Southeast. Its latest trip to Israel Georgian and former intensive care unit focused on medical technology. On Dec. 5, Conexx departed from nurse. “As the CEO, my job and my role is to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International meet with physicians, patients, advocacy Airport for its third and final flight to groups, the Food and Drug Administra- Israel in 2018. Tessler said more than 25 tion, research and development engi- businesspeople visited Israeli companies in fields including cyber security and fineers” as well as investors, she said. Dune was named one of the 2018 Top nance. ■ 10 Innovative Companies by the Tech-

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 17


BUSINESS & FINANCE

Changing Tax Laws and Other Business Trends to Navigate By Roni Robbins In recent months, companies have increasingly turned to Aprio, one of Atlanta’s top accounting and business advisory firms, to help navigate changing tax laws and keep up with trends in such specialty areas as outsourcing and data analytics. Not surprising, then, that those are some of the newest specialty practices for the company with more than 450 employees, named the fifth largest accounting firm by the Atlanta Business Chronicle. Aprio’s founders and many of its team members have a long history of involvement in our Jewish community. Mitchell Kopelman, partner-incharge of Aprio’s tax, technology and blockchain practice, explained the impact of some of the new tax laws and how Aprio is advising its clients and their businesses. Charitable Giving Most relevant to the Jewish community may be changes in tax law that affect charitable giving and paying for day

ternational R&D credit practice in the United Kingdom with plans to expand to a few more countries next year. “We follow our clients and support them wherever they are in the world. We have a strong international practice to help them.”

Mitchell Kopelman is partner-in-charge of Aprio’s tax, technology and blockchain practice.

school education with tax-free dollars. “People might change the way they want to give tzedakah,” Kopelman said. The change in itemized deductions might impact their future giving. Aprio advises some clients to “bunch” their charitable contributions, making donations in one year to a donor-advised fund and then using the DAF to give to a specific organi-

zation over multiple years. Private School In terms of paying for day school, parents can take advantage of new tax benefits to use a 529 tax-free savings plan, typically reserved for college expenses, to cover private education under the new federal tax law. Under a state law passed 10 years ago, Aprio encourages many of its clients to support the ALEF Fund, which allows taxpayers to redirect state tax dollars to provide scholarships for children to attend Jewish preschools and day schools. Real Estate Kopelman said clients are taking advantage of new federal tax legislation that allows them to invest in Opportunity Zones, which are located in low-income communities, to benefit from favorable tax incentives. The investors save on capital gains taxes if they are willing to take the risk on the economically-depressed areas and tie up their investment for five years or more, Aprio reported on its blog. New tax laws are also making it conducive for apartment dwellers to stay in their units longer, which is good news for owners of multi-family developments, Kopelman said. R&D Tax Credits Georgia has one of the best research and development tax credits in the country, Kopelman said. “It has drawn a lot of technology [and manufacturing] companies. It’s wonderful.” Aprio has had an R&D credit practice to handle federal and state credits, which the firm started 10 years ago. “It is our fastest-growing service line at the firm,” said Kopelman. This year, Aprio launched an in-

18 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Outsourcing In June, Aprio continued a 2018 buying spree by acquiring HPC, a cloudbased accounting firm. The acquisition allows Aprio to provide outsourcing with employees in 16 states, Kopelman said. “The acquisition of HPC, with its strong technology processes and experienced cloud team, will allow Aprio to eliminate time-consuming data entry,” according to an Aprio release. Merging with a company focused on the cloud allowed Aprio to build a cloud practice and keep up with a trend of companies outsourcing areas such as finance and human resources to the cloud, Kopelman said. “We want to stay current with our clients’ needs.” Sales Tax A Supreme Court ruling in June requires many online and offline companies that sell goods or license software to collect state and local sales taxes after previously being exempt. For that reason, Aprio created a new practice area to help clients efficiently file the proper forms all over the country and change their business practices. “Our practice has been very busy.” Data Analytics Aprio recently added a new partner who specializes in data analytics to help clients “digest” data. Companies have a lot of data and don’t know what to do with it, Kopelman said. Aprio helps clients address the management and use of data so they can make better business decisions, he said. Interest Rates Interest rates have increased a lot in the last two years, he said. The rise in interest expenses is not helpful to industries such as real estate and heavy manufacturing, which tend to have more debt. The new limitations on interest deductions can also affect a business’ borrowing strategies. As with any of the changes in tax laws or other money matters, Kopelman said, a wealth advisor can help clients take advantage of savings or better manage their business by offering an integrated approach to financial planning. ■


BUSINESS & FINANCE

Avoid the Legal Pitfalls of Operating a Business With ongoing changes in the socio-political landscape as well as the influence of rapidly evolving technology, most businesses are too focused on day-today operations to consider the legal pitfalls they might encounter along the way. “These can manifest in Roni a million different scenarios, from employment law is- Robbins sues to federal, state and local tax and revenue issues,” said Bethani Oppenheimer, an associate at Greenberg Traurig, ranked 13th last year among the Atlanta Business Chronicle’s top 50 law firms in the city. We asked Oppenheimer, who specializes in banking and finance, to answer a few key questions about legal issues facing businesses today. AJT: What are some basic legal issues business owners manage when operating a business? Oppenheimer: All business owners need to understand the importance of choosing the right corporate structure from the beginning. It is almost always easier and less expensive to spend the time up front working with your accountants and attorneys through the shortand long-term plans for your business and deciding on a structure that best serves those plans. Additionally, almost all businesses are subject to some sort of licensing or permitting, even if it’s just a municipal business license. Other businesses are subject to state and federal regulations controlling their operations as well. AJT: What are some legal questions entrepreneurs should consider when

starting a business? Oppenheimer: Are all of your employees properly classified as hourly or salaried? Have you been timely collecting, withholding, reporting, and paying all applicable taxes? Are you doing business under a name that is different than the legal name under which your business is registered? Are you doing business in a different state than the state in which your business is registered or qualified? Are you properly protecting your customers’ data by maintaining compliance with all data and privacy laws applicable to your business? All of these questions are vitally important to the success and longevity of your business. AJT: What are the legal steps for starting a business? Oppenheimer: • You’re going to need a name and you’ll want to make sure that you’re legally permitted to use that name without infringing on the rights of another person. Your attorney can help you reserve or register that name with the applicable filing office in the state in which you want to form your business, perform a nationwide trademark search to see what other businesses are using the same or similar names, and ultimately file your name for trademark protection. • After you’ve picked a name for your business, you will need to incorporate or organize your business. Your attorney, in consultation with your accountants and other tax planning advisors, can help you choose the state in which to organize and what kind of corporate structure would best serve you and any other equity hold-

ers in the new busithat apply to all or ness by advising you most businesses, such on the tax and other as federal and state legal considerations employment laws. involved. Whether starting • The next thing a company or sucthat you’ll need is a cessfully operating federal tax identificaan existing one, Option number, state tax penheimer advises: and employer identi“Don’t be afraid to ask fication numbers, and questions about areas one or more business of the law and your licenses and permits, business that you do depending on the nanot understand. In ture of your business most industries, there Bethani Oppenheimer, an associate are numerous indusand where it will be at Greenberg Traurig, who specializes try-specific publicalocated. If you’re goin banking and finance. tions that frequently ing to have a physical location, your attorney can help you ne- send materials and updates highlighting developments in laws that affect your ingotiate a lease. • You should open a separate bank dustry.” ■ account under your business name to Greenberg Traurig represents businessensure that your business credit is separate from your personal credit. You’ll also es in such matters as mergers and acquisiwant the advice and counsel of an attor- tions, commercial loan transactions, real ney to ensure that you remain compliant estate, technology, intellectual property, litiwith applicable state and local laws that gation, and employment. The firm is very are specific to your business and those involved in the Atlanta Jewish community.

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BUSINESS & FINANCE

Selig Advises Real Estate Action is Inside Perimeter By Jan Jaben-Eilon After celebrating the 100th birthday of his family’s company in October, Steve Selig, president and chairman of Selig Enterprises, remains bullish both about the real estate industry and Atlanta. He says the two biggest changes in the city’s real estate industry are the growth of mixed-use projects that now integrate retail, office and residential use, and in the last 10 to 15 years, an urbanization which has seen people moving back into town. “The BeltLine has changed that,” says Selig. Most of Selig Enterprises’ new development is, not surprisingly, inside Interstate 285. “We’re focusing Intown. ... It’s where the action is. And we already own most of the existing land” on which they are building, says Selig. He mentions the mixed-use development under construction on West Peachtree Street, between 12th and 13th streets, that will include a hotel, retail, condominiums and at least 550,000 square feet of office space. It is scheduled to open in May 2020.

He also points to The Works in the Chattahoochee Industrial Park on Atlanta’s Upper West Side, which was the dream of his late son, Scott. The 80 acres will include retail, residential, office space and acres of green space. He calls the development “adaptive mixed use” because it will convert the area’s low-rise brick warehouses in phases over the next 10 years. The occupancy rate in Atlanta is in the 90-percentile. “It’s been a boom the last 10 years as interest rates have been low,” and with occupancy rates high, it’s still time to build, Selig explains. The boom came after the severe downturn in Atlanta’s real estate industry – and the economy in general – in 2007 to 2008. He doesn’t expect the slowly rising interest rates to make much of a difference in the latest upward trend of the cyclical Atlanta real estate industry. Selig believes Atlanta remains a hot destination for young people. “When a person graduates from college anywhere east of Denver, he makes a list of five cities in which to live. Atlanta is always on

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Steve Selig, president and chairman of Selig Enterprises.

the list. We will get our share because prices are cheaper than other big cities, we have parallel runways at the airport that help get you anywhere in the world, we have good weather, and race relationships, and good arts.” If Selig sounds like a cheerleader representing the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, that’s not far from the truth. Selig, and his company, have been heavily involved in the Jewish and larger community for decades. His office buildings house the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta (the Selig Center), the Consulate of Israel, and the Atlanta Jewish Times. In addition, “we donated the Zaban Shelter at the Temple,” he notes. “The Selig Center was a gift to the Federation when it outgrew its building on Peachtree Street.” In addition to material donations, Selig has generously given of his time. He was president of the Federation in the 1990s; he was national campaign chair for the Jewish Federations of North America from 2002 to 2004. He is also the past president of The Temple and the Atlanta chapter of the American Jewish Committee, from which he earned the Distinguished Service Award in 1992. Beyond the Jewish community, Selig

has served on the boards of Westminster Schools, the University of Georgia Foundation, the Georgia State University council, Spelman College and the Lovett School. A supporter of Atlanta’s arts community, he has served on the boards of the Alliance Theatre and the Woodruff Arts Center. In addition, he served on the advisory board of the Shepherd Center, the board of Camp Sunshine and the Leukemia Society board. He was a founding member of Camp Twin Lakes and president of the National Kidney Foundation. Selig Enterprises was one of two developers of the new City Springs project in Sandy Springs. It also has built student housing and elderly housing, in addition to office, retail, industrial and residential developments. The national AAA Parking system and shopping centers in Florida round out the company’s holdings. But the Selig family wasn’t always in the real estate industry. The company was started by his grandfather, Ben Massell, as a chemical company. After it was sold to Atlanta-based National Service Industries, Selig Enterprises entered the real estate business. And it has never looked back. Selig recalls when his father started developing in the Fulton Industrial area. The company was building so much property that the former Fulton County Commission Chairman Charlie Brown told his father: “You were the first to build out there. Since we’re building a new road, what would you like it to be named?” Now there’s Selig Drive, Selig Circle, and others. When Selig entered the family business, after working in the banking industry, his title was head of leasing. Now his name epitomizes real estate in Atlanta – and he wouldn’t have it any other way. “In the real estate community in Atlanta, we are not really competitors, but friends,” he adds. “We support each other. It’s a wholesome environment. There’s nobody in the real estate business that I wouldn’t do business with. They are all honorable people." ■

direct 404.250.5311 | office 404.252.4908 Follow Us On Facebook Debbie@SonenshineTeam.com | www.SonenshineTeam.com ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Operated By a Subsidiary of NRT LLC.

Atlanta Skyline photographed by Gene Phillips

20 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 21


DINING Cohen Takes on Pizza/Tavern Niche in Grant Park By Marcia Caller Jaffe Several months ago, Atlanta magazine bet on sitting at the bar; we are great for special occathree newcomers. One was Atlanta native Leslie sions and cozy for a date night. Cohen’s Firepit Pizza Tavern on Memorial Drive. Part of the Larkin on Memorial development, the Jaffe: Where did you get the food “bug”? space has equal entrances from both sides and Cohen: My family always had a love for food. sputnik-style lighting that contrasts with the We used dinner time to connect with each other. white brick walls. Front and center is Cohen, who My dad was our home chef. My parents, Lynn and cut her hospitality teeth at the Lenox Road RoastSteve Cohen, have been very supportive. ers prior to taking this entrepreneurial leap. In the Oct. 5 article, Mara Shalhoup pointed Jaffe: What was it like winning a competito the extreme pizza competition in the neighbortion on the Food Channel? hood, but the others don’t have Cohen, who won Cohen: The show aired in 2015. It was an “Cutthroat Kitchen” on the Food Network. The amazing experience. The challenges were diffitavern is mellow, with a cross-section of families cult, but fun. I had to make three separate dishes: and a general ribbon slice of what Atlanta looks biscuit breakfast, chicken nuggets and a shortlike. bread cookie. I think my Southern cooking skills The staff was upbeat without being too helped me win. If you want to watch the show: busy, and Cohen breezed by tables to make sure season 8, episode 10! ■ Grilled portabella sourdough sandwich (top) oozes sharp white cheddar. The everyone was happy. This is an important sign tres leches cheesecake (bottom left) is artistically finished with chocolate What we tasted: of a good hospitality manager. The menu is not coulis. Top right veggie pizza with nice-sized chucks of broccoli, red peppers, overly sophisticated, headed by 26 types of beer Caesar Salad with a properly-cooked salmon filet: the olives and cremini, while the honey ricotta pizza (bottom) is a top choice! dressing was light and not eggy. The croutons were with names such as Emergency Drinking Beer homemade from toasted sourdough bread. Cheese and Scofflaw Hooligan. lovers will delight in huge chucks of shaved parmesan. “Roasters definitely prepared me for ownership. the inside. We use high-end ingredients and bake it in an Not many anchovy notes for those who like it spiky. It takes lots of training to build a business from the authentic brick oven. Veggie Pizza: healthy-sized chucks of bright green ground up, and experience is critical to becoming sucbroccoli crowns, roasted red peppers (more on the cessful,” Cohen said. Jaffe: Why did you select Grant Park? pimento side), cremini mushrooms, green olives, spinach. Cohen: This location means a lot to me. The buildHoney Pizza: Rocking socking mouth-drool activating! Jaffe: Atlanta magazine described Firepit as Detroit- ing is unique with a lot of the original construction still This is a memorable pie. Caramelized onions, Calabrian style pizza and you objected. What’s your description? visible. Everything about the Larkin on Memorial being honey ricotta, fresh basil … Is it sweet? Is it spicy? It’s Cohen: I wanted to bring something different to the a family-friendly neighborhood establishment fit right just plain delish. $19 price point, though it also included capicola, which we eschewed. Atlanta food scene, so our pizzas are not like any other in with my concept. It took about three years to comstyle. They have medium crust, topped with three chees- plete after I found the location. It was worth the wait Tres Leches Cheesecake: alternating rows of cake made es (mozzarella, provolone and sharp cheddar) giving it and gave me time to prepare. the cheesecake lighter. The artistic chocolate coulis presentation threw in a classy touch for a tavern. loads of flavor. We make the sauce in-house. The honey pizza is our Jaffe: What type of customers do you see? Next time I’ll try the grilled portabella sandwich on sourdough with spinach, sharp white cheddar, roasted signature. The flavors compliment each other. The caraCohen: We have a mixed crowd of business protomatoes, pesto mayo … looked divine and gooey. melized onions are also sweet. fessionals during the day, families and young adults at I always appreciate a 100A inspection rating! There is a Pizza has a lot of components and every one must night. The beauty of Firepit is we offer an atmosphere tattoo parlor on the same block for a day’s activity, along be perfect. We hand-toss our dough to create a nice, for any occasion. Even though we are family-friendly, with a visit to historic Oakland Cemetery. round crust that is crispy on the outside, but chewy on you can come in for a business meeting; travelers enjoy

Lakeside High grad Leslie Cohen, Firepit Pizza Tavern owner (right), serves a salmontopped Caesar salad with house-toasted sourdough croutons. 22 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

The Firepit Pizza Tavern in the Grant Park Larkin development serves a slice of Atlanta’s hip and family life.


DINING

Julia Kesler believes in locally-sourced, healthy food preparation.

Stop, Think, Chew By Marcia Caller Jaffe Atlanta’s version of Julia Child is another Julia … a refreshing and fresh-faced personal chef, Julia Kesler, whose business startup, Stop Think Chew, focuses on locally-sourced, healthy food preparation. A product of Atlanta’s Jewish day schools and her South African heritage, Kesler’s goal is to nourish minds and bodies with her brunch pop-up, personally tailored in-home chef preparation and wholesome daily routines. Registered nutritionist and weight loss consultant Sheryl Westerman gave Kesler an initial push to strike out on her own after working for Ted Turner’s Captain Planet Foundation as development and events manager. “Julia cooks specific foods for all kinds of people: gluten-free, egg-free, weight loss, etc.,” Westerman said. “She goes over and beyond to provide the best quality of foods possible for unique plans. It’s not easy to cook delicious, slimming food. Julia does it! And I continue to recommend her to my clients.”

cess. All through college, I worked in New York City restaurants, vegan preparation, food delivery, catering and food startups. My background is nontraditional, and I am not a classically trained chef. But I am committed to staying close to the source, as my grandma and father both have, by using the best ingredients and creating relationships with local farmers. The farmers influence each dish because, without their hard work and sweat, I couldn’t do what I do. Jaffe: What is the concept and operation behind your pop-up and where does it “pop up”? Kesler: BREKKIE is a local healthy, delicious breakfast and lunch pop-up; bringing South African and Mediterranean flavors together with Georgiagrown ingredients. I rotate locations, including Grant Park Farmers Market, The Spindle Kitchen near Krog Street Market and Golda Kombucha on the Westside BeltLine. We also provide jobs by hiring local people and using various food spaces.

Jaffe: What are some dishes we Jaffe: How did you get inspired to might experience there? pursue food preparation as a career? Kesler: My spice bowl is quite popuKesler: I began in my grandmother’s kitchen. She was a magazine food writer lar, with homemade hummus, greens at in South Africa for over 30 years. Her (usually kale), halloumi cheese, a softstyle was always fresh ingredients, often boiled egg from a local farm, roasted red peppers, and peri peri potatoes. Prices French-styled with gratin. It has been an interesting journey. I range from $8 to $10. Extra options can have worked in restaurants since I was add protein or avocado. We also might have a Macrobiotic 15, first as a hostess, the server, and evenBreakfast Bowl with turmeric, chia pudtually made my way into the kitchen. I did not set out to be a chef or have ding, homemade, gluten-free granola, a food business. I originally worked on wildflower honey, and cashew butter. the nonprofit side of food and food jusJaffe: Do you take any inspiration tice. My mission was, and still is, to feed as many people as possible good, healthy, from Judaism for your business? I am an alumna of the Atfood – while supporting farmers. That is Duluth, GAKessler: 678-283-9787 Academy. Judaism holds not always easy, sowww.EnergyConcepts.biz I went to New York lanta Jewish jrobb3328@gmail.com University and studied urban food ac- a high value on food and how it is pre-

Kesler pulls together South African and Mediterranean flavors with Georgia-grown ingredients.

pared. I am proud of Stop Think Chew making wholesome, healthy, and local eating a part of one’s daily routine. I am proud that Stop Think Chew believes in empowering people through food and creating conversation around the table. We believe in supporting our local food system and paying living wages to our servers. By supporting Stop Think Chew, not only are our clients and customers eat-

ing food that will nourish their body and mind, but also supporting an ecosystem of people that make this possible. All food is purchased as locally as possible and directly supports Atlanta farmers. I am hoping to be able to have a space to share with the community, sell local produce and artisanal products, teach cooking classes, and allow other food entrepreneurs to use as an incubation, motivation and channel. ■

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Photos by Heidi Morton // Linda and Mark Silberman relax by the crackled glass bar in front of their first

painting, “Hansen,” by Amy Ringholz. The light fixture, top left, is from Yaacov Golan’s Lighting Loft.

Chai Style Art

The Silbermans turn a page every day in this massive 476-page book of Annie Leibovitz’s photography by Taschen. The intense aquamarine and teal paintings are by Rocky Hawkins (2008).

Biz Mogul Power Couple Inspire Leadership and Glamour

Linda and Mark Silberman have stepped up, conMarcia: How has being chairman of the board of currently, to keep our community viable and relevant as the Federation impacted you and vice versa? top-tier leadership volunteers for the Jewish Federation Mark: It is a two-year commitment for which I was of Greater Atlanta. well-prepared, having worked in the Federation system Mark heads RefrigiWear, the market niche leader for 10 years. I knew I would, at some point, take a leadfor quality cold weather gear and active ership role. This is working with 29 board wear, more specifically, gloves, headwear, members and the CEO. I am fortunate that footwear and insulated clothing for indusmy family and business partner is running try workers and athletes exposed to freezthe day-to-day operations of RefrigiWear to ing temperatures. allow me the time to insert myself wholeThey relax at home among Western art heartedly in the Jewish world. and Linda’s own colorful paintings. Their We recently returned from the GenSandy Springs home serves as a luxurious eral Assembly Federation Mission to Israel, sanctuary with tons of personality that which was an inspiring confluence of Jews fits their lifestyle, interspersed with Miro, from all over the world (1,200 from North Matisse, Madonna, and Mark’s memories Marcia America plus 1,000 Israelis). We toured of Tonto. Bouquets of flowers, both fresh Caller Jaffe the new five-story “Start Up Nation” techand recreated, portend the Hollywood alanology repurposed building, as well as the baster glamour of the “wow” master bedroom. Knesset, where we discussed Israel’s relationship with Linda recalled, “We moved here 11 years ago from the Diaspora. We were the first group to visit the U.S. Crabapple, which seemed, at the time, like the Land of Embassy with Ambassador David Friedman in a private Oz.” ceremony. Read about their purposeful lives and surroundings. Linda: We enjoyed the beach, food, and cosmopol-

itan flair in Tel Aviv, too, and the new Sarona Market (similar to our Ponce City Market) in Jerusalem. Let me add that at the Embassy visit, there was such tight security that we could bring only our passports — no cell phone, no purse. Marcia: Elaborate on your mission as chair of Women’s Philanthropy, a three-year commitment. Linda: We focus on engaging different sectors of women in new ways. We are doing a series of pop-ups, like visiting the Ben Massell Dental Clinic, the Breman Museum, InterfaithFamily, Jewish Fertility Foundation, and more. We want to appeal to all age groups and show the amazing work of Federation. We also had a fabulous mission to Cuba this past spring. Marcia: What are some of the most unusual pieces you have collected? Mark: I saw the Alexis Silk gold glass figure in someone’s office and had to have it. I was fascinated that it was made from one piece of Murano glass. Silk is at the frontier of the conceptual expression of figurative glass in the human form. She created it freehand while ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 25


ARTS Linda blends oil and acrylic to create bold flowers and interpretations of horses. This piece in the family room is “Scarlet Blooms.”

Aussie poodle, Dexter, enjoys the spotlight under the glamorous tray ceiling and chandelier by Circa Lighting in the master bedroom.

the glass is hot without a mold. I lean towards Western art. When I have a cocktail here at the bar, “The Race at Waldo Canyon” by David Bradley, amuses me by conjuring up Tonto racing his horse. The Amy Ringholz “Hansen” (Jackson Hole, Wyo.) is the first piece we bought as a couple. The “Silent Warrior” bronze might be my most prized as it was the first piece done by Barry Henderson, a real estate developer who transitioned into sculptor.

Let’s just say it has appreciated in value. Linda: In the contemporary Western vein, we collect David DeVary, who has work displayed at the Booth Western Art Museum. We met him in Sante Fe, N.M., and liked that he creates portraits, but holds back the full-face view, usually the eyes. On the one in the living room entrance, he added an orange flower to the cowboy hat to make it special for us. He declared, “Something is missing,” before

Linda’s mother owned this original Miro block print “Untitled.” 26 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

we walked out with it. Sentimentally, we blended in my mother’s collection of a Calder, Miro, and Matisse. “Madonna,” in the lower-level rec room, is wild and unexpected for us. Marcia: Linda, what inspires you to paint? Linda: Here you see my intense bold flowers. I originally started with oil, then changed to acrylics or a combination of

Former real estate developer Barry Henderson’s first bronze was this “Silent Warrior.” Mark grabbed it as an early investment.

both. I also paint horses, which is spiritual for me as I lost a very dear family member who loved horses. That somehow helps me channel her. Marcia: How do you use your home to entertain? Linda: We make tons of pizza in the outdoor oven and salads to serve around the pool. We are very casual. We reconstructed the pool to include Pebble Tec and a shallow ledge.

This nontraditional Madonna acrylic dominates the entrance to the lower level.


ARTS Mark’s favorite piece is a Murano glass woman by Alexis Silk, known for her freehand sculpture of human anatomies. Mark liked the lighting, shape and amber hue.

The dining room seats 16. The black velvet fabric contrasts the white vases on the table top. The round eat “in kitchen” table is custom constructed of burnt wood. The chandelier is from B.D. Jeffries. Marcia: Last word. Mark: Remember our Federation is

The Silbermans entertain casually outdoors using the commercial pizza oven for friends and family

not only about donations, but touching people by keeping our Jewish community viable and relevant. In terms of accepting a demanding leadership role (laughing), it’s sometimes about who asks you to volunteer. And, in terms of art, I’d say, ‘Never meet the artist, as you’ll always end up buying the art!’ ■

The Silbermans commissioned this burnt wood table for the kitchen nook. The dramatic chandelier is from B.D. Jeffries.

DeVary’s “Woman with the Orange Flower,” far left, balances Linda’s “Magic Horse.” The vases in the center are from Spin Ceramics, a boutique in Soho.

Photos by Heidi Morton // Linda’s

art studio is grounded on stone with a bounty of natural light.

Linda’s floral paintings adorn the walls. Above the fireplace sits DeVary’s giclee painting, “A Cowboys Dream.” The Calder “Untitled,” inherited from Linda’s mother, is beyond the dining room. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 27


CALENDAR CANDLE-LIGHTING TIMES

Mikeitz Friday, December 7, 2018, light candles at 5:10 p.m. Saturday, December 8, 2018, Shabbat ends at 6:09 p.m. Vayigash Friday, December 14, 2018, light candles at 5:12 p.m. Saturday, December 15, 2018, Shabbat ends at 6:11 p.m.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7

Family Shabbat – Congregation B’nai Israel, 1633 GA-54, Jonesboro, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Potluck dinner with brisket and latkes followed by Shabbat services. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2Sl4XDf.

program and refreshments at Temple Emanu-El, then buses will provide round trips from the temple to the Governor’s Mansion. Open to 100 participants. Registration closes on Dec. 7 at 12 p.m. To register and for more information, www.templeemanuelatlanta.org.

morning filled with celebrating, dancing, latkes, art projects, candle rolling, Hanukkah stories, balloon animals, Circus Camp performers and more. Free. To RSVP, www.epsteinatlanta. org/lightitup.

Grand Opening Celebration Chabad Intown on the BeltLine – Chabad

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8

Giant Menorah Lighting at Marietta Square Glover Park – Glover Park, 50 Park Square, Marietta, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Celebrate Chanukah with a menorah lighting led by Rabbi Joseph Prass. Featuring holiday music, hot chocolate and jelly doughnuts. All are welcome. Please bring any gently worn children’s clothes. Your generosity will help the Ner Tamid spring rummage sale. Free. For more information, www. mynertamid.info.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9

“Light It Up with Epstein” Hanukkah Festival – The Epstein School Tritt Family Gymnasium, 335 Colewood Way, NW, Sandy Springs, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Friends and family in the community are invited to enjoy a

AIPAC at Temple Emanu-El – A Light unto the Nations – Israel’s Humanitarian Reach – Temple Emanu-El, 1580 Spalding Drive, Atlanta, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. This program features speaker Yotam Polizer, Co-CEO of IsrAID. This program is free and open to the community. Advanced registration is required. For additional information and to register, contact Todd Young, tyoung@aipac.org.

Chanukah

Party – Congregation Shearith Israel, 1180 University Drive, Atlanta, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Join Congregation Shearith Israel and its Machaneh Shai religious school for its fun, annual Chanukah extravaganza with latkes and sufganiyot, bounce house, Jerusalem nail spa, face paint-

ing, crafts, games and more. Free and open to the public. For more information, www.bit.ly/2BDEpaQ.

Chanukah Palooza – Temple Kehillat Chaim, 1145 Green Street, Roswell, from 12 to 2 p.m. Annual fundraiser for the Mitzner Family Religious School of Temple Kehillat Chaim. The afternoon begins with a Chanukah sing-along in the sanctuary, followed by lunch, a raffle, silent auction, games, vendors and crafts. $5.00 per ticket, kids under 3 eat for free. For more information, www. kehillatchaim.org.

Intown On The BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, from 3:45 to 5 p.m. Grand opening celebration for their new location on the Atlanta BeltLine. Help paint the new outdoor mural. Ribbon cutting ceremony, menorah lighting, welcoming the Torah, food, activities for children, music, dancing and more. For more information, www.chabadintown. org/?s=grand+opening.

Sparks of Light – Ahavath Achim Synagogue, 600 Peachtree Battle Ave. NW, Atlanta, from 5 to 7 p.m. Light up the 7th night of Chanukah. Celebrate the “festival of lights” with music, arts and crafts, a glow game room and food. Free. For more information, Marc Silberstein, msilberstein@aasynagogue. org or 404-603-5748.

Got old issues? If you discover old issues of the Atlanta Jewish Times laying around, we want them. To boost our archives, we will come pick up any AJT issues from 2014 or earlier. Please call 404-883-2130 or write kaylene@ atljewishtimes.com to setup retrieval. Subscribe, Support, Sustain. As always, thank you for reading your Atlanta Jewish times. 28 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Winter Daddy Daughter Dance –

Chanukah at the Governor’s Mansion – 1580 Spalding Drive, in Sandy Springs, from 3 to 4 p.m. For the 9th consecutive year, Atlanta’s Temple Emanu-El has been asked to represent Georgia’s Jewish citizens at this annual event. After a short celebration

Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 6 to 8 p.m. Pre-K through 6th-grade girls and their “date” (dad, stepdad, grandpa, uncle, older brother, etc.). Dress up in semi-formal attire and join the MJCCA for prizes, dinner and dancing. They will be collecting winter coats in all sizes to donate to those in need. Member couple, $35, community couple, $50. For more information, www.bit.ly/2SjRfk6.


DECEMBER 7-15 Mitzvot and Miracles Family Chanukah Party – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 7 to 8 p.m. Gilner Religious School Singers will lead participants in Chanukah songs, Alefbet Preschool will feature a silent auction and a dairy Chanukah dinner will be served. $10 per adult, $7 per child ages 5 to 12, children under 5 are free. $10 for adults, $7 for kids. No fee for the party without dinner. For more information, www.bethshalom.net.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10

Talking Heads Co-Ed Discussion Group – Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. A different volunteer moderator leads each session and provides participants with the week’s discussion questions in advance, ranging from current events to popular culture. Free for members, $5 for the community.

Event – Souper Jenny West Midtown, 1082 Huff Road, Atlanta, from 7 to 10 p.m. Bring your appetite as you travel around the world sampling what ORT offers through food, beverage, music and education. The price of admission includes all food and beverages plus a raffle ticket. Funds raised at this event will benefit the Supporting Girls in STEM fund at ORT schools around the globe. $50 per person. For more information, www.bit.ly/2Awk4Cm.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14

Shabbat, Me & Rabbi G @ the JCC – Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 5 to 6 p.m. Activities and crafts followed by songs and blessings with Rabbi Glusman, concluding with a visit from the popular “Weinstein School Shabbat Dinosaur.” Challah and grape juice will be served. Free and open to everyone. For more information and to RSVP, www.bit.ly/2BwiaoZ.

FIDF Legends & Heroes of the IDF – Featuring IDF Soldiers Participating in Operation Good Neighbor – City Springs, 1 Galambos Way, Sandy Springs, 6:30 to 10 p.m. $50 per person, $36 young leadership. For more information, www.bit.ly/2DPTDef.

Back of the Chocolate Shop – Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 7 to 9 p.m. Explore and taste different types of chocolate and learn how to incorporate chocolate into a variety of delicious confections. Debbie Lewis will walk you through the steps of making sipping chocolate, chocolate ganache truffles, homemade Oreos and creamy chocolate fondue. Wine will be served. $50 for members, $65 for the community. For more information, www.bit.ly/2AxDNl9.

Blue Jean Shabbat – Congregation Etz Chaim, 1190 Indian Hills Parkway NE, Marietta, from 6:15 to 8 p.m. Musical Shabbat featuring the Men’s Club brisket dinner. Salmon and vegetarian options available. Wear your blue jeans for a delicious Shabbat dinner and short musical service. Open to the community. $8 per adult, $5 children 12 & under. RSVP, www.tinyurl.com/ BJS1214 or email Heather Blake at heather@etzchaim.net.

YJP 2nd Fridays – Shabbat Dinner – Chabad Intown On The BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Join YJP every month for 2nd Fridays Shabbat dinner on the Atlanta BeltLine. Mingle, shmooze and meet new people with an open bar and a Shabbat dinner buffet. $25 per person. Limited to the first 50 RSVPs. For more information, www.bit. ly/2E6BcD0.

OVS Shabbat Dinner – Featuring Con-

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13

Taste of World ORT-Next Gen Major

versations with Rabbi Kassorla – Congregation Or VeShalom, 1681 North Druid Hills Road NE, Brookhaven, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. $18 suggested do-

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 Wanna Whole Latke Love – The Sixth Point, 3777 Peachtree Road NE, Atlanta from 5 to 7 p.m. Celebrate eight crazy nights with The Sixth Point at their annual latke soiree. Light the menorah together, fry up some potatoes and share some cheer. Ages 21 and up only. $10 per person in advance, $12 at the door. To register and for more information, www.bit.ly/2SjUCan.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15

nation per member, $10 associate member, $20 nonmember. To register and for more inf orm ation, w w w. b i t . ly/2E6nErl.

CDT Goes Italian – Congregation Dor Tamid, 11165 Parsons Road, Johns Creek, 6:30 p.m. Enjoy an Italian meal and bring a bottle of Chianti to share. $30 per person. For more information, www.bit.ly/2TWEz47. ■

Find more events and submit items for our online and print calendars at:

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

Calendar sponsored by the Atlanta Jewish Connector, an initiative of the AJT. Please contact community liaison, Jen Evans, for more information at jen@atljewishtimes.com.

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COMMUNITY Bet Haverim’s Chanukah March By Dave Schechter Congregation Bet Haverim celebrated the first night of Chanukah with a walk along the Atlanta BeltLine led by Rabbi Joshua Lesser. Three dozen congregants took part, stopping at sunset for prayers and songs.

Youth members of Congregation Bet Haverim formed a human menorah during the congregation’s BeltLine walk.

Brad Davidorf, a member of Congregation Bet Haverim, with his guitar, leads congregants in song during a march along the BeltLine on the first night of Chanukah.

Congregation Bet Haverim Rabbi Joshua Lesser raised a lighted sign as he led three dozen congregants on the sunset march.

A close-up of the lighted CBH sign that Rabbi Joshua Lesser carried as he led members in the Chanukah BeltLine march.

Congregation Bet Haverim Rabbi Joshua Lesser held aloft a lighted CBH sign as congregant Brad Davidorf, on guitar, led congregants in Chanukah songs, including the Ladino “Ocho Kandelikas.” 30 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


COMMUNITY

Rabbi Hirshy Minkowicz, director of Chabad of North Fulton, lit the menorah for at the Avalon Chanukah celebration.

On Dec. 2, nearly 500 members of North Fulton’s diverse community attended the second annual menorah lighting at Avalon to kick off the eight-day wintertime festival of lights.

Menorah Lighting Celebration at Avalon A giant menorah, inflatable Chanukah symbols and a dreidel guessing game were among the features of the secondannual Chanukah celebration at Avalon in Alpharetta Sunday. North Fulton’s diverse community gathered in celebration of the first night of Chanukah Dec. 2. The partnership between Avalon, a mixed-use retail and residential development, and Chabad of North Fulton attracted nearly 500 guests. A 9-foot menorah stood at one of the

main spaces at Avalon near the Apple store. There was a life-size blow-up menorah and dreidels, where families could take photos, and the winner of the “guess how many dreidels are in the bucket” game (estimated 588) was awarded a gift certificate for use at any Avalon store. Judah the Juggler performed tricks on stage for the children and Rabbi Hirshy Minkowicz lit the menorah while the crowd cheered. Those who attended savored jelly

Judah The Juggler entertains the crowd. For more photos, visit AJT's website.

Alla Umanskiy and Scott Scher light the shamash.

doughnuts, potato latkes and chocolate gelt as cheerful Chanukah music played. “As I stood on the stage at the menorah lighting on the first night of Chanukah, grasping my torch, smiling at my husband who was taking photos, I did not know if I was worthy of the honor,” said

Alla Umanskiy. “But I felt that if there was something that makes it acceptable for me to be on that stage, it was the fact that I held the torch in honor of others, in honor of my family’s past and future, in honor of grandparents and great-grandchildren.” ■

Friends and families of all ages gathered to enjoy holiday-inspired refreshments, exclusive giveaways and musical entertainment for this year’s menorah lighting at Avalon. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 31


COMMUNITY SIMCHA SPOTLIGHT

Mazel Tov Lawrence H. Freiman and Roger A. Kirschenbaum Lawrence H. “Larry” Freiman (left) and Roger A. Kirschenbaum (right) were both selected as Georgia Trend magazine’s 2018 Legal Elite. Both are attorneys specializing in taxes, estates and trusts at the law firm of MendenFreimen LLP.

Bar Mitzvah ■ Tyler Ross Linsky, son of Heath and Melissa Altman, on Dec. 1

Happy Birthday ■ Barry Walls – Dec. 3 ■ Norman Silver – Dec. 8 ■ Olivia Howard – Dec. 9

Have something to celebrate? Births, B’nai Mitzvah, Engagements, Weddings, Anniversaries, Special Birthdays and more ... Share it with your community with free AJT simcha announcements. Email them to submissions@atljewishtimes.com. 32 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 33


Jewish Joke of the Week

KEEPING IT KOSHER

The Son-in-Law Issy goes to meet his soon to be son-in-law, Benjy. He asks, “So nu, tell me Benjy my boy, what do you do?” “I study the Torah,” he replies. “But Benjy, you are going to marry my daughter, how are going to feed and house her?” “No problem,” Benjy says, “I study Torah, and it says G-d will provide.” “But you will have children, how will you educate them?” Issy asks. “No problem,” Benjy says, “I study Torah, and it says G-d will provide.” When Issy returns home, his wife anxiously asks him what Benjy is like. “Well,” Issy says, “he’s a lovely boy. I only just met him, and he already thinks I’m G-d.” Joke provided by David Minkoff www.awordinyoureye.com

Turkey Egg Rolls Recipe by Rivky Kleiman

Thanks to Johns Creek for our bonus "dreidel lighting" Joke of the Week!

Cook and prep: 1 hour 10 minutes Servings: 24 Contains: Eggs, gluten and wheat

Preference: Meat Difficulty: Medium Occasion: Chanukah Cuisines: Chinese

Egg Roll Wraps One 1-pound package Gefen Egg Roll Wraps 1 to 1 1/2 cups peanut or canola oil, for frying Turkey-Vegetable Filling 2 tablespoons Gefen Olive Oil 1 medium red onion, diced 1 red pepper, diced finely 1 orange pepper, diced finely 3 stalks celery, diced finely 2 cloves garlic, crushed or 2 cubes Gefen Frozen Crushed Garlic 1 pound ground turkey 1/4 teaspoon each salt, garlic powder, and onion powder 1/8 teaspoon pepper 2 to 3 tablespoons sweet chili sauce

Yiddish Word of the Week Látkes or Pónchikis? Chanukah food is the nutritionist’s nightmare: starch, sugar and, of course, oil, commemorating the miracle of little oil (Hebrew: ‫ ֶש ֶמן‬shémen) lasting eight days (Hebrew: ‫ ְשמֹונָ ה‬shemonáh). Many of these foods are shared with cultures within which European Jews have lived. The Yiddish term latkes (Yiddish: ‫לאטקעס‬, látkes) is probably inspired by the Russian (латка látka), cast-iron deep fryer. The Hebrew term sufganiyáh ‫ – ֻס ְפגָ נִ יָ ה‬deep-fried jelly doughnut dusted with powdered sugar – echoes its spongy and oil-absorbent texture. Doughnuts are common winter finger-food in many European cultures, called, for example, oliebollen (oil-balls) in Dutch, Berliner Pfannkuchen (Berlin Pancakes) in German and variants of the word “Ponchik” in Eastern Europe. Hence the Yiddish word for Chanukah doughnuts: pónchikis ‫ ָפאנטשיקעס‬. A gúte apetít ‫( א גוטע אפטיט‬Yiddish for Bon Appétit)! Rabbi Joab Eichenberg-Eilon, PhD, teaches Biblical Hebrew and Aramaic at the Israel Institute of Biblical Studies, eTeacher Group Ltd. 34 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Prepare the Turkey Filling Heat olive oil in a large frying pan. Sauté onion over medium heat for three minutes. Add in all the other vegetables and sauté for an additional three minutes. Stir in ground turkey and spices. Break up the turkey with a fork and keep stirring until completely cooked through and no longer pink. Stir in sweet chili sauce and remove from heat. Roll Arrange an egg roll wrap in a diamond shape on your work surface. Place one large tablespoon of turkey-vegetable mixture on the bottom half. Fold the bottom corner upwards over the filling. Fold both sides inwards. Roll and seal the last corner. Repeat with the remaining wraps. Fry Heat peanut or canola oil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Fry the egg rolls until golden, then drain on paper towels. Note: Egg rolls can be prepared in advance and frozen before frying. ■ Photography: Moishe Wulliger | Food styling: Renee Muller Source: Family Table by Mishpacha magazine


BRAIN FOOD

Traditions

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bassador to Copenhagen, Denmark. Elson was sworn in Nov. 23 at the White House. The new ambassador was the first Jewish board member of the University of Virginia, and its first Jewish rector. ■ Mark Jacobson, executive director of The Temple, has been elected to the board of the National Association of Temple Administrators. Mr. Jacobson was installed at their recent conference in San Francisco.

Mark Jacobson, executive director of The Temple, was elected to the board of the National Association of Temple Administrators.

50 Years Ago // December 6, 1968 ■ Teams of Atlanta Jewish young people participated in the Atlanta Torch Relay, carrying a torch from Israel on a 12-mile route passing all Atlanta synagogues and ending with a Chanukah menorah lighting ceremony at the Atlanta Jewish Community Center on Sunday, Dec. 15. Symbolic of the Jewish spirit of freedom, the relay protested against the suppression of Jewish religion and culture in the Soviet Union. ■ The b’nai mitzvah of Kal Koplin and Evan Landis was held Saturday, Dec. 7, at 9:30 a.m. at Ahavath Achim Synagogue. Kal is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Beryl Koplin. Evan is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Landis. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 35


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Honey, Your Shoes are Untied

CLOSING THOUGHTS

I was not a helicopter mom. The only time the word helicopter was part of the lingo of the 70s and 80s was in describing this strange flying machine. Or … When I found out a friend’s husband was a helicopter pilot.

I was a particular fan of “I’m OK – You’re OK” and Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development. I was an avid follower of “Between Parent and Child,” Haim Ginotts’ revolutionary approach to parent-child communication. My girls passed so many “tests.” I, on the other hand, am still working it all out. I was asked to lead seminars on parHelicopter mom? What the heck? I enting. Of course, before introducing a was, what I would comfortably describe as, Shaindle chapter from the newest approach, I would an evolving mom. experiment with my girls. What is an evolving mom you ask? It Schmuckler One such approach was to give chilis a mom who started out as a young hippie Shaindle’s Shpiel dren the opportunity to make their own girl, married and became a young hippie wife. I had enough sense about myself to know I could decisions, and learn from “natural” consequences. So, for example, if your child’s shoes are untied, and probably integrate these roles as being a natural part of me. Well, pretty sure. (Notice the absence of the word you surely do not want them to trip, you do not say: “Tie your shoes or you will trip.” Instead you say: “Honey, “house” in front of the word “wife”?) When I became pregnant, my prayer was I would your shoes are untied,” hoping against all hope, the rehave a girl (I did) and she would innately know how to sponse will be the tying of said shoes. I was intent on bringing up independent, freeguide me to be the mom she would need and deserve. (Boy, did she ever.) She kept my feet to the coals, so to thinking girls. The response I received proved I was dospeak, and every day gently opened her heart and guid- ing one heck of a job. ed me to be a mommy. I was so happy being a mommy, I did it four times Me: Honey your shoes are untied. in 5 ½ years – all girls! My daughter: Yes, I know mommy. Given I was in the counseling field, I would test every new parenting approach introduced as “the right And with that, the discussion was over. way, the new way, the best way” on my sweet and patient daughters. Then there was this one: Teacher of one of my

ACCESSIBILITY

daughters calling her mommy (that would be me). Teacher: Mrs. Schmuckler, your daughter safely rode her bike to school, however, she does not have any shoes on. My daughter’s mommy: Does she have socks on? Teacher: Yes, she does My daughter’s mommy: Well that was her choice, blue knee socks, no shoes. Teacher: Will you be bringing her shoes? My daughter’s mommy: No, I’m afraid not. I respect her choice. If she finds she is uncomfortable, she will never choose socks without shoes again. In my head I am praying this works. No, I am not a helicopter mom, however, my girls never tripped over laces, always learned from their mistakes, supported each other, and never laughed at me. Well, not that I was ever aware of. ■

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ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES DECEMBER 7, 2018 | 37


OBITUARIES

Leon David Alexander 50, Atlanta

Leon David Alexander passed away in his sleep Nov. 14, 2018, at the age of 50. He was the oldest son of Kenneth and Glenda Alexander. He is survived by his parents; his grandmother, Evelyn (101); children, Brandon (26), Meghan (19), and Caleb (14); and his younger brother, Scott (48). Leon was the broker for The Alexander Team residential real estate firm for many years. He was appreciated by his clients and fellow realtors. His favorite pastimes included gold, bowling, bike riding, and flying kites on the beach. He was proud of his children. Brandon, his oldest son, was special in his heart. Meghan, his daughter, was the apple of his eye. He often took his youngest son, Caleb to many football and hockey games. He enjoyed family get-togethers for Hanukkah and Rosh Hashanah. He also enjoyed spending quiet time with his father in Hilton Head, walking on the beach or riding bikes. He will be missed by everyone who knew him. Arrangements made by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

Martin Hochdorf 98, Atlanta

Martin Hochdorf, 98, of Atlanta, died Nov. 29, 2018. Mr. Hochdorf was born in Berlin, Germany, and emigrated to the United States in 1938. He met his wife,

Jane, in New York. Mr. Hochdorf earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from New York University and a master’s degree in physics from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Upon graduation from the University of Arizona in 1952 he moved his family to Chattanooga, Tenn., where he accepted a position as an engineer. Soon after, he volunteered to learn a new technology called computing. Mr. Hochdorf went on to develop the Tennessee Valley Authority’s use of computing and became the chief of the Computing Center. After retirement, Mr. Hochdorf eventually moved to Atlanta in 1987. He was a member of Congregation B’nai Torah in Sandy Springs. For more than 17 years, he led evening minyans. Through this activity, he touched many lives throughout the Jewish community. Among his primary interests and enjoyment were classical music and reading books. Survivors include his son, Robert (Sharon) Hochdorf; daughter, Therese (Joshua) Yarmush; nine grandchildren: Meryl (Joel) Miller, Shoshana (Adam) Nathan, Shmuel Dove (Miriam) Yarmush, Gershon (Deena) Yarmush, Avi (Sarah)Yarmush, Yehuda (Rochie) Yarmush, Daniel (Gila) Yarmush, Gavriel (Basya) Yarmush and Noftoli (Lana) Yarmush; and 39 great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Foundation. A graveside service was held Dec. 1, 2018 at Mount Carmel Cemetery in Glendale, N.Y., with Rabbi Paul Kerbel officiating. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999. Sign online guest book at www.edressler.com.

Sylvia Kaler Atlanta

Sylvia Kaler, of Atlanta, passed away Nov. 26, 2018, surrounded by loving family. She is survived by her sons, Jonathan Kaler, Matthew Kaler, and Michael (Tracy) Kaler; daughters, Amy (Fred) Webster, and Dina (Neil) Jacobson; grandchildren, Rachel, Jessica (Cameron Gauntner), Whitney Webster and Joseph Jacobson; siblings, Jean (Jerry) Cooper, Brenda (Stanley) Daniels, Jerry (Sharon) Kanter; cousin, Gilda Linden; and many nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Weinstein Hospice or William Breman Jewish Home. A graveside service was held Nov. 27, 2018 at Greenwood Cemetery. Arrangements made by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

Chester Rosenberg 70, Atlanta

Chester Rosenberg, 70, of Atlanta, died unexpectedly Nov. 23, 2018. He is survived by his daughter and son-in-law, Marcy Rosenberg and Nhan-anh Nguyen-khoa; son, Scott Rosenberg; sister and brother-in-law, Leslie and Lee Beitchman; sister, Mitzie Wagy; grandchildren, Miles and Ella; and loving nieces and nephews. Chester was born and raised in Atlanta. He was a graduate of Druid Hills High School, University of Georgia, and earned his law degree from Emory University. A legal scholar and American patriot, Chester practiced law at Cohen, Pollack, Merlin, Axelrod, & Rosenberg as well as Seyfarth Shaw firms. He was a longtime member of the Ahavath Achim Synagogue. Chester was an avid runner in his younger years, and he enjoyed playing basketball and boxing and watching Atlanta sports and college football. Most of all, Chester loved spending time with his children and grandchildren. Graveside services were held Nov. 26 at Arlington Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Esophagus Cancer Awareness Association, www.ecaware.org. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999. Sign online guestbook at www.edressler.com. ■ Obituaries in the AJT are written and paid for by the families; contact Managing Publisher Kaylene Ladinsky at kaylene@atljewishtimes.com or 404-883-2130, ext. 100, for details about submission, rates and payments. Death notices, which provide basic details, are free and run as space is available; send submissions to editor@atljewishtimes.com. 38 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


40 | DECEMBER 7, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Atlanta Jewish Times, Vol. XCIII No. 48, December 7, 2018  

Business & Finance

Atlanta Jewish Times, Vol. XCIII No. 48, December 7, 2018  

Business & Finance