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BALERS • SPRAYERS • IRRIGATION SCOTSHEEP 2014 PREVIEW HOUSING • FENCING PROFILE on BARENBRUG UK LOCH LEVEN’S LARDER • DE BRUS BEER

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Introducing two news sections - COUNTRY WOMAN and HORSE SOXVVRPXFKPRUH ,1285)8//<3$&.('3$*(6


More strings to our editoiral bow…

I am delighted to once again announce that we have further improved the diversity of our editorial contents, with the addition of four new sections that we hope you will enjoy over your cup of tea, coffee or mineral water? Equine journalist Melanie Scott has joined our team of columnists, and this issue sees the first ever ‘Horse’ section within the magazine. We have also added ‘Country Woman’, where we can reflect and promote women working within what is usually a very male orientated rural industry in Scotland. Our ‘Topic’ section will take a look at a singular subject which is in current vogue, whereas our ‘In Focus’ pages will look into a new product or service that has come to our editorial attention. So, there is a lot of reading here for your £2.50 cover price, and if you have just bought this magazine for the very first time, I hope that you like what you see? Subscriptions are now possible on our new website. Next issue will be our Royal Highland Show Preview Edition. The year is moving so fast already! Slàinte, Athole.

PUBLISHER/EDITOR Athole Murray Fleming E-mail: mail@farmingscotlandmagazine.com Email: athole@atholedesign.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Athole Murray Fleming Tel. 01738 639747 ADVERTISING MANAGERS Barry Tweed Tel. 01738 550157 Email: barry@farmingscotlandmagazine.com Trevor Knights Tel. 01738 447378 Email: trevor.knights@farmingscotlandmagazine.com PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Christina Fleming Email: christina@atholedesign.com PUBLISHER’S NOTES COPYRIGHT This publication has been produced and published by ATHOLE DESIGN & PUBLISHING LTD who are the copyright owners. No reproduction, copying, image scanning, storing or recording of any part of this publication without the permission of ATHOLE DESIGN & PUBLISHING LTD. SUPPLIED MATERIAL ATHOLE DESIGN & PUBLISHING LTD does not accept any liability for loss or damage to supplied photographs or other such promotional material. FARMING SCOTLAND MAGAZINE is designed, produced and published by Athole Design & Publishing Ltd.

Join us on FACEBOOK Tolastadh, 18 Corsie Drive, www.facebook.com/ Kinnoull, Perth, Scotland PH2 7BU. FarmingScotlandMagazine Tel. 01738 639747 E-mail: mail@farmingscotlandmagazine.com Website: www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

CONTENTS

SXEOLVKHU 7$/.

April 2014

Main Features Irrigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14 Balers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-30 Scotsheep 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-35 Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74-76 Fencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77-80 Company Profile Barenbrug UK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-20 Drovers Tales The diary of Ken Headspeath at Borland Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 InFocus Robots from GEA in Scotland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 Beautiful Tractors Two more tractors to drool over! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Flavour of Scotland Featuring De Brus Beer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36-39 Our Farm Shop Loch Leven's Larder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Topic Hydrocarbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89-90 NEWS SECTIONS Arable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Potatoes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41-43 Renewable Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44-47 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60-67 Sheep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-70 Dairy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-73 Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81-84 Horse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85-86 Country Woman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87-88 Future Farmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92-93 Machinery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94-109 Lifestyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Lifestyle@Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Lifestyle Car . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112-113 Columns In my View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Online Savvy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Let's Cook Scotland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Farmers Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Scottish Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Farming for the Climate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 NFU of Scotland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 The Vet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 National Sheep Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Crofting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Scottish Land & Estates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Conservation Matters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Equine Angles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Southern Belle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 The Money Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Farm Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 People on the Move. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Book Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

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IN

Robots land in Scotland The MIone robotic milking system has well and truly landed in Scotland with GEA Farm Technologies dealers DairyFlow and Dunglinsons installing the first couple of systems in the country in Strathaven and Canonbie respectively The first to be commissioned was in January at Harlawhole, Canonbie and we caught up with the proud owner Mr Imrie to find out how things are going and what prompted his investment in robots. Mr Imrie said: “We began looking into robots three years ago. We want to increase our herd of Friesians from 110 to 150. Our existing 12/12 herringbone had been on the farm 45 years and this and the shed just weren’t big enough to cope with our future plans. The layout of the farm also makes grazing difficult so housing all year round seemed a viable option. In addition we’re finding getting good, regular labour to be a major problem. So taking all these factors into consideration investing in robots seemed like a logical move. “Deciding to move to robots was very much a family decision. Even though my dad isn’t able to do as much on the farm as he’d like to he is very much a large part of the business. Fortunately my wife Emma is a vet so she looked at robots from a cow health and welfare side of things which is of paramount importance to us. “We’ve worked with GEA authorised dealer Dunglinsons for decades and heard that the MIone was working well in the UK so we visited the farm in Devon plus another four farms in Holland. Having recently married and had a baby, Hannah, we needed to

The Imrie family of Harlawhole, Canonbie

GEA’s MIone robotic milking system

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be sure, especially with the large investment costs, that we were choosing the right robot and system for our cows. The visits allowed us to see the MIone in action on different farms, speak to farmers about their experiences and view shed layouts so we could see how best to use the space in our new building. We also saw how Friesians can be managed on a guided system, and it appeared to work extremely well as they can be greedy and lazy animals. “We use to spend 14 hours a day on the farm, three at each end of the day were just on milking, including wash down. I don’t expect to spend less time working on the farm but the two box MIone will allow me to be more flexible and do other jobs for instance the farm office is based on a mezzanine above the robots with a viewing balcony so I can observe the cows and their natural behaviour, helping to pick up lameness etc. When Hannah is a bit older I hope I can do things like the school run as I won’t have to be on the farm to milk. Even though the MIone has only been in a couple of weeks I’m

able to leave the farm an hour earlier than before which means I can help with putting Hannah to bed. “There’ve been other noticeable differences too and I’m absolutely over the moon!! The cows seem really calm and happy too with increased milk yields and good SCC and bactoscans. It’s really remarkable how well they’ve adapted to their new surroundings. Not only have the cows got to get use to a new way of milking but they also have new living arrangements and will be in the shed all the time but they seem to be enjoying having more space and a bright and airy place to live! “I see robots as an investment for the next 20 years and with the challenges of dairy farming it’s critical to be proactive in order to remain viable - I don’t want to get left behind and feel that the MIone will help move me and the business forward.” ?hk fhk^ bg_hkfZmbhg Z[hnmZnmhfZmb\fbedbg`Zg] ma^eZm^lmni]Zm^lhgmablZg] ma^ _Zkf bg LmkZmaZo^g oblbm ppp'ZnmhfZmb\fbedbg`'\h'nd'

=PZP[ FARMING SCOTLAND MAGAZINE UL^^LIZP[L www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com Farming News – Commodity Prices – Weather Outlook Agri Pages Online Directory – Magazine Archives And so much more… www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

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IRRIGATION

Controlling the water of life Irrigation systems and services

A new generation of control panels for Greencrop Irrigation pumps The latest Greencrop Irrigation pump control panels provide optimised fuel efficiency, maximised water utilisation and automated “single operator” irrigation. The goals were to improve fuel efficiency, avoiding irrigation main failures (bursts) and obtain reliable operation which was fully automated and unattended. New features have been refined to optimise pressure and flow management to minimise irrigation water main stresses during all phases of operation. Accurate pressure and flow management throughout irrigation now ensures improved uniform water delivery. Fast and reliable leak detection also avoids loss of valuable water resources. By remote monitoring and control using mobile telephone technology, fewer visits to the pump are required. Richard Fellows, Manager at Cadland Estates, says, “The SIL900LF saves me driving 200 miles per week during the irrigation season.” Mr Fellows and other first operators are very pleased with

12

Greencrop’s optional line fill control panel

the results of optimised utilisation. Models are also available for slurry & waste spreading and dirty water handling. Greencrop Irrigation can also offer high-quality Irrimec irrigators with computer control and low-pressure turbines. Irrimec hose reel irrigators are supplied with painted drum in epoxy anti-corrosive primer

with final coat of oven baked polyurethane paint for superb long lasting finish. Chassis, turret and gun trolley are hot galvanized. Turbine drive with patented “ Turbimec” system interchangeable for flows of 10130mc/hr at low inlet pressure Complete hydraulic operation of support legs, drawbar jack, turntable rotation and trolley lift.

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Single or tandem axle, 3-wheel asymmetric trolley c/w Konkord vari-angle gun and spare nozzles, can be set for centre pull or offset. All our irrigation reels are driven from one or both sides by a cut gear ring positioned on the outer diameter of the drum, unlike a chain drive; the hose to be driven by a low-torque


gear drive, which is positive and low wearing. All machines are supplied with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dosidisâ&#x20AC;? a simpleto-use computer control system that follows a logical formula for setting rates and delay start/ stop times etc. These can also be controlled remotely by GSM systems An alternator is fitted as standard, which maintains full battery charge on each run, relieving the failures experienced with nigh-time operation using solar panels. Greencrop Irrigation are also a leading manufacture in the UK of a full range of highquality diesel pump sets, easy to use semi electronic control and engine protection panel, start up is a simple operation and diagnostic information is easier to understand and see. High/Low and no flow are controlled by a flow meter, that displays on the panel the flow rate ,so you can set the pump

IRRIGATION

Grimme irrigation wheel in action

to the correct flow rate, saving fuel costs. Panel options are full GSM of start run data and stop functions, M3hr record, Auto line fill pressure system

this restricts the pump output until a pre set line pressure is reached, on achieving this the engine will throttle to maintain demand pressure. Or monitor

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irrigation in real time, either buy using mobile phone SMS text messaging or through a web browser. The acoustic cabinet is rated at 72db at only 1 metre.

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IRRIGATION

T.I.S. Sprinkler Wright Rain DEPU hushpack

We are offering a special deal for customers to upgrade their control panels on old (an make) pump sets, to make the pump more efficient. Standard upgrade manual control, or full line fill with telephone operation options will be available. Information on upgrades is available from Greencrop Irrigation. For further information on any of our Greencrop products contact your nearest dealer, or call Greencrop Irrigation on 01328 701992, or Contact Howard Chantry email howard@ greencrop.co.uk. Grimme Irrigation Grimme Irrigation reels are a premium product, built to last using high quality parts and materials. Focus is placed on efficiency and reducing pressure losses within the hose by using larger diameter hoses. Reel sizes range from 90-300m up to 125-750m. The thickest

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rear support legs on the market and an extra wide and strong hose guide section ensure that our reels will not fail at a crucial moment. A computer control system which is simple to use, fast to set up and with extra features unique to Grimme give you confidence that the reel will come in on time - every time. Automatic gun levelling prevents crop damage caused by the gun at the end of the run.Smooth walled drums prevents damage to the specially designed PE hose which also reduces stretch and wear, Control panels will not become outdated as new software updates can be installed in field. All reels are fully compatible with irrigation booms. Layflat storage winder for storing up to 10m of layflat is standard on all reels. At the roots of Grimme Irrigation.... Strength, Precision, Innovation & Service.

All Grimme Irrigation reels are backed up by a 2 year parts warranty and the industry leading after sales care provided through the Grimme UK retail outlets based in the UK and Ireland. Wright Rain Wright Rain also specialises in designing and assembling complete, automated, electric pumping systems specifically designed for the individual farm application allowing for future expansions, flexibility and containerised for housing and security, where required. Many of these Wright Rain pumping systems have been provided over the last few years specific to the agricultural or Industrial applications and using the most efficient computerised control systems to most affectively minimise the power consumption and subsequent running costs. Total Irrigation Systems TIS is a family business which started in 1994 to service

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irrigation needs for sports and agriculture. TIS has recently been appointed as supplier of John Deere Water irrigation equipment into the Scottish market. Their wide range of innovative products for soft fruit, potatoes and nursery crops are proving ever more popular within the commercial sector. New more accurate drippers with water saving potential and a hugely attractive price are available now alongside T.Tape, Hydrolite, Hydropdrip and many other products. TIS will design, supply, install and maintain all your component parts if required. As a result we can offer a turn key on stop shop service of high quality. In addition, borehole prognosis, grey water harvest, rain water harvest, wash bay water recycling system. UV treatment and filtration are all within the TIS group of companies.


BEAUTIFULTRACTORS Specially for all our tractor enthusiasts

MASSEY-FERGUSON, MODEL 35X UK, 1963 In 1953 Massey-Harris purchased Harry Ferguson’s tractor business. The company was known as Massey-Harris-Ferguson until 1957, when it became Massey-Ferguson (M-F). The popular Model 35 tractor began life under Ferguson and endured underM-F, built in both the UK and the USA. The model went through several iterations, culminating in the Model 35X. Features The 35X sported the remarkable three-cylinder Perkins diesel motor and could be purchased as the Deluxe model, with six speeds in dual range, or the Multi Power, with Massey’s novel hydraulic ‘on-the-go’ clutch system, which offered 12 speeds. The 35X was amongst the last with the rounded-front Ferguson styling. The drive train and wheels retained the traditional Ferguson Grey, with the sheet metal in red. Uses The 35X was a truly modern tractor with diesel power, Ferguson hydraulics and great handling abilities. The post-war styling makes the 35X a desirable collector’s item and it is presented in tractor shows as a latter-day classic. Related Models The restyled M-F 135 continued the 35 tradition and led to the Model 245. The 65 was a more powerful tractor in the same style. Power & Size 44.5 hp; weight: 1451kg (3200lb) length: 297cm (117in) width: 163cm (64in) height: 137cm (54in) Manufacturing & Distribution The 35X was built in Coventry until 1964. It was especially popular in southern Africa and also saw service in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and mainland Europe. The 35X was the last of the many variants of the highly successful 35 series.

NUFFIELD, MODEL 3/42 UK, 1961 Produced by the British Motor Corporation (BMC), Nuffeld tractors marketed under the Universal name gained a strong following after the Second World War. The Model 3/42 was introduced in 1961, with a modern diesel motor and updated hydraulic system. In 1968 British Leyland took over from BMC and the Nuffeld name joined the tractor industry’s long list of fallen flags. Features The 3/42 moniker stood for the three-cylinder diesel motor with 42 hp output. It used a five-speed transmission, modern hydraulics and depth control. The 3/42 retained Nuffield’s pleasant 1950s-style rounded hood and sported an overall treatment of Poppy Orange, soon to be replaced by Leyland blue. Uses The versatile and well-built 3/42 was a modern tractor in every way. It was a good second tractor on a large farm or could handle the full workload of a smaller operation. The inexpensive canopy softened the morning chill of autumn ploughing. At today’s shows and fairs a Nuffield will always be cheerfully appreciated in the ‘classic’ category. Related Models The 4/60 was a larger four-cylinder companion to the 3/42. Both were replaced by the 10/42 and 10/60 respectively. Power & Size 42 hp; weight: 2404kg (5300lb) length: 305cm (120in) width: 183cm (72in) height: 193cm (76in) Manufacturing & Distribution Production began at BMC’s Birmingham works, but was shifted near Edinburgh during 1961. The series was built from 1961 to 1964 and sold in the UK, Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, southern Africa and South America.

Images from “Beautiful Tractors – Iconic Models” by Rick Mannen :[^Znmb_neerbeenlmkZm^]k^\hk]h_-)h_ma^phke]lfhlmfZ`gbÛ\^gm%\eZllb\Z`kb\nemnkZefZ\abg^l%]Zmbg`_khf*2*0mh*20/' Iahmh`kZiar[r<ebo^Lmk^^m^k'In[ebla^][r?kZg\^lEbg\hegEbfbm^]' Available in paperback: £12.99. For further information : www.franceslincoln.com www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

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;Zk^g[kn`@kZll>qi^kml Investing in grass seed for the benefit of Scottish farmers By Melanie Scott Barenbrug is one of the largest seed producing companies in the world. The Dutch-company was formed in 1904 and has been established in the UK for over 30 years. The fourth-generation family business spans 12 countries over five continents with around 600 employees worldwide. The company produces more than 90,000 tonnes of seed worldwide each year. Of the 600 staff, a third is employed in the breeding and research side of the business, developing new varieties and products, providing the foundation for the rest of the business. Within the UK there are three sites â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the head office at Bury St Edmunds, the Scottish depot at Falkirk and one in Armagh, Northern Ireland, each distributing seed mixtures to suit the local environment. While Bury St Edmunds is the main storage facility, the Scottish site is 12,000 square foot and can hold 520 tonnes of grass seed. It has a three tonne capacity blender â&#x20AC;&#x201C; making the site the most advanced blending and bagging plant in the north, with distribution to

The Clanrye grass seed being harvested in the UK

the whole of Scotland and the north of England. The blending and bagging is overseen by Ray Gardiner and Norman Keay, while Julia Liddle is the customer service manager. Mhairi Dawson is the regional agriculture sales manager

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and David Greenshields is the Research and Development Manager (Amenity) Barenbrug is a breeder, producer and wholesaler of grass seed working closely with an extensive network of local agricultural seed merchants selling direct to customers. The company are very involved with customer support and have on farm meetings to walk fields and suggest grass mixtures. Mhairi is also involved with several monitor farms in Scotland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Producing grass seed in the UK is very important to us,â&#x20AC;? explained Mhairi Dawson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The production is more easily managed, the seed is cleaner and there are no currency fluctuations to affect pricing, plus we are supporting UK farmers and homegrown production.â&#x20AC;? Grass seeds in your mixtures can be traced back to the fields in which the seed was grown.

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Tried, Tested and Proven â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Grass Experts With weather conditions and landscape varying throughout the UK, Barenbrug has a comprehensive trial programme across three sites (Cropvale in Worcestershire, Kinellar, Aberdeen and Loughgall in Northern Ireland). The extensive trials replicate the varying conditions and climates experienced by livestock producers. Cropvale in the vale of Evesham is the largest of the three sites with over 3,000 trial plots. Situated in the centre of the famous horticultural vale with its longer growing season, and trial varieties meet greater disease pressure and drought stress in summer, Cropvale is used to screen new material from Barenbrug Holland and Barenbrug France and also works in conjunction


Our Cropvale trial research site

with Agriseeds - Barenburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operation in New Zealand. Alongside variety trials, Cropvale also tests mixtures and species, like tall fescue, westerwolds and vetches, which are outside the UK National List system. Cropvale is also the UK National List Site for Disease Assessment. And as part of a working farm, Barenbrug run persistency & palatability trials in the non-plot fields with the farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cattle. The Scottish research site at Blackburn is a working farm in the North-west of Aberdeenshire. It has around 500 plots testing new varieties and additional plots testing the BarForage mixtures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Barenbrugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own range of grass mixtures. The site is run by the SAC as part of the National and Recommended List trials, and includes early, intermediate and late perennial ryegrasses, white and red clover, timothy and Italian and hybrid ryegrasses as well as the BarForage grasses mixtures. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aberdeen is the coldest and most exposed of our three sites,â&#x20AC;? points out Mhairi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s around 220 growing days, so spring growth and winter hardiness is most important. We trial mixtures, varieties and species that are particularly suited to the Scottish market here.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;In order to succeed at Aberdeen, varieties must have very good spring growth, as the longer winter means that grass will start growing later in

the spring and stops earlier in the autumn. The site has a short growing season and harder winters than our third site at Loughgall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are also using the Aberdeen site to develop, new improved mixtures for Scottish conditions, by doing yield and seasonal growth trials on different varieties permutations in the same mixtures,â&#x20AC;? added Mhairi. The oldest of the trials sites is at Loughgall in Northern Ireland. The site is combined with a collaboration programme with the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Loughgall has a very high rainfall and this allows us to find out how grasses perform in mild, wet conditions, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very little frost and it allows us to check each varieties yield potential,â&#x20AC;? explained Mhairi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is the largest of our three UK sites with around 3,200 plots.â&#x20AC;? AFBI have been breeding improved grass varieties grasses for over 60 years and plant breeder, David Johnston, oversees the programme. Barenbrug has had a commercial partnership with AFBI for over 21 years, which has seed more than 20 varieties to be introduced to the market â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they all play a significant role in providing farmers with varieties that are top for exceptional spring growth, palatability, disease resistance and digestibility. Loughgall also produces breedersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; seed and screens

material from Barenbrug and other seed breeders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The three sites give a good comparison and help speed up the process of entering material onto the four regional recommended lists. All the seeds need to be distinct, uniform and stable across all three sites, although they all have different growing conditions the seeds must grow the same and perform the same regardless of the location,â&#x20AC;? adds Mhairi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They also allow us to trial minor species that could have an increasingly important role in tackling the effects of climate change and the need for even better disease resistance.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The three varied UK trial sites, collaboration with AFBI and Barenbrugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own R&D background allow us to continually introduce new varieties and solutions for the Scottish agricultural market.â&#x20AC;? When creating a new seed the overall goal is to improve

the current specification of the existing seeds. However, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a quick process as it takes 17 years and costs around ÂŁ500,000 to create a new variety for commercial sale. The primary requirements are yield, digestibility and seed production. Other important traits are disease resistance, seasonal growth, persistency and palatability. Thereafter they have on-site working farm trials across the country. Grass Advice for Scotland Sowing new grass is expensive but as Mhairi explains it is VERY cost effective. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The initial cost is paid after the first year by the improved yields and quality of grass. By introducing modern clovers, you can significantly reduce N fertiliser applications tooâ&#x20AC;? she explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Scotland the reseeding window is generally end of March to the end of September. However, in 2013, because of

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DOG FOOD

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Newly sown grass emerging

the late spring everything that was usually done in April was done in May and there was also a late autumn with people sowing well into October. It is very weather dependantâ&#x20AC;? Barenbrug has a wide range of mixtures, so what is best for your grassland? Before thinking of reseeding itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best to get the fields analysed advises Mhairi: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soil analysis should be done every four years, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very inexpensive tool and the benefits out weigh the cost. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also address any issues from the soil sample, deal with compaction, this can improve performance at the grass layer of the field. Depending on the farm depth of compaction a shallow sward slitter of or deeper sub soiler may be needed. Dairy farms and those with Permanent grazing causes shallower compaction

Farmers silaging our popular cut & graze mixture

and poaching or from water logging from whilst a heavy machinery movement can cause compaction at much deeper different levels. Another Some signs of soil compaction is are waterlogging, poor productivity and farmyard manure being slow to break down into the soil, which This can be due to low worm activity created by the compaction and compounded by overdosing with slurry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knowing the soil type is also important, soil that is heavy or light performs very different, either retaining the water or drying out or leaching nutrients. In extreme soil types, applying lime and fertiliser appropriately can resolve some of the issues associated with those soil types. If spreading farmyard manure onto the grass land itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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important to get that analysed before spreading,â&#x20AC;? points out Mhairi. Mixtures for Scotland The grass seed mixtures are designed to be specific to each region have been formulated using a number of species and varieties. Before a decision is given to go ahead and reseed it is important that determining what ley is needed and how long it needs to last, is decided. For example an eight year grazing mixture is very different to a two year cutting mixture. Other factors, such as the protein requirements and weed control, also need to be considered. The mixtures are made up with a specific role in mind. Also once you sow your grass donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget about it. Treat it like a crop and appraise it regularly. In Scotland one of the most popular in the Barenbrug BarForage range of grass seed mixtures is Cut & Graze. This is a dual purpose, long term mixture which contains intermediate and late perennial ryegrass, Timothy and a white clover blend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scotland uses more Timothy grasses than the rest of the UK. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much more tolerant of wetter and colder ground,â&#x20AC;? explains Mhairi. Cut & Graze is a highly palatable, long-term forage ley which is persistent and highly flexible. The mixture can

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produce top quality silage but also has the ability to graze. It contains Ensign White Clover Blend, which is important for nitrogen fixation and increasing the protein content. Utilising/Working with Clovers If weeds are known to be an issue, sometimes it can be advantageous to seed sow clover free mixtures allowing you to do some weed control spraying. The white clover can then be overseeded into pasture the following year. When clover is combined with grasses this provides leys with nutritional and environmental benefits. Clover mixtures provide high yields of good quality forage and with the clovers fixing â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;freeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; nitrogen from the atmosphere. White Clovers fix around 120kg N/ Ha/annum. In addition, the inclusion of clover in a ley can raise the protein content of forage by up to 3%. Provided the sward contains 30-40% clover there is little need to apply artificial nitrogen fertiliser White clover is usually used for long term grazing, it is easy to establish and can be over sown into an existing pasture using a grass seed drill or broadcast in the spring or autumn. The soil temperature needs to be in excess of 8 centigrade.


There is also an equestrian range, for racecourses as well as horse commercial hay mixtures and general purpose grass-land mixtures suitable for horses. Other mixtures include organic grass mixtures, forage crops, game cover, conservation, wild flowers mix, green manuring and grass mixtures for small holdings, including two seed mixtures suitable for pigs.

Field containing red clover being harvested

Not just Forage Grass Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just grass for grazing and forage that Barenbrug excel in. They have a strong amenity business with grass seed mixtures designed for golf courses, sports fields, parks, tennis courts and the leisure industry, as well as

lawns for our own homes and gardens. The amenity grass mixtures need to be hardwearing, wear tolerant and have good visual characteristics, compared to agriculture grasses that require high yield and high forage in comparison.

Always looking to the future In 2013 Proto Plus, a new mixture was launched and extensively trialled on farms in South west & Central Scotland with excellent results. Proto Plus is a spring sown, high protein forage ley whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grass component will also grow at lower soil temperatures giving it potential for overwintering sheep and cattle, as well as

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being a green manure or cover crop. It was developed from a ley sold in southern by Barenbrug France, Spain and Portugal and has been adapted for the UK market into a spring sown mixture designed for to produce constant high yields of digestible forage with high protein content. It is a mixture of Italian ryegrass, crimson clover and Persian clover. It continues to grow until the soil temperature drops below 4 degrees C. The clover content leaves the equivalent of more than 40kg of nitrogen in the soil, which feeds the grazing sward. The clover constituent is annual, but the Italian ryegrass will carry on into the second year for cutting or grazing. Another benefit is that the short term clovers do not have the red clover associated problems with phyto- oestrogens making Proto Plus safe for flushing

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Sheep in field of ProtoPlus

Green Velvet lawn seed

breeding ewes or growing tup lambs & shearlings on. Another research programme that Barenbrug are currently involved in is looking at the way grasses containing endophytes perform in UK conditions. Endophytes are naturally occurring fungi that live in a symbiotic relationship with

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the grass. In New Zealand grasses containing novel endophyte have better resistance to drought and heat stress as well as better resistance to disease and pest attack. It appears to create a ‘barrier’ and it is also thought endophytes may inhibit the growth of competitors.

Modern grass for modern farmers With the farming industry constantly changing and the weather unpredictable it’s hard enough to predict tomorrow’s weather forecast accurately. For the researchers at Barenbrug to plan so far in advance do

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they need to consult their crystal ball? It is interesting to see the foresight and the amount of future planning the company undertakes. The next time you walk through your field have a look at the grass – and appreciate there’s a lot more to it than you think.


BALERS

LMK:PF:G:@>F>GM

A brief look at each of the main brands of balers on the market today Case IH balers The range of Case IH balers offers a model to cover every requirement, with the new LB Series of Large Baler, together with RB-Series fixed- and variable-chamber round balers. The stylish exterior of the Case IH LB 324, 334, 424 and 434 Large Balers reflects their completely new design. All key component areas have been revised or redeveloped, including an extremely rugged central frame and a new 2.4m-wide pick-up / rotor system which gathers crop efficiently before transferring it to the bale chamber. Perfect for working in hay and grass silage, the LB 324 and LB 334 models form high

Case RB 455 round baler

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BALERS

Claas Variant 2 baler

quality, easily transportable 80cm x 70cm and 80cm x 90cm bales for long-term storage, with the availability of a fine-cut option. The LB 424 produces 120cm x 70cm high-density bales in straw, silage or hay and is available with a fine-cut rotor for grass silage.

New John Deere C440R wrapping baler

The LB 434 is designed for high-capacity operation in all crop types, producing 120cm x 90cm hay and straw bales which can be up to 2.6m long, the most stable size for economic transportation. The latest variable chamber balers from Case IH deliver significant increases in

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capacity, bale density, output and reliability compared with the previous RB 4 Series machines. Featuring classleading styling the RB455 and RB465, which produce bales of up to 1.5m and 1.8m in diameter, incorporate a raft of new and improved features. Available in Standard, Rotor or Rotor Cutter feeder versions, they include improved four-bar and new five-bar pickup reels with larger, stronger components, a new net wrap system, more accurate twine wrapping, durable endless bale chamber belts and an improved density control system. Claas Variant range The VARIANT 385 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 360 range of variable round balers from CLAAS has been given several new features for the 2014 season. The variable chamber CLAAS VARIANT is ideal for baling hay, straw or silage, thanks to the freely selectable bale diameter and a higher level of compaction in comparison with fixed chamber systems. For 2014, VARIANT 360, 365, 380 and 385 models will now be available with the new 2.35m wide XXL pick-up, giving it the widest pick-up on the market for round balers. By enabling the VARIANT to bale wider straw and grass swathes, this ensures that the high performance potential of the baler can be fully exploited.

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However, the pick-up has not only been made wider; it has also been given automatic chain tensioning. This helps reduce maintenance time, so more time can be spent baling. The oil reservoir has also been enlarged from 3.0 litres to 6.3 litres and incorporates an integrated filter and continuous chain lubrication to again help reduce maintenance time. To ensure that the chains on the VARIANT are always provided with sufficient oil, the quantity of oil can now be adjusted according to requirement. In addition, a central lubrication system is also optionally available on the VARIANT 385 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 360, with all lubrication points centrally supplied with oil via two central lubrication blocks. In addition, the hydraulic performance of the balers has also been increased, so the bale discharge is now completed within just 6 seconds, with the result that the process of opening and closing the tailgate (without tying time) is now 30% quicker than with the old models. John Deere launches new fixed chamber balers With its new line of 400 Series round balers, John Deere now offers a complete solution for small and medium livestock farms, large farms and contractors. The new F440M fixed chamber baler has been


BALERS

Krone Comprima F155 baler

developed for small to medium size farms looking for a single multi-purpose machine. Designed to produce between 1000 and 3000 bales of hay, silage or straw per season, the F440M maintains the high quality bale shape of its predecessor, the 623 model. The F440M can also be ordered with the 623’s versatile MultiCrop tailgate and proven net wrapping system. Along with the high performance feeding system of the 900 Series variable chamber round baler with Fast Release System, the F440M also features some of the 900 Series’ advanced technologies, including a new driveline and rotor, stronger shielding, wider and bigger tyres and other improved components.

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Kuhn FB 2135 round baler

The F440R fixed chamber baler and the C440R wrapping baler are suitable for large livestock farms and contractors who produce more than 3000 bales per season and focus on silage production. These ‘R’ versions also utilise a number of 900 Series components such as the pick-up, high capacity rotor with 13 or 25 knives and new 600/50-22.5 wide tyres. Even with the benefit of this high level technology, the balers’ small colour display and cartridge type automatic greasing system contribute to the low operating cost of these machines. Both the F440R and C440R wrapping baler also benefit from long-life components such as stainless steel strippers and heavy-duty chains and bearings.

Krone launches new Comprima X-treme round baler Krone has launched a new range of Comprima X-treme round balers with faster pickup, rotor cutter and NovoGrip elevator speeds to allow it to cope in the most challenging harvesting conditions. An ability to apply both net and film wraps also makes it an extremely versatile and an allrounder baler. A key feature of the new baler is its bale transfer system, which has been updated to cut out downtime in the field. The design and arrangement of the chamber and the wrapping table allow the bale to simply drop from the chamber onto the table by its own weight. Should this be a problem in undulating terrain, the bale

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will get a nudge from the bale lifter. The Comprima X-treme has a pick-up working width of 2,150mm with tine diameters increasing from 5.5mm to 6.0mm. A stronger pick-up unit helps to maximise baler stability at high forward speeds, while standard crop press rollers and baffle plates minimise blockages and boost throughput. The rotor cutter maintains consistent crop flow from the pick-up to the bale chamber by pulling the material through its 17 knives (two tines per knife). Krone’s unique NovoGrip belt-and-slat elevators have been strengthened and its width increased to 147mm from 115mm on the fixedchamber (CF) models and to 115mm from 90mm on the


BALERS

variable-chamber (CV) models. In addition, the slat holders are manufactured from higherquality material, and the roller floor bolts are thicker, too. All Comprima X-treme models are available with moisture sensing, while bale weighing systems are only available on the CF and CV models. Isobus-compatible electronic comfort control system come as standard and can be complemented by an optional CCI Isobus control unit. Kuhn round balers Kuhn’s range of round balers includes fixed and variable chamber machines with each format offering the option of an integrated chopping system. All machines, fixed and variable, have a 2.3m wide pick-up as standard, giving them compatibility with the highest capacity systems.

Common to all machines, also, is Kuhn’s simple, maintenance-free, short distance intake system, which ensures even feeding regardless of crop conditions. An active intake design allows higher forward speeds whilst avoiding the risk of crop damage and the drop floor facility helps avoids hold-ups due to blockages. The intake system can be equipped with a rotor or one of two OptiCut chopping systems to suit field conditions. “The OptiCut system is available with 14 or 23 knives, allowing operators to select a chopping intensity to suit the task and/or field conditions,” explains Kuhn’s UK sales manager Duncan McLeish. “Knives can be brought in and out of work hydraulically, so operators can quickly and easily adapt the machine during a day’s work.”

The fixed chamber (FB) range produces bales of 1.2m wide x 1.25m in diameter. The press chamber is comprised of 14 ribbed rollers to ensure good bale rotation and high and consistent density even in the most difficult conditions. On the variable chamber (VB) models, bale width is standard at 1.2m whilst the VB 2160 offers an 80cm – 1.6m diameter variation and the VB 2190 an 80cm – 1.85m width range. There is pre-chamber and press chamber of three rollers and five belts. New Lely Welger RP 205 fixed chamber baler The new Lely Welger RP 205 is a non-chopper baler that is perfectly suited to livestock farmers and contractors for baling un-chopped material producing high density well shaped bales. It features the latest Lely Welger modern styling where the functional new

guarding allows easy access to all areas of the machine for routine maintenance and inspection. Impressive intake and perfect bales The heart of the Lely Welger RP 205 is the tried and tested bale chamber from the RP 245, with 18 rollers and the mechanical tailgate locking system, which has an unrivalled reputation for bale shape and density. It has a high capacity pick-up and feed rotor as standard which provides an even crop feed, even in high volume swaths. The new heavy duty drawbar for the Lely Welger RP 205 is tried and tested. It is easy to adjust, ensuring that the baler is always set correctly, allowing optimum performance. With the Varionet and ELS (Easy Load Net system) option, rolls of net are loaded from ground level saving time and effort. An

Agricultural Merchants 4HPUKLHSLYZMVY*3((:)HSLYZ

Dealers for Vicon Balers 7SHU[/PYL‹4HJOPULY`‹:HSLZ :LY]PJL

=PZP[V\Y^LIZP[L for new and used tractor & machinery Z[VJRSPZ[ZHUKolder model/refurb partsSPZ[Z

www.jandwtaitltd.co.uk Sparrowhawk Road, Hatston Industrial Estate Kirkwall, Orkney, KW15 1GE

Tel: 01856 873003 / 872490 Email: info@jandwtaitltd.co.uk

26

Middle Balado, Kinross KY13 0NH

Tel: 01577 863173

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BALERS

Massey Ferguson 2200 baler

extra roll of net can be stored on the cradle saving downtime in the field. A unique characteristic for a baler in its class is a new 2.25m camless pick up. The five tine bar pick-up is equipped with heavy duty tines which provide efficient crop collection especially at high forward speeds. Reliability and strength are always key for all Lely products, and with no camtrack and only 2 bearings the pickup has less moving parts. It is therefore more reliable, less sensitive to wear, quiet and maintenance free. New Massey Ferguson 2200 Series Large Square balers With the introduction of the new MF 2200 Series large Square Balers, Massey Ferguson is further improving on the industry leading MF 2100 Series which has earned a tremendous reputation for outstanding performance, reliability and low cost of ownership. The new MF 2200 Series includes a new Packer Cutter for the MF 2240 and MF 2250 models, automatic chain lubrication, OptiForm bale chamber on the MF 2270 XD and MF 2290 models and a host of other new features to further enhance performance. Bale weighing and AGCOMMAND telemetry are also now available as options. “These new balers inherit the superior design features of

the MF 2100 Series and include the recent additions to the range – the MF 2140 and MF 2170 XD models,” says Mark Grigson, Product Marketing Manager – Harvesting. “As well as making dense, well-formed bales, they are renowned for their reliability and longevity.” Designed and built in the Massey Ferguson factory in Hesston, Kansas, USA these large square balers are now established as the industry benchmark for bale size and weight as well as outstanding dependability. “Indeed, the new MF 2270 XD’s bale dimensions and extra density, packs in up to 20% more material than the standard MF 2270, means the bales are the optimum size and weight for transport,” he says. “The weight, density and height mean they can fully utilise the capacity of a truck’s entire payload.” McHale V6 Variable Chamber Round Baler Range As with all McHale machines, the V6 variable chamber round baler range has been designed with the demands of today’s farmer and contractor in mind. This common sense approach to design ensures that the V660 variable chamber round balers operation is kept simple and user friendly. Features like, the three belt variable bale chamber with double drive

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25 27


BALERS

McHale V660 baler

and the drop floor unblocking system, when combined with high specification components, ensures long life, reliability and a variable chamber round

baler that is rugged enough to handle the toughest of crops and ground conditions. The V660 variable chamber round baler can make a bale

: $*HGGHV/WG 0DLQ'HDOHUVIRU

from 0.7m (2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;4â&#x20AC;?) to 1.68m (5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;6â&#x20AC;?). The bale size can be adjusted up from the minimum setting in increments of 20mm (3/4â&#x20AC;?).

The McHale V6 range of variable chamber balers consists of two models: The V640 - nonchopper variable chamber baler and the V660 - 15 knife chopper variable chamber baler The McHale V660 variable chamber round baler is also fitted with an Expert Plus Control Console, which has a large graphic display. From the control console, the operator can adjust the following from the tractor cab: Bale Size, Inner Core Bale Density, Outer Bale Density and Revolutions of net being applied. The expert plus console, also gives the operator the choice of selecting a soft or hard bale core, depending on the customers feed out requirements. The control console can also store 10 totals. It also features: Knife Display, Door Position Display, Drop Floor Display, Lube Alarm and Crop Flow Drive Indicators.

9(4:(@ 1(*2:653;+ Main dealers for McHALE Balers

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: $*HGGHV/WG 5LYHU6W:LFN&DLWKQHVV

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www.ramjack.co.uk Knowehead Works Mauchline, Ayrshire, KA5 6EY Tel: 01290 550329 Fax: 01290 552508 Email: sales@ramjack.co.uk

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BALERS

Nw Holland RB135 Ultra baler

New Holland introduces the Roll Baler range The new Roll Baler range of heavy duty fixed chamber

round balers is set to become the default choice for professional baling operations. The three model line-up, featuring the

Construction, Farm & Groundcare Machinery Main Dealers for Kuhn Balers

standard Roll Baler 125, and two combination balerwrapper models: the Roll Baler 125 Combi and the Roll Baler

135 Ultra, is set to redefine the benchmark in terms of bale density and wrapping flexibility. Moreover, the sleek modern design and premium construction further enhance the rangeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appeal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The heavy duty Roll Baler has been engineered by design to offer outstanding in-field performance, uniformly dense bales, efficient road transport and bullet proof reliability. Everything professional contractors and large scale dairy farmers are looking for to boost their productivity.â&#x20AC;? Stated Bob Hatz, head of Hay and Forage Product Management. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Furthermore, the flagship Roll Baler completes New Hollandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s round baler line up, alongside the standard BR6000, fixed chamber baler and the BR7000, variable chamber models.â&#x20AC;? The 2.1m pick-up working width for both Roll Baler 125

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$OVR 5(&2Â&#x2021;68/.<Â&#x2021;92*(/ 1227 .521(Â&#x2021;6802Â&#x2021;1&Â&#x2021;675$870$11 0(5/2Â&#x2021;&+$//(1*(5 Aberdeen: Dingwall: Elgin: Maud: Turriff:

01224 772577 01349 863555 01343 541121 01771 613246 01888 563561

www.ravenhill-ltd.co.uk

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29 25 27


BALERS

Vicon RV4216 baler

models and the 2.2m pickup working width for the Roll Baler 135 model ensure that every last piece of valuable crop is efficiently transferred into the chamber, even when

working in heavy first cut silage or dense straw swaths produced by today’s high capacity combines. The five tine bars maintain positive contact with the crop and

provide an even prevent clogging.

flow

to

Vicon RV 4216 – 4220 balers With true multi crop

performance in silage, hay and straw, they incorporate a host of features to make your working day more profitable. Both models offer truly intelligent baling with a clean raking 2.2m 5 tine bar pickup, choice of intake system, programmable ’multi chamber’ bale density system and user friendly ISOBUS compatible controls The two versions offer bale diameters from 0.60m up to 1.65m and 2.00m respectively. The bale diameter is easily adjusted through the control terminal. The Advantages are a 2.2 m pick-up with small diameter for fast and efficient throughput. SuperCut-14 and 25 knife rotors for efficient cutting and tight bales. DropFloor for easy unblocking. 3 different core densities, pre-selectable from the tractor cab. Easy and simple loading of net roll. And ISOBUS control

DEALERS KEY (Participating Dealers in this feature) CLAAS J&W Tait www.jandwtaitltd.co.uk Kirkwall, Orkney : 01856 873003

Berwick upon Tweed : 01289 331904 Kelso : 01573 225213 Macmerry : 01875 617323

W & A Geddes Wick : 01955 602207 Thurso : 01847 891651 Brora : 01408 621220

KUHN Ravenhill www.ravenhil.co.uk Aberdeen : 01224 772577 Dingwall : 01349 863555 Elgin : 01343 541121 Maud : 01771 613246 Turriff : 01888 563561

JOHN DEERE DKR Agricultural Services www.jd-dealer.co.uk/dkagri Biggar : 01899 220897 MLM Engineering www.mlmengineering.co.uk Orphir, Orkney : 01856 811282 KRONE Ancroft Tractors www.ancroft-tractors.co.uk 30

LELY WELGER AM Phillip www.amphillip.co.uk Conon Bridge : 01349 866021 Forfar : 01307 474000 Fraserburgh : 01346 541351 Glenrothes : 01592 775511 Huntly : 01466 799222

MASSEY FERGUSON Ancroft Tractors www.ancroft-tractors.co.uk Berwick upon Tweed : 01289 331904 Kelso : 01573 225213 Macmerry : 01875 617323 McHALE John Drysdale Engineering Kinneswood : 01592 840686 Ramsey & Jackson www.ramjack.co.uk Mauchline : 01290 550329

VICON AM Phillip www.amphillip.co.uk Conon Bridge : 01349 866021 George Colliar Ltd Middle Balado : 01577 863173 Reekie Group www.reekie.co.uk Stirling : 01786 477530 Perth : 01738 622471 Cupar : 01334 652445

NEW HOLLAND Ravenhill www.ravenhil.co.uk Aberdeen : 01224 772577 Dingwall : 01349 863555 Elgin : 01343 541121 Maud : 01771 613246 Turriff : 01888 563561

www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

25


$*5,*$'*(76 Novoda launches Cattle Manager farm app with the help of Scottish school children

21/,1(6$99< Images are website attractors by Allan Bewley & Fiona Sloan Pedigree Farmer Web Design

Novoda, Europe’s largest and fastest growing independent Android software development consultancy, has announced the launch of Cattle Manager, an application that helps cattle farmers manage inventory and records about their livestock through their mobile devices. The application is the result of research conducted by a group of students from Wick High School in Caithness Scotland, some of who come from farming families. The children observed that while local livestock farmers conducted daily rounds to vaccinate their cattle they were carrying around extensive paperwork associated with each beast. The app enables farmers to store their information instantly on a mobile device, thereby eliminating the need to maintain and carry around paper records about the status of its livestock The app has many useful features, including: Livestock

parenting history, Livestock vaccination history and due dates for further required vaccinations, Colour grouping options to help organise related cattle, Calendar integration and reminder integration to track crucial upcoming injections, Import and export options to allow farmers to edit inventory and dates on a PC before venturing outside on their livestock review The children behind the app took part in last year’s Apps for Good competition, an initiative launched by the charity Apps for Good to get young people interested in technology. The contest invited students from across the country to come up with an idea for an app and Cattle Manager was one of the winners. It received funding from corporate sponsor Dell and was created with the help of Novoda. Ma^ZiiblZoZbeZ[e^_hk_k^^ Zm@hh`e^IeZrghp' EbgdmhZii]hpgehZ]3 ammi3(([bm'er(*^]Jces

Over the past few months we’ve covered various subjects on Computer Savy, including how to choose a web address which can be found easily, what you would like to get out of your website and what, potentially you need to do to build an effective and easy to manage site which buyers of bulls, rams, semen and embryos etc will keep visiting. Search engines like Google like change and ensuring good site building and updating your site is very important. Having a pretty website which isn’t search engine friendly is like having a beautiful poster and displaying it in a dark room. Most of the pedigree sheep breeders, if you haven’t already started lambing will be preparing for the arrival of the lambs which will bring in this year’s income. Having a really good lamb in the shed is one thing but letting everyone else see him is quite another. You need to market your rams as soon as they are born because it’s no time till sale time and we’ve all arrived in August and

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wondered where the year went. Many people old and young are now reliant on mobile phones and social media. Why not take a picture now and pop it onto your website? The more you change your site the more people will follow what’s happening and you’ll find potential buyers following his progress through the next six months. You can add his pedigree and EBV’s directly from BASCO or ABRI Breedplan with the most recent BLUP runs automatically added as they change over the summer. So while you are waiting for that next top ewe to lamb or cow to calve, get yourself a piece of paper and start thinking of names for the future sale topper and while you are at it start thinking about you domain name for your website, where you can pop on his pictures, show successes, pedigree, EBV’s where he is going to be sold and when and ultimately the sale details of the best lamb or calf you’ve ever bred. Or you can just look at him in the shed and admire him yourself.

29 31


SCOTSHEEP 2014 By Eddie Gillanders

NSA Scotsheep at Dumfries House, Cumnock, in 2012, was opened by the Duke of Rothesay who was conducted on a tour of the event by NSA Scotland chairman, Jimmy Sinclair (second right)

Scotland’s biennial sheep event returns to the Borders this year and will be held on Wednesday, June 4 on the Berwickshire farm of Quixwood, Grantshouse, courtesy of host farmer, John Macfarlane and his son, Iain. NSA Scotsheep 2014, organised by the Scottish region of the National Sheep Association with Bank of Scotland as main sponsor, is set to attract thousands of sheep farmers from all over Scotland and the North of England for what is firmly established as the main event for the sheep industry in Scotland. “Quixwood is ideally situated just off the A1 at Grantshouse and is widely recognised as a very well managed upland sheep and beef farm producing high quality stock,” said David Leggat, executive chairman of United Auctions, who chairs the local organising committee. “We have an excellent committee of local farmers working with the office-bearers of the NSA in Scotland in planning this large-scale onfarm event and we can look 28 32

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forward to a first-class day of interest to sheep farmers and everyone in the supply chain. It is an event which no one with an interest in sheep farming can afford to miss.” Sponsorship is running well ahead of expectations, thanks to the generosity of a large number of supporting companies, and the trade stand area is a sellout with around 150 exhibitors demonstrating their products and services, along with more than 30 breed societies. “Reform of the CAP is causing considerable uncertainty in the industry and NSA Scotsheep will provide the ideal opportunity for sheep farmers to catch up with the latest developments and technology to help them plan ahead for a profitable future,” said Mr Leggat. “The opportunity to meet up with fellow sheep farmers to discuss everything that’s going on in the industry is also an important element of Scotsheep and the comprehensive seminar programme will offer advice and opinions on a range of topical issues from leading figures in the industry.” The farm tour is always one of the most popular aspects of Scotsheep and visitors will be transported by tractor and trailer to view the farm and stock, with stop-off points where experts from SRUC will be on hand to discuss various aspects of the management of the farm. Quixwood, and the nearby farm of Ferneylea and the adjoining unit of Drakemyre, is a typical Border upland farm extending to 2500 acres, with another 200 acres farmed on a contract basis, rising to 850ft and carrying a flock of 1500 ewes and 700 suckler cows. Arable cropping comprises 600 acres of winter wheat,


SCOTSHEEP2014

The Duke of Rothesay in discussion at scotsheep in 2012 with Maimie Paterson, chairman of the Scottish Sheep Strategy, and QMS chairman, Jim McLaren

winter and spring barley, winter and spring oats and beans, most of which is fed to the stock. The area of trees providing useful shelter belts for the stock extends to 300 acres. The policy is geared to high output from feed grown on the farm, with a minimum of bought-in concentrates, and the stratified structure of the livestock enterprise enables a closed flock and herd policy to be followed (except for the nucleus flock of Blackface ewes although that is set to be

changed), with all replacements bred on the farm and all lambs and calves, except female replacements, finished through to slaughter and sold deadweight to Scotbeef. The sheep flock comprises 300 Blackface ewes crossed with the Bluefaced Leicester to produce replacement females for the 500-strong Mule ewe flock which is crossed with Texel tups. The Texel x Mule ewes are then put to the Suffolk to produce the slaughter generation. “We are planning to take

this policy one stage further by breeding our own replacement Blackface ewes in the future,” says Iain Macfarlane. Ewes are housed in a large open shed after the New Year and start lambing towards the end of February, followed by the hoggs in mid-March and the Blackface ewes from April 1. They are fed a Total Mixed Ration (TMR) fed from a Keenan diet feeder of silage, beet pulp, wheat dark grains, turnip mix and minerals and also have access to Lifeline buckets. This

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year the ewes have scanned at 212% following last year’s good summer which meant the ewes were in great condition at tupping time. Ewes are penned individually just before lambing and move into bigger pens in groups of 10 after lambing for 24 or 48 hours before being turned out. Lambs are creep fed with the aim of catching the early lamb market. “We push them hard to grow as quickly as possible,” says John Macfarlane. “We start selling lambs at the end of May and draw for marketing every 10 days or so through the summer.” The cows in the suckler herd are a mixture of AberdeenAngus, Limousin, Beef Shorthorn and Simmental crosses. The Charolais bull, used as the terminal cross, is now being phased out following the move from selling stores to finishing everything on the farm. Cows are housed in slatted accommodation from November onwards following weaning, or earlier depending on the weather, and calve from April to June. Cows receive silage and straw and calves are creep-fed from July onwards. Around 120 bull calves are kept entire and fed a concentrate diet ad lib for finishing at 14-15 months of age. Steers and heifers not required for replacements are wintered on silage, 3kg/day of concentrates, minerals and home-grown beans as a protein

33


SCOTSHEEP2014

It was umbrellas up when the heavens opened during Scotsheep 2012 at Dumfries House

28 34

source, and finished out of the house the following winter at 650-700kg liveweight for steers and 600-650kg liveweight for heifers. Virtually all grade R or U. Grassland management plays an important part in achieving the objective of high output. Grass is kept young and undersown with barley used as cover. Bespoke mixtures designed specifically for the farm by Watson Seeds are used. Regular dressings of both slurry and bagged nitrogen are applied and a clean grazing system is followed as far as possible with the sheep.

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“The response of young grass from nitrogen is so much better than older swards,” Iain points out. Ewe hogg sale at NSA Scotsheep A multi-breed show and sale of pairs of breeding ewe hoggs will be a major feature at NSA Scotsheep 2014 on June 4. The show and sale will include classes for 14 breeds and follows a similar sale – the first ever of its kind to be held in Scotland – at the Highland Sheep event at Dingwall last year. “The sale at Highland Sheep proved highly successful and attracted a huge ringside of buyers with a top price of 550gns each for a pair of Suffolks,” said Jimmy Sinclair, immediate past chairman of NSA Scotland. “Entries for the show and sale will be limited and I would advise prospective exhibitors to start thinking soon about what they might enter and get their entries in early.” The closing date for entries is May 2. Classes are being offered for Beltex, Bluefaced Leicester, Charollais, Jacob, Lleyn, North Country Cheviot (hill), North Country Cheviot (park), Scottish Blackface, Mules, Shetland, Suffolk, Texel, Zwartbles and any other breed. The sale will be conducted by United Auctions, Stirling. Exhibitors must be members of the National Sheep Association and an entry fee of £50 + VAT will apply for each


SCOTSHEEP2014 use of an ATV with trailer, transporting stock. - General question paper on sheep production and husbandries. - Question paper on sheep breeds’ identification.

Celebrity guest at Scotsheep 2012 was sheep farmer and television presenter, Adam Henson

pair of hoggs entered. Attractive prize money of £200 for first, £100 for second and £50 for third in each class is on offer. NSA Young Shepherd of the year competition Do you work with sheep? Are you motivated by working with sheep? Do you enjoy working with sheep? If so and you have left school and are under the age of 26 on July 31, 2014, why not enter the Young Shepherd of the Year competition at NSA Scotsheep? The competition is designed to test your practical skills and practical knowledge used in your every-day work with sheep, as well as your broader knowledge of the sheep industry throughout the UK and Europe, including the various sheep breeds. “If you have competed before, we would love to see you

again and first-time competitors are equally welcome,” says organiser, Dave Turner, former head of agriculture at Oatridge College. “There are no restrictions on how many times you compete, other than age.” The winner and runnerup will have the honour of representing Scotland in the national finals at the NSA National Sheep event at Malvern, Worcester, which presents the opportunity of qualifying for the World Young Shepherd of the Year competition which is being hosted by France. The competition covers the following: - Practical stock tasks: hoofcare, injection and drenching. - Sheep shearing and wool handling (minimum of BWMB Blue Seal) - Prime lamb selection. - Daily preparation and safe

Qualifying youngsters, who could be working shepherds, farm workers, students or simply with an interest in sheep, are invited to enter and test themselves against other youngsters with the same interests and motivation. =^i^g]bg`hgma^e^o^eh_ lniihkm% k^`bhgZe jnZeb_rbg` \hfi^mbmbhgl pbee mZd^ ieZ\^ mh l^e^\m ma^ mhi mp^eo^ \hgm^lmZgml mh \hfi^m^ bg ma^ L\hmmbla ÛgZe Zm GL: L\hmla^^i pab\a mZd^l ieZ\^ Zm Jnbqphh] ?Zkf% =ngl% ;^kpb\dlabk^%hgP^]g^l]Zr% Cng^-%+)*-' The thousands of visitors expected to attend this year’s NSA Scotsheep at Quixwood can look forward to an actionpacked event with a huge variety of activities to grab their attention throughout the day. The farm tour is always a major attraction at Scotsheep but with around 150 trade stands and more than 30 exhibits by sheep breed societies, there will be plenty to see and do from morning to night. Arrangements are in hand for a sheep shearing competition between two top shearers from eight regions of Scotland and this is sure to attract a great deal of attention. It is also hoped to

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include a Scotland v England test. The programme will include a sheepdog trial and visitors will have the opportunity of taking part in a stockjudging competition, which will include a young farmers’ section as well as an open competition. The seminar programme with top industry experts will cover CAP reform, animal health and increasing the consumption of lamb and local young chefs are to be invited to take part in a Ready Steady Cook lamb cookery competition. Grassland management and soil health will be a major feature of the educational display by SRUC and other demonstrations will include fencing, sheep dressing, wool spinning and crook making. An ATV driving competition is also planned. It is also hoped to have a farmers’ market with craft stalls and the Royal Highland Educational Trust is arranging for a number of school visits from local primary 4 and 6 pupils. The organisers have invited a leading personality in the industry to perform the opening ceremony and Scotland’s Rural Affairs Cabinet Secretary, Richard Lochhead, hopes to attend. It will be a great day out for anyone with an interest in sheep and will cover all aspects of sheep production, from husbandry, nutrition and health to marketing and the promotion of the finished product. A day not to be missed!

35


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De Brus beer and The Bruery ;rFb\a^ee^F\PbeebZfl%HE^ZkrIK

If you think microbreweries are having a moment now, David Austin, who opened The Bruery in Dunfermline at the end of 2013, points out that they were even more fashionable in medieval times when there was a brewery on every corner in the Fife town. But while many new breweries such as Brew Dogs have adopted ultra hip branding, David has taken a different tack -using history and location to create the brand of De Brus beer - and to great effect - De Brus beer has already won plaudits from Oz Clarke and a best beer review in The Scotsman. It was the connection between Scotland’s ancient capital and one of the most interesting kings in Scottish history – Robert the Bruce’s last 36

resting place is in Dunfermline Abbey - that inspired the De Brus name. Fortunately, David’s belief in the appeal of the Robert the Bruce story coincided with what the town’s Business Improvement District (BID) company, Dunfermline Delivers, was trying to achieve. The annual Bruce Festival to celebrate Robert the Bruce is organised by Dunfermline Delivers. As far as events go, there couldn’t be a more relevant occasion to showcase the De Brus beer. The Festival attracts around 25,000 visitors and David is working closely with Dunfermline Delivers to supply the beer and wine marquee. In yet another quirk of fate or happy coincidence the direct descendant of Robert the Bruce, Lord Bruce, who visits

the festival every year, will be able to sample the beer named after his famous ancestor. Fortunately, David asked for Lord Bruce’s permission to use the name when he first came up with the idea. A former UK wine buyer for Rocco Forte David has a vast knowledge of wine but he enlisted the help of master brewer Douglas Ross to help create the various ales in the De Brus range. Douglas came to the De Brus project having established Allan Water Brewery which is also a cozy and friendly pub in Bridge of Allan. There are six ales and ciders in the De Brus range including a cask Blonde, a cask Nut Brown and a traditional Ginger cider. “Dunfermline Delivers work hard to attract tourists and

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visitors to businesses in the centre with innovative and appealing events. We are delighted to get involved and hope that visitors and residents will include the microbrewery as a stop along the way when it opens to the public in spring 2014. Douglas has helped us make a great beer so it’s gratifying when people like Oz Clarke praise De Brus and support us and other independent brewers’��� says David. Housed in an attractive three storey stone town house, The Bruery, which is close to Dunfermline Abbey, serves the beer and cider on draft in the bar and bistro and is open from 12 noon every day. Ie^Zl^ \hgmZ\m =Zob] bg Z]oZg\^ b_ rhn phne] ebd^ mh oblbm ma^ fb\kh[k^p^kr hg )*,1, 0-00.0'


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Food & Drink SMES reformulate for health & growth Small and gradual changes to recipes are creating a win-win for customers and food producers in Scotland, the Scottish Food and Drink Federation (SFDF) has said. Cameron Skinner, owner of T&R Skinner, a family butchers based in Stirlingshire, who have taken 25% of the salt in their premium sausage range under the SFDF Programme said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Working with the SFDF Reformulation Programme has enabled us to make sure that our products continue to appeal to the modern, food educated and health conscious consumer base that we supply.â&#x20AC;? Dr Colette Backwell, Director at SFDF, the voice of manufacturers in Scotland, said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many of the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest manufacturers have reformulated to great effect in recent years, making progress in areas such as salt and saturated fat reduction and the elimination

of artificial trans fats. But this tool is not just the reserve of the larger players, with 37 SME producers having reformulated their products for health under the SFDF Reformulation Programme. I hope that their achievements will inspire others.â&#x20AC;? Michael Matheson MSP, Minister for Public Health, Scottish Government: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am encouraged to see the progress being made across the food industry, and especially pleased to support small businesses in Scotland, through the Scottish Government funded SFDF Reformulation Programme. We are committed to improving Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public health, and supporting people to eat a healthy, balanced diet is a key part of that. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to encourage more businesses to get involved with reformulation work and help to make a real difference to the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health.â&#x20AC;?

Threat to Butchery Service Given a Seriously Good Lift

The future of a Perth butchery service for small farmers has been safeguarded by Vikki Banks of local Perthshire business, Seriously Good Venison Ltd. A change of direction by the board of Highland Drovers Limited in 2012 meant that the lifeline butchery service they offered to local beef, lamb and pig farmers was threatened with closure. After looking at a number of options and agreeing to focus on marketing and selling their own Highland beef, Highland Drovers has sold the butchery service to Vikki Banks, who will operate it under the name Seriously Good Butchery Ltd. This comes at a time when local abattoirs are decreasing in number, resulting in producers having to take their livestock further afield for slaughter at an increased cost. Losing a local butchery facility which specialises in cutting and packing to their specifications would have been

a further blow to many small producers in the area. Losing this facility may well have been a blow too far for some businesses so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m committed to building up the excellent service which people have come to expect at Highland Drovers. We know about meat and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be offering our bespoke service to trade and the public alike in the future.â&#x20AC;? Seriously good Butchery Ltd will continue to operate separately from Seriously Good Venison Ltd under Vikki Banksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new ownership from Units 2-4 Mercian Buildings, Shore Road, Perth. The specialist butchery service will continue to offer butchery services for conventional or organic beef, lamb or pork to the trade or direct to the public. Mh ^gjnbk^ Z[hnm ma^ [nm\a^kr l^kob\^l% \hgmZ\m Obddb ;Zgdl hg )*0,1 ./*.+, hk \hgmZ\m lZe^l9 l^kbhnler`hh][nm\a^kr'\h'nd'

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Scottish Food & Drink ‘Oscars’ launched In what promises to be the food-lovers’ event of the year, the Scotland Food & Drink Excellence Awards 2014 were given a special launch today by Iain Burnett, The Highland Chocolatier. Recognising excellence across the food and drink industry in Scotland, the awards will be the biggest yet and will take place in their largest ever venue, the Edinburgh International Conference Centre. Iain Burnett, The Highland Chocolatier, who won the coveted Product of the Year award last year, said: “There are so many exciting things going on in the Scottish food and drink world and I’m thrilled to be launching the 2014 Scotland Food & Drink Excellence Awards. I was delighted to have won last year and would urge others businesses to enter. The award

brought us real recognition and the kind of publicity you just can’t buy”. Known as the Scottish food and drink industry’s ‘Oscars’,

the ceremony will be bigger than ever before with more than 500 guests attending the glamorous event on 22 May. Attendees will be treated to a

drinks reception and sumptuous dinner, showcasing the very best of Scotland’s larder. Tickets for the event are on sale from Scotland Food & Drink now.

Eat, Drink, Discover Scotland event Plans for Scotland’s celebratory food and drink event, “Eat, Drink, Discover Scotland” – are well and truly underway with sponsors and exhibitors now being confirmed. From

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Friday 12th to Sunday 14th September, the event will play host to over a hundred food and drink companies drawn from every region of Scotland – giving consumers the chance to

literally taste all of Scotland, in one day, under one roof. It’s all taking place at The Royal Highland Centre in Edinburgh and offers something for every palate, preference and

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price range. And, in addition to eyeing, trying and buying Scotland’s rich and diverse larder, consumers will see celebrity chefs running master classes and demonstrations throughout the weekend. There will be educational activities for children, and a host of skills demos and talks by Scottish food experts, all accompanied by a live music programme. Tickets will be on sale to the public from April onwards. Oblbm ma^bk p^[lbm^ !ppp' ^Zm]kbgd]bl\ho^kl\hmeZg]' \h'nd" mh [^ Z]]^] ma^bk fZbebg`eblm' B_ rhn Zk^ Z L\hmmbla _hh] Zg](hk ]kbgd \hfiZgr ehhdbg` mh lahp\Zl^ rhnk ikh]n\ml Zm ma^ ^o^gm ghp bl ma^ mbf^ mh l^\nk^ rhnk ^qab[bmbhgliZ\^%ZelhobZma^ p^[lbm^_hk\hgmZ\m]^mZbel' ?hk fhk^ bg_hkfZmbhg% ie^Zl^\hgmZ\mGb\heZFZ]bee hg )0202-0* 0,0 gb\heZ9 he^Zkrik'\h'nd


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ScotchWatch to look at Scottish meat on supermarket shelves NFU Scotland is building on its successful ShelfWatch campaign to specifically look at the availability of Scottish meat on Scottish retailer shelves. One year on from the ‘Horsegate’ scandal, when horsemeat was discovered in processed products incorrectly labelled as containing beef, the Union is looking to build on Scottish consumer support for products clearly identified as being ‘Scotch’ or ‘Scottish’ that emerged from that debacle. Under its ShelfWatch work, the Union has been examining retailer shelves for several years, looking at support for Scottish and British produce and the level of imported meat on offer. On the anniversary of the horsemeat scandal, that work is now being extended to ScotchWatch to track retailer commitment to making sure that beef, lamb, pork and chicken from Scottish farms is labelled as being Scottish. This will involve NFU Scotland representatives checking retail shelves on a monthly basis and assess the ratio of shelf facings dedicated to Scottish labelled meat as opposed to meat labelled as British or imported. Initial results of ScotchWatch are encouraging but also highlight that there is considerable scope for improvements – both by some major retailers in their support of Scottish labels and in some particular categories. Commenting on ScotchWatch, NFU Scotland President Nigel Miller said: “The Scottish public’s support for Scottish farmers and their produce during the ‘Horsegate’ debacle was resolute and a massive vote of confidence in the assurance and traceability systems that we have in place in Scotland. “The retailer response to the crisis also gave us some optimism that there was a tide turning towards sourcing products more locally and that retailers would show a strong commitment to

Scottish meat, its reputation for quality, and the labels that are linked to our Scotch Beef and Lamb and Specially Selected Pork assurance schemes. “While retailers have retained a strong commitment to Scottish produce, we have noticed some movement in Scottish shops towards British or own brand labels. Clearly there is a dialogue to be had with retailers on why a Scottish label isn’t always the label of choice. We want the Scottish label to be the preferred option in the future, and not just in Scotland, as Scottish produce has a reputation in other parts of the UK as well. “The initial ScotchWatch results show some very positive results but also some that are a worry. We have already started to discuss our findings, both good and bad, with the retailers. NFU Scotland’s Food Chain Relationship Manager, Kylie Barclay, who will be analysing the monthly results for beef, lamb, pork and chicken explained: “The beef category is a good example of the variability that exists between supermarket chains in how they promote Scottish product. In this month’s ScotchWatch, there were a number of retailers that dedicated more than 70 percent of their shelf facing to Scotch labelled beef products. These retailers were the Co-op out front with 93 percent followed by Lidl, Morrison’s and Aldi. “Disappointingly, Asda, M&S and Sainsbury’s all displayed less than 70 percent of Scotch labelled beef product, although Asda’s score is perhaps unfairly low due to the high volume of British mince products on the shelf. Trailing behind at the bottom of the pack is Tesco who dedicated only 28 percent of their shelf facing to Scotch labelled beef, the rest being a mixture of British and Irish product. We have already spoken to Tesco about our findings and its underlying commitment to Scotch beef remains strong.

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O U R FA R M SHOP

Loch Leven’s Larder, is a multi-award winning family run farm, restaurant, deli and retail shop situated three miles from Kinross – in the heart of Perthshire, easily accessible from Edinburgh, Perth and Dundee. The constantly evolving Larder gives you a differing experience on every visit with the seasonal offer, menu and events changing be it Spring, Summer, Autumn or Winter.

As many locals and regulars know, the location on the north side of Loch Leven, boasts enviable panoramic views, which can be experienced while dining in the restaurant, eating outdoors or in one of the two fantastic pods. The stunning views together with the personal service, differing dining options, plus the deli and nature trail – really do make the Larder a unique visitor experience. Here you can find a diverse mix of the finest local produce and delicatessen, combined with a delightful gift shop providing an eclectic mix of Scottish designer wares, European labels and quality home furnishings.

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SHOP, VISIT, EAT…

Loch Leven’s Larder also host private dining and events or an outside catering service to take the stress out of home entertaining. As a family run business, the team and colleagues are at the heart of what they do. They provide quality service, seasonal produce and stylish gifts, with their own farm produce, freshly baked goods from their kitchen and a range of Scottish ‘own-label’ products. Loch Leven’s Larder are truly passionate about the farming techniques they use and incorporate as much local produce as possible into their menus, believing in the traceability and seasonality of their offer. The Shop is brimming with life’s little luxuries, quirky gifts and kitchen gadgets alongside local food and daily essentials, which many of the visitors and those living locally appreciate. From the farm Channel, they stock a wide variety of seasonal

home grown vegetables which are picked daily straight from the field to our shop. The deli features a wide range of Scottish and European cheese, pates, olives, cold meats and salamis. The food offer further extends into the shop with locally sourced produce, daily essentials, a selection of wines and fabulous home-made bread and cakes. Loch Leven’s Larder are proud to sell a range of own label products. This includes an everyday range featuring oatcakes, rice, dried fruit & nuts; a contemporary range of jams, pickles, honey, chutneys & marmalades; and a delectable range of confectionary including Belgian chocolates, assorted mendicants, rose & violet creams, marzipan fruits & clootie dumpling fudge. The Larder gift shop is a delightful mix of Scottish, Norwegian and European influences with a twist on tradition. Featuring quirky

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gadgets, quality designer home wares- including Joules, Sia, and Aigle, Broste and other heavenly treats, there is something for everyone. Their own tartan range of scarves, throws and picnic blankets were inspired by the surrounding landscape and created by Johnstons of Elgin. Loch Leven’s Larder have recently taken country to town and opened an outpost of the popular Kinross-shire headquarters, located within Perth’s long established central department store McEwens. Hi^gl^o^g]ZrlZp^^d% 2',)Zfmbee.',)if M^e^iahg^3)*.2+1-*))) ppp'eh\ae^o^gleZk]^k'\hf


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By Richard Lochhead Rural Affairs and Environment Secretary The Scottish Government Mabl bl Z \kn\bZe mbf^ _hk L\hmmbla _Zkfbg`' P^ g^^] mh]^\b]^ahpmhbfie^f^gm ma^ g^p <hffhg :`kb\nemnkZe Iheb\r% Zg] \ahb\^l p^ fZd^ pbee bg_en^g\^ ma^ laZi^ h_ ma^ bg]nlmkr [^mp^^g ghp Zg] +)+)' Ma^ g^p <:I bl \^gmkZe mh fr oblbhg _hk L\hmmbla Z`kb\nemnk^3 Z jnZebmr _hh] ikh]n\bg` gZmbhg pbma _Zkf^klZ[e^mh\hfi^m^bg phke]pb]^ fZkd^ml pabe^ hnk gZmnkZe ^gobkhgf^gm bl ikhm^\m^]' P^o^ [^^g \hglnembg` hg hnk ikhihlZel _hk bfie^f^gmbg`ma^<:I%Zg] ma^k^ aZl [^^g Z ebo^er ]^[Zm^ Z[hnm paZm ma^ree f^Zg _hk L\hmeZg]l _Zkf^kl' ;n]`^m\nmlbfihl^][r P^lmfbglm^k f^Zgl p^ aZo^e^llfhg^rmhli^g]' Ma^ ND @ho^kgf^gm aZl \hglb`g^] L\hmeZg] mh ma^ o^kr [hmmhf h_ ma^ >nkhi^Zg _ng]bg` e^Z`n^ mZ[e^l bg [hma IbeeZk Hg^ !=bk^\mIZrf^gml"Zg]IbeeZk Mph !KnkZe ]^o^ehif^gm"' LfZee^k [n]`^ml Zg] fZg]Zmhkr ]^]n\mbhgl bfihl^] [r >nkhi^ f^Zgl lhf^ k^]n\mbhg bg iZrf^gml bl bg^obmZ[e^' P^ fnlm Zelh fZd^ lnk^ g^p ^gmkZgml Zk^ _Zbkermk^Zm^]bgma^g^qm<:I' BfihkmZgmer%hnkfh]^eebg` lahplhnkikhihlZelphne] Z\mnZeerl^^fhk^maZgaZe_

h_ Zee _Zkf^kl% bg\en]bg` [^^_ _Zkf^kl% k^\^bo^ ab`a^k iZrf^gml'  E^ll maZg aZe_ phne] `^m ehp^k iZrf^gml% Zemahn`a B k^\h`gbl^ fZgr ikh]n\^kl _Z\^ Z ]^\ebg^ ng]^k ma^ >Nlg^pk^`bf^' Bfnlmlmk^llmaZmghmabg` bll^mbglmhg^3Bpbee\Zk^_neer \hglb]^k Zee _^^][Z\d _khf hnk \hglnemZmbhgl [^_hk^ k^Z\abg`_bgZe]^\blbhgl'?hk ^qZfie^% Bo^ Zek^Z]r lZb] Bee ehhd Zm ln``^lmbhgl _hk iZrf^gm k^`bhgl bg L\hmeZg]' PaZmp^fnlmghm]hbl e^m ma^ l^\mhk m^Zk bml^e_ ZiZkmho^kmabl<:Ik^_hkf' B pZgm mh Zohb] iZkmbZe lhenmbhgl maZm ibm _Zkf^k Z`Zbglm _Zkf^k  rhng` Z`Zbglm he]% [^^_ Z`Zbglm ZkZ[e^%abeeZ`ZbglmehpeZg]' <e^Zker%p^fnlma^eimahl^ pah g^^] bm% [nm p^ Zelh g^^] mh \hglb]^k ma^ ihm^gmbZebfiZ\mhghma^kl' Bg]bob]nZe `khnil fnlm% h_\hnkl^%_b`amma^bk\hkg^k' ;nm ma^ k^Ze ikh[e^f bl ma^ o^kr ehp [n]`^ml p^ aZo^ [^^g e^_m pbma' Bm f^Zgl mZdbg` mhn`a ]^\blbhgl Z[hnm ikbhkbmblZmbhg pab\a f^Zgl \hglb]^kbg` ma^ bfiZ\m h_ \aZg`^l hg L\hmmbla Z`kb\nemnk^ Zl Z pahe^' P^ g^^] lhenmbhgl maZm Z]]k^ll ma^ g^^]l h_ Zee _Zkf^kl bg L\hmeZg]% Zg] maZmlpaZmBfZbfbg`_hk'


RENEWABLEENERGY

VG Energy concludes major deal with a private investor Renewable technology specialists, VG Energy is delighted to announce that it has successfully concluded a deal with a successful ‘high net worth’ individual to invest in the company’s wind turbine land leasing division. The private investor, who sold his own business in 2011 for over £100 million is investing into VG’s ‘Windvestment’ brand, which has been developing numerous wind turbine sites across Scotland and England for the past three years. This deal will enable VG Energy to commence construction of its first 500kW turbine, and four 225kW turbines, all due to be completed before April 2014. The company has an additional 12 sites currently consented to be built during the first half of 2014. VG Energy has selected the

44

Endurance X29 wind turbine for these large scale developments, which will represent the first of their kind in Scotland. Following this investment, VG Energy is actively seeking out either landowners with turbine consents in place, or landowners who believe their land to be suitable for a wind turbine, to take advantage of an enhanced wind turbine investment offer. VG‘s windVestments division is focussed on leasing land and developing sites for farmers and landowners who do not wish to invest the capital themselves on a renewable project. Under this scheme, the landowner is offered a long term income with no financial input required from them. The customer will still benefit from the clean energy and a healthy income without the expense of

the capital layout. VG Energy supply a range of turbines up to 2.0MW and have the right turbine for the wind conditions on a customers land. Formed in 2008, award winning VG Energy provides a full turn-key solution for any renewable project whether wind, solar or biomass. The company is unique in the UK wind industry, employing over 60 technical specialist staff operating out of three regional UK offices with the capability to fully complete projects from start to finish in-house from initial site visit through planning, construction, installation, and operation and maintenance of the project on the customers land. VG Energy currently employs a wide range of professionals including, site surveyors, planning consultants, architects, project

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managers, and fully qualified electricians and engineers. Over the last five years, VG Energy has consented, sold, and installed a significant percentage of all wind turbine FIT projects UK wide in the 15 to 100kW bracket, while also expanding into the larger segment of the market and is distinctive within the industry as being able to provide a turbine suitable for all wind-speeds and site conditions. In addition to its enhanced wind deal, VG has invested 'significant resource' over the past year growing its biomass division. VG Biomass is now installing three biomass heating systems per week, and is currently recruiting an extra installation/servicing team to meet demand. For more information on VG Energy, please visit www. vgenergy.co.uk


RENEWABLEENERGY

New Renewable Energy website now live A new website for farm-based renewable energy in Scotland is now live. The launch of the new website, part of NFU Scotland’s Renewables Development Initiative (RDI), will improve the quality and availability of information about farm-based renewables energy technologies to all Scottish farmers. The RDI has been established with the aim of providing sound independent advice to farmers and land managers across Scotland on renewable energy with specific focus given to facilitating knowledge transfer between farmers on renewables. By showcasing renewable technologies in action on farms, the initiative aims to provide a far greater understanding about the true benefits available and what can be achieved.

Aberdeenshire farmer David Smith, one of the farmers featured in the first open farm event held in November 2013, said: “It is essential that Scottish farmers grasp the opportunity that renewables present”. The website has a modern, colourful design and offers quick and easy access to essential information on renewable energy. Case sheets on featured projects and fact sheets on specific technologies are available and content will continue to be added to the website over the three-year life of the initiative. A news page will provide information on forthcoming events at featured farms across Scotland. Ma^ p^[lbm^ \Zg [^ oblbm^] Zm ammi3((ppp' k^g^pZ[e^^g^k`rhg_Zkfl'\h'nd

Wind farm development and biomass station given go-ahead Planning consent has been granted for two renewable energy projects that will benefit local communities in Fife and the Highlands. Scottish Ministers have granted consent for a 20-turbine wind farm at Moy, near Inverness, and a combined heat and power biomass plant for the Port of Rosyth. The Moy wind farm, which represents a £65 million investment by developer Eneco Wind UK Ltd, will have 20 turbines with a generating capacity of up to 66MW. It could power the equivalent of approximately 31,000 homes

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in the area. The Rosyth plant, a £325 million investment by Forth Energy, would provide low carbon energy to the local area, and the equivalent of over 40 per cent of the Fife Council area’s electricity needs would be met by the development. Both projects would lead to the creation of a significant number of jobs, with the Rosyth plant bringing up to 500 jobs to the area during construction, and 70 operational jobs based at the port. Forth Energy estimates the project will deliver £26 million of annual economic benefit per year to the area.

45


RENEWABLEENERGY

Solar-biomass - an antidote to rising costs in poultry farming Similar to many poultry farmers in the UK, Brian and David Jamieson - brothers and proprietors of two broiler chicken farms up in Angus, Scotland - were facing rising fuel and electricity costs and inevitable diminishing returns. Undaunted by the challenge, the two brothers turned to renewable energy as a way to reduce their costs and generate a welcome source of income. However, unlike many farmers who tend to choose a single renewable option, the Jamiesons went for two. Brian Jamieson replaced his existing LPG heating with a powerful solar-biomass renewable energy combination consisting of a 499kw ‘Woodpecker Blaze’ woodchip biomass boiler for heating and a 50 kWp roof mounted REC solar PV array to generate power for ventilation and lighting. A second 25kWp roof mounted solar PV array was also installed on David

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Jamieson’s neighbouring farm. The solar PV generation has been so successful that Brian added a further 50kW solar array, taking Brian’s pv capacity to 100kWp. Neither of the brothers had any prior experience dealing with renewable energy installers so choosing the right company for the job was paramount. In the end they went for Greenpower Technology, a recommended biomass and solar installer with a strong track record in the poultry sector. Brian Jamieson comments: “The reason we went for Greenpower is their knowledge of our sector. Greenpower Technology installed the system over three separate phases, undertaking the majority of the work during natural breaks in the broiler calendar. Every six weeks the farm is emptied of chickens giving us one week to wash down the sheds and prepare for the next batch. Tom and the team worked hard

during these intervals so that there was minimal disruption to our business – after just seven weeks everything was done.” Combining solar with biomass is a particularly effective solution for broiler chicken farmers because each respective technology works most effectively when heat and electricity demand is at its highest. For example, electricity demand is at its peak during the summer, when power is needed to run ventilation systems to keep the chickens cool. Solar PV produces the most power when the sun is shining, which mirrors these daily and seasonal peaks in demand. During the winter months, the biomass boiler produces cheap, low carbon heat to keep the sheds warm and dry, again at a time when heat is most needed. In addition to this beneficial seasonal match, the biomass element of the solution

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produced some unexpected benefits for the Jamiesons. For example, Brian Jamieson’s original LPG heating was proving expensive to run – LPG was the second largest overhead on the farm. The biomass boiler delivers heat via hot water and radiators and this creates a dryer atmosphere within the chicken sheds. This dry heat produces a higher grade litter, which doesn’t need to be replaced as often, saving money and reducing associated health problems for the chickens. The combined solar-biomass solution is also set to deliver considerable cost savings and income for the broiler brothers. For example, woodchip – the fuel used for most commercial grade biomass boilers - is up to 30% cheaper than LPG, the fuel choice for many conventional boilers, and the electricity produced by the solar PV arrays is in effect, completely free. In addition, the Jamiesons will benefit from annual income from both the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) and Feed in Tariff (FIT). Brian Jamieson: “I think the financial benefits and seasonal fit that biomass and solar delivers to broiler farmers is compelling. Farmers are always looking for new ways to generate income and reduce costs, and renewable energy can deliver both. We are also aware of the pressure supermarkets are under to buy chicken from low carbon sources. It is only a matter of time before this pressure becomes a requirement, and those farmers who have already taken steps to reduce their carbon footprint will benefit in the long term.” ?hk fhk^ bg_hkfZmbhg Z[hnm [bhfZll Zg] lheZk ie^Zl^oblbmppp'`k^^gihp^k& m^\agheh`r'\h'nd Zg] \eb\d hg hma^k k^g^pZ[e^l _hk [bhfZllhimbhgl':em^kgZmbo^er ie^Zl^\Zee)*,*//20-.)'


RENEWABLEENERGY

Plans for Cruachan could be instrumental to Scotland’s transition to low carbon Scotland could be on the verge of a new generation of hydro power to rival the revolution in the glens which saw electricity taken to the Highlands in the 1950s. Scottish Power today announced its intention to examine more than doubling the capacity of the iconic Ben Cruachan pump storage station – the world’s first high head reversible pump storage hydro scheme, housed in a gigantic man-made cavern. Welcoming the announcement, First Minister Alex Salmond said: “Combined with other planned developments around Scotland, this major announcement today heralds a renaissance in hydro and pump storage energy, and opens another chapter in our outstanding history of harnessing renewables. “In 1945, fewer than half of the homes in the highlands had access to electricity. By 1959, that proportion had increased to over 90 per cent through

the forethought and leadership of Tom Johnston, who led the hydro-electric revolution. “Today, the Scottish Government recognises the potential for future development at Cruachan and other similar proposals for hydroelectric storage, to contribute to a balanced mix of energy generation across Scotland. This could see hydro power generate up to one third of Scotland’s entire generating capacity in the next decade. “Together with other developments, this major extension of pump storage technology will allow us to build on Scotland’s powerful position as a world leader in harnessing natural resources. The plans for future pump storage development demonstrate that our significant and diverse range of natural assets continue to attract the huge investment in infrastructure that will enable the Scottish economy to flourish.

=PZP[ FARMING SCOTLAND MAGAZINE UL^^LIZP[L www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com Farming News – Commodity Prices – Weather Outlook Agri Pages Online Directory – Magazine Archives And so much more…

Selecting Slurry Spreading Systems Chloe McCulloch Agricultural Consultant, SAC Consulting.

When we picture a traditional slurry spreading system, most of us probably still think of a tanker or umbilical system spraying a large arc of slurry behind it as it travels round the field. Increasingly though we are being encouraged to consider the alternatives which have benefits for both the environment and the producer’s pocket. Spreading using the splash plate method, described above, can result in up to 30% of the available nitrogen in the slurry being lost as ammonia gas in the first 3 hours, increasing to 80% in the following 12 hours. This is because the action of spraying the slurry exposes a large surface area to the air – air fresheners are effective for the very same reason. Another downside is that the splash-plate effectively coats the grass with slurry. Even at light applications, this is unpalatable to stock for long periods and, at heavier applications, you may risk bringing it back in with a silage crop. Alternatives worth considering include a trailing shoe, band spreading and injection (shallow and deep). Band spreading (placing slurry close to the ground rather than through the air) reduces ammonia losses –

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though it still coats the grass. A natural progression from the band spreader is a trailing shoe. The ‘shoe’ is pulled through the base of the sward depositing the slurry underneath the leaves. Deep injection (to around 6”) can be very successful on the right ground – hard stony fields are out. Injection into much shallower channels (shallow injection) is more widely suitable. The advantage of placing slurry below the grass leaves is that stock can be moved back onto the grass relatively quickly and opens up the possibility of using slurry in a paddock grazing situation. Equally slurry can be applied to silage crops 6 weeks before cutting with no adverse effects on silage quality. Where using a splash plate, other than giving variation in nutrients applied, thicker, lumpier or less well mixed slurry is less likely to cause difficulty. However because injectors, band spreaders and trailing shoes pass slurry through a small-bore pipe, they work best with either the separated liquid fraction of slurry or where a macerator is incorporated. ?hkfhk^mbilZg]b]^Zlhg ikZ\mb\ZepZrlmhikhÛm_khf \nmmbg` ^fbllbhgl% l^^ ppp' _Zkfbg`_hkZ[^mm^k\ebfZm^' hk`hk_heehpnlhgMpbmm^k9 _Zkf-\ebfZm^' 47


SPRAYERS

INNOVATIONS & UPDATE SYSTEMS :HWDNHDORRNDWVRPHRIWKHWRSEUDQGVDYDLODEOHIRUWKHVHDVRQDKHDG

Amazone Pantera 4502

Pantera 4502: the allnew AMAZONE sprayer The Pantera is now very well accepted in crop spraying circles and, building on this excellent reputation, the new Pantera 4502 will now offer greater engine power, greater tank sizes, faster travelling speeds and more efficiency. The tank size is now a nominal 4500 litres, with the ability

48

to take 4800 litres of liquid fertiliser. The drive unit is new from the ground up with three new chassis variations: Standard â&#x20AC;&#x201C; High clear â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wide track (for all spraying applications from maize to potatoes through to cereals.) The hydrostatic drive system receives more torque, bigger wheels and disc braking giving it the ability, in

theory, to travel at up to 50 km/h on the road where it is legally possible. Tyre options now include the popular 710mm wide flotations plus it is now possible to fit wheels of up to 1.95m in diameter for more ground clearance. The 218 hp Deutz 6-cylinder engine now meets the Tier 3B emissions standards using an exhaust

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gas recirculation system and self-regenerating diesel particulate filter. Monitoring and cleaning of the filter is carried out automatically when necessary. The unique engine management system and traction control set-up remains from the Pantera 4001. The communication system is now ISOBUS with a choice of AMATRON 3 or AMAPAD controllers looking after the spray pack. The AMADRIVE touch screen continues to look after the vehicle functions as well as controlling the spray pump drive level. AMADRIVE also looks after the control of the Comfort-Pack II option which offers an additional fresh water pump for automatic clean water fill as well as fresh water always being available for canister cleaning, even with a full tank mix on-board or when bowser filling. A twin P260 Altek pump system is used now across the range meaning shorter pipe runs and less residual spray volumes for reduced wastage and quicker clean-out times. Better working environment: A Category 4 filtration system is now an option for the high-visibility Vista cab.


SPRAYERS

Category 4 means that the cab is kept at an overpressure, and all the necessary filter inserts are available, so that any dust or droplets are prevented from entering. The filtration makes sure that the safety of the operator is looked after at all times due to the cleaner air in the cab. Boom widths continue to be available up to 40m with the new Super-L2 boom. Big boom time for Berthoud Berthoud go into 2014 with 3 superb new big boom options: Ektar B2 and B3 and 36/38m Axiale booms for Tenor and Raptor sprayers. The new Ektar B3 three section aluminium boom has dual action pendulum-axial type suspension with anti-yaw and booms which fold within the length of the sprayer. It offers a combination of strength, low maintenance and improved ride. It provides operators with the flexibility to alter suspension to best suit the terrain they are working on, selecting either the pendulum or the axial centre pivot system from inside the cab. The triangulated aluminium structure integrates pipework and nozzle holders. Nitrogen ball on variable geometry cylinder guarantees improved shock absorption. Ektar B3 is available in widths from 36m to 44m. Ektar B2 two section booms The Ektar B2 aluminium boom also features dual action pendulum-axial type suspension with anti-yaw technology. The triangular strut aluminium structure integrates pipework and nozzle holders. The 2 section boom offers a combination of strength, low maintenance and improved ride. It provides operators with the flexibility to alter suspension to best suit the terrain they are working on, selecting either the pendulum or the axial centre pivot system from inside the cab. Ektar B2 is available in widths from 36m to 42m

Berthoud 43-46

Chafer Multidrive sprayer Chafer Machinery have been working closely with Multidrive tractors to develop a new versatile forward control self propelled sprayer based on the well proven Multidrive 6195 tractor. The first of these new self propelled sprayers have now been sold and will be delivered in the autumn of 2012. The new machine has been designed to combine the benefits of a mechanic transmission with the efficient layout of a forward control sprayer. The Chafer Multidrive FC will be sold exclusively in the UK by Chafer Machinery Ltd through their national dealer network. The move to a forward control cab allows for a larger centrally located area for the Chafer spray pack which gives huge improvements in weight distribution and also the ability to fit a larger tank. The longer load space allows for the fitting of longer, lower spray tanks lowering the centre of gravity and improve the weight balance. The overall front to rear weight distribution www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

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SPRAYERS

Chafer 3500

is close to 50/50 resulting in lower ground pressures and better traction. The new chassis features a reduced wheelbase of 3.8m wheel base ensuring a tight turning circle and maximum manoeuvrability. The cab gives excellent all round visibility and comes as standard with climate control, tinted curved glass and additional storage for documents and tools. The Chafer Multidrive FC chassis is based on the underlying chassis, steering, axles and suspension from the 6195 Multidrive which has been in production since 2008.

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Challenger RoGator 600C updates Challenger has updated its award-winning RoGator 600 self-propelled sprayer with a new Tier 4 final engine and a host of improvements which will make spraying performance even more efficient. The new RG600C will be presented for the first time at Agritechnica. The RoGator 600 broke new ground at is launch in 2009 with its pioneering design, from its exclusive chassis to its novel spraying system. Its unique features brought Challenger many accolades across the globe and made it the first choice for leading farmers and

professional sprayer operators. Its purpose-designed cab has set new standards, offering sprayer operators the comfort, space, visibility and working environment they have come to expect from top specification tractors. The Category IV cab has won many commendations, the most recent when it was highlighted in the Agricultural Best Practice feature at the 2013 SIMA show. The RoGator 600B cab was chosen for its superior air quality. It is the first farm machine ever to achieve a Category IV rating (EN ISO 15695-1 and EN ISO 15695-2)

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for its cab air quality. Constant and monitored overpressure in the cabin, together with a special air filter, prevents dust and chemical particles from entering the cab, ensuring a comfortable and safe operator environment. “Challenger has responded to customer feedback to drive innovations in design and function. The latest developments enhance the RoGator 600C’s uncompromising design, increasing efficiency while easing the workload for the operator and adding to its long working life,” says Hubertus von Dungern, Manager Product Marketing. Updates improve filling accuracy, extend machine life when working with more aggressive products and make operation easier. For the first time, operators can also rinse the sprayer from the cab, saving time back at the store and encouraging best practice which can prevent cross contamination when working with a range of products. The new ACGO POWERTM six cylinder Tier 4 final engine reduces emissions once again and offers improved fuel economy. Service intervals are increased from 250 to 500 hours, further cutting the cost of ownership. Challenger’s self-levelling suspension system offers improved filling accuracy for the ultimate precision in the field. The unique Opti-Ride™


SPRAYERS operator to monitor the amount of clean water in the tank from the cab, using the Optiflow display. Cleaning operations can also be activated without leaving the cab when the indicator is linked with an electric five-way valve for the first time. Control is via the Optiflow menu, using the icons to select the valves required.

Challenger RoGator

all-wheel double wishbone suspension gives the operator the ability to set the machine height from the cab at 75 cm or 120 cm, for variable crop clearance. Opti-RideTM suspension now allows the height of each

wheel to be adjusted so the chassis stays level, using a single press of a button on the C1000 monitor. This improves the accuracy of the tank filling indication so operators always fill with exactly the right amount of

chemical and water needed. Accurate filling works with the spraying system to ensure optimum application and the best possible results. The 500 litre clean water tank now has an electronic level indicator which allows the

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The FSV mounted range is FarmGEM's latest offering The FarmGEM FSV mounted sprayer offers a choice of tank capacities 1300, 1600 or 1900 litres. It features a heavy duty close coupled frame with A Frame mounting system. The stylish polyethylene tank to ensures weight is kept close to the tractor enhancing stability. The FSV 24 metre boom is a vertical folding boom, it is compact and versatile as it allows spraying at 12, 18 and 24 metres. It

51


SPRAYERS

without excessive weight. The 19mm stainless spraylines and nozzles are fully protected within the boom structure. As with all FarmGEM sprayers the FSV is painted using a twin pack powder coating system which produces a hardened protective finish. All moving hinge points have greasable bearings and bushes for long, trouble-free life.

FarmGem folding sprayer

also boasts variable geometry and independent wing folding. The proven terrain following suspension and anti-yaw damping system to ensure

excellent boom stability. The boom is constructed with 5mm high-tensile steel and the fully welded lattice design ensures strength and durability

New features and products from HARDI Ltd A larger tank capacity, new liquid system and integrated electronics on trailed and new integrated electronics and features for mounted sprayers The two new NAVIGATOR models follow the “value for money” design idea from the Navigator 3000 and 4000 l - and provide extra capacity in both tank volume and boom size. This along with the introduction a number of wellproven HARDI-solutions mean that the new NAVIGATOR models will live up to the design idea more than ever. The NAVIGATOR with the concept of easy operation, reliability and good field performance is making this product line to be one of the best-selling trailed sprayers

Hardi Navigator 4000

52

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in the world market today. The two new top models in the NAVIGATOR line provide capacity of 5000 and 6000 l water plus 5% extra capacity. With the increased tank size comes bigger booms sizes from the exciting and well-proven HARDI boom range the Force 24-36m, alongside the familiar Delta 18-28m. Thus securing the maximum performance and capacity for a very wide range of farmers worldwide. With the new tank and boom range comes a New liquid system – higher precision in application rate. DynamicFluid4 was introduced in 2011 on the new COMMANDER range and has challenged the standards for regulation. Utilising four sensors on the flow, speed, pressure and pump rpm they work together to give the advantage of faster reaction and control both when useing CVT/PowerShift transmissions, and when sections are turned on and off using GPS AutoSectionControl. Together with high reliability, the 4 sensors are supporting each other in case of errors on one or more sensors. The 12.1’’ touch screen HC 9500 and the new 8.4’’ HC 8500 controller are now available on the full NAVIGATOR line and on the Master mounted units. Both controllers offer a large integration of features with only one screen to manage in the cabin. Both 8500 and 9500 offer full GPS AutoSection control, feildmapping and a host of other features. The HC 6500 controller is also an option on both Master and Navigator, offering joystick convenience. Boom management features are not restricted to trailed units either. AutoSlant is now available across the Navigator and Master range, offering an affordable boom management option. Other new features include BoomPrime circulation and the ALL new SprayRover AutoSection control, a cost effective way of managing your sections automatically with the increased electronics package HARDI can also offer


SPRAYERS

John Deere M740 trailed sprayer

an ISO solution, simply plug an ISO equipped Commander, Navigator or Master into your tractor and away you go.

New John Deere trailed sprayers John Deere’s new midspecification M-Series trailed

sprayer range makes its working debut at Cereals 2014, in the Sprays & Sprayers demonstration arena.

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To help reduce spraying cost per hectare, the M700 Series sprayers have been specially designed for farms growing up to 750ha of cereals, oilseed rape or row crops. M700 Series sprayers are available as standard versions with 2400, 3200 or 4000-litre tanks, or as ‘i-specification’ machines with 3200 or 4000-litre tank capacities. Equipped with a triple folding 30m boom, these sprayers match 6m seeders or drills. The larger M900 Series sprayers have many of the same features as the top of the range R900i Series trailed machines, including high capacity filling performance using the PowrFill chemical inductor, the same choice of 5200 or 6200-litre tank capacities for maximum productivity, and durable steel booms from 24 to 40m. Both the M700i and M900i sprayers are ISOBUS

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SPRAYERS

automatic boom height and tilt control and FieldDoc documentation software. M900i sprayers also offer an in-cab nozzle control, allowing the operator to switch between spray nozzles on the move. To meet the increasing demand for satellite guidance systems, AutoTrac automatic tractor steering and GPS boom section control are available for use with both i and non-i versions of the M-Series sprayers.

Kellands Agribuggy

ready, so the machines can communicate with the tractor and enable ‘intelligent’ John

54

Deere solutions. These include the Tank Fill Calculator, which helps the operator to

calculate the correct amount of refill volumes required for each application, BoomTrac

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Lowest running and maintenance costs from Kellands Kelland’s sprayer name is renown for innovation and advanced technical features that farmers and contractors appreciate. The Kellands Agribuggy is the true low ground pressure sprayer available with high crop clearance. Powder coated, fully welded box section chassis


SPRAYERS all round suspension, operators will appreciate its smooth, quiet and road safe operation at 50km/h. With the lowest running and maintenance costs in its class, the high crop clearance option provides row crop tyres up to 40â&#x20AC;? on adjustable rims with an underbelly sheet and front crop deflector shield. The famous Agribuggy name is enhanced by the bug look, where the operator has 360° vision through curved, tinted glass. Designed for easy operation, functional features include air conditioning in the roof and heaters to your feet!

Kuhn Metris trailed sprayer

carry demountable 2700 litre sprayer complete with12/24 metre fully hydraulic aluminium booms.

The latest Agribuggy is powered by a 3 litre, 160hp turbo charged intercooled engine, driving a four speed

automatic transmission with 2-speed transfer box. Fitted with heavy duty, reduction hub axles with up rated brakes and

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New trailed sprayer from Kuhn The Metris trailed sprayer, with 3,200 or 4,100 litre tank capacity and boom width options from 18 to 36 metres, was shown at LAMMA 2014 for the first time in the UK. This machine is the newest entry into

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SPRAYERS

Lemken Gemini

the Kuhn sprayer range, sitting between the established Grand Large and Oceanis models. Many of the beneficial features on the Metris are consistent with other models in a range that has been developing since the acquisition of Blanchard by the Kuhn Group in November 2008. Key features common to the range include the injected polyester tank construction, with easily cleanable inner surfaces, and anti-roll tank design for good stability. The 450 litre rinsing tank is positioned centrally and at the rear for optimum load distribution, and Kuhn’s Equilibra boom suspension system is available for this model. The Metris, with a ring-toaxle length of 4.35 metres, is compact and manoeuvrable in the field and – with aluminium boom configurations that allow folding within the machine dimensions – it is convenient to transport. A reversible drawbar enables adaptation for various attachments. Optional equipment as offered on other Kuhn sprayers includes GPS section control, automated rinsing, a following axle, and boom height control for headlands. 56

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Gemini front tank to complement the Lemken Sirius Lemken’s product range includes the Sirius, a large mounted field sprayer with a tank volume of up to 1900 litres. The Gemini front tank can be added to increase the volume by another 1100 litres. This system extension not only increases acreage performance, but also ensures superior stability during travel, as tractor loads are evenly distributed. The Gemini front tank is designed to match the Sirius mounted field sprayer perfectly. For optimum interaction between the two devices, the Sirius can be fitted with an optional electric selection valve, which is comfortably operated from the terminal in the tractor cabin. With its 1100 litre-tank, plus an integrated 120-litre clear water tank, the Gemini provides sufficient volume for an additional reach of at least 50% per pass, depending on application rates. The Gemini front tank is available in two variations: The basic model allows the full volume to be used for fresh water or liquid fertiliser, while the model for crop protection products comprises a powerful agitator to ensure that spraying liquids remain homogeneously mixed at all times without forming any deposits. The agitator and internal cleaning system are both fed by a hydraulic pump. The Gemini is easily operated via two selection valves for switching between suction, clear water or spraying liquid, agitation and cleaning. The Gemini front tank also features a well thought-out external design. Its substructure is smooth to prevent any plants from getting caught, and a special mounting frame provides large ground clearance for working with tall crops. The tank has a flat design to maintain optimum visibility, and the lower link coupling points can be flexibly selected


SPRAYERS

Sands Vision sprayer

in the direction of travel. An optional mounting carriage considerably shortens the mounting time for the front tank, as it does away with the need to screw individual rollers on or off.

The combination of the Sirius mounted field sprayer and Gemini front tank proves its full worth on hilly fields. Its outstanding manoeuvrability, combined with a tank volume of about 3000 litres, makes

it an excellent alternative to trailed field sprayers. Hi-Spec Sands Vision 5:5 Sands Agricultural Machinery Ltd are currently building what could be the highest

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specification Vision sprayer yet to come out of their factory at Stalham in Norfolk. Built for a customer in the East of England, this machine features all the latest technologies and options to make it both a high performance sprayer and also one which can adapt to varying spraying systems. It will also feature the latest Deutz â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tier 4iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; engine with an increased power output of 242hp. With a 5500 litre capacity coupled to a 36m boom the infield performance of this machine will be without question however the extra features that have been specified will further increase both accuracy and flexibility. On the mechanical side it will be fitted with a fully hydraulically adjusting axle allowing it to suit track widths from 1.8 to 2.7m. To keep the overall weight down 9.1tonne unladen - the sprayer is fitted with the latest RHA

57


SPRAYERS

Spray Techniques Trekker

aluminium from Pommier. This sprays as 24 and 36m and features ‘proportional’ auto boom levelling from specialists Norac. On the GPS side an Agleader Integra controller will be fitted to control spray application rate, steering and auto section control. An RTK

enabled receiver will allow for sub-inch steering accuracy using the very latest ‘Geosteer’ fully integrated system. Auto section control will be for twelve 3m sections – easily allowing for 24m spraying whilst still utilising auto section control at this width. Other options fitted to

increase efficiency are an auto fill-stop system from Polmac, which will eliminate potential overfills, extra work lights over the induction hopper, SMART Drive Traction Control and a single sprayline which carries four spray tips and a fertiliser dribble bar. Sands are predicting that there will be a significant increase in demand for high specification sprayers similar to this in both the UK and its overseas markets. The Spray Techniques Trekker The Trekker range of demountable sprayers from Spray Techniques enjoy a high standard specification but as each machine is individually manufactured different specifications can be catered for, allowing you to suggest your own machine specification taking into account your requirements and costs. The basic units are designed to fit the Stretched JCB Fastrac and the Multidrive units The tanks are specially designed for the sprayer and manufactured in stainless steel. Tank sizes are available from 2700 to 5000 litre and boom widths from 20 to 36 meter. Powered by two hydraulically driven pumps one for high seed filling and the other to provide the variable flow and pressure for the spraying posses.

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Filtration is through suction and pressure filters with the added protection of line filters for each boom section. Wherever possible the plumbing is kept to a bare minimum reducing the amount of chemical residue left in the system, boom recirculation gives quicker charging of chemical in the lines reducing the amount of time and waste of chemical before commencing spraying. Air operated DCV shut offs can be fitted giving instant control of turning nozzles on and off. The Ag-Leader Integra is fitted to all our top of the range sprayers having all the controls at the driver’s fingertips. Also it can supports the NORAC UC5™ boom height control system – ensuring ideal crop coverage without drift or wasted product. Spray Techniques also produce three tank sizes of front mounted tanks 800, 1000 and 1200 litre capacities ideal to increase the spraying output of your sprayer but also can be utilised for carrying liquid fertiliser for planters. Mounted to the front of the tractor with a centrifugal pump powered by the tractors hydraulics they can self fill, transfer or fitted with different controls system to switch on/ off a spray boom or transfer automatically or manually to the rear sprayer tank. Team front-mounted Sprayer This striking-looking frontmounted spray tank from Cambridgeshire firm Team is designed to increase spraying capacity and boost productivity. The unit is said to be easy to mount and demount from the tractor, thanks to quick-release couplings on all liquid and hydraulic hoses. In-cab controls allow fast transfer of liquid to the rear tank during spraying and a 700 litres/min transfer pump is fitted. The low-line 1,000 and 1,500 litre tanks are said to give good operator visibility


SPRAYERS

Team 1000L front tank

and ground clearance. Being close-coupled to the tractor also reduces overall length and helps weight distribution. The steel chassis has fold-away storage legs, too. Vicon iXter sprayer iXter is setting a new standard. Easy Set Control Panel The Easy Set control panel makes life easy by its intuitive operation.

Vicon sprayer

The controls are separated to a suction and pressure side. The valves are well protected behind the door: this keeps your operational area free of dirt and pesticides. Easy Hitch Makes Life Easy There is enough space to connect the PTO shaft and the hydraulic and electric cables. An ingenious locking system secures the machine and shows

the operator it has connected correctly. Easy Operation the graduated chemical inductor with a capacity of 20 litres is mounted on rails and fully integrated in the frame. In storage position the inductor is sealed against the top plate and no cover is needed. The rotating canister cleaning nozzle releases the water when pushed downwards. The circular

rinsing system is no add on: it is part of the design! The standard return flow agitation with its unique agitation tube keeps the tank mixture agitated. The turbo agitation system (optional) allows powerful mixing during preparation of the mixture. This is especially helpful when powders are used or after sedimentation during a longer period of interruption.

DEALERS KEY (Participating Dealers in this feature) AMAZONE AM Phillip www.amphillip.co.uk Conon Bridge : 01349 866021 Fraserburgh : 01346 541351 Huntly : 01466 799222 Reekie Group www.reekie.co.uk Stirling : 01786 477530 Perth : 01738 622471 Cupar : 01334 652445 W & A Geddes Wick : 01955 602207 Thurso : 01847 891651 Brora : 01408 621220 BERTHOUD AM Phillip www.amphillip.co.uk Conon Bridge : 01349 866021 Forfar : 01307 474000

Fraserburgh : 01346 541351 Glenrothes : 01592 775511 Huntly : 01466 799222

Stirling : 01786 477530 Perth : 01738 622471 Cupar : 01334 652445

CHALLENGER Ancroft Tractors www.ancroft-tractors.co.uk Berwick upon Tweed : 01289 331904 Kelso : 01573 225213 Macmerry : 01875 617323

KUHN Ravenhill www.ravenhil.co.uk Aberdeen : 01224 772577 Dingwall : 01349 863555 Elgin : 01343 541121 Maud : 01771 613246 Turriff : 01888 563561

JOHN DEERE DKR Agricultural Services www.jd-dealer.co.uk/dkagri Biggar : 01899 220897 MLM Engineering www.mlmengineering.co.uk Orphir, Orkney : 01856 811282

SPRAY TECHNIQUES AM Phillip www.amphillip.co.uk Conon Bridge : 01349 866021 Forfar : 01307 474000 Fraserburgh : 01346 541351 Glenrothes : 01592 775511 Huntly : 01466 799222

HARDI Reekie Group www.reekie.co.uk

TEAM AM Phillip www.amphillip.co.uk

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Conon Bridge : 01349 866021 Forfar : 01307 474000 Fraserburgh : 01346 541351 Glenrothes : 01592 775511 Huntly : 01466 799222 VICON AM Phillip www.amphillip.co.uk Conon Bridge : 01349 866021 Reekie Group www.reekie.co.uk Stirling : 01786 477530 Perth : 01738 622471 Cupar : 01334 652445

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By Nigel Miller, President NFU Scotland As NFU Scotland enters its 101st year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and I enter my final 12 months as President â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it is clear that 2014 will be a pivotal time for our food and farming sectors. The independence referendum in September and the work generated by the review of agricultural holdings legislation are just two areas that will draw on the Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time and resource. However, securing a support structure that delivers for existing, developing and new farming businesses in Scotland is easily our greatest challenge. The Scottish Government consultation on direct support closed at the end of February and the debate around proposed area rates, dealing with our huge rough grazing area and ensuring limited funds are used to recognise activity has been fierce. Many producers have made use of the Scottish Governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready reckoner and, without changes, many systems â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whether hill, livestock or cropping â&#x20AC;&#x201C; face a hit that could prompt business restructuring. That has implications for production and our ambitions as a food and drink nation. The Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intention survey work indicates that

production starts to dip when producers face cuts of 20 per cent or more. If that view translates into reality, then jobs, support infrastructure, rural communities and processing are all likely to suffer as critical mass is lost. Required reductions from Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s low budget already means that support will fall by more than 26 per cent before redistribution although young farmers and calf producers have options that may claw some of that loss back. The reform will, however, open the door to businesses locked out of support by Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic system and there is a real commitment to move new entrants to full area support in 2015. Days for debate are running out. Final decisions need to be fixed soon. The government should protect the interests of the New Generation. However, government should not use that priority as a reason to walk away from established livestock and cropping businesses, production jobs and the food economy. Failing to manage Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transition to area payments and failing to keep options open is only good news for our competitors.

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Better communication is needed By Mamie Paterson Richard Lochhead, responding to a question at the Stirling bull sales, revealed that 38% of Scottish farmers had no idea how CAP reform is likely to affect their Single Farm Payment. The farming press has certainly done its bit in publishing ready reckoners to enable farmers to work out a rough estimate of their likely gains or losses, but informing farmers and helping them to understand whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in store is primarily the job of the government, rather than the farming press. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem that many years ago since farmers would receive a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dear Producerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; letter from the government department responsible for agriculture, informing them of forthcoming changes. Now the civil service assumes that farmers are all computerliterate and can go online for necessary information and updates, and to respond to consultations. It is unclear why this assumption has been made, especially when many parts of rural Scotland still do not have access to broadband, and farmers, especially older models, are technophobic when it comes to computers. Farmers without computer access or ability may request a paper copy of the consultation, but they will only discover this advice if they can use a computer and

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go to the online consultation. Of those farmers who do use computers, remarkably few will have looked at the CAP reform consultation document on the Scotgov website. Some of those who have done so will have attempted to respond, and of those, most will have given up because they found themselves losing the will to live, having struggled the get to grips with concepts such as the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Irish tunnelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, degressivityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;reduction co-efficientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;internal convergenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Politicians and farming organisations have been urging farmers to respond to the CAP reform consultation, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incomprehensible and inaccessible to far too many members of the farming community. They will be denied a say in the crucial decisions which will be made in the coming months. ?hkbg_hkfZmbhghg GL:L\hmeZg]\hgmZ\m3 @^hk`^Fbeg^% GL:L\hmeZg] =^o^ehif^gmH_Ă&#x203A;\^k DbgZe]r?Zkf% Lm:g]k^pl%?b_^ M^e3)01,*.**,,) >fZbe3 `^hk`^'glZ9[m\hgg^\m' \hf

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HOUSING

Storing Fuelling a safer environment

Vehicles, plant and machinery all need fuelling and on site fuel needs safe storage in bunded diesel and bio-diesel tanks. Then you need an integrated pump, hose and automatic cut-off nozzle, often with a flow meter and filter incorporated in the fuel management system to log and control the fuel being used. Dispensing the fuel also calls for equipment to be contained in an area of the tank that offers protection against accidental spillage and overall you’re looking for complete environmental compliance. Southern Tank Services offer a supply and installation facility backed by many years of experience. In fact, they are celebrating 10 years in the fuel tank business and can offer a wide range of solutions in plastic and steel tanks with a variety of pump options, ranging from a

hand pump or 110v or 240 v ac and 12v or 24v dc battery powered pumps. The medium density polyethylene tanks are available from 1,300 to 15,000 litres with pump and equipment to suit the majority of end user requirements. Southern Tank supply EnviroBulka steel tanks

that have been designed with site, yard and farm use in mind. They offer a generous sized fuel cabinet to store the pump and hose as well as barrels and spill kits, with high security and the ability to fuel other appliances, such as grain dryers, generators and boilers. Meeting the Environment Agency’s regulations is paramount and their dislike of gravity diesel tanks has prompted Southern Tank

Services to develop a system that allows the same ground level bunded tank to re-fuel tractors and vehicles while being able to maintain a pressure regulated fuel supply for grain dryers. While the system can be used with most tanks and existing pipework it has become very popular in use with the EnviroBulka range of tanks. Southern Tank Services 01722 714514 www. tankservices.co.uk

Innovative concrete constructions from Creagh Concrete Established in 1976, Creagh Concrete has grown to become one of the largest and most innovative producers of concrete products for a diverse range of market sectors, throughout Ireland and the UK, including: construction, civil engineering, house building, gardening and agricultural. Creagh design, manufacture and supply an extensive range of concrete products. The company operate from their head office in Toomebridge, with bases at St Neots, Cambridgeshire and Edinburgh. The ethos of the company is the manufacture of quality products. Creagh Concrete is committed to providing products 74

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and services that meet customer’s specified contractual and project requirements. Creagh Concrete Products has developed and will maintain an Integrated Management System that conforms to the requirements of: ISO 9001: 2008 ISO 14001: 2004 OHAS 18001: 2007. The scope of the registration covers the design, production, control and supply of precast & readymix concrete and production of aggregates for use in concrete products. Creagh Concrete are members of the Quality Scheme for Readymix Concrete which certifies concrete to BSEN8500 and operate a UKAS approved testing laboratory which meets the requirements of ISO17025.


HOUSING

Advanced Roller Doors Advanced Roller Doors are a roller shutter door manufacturer based in East Kilbride. Established in 1997, the company has grown and currently employs 18 staff. Works are carried out throughout Scotland and the North of England with the majority of work coming from the Central belt. Advanced Roller Doors have fitted roller shutters and carried out repairs for Ingliston

Country Club, Rowallan Activity Centre, now Morris Equestrian Centre both of which are in the local area and have worked in farms and small holdings all over the country. Advanced Roller Doors manufacturer, install, service and repair a wide range of roller shutter doors including Traditional, Insulated, Fire Rated, Sectional Overhead Doors and Garage Roller Shutters. The majority of the roller shutters are built in-

house at the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s East Kilbride factory where there is an extensive stock of sections and repair material. Advanced Roller Doors cover a wide range of sectors including High Street shops, commercial premises, industrial warehouses, domestic dwellings

and of course Agricultural & Equestrian property. In recent years the company has expanded into the farming and riding communities. ?hk fhk^ bg_hkfZmbhg \hgmZ\m Cbf Zm :]oZg\^] Khee^k =hhkl hg !)*,.." +,2.)+'

Sustainable timber frame buildings from Farmplus

Farmplus are experts in the design and construction of timber buildings which are structurally very strong, aesthetically pleasing and excellent value for money. Free advice is offered on the design, layout and the choice of structure which will best suit your needs. Erection can be carried out by Farmplus or you can erect it yourself. Site evaluations, levels and setting out can all be carried out by Farmplus. The timber used in Farmplus buildings is from sustainable forests. Wood is the most environmentally friendly commercial building material known to man. In Europe we only harvest 65% of forest

growth; therefore tree numbers increase every year. Uniquely it is renewable and, even allowing for the energy required for logging, shipping and processing, it is effectively carbon neutral: for every cubic metre of growth trees absorb one tonne or carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, storing it as carbon and releasing oxygen. Because wood breathes it helps keep the indoor environment of a Farmplus building healthy. Wood is naturally beautiful; it has warmth, character and integrity- features that never go out of fashion. ?hk fhk^ bg_hkfZmbhg \hgmZ\m?ZkfIenlhg!)*00+" 01.+.+' www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

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HOUSING

Every class of farm animal now in Roundhouse building

Seven years ago conventional building design for livestock buildings was turned on its head when the innovative Roundhouse livestock building was launched. Since then this all–circular building with no walls and a high tensile canvass roof with a vent-hole in the centre has scooped dozens of awards for innovation and its striking good looks. Originally designed for beef animals, the building’s versatility is now home to every class of farm animal thanks to the completion of a Roundhouse for goats in Staffordshire. Now the building is home to beef finisher animals, suckler cows, milking cows, calves, heifers, pigs, sheep, goats and even deer. There are even Roundhouses keeping rabbits and other domestic species on farms open to the public. The building’s design is a radical, innovative idea and was introduced to a sector that had never had conventional building design challenged in such a way, according to Simon Pelly, sales manager for Roundhouse Building Solutions, which makes and markets the building: 76

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“Farm buildings have been rectangular or rectangles because straight lines and corners are easy to construct. Farm buildings, largely, have been put-up next to each other because it suited the farm, or the farmer, not because it would be best for the livestock. The Roundhouse is different and puts the animal’s requirement first.” There are two sizes of Roundhouse, known as the Rh30 and Rh45. The original Rh30 has a diameter of 30 metres, a circumference of 95 meters and an internal area of 720 sq. meters. At recommended stocking rates for livestock it holds around 140 beef animals at 500kgs, or 70-90 dairy cows. The newer Rh45, launched two years ago, has a diameter of 45 meters, a circumference of 144 meters, and an internal area of over 1500 sq meters. Consequently it can hold just over 300 beef animals at 500 kgs, or 180 dairy cows. Although the Rh30 is already used on dairy farms it is primarily used for calves, heifers and dry cows. The Rh45 makes the round building concept applicable for milking cows for the first time, and one has already been erected for that purpose in Nottinghamshire. This building will have three robots adjacent. Farmers using the building report healthier stock because of the better ventilation, better growth rates, lower stress levels, and reduced veterinary and bedding bills. They also commend the dedicated stock handling system in the middle of the building, and other safety features such as gateless entry and exit points. ?hk fhk^ bg_hkfZmbhg \hgmZ\m Lbfhg I^eer Zm Khng]ahnl^;nbe]bg`Lhenmbhgl hg!)*1,,"/2/2+1'


FENCING Protecting your livestock and boundries

Rabbit fencing by Coventry Fencing

Coventry For Fencing Coventry For Fencing is a family run Scottish business which was established in 1971. They believe the best way to understand all aspects of our business is to do it, so that our customers receive a service which is second to none. Their Head Office is in Auchterarder and they have opened further outlets at Carstairs and Doune, where they operate our sawmill. Coventry For Fencing pride themselves on sourcing the

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best fencing products at the keenest prices and as well as holding large stocks available for collection, they offer direct delivery to farm or site from all depots. They use and supply larch and pine posts, stobs and strainers all treated to the highest industry standard, and hold over 9000 rolls of wire in stock, sourced from the United Kingdom and around the world. This range includes barbed wire, line wire, stock netting, deer netting, special size nets,

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FENCING rabbit netting and security fencing. Coventry For Fencing are the main agent in Scotland for galvanised field gates and produce our own high quality timber field gates, panels and sheep troughs at our factory in Auchterarder. They strive to cater for all your fencing needs and are, as a family built company,

proud to have built many friendships with many clients over the years.

Bryce Post Drivers Bryce Post Drivers have introduced the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hole Puncherâ&#x20AC;? which allows holes up to 30cm diameter to be punched into any type of ground. The Hole Puncher is the perfect answer for

all types of agricultural, equestrian or industrial security fencing where posts have to be set with precision using concrete. The Hole Puncher eliminates the need for a digger or auger to make holes and saves a lot on concrete. It also punches a tight hole as all the material is pushed out to the

JB Corrie fencing

Bryce post driver in action

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circumference of the hole. The Hole Puncher saves time and money, is quick, clean and easy with no mess and no spoil needing to be removed from site. It is made out of cast steel which has been heat-treated and tempered ensuring a long, maintenance-free life when used under continuous demanding conditions.


The Hole Puncher can be used on all Bryce post drivers which have a rockspike fitted. Contact Jock on 07970 730567 or Andrew on 07901 618479 JB Corrie & Co Ltd Based in Blairgowrie, Perthshire, the Scottish division of J B Corrie & Co Ltd of Petersfield, Hampshire, is geographically well situated to provide the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full range of products and services to customers in Scotland and the North. They have the freedom and independence that enables us to be flexible and adaptable while remaining a fully integral part of J B Corrie & Co, benefiting from all the knowledge, experience and resources available to a larger company formed over 80 years ago. The Scottish team itself, with well over 100 years of combined fencing experience, has the knowledge and ability, to carry out a wide variety of fencing projects, gained through undertaking many diverse contracts in often, challenging and logistically demanding locations throughout the Scottish Mainland and Islands. The Scottish division of J B Corrie are authorised installers of many manufacturers fencing products and systems and are past winners of the national Fence of the Year competition. Through our mature Quality Management System, dynamic approach to Health & Safety and pro-active Environmental commitment, they are at

FENCING

the forefront of the Scottish fencing industry. Whether you want Deer Fencing on a Highland Estate, Security Fencing for an Electricity Substation or Metal Railings and Timber Palisade for a new Housing Development, JB Corrie will visit the site, discuss your requirements, carry out a comprehensive survey, and prepare a detailed written quotation. Rutland Electric Fencing The market leaders in electric fencing in the UK. Their products, expertise and distribution network will ensure you obtain the best electric fence for your animal control, whether it is for farm animals, horses, wildlife, vermin or pets. Electric fencing can provide safe and secure boundaries for permanent, semi-permanent or temporary applications at a cost lower then conventional fences. Their extensive web site has been designed to assist you in designing your fence and selecting products from our range of Electric Shepherd energisers, posts, insulators, wire, tape and accessories. They also offer several tips and advice for installation and maintenance of your electric fence. See for yourself at www. rutland-electric-fencing.co.uk

Peter & WE Cramb fencing

Peter & WE Cramb Based by the picturesque village of Gargunnock in the heart of Scotland, Peter & W E Cramb offer an efficient, friendly timber supply service to all business customers www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

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FENCING and private individuals alike. Their family business has been supplying timber and related products countrywide for three generations, while avoiding overexpanding, meaning they are able to maintain a policy of providing tailor-made product sizing rather than being limited to producing “mass market” products with little flexibility. Peter & WE Cramb can cut from sizes 0.5 m x 38mm x 19mm to 6.1 m x 300mm x 300mm in various types of timber, and also stock a regular supply of spruce, douglas fir, pine, larch and noble fir. They also take environmental and social responsibility extremely

seriously and are committed to developing a business towards ecological, social and economic sustainability. That commitment to the environment in business operations broadly falls under the following areas: * Sourcing Supplies of Sustainably Grown Timber * Making it their business to ensure that the majority of timber is sourced from Agents utilising sustainably grown UK forests. Their hauliers work closely with the Forestry Commission to comply with all current legislation in regard to working hours and practices. Recycling is another pivital point. With practically no waste, using the central portion of the log for fencing

with the outer portion being chipped and distributed for use in floorboard manufacture, gardening mulch etc. The sawdust is then collected and distributed for use in wood fuel pellets, animal bedding, etc, a wide ranging product and service orientated business indeed. Ever wondered how electric fences actually work? Written by Andrew Fitzjohn, Agri-Supply UK Ltd. - www.agri-supply.co.uk Electric fences are becoming increasingly popular throughout our rural landscape. They serve a number of different functions. From protecting livestock to safeguarding crops these fences provide an essential service for farmers. If you’re considering erecting electric fencing then you need to know how such fences work. Below is a guide to the principals of electric fencing. The Energiser All electrical fences have an energiser. This device generates high voltage impulses between two separate output terminals. Whenever the animal comes into contact with the fencing they receive an electrical shock that causes their muscles to contract. This mild charge acts as a deterrent, and keeps the animal safely contained within the environment. What does it feel like? For those of you that haven’t experienced an electrical shock the most accurate way to describe the feeling

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are that anyone exposed to such fencing will experience muscle cramping, for just a brief moment. The feeling isn’t pleasant, but it’s not painful. This way an electrical fence proves to be effective in safeguarding livestock. Electrical Fencing and Livestock If you’re concerned that you’ll harm your livestock then let us re-iterate that the electrical charge felt will not harm the animal. Unlike us animals are well insulated. Fur, feathers and hide, quell the impact of the shock sufficiently. However the muscle cramping is remembered by the animal and they learn from the experience. Voltage Specifics In general, we feel an electrical charge if our skin is exposed to just a hundred volts. On the other hand most animals require a larger charge to feel a sufficient shock. High voltages produce long distance sparks that jump the air gap over the animals insulating surface. Typical lengths of such a jump are around a millimetre for two thousand volts. Some fences are charged with as many as twelve thousand volts. This charge is effective for animals with a thick fur or hide and sufficiently protects them. To sum up, electrical fences provide an effective deterrent and safeguarding for livestock and us. If you are sitting on the fence, wondering whether or not to erect such fencing then perhaps it’s time to hop off and give them a try!


ESTATE

GAME ON FOR EARLY BIRD

GWCT Scottish Game Fair unveils exclusive Early Bird ticket offer 4, 5 & 6 July, Scone Palace The early bird will catch a cracking deal on tickets to the 2014 GWCT Scottish Game Fair, Scotland’s largest game fair and best annual outdoor show this coming July with a great value advance ticket offer now on sale. For just £34, the new Early Bird ticket offer gives a family of four (two adults and two children, aged 5-15 years) an exclusive 10% discount on the gate price with the added benefit of a free Gold Parking pass worth £10. Adult tickets can also be purchased for £16 per person with free Gold Parking available on sales of two or more tickets by 30 April 2014.

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Building on the success of last year’s 25th anniversary event, this year’s three day event will once again take place on the banks of the River Tay against the backdrop of Scone Palace with the scenic stately grounds home to an array of lively shows, competitions and outdoor events for all the family over the weekend of Friday 4th, Saturday 5th and Sunday 6th July from 0930 until 1800 hours daily. ?hk fhk^ bg_hkfZmbhg hg ma^ ikh`kZff^% ^o^gml Zg] ZeeZoZbeZ[e^mb\d^miZ\dZ`^l% ie^Zl^ oblbm ppp'l\hmmbla_Zbk' \hf hk \Zee )*0,1 ..-1+/ _hkfhk^bg_hkfZmbhg'

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ESTATE

Polaris partners NFU for 2014

ATV specialist Polaris and the NFU have renewed their partnership for 2014 with a special deal for NFU members, saving up to £620 on most Polaris Sportsman and Ranger models. “ATVs are an important piece of farm machinery and assist many farmers in completing their daily activities,” says Ben Coates, NFU Affinities and Services Manager, “therefore, following negotiations with Polaris, I am pleased to announce that NFU members will continue to get a 5% discount on Polaris ATV and Ranger models for a further 12 months. Polaris is one of the NFU’s most used affinities and I look forward to working with Polaris to continue raising awareness of the offer amongst NFU members.” All members need to do is talk to their Polaris dealer or

visit the Polaris website for more details. To claim the discount a unique Polaris 5% off voucher will be sent in the post. This is then presented at the Polaris dealership along with their NFU Membership Card and ID. The 5% is in addition to any discount negotiated with the Polaris dealer and will be incorporated into the vehicle price at the time of purchase “We’re delighted to be able to continue the relationship for another twelve months,” says Polaris’ Country Manager, Phil Everett, “in the years we have done this promotion the take up with NFU members has been very high.”

Comprehensive guide of game cover and stewardship crops now available The new 2014 HiBird Gamecover and Environmental Crops guide is now available from Limagrain. It contains information on a range of gamecover and environmental stewardship crops, including sorghum, kale, sunflowers and maize, as well as a wide variety of cover crop mixtures. It also provides guidance on achieving good crop establishment. The HiBird range includes a range of cover crop mixtures such as Setter, which provides two year full-season cover and feed, and is made up of kale, millets and buckwheat. Mr Titley explains: “When several plant types are used in a cover crop mixture, it can be difficult to control weeds. However, following herbicide trials with BASF, Limagrain

For details of Polaris ATVs, Ranger vehicles, dealer location and the NFU 5% discount contact Polaris on 0800 915 6720 www. polaris-britain.com

Scots Pine is national symbol The Scots Pine has been chosen by the people as the national tree of Scotland. A recent three month consultation to choose a national tree found that the Scots Pine was the clear favourite, with over 52 per cent (2,374) of all responses opting for the tree. Over 4,500 people responded to the consultation run by Forestry Commission Scotland. The second favourite tree, the Rowan, received 15 per cent (687) of the responses and in third place came the Holly with 7 per cent (333). Announcing the consultation results during a 82

Members’ Debate in the Scottish Parliament, Environment and Climate Change Minister, Paul Wheelhouse, said: “Scotland’s trees, forests and woodlands are some of our greatest and most treasured natural assets. We are rightly proud of them because they help shape our landscape and make Scotland the fantastic country that it is. “The Scots Pine was an obvious choice and certainly the people’s choice. Its designation of being the national tree of Scotland will help create an iconic symbol to highlight the significant contribution trees make to our country”. www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

has developed a range of HiBird mixtures which are tolerant to specific herbicides so that gamekeepers can successfully establish weedfree good cover. For example, Cocker, which consists of Caledonian kale, mustard, fodder radish and linseed, is tolerant to Butisan herbicide, and provides full season cover for up to two years. Further mixtures are included in the guide.” ?hk Z _k^^ \hir h_ ma^ Ab;bk] @Zf^\ho^k  >gobkhgf^gmZe <khil @nb]^% ^fZbe EbfZ`kZbg ND Zm3 ^gjnbkb^l9ebfZ`kZbg'\h'nd hk oblbm ppp'ebfZ`kZbg' \h'nd Zg] pZm\a ma^ ob]^h <ahhlbg` ma^ Kb`am <ho^k <khi_hkrhnkLahhm'


ESTATE

Beaver Trial Wins Prestigious Conservation Award

The Scottish Beaver Trial, the first ever licensed reintroduction project for beavers in the UK, has won ‘Britain’s Best Conservation Project’ in the 2013 BBC Countryfile Magazine Awards. The Trial was up against two other conservation projects in this category: a basking shark tagging project aimed at understanding the world’s largest fish and a campaign against the use of neonicotinoid pesticides, which are having a detrimental effect on bee populations. A partnership between the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland and Scottish Wildlife Trust, the five year study is now in its final monitoring year and fieldwork is scheduled to wrap up in May 2014. There will then be a holding period while Scottish Government reviews data collected throughout the trial and makes its decision on the future of beavers in Scotland. Simon Jones, Project Manager for the Scottish Beaver Trial, said: “We are honoured to accept the award

for Britain’s Best Conservation Project in the BBC Countryfile Magazine Awards, especially in the final year of the project. This is amazing recognition for the project and its conservation value. The team’s devotion to the Trial, including raising awareness of the ecological benefits of beavers, has been tireless over the past five years. “As the first licenced mammal reintroduction project to take place in the UK, the Trial is hopefully paving the way for potential reintroduction projects in the future. Research conducted by our field team is also being used to advise international programmes on areas including beaver health and management.” ;;<<hngmkrÛe^FZ`Zsbg^ Zld^] ^qi^kml bg ^Z\a Û^e] mh ]kZp ni lahkmeblml h_ \Zg]b]Zm^lbg^Z\a\Zm^`hkr' Ma^ ZpZk]l p^k^ ma^g ohm^] _hk [r k^Z]^kl h_ ma^ fZ`Zsbg^ Zg] f^f[^kl h_ ma^ in[eb\ obZ ihlm% ^fZbe Zg] hg ma^ ;;< <hngmkrÛe^ FZ`Zsbg^ p^[lbm^% ppp' \hngmkrÛe^'\hf'

The Land Agent By James Galbraith Board member, Scottish Land & Estates and Chairman, CKD Galbraith There have been occasions within the rural sector when land agents have not always ranked highly in popularity contests but such opinions can often be fuelled by both a misunderstanding and under appreciation of what the land agent’s role entails. As chairman of a wellknown property consultancy, as well as a board member of Scottish Land & Estates, I have a good view of the issues that land agents face in their daily work. With the review of agricultural holdings legislation continuing, the relationship between tenants and land owners, and the role land agents play, is one that will obviously attract attention. The pattern of land ownership across Scotland is incredibly diverse and so is the work that land agents carry out. On some estates, the land agent is effectively the person running the estate and acting as its public face, most notably to tenant farmers. On other holdings, land agents will be liaising face-to-face on an almost daily basis with an owner whose family has owned an estate for generations and ensuring it can thrive for the benefit of all who rely on it. Whatever the specific requirement is of each client, good communication is at the heart of almost everything that takes place on Scotland’s rural land.

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As a key link between the owner and staff, the land agent has to liaise with the owner and then carry out their task to the best effect, working with staff, contractors, tenants and other stakeholders. This often leads to a tricky balancing act but in my experience, land agents do not set out to antagonise anyone during the course of their duties. Most landowners take a long-term approach and land agents themselves know only too well that their actions can have ramifications that go way beyond their immediate client. Land agents also know that they need to abide by professional codes, such as those set down by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors., which makes it in their interest to solve issues where they occur, instead of wishing to make life difficult for others. However, we must remember that despite the day to day demands of a busy estate, all parties must keep in mind the importance of good communication. Making time to communicate properly will not only help an individual land agent but also the sector as a whole. For more information www. scottishlandandestates.co.uk Telephone : 0131 653 5400 83


ESTATE

Top lumberjack event announced

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

The worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best-selling chainsaw brand, STIHL is excited to announce the 2014 British Championship of the STIHL TIMBERSPORTS® Series will take place at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CLA Game Fair (18-20 July 2014), Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire. CLA Game Fair visitors will enjoy the unique and high-octane thrills of top lumberjack sport with STIHL TIMBERSPORTS® events running across the three days and including the British Championship on Saturday 19th July. Considered the major league of lumberjack sports worldwide, the STIHL TIMBERSPORTS® Series started more than 25 years ago, and Britain has been represented at numerous international events. Now visitors to the CLA Game Fair can witness the action on home soil, with the British Championship set to attract top lumberjack athletes to compete on the stage.

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Six exciting disciplines make up STIHL TIMBERSPORTS®: the Underhand Chop, Standing Block Chop, STIHL Stock Saw, Single Buck, Springboard and the always-appealing (and noisy!) Hot Saw. Technically as well as physically demanding, each event tests athletesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; handling of an axe or chain saw and their skill with wood. What is more each STIHL TIMBERSPORTS® discipline is a real thrill to watch with competitors racing to cut through great hunks of wood (some taking three slices off with a chainsaw in under six seconds), hopping up onto planks more than 2.5m high as they race to fell a simulated â&#x20AC;&#x2122;tree trunkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the springboard event for example, and wielding literally razor sharp axes with centimetre-tight accuracy and skill. Fhk^bg_hkfZmbhghgLMBAE MBF;>KLIHKMLÂ&#x2020; \Zg [^ _hng] hg ma^ LMBAE p^[lbm^3 ppp'lmbae'\h'nd(mbf[^klihkml& g^pl'


Equestrian dates February 2014 Wednesday, 26 – Royal Northern Spring Show March 2014 Sunday 9 - BSPS Scotland Winter Show, SNEC, West Lothian Sunday 16 - BSPS Scotland Novice Spring Show, Muirmill EC, Ayrshire Saturday 22 – Lanarkshire & Renfrewshire point-topoint April 2014 Saturday 5 - BSPS Scotland Spring Show, Morris EC, Ayrshire Sunday 13 – BE Kirriemuir Saturday 19 - Kilmaurs Show Saturday 19 & Sunday 20 - BE Dalkeith Monday 21 - Scottish Connemara Group Dressage Competition, SNEC Saturday 26 & Sunday, 27 - NPS Scotland Spring Show, SNEC Saturday 26 - Dundonald Show Sunday 27 – BE Burgie Sunday 27 – Scottish regional group Arabian Horse Supporters Spring Show May 2014 Saturday 3 & Sunday 4 - Mundole Spring Show, Forres Friday 9 & Saturday 10 - Ayr Show Sunday 11 – BE Brechin Castle Friday 16 to Sunday 28 – BE Floors Castle Saturday 24 – BE Scostburn Saturday 24 - Fife Show

HORSE

Royal Highland Show – a must visit event for horse lovers The Royal Highland Show, June 19-22, is Scotland’s largest equestrian event featuring a vibrant top class show jumping section with talented riders such as Olympic Gold Medal winning Scott Brash. Light horse and pony showing classes -including sections promoting Scotland’s native breeds - also forms part of the four-day show. In partnership with RBS since 1981, the show offers an impressive array of equine sections and classes, including much sought after Horse of the Year Show qualifiers in 34 categories. “To be a part of the Horse of the Year Show is a great honour for any equestrian event and we are thrilled to be part of the process,” said Helen Goldie RHASS director. “The Royal Highland Show is an equestrian event of significant standing and this is reflected in the many exhibitors that we attract from all over the UK.

The 2014 judges have been announced and in light horses, Joyce Coltart will be judging the equine crème de la crème in The Queen’s Cup which will go to the best In-Hand drawn from the first 3 days of judging. Mrs Coltart has also been given the honour of judging a newly created HOYS qualifier for Ridden Part Bred Welsh or Arab Ponies, which will certainly be hotly contested. Reflecting the increasing popularity of Mountain and Moorland Ponies, the HOYS Under Saddle qualifying classes will be split into two sections differentiating small and large breeds. In addition to all the action in the rings, the Equine Shopping Village has absolutely everything you could need for horse and rider from hats to luxury horse lorries. ?hk _nkma^k bg_hkfZmbhg Zg] mb\d^ml oblbm ppp' khrZeab`aeZg]lahp'hk`

Central Scotland Horse Trials forced to pull second fixture from BE calendar The organisers of Central Scotland Horse Trials are disappointed to announce that the second 2014 fixture will no longer run due to a clash of dates in the British Eventing calendar. Organiser James Oakden said, “We are bitterly disappointed that due to date congestion we have been asked not to run the second Central Scotland fixture which was scheduled for July 19/20th at the new venue of Dalkeith Park, Edinburgh.” The decision comes after a clash in the British Eventing calendar which didn’t directly

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involve the Central Scotland fixture but now sees Hopetoun being allowed to run their second fixture on the July 19/20th weekend. “We are striving to establish Central Scotland in its new venue at Dalkeith Country Park and to establish a good working relationship with the Beccleugh Estate and this late change is a serious setback” added James. The first Central Scotland fixture which is set to take place on April 19/20 is going ahead as planned. For updates on the events progress visit www. centralscotlandhorsetrials. co.uk. 85


EQUINE ANGLE Is it time to put horse meat on the menu? By Melanie Scott

A year ago consumers were shocked to discover many beef items in their freezer were actually horse. It got worse - horse DNA was then found in 5% of EU tested beef products. Horse or ‘chevaux’ can be found in every French butcher or supermarket. Unlike Britain, France has very few horse welfare problems, as they have a value in the horsemeat sector. In Britain it’s estimated around 7,000 horses are at risk of neglect and abandonment. These numbers are due to an increase in breeding despite the decreasing value of horses –some as little as £5 at markets – although farriery, veterinary and feed costs continue to rise. Horses born after 2009 are required by law to have micro-chips linked to their passport, but this has not been enforced. Horses born before 2009 will potentially remain untraceable. In addition it is also unlikely that many of these 7,000 horses do not have a passport as the initial cost exceeds the value of the horse. 86

Speaking at the annual conference of World Horse Welfare last year Princess Anne suggested British attitudes towards eating horsemeat may have to change. She said: “Should we be considering a real market for horsemeat and would that reduce the number of welfare cases, if there was a real value in the horsemeat sector? I chuck that out for what it's worth because I think it needs a debate. As I was reminded not so long ago by somebody who travelled in France, the most expensive piece of meat in a local butcher was a fillet of horsemeat.” To many Britons the idea of eating horse repulses them. I for one couldn’t eat horse but I do believe putting horsemeat onto menus in Britain could help put a value on the lower quality end of the horse market and potentially reduce the number of abandoned horse. An increasing number of people are relying on local food banks, if horse meat was introduced to Britain’s menus could it help solve two problems at once?

HORSE

Ridden Partbred Pony of the year New qualifier at the Royal Highland Show 2014

It’s an exciting year ahead for ridden ponies at the Royal Highland Show in2014. For the first time there will be the chance to qualify for an entirely new Championship at the Horse of the Year Show (HOYS) 2014. The Ridden Partbred Pony of the Year Championship aims to recognise and promote quality ridden ponies, the breeding of which, in part, is Arab or Welsh, or a combination of the two. There will be 14 qualifying rounds and the Royal Highland Show will be one of 11 shows offering mixed Welsh/Arab; the remaining two shows will be restricted; one is Part Arab and the other is Part Welsh only.

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This year sees another first for the Royal Highland Show - adults will be eligible to ride plaited ponies for the first time. Traditionally, the riding pony has been classified with age limits for children to ride however this new category has no age limit. Helen Goldie, RHASS Director said: “This not a show or a hunter pony class - part breds have no type – the minimum Welsh or Arab only has to be 12.5%. The emphasis is on a ‘performing’ animal with conformation related to soundness.” Closing date for entries is 21 April by post and 28 April online. The Royal Highland Show is from the 19-22 June 2014.


COUNTRY WOMAN

Adele Thomson

Society Secretary Royal Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland Ma^ÛklmbgZl^kb^lh_J:lmre^bgm^kob^plpbmaphf^g pahphkdpbmabgL\hmeZg]lknkZe[Zl^]bg]nlmkbZel^\mhk' ;rCn]bmaHE^Zkr

What is the role of the Society? The Society aims to promote agriculture and rural business in Scotland. How does your job help deliver the Society's role? My role is to ensure the Society meets its remit as charity a membership organisation. We have over 15,000 members who elect our Board of 59 Directors. I look after the Membership, the Board, Committees and a number of

other Companies and Trusts, which are within the Society’s portfolio. What projects are you working on at the moment? This is an exciting year for the Society as we celebrate our 230th anniversary with a members’ ceilidh and an exhibition of the Society’s artwork. I am also organising the CARAS Scottish Conference, the ASAO National Conference and the Commonwealth

Agricultural Conference, which will be held in Brisbane later in the year, … and, of course, there is plenty going on with supporting the delivery of the Royal Highland Show in June and Eat Drink Discover Scotland in September.

true to its roots at the same time as developing the organisation in new ways to remain relevant in a modern society. I feel that we are caretakers rather than just employees looking after the heritage of the Society to pass it onto the next generation.

What is it like working for an organisation that has such a long history? It makes me feel very privileged to work with such a longstanding and well-respected organisation which remains

As only the second woman to hold this post in the 230 year history how do you find working in this role? Even after 8 years, I find the role exceptionally varied – the

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87


COUNTRY WOMAN job has grown and developed greatly during that time. I come from a corporate background with a strong focus on people. Working with people from all walks of life is important in this role and I think my background has lent itself well to the development of my position here. Do you feel the Society promotes the interests of women? I am confident that the Society promotes the interests of the best people in the industry, whether they are male or female. Awards and scholarships are most definitely given on ability however it is heartening to see more women applying for funding. As someone who is from a non-farming background how do you find working in the rural industry? I find that every day is a school day! The industry has taught me so much about diversity and change. It has also made me more aware of the challenges in the industry. You deal with lots of international organisations in your role? How do you find the Society compares with other similar international bodies?

I find that on the whole, most organisations are facing similar challenges/opportunities regardless of country – just some are on a different scale to what we have! Many of the other international bodies are really keen to understand more about our unique positioning of RHET within the Curriculum for Excellence. Equally, we have much to learn from our Commonwealth counterparts and this is what makes the exchange of information at international events most valuable to all of us. The agricultural community on worldwide scale is relatively small and no matter which country we visit, farmers are always excited to show us how they have overcome their challenges to achieve better results. What is the most exciting thing you've had to do in your job? Being responsible for Royal visits to the Royal Highland Show is always a challenge but hugely rewarding. I also enjoy representing the Society on a global stage at the Commonwealth Agricultural Conference – it’s even better when we host delegates here, as I am immensely proud of Scotland and the work of RHASS.

Country Woman We are looking for stories about women who work within the agricultural and rural industries in Scotland. Whether starting up a new business, or working within an established organisation, we invite you to submit ideas for possible publication within this new section. 88

Southern Belle BE SEEN AND BE SAFE… YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY As the sun shines in the South West on a beautiful day following the rain and storms, I am sadly preparing to attend the second of two funerals this week of two friends tragically killed in separate accidents. In all walks of life these days we are bombarded by Health and Safety, some of which, to those of us who grew up playing conkers and climbing trees, seems completely ludicrous. However, having “almost” been involved in an accident myself recently I would like to encourage everyone to bear in mind that simple stuff can save our lives. Driving along a dark, unlit country road, another car approach and I dipped my lights. Just at that moment, I saw a sparkle of what I thought was a fox’s eye on the road so I slowed a bit. Immediately around the next corner was a young lad on a bike with no lights and no light clothing. The “what if’s” have lived with me since! What if the other car wasn’t coming and didn’t catch that sparkle of bike metal, what if I hadn’t seen him on time…he carried on regardless…. Just because you can see where you are

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going it doesn’t follow that people can see you! Please don’t ride your bikes without lights and luminous jackets. Don’t walk your dogs or horses even in daylight during the winter without luminous jackets and always make sure that your car lights are on in ANY dull conditions, rain or fog. Be seen!! My other half once caught my daughter and I going for a short ride in the sun with no helmets. I think it’s the only time I’ve ever heard him raise his voice to us. A few years previously he had been biking home in full luminous gear and helmet and a car misjudged a corner hitting him and he went through the windscreen. The Firemen who freed him said he would not have survived without his helmet. Lucky break for all of us. Needless to say I look like a giant yellow balloon walking the dog and biking helmets are compulsory no matter how warm or how bad my hair might look afterwards. Be safe! You owe it to yourself, your family and to the person who didn’t see you…It’s a no brainer. Literally!!!


TOPIC The Art of Mediation Mediation highlighted by Scottish Government as effective settlement process for rural affairs By Callum Murray Director, Murray & Duncan

Costly, public and lengthy court disputes often dominate the business pages of our daily news, with headlines involving multi-million pound sums between large corporations, banks and investment funds. However, disputes between feuding families over succession, boundaries or rights of way are equally as common and typically result in lengthily court procedures, which is why alternative methods of resolution, such as mediation, are becoming increasingly popular. Since 2013, the specific case of Salvessen versus Riddell involving farm tenancy insolvency and the rights of landlord and tenant has received widespread coverage

in rural affairs areas and mainstream media. Judgement and legislation stemming from European bureaucrats has had far reaching implications for an unfortunate few. A number of tenant farmers have found themselves in an uncertain position over tenancy agreement legislation, altered by administration from the Scottish Parliament, which was then challenged by the European Court of Human Rights. Essentially, the Scottish Government aimed to provide additional protection to tenant farmers within limited partnerships. However, the European Court ruled that the Scottish Government were

outwith their jurisdiction. The affected farmers are those who applied for or had a tenancy dissolved between September 2002 and June 2003. Scottish ministers were given 12 months to rectify the legislation change. The end result leaves a number of tenant farmers facing eviction, the prospect of which the original section 72(10) aimed to avoid. Following changes to the draft, the Scottish Government has offered to cover the cost of independent mediation for those affected by this case. What is mediation and should it interest you? Mediation is a non-adversarial process of facilitated negotiation used to resolve disputes of many descriptions.

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Mediation is sometimes referred to as Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and can take place before or during court litigation if the parties agree to it. Mediation can save months, or in some cases years, of time, stress and ongoing financial burdens. It is a confidential process which the participants control and decide outcomes, rather than a decision being imposed by an arbiter, sheriff or judge. Success or settlement rates of mediation cases are consistently shown to be between 80-85%. More frequent disputes arising in an agricultural setting include succession and inheritance cases. Passing on a lifelong business, property 89


TOPIC

and land to family members on retirement can be a daunting and often complex process. Seeking legal advice from a family solicitor or law firm is important to ensure actions are lawful, whilst the services of an accredited mediator can help to ensure that a satisfactory agreement is reached for all involved. Disputes reaching court based litigation can lead to heavy financial outlays independent of the outcome and often lead to adversarial and entrenched negative attitudes. Where family members or nearby businesses are involved this can cause further difficulties. The dispute may indeed be settled but the established working or personal relationships can be damaged beyond repair in the process. Should a disagreement or dispute contesting a will or passing of ownership become contentious, mediation can offer an efficient avenue to pursue settlement and reconciliation. This process is non-adversarial and looks to find an amicable solution without a win or lose outcome. Instructing a solicitor to draft a writ prior to considering other options may be premature. Although a legal advisor is not required to refer a case to mediation, it is possible to take advice and have them attend the mediation with you. Your legal advisor will be aware of mediation as an option in their toolkit to assist you in resolving your dispute. Given the complex and variable nature of rural disputes there is not one strategy to most effectively deal with all scenarios, however in Scotland solicitors are duty bound to offer guidance on ADR allowing clients to make an informed decision based around the facts and circumstances of the case. Having established why mediation is applicable, what does an accredited mediator do during the process and 90

why would one wish to appoint a stranger to become involved with private matters? Firstly, by employing an accredited mediator, you are ensuring that the individual has undertaken training and been assessed by an independent person as competent to mediate. Groups such as the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and London School of Mediation provide training in mediation leading to accreditation. Taking the example of a boundary dispute between neighbouring land owners or operators, the proposal to undertake mediation is received by the mediator from an aggrieved party, a law firm or other business advisor. An outline of the case will be discussed with the mediator and both parties have the opportunity to submit relevant information about the situation. At this point a fixed fee will be discussed and agreed which is usually split between all participants in the dispute. A mediation agreement document is drawn up which commonly include and clarify issues of confidentiality, applicable law, privilege and authority to act and settle. Once this has been agreed and signed, all of the participants have a full understanding of what they can expect of one another during the mediation process. An important aspect of mediation is the agreement of both parties to maintain strict confidentiality about any information disclosed during the process, including

commercially sensitive data. This is enforceable to the fullest extent which the law permits. In addition, the information disclosed during mediation is subject to legal privilege meaning that any discussions, offers or admissions of liability may not be taken forward or relied upon as evidence if subsequent court proceedings take place. Once supporting documents have been received and mutually agreeable arrangements made over the course of a week or two, a mediation date will be arranged whereby all parties concerned will attend and undertake usually a full day of facilitated discussion and negotiation. A facilitative mediator will not impose a decision, or provide legal opinion. Control of the process and areas for negotiation and agreement remain with the parties involved. The mediation process is very flexible, private discussions to be held with individual parties and the mediator. Discussions can be facilitated with all the parties together depending on their wishes and the experienced opinion of the mediator. In the scenario of an emotive boundary dispute, it is typical that this will have been a contentious issue for an extended period of time, be that months or years. If there is ill feeling towards either party involved, discussion can begin separately with a form of shuttle diplomacy undertaken by the mediator. In certain cases, once common ground has been

achieved, the parties come together for a period of joint discussion which is facilitated by the mediator, although this decision ultimately lies with the participants. Mediation typically results in 85% of cases reaching a mutually agreeable outcome and the details of which can be established in a written settlement agreement, often drafted by legal advisors to conclude the mediation. The details included in a settlement tend to be far broader than a financial judgement issued in court. It is sometimes the case that participants are more concerned with issues of privacy, confidentiality, an apology or controlling interests, as opposed to a purely financial settlement. A mediation settlement agreement carries the enforceability of any other commercial contract if the participants decide to commit their agreement or settlement to a written document. A mediation settlement agreement is more likely to be fulfilled and maintained as the detail contained within has been reached through a process of negotiation and agreement for the needs of those involved. In summation, those involved in rural agricultural and farming disputes that may be heading for court based litigation should seriously consider the mediation process undertaken by an accredited mediator to help reach a mutually acceptable resolution. Mediation is likely to save time, money and those important ongoing relationships that are central to rural life and business. ?hk _nkma^k bg_hkfZmbhg3 M^e^iahg^)*,*.*,20.0hk oblbmppp'fnkkZrZg]]ng\Zg' \hf Mabl Zkmb\e^ \hgmZbgl bg_hkfZmbhg _hk `^g^kZe bgm^k^lm Z[hnmf^]bZmbhg'Mablblghme^`Ze Z]ob\^'B_rhnk^jnbk^e^`ZeZ]ob\^ hgZgrh_ma^blln^lkZbl^]bgmabl Zkmb\e^% ie^Zl^ \hgmZ\m Z lnbmZ[er jnZebĂ&#x203A;^]e^`Zek^ik^l^gmZmbo^'

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FUTUREfarmer Graduation day for John Deere technicians

A total of 19 young service technicians have graduated from the latest John Deere Ag Tech, Parts Tech and Turf Tech advanced apprenticeship programmes, run by national training provider Babcock. Iain Bond from dealer Sharmans Agricultural Ltd of Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire was named ag & turf apprentice of the year, while parts apprentice of the year was Ryan Murch of Smallridge Bros Ltd, Barnstaple in Devon.

The group of third year students received their certificates at the John Deere Forum visitor centre in Mannheim, Germany during a specially arranged visit to the company’s tractor and cab factories and European Parts Distribution Centre (EPDC). The presentations were made by Deere & Company’s regional training delivery manager Dr Lutz Schueppenhauer, John Deere Limited training manager Chris Wiltshire and Babcock programme manager James Kesterton.

Lantra research reveals high demand for technical and commercial skills within Scotland’s land-based, aquaculture and environment industries The latest findings from Lantra, the Sector Skills Council for land-based, aquaculture and environmental industries, indicate a rise in employer demand for more advanced technical and commercial skills, as Scotland’s landbased and aquaculture industries seeks up to 30,000 new entrants by 2020. Lantra undertake regular industry research as part of their Skills Assessment, an ongoing research programme which accumulates employment statistics from the UKCES Employer Skills Survey, The Labour Force Survey (LFS), the InterDepartmental Business Register and other primary research sources. The latest research was conducted through 2013. Although Lantra’s research highlighted a relatively low level of vacancies across these industries - 11% of employers had a vacancy at the time they were surveyed - taking into

account the numbers eligible for retirement, it is forecast that as many as 30,000 more people could be required by 2020 with a particularly high demand for employees with technical and commercial skills - up to 13,000 vacancies are expected for skilled trade occupations and 3000 for managerial/ commercial roles based on the specific technical skills in demand were identified through primary research which formed part of the Sector Skills Assessment in 2012, these included: ICT, robotics, automation, animal handling/care, disease identification and control, machine handling, whilst the most sought after commercial skills include succession planning, entrepreneurial skills, business planning, business and supply chain management, risk management as well as new agronomy and production methods.

Young Irishman wins Coveted Engineering Scholarship The CLAAS Group has chosen Irishman David Thornton as its next Agricultural Engineering Scholar from Harper Adams University. David, 20, from Maganey, County Kildare, Ireland is currently in the second year of an honours degree in agricultural engineering. As this year’s winner of the coveted CLAAS Scholarship, David, who grew up on the family farm, will have his fees for the second and fourth years of his studies covered, and in year three he will complete a one-year sandwich placement

with CLAAS, spending time in England and Germany. In selecting David as its latest Scholar, CLAAS took into consideration not only his academic background, but also his character, skills and enthusiasm for agricultural engineering. David said: “I’m absolutely thrilled – it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I have worked with CLAAS machinery over the years and have a genuine interest in the machinery they produce, especially combine harvesters, coming from an arable farm”. www.farmingscotlandmagazine.com

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Make a CLEAN SWEEP with an NC Road Sweeper

Tried and tested, our range of sweepers are suitable for many applications. NC Engineering (Hamiltonsbawn) Ltd. 2 Killyrudden Road, Hamiltonsbawn Richhill, Co. Armagh, BT61 9SF Tel: +44 (0)28 38871970 Rodney McCall: 07818 077897 www: sales@nc-engineering.com

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AGRICULTURAL and TRACTOR COMPONENTS ALL PLOUGH METALS AVAILABLE

“Where Quality Comes First”

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Dinneswood, Tarves, Ellon, Aberdeenshire AB41 7LR

Tel: 01651 851636 Fax: 01651 851880 www.murraymachinery.com 102

WILKS BROTHERS Main dealers in Perthshire for DEUTZ FAHR Tractors

The new 5, 6 and 7 Series Tractors

Sales â&#x20AC;¢ Service â&#x20AC;¢ Parts Repairs for a wide range of Agricultural Machinery Murthly, Perthshire, PH1 4HG Tel: 01738 710381 Fax: 01738 710581

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FARM WATCH

Watch out for rustlers! By Constable Murray Westwood D Division, Perth & Kinross 2QH RI 8.¡V OHDGLQJ PDQXIDFWXUHUV RI VSHFLDOLVW VSUD\LQJ HTXLSPHQW 0LFURQ *URXS KDV SUHVHQWHG LWV ODWHVW LQQRYDWLRQV HDUOLHU WKLV \HDU DW /DPPD 7KH FRPSDQ\ XVHG LWV VWDQG WR ODXQFK WKH *HQHUDWLRQ ,, 0LFURQ 'XDO 7DQN DQG WKH QHZ GHVLJQOLWUH7DQN6\VWHP 7KH QHZO\ XSGDWHG 0LFURQ 'XDO7DQNLQFOXGHGDQXPEHURI QHZIHDWXUHVWRDZDUGWKHV\VWHP ZLWK LPSURYHG VWDELOLW\ HDVH RI XVHDQGDGGHGSURWHFWLRQ

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Sheep Rustling, a crime many believe had been left behind in history, made a resurgence in the rural areas of Scotland in 2013. Thefts of sheep have been reported to police from Northern England through the Scottish Borders and up to the Tayside area. Tayside Division of Police Scotland is appealing for information following a spate of sheep thefts from the Perthshire area, with a substantial value and loss to the farmers targeted. Constable Murray Westwood said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;The crimes reported follow the farming year and whatever is most profitable at the time to those responsible. As such farmers must stay vigilant at all times and report any stock losses as soon as possible so that any patterns of this crime can be established. Crime prevention methods for these crimes will be dictated by the geography of the land being farmed, and each farmer will have to choose there own particular method which best suits them. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;During the early months of last year a large number of ewes in lamb were stolen from several locations, and most recently there have been a number of thefts of animals including ready lambs for slaughter and ewe lambs which were destined as breeding stock. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Those responsible have to have the knowledge of how

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to round up sheep with the assistance of a sheep dog and a suitable trailer and vehicle to take them away.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Police Scotland urge all farmers across Scotland to be vigilant, particularly in the areas which have been targeted in the past where it is known that thieves have revisited these areas and struck again. Constable Westwood said there were some basic steps that farmers could take to prevent their flocks being targeted. He added. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave handling systems set up next to the road and if thefts are consistent in your area consider grazing your sheep away from main roads where possible and padlock gates to fields. If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already, get in touch with us to arrange setting up a farm watch scheme. Make sure your stock is tagged and records are kept up-to-date as this greatly assists with future identification should officers come across stolen animals. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Thieves may stake-out your livestock in advance. Try to take notice of suspicious vehicles and note their registration number and report any incidents to police as soon as possible. Try not to advertise that you are away by leaving notes for tradesmen or delivery drivers and if you are away, ask neighbours and friends to keep an eye on your property and livestock and be prepared to do the same for them.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 109


/,)(67</( British Wildlife Photography Awards 2014 - Now open for entries

Lets hear it for the boys!

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Inverness farmer reduced premiums from ÂŁ2850 to ÂŁ2123 Aberdeenshire farmer reduced premiums from ÂŁ4208 to ÂŁ3986

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This is our chance to win a prestigious award, with cash prize of ÂŁ5,000 and reach millions through national exposure. Help raise awareness about British wildlife and celebrate our natural heritage. Winners and commended entrants will have their work showcased in a touring exhibition and stunning book, and will be invited to an exclusive Awards ceremony, hosted by Naturalist and TV Presenter Chris Packham. The overall prize fund worth up to ÂŁ20,000 includes products from lead sponsors Canon and Sky. Images from every aspect of British wildlife are eligible. For instance marine life, animal behaviour and urban wildlife; also botanical subjects and the hidden secret world that lies in the undergrowth. ?hk fhk^ bg_hkfZmbhg hg Zeeh_ma^\Zm^`hkb^lZg]`k^Zm ikbs^lmaZm\Zg[^phg%rhn\Zg oblbm3ppp'[piZpZk]l'hk` The competition is open until 3rd May.

Combining country tweeds with slick city styling, the Timothy Foxx spring/summer menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection brings together the together traditional tailoring with contemporary elements. Taking traditional British tweed and urban styling, the designer brand has created a collection of accessories and clothing, which no discerning gent should be without this season. From dapper tweed and paisley bow ties, through to cotton polo shirts, patchwork flat caps, logo tees, fleece hoodies, single breasted suit jackets (their best seller), plaid drill cotton shirting and tweed fitted waistcoats, the Timothy Foxx Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Collection ensures that when it comes to looking â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;foxxyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, the boys can look good and step out in styleâ&#x20AC;Ś BfZ`^ lahpl3 ;hp Mb^3 {,.'))% RZk] Labkm KKI3 {/.'))% A^\mhk PZblm\hZm KKI3{*-2 Kni^km CZ\d^m Bg =nd^ KKI3 {,.)')) www.timothyfoxx.co.uk

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/,)(67</( @home Time to paint your Garden furniture

All exterior wood looks tired and weather beaten after the winter, so why not get some brightly coloured paints and get brushing this spring? This lovely garden room has been finished by Mylands

water-based exterior eggshell in Museum No.151, a great example of what can be done. Mylands Paints ppp'freZg]l'\h'nd

Enzo Swivel Chair in Red Leather

From ‘Darlings of Chelsea”. This is an extremely comfortable contemporary designed chair with full 360 degree swivel in huge range of leather colours.

Makes a fabulous set when combined with the footstool. Price: £1025.00 ppp']Zkebg`lh_\a^el^Z'\h'nd

Colourfull bowls to brighten any table

Okay, so a bowls is a bowls, but that depends on the bowl! Here we have a range of modern colourful gems which would make your cornflakes look fab!

By Midcentury Modern Modern Shows M^e^iahg^3)010.-,1*11 >fZbe3 en\r9fh]^kglahpl'\hf

Provencal Bonaparte French Bed

A breathtakingly stunning French bed make from solid hand-carved mahogany with intricately carved headboard, side rails, corners, top edges, feet, and outer and inner panels - it takes six weeks to make one of these beds. The bed is then finished in a classic distressed

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antique white. This is French style furniture at its absolute best. Fits standard UK kingsize (5ft)- £1795 and superking (6ft)- £1995 mattresses. Price: £1795.00 www.frenchbedroomcompany. co.uk 111


/,)(67</( car Nissan LEAF leads the pack as Europe's best-selling electric vehicles Nissan recently announced that sales of the world's bestselling electric vehicle (EV), the 100 percent electric Nissan LEAF, recorded its best year yet selling 25 percent more units in 2013 than the next best seller in Europe. Now commanding 33 percent of the EV passenger car market in Europe, the Nissan LEAF sold more than 5,600 more units in 2013 versus 2012, cementing its position as the world's best-selling 100 percent electric vehicle. The success of the Nissan LEAF in Europe has been

propelled by consistently strong sales in Norway where the Nissan LEAF, the thirdmost sold passenger car last year, became the country's best-selling car at the end of January 2014 with 650 units. Huge strides are being made in the UK with sales of the British-built Nissan LEAF increasing by more than 1000 percent in January versus the prior year. The UK recently saw the installation of the 195th CHAdeMO rapid charger at the Clackett Lane Services on the M25. These chargers can "refuel"

Kia’s all-new Soul EV

The all-new Kia Soul EV has made its European debut at the 84th Salon International de l’Automobile in Geneva, alongside a special technology exhibit for the brand’s nextgeneration hybrid powertrain. These were joined on the stand by the enhanced Kia Sportage and upgraded Optima Hybrid, as well as the GT4 Stinger concept car which made its global debut at the Detroit Auto Show earlier this year. Embodying the iconic design of the recentlylaunched second-generation 112

Kia Soul, the all-new Kia Soul EV will become the brand’s first globally-sold electric vehicle when production starts in the second half of 2014. The Soul EV is a front-wheel drive electric vehicle with a high-capacity 27 kWh lithiumion polymer battery pack and class-leading 200 Wh/kg battery energy density. Power comes from an 81.4 kW electric motor producing a generous 285 Nm of torque. The vehicle will appeal to city commuters thanks to a driving range of around 124 miles (200km) on a single charge.

a Nissan LEAF from 0-80 percent battery in just 30 minutes at zero cost to the driver. The UK charger was

the 1000th CHAdeMO rapid charger in Europe, almost double the number installed by January 2013.

Jeep® brand records new alltime global sales record in 2013

For the second consecutive year, the Jeep brand has set a new all-time global sales record. Sales of 731,565 Jeep vehicles across the globe in 2013 bettered the previous record of 701,626 established in 2012. “Jeep vehicles have now recorded sales increases both globally and in the US market for four consecutive years, with back-to-back global sales records,” said Mike Manley, President and CEO – Jeep Brand, Chrysler Group LLC. “Customers clearly appreciate the new Jeep vehicle line-up that delivers vastly improved

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on-road driving dynamics and fuel efficiency, in addition to legendary, benchmark 4x4 capability. “We are especially pleased with the performance of Jeep Cherokee, which sold more than 25,000 units in its first two months in dealer showrooms,” Manley added. “We achieved this record while being out of the world’s largest SUV segment for three quarters of the year. With a full line-up of capable, efficient SUVs – and with new Cherokee arriving in Jeep showrooms across the globe – we expect to continue our sales momentum in 2014.”


/,)(67</( car Infiniti’s Q50 – award winning technology leader

award for Predictive Forward Collision Warning. Europe’s world-leading safety experts have branded the Q50 among the safest cars on the road. In the UK the car’s collisionavoidance systems have earned top marks with Thatcham, the Motor Insurance Repair Research Centre. And in the US the Q50’s world-first steer-by-wire

technology has been garnered a top science award. In the annual ‘Best of What’s New’ competition in the US, the editors of Popular Science chose Infiniti’s Direct Adaptive Steering as one of their 12 Grand Award recipients. Describing the first production steer-by-wire system as “one of the biggest steps yet” to self-driving cars.

Lamborghini Huracán an immediate success

Infiniti continues to receive accolades from some of the world’s arbiters of automotive excellence as they make the all-new premium Infiniti Q50 saloon one of their top choices. Sixty-Nine of the world’s leading motoring journalists have recently voted the Infiniti Q50 as one of finalists for the

2014 World Car of the Year title. In Canada, independent motoring journalists have decreed the Infiniti Q50 as 2014’s Best Luxury Car, Best New Innovation (for the aircraft industry-inspired steer-by-wire Direct Adaptive Steering) and Best New Safety Technology

The Lamborghini Huracán has already obtained 700 orders during as yet unfinished, monthlong private preview tour worldwide for VIP clients. An excellent start for the heir to the best selling Lamborghini to date, the Gallardo. The Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4 is powered by a 610-horsepower 5.2litre

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normally-aspirated V10 engine, which allows it to reach a top speed of 325 km/h and accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in 3.2 seconds, placing it at the top of its segment. At the Geneva Motor Show, it was the first vehicle to be revealed at the exhibition, during a press conference given by President and CEO Stephan Winkelmann.

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PEOPLE ON THE MOV

Jamie Brett Jamie Brett has been appointed to Alo UK as Area Manager for Scotland and the North of England. Jamie joins at an exciting time for Alo, with several new product ranges having been introduced at Agritechnica. Jamieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enthusiasm for customer service fits in very well with Aloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ambition, having recently taken the decision to increase its area coverage of the UK by adding an additional Area Manager to cover the Eastern side of England. This new addition demonstrates Aloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to UK agriculture and to serving their customers with even greater attention and expertise.

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Elizabeth Tainsh Tods Murray Solicitors have bolstered their Planning and Environment Team with the appointment of Elizabeth Tainsh. Elizabeth arrives from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) where she was a corporate solicitor based at their Stirling Corporate Office. Elizabethâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work focused on flooding and was heavily involved in the publication of SEPAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new flood hazard maps. She also has experience in areas including the Environmental Information (Scotland) Regulations 2004, contaminated land, waste, the Water Framework Directive and planning matters. Elizabeth has a Masters Degree (LL.M) in Environmental Law from the University of Dundee. Pete Saunders Syngenta has appointed Pete Saunders as the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Field Technical Manager for vegetable crops. Based in Cambridgeshire, he will provide technical support to the Syngenta crop specialists, grower customers and agronomists, as well as to implement the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dedicated trials programme for field vegetables, pulse crops and salads across the UK. Mr Saunders brings a wealth of experience in vegetable production from a practical growersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perspective, as well as important knowledge and understanding of the interface with multiple-retailers and the supply chain.

Richard Huxtable, Davy McCracken & Richard Dewhurst Richard Huxtable in now Head of the SRUC Farms Group, Professor Davy McCracken is Head of the Hill & Mountain Research Centre and Professor Richard Dewhurst is new Head of the Beef & Sheep Research Centre. "These posts are vital for SRUCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research and education services and offer SAC Consulting opportunities for wider industry and public engagement," said SRUC's Vice Principal Research, Professor Geoff Simm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am delighted that Richard Huxtable, Davy McCracken and Richard Dewhurst have taken on these exciting and challenging roles 114

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Farming Scotland Magazine (March - April 2014)