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Australia and New Zealand

i s s u e 6 - s e p t e m b e r 2 0 17 | d i g i t a l a r t i s t r y


06 E D I T O R ’ S M E S S A G E b y A t h a l i e Ta y l o r

27 E L LY

GEMIMA GIRAFFE

41

SHINE ON by Dale Botha

b y Tr i s h H o s k i n

07 P H O T O S H O P A R T I S T R Y by Sebastian Michaels

28 C O L D M O R N I N G AT T H E . . . THE OLD AND THE NEW

42 J U S T A R O U N D T H E . . . by Heide Hoffmann

b y Tr i s h H o s k i n

08 W H AT ’ S O N a n d N E W S by ADU Members

29 N E W S T Y L E L I V I N G

43 A B S T R A C T C O L O U R . . . ABSTRACT COLOUR...

b y Tr i s h H o s k i n

b y A t h a l i e Ta y l o r

14 I N T E R V I E W

by Helen Akerstrom & ADU

30 E M E R G E N C E

P A N D O R A’ S B I R D C A G E

44 H E AV E N C U B

RAINBOW KISSES by Helen Akerstrom

by Anthea Scotte

18

T H E P I R AT E K E E P S . . . CAMELLIA T WIG by Liz Abbott

19

ESCAPE FOM POSEIDON H A K U N A M ATATA

31 S W A M P G I R L TEMPER

45 T H E B A S S P L AY E R b y To n y S t e p h e n s o n

by Christine Stevenson

32 S U R R E A L I S T I C V E N E T I A N by Barbara Dudzinska

46 G R A S S I N T H E W I N D GIRL IN FOREST

by Michelle Drummond

20 A R I E L A R I E L I TA by ALBaMass

b y To n y S t e p h e n s o n

33 T I M E L E S S B E A U T Y by Barbara Dudzinska

47

T REE ON HIL L – PAIN T ED TREE ON HILL b y To n y S t e p h e n s o n

21 M A G I C B U T T E R F LY MIDNIGHT VIGIL by Andrew Haysom

22 D A N C I N G O N T H E E D G E BESIDE A BABBLING... by Ann Wehner

23 W O L F M A N

QUIE TING THE STORMS...

34 K I C K I N G U P A S T O R M S I N G L E B U T T E R F LY by Ilona A bou-Zolof

35 C A L M M Y S O U L

RE DL A NDS S T R AWBE RRY

S I LV E R L I N I N G S W H I T E . . . by Viki Murray

25 D O W N AT T H E D O C K S b y Tr i s h H o s k i n

36 S P O O N S A B S T R A C T. . . by Jacqueline Hammer

LEO

b y Tr i s h H o s k i n

b y To n y S t e p h e n s o n

49 F LY I N G

b y To n y S t e p h e n s o n

50 N E W B E G I N N I N G S

W AT C H I N G O V E R Y O U by Julia Harwood

38 T R A C E S O F C O L O U R

TRACES OF COLOUR 2 by Helen Jones

39 C O M P O S I T E 13 8 A C O M P O S I T E 14 7A by Colin Campbell

26 G E O R G E

SPIRIT OF CHANGE

by Maureen Maxwell

by Julie Powell

24 S I LV E R L I N I N G S

48 L O S T S U M M E R

40 B I R D ’ S E Y E V I E W by Dale Botha

51 C O R R O D I N G B E A U T Y

DANCE LIKE THERE’S... by Jim Dawson

52 F E R N S

THE DILEMMA by Phillipa Frederiksen

53 F R O G N I G H T M A R E EQUALIT Y

by Margaret Kalms


54 F R O G L E T

FREE WHEELING

68 M I M I S I R E N

ISABELL A MERMAID

by Mary Knaggs

55 TA C C A C H A N T R I E R I

AMICUS CERTUS IN RE...

82 L E T T H E L I G H T S H I N E by Ann Lavin

by Sue Masterson

69 M I M I R I S E S

by Sue Masterson

83 D R A G O N F LY by Ann Lavin

by Ingrid Douglas

56 T H E A R T O F. . .

70 M Y S O N

84 S AV I N G T H E B R O K E N . . .

58 M A L C O L M D I D N O T. . .

71

85 E L E C T R I F Y I N G

by Michelle Drummond

H E R E ’ S L O O K I N G AT. . .

by Christina Brunton

FLOWER GIRL

72 M I C H A E L

LIL LOT TIE

BEEING PRESENT

73 A M E L I A EBONY

by Judi L apsley Miller

61 N E W B E G I N N I N G S by Sonja Stef fen

by George Koncz

74

D AW N M E A D O W MAHENO WRECK by Gerard Whelan

62 M U M R E S T I N G A F T E R . . . WILDS OF AFRICA

86 M E R M A I D

KINDRED SPIRITS

by Jack McKenzie

by Carolyn Jenson

60 A L L T H E I N S P I R AT I O N

by Louise Campbell

by Mike Stone

by Bill Oldham

59 C I T Y

D AV E T H E M A G I C I A N

by Hazel Blake

75

GREEN SUNRISE JUST THREE OF US

by Louise Campbell

87

F LY A W AY THE BEST DRE AMS by Louise Campbell

88 B R E A K T H R O U G H MAGIC FOREST by Louise Campbell

89 M A R I N A

by Louise Campbell

by Lyn Darling ton

b y D i e p Tr a n

63 P E L I C A N D R E A M S

76 M A R K M A K I N G

90 W I N T E R L E AV E S

78 T H I S I S L O V E

91 P A I N T E D F U N G I

THE WITHERING OF AGE

by Nigel Lazenby

by Jill Capper

by Chris Barnes

64 M Y L O V E LY C R E AT I O N MY PAR ADISE

by Merran G Âû

by Edwin Leung

65 L E A P O F F A I T H by Sue Masterson

SHADES OF AUTUMN by Thysje Arthur

79 D E S I R E

THE CONJURING

92 S H E H A D A D R E A M 1 by Joyce Maris

by Pamela Henderson

66 A N N A’ S D R E A M B A S K E T FINAL STEPS

80 E R U P T I O N

93 S H E H A D A D R E A M 2

81 G O D D E S S O F N E W L I F E

94 B E T T E R A L O N E . . .

by Kar yn Waalw yk

by Joyce Maris

by Sue Masterson

67 H E R R O YA L H I G H N E S S JESS IN EUROPE by Sue Masterson

by Margie O’Hara

by Ona Boorman


95 P L A N T T R E E S

by Johanna Goudsblom

101 M O E R A K I B O U L D E R S V I N TA G E

107 C O M I N G T H R O U G H by Bronwyn Kenmir

by Corrine Davis

96 M E L B O U R N E S T R E E T A R T by Andrew Haysom

102 L A B O U R O F L O V E

S P I R I T O F E C S TA S Y

108 P E R T H S K Y L I N E by Sue Maples

by Mick Rooney

98 E F F E R V E S C E N C E F LY I N G K I T E S by Dean Hohn

99 A B S T R A C T – T H E W I N T E R ABSTRACT – OSLO...

103 H O M E 1 HOME 2

U N D E R AT TA C K by Lynn Jenkin

Sanatorium

To n y S t e p h e n s o n

by Sue Maples

by Sharon Rankmore

104 O P E N I N G O N L I N E . . . by Norber t Grill

by Colin Killick

100 D A N C I N G O N T H E E D G E . . .

109 A S W A N F E E L I N G . . .

110 C I T Y B L U R

CIT Y BLUR 2 by Jill Clif fe

106 W A D I N G

MAN ON EDGE by Kye T hompson

111 C E L E S T I A L B E A U T Y EAGLE GUARDIAN by Leanne M Williams


Self Portrait

To n y S t e p h e n s o n


aD rOt W i s tNs U N D E R Australia and New Zealand

EDITOR’S MESSAGE

Down on the Wharf

The September issue of the “Artists Down Under – Australia and New Zealand” magazine is the 6th issue since the Artists Down Under group formed and their first magazine went live. This past month saw members once again excelling in competitions and having work accepted into books and international magazines. See the news section for more details. Many Down Under Artists were represented again in the August issue of Sebastian Michaels’ “Living the Photo Artistic Life” See the news for more details. Our very good AWAKE friends Teddi Rutschman and Diane Stafford are continuing to support the Artists Down Under group with gifts for members who regularly contribute to and support the ADU public Facebook page. See the report with images from the three winning artists on pages 12 – 13.

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Tr i s h H o s k i n

Artists Down Under (ADU) interviewed our own Helen Akerstrom, animal photographer, who is passionate about animals, particularly the endangered species. See pages 14 – 17 for her insight into the decline of the exotic species and conservation. Jacqueline Hammer will once again delight you with her article on her Spoons Abstracts Series. Pages 36 – 37. On pages 56 – 57 Michelle Drummond from Palmerston North, New Zealand, shares her story and imagery with us. Michelle’s article “The Art of Imagination” tells about her art journey and how much her creations mean to her, her family and especially her two sons, Macauley and Jonty, who regularly feature in her artworks. You will learn more about Tasmanian Artist Nigel Lazenby’s artistic life experiences when your read his article “Mark Making” on pages 76 – 77.

Laura and the Cheetas...Sue Masterson

Art is all around us, particularly in the streets of Melbourne. ADU member Andrew Haysom is passionate about recording the art of the street artists before it is replaced by other artworks. Read all about his love affair with Melbourne street art and graffiti on pages 96 – 97. Last but not least meet ADU and AWAKE’s good friend Norbert Grill from Germany on pages 104 – 105. He is opening an online gallery and shop available to members of ADU. His first featured artist is ALBaMass.

Athalie Taylor Backgrounds: Laitha’s Designs Foxey Squirrel Cover image: L o u i s e C a m p b e l l Pretty in Purple Copyright 2017 © Artists in this publication are responsible for any rights appertaining to their work.


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aD rOt W i s tNs U N D E R Australia and New Zealand

WHAT’S ON Judi Lapsley Miller

Sanctuary Stories

September 2017

Zealandia EcoSanctuary Gallery End of Waiapu Road, Wellington, NZ

publication and every year some superb and highly awarded images just don’t fit. On the other hand, selection is anonymous and new photographers often get published. PSNZ chose 150 images from the 618 submitted. The quality of the images in New Zealand Camera 2016 was outstanding.

for “New Zealand Camera” this year.

NEWS NEW ZEALAND CAMERA Johanna Goudsblom “New Zealand Camera” is the Photographic Society of New Zealand’s flagship publication for the wider audience. It aims to showcase outstanding photographic images from members of the Photographic Society of New Zealand. Each PSNZ member can submit two images but only one can be selected. There are a limited number of images printed, so not every entrant will get an image published. PSNZ’s aim is to create a great looking

I was happy to be informed recently that my image “Space and Light” was also selected

I photographed this image in a church in central city, Brisbane. A number of distracting items were removed and there was a lot of work in Photoshop on the image to create the lighting, moody effects, blurring and toning. “Space and Light” is pictured opposite.

Living the Photo Artistic Life magazine In 2015 Sebastian Michaels launched his advanced group AWAKE: Living the Photo Artistic Life, and began publishing a monthly magazine featuring their artwork. You can view the latest magazine through:

https://issuu.com/thephotoartisticlife/docs/ issueno30-final?e=15580327/52164237 Congratulations to the following Down Under artists who had work published in the August magazine. Julie Powell, Sue Masterson, Ilona

Abou-Zolof, Louise Campbell, ALBaMass, Ann Wehner, Colin Killick, Rosemary S Smith, Viki Murray, Leanne M Williams, Dale Botha, Johanna Goudsblom, Christina Brunton, Jack McKenzie, Michelle Drummond, Edwin Leung, Tony Stephenson and Trish Hoskin.

Nigel Lazenby/Dean Hohn collaboration for the Care for Africa Foundation Raffle

Water Is Life

8

The artwork being raffled this quarter is a collaboration between Tasmanian artist Nigel Lazenby and myself.

Raffle tickets are $5 for one and 3 for $10. The raffle will be drawn October 24. Watch this space for the winner.

The piece is a Unique State (1/1) image so don’t miss your chance to be in the draw for this collaborative Nigel Lazenby/Dean Hohn piece.

Tickets are available from the Penguin Creek Gallery, or from me by sending me an email to dean.hohn@bigpond.com

Frank Hoekstra and Marie Cosgrave from Print2Metal have once again donated their printing services to produce this second stunning piece for the Care for Africa Raffle.

Raffle tickets are also be available from Care For Africa Foundation CEO, Diana Butler OAM, and her team in Launceston at: diana@careforafrica.org.au Dean Hohn


NEWS

(CONT)

CREATIVE FOCUS Johanna Goudsblom Creative Focus is a yearly competition run by the Pukekohe Franklin Camera Club (northern North Island, New Zealand). Each year the club looks forward to receiving imaginative creative images in their competition, and equally each year I personally look forward to entering some of my creative images. The competition is open to all camera club members, non-camera club members, national and international competitors.

T he Garlic Af fair

The Birdhouse

Lost in the Dance

Space and Light

The beautifully published “Creative Focus” book produced from successful entries is well known for its inspiring photography. This year the themes were: Creative Focus, Emotive Scapes, Natures Palette and Motion Blur. Four entries for each subject can be entered. The awards hierarchy system is: Gold, Silver, Bronze, Honours, Highly Commended and Accepted. Last year I was thrilled to receive a Bronze award and equally thrilled this year to receive 4 Highly Commended (“The Garlic Affair”, “The Birdhouse”, “Lost in the Dance”, “Space and Light”) and 4 Accepted (“She Danced and Danced”, “Mishka”, “Change Of Season”, “Just Memories Left”). Johanna Goudsblom Creative Focus website: http://www.creative-focus.co.nz/cf/

Change of Season

Mishka

She Danced and Danced

Just Memories Left

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NEWS

(CONT)

Light, Space and Time Online Art Gallery’s 7th Annual “Botanicals” Art Competition results. Several Artist Down Under members were successful in the Light, Space and Time 7th Annual “Botanicals” Art Competition in July. Judi Lapsley Miller was awarded 4th place in the Overall Category for her image “In a Bind”. This artwork was also awarded 2nd place in the Photography/Digital Category. Another of her images “Got My Knickers in a Twist” received a Special Merit award in the Photography/Digital Category.

Ineke Clark received a Special Merit award for “Sunday Afternoon” and a Special Recognition award for “Blowing in the Wind”. Both of these awards were for artists in the Photography/Digital Category. Other members who were successful in the Photography/Digital Category were Mary Knaggs and Diep Tran. Mary’s image “Ranunculas” was awarded a

Special Merit Award and “Lotus Light” received a Special Recognition award. Diep Tran also had work in this Category. She received a Special Merit for “End of Spring” and a Special Recognition award for her image “Sunflower”. Congratulations everyone.

4t h P lac e O v er all, 2nd P lac e P h o t o g r aph y/ Dig i t al

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Judi L apsley Miller

In a Bind


NEWS

(CONT)

Light, Space and Time Online Art Gallery’s 7th Annual “Botanicals” Art Competition results.

SM

JLM

G o t m y K n i c k e r s i n a Tw i s t

SM Mary Knaggs

SM

Ineke Clark

SM

Ranunculas

Sunday Af ternoon

D i e p Tr a n

End of Spring

SR

SR

D i e p Tr a n

Ineke Clark

SR

Sunflower

Blowing in the Wind

Mary Knaggs

Lotus Light

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NEWS

(CONT)

ARTISTS DOWN UNDER FACEBOOK PAGE Three ADU members receive a special gift The Artists Down Under – Australia and New Zealand Facebook page was created on March 01 to showcase the work of the artists who reside in Australia and New Zealand.

choosing. http://www.foxeysquirrel.com/

The artists in this group met through a common interest in photography and digital art.

Diane Stafford, from Chester, UK, designs Photoshop textures and overlays for photo artists and photographers to use in their digital artwork. Each of Diane’s fine art textures start life as a hand painted art piece or an interesting photograph.

They were all part of the world renowned International Photoshop Instructor Sebastian Michaels’ Photoshop Artistry: Fine-Art Grunge Composition course. They later enrolled in the more advanced course Awake: Living the Photo Artistic Life. It was through these two courses that friendships blossomed and grew.

http://shop.scrapbookgraphics.com/search. php?mode=search&page=1

R u i n s f r o m Te d d i

For September Diane has created another special collection of 10 art textures just for Artists Down Under.

Our very good Awake friends Teddi Rutschman of Foxey Squirrel and Diane Stafford from WhiteLaneStudio have once again given gifts as a reward for members of the Artists Down Under group who have been contributing to the ADU Facebook page by regularly posting their artworks and supporting other members with their comments.

Two artists will each receive a Diane collection. This month the top ten contributers from the Artists Down Under public Facebook page were Dean Hohn, Colin Campbell, Maureen Maxwell, Leanne M Williams, Sue Masterson, Ann Wehner, Dale Bradshaw Botha, Louise Campbell, Ann Lavin and Mary Knaggs. Thank you to all contributers.

Teddi, from Virginia, USA is well known for her fantastic sets of digital designer backgrounds, masks and all kinds of wonderful elements ready for designers to add to or build a wondrous creation. This month she has given a gift voucher and the member receiving it can put it towards a package of their

Mary Knaggs – Blossoms

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https://www.etsy.com/shop/whitelanestudio

Three members, Leanne M Williams, Mary Knaggs and Louise Campbell, were randomly selected from this group to receive this month’s gifts.

Mar y K nagg s – Abstract #1

Leanne M Williams – Open Wide!!!


NEWS

(CONT)

Louise Campbell – Endings

Louise Campbell – Time

Leanne M Williams – Floral Let ter

Leanne M Williams – Oblivious

The Artists Down Under members have work showcased every month in their magazine “Artists Down Under – Australia and New Zealand” which is published on the 1st of

each month. The next issue will be published on October 1st. You can view the magazines through Issuu. The Artists Down Under public Facebook page

Mary Knaggs – Masked

also shows the members’ work with links to their personal websites. https://www.facebook.com/groups/ArtistsDownUnder/

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aD rOt W i s tNs U N D E R Australia and New Zealand

E XO T IC S P E CIE S : C ONS E RVAT ION Helen Akerstrom – Animal Photographer

Kito Por traits in the Mist

Helen Akerstrom loves animal photography. Growing up on a farm she always photographed all her pets and the farm animals who were her best friends. Helen has a special affinity with animals of all breeds. Now, 45 years later, she loves capturing wildlife with her lens. Helen volunteers at her local zoo and the exotic species of the world now hold her heart. ADU: Why has the zoo captured a farm girl’s heart? Photographing rare and endangered species has become my new passion. The zoo is my happy place. I go there to escape grief and to heal my heart. My precious daughter Stephanie went to Heaven 2 years ago. So photography and digital art is a blessing, and has distracted me and helped me cope through a world of pain. Interacting with these magnificent animals, learning about them and finding each one has a unique personality brings me great joy and understanding. I now volunteer at the zoo and help educate

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Black Rhino Rub

people on the plight of these animals in the world and how their numbers are being decimated at an alarming rate. Awareness is the key and teaching people about what they can do to help is fulfilling. ADU: How has your photography developed since being at the zoo?

I make more emotional work now, getting the person looking at my image to feel for the animal and to see it has a soul. We have to change our mindset and look after all these animals; from stopping plastic bag pollution to learning about conservation for our native animals as well as exotic ones. I like to show my subjects have a purpose in this world.


E XO T IC S P E CIE S : C ONS E RVAT ION I love digital art and it takes away the fences in my images so the animals look like they are in their natural enviroment. If the photo is natural without a fence in it I will leave it.

(CONT)

The endangered animals all suffer from human conflict. Our increasing population in all countries is encroaching on the land the animals need to survive. Palm oil plantations,

tigers and cheetahs have been driven out of 91% of their historic range – the big cats once roamed nearly all of Africa and much of Asia. People do not understand how dire the situation is for most of these animals. ADU: What else do we need to be educated about? The illegal wildlife trade and poaching remains the major threat to the survival of most species. Much of this trade plays to the the selfishness of man; making a profit or gaining a trophy or maybe even vanity is the prime motivation. Rhinos. Rhino horn is more valuable than gold. It is used in Asian medicine and is a status symbol. The horn is made of keratin, the same as our hair and fingernails so has no medicinal value. Asian tradition demands it.

Watching E x tinction

I am lucky that the zoo has big open expanses so not getting fences in the image is a bonus. These areas also make the animals content and safe, and hence condusive to breeding. I love photographing the babies, and watching them grow and play. My ultimate thrill is getting action photos. ADU: What do you talk about to educate people?

habitat destruction for agriculture to feed the people, housing, all take grazing and hunting land. African Wild Dogs are run over because of roads now built through their habitat. They also are threatened by disease and shot by farmers as they attack livestock. They don’t have the hundreds of miles they used to for hunting. Elephants, rhinos, giraffes, Prezwalksi horses all suffer from loss of grazing land. Lions,

Black rhino was once the most numerous rhino species but due to excessive poaching the population has been reduced by over 90% in just the last 70 years. White rhinos, like black rhinos, are being killed at 3-6 a day or over 1000 a year. Rhinos are easy to poach as they are very predictable. Rhino always toilet in the same spot called a Midden. Olfaction means communication via odours. This can be from urine or dung. A male can discover if a female is ready to mate or a subordinate male can tell if there is a dominant male close by. So the midden acts as a message board. The poachers just wait by these middens to shoot the rhinos as they approach. Greater One-horned Rhino or Asian Rhino only have one horn but are still poached. They are very distinctive with their grey brown hide and skin folds that look like they are armour plated. Rhino are being killed faster than their birth rate so their numbers are decreasing. Elephants are killed for ivory, but also for their hide. Elephant skin is dried and mixed with other ingredients to make topical creams for skin conditions. It can also be used for medicine for stomach ailments or polished into beads as charm bracelets. Long hairs are put into rings and worn for luck. Teeth are ground down into a powder for a face cream.

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E XO T IC S P E CIE S : C ONS E RVAT ION

(CONT)

Pride Cubs

Poaching for body parts is on the rise as there are not enough elephants with tusks. Giraffes are one of the silent extinctions. Only 80,000 or so remain in the wild due to

Cheetahs are very hard to breed, so zoos around the world are establishing insurance populations that are extremely valuable to the global population. Today there are only about 7,000 in the wild, down from 14,000

Majestic

reasons. Trophy hunting has gained popularity as it is still legal. Lions are being bred on farms for canned hunts. The easy slaughter of lions in fenced areas is like shooting fish in a barrel. A fully grown lion is put in an enclosure where it is shot with a gun or crossbow by a rich trophy hunter from the safety of the back of a truck. It is still completely legal. Demand for lion body parts is escalating. While the trade in tiger parts is now illegal, demand for lion parts for traditional Asian medicine is driving profits for lion breeders. The increase in volume is terrifying. Tigers. Relentless demand for illegal tiger parts is why tigers are so endangered. Their pelts are valuable on the black market. Wealthy Asian businessmen buy them to prove their wealth. Tiger bone wine and medicines are also used for promotion within corporations.

Tu l i p C u t e n e s s F r a m e d

habitat destruction, the illegal meat trade and trophy hunting. It is a status symbol to have a giraffe tail hanging on your wall. Prezwalski Horses from Mongolia were hunted to near extinction. It is the only truly wild horse species left in the world. They were hunted for their meat and hide. Zoos around the world started breeding them and have since reintroduced them back into their native land where they are now protected.

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in 1975. Loss of habitat due to land dedicated to agriculture or livestock is driving cheetah close to civilisation. They are killed as they are perceived to kill livestock, which is rarely the case. Cheetahs are also subject to vehicle collisions, poaching for their hide and other body parts. The pet cheetah trade is also high. Lions. In the last 50 years the lion population has decreased by 75%. Loss of their natural habitat and human conflict are the main

Poaching is done by increasingly sophisticated and well armed criminal gangs. Tigers are caught by steel traps on well known tiger trails. Around the world countries that have tigers are losing forests to palm oil etc at 4,000 football fields per minute. Just one tiger needs 25,000 acres to properly survive. About 50% of all tiger cubs do not survive more than 2 years. ADU: All this is very alarming and


E XO T IC S P E CIE S : C ONS E RVAT ION

(CONT)

Cub Chase

upsetting Helen. No wonder you want to help these animals so much.

Yes if we are not more vigilant, these animals will be gone in the next 50 years...

Education and awareness is very much needed.

What a sad world that would be... I want my grandchildren to be able to see these

To p D o g

magnificent creatures in the wild. So talking to the tourists at the zoo and using my images to gain exposure is my small way in helping conservation.

Nuruu

White Rhino Rusk

Cheers

Sak ti Stare

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T H E P I R AT E K E E P S WAT C H

CAMELLIA T WIG by Liz Abbott

New Zealand

shejustsnapped.blog spot.co.nz h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / i u r t 8 l /

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ESCAPE FROM POSEIDON

H A K U N A M ATATA by Michelle Drummond

New Zealand

h t t p : //e n c h a n t e d - r e a l i t y. b l o g s p o t . c o . n z / h t t p s : // w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / W h i m i s c a l . I m a g e r y/

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A R I E L A R I E L I TA by ALBaMass

Australia

ALBaMass@mac.com h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / n s t h n n /

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M A G I C B U T T E R F LY

MIDNIGHT VIGIL by Andrew Haysom

Australia

h t t p s : // w w w. f l i c k r. c o m /a j h a y s o m / h t t p s : /a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / v7 y y b 0 /

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DANCING ON THE EDGE

BESIDE A BABBLING BROOK by Ann Wehner

Australia

h t t p : // w w w. a n n w e h n e r d i g i t a l a r t i s t r y. c o m h t t p s : // w w w. f l i c k r. c o m / p h o t o s /a n n w e h n e r d i g i t a l a r t i s t r y/

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WOLF MAN

QUIE TING THE STORMS FROM WITHIN by Julie Powell

Australia

h t t p : // w w w. j u l i e p o w e l l p h o t o g r a p h y. c o m / h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /g l u l 6 i /

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S I LV E R L I N I N G S

S I LV E R L I N I N G S W H I T E W O O D 3 by Viki Murray

Australia

h t t p s : // w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / V i k i m a g e s h t t p s : // w w w. i n s t a g r a m . c o m / v i k i _ m u r r a y/

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T R I S H HO SK I N

D O W N AT T H E D O C K S 25


GEORGE

LEO b y Tr i s h H o s k i n

Australia

h t t p : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 7 2 6 r z m / h t t p : // t r i s h 6 15 0 . w i x . c o m / t r i s h h p h o t o g r a p h y

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E L LY

GEMIMA GIRAFFE 27


C O L D M O R N I N G AT T H E P O R T

THE OLD AND THE NEW b y Tr i s h H o s k i n

Australia

h t t p : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 7 2 6 r z m / h t t p : // t r i s h 6 15 0 . w i x . c o m / t r i s h h p h o t o g r a p h y

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NEW ST YLE LIVING I was born and have lived all my life in South Australia and have been interested in art for most of my life. My extensive overseas travels have afforded me the opportunity to experience and see some amazing things. It allowed me to not only visit some of the great art galleries of the world and view the masters, but also to develop my love of photography. I have taken courses in Tasmania, England and on-line to hone my skills in Photography and the Arts as well as interacting with other artists to develop my own style. I am privileged to be a Fellow at the Royal South Australian Society of Arts.

Having worked professionally with computers for my living the transition to learning and taking an interest in computerized art has also been of great value. The ability to work with my photos using such tools as Photoshop has also extended my further enjoyment in the arts and most recently iPad and iPhone art and dabbling in abstract styles. I have found without really realizing it over the years that the principles that have been taught with painting lessons have flowed into my ability to allow me to take some wonderful photos. Such things as remembering the rule of thirds and focal points for impact seem to have just been imbedded in my brain without me realizing it.

I love the immediacy and sudden impact that photography allows and a recent course has extended my skills into Photo Artistry. I have been published in several magazines including the Royal South Australian Society of Arts – Photographers Magazine, The Photo Artistic Life Magazine on numerous occasions as well as Stampington – Somerset Digital Studio. Finding PhotoArtistry with Sebastian Michaels and then Awake and Kaizen has been the most amazing journey and inspiration for my work that I could ever have imagined. Trish Hoskin

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EMERGENCE

PA N D O R A’ S B I R D C A G E by Anthea Scotte

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Australia


S WA M P G I R L

TEMPER by Christine Stevenson

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 9 1d 3 b y/

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SURRE ALISTIC VENE TIAN MASK by Barbara Dudzinska

Australia

w w w. S m a r t A r t P l a c e . c o m h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 7q n7s 6 /

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TIMELESS BE AUT Y by Barbara Dudzinska

Australia

w w w. S m a r t A r t P l a c e . c o m h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 7q n7s 6 /

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KICKING UP A STORM

S I N G L E B U T T E R F LY b y I l o n a A b o u -Z o l o f

Australia

h t t p : // w w w. i l o n a a b o u z o l o f. c o m /

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CALM MY SOUL

R E D L A N D S S T R AW B E R R Y F A R M by Maureen Maxwell

Australia

35


aD rOt W i s tNs U N D E R Australia and New Zealand

SPOONS ABSTRACT SERIES Jacqueline Hammer

Fence

Xray

I am a photographer who loves to create, often in a minimalist style. The Spoons Abstract series came about from one single image, called Forest. It was created for a competition with the theme of plastic. I photographed a white spoon on a black background and wondered what more I could do with it. I had seen from others the idea of multiplying objects in photoshop, so thought I would try this out with my spoon. I multiplied it and resized them and arranged them in various ways. Then I thought I would look at some of the blend modes to see what they would do. When I tried out Difference I saw this interesting effect – the overlapping areas became black. I thought the spoons looked like

36

a forest of trees, hence the title, but also saw other things in the image – a group of people, candles etc. I had in fact created an optical illusion. This image was well received, so I wondered if I could use this method to create more optical illusions, and create a series. The next creation was Audience, followed by Wine Glasses and Fence. Some used Difference and others were just multiplied and overlapped. By then I was struggling to create more optical illusions but felt there were still more general images to create on the same theme. A competition came up with the theme of eggs, so Eggs was produced. The others came about purely by fiddling around on the computer with different arrangements. There

Forest

was no actual end to the series, I just got busy with other creative ideas and themes at the time. However some time later I revisited the spoons and formed a new image Tree Rings, which I was very happy with. In this image, the spoons overlapped on top of each rather than side by side, a very simple idea which I never even thought of back at the beginning! There may be more to come for this series, I feel I have explored it well but not exhaustively. https://1x.com/blog/permalink/7618 https://www.greatbigcanvas.com/category/ hammer-jacqueline/


SPOONS ABSTRACT SERIES

(CONT)

Wine Glasses

Time

37


TRACES OF COLOUR

TRACES OF COLOUR 2 by Helen Jones

Australia

b e l l h o u s e15 _ h e l e n j o n e s h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /c u r a t e /

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C O M P O S I T E 13 8 a

C O M P O S I T E 14 7a by Colin Campbell

Australia

colincampbell.mypor t folio.com h t t p s : // w w w. a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 6 b q 9 c j /

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BIRD’S E YE VIE W by Dale Botha

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / x1e l 9 6 /

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SHINE ON by Dale Botha

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / x1e l 9 6 /

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JUST AROUND THE CORNER by Heide Hof fmann

New Zealand

w w w. h a u p a . n e t w w w. f l i c k r. c o m / p h o t o s / h e i d e h o

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ABSTRACT COLOUR AND FORM 1

ABSTRACT COLOUR AND FORM 2 b y A t h a l i e Ta y l o r

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /e k a 9 s g / h t t p : // t i n y u r l . c o m /A t h a l i e -Ta y l o r- D i g i t a l - A r t i s t

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H E AV E N C U B

RAINBOW KISSES by Helen Akerstrom

Australia

h t t p s : // w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / h e l e n . a k e r s t r o m h t t p s : // w w w. i n s t a g r a m . c o m / h a 2 2 6 0 /

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T O N Y S T EP HEN SON

T H E B A S S P L AY E R 3 45


GRASS IN THE WIND

GIRL IN FOREST b y To n y S t e p h e n s o n

Australia

h t t p : // t o n y s t e p h e n s o n . p h o t o s h e l t e r. c o m / h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / v1t z l g /

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T R E E O N H I L L – PA I N T E D

TREE ON HILL 47


LOST SUMMER

SPIRIT OF CHANGE b y To n y S t e p h e n s o n

Australia

h t t p : // t o n y s t e p h e n s o n . p h o t o s h e l t e r. c o m / h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / v1t z l g /

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F LY I N G Digital Artistry enables me to combine a passion for photography which started when I was a teenager growing up in Africa, with all the wonders of the natural world and the people who inhabit it. I love the way I can add (or remove) texture, light, colour, saturation and blur to render an image far closer to my version of reality than a photograph. I believe art is part of a process of finding and expressing something that’s deep inside you. When I work, I find myself questioning “Why

am I wanting to paint this?”; “What does this painting reveal to me (and/or others) about my self?”; “How could I express this more effectively?”, “How would I like my viewers to respond to this painting?”. I think these questions help me go deeper and further with my art. Born in Africa, I follow the footsteps of my mother, whose iconic oil paintings of the Rhodesian bush grace walls all over the world, and my sister, who captures African

animals and scenes in glorious watercolour. I was privileged to grow up at a time when kids could just be kids. I fished, roamed the granite hills near our country town, swam in wild rivers and lakes, and indulged my curious nature and zest for adventure. I believe this reflects in my art. I continue to build an extensive portfolio of wildlife, landscape and portrait art works based on my rich life experiences.

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NEW BEGINNINGS

WAT C H I N G O V E R Y O U by Julia Harwood

Australia

h t t p : // w w w. j u l i a h a r w o o d . c o m h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /s 6 w7a f /

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CORRODING BE AUT Y

D A N C E L I K E T H E R E ’ S N O O N E WAT C H I N G by Jim Dawson

Australia

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FERNS

THE DILEMMA by Phillipa Frederiksen

Australia

p h i l l f o t o . s m u g m u g . c o m h p : // w w w. j u l i a h a r w o o d . c o m h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 3 3 o 0 h k /

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FROG NIGHTMARE

EQUALIT Y by Margaret Kalms

Australia

endowomanart.com facebook.com/lifewithendometriosis

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FROGLE T

FREE WHEELING by Mary Knaggs

Australia

h t t p s : // t i n y u r l . c o m / M a r y K- P h o t o g r a p h i c - A r t h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /o c 0 9 1r/

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TA C C A C H A N T R I E R I

A M I C U S C E R T U S I N R E I N C E R TA C E R N I T U R by Ingrid Douglas Australia h t t p : // w w w. p e r f e c t o a r t s . c o m . a u

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aD rOt W i s tNs U N D E R Australia and New Zealand

THE AR T OF IMAGINATION Michelle Drummond For as long as I can recall, art has been part of my life in some form or another. My father is incredibly gifted, with his hands being able to craft anything he puts his mind to; he is able draw 3 dimensionally, likes to paint watercolours and has even trained as a glassblower. I took art as a subject throughout my secondary school years, and later I learned folk-art painting whilst pregnant with my first child (Mackenzie) and then progressed to teaching it. I have a love of photography, particularly the digital generation. I enjoy painting using acrylic on canvas, drawing with watercolour pencils and hybrid scrapbooking.

ceiving one baby if we used two blastocytes (stage before forming an embryo), with 0% chance of conceiving twins. Well both blastocytes hatched and I was pregnant with what we discovered were two little precious boys (and oh man – was that a life changer!). I carried on with Dogstriders until I just could not manage the daily mileage any more, as by 24 weeks my belly was huge and I was the size of a full-term mother. Essentially, that left me with nothing to occupy my brain and this is where the catalyst of my digital art journey began. I came across digital scrapbooking which

Jonty

I had a very active job, walking up to 150 kilometres each week working in my business of 3 years called “Dogstriders”, where I walked and trained dogs and puppies, as well as running a Doggy Day Care. Dogstriders was the first of its kind in Palmerston North. I designed and developed my own website with the accompanying marketing material. My husband, Phillip, and I were married in May 2008 and we commenced IV treatment shortly thereafter. The specialist advised us that we had a 30% chance of con-

56

Pride Rock

ing them. I would purchase digital scrapbooking kits and create “pages” using the photos that I had taken of them and upload the pages to digital galleries. In 2011, I was approached by a Digital Scrapbook Designer to become part of her Creative Team. I had no idea what this involved, but I excitedly accepted and began learning all I could. Before long, I was part of 30 Creative Teams and loving every minute of it. Working for these Designers gave me exposure to the many different digital scrapbooking styles, but it wasn’t long before my passion developed for creating

Macauley

The Mad Hatter

had an immediate effect on me. I loved the possibility of creating unique visual art of my babies which could be printed into book form, so over the following months I taught myself how to use Photoshop Elements as my belly grew bigger and bigger (in fact, it was huge!).

composite pieces which contained extracted images of my boys that had a magical, surreal and fantasy feel. I felt that I needed more creative scope than the scrapbooking kits were allowing me, as they often did not contain elements that I wanted to use.

At 36 weeks, our baby boys were born. Jonty was a tiny 3lb 15oz and Macauley was 6lb 1oz. I was totally in love with both boys. They were unbelievably beautiful and I adored photograph-

As the boys grew older, I would put them into costumes and photograph them, always trying to achieve a point of difference. Neither boy was overly enthusiastic about posing for the camera,


THE AR T OF IMAGINATION and I would often have to bribe them with a significant reward when they were finished! I frequently draw ideas from movies (I admire Johnny Depp), children’s books or an image that has mystical qualities to it. When Jonty and Macauley started school (both boys attend St James School), the school organised a “Wacky Wardrobe Walkathon” to help raise money to pay the final instalment of the outdoor track around the field. The school was awarding prizes for the best costume. This was a challenge that I totally sunk my teeth into and I began creating their costumes. Macauley was crafted into “The Mad Hatter” and wee Jonty was transformed into the “Cat in the Hat”. I made all the accessories for each outfit and did both of their makeup on the day. They looked sensational, they loved the transformation and I was in photographic heaven. They were both placed equal 1st in the prizegiving. I used many of the images I took that day in my artwork for the next year.

(CONT)

had Jack’s quirky mannerism down pat. As we walked into school that morning, he sauntered up the pathway and said to his Principal – “This is the day you will always remember as the day you almost caught Jack Sparrow” (Jack Sparrow quote). I was so proud of him that I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry. At the completion of the Walkathon, Macauley won a prize for “The Most Creative Hair”. As he walked up to collect his prize, he said – “Not all treasure is silver and gold mate” (another Jack Sparrow quote). I have been working for my husband as his PA since early 2014, so between the twins and running the house, my life is really busy. It is only in the evenings, when the boys have gone to bed that I am able to sit down at my computer and allow my mind to drift off into my world of imagination. The more I soak up, the greater the thirst for perfection and boundless the rewards. My husband has supported my digital passion by helping me upgrade my computer, monitor and changing the software from Elements to Pho-

Macauley Jack Sparrow

The following year, the school organised another event – “Wacky Hair Day”. Given my admiration for Johnny Depp movie characters, I sold the idea to Macauley that he should “become” Jack Sparrow. I spent 3 months designing this outfit including the wig. I learnt how to make Jack’s facial hair (moustache and goatee) and, on the day, Macauley looked spectacular. He looked like a mini Jack Sparrow. Macauley and I had spent the previous 3 months watching all of the Pirates of the Caribbean movies and he

I wish there were more hours in a day. Sometimes the ideas for a new piece is instantaneous and everything clicks into place, and other times the ideas are slow to kindle and just seem to gradually evolve until I am satisfied. The time to finish a piece can take anywhere between 8 to 20 hours, but to me the time is irrelevant. It is essential that each piece features an extracted image of either Jonty or Macauley as this is my way of preserving our family memories. My objective is to produce artwork that has a blend of a mother’s love and devotion that speaks from my soul, showing the love that I have for my children. The artworks must be unique, blur the lines between magic and reality, be whimsically detailed and imaginative, have great lighting and complementary colour, be full of emotion and tell the viewer a story. I believe my artwork reflects all of those elements which I hope is inspirational to others.

Macauley Revenge of the Kracken

toshop CC, which are all essential tools for any digital artist. As for the boys, bribing them with rewards is no longer an issue; all I have so say is “I have an image of a tiger – who wants to read it a story” and Jonty, the lover of all animals, always says “meeeeee”. As for Macauley, well he is always making suggestions for the next piece in the Jack Sparrow series. Although in saying that, he has recently asked me to design him either a Barnabas Collins or Edward Scissors Hands costume for the next school event, hence

I also believe that any form of art is a journey that is continually evolving as you never stop learning new skills and techniques. I truly believe that you are only limited by your own imagination and the next creation may well be the “masterpiece”. As Einstein said, “Logic will take you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” http://enchanted-reality.blogspot.co.nz/

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MALCOLM DID NOT RECOGNISE HIMSELF

H E R E ’ S L O O K I N G AT Y O U K I D by Bill Oldham

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /d 6 a u 4 o /

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CIT Y

FLOWER GIRL by Carolyn Jenson

New Zealand

w w w. c j e n s o n i m a g e s . c o m

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A L L T H E I N S P I R AT I O N

BEEING PRESENT by Judi L apsley Miller

New Zealand

h t t p : // w w w. a r t b y j l m . c o m / h t t p s : a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 9 3 x42 w /

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NEW BEGINNINGS by Sonja Stef fen

Australia

w w w. i n s t a g r a m . c o m /s o n z a r t a n d p h o t o g r a p h y w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m /s o n z a r t a n d p h o t o g r a p h y

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MUM RESTING AF TER TRYING TO TE ACH HER YOUNG TO HUNT

WILDS OF AFRICA by Lyn Darling ton

Australia

w w w. s a b v a n i n g p h o t o a r t . c o m

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PELICAN DREAMS

THE WITHERING OF AGE by Chris Barnes

Australia

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M Y L O V E LY C R E AT I O N

M Y PA R A D I S E by Edwin Leung

New Zealand

h t t p s : // 5 0 0 p x . c o m /e l k y n z h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /o l a 8 i 6 /

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S U E M A S T ER SON

LE AP OF FAI T H 65


A N N A’ S D R E A M B A S K E T

FINAL STEPS by Sue Masterson

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /g 6 g t11/

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H E R R O YA L H I G H N E S S

JESS IN EUROPE 67


MIMI SIREN

ISABELL A MERMAID by Sue Masterson

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /g 6 g t11/

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MIMI RISES My name is Sue Masterson. Throughout my life art has played various rolls each one evolving from the other, starting with ceramics then learning to paint so I could paint on the ceramics, then not want-

ing to paint someone else’s picture, taking up photography. Then chance had me find a course that would allow me to combine my photos and my love of art in a new and exciting way. Learning to become a digital artist is by far the best journey I have encountered.

Most recently with my art I have been involved with a group of young local models, helping them start their journey into the unknown gives me a huge amount of pleasure. I hope you enjoy this sneak peek into their world and mine.

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MY SON by Christina Brunton

Australia

w w w. c h r i s t i n a b r u n t o n . c o m

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D AV E T H E M A G I C I A N by Mike Stone

Australia

71


MICHAEL

LIL LOT TIE by Jack McKenzie

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New Zealand


AMELIA

EBONY by George Koncz

Australia

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D AW N M E A D O W

MAHENO WRECK by Gerard Whelan

Australia

h t t p : //g e r r y s p i c t u r e s . c o m . a u / h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /a b f4 8 i /

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GREEN SUNRISE

JUST THREE OF US b y D i e p Tr a n

Australia

h t t p s : // w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / t r a n p h o t o g r a p h y/ h t t p s : // w w w. i n s t a g r a m . c o m / t r a n d i e p12 3 4 /

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aD rOt W i s tNs U N D E R Australia and New Zealand

MARK MAKING Nigel Lazenby – Class of 1964 The technology that Nigel uses maintains the integrity of the digital mark, no matter what the scale of the printed or projected artwork. He has been working with the iPad Pro for three years, changing the direction of his art making, to encompass architectural works for homes and businesses. When he first began studying at art school, then art teaching and in his own art practice, this was an unimagined way to work.

Coralyn

Drawing is imporant to artist Nigel Lazenby and he took two years out to focus on it early in his career in 1978, spending 40 to 60 hours on each artwork, inspired by the landscape of the North West Coast of Tasmania. The works are intricate pieces forming his future and current work practice. Nigel’s son Cain is a graphic designer and his daughter

is ‘IT crazy’ and has designed an App to assist her as a University Lecturer. The iPad she gave Nigel sat unused until Kane uploaded a drawing programme for him to use. The first series of work that came from that intoxination with digital drawing was on the theme of the 1960’s go-go dancers, exhibited at the Mill Provedore in Launceston, Tasmania.

When each work is completed, transfers go to the printmaker and are then produced onto acrylic, aluminium or any other medium. Nigel has been able to negotiate and create a pleasing outcome for everyone without too much compromise. “My first commission using this technology was for the foyer of Charles Clinic Heart Care and the subject was totally foreign to me”. He learned a lot about the heart, the technology of the vector files used in the programme to create the artwork, and through the process of negotiation realised the potential for exciting ways for this artwork to occupy corporate spaces. Within this architecture the work sits well on the walls and flows through and along the front of the reception desk, almost like an installation. The seeds for the strong design elements of this work were sown when Nigel was a young boy. He began his school life as a young boarder at the age of four in England after his father died at a young age. Later his mother moved them to Tasmania where he continued boarding at Launceston Grammar. “My mother worked as a painter for local interior designer Rex Edwards. Boarding was what I knew. I was an only child, I’d be home by myself... what do you do... our neighbour Mrs Cox loaned me a book about architecture, with translucent tissue between the leaves and I copied all the drawings, like thatched roof cottages and oak trees. Even as a child

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MARK MAKING

(CONT)

Nigel Lazenby – Class of 1964 I was taken to lots of exhibitions and gallery owner Mary Jolliffe helped me put a portfolio together when I applied to The Examiner Newspaper to be a commercial artist a year after leaving school”. The Examiner recommended art education and Nigel attended Technical and Further Education (TAFE) with teachers and Old Boys Alan McIntyre (Class of 1930) and Geoff Tyson (Class of 1928) who “... were the sort of people I needed”. After TAFE and encouragement from John Heywood he continued study-

ing with a scholarship at the Art School in Hobart, leading to a career as a High School art teacher. In 1982 with three children under the age of 11 years Nigel made the big decision to work as a full-time artist. To reach that point he had taken a gap year after School, worked as an art teacher with great peers and artists like Kit Hiller, Peter Barraclough and the late Alan Turner, and travelled overseas to Europe. Travel is a “great education, making comparisons, going to the Continent and experiencing cultures and languages”, but he wouldn’t want to live anywhere else but

Tasmania where he belongs in a supportive, stimulating and creative community. Nigel worked with furniture and wood worker Toby Muir-Wilson (Class of 1971), wood turner and furniture maker Mark Bishop (Class of 1982), and potter Ian Clare in the mid 1990s. The artists formed a group called The Tasmanian Touch and exhibited nationally together for five years. These connections are strong and they will exhibit again this year at Cradle Mountain.

Nudi Bonsai 7

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THIS IS LOVE by Merran G ร‚รป

New Zealand

h t t p : // b i t . l y/ M e r r a n G h t t p : // b i t . l y/ M G H a l l e l u j a h

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DESIRE

THE CONJURING by Pamela Henderson

Australia

h t t p s : // p a m h1. m y p o r t f o l i o . c o m / h t t p s : // w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / p g / S n a p N s h o o t- D e s i g n -10 0 2412 7 8 9 8 16 6 9 5

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ERUP TION by K aren Waalw yk

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / l1s a h n / h t t p s : // w w w. f l i c k r. c o m / p h o t o s / 8 8 16 5 7 6 6 @ N 0 5 /

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GODDESS OF NEW LIFE by Margie O’Hara

Australia

h t t p s : // w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / m a g g i e o d i g i t a l a r t h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / i h 3 g a r/

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LE T THE LIGHT SHINE by Ann Lavin

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /d 6 a u 4 o /

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D R A G O N F LY by Ann Lavin

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t /d 6 a u 4 o /

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S AV I N G T H E B R O K E N H E A R T by Hazel Blake

Australia

w w w. h a z e l b l a k e . c o m . a u w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / h a z e l b l a k e p h o t o g r a p h y/

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LO U I S E C A M P BE L L

ELECTRIF YING 85


MERMAID

KINDRED SPIRITS by Louise Campbell

Australia

w w w. d i g i t d e s i g n . c o m . a u w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / D i g i t D e s i g n S t u d i o

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F LY AWAY

THE BEST DRE AMS 87


BRE AK THROUGH

MAGIC FOREST by Louise Campbell

Australia

w w w. d i g i t d e s i g n . c o m . a u w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / D i g i t D e s i g n S t u d i o

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MARINA I live in regional Australia with my husband and animals on a small property in a beautiful valley surrounded by mountains and farmland. I find peace and happiness in this part of the world, the perfect place to focus on being creative. I have spent most of my working life as a Graphic Designer but recently I have been looking for other ways to express my creative self. I like all kinds of artistic work but I haven’t really been able to fully tap into the creativity that I know is buried deep within.

Fourteen months ago I saw an ad for an online course in Digital Photo Art. It looked liked something I’d be interested in so I took the plunge and subscribed – I am so grateful that I did! It has opened up a whole new world for me. I have developed a passion for this art form which brings me so much pleasure as well as the freedom to create whatever I want without restriction. Finally I am able to express myself artistically, I’m only at the beginning but as I continue to learn and grow I know that I am meant to be travelling down this path.

I hope that the joy I get from creating these images translates into the finished piece for others to enjoy. That would be awesome, but ultimately the pleasure that I get personally from creating this art is what I am truly grateful for. “Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love. It will not lead you astray.” – Rumi Louise Campbell

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W I N T E R L E AV E S by Jill Capper

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New Zealand


PA I N T E D F U N G I

SHADES OF AUTUMN by Thysje Arthur

New Zealand

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / w p q a 4 m / h t t p : // w w w. t g a g r a p h i c s . c o . n z /

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SHE HAD A DRE AM 1 by Joyce Maris

Australia

w w w. j m a r i s a r t . c o m . a u h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 5 y 5 m 3 p /

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SHE HAD A DRE AM 2 by Joyce Maris

Australia

w w w. j m a r i s a r t . c o m . a u h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 5 y 5 m 3 p /

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BE T TER ALONE SOME TIMES by Ona Boorman

Australia

h t t p s : //a u . p i n t e r e s t . c o m /o n a b o o / m y - s c r a p b o o k - p a g e s /

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PLANT TREES by Johanna Goudsblom

New Zealand

a s s e t i m a g e r y. z e n f o l i o . c o m h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 13 e n w 6 /

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aD rOt W i s tNs U N D E R Australia and New Zealand

MELBOURNE STREET ART Andrew Haysom inner suburbs are rich sources of stunning artwork. The transient nature of the medium is a double-edged sword. The constant change is always presenting new things to enjoy, but at the same time some of the art lasts for only a short time before it is painted over or defaced. This is the reason why I am passionate about recording, via my photos, as much of the art that I love as I can. Finding and photographing the work, especially that of my favourite artists before it disappears is an obsession.

Fitzroy, Melbourne

My “Melbourne Street Art” album on Flickr contains over 3,250 images and I’m currently working on my twelfth 240-page photo book recording my minor obsession with the street art of Melbourne.

Melbourne is world famous for street art and there are many wonderful alleyways and laneways around the central business district that are literally full of street art and graffiti. A multitude of city laneways and many of the

I was very honoured recently to have two of my photographs used in a new Lonely Planet book called “Street Art”. The Lonely Planet book shows 42 cities around the world and gives a guide to where to go to see some of the best in each city, and also contains a

Kaffeine

Melbourne’s history of graffiti and street art dates back to the 60s and 70s but my love affair with my city’s street art started in February 2012 when the instructor who was leading the CAE photography course I was doing took us into Hosier Lane. So, I’ve been “into” street art for pretty much the same time

as I have photography.

Deb Uniacke Court, Melbourne

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MELBOURNE STREET ART

(CONT)

number of artist interviews. It is a lovely little book, you can see more information about it through the link at the end of the article. The talent, imagination and hard work of the fantastic artists who create all this wonderful art seems boundless, and the range of artworks to be found infinite. The subject material is so varied, as is the medium from freehand aerosol spray can, to stencil, to paste-up as well as 3D installations. Works can vary from murals that cover an entire multi-storey building to small pieces only inches high. The artists that I have met are all such beautiful people, and have such strong social consciences and their work so often supports very needy causes. I have also been lucky to make a small group of very good friends who share my passion, and sharing information about the new pieces that are out and about can be very important in finding them before they are too often defaced or painted over.

Baby Guerrilla

Victoria University, Footscray, Melbourne

Finding the new work is sometimes easy, sometimes difficult. Following the artists, and others with similar interests on social media helps, but often there is secrecy about locations and many hours can be spent examining photos, and using Google Maps Streetview, or simply wandering the streets to try and locate a new work, but the thrill of the hunt is half of the fun. I can often be found early in the mornings on weekends wandering the laneways, or inner suburbs searching for art, and these are some of my favourite times. The thrill of finding something new is immense. The narrow laneways and dim lighting conditions can also add to the technical photographic challenge.

Mimby Jones Robinson

Fitzroy, Melbourne

I encourage you all to spend some time wandering Melbourne’s streets looking for the wonderful street art, you never know what you’ll find. If you need a guide – just let me know. Andrew’s Melbourne Street Art Flickr album: http://bit.ly/AJHaysom-MelbourneStreetArt Lonely Planet “Street Art” book details: http://shop.lonelyplanet.com/world/streetart-1/

Heesco

Docklands, Melbourne

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EFFERVESCENCE

F LY I N G K I T E S by Dean Hohn

Australia

https://tinyurl.com/ybuoo5fz https://artboja.com/art/yw8ic8/

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ABSTRACT – THE WINTER GARDEN, NEW YORK

ABSTRACT – OSLO OPERA HOUSE Colin K illick

Australia

w w w. d r i f t i n g l e a v e s . n e t

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DANCING ON THE EDGE OF LIFE

U N D E R AT TA C K by Lynn Jenk in

Australia

h t t p : // w w w. j e n k i n p h o t o g r a p h y. c o m . a u /

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MOERAKI BOULDERS

V I N TA G E by Corrine Davis

New Zealand

w w w. m a d e i n g l e n o r c h y. c o . n z h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / f j o n s r/

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L ABOUR OF LOVE

S P I R I T O F E C S TA S Y by Mick Rooney

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Australia


HOME 1

HOME 2 by Sharon Rankmore

Australia

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aD rOt W i s tNs U N D E R Australia and New Zealand

OPENING ONLINE GALLERY AND WEBSHOP Norbert Grill – Digital Artist – Germany Our very good friend Norbert Grill from Germany is opening his online gallery and webshop. He has very generously extended an invitation to AWAKE members both here Down Under and across the world to show work in his gallery and shop. For the opening he is showcasing the artwork of our very own ALBaMass from Perth, Australia as his first featured artist. Thank you Norbert and Congratulations AL. Norbert Grill I am very proud to be able to make a small contribution to the magazine Artists Down Under in announcing the opening of my online gallery and web shop, set for August 25, 2017.

and from there you are directed to my web shop: www.normonie.de

in the English-speaking world. I hope to change that.

What is so special about my web shop?

For the past couple years, I have been a member of the digital artistry group AWAKE (orchestrated by Sebastian Michaels, who features the AWAKE artists and showcases their magazine each month at http://QuillAndCamera.com), and I owe Sebastian a great deal. I am also grateful to all the other members of AWAKE, from whom I have learned so much, and who still inspire my work every day.

First, the web shop was designed with all the passion of an active digital artist. What's more, the software specialists at www. code108.de who programmed the pages are not only skilled IT specialists but also artists themselves. You can see and feel this in the way the site is designed. Even more exciting, you'll find that I offer artists from all over the world a platform to offer their artwork on the German market. This will be beneficial to many, particularly those who have no or little chance in selling their work in their own country.

https://www.facebook.com/norbert.grill.normonie/

Finally, my hope is to create a lively community for digital art in Germany. Speaking from experience, digital art is not yet as established in Germany as it is, for example,

The above three artworks are from Norbert’s extensive portfolio of work. You can see more of his art through his facebook page, link in the text above, and read about his approach

to his art through Sebastian Michaels’ interview with him on his blog Quill and Camera http://www.quillandcamera.com/interviewwith-norbert-grill/

You can visit my fan page on Facebook here:

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The first artist I will feature in my web shop will be AlBaMass (based in Australia). She is a highly popular member of AWAKE, and I'm confident you will enjoy her work very much. Greetings to all readers of the magazine Artists Down Under – Australia and New Zealand I hope you take pleasure in my new gallery, and I hope to see your work there someday! Norbert Grill (alias Normonie)

Artworks from L to R: “Beat” “The Second Face” “Spicks and Specks”


OPENING ONLINE GALLERY AND WEBSHOP

(CONT)

ALBaMass – Digital Artist – Australia

I Miss You

Teleporter Challenge 1

A selection of ALBaMass artworks are available for viewing and purchase from: www.normonie.de and https://artboja.com/ art/nsthnn/

Black Stump iCar

Puppet Teen

Urban Planner

ALBaMass, the first of Norbert’s featured artists, lives in Perth, Western Australia. AL is a highly motivated freelance photographer and digital artist who creates wonderfully

unique and inspiring artworks. You can view more of her work on: https://artboja.com/art/nsthnn/

Lady Drips from a Drop a Lot

By the time this magazine is published you will see her work in Norbert’s online gallery and shop at: www.normonie.de

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WA D I N G

MAN ON EDGE b y Ky e T h o m p s o n

106

Australia


COMING THROUGH by Bronwyn Kenmir

Australia

h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / b p r 5 p e / w w w. s m i l e t i m e . p h o t o g r a p h y

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PERTH SK YLINE by Sue Maples

108

Australia


A S WA N F E E L I N G I S O L AT E D by Sue Maples

Australia

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CIT Y BLUR

CIT Y BLUR 2 by Jill Clif fe

New Zealand

w w w. b l e n d e d f o c u s . c o m h t t p s : //a r t b o j a . c o m /a r t / 5 6 1d v j /

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CELESTIAL BEAUT Y

EAGLE GUARDIAN by Leanne M Williams

Australia

h t t p s : // w w w. i n s t a g r a m . c o m / l e a n n e m w i l l i a m s 3 3 3 h t t p s : // w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / l e a n n e m w i l l i a m s i m a g e s / ? p n r e f = l h c

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http://tinyurl.com/artisitsdownunderpublic

Artists Down Under issue 6 september  

Digital artwork from the members of Artists Down Under - Australia and New Zealand group.

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