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Alaa Tarabzouni Pratt Institute GAUD F/W.12 - S/S.13 M.Arch Portfolio


TABLE OF CONTENTS COMPUTER MEDIA

POLYGONALLY WEIGHTED

LINE VARIANCE + POLYGONS

STUDIO PROJECTS

DUMBO BATH-HOUSE

PROGRAMMATIC RESOLUTION + FORM MAKING

22

ONE PECK SLIP

2

SCHOOL DESIGN WITHIN TIGHT URBAN FABRIC

28


FIELDS OF ATTRACTION

UNIT MULTIPLICATION SOPHISTICATION

INVIGORATED INFRASTRUCTURES

PARAMETRIC MANIPULATION

SECTIONAL ANALYSIS + MORPHO- GRASSHOPPER DEFINITION MALOGICAL STUDIES NIPULATION

6

DIGITAL FABRICATION SECOND

12

SKIN

PROTOTYPE + FABRICATION

48

LED E-17

18

PROTOTYPE + FABRICATION (COMPETITION ENTRY)

56


Polygonally Weighted ARCH.611 Fall 2012 Multimedia Part 3 Critic: Christopher Kroner


Similar to the light bulb, a technical drawing is delicate and intricate, both in terms of its composition as a whole and the qualities of its separate elements. Sculpting the form out of primitive polygon shapes has revealed these intricacies. This project was part of a three week intensive computer media workshop, that focused on the understanding of line type and weight. This was achieved by modelling the incandescent bulb in Maya, transferring the model to Rhino and finally taken into Adobe Illustrator to vary the line weight and type to create a clear and legible drawing. As a personal agenda I took the drawing further by using it in pattern making, which became a theme in my computer media studies.

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Further exploration of ‘drawing’, pattern and pattern making emerge as a theme in computer media projects.


ALAA TARABZOUNI 2311534

a

Computer Media I: Multimedia 12/FA-ARCH-611-05

Bulb Bulb

Filament Filament

b

b

Glass Mount Glass Mount

Screw Contact ScrewThread Thread Contact

c

c

Electrical Contact Electrical FootFoot Contact

a Similar to and the light bulb, drawing is and delicate both in terms of its composition Section cuts sectional analysis of thealight bulb drawing, clear use ofand variousintricate, line weight and type. as a whole and the qualitiesof its separate elements. While the task of building a 3d-model can be considered solely for the purpose of learning the software, the notion that the choice of the object (a light bulb) was not arbitrary. To further the analogy, a drawing just like a light bulb has an everyday presence, and because of that it is sometimes overlooked. both are truly fascinating objects.

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Fields of Attraction ARCH.611 Fall 2012 Multimedia Part 3 Critic: Ben Martinson


The meticulous nature of creating the unit for this exercise extends to every aspect of the steps necessary to its completion. It is a process that involves the parts and the whole; treating them all with equal attention in order to accomplish the task. AustrianAmerican sculptor Erwin Hauer was an early advocate of Modular Constructivism and the exploration of infinite surfaces. The project started with the analysis of Hauer’s works, eventually leading up to the creation of my unique unit and that was multiplied to create an aggregated screen. The final product was featured in a short animation to see the video please visit: https://vimeo.com/55680289

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top (from left): The original unit (base) and the manipulation (target). bottom: The morphosis of the unit from base to target.

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Multiple views of the 3D printed screen section.

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Invigorated Infrastructures ARCH.612 Spring 2013 Advanced Multimedia Critic: Christopher Kroner


In essence this project was an exploration of infrastructure units and kinetic design. To keep with the theme that I have adopted as my focus for my media studies, I implemented the idea of pattern making in the final animation of my kinetic bridge. As opposed to modelling an existing bridge I developed my own cross section which was a hybrid of the Santiago Calatrava Kuwait Pavilion and the pedestrian bridge in La Roche-surYon by Bernard Tschumi. The culmination of modelling, animating, rendering and post production editing resulted in the final animation that is available for viewing at: https://vimeo.com/61815912

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Layered renderings of the bridge at different stages, give the still image the sense of motion that is portrayed in the animation.


top: Aerial views of the bridge while in line and as they shift. bottom: Elevation view of the separate units as they shift and open up.

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Morphological perspective view of the bridge, depicting the movement in the animation.


top: Morphological elevation view. bottom: Perspective still from animation.

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Parametric Manipulation ARCH.612 Spring 2013 Advanced Multimedia Critic: Robert Cervellione


While parametric studies and design are the ideology and generator of the forms in this project, representation techniques are the core of the project. Precision variations of base unit showing morphological breadth, developed parametric transformation, complete parametric assembly model. Diagrammatic description for the morphology of the unit with focus on layout and presentation. The drawings were created by firstly choosing an object to model and manipulate. Deploying the unit through the Grasshopper manipulation. Then extruding multiple drawings from Rhino and overlaying them in Photoshop to create a composite drawing. Finally editing the drawing to create a coherent series of drawings that are legible.

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Representation of side of the unit comprised of a composite image that was edited in Adobe Photoshop.


top (from left): Top view of Grasshopper deployed unit. The two units used in the definition. bottom: Unrolled Grasshopper deployment.

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DUMBO Bath-house ARCH.601 Fall 2012 Studio Critic: Karel Klein


The Dumbo bath-house project was comprised of two parts, the object/container exercise that illustrated the relationship between interior and exterior. Both were challenging in a programmatic sense as well as in form making. The site of the project is a urban, triangular, paved park situated in DUMBO. Functionality and logic were the drivers behind the design; it had to feel intuitive yet theatrical. Due to the proximity of the site to the Manhattan Bridge, and the noise of the subway lines it carries, as well as the overwhelming claustrophobic sense of the site because of its size and being surrounded by high buildings, an underground/ landscape scheme was adopted.

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Axonometric exploded view of over all scheme.


top (from left): Ground floor and subterranean level plans. bottom: Illustration of object/container exercise that served as inspiration.

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Longitudinal section through the bath house.


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One Peck-Slip

ARCH.602 Spring 2013 Studio Critic: Theoharis David


The studio project commenced with a hypothetical project, that explored form and decision making without the need to resolve programmatic issues. Making the transition from the experimental 2D collage and drawings to physical realizations more swift. This quick turn over resulted in a deep understanding of the actual site restraints from this hypothetical exercise. The school’s site is situated at 1 Peck Slip on the Hudson river, from the experimentation a sense of a modulation of light, materiality and transparency to create an environment that is both tactile and visually appealing to the diverse user groups of the schools. Creating unique experiences as one navigates through the site.

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top (clockwise from left): Collage, sketches and massing model (developmental series of experimentation).


top (clockwise from left): Collage, sketches and massing model (developmental series of experimentation).

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Section at 40 feet.

Section at 30 feet.

top: Section at 20 feet into the site. bottom: Section at 50 feet into the site; both illustrate the diverse building conditions in a limited site.


Multiple views of initial massing and materiality model.

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Site plan of One Peck Slip.


from left: Sketches of journey to the site by different means of transport: by car, subway and ferry.

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Aerial view of final study massing and materiality model.


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Multiple close up views of massing model.


Interior image of basement in the final school model depicting a theatrical moment in light and materiality.

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top: First floor plan. bottom: Lower level floor plan.


top: Second floor plan. bottom: Third floor plan.

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left (clockwise): Wall section through building. Cross section. Prince street elevation.


top: Longitudinal section. bottom: Peck Slip elevation.

42


Perspective view of relationship of building to cross street through site.


Multiple views of building model within site.

44


View of model of One Peck slip illustrating massing relationship to site.


46


Second Skin

ARCH.712 Spring 2013 Digital Fabrication Critic: Jeffrey Taras


The final piece if the result of the study and modeling of sting-ray skin. The entire semester was dedicated to acquiring the skills to extract the computer generated designs and fabricate them. After a rigorous process of modeling through Rhino with the aid of RhimnoCAM and creating prototypes using various materials such as clay, plaster and resin, finally the finished piece was realized. The 2’x4’x4� underwent the shaping, parallel finishing and finally the application of the pattern using the CNC router. After the CNCing of the piece, the Baltic Birch wood was painted, sanded, stained, re-sanded, gilded and antiqued to achieve the final finish. Although the result deviates from sting-ray skin, it remains highly inspired by it.

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top: Front illustration of board. bottom: Side illustration of board.


top: perspective illustration of board. bottom: side illustration of board.

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Close up of board after being milled.


top (from left): Progressive illustrations from RhinoCAM’s shop documentation of the milling actions. bottom: Image of completed board.

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Close up of finished board, to illustrate the finishing process of painting, staining, gilding and antiquing.


Various close ups of the board depicting the diverse nature of the pattern.

54


LED E-17

Philips Competition Summer 2013 Competition Entry Critic: Phillips Competition


The Philips 3D LED competition was to design a light bulb fitting for the LED E-17 base that could be 3D printed. The requirement was to have a light bulb that could be enjoyed both on and off. The concept behind assemblage was to create a light source that seemed like it was literally emitting. Meaning that the light was a tangible-physical object. I also wanted to experiment with the limitations and accuracy of 3D printing. By creating an object that was both intricate and fragile. Also the light bulb fitting created can be hung from the ceiling or placed on a surface. The delicate form of the fitting is interesting especially that in reality it is created from a rigid material.

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Side view of the light bulb.


top (from left clockwise): View from bottom of light. View from top of light. bottom: View of cluster of the light.

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F/W.12 - S/S.13 First Year Pratt GAUD M.Arch Portfolio