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ISSUE 2/ 2012

THE QUARTERLY MAGAZINE OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PICTURE PROFESSIONALS

PROFESSIONAL

SUMMER


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FEED ME, FRIEND ME

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ANNE DAY

© Cindy Sherman

PHOTO EXHIBITIONS NEAR YOU

MATT ARMENDARIZ

© Chris Bellezza

PINTEREST PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

© Ben High

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BY MICHAEL MASTERSON

EDITOR’S LETTER

THE NEW TECH SECTION

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PIN THIS INSPIRATION BOARD

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CLICK

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HARRINGTON COLLEGE OF DESIGN

© Julia Green Illustration

WHAT’S HANGING

PORTFOLIO

PORTFOLIO

© Matt Armendariz

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DEBORAH HAMON

© Anne Day

© Deborah Hamon

PORTFOLIO

ISSUE 2 / 2012

BY APRIL WOLFE

THE PICTURE PROFESSIONAL

Q/A

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GYLN EVANS OF iPHONEOGRAPHY.COM

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CHAPTER CAPTURE

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CHAPTER MEETINGS NATIONWIDE

THE LAW:TAKING A BITE OF APPLE 48

MATT DANIELS PHOTOGRAPHY

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© Wilder Mann

© Matt Daniels

BY JOEL L. HECKER, ESQ.

BOOK REVIEWS

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WHAT WE’RE READING 1

CONTRIBUTORS

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LIFE IN FOCUS

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COVER IMAGE: © MATT DANIELS

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American Society of Picture Professionals

Since first forming as a small, dedicated group of picture professionals in 1966, ASPP has grown into a large community of image experts committed to sharing our experience and knowledge throughout the industry. We provide professional networking and educational opportunities for our members and the visual arts industry. If you create, edit, research, license, distribute, manage or publish visual content, ASPP is the place for you. Join us at www.aspp.com.

LIST OF ADVERTISERS Adobe SendNow age fotostock akg-images Art Resource Artists Rights Society Association Health Programs Aurora Photos Biosphoto

Bridgeman Art Library Corbis Curt Teich Postcard Archives Custom Medical Stock Photo Dan Suzio Photography Danita Delimont Stock Agency Fundamental Photographs Goodman/Van Riper Photography

Levine Roberts Photography Minden Pictures New York Public Library North Wind Picture Archive Nature Picture Library Robert Harding World Imagery Ron Sherman Photography Science Source/Photo Researchers

MASTHEAD

The Picture Professional quarterly magazine of the American Society of Picture Professionals, Inc.

ASPP Executive Offices 217 Palos Verdes Blvd., #700 Redondo Beach CA 90277 Tel: 424.247.9944 Fax: 424.247.9844 director@aspp.com

Treasurer Mary Fran Loftus

Editorial Staff Jain Lemos - Publisher April Wolfe - Editor-in-Chief Ophelia Chong - Art Director Kimberly Phipps - Photo Editor

Technology Cecilia de Querol

Bay Area Mike Kahn

Marketing & Communications Jennifer Davis Heffner

Minnesota Julie Caruso

Contributing Writers Ben High Paul H. Henning Laurie ShoulterKarall Joel L. Hecker, Esq. Josh Steichmann 2012-2013 National Board of Directors President Michael Masterson Vice President Sam Merrell Secretary Sid Hastings

Membership Doug Brooks Holly Marshall

Sovfoto/Eastfoto The Granger Collection The Image Works The Kobal Collection Travel USA Stock Photo VIREO/The Academy of Natural Sciences

DC/South Lori Epstein Jeff Mauritzen

Editorial April Wolfe editor@aspp.com

2012 Sub-Chapter Vice Presidents

National President Michael Masterson michaeldmasterson@gmail.com

Missouri Sid Hastings

2012 Chapter Presidents

Ohio Mandy Groszko

West Mark Ippolito Jason Davis

Wisconsin Paul H. Henning

MidWest George Sinclair Wendy Zieger

Membership Doug Brooks Holly Marshall membership@aspp.com Website Daryl Geraci webmanager@aspp.com Tel: 602-561-9535 eNews Blog Cecilia de Querol newsletter@aspp.com

Advertising & Executive Officers Jain Lemos Executive Director director@aspp.com

New England Jennifer Riley Debra LaKind New York Jessica Moon Daniella Nilva

• The American Society of Picture Professionals (ASPP) is a community of image experts committed to sharing their experience and knowledge throughout the industry and to promoting the professional and educational advancement of members. This non-profit, non-partisan association provides networking and educational opportunities for those who create, edit, research, license, manage or publish visual media. The Picture Professional (ISSN 1084-3701) is published spring, summer, fall and winter as a forum for distribution of information about use, purchase and sale of imagery. • ASPP is dedicated to promoting and maintaining high professional standards and ethics and cooperates with organizations that have similar or allied interests. We welcome the submission of articles and news from all sources, on all aspects of the imagery profession. Send articles and accompanying illustrations with clear captions and credit lines. Contact: editor@aspp.com • Advertising is also desired and welcomed. We offer a specific readership of professionals in positions of responsibility for decision making and purchase. For our media kit and rate sheet, contact Jain Lemos, 424-247-9944. Space reservation deadlines: February 10, May 10, August 10, November 10. Subscription rates: Free to members, $40.00 per year to non-members. Back issues: $10.00 when available. Non-members are invited to consider membership in ASPP. Address changes: Send both old and new addresses to the National Office or update your individual profile in the Member Area on our website at www.aspp.com. • ©2012 American Society of Picture Professionals, Inc. Single photocopies of materials protected by this copyright may be made for noncommercial pursuit of scholarship or research. For permission to republish any part of this publication, contact the Editor-in-Chief. ASPP assumes no responsibility for the statements and opinions advanced by the contributors to the Society’s publications. Editorial views do not necessarily represent the official position of ASPP. Acceptance of an advertisement does not imply endorsement by ASPP of any product or service. American Society of Picture Professionals

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE MICHAEL D. MASTERSON ASPP NATIONAL PRESIDENT

© Bob Schmolze

DEAR PICTURE PROS, Ready, set, summer! And that also goes for those of us who live in Los Angeles. Too many harbor the misconception that we don’t have seasons in Southern California. Any resident can assure you that we do–leaves drop off the same trees here as in Vermont—which a quick drive under the bare limbs on the eponymously named Sycamore Street in Los Angeles in December will confirm. Of course, the weather always being the same year round on Palm Drive no doubt helps account for outsiders’ seasonal confusion. Regardless, summer takes place here as it does elsewhere, just beginning a bit more subtly, sometimes imperceptibly in our “June gloom,” and lasting a bit longer in compensation perhaps. I was made all the more aware of seasons in London at the annual CEPIC (Coordination of European Agencies Stock, Press and Heritage) event a few weeks ago. Although we were technically on the threshold of summer, the storied English weather did not disappoint, thrusting grey drizzly days on us for the entire conference. At least the profusion of celebratory Jubilee Union Jacks provided a dash of color. Fortunately, there was plenty to keep us inside at the conference, including a particularly good lineup of speakers and panelists this year. The ASMP (American Society of Media Photographers) sponsored Photocentric Day as the kickoff. Allen Murabayashi of PhotoShelter was engaging as always with his thoughtful dissection of the traditional photographer/distributor relationship, its altered state, and the technology that enables content creators to reach buyers directly. Judy Hermann, past ASMP president, moderated an excellent two-part panel, Moving Into the Future, a standard topic usually; however, the participants this time, including the always-entertaining Tomas Speight (Masterfile), Anthony Harris (Cultura Creative), Eugene Mopsik (ASMP), Chris Shain (Australian Institute of Professional Photography), and others brought a fresh look to what is often a pro forma affair. Longtime ASPP member Scott McKiernan of Zuma Press provided the entr’acte visuals with a moving multimedia montage called 2011–The Year of Living Dangerously. There was also a day focused on metadata, including search issues and orphan works with the IPTC (International Press Telecommunications Council) leading the way for the sixth time at CEPIC. The venue in trendy Brick Lane provided plentiful networking opportunities, and this year’s trade association confab, hosted by the ASMP, helped bring us up-to-date on legal and business issues faced by each organization. As riveting as it all was, it felt good to swap monochromatic London for multi-hued Los Angeles and even better to see how much my garden had grown while I was gone. This issue of The Picture Professional celebrates summer. We hope you do, too. ✹

MICHAEL

michaeldmasterson@gmail.com 5

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American Society of Picture Professionals


EDITOR’S LETTER APRIL WOLFE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF THE PICTURE PROFESSIONAL Many of our members and prospective members and advertisers gave us some wonderful feedback on how we can continue to evolve to meet their needs and interests. I can’t tell you how happy we are about this active participation. One of the comments mentioned that I should give a more thorough introduction of myself. It’s true: I shied away from that with my first issue, but mostly because I wanted the focus to remain on the magazine. Now that we’ve had our first release, I’ll tell you more about where I came from, and then I’ll shut up. I began this illustrious career of mine by studying fiction writing and playwriting at Western Michigan University. From there, I took a position in the editorial department of Workbook, back when I could be greeted by your president Michael’s face in the morning, and I was also on the editorial team of New Zealand Magazine with our designer Ophelia. Small world, no? I completed my MFA in fiction writing at Boise State University, where I was the editor-in-chief of the magazine cold-drill and on the editorial staff of the Idaho Review. At that time, I also wrote a music column for The Boise Weekly, taught fiction and essay writing at BSU, and was a teaching artist for Writers in the Schools, conducting creative writing workshops for at-risk youth through a generous grant from the NEA. Shortly after that, I moved to the Bay Area to work in both publicity and editorial for the prestigious independent publisher, Counterpoint / Soft Skull Press, where my highlight was having Wendell Berry pose with me in my office, giving the thumbs up for a picture someone took on a cell phone. I began telling stories for NPR’s Snap Judgment and performing multimedia improvisational acts in galleries and clubs. Despite my interest in writing, I’ve always utilized design, photography, performance, and illustration to complement everything I do, having been a comics artist, a filmmaker, and designer in other career incarnations. I volunteer as a farmhand and a children’s tutor, have been a third-shift truck-stop waitress, and typist of mattress Do Not Remove tags. I’m a regular writer for the National Magazine Award-nominated Vice magazine, a copywriter for Amazon and Kirkus Books, and a screenwriter and script doctor for several production companies. I love pictures, both moving and still, and I took on the role of editorin-chief of The Picture Professional for one simple reason: community. Life is found in community, in reaching outside of your comfort zone to make acquaintances, then friendships, and The American Society of Picture Professionals is the only photography association who understands this. For the ASPP to thrive, it is necessary for us to continue opening up our arms to graduating students and mid-career professionals who are searching for that community, especially as staff positions in the industry dwindle, and more of you are facing a freelance or contracting lifestyle. Let me ask you: How can we help you

connect? What questions do you need answered? Who do you need to meet? In this issue, we introduce you to our cover photographer, Matt Daniels, who talks with us about being a filmmaker, photographer, and avid Instagram user. We also introduce you to multimedia photographer Deborah Hamon and editorial photographer Anne Day, as well as the graduating students of Harrington College in Chicago, in our continuing effort to pair industry veterans with rising stars. And if you attended the ASPP-sponsored event Feed Me…Friend Me, you’ll see the familiar face of food photographer and social media wizard, Matt Armendariz, who shares with us some not-so-common sense about building an online brand and an innovative photography portfolio. In addition, Joel Hecker returns with his much-needed law news about e-books, and member Laurie ShoulterKarall talks terms of use on Pinterest. We also caught up with editor and founder of iPhoneography. com, Glyn Evans, to get a glimpse of photography future, and our final introduction brings us to Ben High, an Iowa photographer and jewelry maker, who begins our first installment of tech trends in CLICK, where he reviews the new Part and Poly apps for iPad. You may have noticed we’re pretty into technology and social media in this issue, and why not explore all the gadgets and networks that keep you connected before the winter doldrums set in. If you’re new to us, then, hey, we’re happy to meet you and welcome to the BBQ, and if you’ve been with us for the long haul, it’s great to see you again, we hope you brought that fantastic potato salad from last time. Drinks are over by the snack table, so help yourself, and drop us a line at editor@aspp.com. ✹ Sincerely,

A.WOLFE 7

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Š Deborah Hamon American Society of Picture Professionals

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Send large files with ease

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S E Rvenice E N inI Swinter SIMA

SERENISSIMA

Kindergarten students work on math using computer teaching games, March 2011. © Elizabeth Crews / The Image Works

Bridgeman_2_2012.pdf

venice in winter

PHOTOGRAPHS by FRANK VAN RIPER and JUDITH GOODMAN TEXT by FRANK VAN RIPER “One of life’s subtlest acquired pleasures is the Venice of winter, of mists and puddles, umbrellas and empty alleys and gondolas in the rain. This book magically acquires the pleasure for us—and no less miraculously — enables us to enjoy it all the year round.” — JAN MORRIS, AUTHOR, THE WORLD OF VENICE; FELLOW OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LITERATURE

PHOTOGRAPHS B Y F R AN K VAN R I P E R AN D J UD I T H GO O D M AN

TEXT BY FRANK VAN RIP ER

AVAILABLE on AMAZON.COM and BARNESANDNOBLE.COM To order signed and inscribed copies, visit www.veniceinwinter.com American Society of Picture Professionals

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“Serenissima: Venice in Winter takes us on the rare journey that a perfect book can and unravels the secrets of a very personal walk through the streets, canals, and homes of Venice…This book is a rare combination of pictures that take you there, and prose that lets you feel as if you’re watching it all from the corner of a small Venetian coffee bar, espresso in hand, ever glancing out the windows.” — DAVID BURNETT, PHOTOJOURNALIST, CONTACT PRESS IMAGES

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Kindergarten students work on math using computer teaching games, March 2011. Š Elizabeth Crews / The Image Works

editorial specialists for over 25 years historical

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PO Box 443 Woodstock NY 12498 800.475.8801 845.679.8500 info@theimageworks.com


M ATT ARMENDARIZ SITS in a high-backed chair beside a white wall on which he’s projected an image from his Instagram account. “You have to share and be interested in other people,” he says. “Or people will lose interest, because you’re losing interest in them.” Matt’s here at the Lew Robertson Studios in Culver City for his event, Feed Me…Friend Me, a mix of food photography know-how and social media demystification presented by ASPP West. Over forty attendees, some current members and some who would join shortly after the event, take notes on legal pads and iPads as Matt and his partner, Adam Pearson, who happens to be an expert food stylist, field questions on the intricacies of Twitter and the almighty book deal. Matt says, “I never wanted to write, but it was a thing I had to do,” and for any other writing-reluctant photographers and artists out there, Matt’s words may well register hauntingly, as you’ve probably watched your peers adapt to social media and blogs in a quick blink. Not to worry: Matt may have over 11,000 Twitter followers, but he didn’t get there overnight.

Feed Me, Friend Me Matt Armendariz on Social Media and Food Photography BY A. WOLFE PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATT ARMENDARIZ

Matt calls his path to photography “the shortest twenty years” of his life, beginning as a bagger then graphic designer in the early days of Whole Foods, then moving on to art direction, eventually finding that the only way to achieve his vision on a shoot was to become a photographer himself. And while he’s shot for everything from Saveur to Martha Stewart Everyday—the latter’s last assignment actually coordinated completely through Facebook—Matt’s devoted a great deal of his life to sharing the photographs, recipes, and writing of others with his fans and followers the same way he probably shares meals with friends. Through this constant stream of sharing, he’s been able to cultivate a voice and a virtual persona that fans can identify as distinctly Matt, and as he reminds the attendees, if you begin a blog or twitter account, you have the ability to control everything there. If you’re used to taking on gigs you’re not too keen on just to pay bills, for instance, you could use a blog or Tumblr to your advantage, as cultivating your interests and expertise on a subject, like Matt did with food, could give you an authority on the subject and introduce new clients to your work. When you look at Matt’s blog, mattbites.com, it’s immediately evident that this is a man who loves food and who has knowledge of the trends to back it up. But if all of this still sounds daunting, his advice for how to get started in social media is simple, and grand: tell people about the things you like. Depending on your personality, this concept of constant sharing could either signal a serious breakdown or could finally become the outlet for community you’ve been searching for from the sterility of your darkroom, but Matt’s quick to say, “You have to find out what works for you. Because it can take over your life.” His partner Adam gives a wry smile and a slight head nod. Yes, it can, and Adam knows this better than most, as the couple works together on an almost daily basis out of their American Society of Picture Professionals

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CLICK............. PART, DESIGNED BY MEA MOBILE, claims to “make something simple, find something beautiful.” It takes an image from your device and converts it into one giant circle (or square, depending on the mode you’ve set it to), each time you tap or slide your finger across the big shape, it splits in half. Eventually, with a lot of tapping and swiping, you can get to a pixelized, but recognizable, version of what you started with. Like most special effects, though, it only has a limited application. Part tends to excel when your image either has a specific element you want make stand out, or if you just want a big mess of dots or squares in roughly the colors your photo was. Making a mess of dots is fun and all, but after the first two images, that game gets pretty tired. If you’re up for some real ridiculousness, you can go watch their “Made With Part” demo video. In it, they show you that the “something beautiful” they talk about in their tag line is little more than making your image into a few clumps of colors. Think about a great demo image you could take, like a can of tuna (what were they thinking?), and then turning the whole photo into a 3x4 grid of somewhat tuna-like colors. Simple? Yes. Beautiful? Maybe they should just stick to simple. Had I not downloaded the app and played with it before watching the video, I might’ve just foregone the whole affair. All that being said, the interface is impressively simple and easy to use. Annoyingly, it only saves images in landscape orientation, but that’s something easy enough to remedy from the camera roll of your iPhone or iPad. While the app was fun to play with, I found myself going through the same process of loading an image, swiping around for a little bit, not being super impressed with my result and then starting again. There were a few times where I made something really cool though (specifically the photo of my grandma’s face), so don’t write the app off entirely. When it does work, it looks great. Folks who like to use apps like Decim8 might also find this interesting as a more controllable way to pixelize and de-resolve their images. Poly, by Innoiz, is a similar app, but instead of just tapping to divide, each time you tap, you’re inputting a point to overlay a geometric pattern over your photo. Think about it as kind of manually fractalizing your image. The results, unlike Part, are very sleek and smooth and can be adjusted by adding or subtracting points. The more detail you want, the more points you can add. One helpful feature is the ability to adjust the opacity of the polygonal layer, which helps massively in giving you more control of the image as you build it. I was able to make some okay images look even better by polygonalizing them. Dumping all the details and focusing more on the important shapes and colors made some images look better than they really deserved to be. There is something about the clean, sharp lines this app makes that keeps bringing me back to it. Despite their similarity, the results from the two apps are strikingly different. One thing to note though, both of these apps require a lot of fine tapping control and work best on the iPad’s big screen, so iPhone users: you are warned. ✹ American Society of Picture Professionals

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PART & POLY FUN WITH FRACTALS BY BEN HIGH

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@Lisa Tyson Ennis WE072167American Š Marcos Welsh Society

of Picture Professionals

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THE LAW: TAKING A BITE OUT OF APPLE JOEL L. HECKER, ESQ.

WILL PHOTOGRAPHY BOOKS STILL EXIST IF WE ALL GO

© Martin Turner www.longerexposure.com

DIGITAL?

ON APRIL 11, 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice (the “DOJ”) commenced litigation against Apple and five of the six major book publishers in the United States, alleging that the defendants conspired to raise the price of electronic books over a period of time in response to Amazon’s practice of selling e-books for the consumer’s favorite price of $9.99. The publishers entered into this alleged conspiracy basically to protect their pricing formula for print books, and the fear expressed by the publishers is that the erosion in revenue from print books as a result of availability of less expensive e-books could render them unprofitable. If this comes to pass, a major consequence may very well be a substantial decrease in the funds available for photography books, since high quality photography books are rarely profitable. The complaint alleges that the publisher defendants, concerned by Amazon’s pricing of newly released and bestselling e-books at $9.99 or less, agreed among themselves and with Apple to raise the retail prices of e-books by taking control of e-book pricing from American Society of Picture Professionals

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retailers, which would increase the price consumers paid for e-books, end price competition among e-book retailers, constrain innovation among e-book retailers, and slow the migration of print books to e-books. Until the alleged conspiracy took effect, publishers sold e-books under a model that had prevailed for decades in the sale of print books, called the wholesale model, selling copies of each title to retailers at a discount off the list price. Retailers, who became the owner of these books, were free to determine at what price they would sell the books to consumers. Thus, publishers would recommend prices, but retailers could compete for business at discounted prices, which obviously benefited consumers. But in 2007, Amazon launched its Kindle e-reader service. Amazon offered a portion of its e-book catalogue, which primarily consisted of newly released and New York Times bestselling e-books, for $9.99. To compete with Amazon, other e-book retailers felt they had to and therefore often matched this $9.99 price. As a result, alleges the DOJ, consumers benefited from Amazon’s low prices.


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THE BEST OF THE BEST ALL IN ONE PLACE

AURORA PHOTOS American Society of Picture Professionals

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info@auroraphotos.com www.auroraphotos.com 207.828.8787


m cs se ot en es AO

BEN HIGH is an Iowan turned

Angeleno turned Iowan. He used to be a music industry wonk and commercial photographer. Now he designs fancy (sometime photography related) jewelry and shoots Polaroid and instant film. You can see what he is up to at benhigh.com.

© Nina Wurtzel

JOEL L. HECKER, ESQ. practices in every aspect of photography

and visual arts law, including copyright, licensing, publishing contracts, privacy rights and other intellectual property issues, and acts as general counsel to photography and content-related businesses. In addition to The Picture Professional, Hecker lectures and writes on these issues in PhotoStockNotes, the New York Bar Association Journal and the association’s Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law Journal. He is a past trustee of the Copyright Society of the USA, and past chair of the Copyright and Literary Property Committee of the New York City Bar Association. Tel.: 212.557.9600; website: www.RussoandBurke.com; email: HeckerEsq@aol.com.

LAURIE SHOULTER KARALL has spent more than twenty-eight years working in the photo industry in every conceivable field, from professional photo lab to textbook publisher, as well as stock photo agency management. She never met a photograph she didn’t love; from Robert Vail’s color-saturated neon lights to Henri Cartier Bresson’s iconic street photography. She writes the ASPP Midwest Blog at asppmidwest.wordpress.com and edits articles for several law firms.

CONTRIBUTORS ISSUE 2 / 2012 THE PICTURE PROFESSIONAL © Jerry Tovo Fotographie

PAUL H. HENNING was a professional

© Paul H. Henning

© Barry Mulling

The first time JOSH STEICHMANN got paid for photography was when he turned a snack shack at a summer camp into a 12-foot by 12-foot pinhole camera. Since then, he’s had a love of alternative processes, creative risk taking, and mural prints. Working as a writer, he’s covered everything from Elvis festivals to US Code 2257, and plenty in between. As a photographer, he’s shown across Michigan, and can usually be found jumping Los Angeles fences with a home-hacked Holga. 63

location photographer for 15 years. He co-founded & directed Third Coast Stock Source, and was Manager of European Operations for the Comstock picture agency in London. He’s served as Acting Managing Director at the Robert Harding Picture Library and is the founder of Stock Answers™, a consultancy which works with stock picture agencies & photographers worldwide. Paul also serves as the Director of Business Development for Tetra Images, a New Jersey-based royalty-free image production company.

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LIFE IN FOCUS

© Ryan Young Photography

“Sweet, sweet burn of sun and summer wind, and you my friend, my new fun thing, my summer fling.” - k.d. lang

American Society of Picture Professionals

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Issue 2, 2012: ASPP's The Picture Professional Magazine