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Modern & Contemporary Art


Modern & Contemporary Art Evening Sale | Cape Town | 4 March 2021 Public auction hosted by Aspire Art Auctions

V IE W ING AND AUC T I O N LO C ATI O N

37A Somerset Road | De Waterkant | Cape Town | 8001 AUC T ION

Thursday 4 March 2020 | 7 pm V IE W ING B Y AP P OIN TM EN T

Select lots will be on view at our Cape Town & Johannesburg galleries visit aspireart.net to book a slot AUC T IONE E R

Ruarc Peffers AUC T ION C ODE AND N U M B ER

When sending telephone or absentee bids, this sale is referred to as: AAA CT 4 MAR 21 C ONDIT IONS OF S AL E

The auction is subject to: Rules of Auction, Important Notices, Conditions of Business and Reserves AUC T ION R E S ULT S

+27 11 243 5243 | +27 21 418 0765 View them on our website www.aspireart.net AB S E NT E E AND T E L EPH O N E B I D S

bids@aspireart.net | +27 71 675 2991 S AL E C ONTAC T S

Emma Bedford | emma@aspireart.net | +27 83 391 7235 Jacqui Carney | jacqui@aspireart.net | +27 71 675 2991 Ruarc Peffers | ruarc@aspireart.net | +27 84 444 8004 Marelize van Zyl | marelize@aspireart.net | +27 83 283 7427 GE NE R AL E NQUIR IES

CT | ct@aspireart.net | +27 21 418 0765 JHB | enquiries@aspireart.net | +27 11 243 5243 Company Reg No: 2016/074025/07 | VAT number: 4100 275 280

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GLOSSARY O F CATAL O GU ING T E R M S AND P R AC T IC E Terms used in this catalogue have the following meanings and conventions ascribed to them. Condition reports are available on all lots by request, and bidders are advised to inspect all lots themselves.

AR T I ST D E TA I L S If a work is by a deceased artist, the artist’s name is followed by their country of origin and birth–death dates. If an artist is still living, the artist’s name is followed by their birth date and country of origin. Attributed to … in our opinion, most likely a work by the artist in whole or in part. Studio of … / Workshop of … in our opinion, a work likely to have come from the studio of the artist or produced under their supervision. Circle of … in our opinion, a contemporaneous work by an unidentified artist working in that artist’s style. Follower of … in our opinion, a work by an unidentified artist working in the artist’s style, contemporary or near contemporary, but not necessarily by a student of the artist. School of … in our opinion, a work executed at the time and in the style associated with the artist. South African School, 18th century … in our opinion, a work executed at the time and in the style associated with that region. Manner of … in our opinion, a work by an unidentified artist working in the artist’s style but at a later date, although not of recent execution. Style of … in our opinion, a work by an unidentified artist working in the artist’s style and of recent execution.

C O N V E N TION S IN TITL ES For works where the title is known (i.e. given by the artist, listed in a catalogue or referenced in a book); where it is acknowledged as the official title of the work, these titles are in title case and italics – unless specifically stated by the artist as sentence case, lower case, upper case or any variation thereof. Where the title of an artwork is unknown, a descriptive title is given. This title is in sentence case and is not italicised.

PROVEN AN CE The history of ownership of a particular lot.

S I G N AT URE, DATE AND IN S C R IP TION CON VEN TION S The term signed … /dated…and /or inscribed … means that the signature and/ or date and/or inscription is by the artist, in our opinion. The term bears a … signature/date/ inscription indicates our opinion that the artist’s name/date/inscription has been added by another hand (this is also applicable where the term ‘in another hand’ is used). Where a semi-colon is used, everything thereafter is on the reverse of the artwork.

ESTIMATE The price range (included in the catalogue or any sale room notice) within which we believe a lot may sell. Low estimate means the lower figure in the range and high estimate means the higher figure. The mid estimate is the midpoint between the two figures.

D IME NSION CON VEN TION S Measurements are given in centimetres (height before width) and are rounded up to the nearest half centimetre. In the case of prints and multiples, measurements are specific to one decimal place, and the dimensions will be listed as sheet size, plate size or print size. Sheet size: describes the size of the entire sheet of paper on which a print is made. This may also be referred to as ‘physical size’. Plate size: describes the size of the metal sheet on which an etching has been engraved and excludes all margins. Print/image size: describes the size of the full printed area for all other printmaking methods and excludes all margins.

F R A MIN G All works are framed, unless otherwise stated in the catalogue, or if they are listed as a portfolio, artist’s book, tapestry or carpet.

EXHIBITED The history of exhibitions in which a particular lot has been included.

L ITERATURE The history of publications in which a particular lot has been included.

L OT Is an item to be offered at auction (or two or more items to be offered at auction as a group).

RESERVE A confidential amount, below which we are not permitted to sell a lot.

SAL EROOM N OTICE A written notice regarding a specific lot(s), posted near the lot(s) in the saleroom, published on www.aspireart.net, and announced by the auctioneer prior to selling the lot(s).

CON DITION REPORT A report on the condition of the lot as noted when catalogued. [We are not qualified restorers or conservators. These reports are our assessment of the general condition of the artwork. Prospective buyers are advised to satisfy themselves as to the condition of any lot(s) sold.]

After … in our opinion, a copy by an unidentified artist of a work by the artist, of any date.

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CON TE N T S

Auction Information iii Glossary of Cataloguing Terms and Practice v Staff ix Buyers Guide xiii Online Bidding Guide xi Evening Sale Lots 1 to 113

2-163

Terms and Conditions of Business 164 Artist Index 168 Catalogue Subscription Form 171 Commission/Telephone Bidding Form 172

Details used in prelim pages from: COVER

Lot 26 Marlene Dumas SCORE PAGE II

Lot 16 William Kentridge Dutch Iris II PAGE IV

Lot 19 Cecil Skotnes Head PAGE VI

Lot 55 Robert Hodgins Songs my mother taught me PAGE VIII

Lot 56 William Kentridge Drawing from Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old PAGE X

Lot 83 Irma Stern Dahllias and Fruit PAGE XII

Lot 36 Edorardo Villa Reclining Figure PAGE XVI

Lot 38 Peter Clarke Dop

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STAFF

J OH A NNESB UR G

CAPE TOWN

Ruarc Peffers Senior Specialist | Managing Director ruarc@aspireart.net +27 84 444 8004

Emma Bedford Senior Specialist | Director emma@aspireart.net +27 83 391 7235

Jacqui Carney Senior Specialist jacqui@aspireart.net +27 71 675 2991

Marelize van Zyl Senior Specialist marelize@aspireart.net +27 83 283 7427

Tlotlo Lobelo Cataloguer tlotlo@aspireart.net +27 11 243 5243

Joshua Stanley Junior Specialist joshua@aspireart.net +27 76 647 8560

Themba Ndzipho Store Keeper enquiries@aspireart.net +27 11 243 5243

Lisa Truter Junior Specialist lisa@aspireart.net +27 82 568 6685

Carina Jansen Intern carina@aspireart.net +27 11 243 5243

Marc Smith Junior Specialist marc@aspireart.net +27 72 841 3198

Micaela Wentzel Intern micaela@aspireart.net +27 11 243 5243

ACCO U NTS Michelle Noble Financial Officer Johannesburg accounts@aspireart.net +27 83 273 8034

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BUYERS GU IDE The following information is designed to guide prospective bidders through the auction process and explains how to bid at an auction by Aspire. Our staff are happy to assist with any queries.

4. Specialist assistance Our specialists are available to discuss any lot in further detail if you require additional information. Please do not hesitate to contact us.

1. Identify your potential acquisition Aspire holds four live auctions per annum. You can subscribe to our printed catalogues to view all works coming up in an auction or alternatively, our e-catalogues are posted online approximately a month prior to each sale; these are free downloads and give a full overview of each auction. Keep an eye on our website and social media platforms where we will provide regular updates regarding sale information and when catalogues are available to view online. The auction preview is open to the public.

5. Bidding with Aspire Bidding may be done in four ways, depending on your preference and availability during the live auction. New bidders to Aspire will need to supply us with their ID/Driver’s license and proof of address.

2. The catalogue The catalogue includes all information regarding the lot(s) being offered in an auction (including artwork details, date, medium, dimensions, quantity of items in the lot, and so forth). Condition reports are not included in the catalogue, but may be requested by emailing conditionreports@aspireart.net. However, as we are not qualified conservators, we advise that you view the lot in person to satisfy yourself as to the condition of a prospective purchase. Condition reports are not necessarily compiled by professional conservators unless otherwise stated. 3. Estimates Aspire assigns a low and high estimate to every lot. These estimates give our opinion of value, bearing the following factors in mind: the sales precedent of each artist, the subject matter, the importance of the work within the artist’s oeuvre, the condition of the work and assimilates the accumulative totality of all of these factors. Each lot has a confidential reserve price agreed between Aspire and the seller of the lot. The reserve is the minimum price that will be accepted for a lot, any amount below which a lot will not be sold. The reserve price will not exceed the low estimate

5.1. Live bidding in the saleroom You can physically bid during a live auction by registering and bidding in the saleroom. You may register to bid prior to the auction (during the preview), or you can register on the day of the auction. The auction is open to the public. If you cannot attend the auction, there are two absentee bidding methods available to you. 5.2. Telephone bid An Aspire representative will phone you during the live auction: a trained staff member will walk you through the auction as it happens and you may instruct the representative to bid on a lot on your behalf. Don’t forget to send through your telephone bids at least 24 hours before the commencement of the auction to ensure sufficient time for processing.

being made, for information only, on the basis of the rate of change in force on 9 February 2021. These conversions are for information only, and bidders are invited, if they wish, to check the rate of exchange in effect on the day of the sale. All invoices that will be issued after the sale, will only be expressed in South African Rands. All payments relating to the sale must be made in South African Rands. 6. Payments, collection and storage Payment must be made immediately after completion of the auction, as stated in our Terms and Conditions of Business, unless otherwise agreed with Aspire beforehand. Once payment for the purchased lot is made and cleared, you may take the lot or arrange for collection. An Aspire representative will contact you the day after the auction to assist with logistics. If you are unable to collect the artwork within the allocated time – Aspire will arrange storage or delivery of the lot, which will be for your account. Aspire will store artworks purchased at the auction under Aspire’s insurance for a limited time only (see our Terms and Conditions of Business). Storage and handling costs will be charged if the property is not collected within this time.

5.3. Written bid (Absentee bid/Book bid/ Commission bid) Recorded bids entered into the auctioneer’s catalogue. The auctioneer will, in your absence, bid on your behalf, up to the maximum amount given by you. Should the bidding not reach your maximum bid, you will acquire the lot for one increment above the previous bid.

7. Commissions and fees payable Buyers premium Buyers will be liable for payment of the purchase price. The purchase price is the hammer price, the Buyer’s premium and VAT charged on the premium.

5.4. Online via www.auctions.aspireart.net or through the Aspire Art Auctions app

Commission charged on any lot selling in excess of R20 000 is 12% (plus VAT).

The estimates included in this catalogue are expressed in South African Rands, the conversion into foreign currency

Commission for Aspire’s online bidding is 15% (plus VAT).

Commission charged on any lot selling up to and including R20 000 is 15% (plus VAT).

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David Goldblatt, The last of the bigger rocks has just been dropped into a kibble. Now, with shovels, the team “lashes” (loads) the small stuff into the kibble, 1969 - 1970

INVITING CONSIGNMENTS Modern & Contemporary Art Inviting entries for our upcoming auctions in 2021 VALUATIONS Cape Town: +27 21 418 0765 | ct@aspireart.net Johannesburg: +27 11 243 5243 | enquiries@aspireart.net

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NEW PREMISES New Cape Town Gallery & Offices 37A Somerset Road | De Waterkant | Cape Town | 8001 CONTACT Cape Town: +27 21 418 0765 | ct@aspireart.net

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CAPE TOWN Modern & Contemporary Art

Thursday 4 March | 7 pm


1 Jane Alexander b.1959 South Africa

Harbinger in Correctional Uniform, Lost Marsh 2007 pigment inks on archival cotton rag paper signed, dated, numbered 59/60 and inscribed ‘Harbinger in Correctional’ on the reverse sheet size: 46 x 56 cm

ZAR 30 000 – 50 000 USD 2 021 – 3 368 GBP 1 468 – 2 446 EURO 1 674 – 2 790

PROVENANCE

From a sold-out ArtThrob edition.

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2 Mary Sibande b.1982 South Africa

Sophie - Ntombikayise 2009 archival pigment inks on 100% cotton rag paper signed, dated, inscribed with the title and ‘limited edition’ in pencil along the bottom margin sheet size: 54 x 54 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

NOTES

MAC Lyon - Musée d’art Contemporain de Lyon in France will present a large scale solo exhibition of Mary Sibande’s work in early 2022. Her work also recently formed part of the group exhibition Radical Revisionists: Contemporary African Artists Confronting Past and Present at the Rice University’s Moody Centre for the Arts in Houston, USA.

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3 Georgina Gratrix b.1982 South Africa

Beach Bat and Rugby Man, a pair 2014 gouache on paper each signed and dated bottom right Rugby Man: 100 x 69.5 cm; Beach Bat: 49 x 64.5 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

EXHIBITED

SMAC Gallery, Stellenbosch, PAPERWORK, 13 February to 26 April 2014. NOTE Georgina Gratrix’s first museum solo exhibition titled The Reunion: Georgina Gratrix is currently on show at the Norval Foundation, Cape Town until 31 May 2021.

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4 Robert Hodgins South African 1920–2010

In the gym 1991 oil on canvas signed, dated and inscribed with the title on the reverse 30.5 x 46 cm

ZAR 120 000 – 160 000 USD 8 084 – 10 779 GBP 5 870 – 7 827 EURO 6 696 – 8 929

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5 Siwa Mgoboza b.1993 South Africa

Untitled isishweshwe collage, tulle and pine ply 143 x 111 x 8 cm

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 695 – 4 042 GBP 1 957 – 2 935 EURO 2 232 – 3 348

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NOTE

The use of Isishweshwe cloth is instrumental in Siwa Mgoboza’s work. Traditionally worn by women, Mgoboza references a motif that is immediately recognisable as “African” but on closer investigation, has truly global roots having arrived in Southern Africa from India via Dutch trade routes. By subverting geographical (and gender specific assumptions), Mgoboza opens up alternative readings of what it is to be African.


6 Simphiwe Ndzube b.1990 South Africa

Uginya Ilanga (To Swallow the Sun) 2016 acrylic, gold leaf, duct tape and found fabrics on canvas signed, dated and inscribed with the title on the reverse 115.5 x 80 x 4.5 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

NOTE

Oracles of the Pink Universe, Simphiwe Ndzube’s first institutional solo exhibition in the United States is currently on view at the Denver Art Museum until September 2021. He is also exhibiting in Witness: Afro Perspectives from the Jorge M. Pérez Collection at El Espacio 23 in Miami. Last year, Ndzume presented a solo exhibition New Works on Paper at Stevenson in Amsterdam.

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7 Zemba Luzamba b.1973 Democratic Republic of Congo

Dandy Club I 2020 oil on canvas signed and dated bottom right; inscribed with the title, the artist’s name and the date on the reverse 129 x 159.5 x 2.5 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

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8 Bambo Sibiya b.1986 South Africa

Lamenting upon minister of African culture 2017 charcoal and acrylic on canvas signed and dated bottom right; inscribed with the artist’s name and the title on an Everard Read label on the reverse 190 x 300.5 x 8 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

EXHIBITED

Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg, Bambo Sibiya, 2017.

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9 Ablade Glover b.1934 Ghana

Marketscape oil on canvas signed bottom right 76.5 x 60.5 cm

ZAR 70 000 – 100 000 USD 4 716 – 6 737 GBP 3 424 – 4 892 EURO 3 906 – 5 580

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EXHIBITED

Christopher Moller Gallery, Cape Town, Indivisible, 2014. LITERATURE

cf. Art South Africa, 2014. Yvette Gresle in Conversation: Ablade Glover. (01), a similar example illlustrated in colour on p.44. NOTES

“The dynamism of the market possibly points to the fact that the place is purely a females domain. The movement, unending

changing scenarios and the colour, simply fascinating. It is also the place for both the good and the bad. The “Kalabule”, the intrigues, seem to colour the atmosphere, and you cannot enter the market and emerge without a “stain” it seems. Yes I try to paint the movement, capture the dynamism, and indeed the colour of the market business with its gray areas, and unending study of “busyness”. (Taken from the Christopher Moller Gallery Indivisible catalogue).


10 Irma Stern South African 1894–1966

Three women 1952 gouache over pencil on paper signed and dated top left 37.5 x 27.5 cm

ZAR 150 000 – 250 000 USD 10 105 – 16 842 GBP 7 338 – 12 230 EURO 8 370 – 13 951

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Teresa Firmino

Blessing Ngobeni

b.1993 South Africa

b.1985 South Africa

Untitled

Greedy Mood

2020

2020

acrylic and collage on un-stretched canvas signed and dated bottom right 102.5 x 117.5 cm

acrylic and collage on paper signed and dated bottom right 139 x 85.5 cm, unframed

ZAR 50 000 – 80 000 USD 3 368 – 5 389 GBP 2 446 – 3 914 EURO 2 790 – 4 464

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696


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13 Banele Khoza b.1994 South Africa

Saw So Many 2016 acrylic and ink on canvas signed and dated on the stretcher 60 x 90 cm

ZAR 30 000 – 50 000 USD 2 021 – 3 368 GBP 1 468 – 2 446 EURO 1 674 – 2 790

EXHIBITED

Lizamore, Johannesburg, Lonely Nights, 2017.

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NOTES

Banele Khoza was the recipient of the prestigious Absa L’atelier Gerard Sekoto Award in 2017, which earned him a residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris that same year. Shortly thereafter, he presented a solo exhibition titled, LGBTQI+: Banele Khoza as part of the Curatorial Lab at Zeitz MOCAA in Cape Town. This exhibition was supported by Consulate General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Earlier museum exhibitions include his solo show Temporary Feelings at the Pretoria Art Museum in 2016. In 2019 he was selected as one of Mail & Guardian’s 200 Young South Africans.


14 Blessing Ngobeni b.1985 South Africa

Figures and fish 2015 acrylic and collage on canvas signed and dated bottom right 84 x 118 x 3.5 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

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15 Brett Murray b.1961 South Africa

The Party vs The People 2010 bronze 59.5 x 61 x 80 cm

ZAR 280 000 – 350 000 USD 18 863 – 23 579 GBP 13 698 – 17 122 EURO 15 625 – 19 531

EXHIBITED

Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, Hail to the Theif, 20 November 2010 to 8 January 2011. LITERATURE

Murray, B. (2013). Brett Murray. Johannesburg: Jacana Media, illustrated in colour on p.241.

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16 William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa

Dutch Iris II 1991 colour etching with aquatint signed and numbered Proof 4/5 in pencil along the bottom margin sheet size: 118 x 81 cm

William Kentridge’s expressive Dutch Iris prints are highly sought-after. Exceeding the limitations of printmaking, they capture painterly effects exquisitely. No longer is intaglio printing a means of replication, but the artist’s mastery of the medium is said to achieve such heights and flexibility that it rivals painting.

ZAR 500 000 – 800 000 USD 33 684 – 53 895 GBP 24 460 – 39 136 EURO 27 902 – 44 643

Expanded to a scale larger than life, the beauty of Kentridge’s Dutch Iris series was envisioned by the artist as a four plate print series and was published by David Krut as one of his earliest publications with the artist in the early 1990s. The iris prints allowed Kentridge to experiment with a range of media and techniques, such as aquatint, etching, printed acrylic plates and many colour trials. The flexibility to proof many variations of the image without destroying the matrix, granted the prints the same dynamic qualities of his iconic, animated drawings, which undergo numerous stages of erasure and change. Describing the allure of these iris prints, Rosemary Simmons, the editor of Printmaking Today, stated that ‘You may start with a charcoal drawing of an iris flower but at some stage the copper and acid or the acrylic sheet and the engraving tools impose their own scenario much as characters in a play or film. I think it is what William Kentridge welcomes and allows.’1 MS 1

Simmons, R. 1993. Romancing the Plate. Printmaking Today. Volume 2, Number 4, Winter 1993, by Rosemary Simmons, (ed).

Available at: https://davidkrutprojects.com/46365/william-kentridge-printmaking-at-jack-shirreff-1993. Accessed 1 February 2021.

William Kentridge exhibition in Chicago in 1998. Images courtesy David Krut Projects.

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Known for his compassion, admired for his skill and revered for his talent, Cecil Skotnes’ works continue to capture the imagination of viewers and are appreciated both locally and abroad. Unsurprisingly, it was a work by Skotnes which became the first by a South African artist to be reproduced in the Encyclopedia Britannica.1

17 Cecil Skotnes South Africa 1926–2009

Family group carved, painted and incised wood panel in the artist’s hand-made frame signed bottom left 120 x 122 x 3 cm

ZAR 500 000 – 700 000 USD 33 684 – 47 158 GBP 24 460 – 34 244 EURO 27 902 – 39 062

Skotnes is best known for his woodcuts, carved and incised panels and for his skill as a printmaker.2 Of his creative output, his carved panels stand tall as some of his most celebrated works – many of which were commissioned by prominent South African institutions, such as the Iziko South African National Gallery, Barclays Bank, Standard Bank and the Cape Wine Growers Association (KWV).3 Regarded collectively, the three panels on auction (Lot 17, 19 and 20) exemplify the profound explorations that Skotnes undertook to imbue his work with a more African sensibility, as opposed to blindly following the artistic tenets of Europe. As a result of this exploration, the artist’s figures underwent aesthetic transformations. When considering Head (Lot 19), the panel is incised with forms associated with Skotnes’ earlier panels, wherein ‘prickly’, ‘angular shapes’ and ‘thorn bush-like figures’ were inspired by the organic forms of plant life found in the veld.4 These earlier heads were often disproportionate, with the subtle presence of shoulders and a torso, but a bold outline that encased a collection of intricate markings suggesting eyes and a mouth, causing the viewer to ponder the persona that they render.5 In the case of the two figurative works (Lot 17 and 20), Skotnes’ mastery of medium later gave way to figures depicted through more recognisable, human forms and demonstrated his exceptional ability to capture the ‘softness of flesh in the hard medium of wood.’6 Ultimately, the elements of Skotnes’ panels provide his work with a unique character that attracts collectors time and again. As a friend of the artist and former Director of the Michaelis School of Fine Art, Neville Dubow was perhaps most apt when he stated that Skotnes’ work may be seen ‘as landscapes of the mind, at a point where the physical and metaphysical intersect. Physically, in material terms, his carved panels are landscapes of a kind, with their own ridges and peaks, valleys and plains.’7 MS Berman, E. (1975). The story of South African Painting. Cape Town: A.A. Balkema, p.224. Proud, H. (2006). ‘Cecil Skotnes’. In Proud, H. (ed.), ReVisions: Expanding the Narrative of South African Art. South Africa: SA History Online and UNISA Press, p.160. 3 Harmsen, F. (1996). ‘Chapter 1: Artist Resolute’. In Harmsen, F. (ed.), Cecil Skotnes. Cape Town: South African Breweries, pp.11– 63. Available at: http://cecilskotnes.com/artist-resolute-by-frieda-harmsen/#footnote_18_1427. Accessed 1 February 2021. 4 Ibid. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. 7 Dubow, N. (1996). ‘Landscapes of the Mind’. In Harmsen, F. (ed.), Cecil Skotnes. Cape Town: South African Breweries, pp. 111–128. Available at: http://cecilskotnes.com/publications/landscapes-of-the-mind/. Accessed 1 February 2021. 1

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18 Edoardo Villa South African 1915–2011

Column for the African Life Centre, Pretoria (maquette) 1964, cast 1991 bronze on a steel base signed and dated 88 x 25 x 27 cm excluding base; 155 x 50 x 50 cm including base from an intended edition of 6

ZAR 200 000 – 300 000 USD 13 474 – 20 211 GBP 9 784 – 14 676 EURO 11 161 – 16 741

LITERATURE

De Clerk, C. and De Kamper, G. (2013). Villa in Bronze: A comprehensive reference to the castings of Edoardo Villa. Pretoria: The University of Pretoria Museum, another example from the edition illustrated on p.78. Günther, E. (1998). Edoardo Villa Museum catalogue. Pretoria: University of Pretoria, the plaster cast illustrated on p.21, plate 68.

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Forging African-inspired imagery and Cubist forms, allowed Edoardo Villa to develop a unique artistic language drawing on both his European heritage and his local environment. This approach is evident in the exquisite Column, conceived in 1964, a few years after completion of his monumental Traverse (1957), and produced for the African Life Centre in Pretoria. It derives from modelling forms in clay to achieve a voluminous sculpture that, through enticing the eye from one form to another, encourages viewing in the round. EB


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19 Cecil Skotnes South Africa 1926–2009

Head carved, incised and painted wood panel 60.5 x 60.5 x 5.5 cm

ZAR 100 000 – 150 000 USD 6 737 – 10 105 GBP 4 892 – 7 338 EURO 5 580 – 8 370

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20 Cecil Skotnes South Africa 1926–2009

Three figures carved, painted and incised wood panel signed bottom left 91.5 x 91 x 5 cm

ZAR 300 000 – 500 000 USD 20 211 – 33 684 GBP 14 676 – 24 460 EURO 16 741 – 27 902

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21 David Brown South African 1951–2016

Ship 1989 bronze signed, dated and numbered 1/1 75 x 92 x 41 cm

ZAR 100 000 – 150 000 USD 6 737 – 10 105 GBP 4 892 – 7 338 EURO 5 580 – 8 370

David Brown started using bronze casting in his artistic process following encouragement from his father-in-law, Cecil Skotnes, to pursue sculpture as a medium. Brown began by making a series of ‘war machines’, which he carved directly into wax rather than making moulds from shaped clay. He favoured this method as it resulted in each work having a visual potency and high resolution—as if the artist had in fact sculpted the bronze while it was red hot and malleable. In 1988, Brown began the series, Voyages, a group of bronze sculptures made up of different satirical forms of ships—as a critical reference to their role as the transporters of slaves and colonial endeavours. These are not ships that sail the seas lightly with the wind, but the type that sail heavy as would a tank if it had an ore and a pent-up crew hyped-up on violence. In 1989, David Brown was the winner of the AA Mutual Life VITA Art Now Award. JKS

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22 Moshekwa Langa b.1975 South Africa

About Yesterday 2008 pen, pencil, ink, gouache, collage and lacquer on paper 76 x 56 cm

ZAR 100 000 – 150 000 USD 6 737 – 10 105 GBP 4 892 – 7 338 EURO 5 580 – 8 370

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NOTE

Moshekwa Langa recently exhibited in Crossing Cultures: 30 Years Thami Mnyele Foundation Residency Award at Centrum Beeldende Kunst (CBK) Zuidoost in Amsterdam.


23 Kudzanai Chiurai b.1981 Zimbabwe

Untitled pastel, gouache and collage on paper 55.5 x 37 cm

ZAR 70 000 – 100 000 USD 4 716 – 6 737 GBP 3 424 – 4 892 EURO 3 906 – 5 580

NOTE

Kudzanai Chiurai’s work will be included in the upcoming exhibition _UBUNTU: A Lucid Dream, at Palais de Tokyo in Paris. In 2020, he formed part of Allied with Power: African and African Diaspora Art from the Jorge M. Pérez Collection, at the Pérez Art Museum Miami; Witness: Afro Perspectives at El Espacio 23 in Miami and Uptown South at Adler Beatty in New York.

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24 Turiya Magadlela b.1978 South Africa

Ngizokuthanda ngasosonke isikhathi ngoba wena ulithemba lami ii 2019 nylon and cotton pantyhose and sealant on canvas signed, dated and inscribed with the title on the reverse 150 x 150 x 5 cm

ZAR 70 000 – 90 000 USD 4 761 – 6 063 GBP 3 424 – 4 403 EURO 3 906 – 5 022

According to Turiya Magadlela, ‘the work is actually part of a series named after a struggle song, which is a love song about beauty, written by Khaya Mahlangu. South Africa has a tendency of neglecting its legacy, its history and the people that created it. I am concerned with these issues, and in a small way I want to restore gaps in our cultural history using my work. And again alluding to the philosophy that ultimately whatever art is saying it must be beautiful’.1 Ubuhle bakho bufana ne langa, liphuma...Ngizokuthanda ngasosonke isikhathi, ngoba wena ulithemba lam’ ngithembise ukuthi, nakuwe koba njalo, wen’ungowam ... Your beauty is like the sun rising ... I will love you till the end of time, because, you are my only hope, promise me that you will feel the same ... you belong to me … EB 1

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As relayed to Emma Bedford via social media, 2 February 2021.


25 Turiya Magadlela b.1978 South Africa

Inequalities 2016 nylon and cotton pantyhose and sealant on canvas 150 x 150 x 5 cm

ZAR 70 000 – 90 000 USD 4 761 – 6 063 GBP 3 424 – 4 403 EURO 3 906 – 5 022

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26 Marlene Dumas b.1953 South Africa

SCORE

Marlene Dumas’s Score is an extraordinary painting that forges youthful passion and the principles of Classical art into a dynamic statement about life, love and art. It was inspired by the central panel of Italian Renaissance artist, Andrea Mantegna’s The Adoration of the Magi, painted around 1460 and now in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. Dumas remembers painting Score during her years at the Michaelis School of Fine Art at the University of Cape Town, in response to an assignment by one of her lecturers1 — perhaps the legendary teacher and artist, Stanley Pinker, whom she greatly admired. Instructed to choose a Classical painting for its composition and to transform it, Dumas chose Renaissance master, Mantegna.

oil on canvas inscribed with the title top right accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist 122 x 122 cm

Retaining the original composition, Dumas has nevertheless radically reinterpreted the original by changing the content in profound ways. An erotic body is transposed into the holy cave, and where the Virgin was surrounded by angels, the artist has kissed the canvas with her own lips coated in fuchsia and red oil paint – an activity she likens to pilgrims kissing the feet of the saints.2

ZAR 3 000 000 – 5 000 000 USD 202 106 – 336 843 GBP 146 762 – 244 603 EURO 167 410 – 279 016

The title SCORE inscribed in red vibrates against its complementary green in the upper right, alluding to winning the game, sexual scoring or religious fervour. Her use of the word also acknowledges art historical precedents from Kurt Schwitters, the Cubists and Jasper Johns to Pop artists Richard Hamilton and Eduardo Paolozzi, who are amongst artists who introduced lettering or statements in their art.

LITERATURE

Dumas is widely regarded as one of the most influential painters working today. Her engagement with art history and her experiments with representations of the sexual body have drawn keen interest worldwide. Recent exhibitions have included paintings ranging from monumental figures to intimately scaled canvases presenting details of bodily parts and facial features.

Dumas, M. and Bedford, E. (2007). Marlene Dumas: Intimate Relations. Cape Town: Jacana Media and Amsterdam: Roma Publications, illustrated in colour on p.17.

EB

34

1

Email from the artist to Emma Bedford, 26 October 2020.

2

Ibid.


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27 Penny Siopis b.1953 South Africa

Untitled acrylic, pastel and collage on paper signed bottom left 40 x 90 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

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28 Penny Siopis b.1953 South Africa

Damaged Funerary Angel Congo 1964 1996/7 oil on canvas signed and dated 1996/7 on the reverse 39.5 x 50 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

Although well known for her videos and installations, Penny Siopis is foremost a painter. As an artist who has consistently engaged with South Africa’s fraught social and political life, her central concerns are with the physicality of paint, the accumulation of found objects (including video footage), material memory, and the politics of embodiment. As she has previously articulated her ‘interest in materiality as concept, form defined as much through the relief surface as by colour and composition.1 The work featured as one of a series shown (in a line) on Lift Off 1997, a group exhibition that launched the ‘new’ Goodman Gallery in Joburg which had moved from Hyde Park to Parkwood. The series was positioned opposite my installation Reconnaissance 1900 - 1997, a collection of found objects (personal) arranged on a platform in front of a huge photograph (like a screen) of my grandfather’s cinema, which became one of the references for my film, My Lovely Day. The paintings referenced some of the objects featured in the installation, and also some that were not in the collection. Text and dates—in painted script—evoke concerns of memory and what falls in and out of the official archive.2 EB

EXHIBITED

Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, Lift Off, 1997.

1

Excerpts from a text by Alexandra Dodd. Aspire Art Auctions. Spring 2016, p.50

2

Penny Siopis, email to the seller, 1 February 2021.

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29 Tracey Moffatt b.1960 Australia

Up in the Sky #3 1997 offset print signed, dated, numbered 57/60 and inscribed with the title in pencil along the bottom margin from an edition of 60 + 8AP sheet size: 72.5 x 101.5 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

NOTES Courtesy of the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, and Art Gallery of NSW, Australia.

30 Tracey Moffatt b.1960 Australia

Up in the Sky #12 1997 offset print signed, dated, numbered 57/60 and inscribed with the title in pencil along the bottom margin from an edition of 60 + 8AP sheet size: 72.5 x 101.5 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

NOTES Courtesy of the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, and Art Gallery of NSW, Australia.

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Tracey Moffatt is one of Australia’s most renowned contemporary artists, both nationally and internationally. Working predominantly in photography and film for over three decades, Moffatt is known as a powerful visual storyteller. The narrative is often implied and self-referential, exploring her own childhood memories, and the broader issues of race, gender, sexuality and identity. Moffatt has held over 100 solo exhibitions of her work in Europe, the United States and Australia. Her films, including Nightcries – A Rural Tragedy, 1989, and Bedevil, 1993, have been screened at the Cannes Film Festival, the Dia Centre for the Arts in New York and the National Centre for Photography in Paris. Moffatt also represented Australia at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017. Tracey Moffatt’s Up in the Sky series presents a loose narrative set in an Australian outback town, implying commentary on Australian race relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. Works from this series are exhibited at Tate Modern in A Year in Art: Australia 1992, a showcase of recent works examining tensions around land rights and ongoing colonial legacies. The exhibition is on view from 15 February 2021 to Spring 2022. Proceeds from the sale of lots 29 to 32 are in aid of Molo Songololo and its valuable work that benefits thousands of children each year. Largely 12 to 17-years of age and from poor families and communities, child victims of sexual violence and exploitation, those at risk and their parents and families all benefit from the organisation’s vital work. Government and NGO service providers engaged in this vitally important work also greatly benefit from Molo Songololo’s initiatives. EB


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31 Tracey Moffatt b.1960 Australia

Up in the Sky #16 1997 offset print signed, dated, numbered 57/60 and inscribed with the title in pencil along the bottom margin from an edition of 60 + 8AP sheet size: 72.5 x 101.5 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

NOTES Courtesy of the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, and Art Gallery of NSW, Australia.

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32 Tracey Moffatt b.1960 Australia

Up in the Sky #5 1997 offset print signed, dated, numbered 22/60 and inscribed with the title in pencil along the bottom margin from an edition of 60 + 8AP sheet size: 72.5 x 101.5 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

NOTES Courtesy of the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, and Art Gallery of NSW, Australia.

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33 Isaac Julien b.1960 United Kingdom

Chameleon (Ten Thousand Waves) 2010 endura ultra photograph, diasec mounted accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from an edition of 6 + 1AP 180 x 240 x 7.5 cm

ZAR 600 000 – 800 000 USD 40 421 – 53 895 GBP 29 352 – 39 136 EURO 33 482 – 44 643

EXHIBITED

The Whitworth, The University of Manchester, Manchester, Isaac Julien: Ten Thousand Waves, 30 March to 28 August 2018, the nine-screen video installation exhibited. Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town, All Things Being Equal..., 22 September 2017 to 30 June 2019, the nine-screen video installation exhibited. Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris, Chinese Artists at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, 27 January to 29 August 2016, the nine-screen video installation exhibited. MOMA, New York, Isaac Julien: Ten Thousand Waves, 25 November 2013 to 17 February 2014, the nine-screen video installation exhibited. Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, San Diego, Isaac Julien: Ten Thousand Waves, 23 February to 4 November 2012, another example from the edition exhibited. The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, Isaac Julien: Ten Thousand Waves, 28 October 2011 to 4 March 2012, the ninescreen video installation exhibited. Metro Pictures, New York, Isaac Julien: Ten Thousand Waves, 18 March to 30 April 2011, another example from the edition exhibited. Victoria Milo Gallery, London, Isaac Julien: Ten Thousand Waves, 7 October to 13 November 2010, another example from the edition exhibited.

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Internationally acclaimed artist Isaac Julien is renowned for his immersive, large-scale cinematic installations and multi-media works that pioneered the dialogue around cultural politics. A first to the South African market, this alluring, large-scale photographic work is part of the artist’s epic multi-media project, Ten Thousand Waves. Originally inspired by the 2004 Morcambe Bay tragedy, and shot on location in China in the remote Guangxi province and at the famous Shanghai Film Studios, Julien casts Maggie Cheung—the Hong Kong-based actress—as the ghostly protagonist in a series of meticulously staged, dramatic settings and fictional scenes. The work poetically weaves together stories of the past and present to explore the movement of people across countries and continents as a comment on journeys not completed. Ten Thousand Waves premiered in 2010 at Victoria Miro Gallery, London. Since then, it has been shown in various prestigious art institutions around the world—including MoMA in New York and the Pompidou Centre in Paris. In 2017, the work was displayed at Zeitz MOCAA in Cape Town as part of the inaugural exhibition, All things being equal…. A catalogue documenting the Ten Thousand Waves project was published by Metro Pictures, New York and Victoria Miro Gallery, London. In 2017, Julien was invited to participate in the 57th Venice Biennale at the inaugural Diaspora Pavilion and in 2015, he exhibited in the 56th Venice Biennale curated by Okwui Enwezor. Julien’s work is included in the collections of Tate, London; MoMA, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC; the AlbrightKnox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris; the LUMA Foundation, Arles; the Kramlich Collection, California; and Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town. MVZ


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34 David Goldblatt South African 1930–2018

Luke Kgatitsoe at his house, bulldozed in February 1984 by the government after the forced removal of the people of Magopa, a black-owned farm, which had been declared a ‘black spot’, Ventersdrop district, Transvaal, 21 October 1986. 1986, printed later silver gelatin print signed and dated 21/10/86 in pencil on the reverse image size: 57 x 72 cm from an open edition

ZAR 150 000 – 250 000 USD 10 105 – 16 842 GBP 7 338 – 12 230 EURO 8 370 – 13 951

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NOTES

Other examples from the edition are in the permanent collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA), USA and MOMA, New York. LITERATURE

Goldblatt, D. and Loock, U. (2008). David Goldblatt: Intersections Intersected. Fundação Serralves, Porto, another example from the edition illustrated on p.52. Goldblatt, D., and Parr, M. (2006). David Goldblatt: Photographs. Roma: Contrasto, another example from the edition illustrated on p.133. Goldblatt, D., Diserens, C. and Enwezor, O. (2001). David Goldblatt: Fifty-One Years. Barcelona: Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, another example from the edition illustrated on p.333. Goldblatt, D. (1998). South Africa: The Structure of Things Then. USA and Canada: The Monacelli Press, another example from the edition illustrated on p.60.


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35 David Goldblatt South African 1930–2018

Boy 1975 1975, printed early 1980s hand printed gelatin silver print signed, dated, inscribed with the title, the darkroom annotations and ‘Johannesburg’ on the reverse sheet size: 40.5 x 30.5 cm; image size: 24.5 x 22.5 cm, unframed unique

ZAR 120 000 – 150 000 USD 8 084 – 10 105 GBP 5 870 – 7 338 EURO 6 696 – 8 370

NOTES

Hand printed by David Goldblatt early 1980s. PROVENANCE

Gifted to the current owner by the artist.

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36 Edoardo Villa South African 1915–2011

Reclining Figure 1990 painted steel signed and dated on the base excluding base: 170 x 270 x 200 cm; including base: 198 x 270 x 200 cm

ZAR 700 000 – 1 000 000 USD 47 158 – 67 369 GBP 34 244 – 48 921 EURO 39 062 – 55 803

PROVENANCE

Private collection, Vaal Estate.

Reclining Figure is an exuberant assemblage of intertwined tubular and disclike shapes in steel. Produced in 1990, this impressive sculpture shows Edoardo Villa’s return (at the age of 75) to creating larger volumetric works and affirms the artist’s ability to innovatively construct complex formal structures, as well as his incredible mastery of working with steel, on an amplified scale. At almost 2 metres in length, Reclining Figure presents a symphony of geometric and organic forms where “Villa appears to revel in an almost Baroque feast of varied, bold, twisting, stretching, expanding, massive, open shapes”.1 A touch of lush green inside the “loose-limbed” tubes indicates the dialogue between the interior and exterior parts of the composition. Although an abstracted construction, Villa’s sculptures are generally derived from a figurative source, and this sculpture, according to Karel Nel and Amalie von Maltitz, is reminiscent of Henry Moore’s Falling Warrior (1956) at Tate Gallery in London. But unlike the earlier work, Reclining Form, rather than being heroic, suggests vulnerability.2 Villa was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal at the University of Pretoria in 1990 and in 1995 the Villa Museum opened on the main campus. To celebrate the inauguration, a long-term exhibition of Villa’s large steel sculptures was on public display at the university. Reclining Figure was included in the exhibition and installed on the campus at the time.

LITERATURE

Nel, K., Burroughs, E. and Von Maltitz, A. (eds). (2005). Villa at 90. Johannesburg and Cape Town: Jonathan Ball Publishers, illustrated on pp.98 & 99.

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MVZ 1

Nel, K. and Von Maltitz, A. ‘Edoardo Villa: A Life Considered’ in Nel, K., Burroughs, E. and Von Maltitz, A. (eds.), Villa at

90. Johannesburg and Cape Town: Jonathan Ball Publishing, p.92. 2

Ibid, p.98


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George Milwa Mnyaluza Pemba occupies a unique place in South African art. His depictions of people are marked by insight and empathy for his fellow human beings. Painted in 1947, I Epolojice My Warship is a legacy piece that introduces Pemba’s social realism.

37 George Pemba South African 1912–2001

I Epolojice My Warship 1947 oil on canvas signed and dated along the left edge; inscribed with the title on the reverse 41 x 35 cm

ZAR 400 000 – 600 000 USD 26 947 – 40 421 GBP 19 568 – 29 352 EURO 22 321– 33 482

PROVENANCE

Acquired directly from the artist and thence by descent.

Pemba completed this painting while he was preparing for his first solo exhibition in East London in 1948. The work was originally acquired directly from the artist and has remained in the same private collection for over six decades. An accomplished portrait in oil paint, this rare early painting stands among the finest works by Pemba ever to come to auction. As a painting it can be appreciated on multiple levels. The apparent humour of the title (inscribed on the reverse of the canvas) resides in the artist’s deliberate use of pidgin English which the court—at that time—might have expected of a black man. Pemba, one of the first black artists to benefit from tertiary education, provides clear indicators of his intent in the title in which the phrase ‘your worship’ is transposed into My Warship – each the very antithesis of the other. The sitter’s quizzical expression alerts the viewer to the significance of the work. Pemba’s expertly painted portrait conveys the humanity of the subject caught in a double bind—while understanding the consequences of a harsh judgment from the court, he must nevertheless perform obsequiously without undermining his own sense of self-worth. With his subject consciously role playing the obsequiousness required in the relations between subaltern and coloniser, Pemba provides a critique of the colonial order of authority. Hayden Proud, Senior Curator of Paintings and Sculpture at the Iziko South African National Gallery and author of the Pemba monograph, commends “Pemba’s respect for the value of good drawing, inventive composition, accomplished handling of paint and an overarching sense of vision”1 which are all evident in this early painting. EB 1

Proud. H. and Feinberg, B. (1996). George Milwa Mnyaluza Pemba - Retrospective Exhibition. Cape Town: Mayibuye Centre

and Iziko South African National Gallery, p.16.

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38 Peter Clarke South African 1929–2014

Dop 1970 acrylic with sand on board signed and dated March 1970 bottom right; inscribed with the title on a label on the reverse 44.5 x 59 cm

ZAR 400 000 – 600 000 USD 26 947 – 40 421 GBP 19 568 – 29 352 EURO 22 321– 33 482

Peter Clarke holds a unique place in South African art both for his poignant insights into South African society and his vivid imagery. Printmaking classes at the Michaelis School of Fine Art in 1961 refined his graphic skills. And his attendance in 1962 at the Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten in Amsterdam with funding from the Congress for Cultural Freedom in Paris, which was arranged through exiled South African writer Ezekiel Es’kia Mphahlele (with whom Clarke was acquainted through their work for Drum magazine),1 provided additional artistic skills and confidence. By 1970, Clarke was an established painter and graphic artist, writer, poet, chronicler of his times and commentator on life. Nowhere is this multiplicity of skills and insights more poignant than in this painting, simply titled Dop. As any South African will know, ‘dop’ means ‘drink’: it is both a noun, describing an alcoholic beverage and it is also a verb – to drink. The word conjures images of gaiety, celebrations and shared pleasures. However, it also carries connotations of the dreaded ‘dop system’, a practice whereby workers, especially on farms, were paid in measures of alcohol. This is a rare subject in Clarke’s oeuvre, making it an exceptional work. Clarke was acutely attuned to the woes of ordinary people and particularly those against whom the apartheid system of racial division was cruellest. Images of suffering that confirm his great empathy for his fellow human beings include Die lang pad (1962) and Anxiety (1966).2 In this painting a youth is shown drinking from an unmarked bottle. Behind him stands an older figure—a man staring with disapproving looks or a manifestation of his conscience—as if to warn him against the pitfalls of alcohol consumption. Danger is echoed in the surrounding landscape with its thorny branches and red skies. EB 1

Hobbs, P. and Rankin, E. (2011). Listening to Distant Thunder: The Art of Peter Clarke. Johannesburg: Standard Bank of

South Africa, p.89. 2

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Ibid, pp.92 and 98.


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39 Gerard Sekoto South African 1913–1993

Landscape and figure studies, seven 1971 watercolours on paper each signed and dated bottom right 10 x 11 cm; 8.5 x 13 cm; 13 x 8 cm; 10 x 8 cm; 8 x 13 cm; 9.5 x 13 cm; 10 x 11 cm

ZAR 220 000 – 280 000 USD 14 821 – 18 863 GBP 10 763 – 13 698 EURO 12 277 – 15 625

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40 Christopher Uchefuna Okeke Nigerian 1933–2016

Zakian 1956 watercolour and fineliner pen on card signed, dated and inscribed with the title bottom right 19.5 x 12 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

41 Cecil Skotnes South Africa 1926–2009

Assassination of Shaka 1973 each print signed, dated and inscribed with the sequence number in pencil in the margin, the title page signed by the artist and the poet A portfolio of forty-three colour woodcuts by Cecil Skotnes with forty-three caption texts by Stephen Gray. This edition limited to 225 sets and 25 artist proofs, this portfolio numbered 197/225 sheet size: 50 x 33 cm each, within a beige linen-covered portfolio box

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

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42 Christopher Uchefuna Okeke Nigerian 1933–2016

Nok Suite, six 1958/59 pen and ink on paper each signed and dated Dec 58 or Jan 59; each inscribed with the respective title on the reverse 19 x 12.6 cm each

ZAR 180 000 – 240 000 USD 12 126 – 16 168 GBP 8 806 – 11 741 EURO 10 045 – 13 393

LITERATURE

Okeke, U. (2019). Art in Development – A Nigerian Perspective. Beiruth: Iwalewa Books. NOTES

Christopher Uchefuna Okeke was born in Nimo in Nigeria in 1933. A seminal figure in modern, twentieth-century Nigerian art, he is also perhaps the most famous and influential historical figure in arts education in the country. Okeke’s major concern and most important philosophical contribution to the visual arts in Nigeria was what he called the process of ‘natural synthesis’. For Okeke, this process and reality for African art, in particular Nigerian art, impacted as it was by colonial education systems, in particular, had to be thought of as a new, modern style of its own, capturing both the essence of African spirituality as it was expressed in art, along with European styles and sensibilities. This was what he called the process of ‘natural synthesis’, each tradition flowing naturally into one another to establish a new way of making art and how it expressed modern Nigerian culture in particular.

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43 Gerard Sekoto South African 1913–1993

Man at a desk c.1945 gouache on paper signed bottom left 71 x 54 cm

ZAR 300 000 – 400 000 USD 20 211 – 26 947 GBP 14 676 – 19 568 EURO 16 741 – 22 321

PROVENANCE

Mr. J. Kilian Private Collection, Johannebsurg. EXHIBITED

Johannesburg Art Gallery, Johannesburg, Gerard Sekoto: Unreserved ties, 1 November 1989 to 10 February 1990. LITERATURE

Spiro, L. (1989). Gerard Sekoto: Unreserved ties. Johannesburg: Johannesburg Art Gallery, illustrated in colour on p.80.

This intimate portrayal by Gerard Sekoto of a man at his desk carries notable compositional similarities to post-impressionist Vincent Van Gogh’s The Bedroom (also affectionately known as Bedroom in Arles) from 1888. Sekoto himself had been shown copies of the great Dutch painter’s works in the 1930s whilst teaching at the Khaiso Secondary School. His colleague, the artist Ernest Mancoba, much admired the works and used them as a comparison for the struggle that both Mancoba and Sekoto faced as black artists in a segregated South Africa. Van Gogh’s bedroom in bright, contrasting colours was created (along with a series of works of the same theme) shortly after the artist’s arrival in Arles in the South of France. Sekoto, in comparison, painted this more subdued interior scene upon his arrival in Eastwood, Pretoria, where he resided with his mother and stepfather in the years prior to his self-exile to Paris. Unbeknownst to Sekoto, just years after his depiction of this humble bedroom in Eastwood, the suburb would fall victim to forced removals, and its population relocated — along with the communities of Sophiatown — to the Ga-Rankuwa township. This private view and sincere depiction of a man quietly working at his desk, gives unique representation to, and intimate insight into a since uprooted community. Today, Pretoria acts as a symbol of South Africa’s democracy, and Eastwood is a suburb populated by embassies and ambassadors—situated less than a kilometre from the Union Buildings, where in 1994 South Africa’s first democratically elected leader Nelson Mandela was inaugurated. LT

Vincent van Gogh, The Bedroom, 1888.

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44 George Pemba South African 1912–2001

Xhosa Traditional Dancers I 1981 oil on board signed and dated top left 38.5 x 49.5 cm

ZAR 250 000 – 350 000 USD 16 842 – 23 579 GBP 12 230 – 17 122 EURO 13 951 – 19 531

PROVENANCE

Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg. LITERATURE

cf. Hudleston, S. (1996). Against All Odds, George Pemba: His Life and Work. Johannesburg: Jonathan Ball Publishers, Xhosa Traditional Dancers II illustrated on p.57.

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George Pemba is one of the most important social realists in South African art. Throughout his career, Pemba drew inspiration from his own surroundings. As a compassionate and concerned observer, Pemba became a visual chronicler of the joys and sorrows of township life. By the 1950s Pemba had mastered oils, and by the 70s he made the decision to step away from his family’s business—a spaza shop called Gabby’s Store— to paint more professionally. Having had several years to focus solely on his painting, come the 80s Pemba was an artist in his prime and had developed a great confidence with his own distinctive style—one for which he is still recognised today. Whilst Pemba prided himself on his Christian faith, his Xhosa customs and traditions remained of utmost importance to him. Proud of his heritage, Pemba used his art as a means to keep these traditions alive. In the late 60s, he turned playwright and produced two plays, The Xhosa Prophet Ntsikana and The Story of Nongqawuse, both based on the Xhosa history and mythology which he so loved. Later, Pemba began to more frequently depict scenes of sangomas as well as Xhosa weddings and funerals in his paintings. Xhosa Traditional Dancers I is indicative of the artist’s particular decision to contextualise these more traditional scenes in urban surroundings. Significantly, Pemba is one of few black modernist painters to have come from the Eastern Cape province, and certainly the best-known. In fact, he is the only artist from the region to have been represented in the Revisions collection— rendering his insight into daily life and traditions there particularly unique. LT


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45 Willie Bester b.1956 South Africa

The Missing Ones 2007 painted and assembled steel signed, dated and numbered 2 on the underside 24 x 114 x 19.5 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 80 000 USD 3 368 – 5 389 GBP 2 446 – 3 914 EURO 2 790 – 4 464 NOTES

LITERATURE cf. Bedford, E. (ed.). (2007). Willie Bester. Cape Town: Goodman Gallery Editions, a comparable example illustrated in colour on p.23.

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Willie Bester’s work formed part of the large scale exhibition Still Here Tomorrow to High Five You Yesterday, curated in 2019 by Azu Ngwagbogu at Zeitz MOCAA in Cape Town.


two views of lot 46

46 Angus Taylor b.1970 South Africa

Head 2012 bronze and granite signed, dated and inscribed ‘copy unique’ 31 x 36 x 15 cm including base

ZAR 50 000 – 80 000 USD 3 368 – 5 389 GBP 2 446 – 3 914 EURO 2 790 – 4 464

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47 Angus Taylor b.1970 South Africa

Standing man Belfast granite on a steel ligature 260 x 147 x 94 cm including base

ZAR 200 000 – 300 000 USD 13 474 – 20 211 GBP 9 784 – 14 676 EURO 11 161 – 16 741

EXHIBITED

University of Johannesburg Art Gallery, Johannesburg, Deduct, 2006.

Throughout history stone has been the medium of monuments, from the colossal granite image of King Ramesses II to the Italian Renaissance’s David. The masters have appreciated the many qualities varying stones brought to the creative process, but not until recent times has the raw, unrefined character of stone been celebrated in the art canon. Angus Taylor does not deter from the inherent materiality of his mediums, he draws inspiration from them. In Standing man, granite appears unadulterated as if summoned from the earth rather than by the hand of Donatello; Taylor creates a figure from stone without employing the traditional method of mallet and chisel. Standing 2.6 metres tall, the heavy weight of granite rocks is strategically balanced, suspended and affixed by steel rods to form this striking monument of a figure. In keeping with South Africa’s great contemporary sculptors, Taylor continues to ambitiously push the use of traditional mediums in new refreshing ways. Standing man was exhibited at Angus Taylor’s solo exhibition Deduct at the University of Johannesburg Art Gallery in 2006. Since starting his career in the mid 90s, he has exhibited locally and internationally, notably in Australia and London. In 2017, Taylor was awarded the Helgaard Steyn Award for Sculpture. JKS

Images at Deduct, University of Johannsburg, 2006. Images © Angus Taylor

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48 Cyrus Kabiru b.1984 Kenya

Njia Ya Maisha, Macho Nne: Brazilian Mask 2015, printed 2016 pigment ink on HP Premium Satin Photographic Paper accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist number 4, from an edition of 5 + 2AP 150 x 120 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 80 000 USD 4 042 – 5 389 GBP 2 935 – 3 914 EURO 3 348 – 4 464

EXHIBITED

The Armory Show, New York, SMAC Gallery, (Booth 630, Pier 94), 3 to 6 March 2016, another example from the edition exhibited.

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Cyrus Kabiru was recently selected for the Apollo 40 Under 40 Africa list of the continent’s most influential rising artists, thinkers, patrons and advocates. This striking work forms part of Kabiru’s Njia Ya Maisha series which was created for his 2016 solo presentation at the Armory Show in New York. Swahili for “way(s) of life”, the Njia Ya Maisha C-Stunner range of intricate eyewear made from found materials, chronicles the dynamic flows of commodity culture: both the artefacts and brands, and their shifting symbolic value. In Macho Nne: Brazilian Mask, repurposed MacCoffee packaging is turned into a spectacular facial ornament. Here Kabiru enacts an alter ego when wearing the glasses for the self-portrait. Macho Nne means ‘four eyes’ in Swahili and is the title Kabiru assigns to his photographs, alluding to the transformation that occurs once he puts on the C-Stunner. MVZ


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49 Guy Tillim b.1962 South Africa

Kunhinga Portraits: Mateus Chitangenda, Fernando Chitala and Enoke Chisingi 2002 archival pigment ink on 300g cotton rag paper signed, dated, numbered 7/12 and inscribed with the title in pencil along the bottom margin sheet size: 61 x 76 cm

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 695 – 4 042 GBP 1 957 – 2 935 EURO 2 232 – 3 348

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EXHIBITED

Stevenson, Johannesburg, Kunhinga Portraits, 18 June to 19 July 2003, another example from the edition exhibited. Johannesburg Art Gallery, Johannesburg, Africa Remix: Contemporary Art of a Continent, 24 June to 30 September 2007, another example from the edition exhibited. LITERATURE

Njami, S. (2007). Africa Remix: Contemporary Art of a Continent. Johannesburg: Jacana Media, another example from the edition illustrated in colour on p.82.

NOTES

Taken in February 2002 in the Angolan province of Bie, near Kuito, Guy Tillim’s Kunhinga Portraits portray displaced people, who in the months before the end of the civil war, fled in advance of the Angolan government’s “clearing” of regions where civilians had provided cover for UNITA soldiers. The subjects had walked for five days from Monge to seek refuge in the small town of Kunhinga in the safe havens provided by foreign agencies stationed in the area.


50 Mikhael Subotzky b.1981 South Africa

Johnny Fortune, Pollsmoor Maximum Security Prison (from Die Vier Hoeke series) printed in 2004 inkjet print on cotton rag paper signed, dated and numbered 2/9 in pencil along the bottom margin image size: 45.5 x 69.5 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

PROVENANCE

Another example from the edition is in The Walther Collection, Germany.

51 Mikhael Subotzky b.1981 South Africa

Shackles, Pollsmoor Maximum Security Prison (from Die Vier Hoeke series) printed in 2004 inkjet print on cotton rag paper signed, dated and numbered 2/9 in pencil along the bottom margin image size: 45.5 x 69.5 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

PROVENANCE

Another example from the edition is in The Walther Collection, Germany.

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52 Mikhael Subotzky b.1981 South Africa

Reception, Pollsmoor Maximum Security Prison (from Die Vier Hoeke, Panoramic series) 2004 inkjet print on cotton rag paper signed, dated and inscribed AP in pencil along the bottom margin image size: 38 x 181.5 cm

ZAR 180 000 – 240 000 USD 12 126 – 16 168 GBP 8 806 – 11 741 EURO 10 045 – 13 393

PROVENANCE

Another example from the edition is in The Walther Collection, Germany.

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53 Bridget Baker b.1971 South Africa

The Blue Collar Girl (Valais, Switzerland) 2006–7 lambda print and diasec at Grieger, Dusseldorf, Germany accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist number 2, from an edition of 8 60 x 241.5 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

EXHIBITED

The New Church Museum, Cape Town, Subject as Matter, 15 November 2012 to 29 June 2013, another example from the edition exhibited. João Ferreira Gallery, Cape Town, Bridget Bæker, 3 to 27 October 2007, another example from the edition exhibited.

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NOTES

The Blue Collar Girl series is a sequence of staged images that refer to the act of liberating oneself from socio-economic, class and gender politics through public gestures and the myth-making language of cinema. This work, featuring a scene in the Blue Collar Girl drama is presented as a triptych – an episodic moment that carries a fuller narrative beyond the frame and image. Here, one sees—and then no longer sees—the Blue Collar Girl. In the first frame she is seated in an Art Deco cinema, reading a German film magazine. In the next frame, she is absent from the view of a snowpack glacier and in the final frame the ghostly phrase Only you can © appears from icy water as a declarative and affirmative statement. Produced in association with Centre de réflexion sur l’image et ses contextes (CRIC, Sierre, Switzerland), Ecole Cantonale D’Art du Valais (ECAV, Sierre, Switzerland) and Official BB Projects. Locations in Valais, Switzerland: Cinema Casino, Sierre; Saleina Glacier, Orsières Photographer: Daniel Stucki


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54 Misheck Masamvu b.1980 Zimbabwe

Lady parts on the Coat of Arms 2016 oil on canvas 178 x 171 x 2 cm

ZAR 200 000 – 300 000 USD 13 474 – 20 211 GBP 9 784 – 14 676 EURO 11 161 – 16 741

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EXHIBITED

Goodman Gallery, Cape Town, Still Still, 15 September to 20 October 2016.


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Songs my mother taught me is a song for voice and piano written in 1880 by Antonín Dvořák, the Czech composer of Romantic music. It is the fourth of seven songs from his cycle Gypsy Songs. Passionate about his homeland and its traditional music, he often employed the rhythms and other aspects of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia into his music.

55 Robert Hodgins South African 1920–2010

Songs my mother taught me c.1983 oil on canvas signed, dated and inscribed with the title on the reverse 81 x 61.5 cm

ZAR 450 000 – 550 000 USD 30 316 – 37 053 GBP 22 041 – 26 906 EURO 25 111 – 30 692

Its bittersweet melodies evoke memories of times when mothers might have sung to us to lull us to sleep, or perhaps sung to express their own joys, or to mitigate life’s sorrows. A mother, dressed in a colourful shift—as timeless in the flapper era as it would have been in Mary Quant’s 60s, or even today—observes a boy, engaging in different activities — skipping, twirling a hoop and balancing on a high wire which is simultaneously the string of a bright kite that swirls across the sky: a line that is both dangerous and playful. The likelihood that this is an autobiographical work is very compelling. Robert Hodgins was a great painter, able to turn the stuff of ordinary life into art and poetry – which is why he is so beloved. Born just after the first World War, to a single mother, Hodgins would have had a tough life were it not for his indomitable spirit, great intelligence and compassion, and his love of art, literature, theatre and music which enrich his paintings and make them so seductive. Here he manages to create a playful scene which—at the same time— suggests that each is isolated in their own activities and reveries. Much as we might try to protect our loved ones, we will inevitably have to trust that they can make their many and various ways in the world. The painting predates Marlon Brando’s autobiography of the same title which, one cannot help thinking, would have delighted the artist. EB Listen to this hauntingly beautiful version of Songs my mother taught me with Augustin Hadelich on violin accompanied by Charles Owen on piano: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fM16l3GYZN0 And this version with soprano, Ernestina Jošt: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8AuPWZNxpY

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56 William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa

Drawing from Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old (Mrs Eckstein, preparing for the day) 1991 charcoal and pastel on paper signed bottom right 135 x 108.5 cm

ZAR 2 800 000 – 3 800 000 USD 188 632 – 256 001 GBP 136 978 – 185 898 EURO 156 249 – 212 052

William Kentridge’s works captivate audiences in galleries and museums worldwide and set sale rooms alight with competitive bidding. This was the case when we set a world record with Drawing from Stereoscope (Double page, Soho in two rooms) selling for R6,600,400 in October 2018, beating our own world record of R5,456,640 for Drawing from Mine (Soho with Coffee Plunger and Cup) set in November 2017. More recently we sold Drawing for Johannesburg, 2nd Greatest City after Paris (Soho Eating) for €232,200 in an auction in Paris in 2020. The drawings from Kentridge’s celebrated animated film series, combining both his artistic and literary sensibility, are undoubtedly amongst the most sought-after works. Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old (1991), in which Soho and Felix resume their contest for the affections of Mrs Eckstein, is the fourth film in the Soho Chronicles. The story takes a dramatic turn when Soho questions what it profits him to own the earth if he has lost the woman he loves. To win her back he is forced to dissolve his empire. Drawing from Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old (Mrs Eckstein, preparing for the day) depicts the beloved in all her splendor, giving herself over to the pleasure of dancing in anticipation of the day ahead. She is the object of desire. In fact, the real subject of the films, as the artist’s brother, Matthew Kentridge, states in his celebrated book. It is worth noting that Kentridge won the Rembrandt Gold Medal at the Cape Town Triennial in 1991 for the animated film Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old. EB 1

Film stills from Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old.

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Kentridge, M. (2015). The Soho Chronicles: 10 Films by William Kentridge. London, New York and Calcutta: Seagull Books, p.6.


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57 Marlene Dumas b.1953 South Africa

Portrait of a young Nelson Mandela 2008 lithograph on wove paper signed, dated, numbered 160/250, inscribed with the title and ‘Would you trust this man with your daughter?’ in pencil along the bottom margin sheet size: 45.5 x 35 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 80 000 USD 4 042 – 5 389 GBP 2 935 – 3 914 EURO 3 348 – 4 464

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58 William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa

Cat 2012 linocut on Shorter Oxford English Dictionary pages mounted on selim Arches Cover White paper signed, numbered 9/30 and embossed with a David Krut Workshop chop mark along the bottom margin sheet size: 35.5 x 54.5 cm

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 695 – 4 042 GBP 1 957 – 2 935 EURO 2 232 – 3 348

NOTES William Kentridge’s Cat is a work from a series titled, the Universal Archive. Commencing in November 2012, the series consists of a collection of small ink drawings that were photo-transferred onto linoleum plates carved by David Krut Workshop printmakers and printed on pages of dictionaries and encyclopedias. This unique transferal of gestural detail from hand-drawing to linocut offers a distinctive expansion of the boundaries of drawing. The application of the abstracted gestural form – in this case, a cat – realised on top of dictionary pages, makes for a disrupted association of meaning through the two different mediums. The work confronts and questions ideas around knowledge production through its ambiguously gestural manifestation.

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59 David Hockney b.1937 United Kingdom

Mo with Five Leaves 1971 etching on J. Green paper signed, dated and inscribed A.P. in pencil along the bottom margin plate size: 68.5 x 54.5 cm from an edition of 75 + 16AP

ZAR 50 000 – 80 000 USD 3 368 – 5 389 GBP 2 446 – 3 914 EURO 2 790 – 4 464

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NOTES

Published by Peterburg Press, London. PROVENANCE

Other examples from this edition are in the permanent collections of Tate Modern, London and The Met, New York. LITERATURE

Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, catalogue number 117. Scottish Arts Council, catalogue number 125.


60 David Hockney b.1937 United Kingdom

Celia Musing 1979 lithograph on Japanese Toyoshi paper signed, dated and numbered A.P. XI/XVI top left sheet size: 102 x 72.5 cm from an edition of 100 + 16AP

ZAR 120 000 – 150 000 USD 8 084 – 10 105 GBP 5 870 – 7 338 EURO 6 696 – 8 370

NOTES

Published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles. Gemini G.E.L. 832. PROVENANCE

Another example from the edition is in the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

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61 Hong Viet Dung b.1962 Vietnam

Girl with lotus 2014 oil on canvas signed bottom left 101 x 90 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

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NOTES

Internationally renowned, Hong Viet Dung was a central figure of the famous ‘Gang of Five’, a group of artists considered to be the progressive pioneers of Vietnamese contemporary art during the Doi Moi Era and who were amongst the first to receive global recognition in the 1990s.


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62 Peter Eastman b.1976 South Africa

Change of Weather 2007 acrylic and enamel on aluminium 200 x 150 cm

ZAR 100 000 – 150 000 USD 6 737 – 10 105 GBP 4 892 – 7 338 EURO 5 580 – 8 370

EXHIBITED

WHATIFTHEWORLD, Cape Town, Peter Eastman: Supernature, 2008.

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This captivating larger-than-life painting formed part of a suite of enamel and acrylic on aluminium works that Peter Eastman produced for his 2008 solo exhibition Supernature. This singular body of work saw the artist employing a naturalistic style to create a series of oversized, close-up portraits of various owl species to explore themes of superstition and luck; like ‘a change of weather’. The work shows off Eastman’s highly skilful rendering of images combined with his distinctive and sensual handling of paint and colour to create rich and visually dramatic depictions. MVZ


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63 Robert Hodgins South African 1920–2010

Figure by a River 2006 oil on canvas signed, dated and inscribed with the title on the reverse 75 x 75 cm

ZAR 500 000 – 800 000 USD 33 684 – 53 895 GBP 24 460 – 39 136 EURO 27 902 – 44 643

PROVENANCE

Ebony, Cape Town. EXHIBITED

Goodman Gallery, Robert Hodgins, 17 March to 14 April 2007.

Known for his indulgence in satirical social commentary, Robert Hodgins has long employed painting as a site for the mockery of self-important figures. Despite the absence of the artist’s archetypal pinstripe-suited characters, Figure by a River is certainly no exception. In a Rothko-esque fashion, Hodgins’ composition is defined by flattened planes of colour in shades of bold magenta below and blushing pink above. In an act of audacious abstraction, a single blue shape is left to signify the titular river. The isolated figure, nude, appears to be edging out of the picture’s frame—clearly aware of his seemingly abrupt exposure. Painted in 2006, Hodgins makes reference to an event which took place many centuries prior; the Battle of Cascina. In 1364, the Florentine army was taken by surprise in an attack by the Pisans when they were found, mid-battle, bathing naked in the river Arno. The scene was famously depicted by Michelangelo, who was commissioned in 1504 to create a fresco for the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence. The tableau provided the Old Master the opportunity to show off his technical ability, whilst depicting a favoured subject: the male nude. For Hodgins, the contemporary re-imagining speaks, quite literally, to the naked vulnerability of leaders and heroes. Stripped of their armour (or the pinstripe suit), their fragility is exposed. In a moment of humility and humanity, they are left simply looking pretty in pink. LT

Michaelangelo, Battle of Cascina, 1504

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two views of lot 64

64 Gerald Machona b.1986 South Africa

Soft Hat 2015 decommisioned currency, foam padding, fabric, wood, Perspex, rubber, plastic tubing and nylon thread 10 x 20.5 x 21 cm

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 695 – 4 042 GBP 1 957 – 2 935 EURO 2 232 – 3 348

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65 Frances Goodman b.1975 South Africa

The Mirror is your Tool 2007 sequins, embroidery thread and satin on hardboard 46 x 67.5 x 7.5 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 80 000 USD 3 368 – 5 389 GBP 2 446 – 3 914 EURO 2 790 – 4 464

NOTE

Frances Goodman’s work was recently included in the group exhibition Matereality, at the Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town.

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66 Diane Victor b.1964 South Africa

Shadow Boxer 2015 charcoal and pastel on paper signed bottom left 151 x 128 cm

ZAR 100 000 – 150 000 USD 6 737 – 10 105 GBP 4 892 – 7 338 EURO 5 580 – 8 370

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EXHIBITED

Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, One Pound of Flesh, 19 November to 19 December 2015.


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67 Bambo Sibiya b.1986 South Africa

Hyenas 2020 charcoal and acrylic on unstretched canvas signed and dated bottom right 135 x 203 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

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68 Diane Victor b.1964 South Africa

Two figures and a horse 1999 pastel and charcoal on paper signed bottom right 87.5 x 104 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

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69 Deborah Bell b.1957 South Africa

Mace I 2007 bronze accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist number 1, from an edition of 5 235 x 16 x 12 cm

ZAR 280 000 – 320 000 USD 18 863 – 21 558 GBP 13 698 – 15 655 EURO 15 625 – 17 857

EXHIBITED

Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, Objects of Power, 18 August to 8 September 2007, another example from the edition exhibited.

Well known for her atmospheric and mystical sculptural work, Deborah Bell’s totemic bronzes, such as Mace I, often signify a means of passage from the realm of existence and belief to another, more spiritual plane of existence. Often focused on more regal or sacred figures from an imaginary realm, and drawing on the iconography of Egypt, ancient Assyria, the Middle East and others, her sculptures embody imaginary rituals. This mace totem is an elegant staff of office, indicating the elevated status of its absent bearer, perhaps a member of a royal family of a long forgotten dynasty.

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70 Deborah Bell b.1957 South Africa

Sentinel 2004 watercolour and charcoal on paper signed and dated bottom right 199 x 61.5 cm

ZAR 120 000 – 180 000 USD 8 084 – 12 126 GBP 5 870 – 8 806 EURO 6 696 – 10 045

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71 Edoardo Villa South African 1915–2011

Interlocking form 1972 steel signed and dated on the base 83 x 99 x 42 cm including base

ZAR 200 000 – 300 000 USD 13 474 – 20 211 GBP 9 784 – 14 676 EURO 11 161 – 16 741

LITERATURE

Engel, E. P. (ed). (1980). Edoardo Villa Sculpture. [s.l.]: United Book Distributors, illustrated in colour on p.120.

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Influenced by the minimalist and reductionist works of the new sculptural avant-garde which he encountered at the Venice Biennale in 1962, and again in 1972 during another visit to Italy, Edoardo Villa embarked on producing an experimental body of work which saw him fully explore all the possibilities that a particular formal combination could offer—by bending, curving and turning single sheets of steel. Interlocking form is a smaller-scale example of these hard-edged compositions where volume is reduced in favour of line and the visual tension created by a variety of carefully balanced surface levels. Here, Villa presents an open structure assembled from various supporting and formal arrangements. No attempt is made to represent an outside reality. Instead, the focus is on the physical presence of the work. The material from which the sculpture is made and its visible form provide the work with its own reality. Villa’s choice of industrial steel is a significant expression of modern technology, and his works stand as icons of the industrial age. By leaving the steel ‘raw’, Villa accentuates the element of shine inherent in the metal. Despite its visual simplicity, Interlocking Form is infinitely complex in the ways in which it engages the viewer. As with all of Villa’s sculptures, it certainly possesses its own gestalt. MVZ


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300 Water Nymphs is a singular granite sculpture that pays homage to an ancient Greek concept of special female entities - the nymphs, that protect and comfort various aspects of water. A nymph is a mythological spirit of nature imagined as a beautiful maiden inhabiting the sea, rivers, woods, mountains or other natural locations. The Greek word nymph originally meant ‘bride’, suggesting that the relationship between a nymph and the area of her influence was that of husband and wife. The ‘nymph’ or ‘bride’ was ideally a desirable woman of extreme beauty, a woman men might long for and with whom they could spend all their days.

72 Willem Boshoff b.1951 South Africa

300 Water Nymphs 2011 Belfast Black granite from Boschpoort Quarry, Mpumalanga 20 x 168 x 160 cm

ZAR 350 000 – 500 000 USD 23 579 – 33 684 GBP 17 122 – 24 460 EURO 19 531 – 27 902

Water nymphs are associated with various locations of water such as the sea, rivers, dams, lakes, wells, streams and so on. Only the names of nymphs appear on the sculpture. For my sculptures I mostly use Belfast Black granite, an igneous material formed by magma or lava (molten rock) cooling and becoming solid. This means that, at some point in time immemorial, granite was a liquid. By polishing the natural rock, I take it back, to some degree, to its molten, amorphous constituency. In a way the liquid form of the stone as molten lava is associated with water as the liquid form of ice. The ultimate shape of my stone sculptures should look as if it has something to do with the rock’s history, with its own ‘memory’ of its liquid essence being moulded and settling in a place. The water nymphs and the liquid stone are both historical highlights in the history of the world we live in. The soil, the bedrock and the earth contains a record (some would even say memory) of past events. The Belfast Black stone is selected from the farm Boschpoort. This black granite is one of the most impervious stones. It is highly prized and its market value exceeds that of most other granite materials. From the artist Willem Boshoff

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73 Kevin Roberts South African 1965–2009

Lady with Horse and Widow 2007 oil on board signed and dated bottom left; printed with the title on a label on the reverse 119 x 157 cm

ZAR 380 000 – 500 000 USD 25 600 – 33 684 GBP 18 590 – 24 460 EURO 21 205 – 27 902

PROVENANCE

Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg.

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The Silberberg Collection Lots 74 to 78 The Silberberg collection of paintings of Johannesburg was first exhibited in 1956 to mark the 70th anniversary of the City of Gold. This unique collection of rare early paintings and Africana was developed by Johannesburg art and antique dealer, Dr H. K. Silberberg, and gifted to his son, Roger, to mark his birth in that city. As a youngster, the 11-year-old schoolboy was clearly delighted when Councillor H. Miller, ex-Mayor of Johannesburg, agreed to open the exhibition.

74 Gerard Sekoto South African 1913–1993

Sophiatown watercolour and pencil on paper signed bottom left 23.5 x 34 cm

ZAR 150 000 – 250 000 USD 10 105 – 16 842 GBP 7 338 – 12 230 EURO 8 370 – 13 951

PROVENANCE

The Silberberg Collection, Johannesburg. LITERATURE

Lindop, B. (1988). Gerard Sekoto. Johannesburg: Dictum Publishing, illustrated in colour on p.85.

Highlights from the collection include a rare early watercolour of Sophiatown by Gerard Sekoto, two oil paintings by Pieter Wenning, William Timlin’s exquisite vision of the old Colosseum Theatre by night and a rare early painting by German-born, Hanns Ludwig Katz who, after an early stint in the atelier of Henri Matisse, emigrated to South Africa in 1936. These are amongst many paintings, drawings and etchings that bring the city of Johannesburg, and the surrounding mineral-rich hills of the Witwatersrand, vividly to life, providing insights into its history and development as the megalopolis of commerce and culture that it is today.

This rare, early watercolour provides unique insights into Gerard Sekoto’s vision of Sophiatown. By 1938 Sekoto had left rural Botshabelo and settled in thriving Sophiatown, the legendary black cultural hub of Johannesburg, made famous in literature and music by the likes of Miriam Makeba, the so-called African songbird. By the 1950s, Sophiatown was no more—homes had been torn down and communities dispersed. It is this place and this time that Sekoto brings to life in his early paintings of Sophiatown. With bright gem-like colours, the artist captures the spirit of the place evoking the lives lived there. Barbara Lindop, renowned author of several Sekoto books and friend of the artist, describes the ‘humanity of his pre-exile paintings: his lack of sentimentality, his commitment to truth, a poignant realism and an acute awareness of the heroism revealed in ordinary human life’.1 EB 1

Lindop, B. (1995). Sekoto: The Art of Gerard Sekoto. London: Pavilion Books, p.10.

The balance of The Silberberg Collection will go on auction in Aspire’s April Timed Online auction. Visit aspireart.net for more information

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75 Pieter Wenning South African 1873–1921

Landscape oil on canvas board 15.5 x 31 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 90 000 USD 4 042 – 6 063 GBP 2 935 – 4 403 EURO 3 348 – 5 022

These rare early works by Pieter Wenning were painted on his first trip to Johannesburg between January and December 1914. Both are striking examples of the plein air approach of The Hague School painters whose works he had studied and admired whilst living in Holland. Like the Impressionists, they favoured working outdoors to capture the immediacy of the scene and the effects of light on the landscape. We know that, at this time, his mentor, D. C. Boonzaier was reading Letters of a Post-Impressionist (Vincent van Gogh), published in 1913.1 They would undoubtedly have shared their enthusiasm for Van Gogh’s vision and painterly application which is clearly evident here. With their thick application of paint and energized brushwork, these Witwatersrand landscapes are uniquely different to his later Cape paintings. With their open vistas, dotted with only a few signs of settlement and industry, they are rare documents of early Johannesburg. EB 1

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Scholtz, J. du P. (1973). D.C. Boonzaaier en Pieter Wenning: Verslag van ‘n Vriendskap. Cape Town: Tafelberg Publishers, p.16.


76 Pieter Wenning South African 1873–1921

Witwatersrand 1914 oil on canvas signed and dated bottom right; inscribed with the artist’s name, the title and the date on the reverse 20.4 x 41 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

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77 William Timlin British 1892–1943

The Colosseum 1932 pen, ink and gouache on paper signed, dated, inscribed with the title and the artist’s owl device mark bottom right 76 x 94 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

William Timlin, architect, artist and illustrator of the beloved book, The Ship that Sailed to Mars, which has, since publication in 1923 become a fantasy classic, clearly brought to his vision of The Colosseum a unique sensibility. The flagship of African Consolidated Theatres, opened by General Smuts in 1933, soon became the crown of Commissioner Street with its distinct ‘Egyptian’ motif on the facade. The auditorium, designed by Timlin in a ‘castleated’ style with turrets and fairy dragons, must have delighted audiences—adults and children alike. The ceiling of the large auditorium which contained hundreds of tiny concealed lights giving the effect of looking up at a night sky with stars twinkling, would have created a magical effect comparable to Timlin’s drawing—a wondrous image of the jewel in the city of gold’s nightlife. EB

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78 Hanns Katz German 1892–1940

Mine Storm over Johannesburg 2014 oil on board inscibed with the title on the reverse 87 x 119 cm

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 695 – 4 042 GBP 1 957 – 2 935 EURO 2 232 – 3 348

An early short sojourn in Paris at the atelier of Henri Matisse, made a significant impression on Hanns Ludwig Katz, which is evident in the brilliant palette of this painting. In Frankfurt from 1920, Katz became known as a painter of portraits, cityscapes, and still life, which revealed the influence of Max Beckmann and the “Neue Sachlichkeit”. After the Nazi takeover in 1933, Katz took an active part in the Frankfurt section of the Jüdischer Kulturbund. He immigrated to South Africa in 1936, escaping Germany before one of his best expressionist portraits was publicly denounced as ‘degenerate art’ in 1938.1 EB 1

Extracted from http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/katz-hanns-ludwig (adjusted)

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79 Jacobus Hendrik Pierneef South African 1886–1957

Bosveld watercolour and pencil on paper signed bottom left 28 x 36.5 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 90 000 USD 4 042 – 6 063 GBP 2 935 – 4 403 EURO 3 348 – 5 022

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80 Jacobus Hendrik Pierneef South African 1886–1957

Bushveld trees pastel and charcoal on paper signed bottom right 32 x 41.5 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 80 000 USD 3 368 – 5 389 GBP 2 446 – 3 914 EURO 2 790 – 4 464

PROVENANCE

Strauss & Co., South African and International Art, 11 November 2013, Lot 52.

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81 Jacobus Hendrik Pierneef South African 1886–1957

Silverton 1922 oil on card signed and dated bottom right 20 x 30 cm

ZAR 200 000 – 300 000 USD 13 474 – 20 211 GBP 9 784 – 14 676 EURO 11 161 – 16 741

An ode to youth and artistic exploration, this scene of the Silverton area, east of Pretoria, is a quiet yet beautiful example of a younger JH Pierneef, returning from his travels in Europe, to look upon the South African landscape in a new Impressionist-influenced light. The artist’s delicate layering of paint and short brush strokes might seem a far cry from his later work but reveal more the longer one spends time with this painting. A peaceful Highveld landscape is portrayed through the dry, pale blue sky and golden-green hues of the ‘veld’, as the eye is drawn to a pair of willows, just off center. This work reminds us of Pierneef’s harmonious use of subtle colour renderings and his extraordinary understanding of light and spatial composition within the landscape. This charming early work offers a glimpse into his experimental adventures and is a clear nod in the direction of the work we have come to know and admire. CJ

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82 Maggie Laubser South African 1886–1973

Birds Against Seascape 1953 oil on board in the artist’s frame signed bottom right 40 x 50.5 cm

ZAR 400 000 – 600 000 USD 26 947 – 40 421 GBP 19 568 – 29 352 EURO 22 321– 33 482

PROVENANCE

Private collection, Johannesburg. Mrs HG Dekker. Prof G Dekker. LITERATURE

Marais, D. and Delmont, E. (1994). Maggie Laubser: her paintings, drawings and graphics. Johannesburg and Cape Town: Perskor Publishers, illustrated on p.354, catalogue number 1552.

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Maggie Laubser was born and raised on her parents’ wheat farm Bloublommetjieskloof in Malmesbury, Western Cape. A farmgirl through and through, her affinity for nature was the primary impetus for her individual style and personal perspective that earned Laubser recognition as one of South Africa’s foremost artists. In 1947, Laubser relocated to Strand, a coastal town in the Helderberg area, where she lived in her cottage Altyd Lig. This move from the rural farmlands and the consequential nostalgia for her kontrei marked a notable change in Laubser’s work. Now in her sixties, well-established and recognised as an artist, Laubser—in her new urban surroundings—became reliant on recollections and memories of a pastoral past. No longer immersed in the former landscapes she depicted, she initiated a period of synthesis and simplification of form. Birds Against Seascape, painted in 1953, is characteristic of the dreamlike renderings Laubser produced throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Here, the artist has switched her palette of vivid colours for softer, pastel hues which she uses to make up flattened surface planes and simplified forms. Gentle tones of complementary pinks and greens in this seascape are coupled with harmonious lines; and the rhythmic curvature of the plump clouds above are echoed in the tide that rolls in below. A window into Laubser’s great imagination, this is a scene from the artist’s utopia. As Laubser continued to reminisce throughout these later years, it was also a period defined by many career highs. Between 1950 and 1960, she participated in more than 20 exhibitions, and received acclaim and admiration in 13 solo shows. In 1947 Laubser participated in the 26th Venice Biennale. With three of her works exhibited, this was surely a defining moment for the artist. LT


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83 Irma Stern South African 1894–1966

Dahlias and fruit 1960 oil on canvas signed and dated bottom right 104 x 94 cm

ZAR 4 500 000 – 6 000 000 USD 303 159 – 404 212 GBP 220 143 – 293 523 EURO 251 115 – 334 820

Irma Stern’s best paintings confirm her stature as a consummate artist and celebrated colourist. Nowhere is this better observed than in her still life paintings. As acknowledged Stern authority, Marion Arnold, reminds us, “although many of Irma Stern’s wide range of subjects derived from hasty notations during her travels, the interior spaces of her home and the sanctuary that was her studio were as important to her as the world at large. Her still life paintings comprise some of her most sumptuous and sensual images. Here—in her depictions of objects—she fuses form and content, Modernist preoccupations with visual language, and social commentary on nature and material culture”.1 Dahlias and fruit is undoubtedly one of the most vibrant paintings Stern ever produced. Alive with colour and bursting with energy, it draws the viewer into the heart of its luscious array of flowers and fruits. Complementary colours are made to animate one another: crimson reds vibrate against lush greens, the vivid lemon vase accentuates the lilac blooms and cloth, while orange dahlias pulse against the blue background. Her joy in both the subject and her medium of paint is palpable reminding us how much Stern enjoyed food and flowers, whether capturing their voluptuous forms or consuming them in ample quantities! This glorious still life has all the immediacy of a work painted with passion and completed in the heat of the moment without hesitation. EB 1

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Arnold, M. (1995). Irma Stern: A Feast for the Eye. Stellenbosch: Rembrandt van Rijn Art Foundation, p. 125.


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84 Edoardo Villa South African 1915–2011

Bird 2002 painted steel signed and dated 95 x 44 x 95 cm excluding base

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

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85 Edoardo Villa South African 1915–2011

Abstract form 1993 painted steel signed, dated and numbered 1/9 59 x 70 x 45 cm excluding base

ZAR 60 000 – 90 000 USD 4 042 – 6 063 GBP 2 935 – 4 403 EURO 3 348 – 5 022

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86 Robert Hodgins South African 1920–2010

Study in Blue and Orange (Literally True: Not an easy way out of titling work) 2005 oil on canvas signed, dated and inscribed with the title on the reverse 76 x 76 cm

ZAR 250 000 – 350 000 USD 16 842 – 23 579 GBP 12 230 – 17 122 EURO 13 951 – 19 531

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87 Lucas Sithole South African 1931–1994

Who is coming Who is Coming? (LS7839) 1978 carved yellowwood on a liquid steel base signed 84.5 x 12 x 12 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 80 000 USD 4 042 – 5 389 GBP 2 935 – 3 914 EURO 3 348 – 4 464

PROVENANCE

Private Collection, Johannesburg. Collection M.T.H., Johannesburg, Gallery 21, Johannesburg, 1978. EXHIBITED

Gallery 21, Johannesburg, X25 ZAR850, 1985. Gallery 21, Johannesburg, Treasures of the Year, 1978, catalogue number 16.

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88 Walter Battiss South African 1906–1982

Seated nude, two woodcut with original woodblock signed, dated and inscribed with the title on the reverse woodcut image size: 49 x 41 cm; woodblock: 46 x 38 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 80 000 USD 4 042 – 5 389 GBP 2 935 – 3 914 EURO 3 348 – 4 464

PROVENANCE Gallery AOP, Johannesburg.

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90

91

Edoardo Villa

Edoardo Villa

South African 1915–2011

South African 1915–2011

Conversation II

Seated Figure II

1985

1988

bronze on a wooden base signed, dated and numbered 2/5 21 x 25 x 15 cm including base

bronze on a wooden base signed, dated and numbered 2/5 22 x 30 x 15 cm including base

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 695 – 4 042 GBP 1 957 – 2 935 EURO 2 232 – 3 348

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 695 – 4 042 GBP 1 957 – 2 935 EURO 2 232 – 3 348

LITERATURE

LITERATURE

De Clerk, C. and De Kamper, G. (2013). Villa in Bronze: A comprehensive reference to the castings of Edoardo Villa. Pretoria: The University of Pretoria Museum, another example from the edition illustrated on p.58.

De Clerk, C. and De Kamper, G. (2013). Villa in Bronze: A comprehensive reference to the castings of Edoardo Villa. Pretoria: The University of Pretoria Museum, another example from the edition illustrated on p.126.

De Clerk, C. and De Kamper, G. (2013). Villa in Bronze: A comprehensive reference to the castings of Edoardo Villa. Pretoria: The University of Pretoria Museum, another example from the edition illustrated on p.151.

EXHIBITED

EXHIBITED

EXHIBITED

SMAC Gallery, Stellenbosch, Edoardo Villa: Bronzes, 11 February to 15 March 2009, another example from the edition exhibited.

SMAC Gallery, Stellenbosch, Edoardo Villa: Bronzes, 11 February to 15 March 2009, another example from the edition exhibited.

SMAC Gallery, Stellenbosch, Edoardo Villa: Bronzes, 11 February to 15 March 2009, another example from the edition exhibited.

89 Edoardo Villa South African 1915–2011

Head I 2001 bronze on a wooden base signed, dated and numbered 2/5 32 x 28 x 23 cm including base

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

LITERATURE

136


90

91

137


92 Judith Mason South African 1938–2016

Figure oil on board signed bottom right 120 x 92 cm

ZAR 70 000 – 100 000 USD 4 716 – 6 737 GBP 3 424 – 4 892 EURO 3 906 – 5 580

138


93 Deborah Bell b.1957 South Africa

Museum Solstice (from the Alchemical suite) 2007 charcoal, pastel, ink and watercolour on paper signed, dated and inscribed with the title along the bottom edge 78 x 78 cm

ZAR 80 000 – 120 000 USD 5 389 – 8 084 GBP 3 914 – 5 870 EURO 4 464 – 6 696

139


94 Judith Mason South African 1938–2016

Axe oil on canvas laid down on board signed bottom right 149 x 88 cm

ZAR 120 000 – 160 000 USD 8 084 – 10 779 GBP 5 870 – 7 827 EURO 6 696 – 8 929

140


95 Gerhard Marx b.1976 South Africa

Untitled 2014 plant material, tissue paper and acrylic ground on board signed and dated bottom right 178.5 x 118.5 cm

ZAR 280 000 – 350 000 USD 10 105– 13 474 GBP 7 338 – 9 784 EURO 8 370 – 11 161

141


96 William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa

Untitled (Scene before the Paris Opera) 2012 charcoal, pastel and metallic ink on paper signed bottom right 73 x 51 cm

ZAR 500 000 – 700 000 USD 33 684 – 47 158 GBP 24 460 – 34 244 EURO 27 902 – 39 062

PROVENANCE Johans Borman Fine Art, Cape Town, c.1998.

142

Since studying at the l’École Jacques Lecoq in the early 1980s, William Kentridge has had an abiding interest in Paris, evident in this work with its ornate façade evoking the Paris Opera. Here the extraordinary opulence of its Napoleon III style provides the backdrop to naked wrestlers observed from an urbane coffee shop counter, an ideal vantage point from which to contemplate a scene of intense passions playing out in the city or perhaps remembered elements of Johannesburg’s theatre world. This drawing was produced around 1985/6 at a time of radical political upheaval in South Africa to which Kentridge responded with powerful works that marked his emergence as a significant multi-media artist. In 1984 and 1985 he directed Samuel Beckett’s Catastrophe, for the Wits Theatre and the Market Theatre, Johannesburg. Commissioned in 1982 by A.I.D.A. (Association Internationale de Défense des Artistes), Beckett had dedicated it to then imprisoned Czech reformer and playwright, Václav Havel. Kentridge’s charcoal drawing, Watteau’s Tea Room of 1984-5 and the animated film, Vetkoek/Fête Galante made in 1985, reference Antoine Watteau’s eighteenth-century depictions of aristocrats disporting themselves in a mythical Arcadian world, as a means to critique the increasing racial and social disparities in his home country. EB


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97 Robert Hodgins South African 1920–2010

Study after Michelangelo no.2 2009 oil on canvas signed, dated and inscribed with the title on the reverse 60 x 60 cm

ZAR 300 000 – 500 000 USD 20 211 – 33 684 GBP 14 676 – 24 460 EURO 16 741 – 27 902

144


145


98 Norman Catherine b.1949 South Africa

Time Share 2003 carved and painted wood signed and dated bottom left; inscribed with the titlte on the reverse 100 x 119 x 11 cm

ZAR 200 000 – 300 000 USD 13 474 – 20 211 GBP 9 784 – 14 676 EURO 11 161 – 16 741

146


147


99 Sam Nhlengethwa b.1955 South Africa

Kind of Blue, ten 2010 etchings each signed, dated, numbered AP 1/5, inscribed with the respective title in pencil along the bottom margin and embossed with The Sguzu Whag Press chop mark sheet size: 38 x 28 cm each

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

EXHIBITED

Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, Kind of Blue, 26 August to 29 September 2010, other examples from the edition exhibited.

148


100 Sam Nhlengethwa b.1955 South Africa

Pianist 2001 oil and collage on canvas signed and dated bottom right 75 x 85 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 368 – 4 716 GBP 2 446 – 3 424 EURO 2 790 – 3 906

NOTE

Sam Nhlengethwa created a real-life immersive ‘living-room’ installation as part of the Nature Morte – The Still from Life exhibition now on view at the Rupert Museum in Stellenbosch.

149


101 Norman Catherine b.1949 South Africa

National Anthem 1981 airbrush, collage and watercolour on paper signed, dated and inscribed with the title in pencil along the bottom margin 71.5 x 68.5 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 90 000 USD 4 042 – 6 063 GBP 2 935 – 4 403 EURO 3 348 – 5 022

150

PROVENANCE

Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg. The collection of Linda Givon, Johannesburg. EXHIBITED

Pretoria Art Museum, Pretoria, Now and Then, 2004/6.


102 Nelson Makamo b.1982 South Africa

Stories 2007 charcoal and gouache on paper signed and dated bottom right 94.5 x 67.5 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 80 000 USD 4 042 – 5 389 GBP 2 935 – 3 914 EURO 3 348 – 4 464

151


103 William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa

Universal Archive (Six birds) 2012 linocut on pages of Shorter Oxford English Dictionary signed and numbered 28/30 in pencil along the bottom edge; embossed with the David Krut Workshop chop mark bottom left sheet size: 73 x 80 cm

ZAR 120 000 – 160 000 USD 8 084 – 10 779 GBP 5 870 – 7 827 EURO 6 696 – 8 929

PROVENANCE Ebony, Cape Town.

152


104 William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa

Olympia 53 2007 lithograph with collage signed and numbered 18/25 in pencil along the bottom edge; embossed with The Artists’ Press chop mark bottom right sheet size: 74 x 92.5 cm

ZAR 150 000 – 200 000 USD 10 105– 13 474 GBP 7 338 – 9 784 EURO 8 370 – 11 161

153


105 Simon Stone b.1952 South Africa

Woman smoking a pipe 2002 oil on board signed bottom right and dated bottom left 97 x 77 cm

ZAR 60 000 – 80 000 USD 4 042 – 5 389 GBP 2 935 – 3 914 EURO 3 348 – 4 464

154

NOTE

Simon Stone’s work has been acquired by the Smithsonian National Museum for African Art Collection in Washington DC. Other notable collections include: Anglo American Collection in Johannesburg and London; Gencor Industries Collection in Orlando, Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town; Johannesburg Art Gallery (JAG); Standard Bank Art Collection in Johannesburg; Sanlam Art Collection in Cape Town, the University of South Africa (UNISA) Art Collection, in Pretoria, the University of The Witwatersrand (WITS) Art Collection in Johannesburg.


106 Peter Schütz South African 1942–2008

Woman in green dress carved and painted Jelutong 75 x 30 x 26 cm

ZAR 50 000 – 60 000 USD 3 386 – 4 042 GBP 2 446 – 2 935 EURO 2 790 – 3 348

155


107 Ephraim Ngatane South African 1938–1971

Musicians oil on board signed bottom left 60 x 75.5 cm

ZAR 150 000 – 250 000 USD 10 105 – 16 842 GBP 7 338 – 12 230 EURO 8 370 – 13 951

156

108 Withdrawn


157


109 Robert Hodgins South African 1920–2010

The Annunciation to Mario 1993 oil on canvas signed, dated, inscribed with the title and a dedication on the reverse 50.5 x 40.5 cm

ZAR 300 000 – 400 000 USD 20 211 – 26 947 GBP 14 676 – 19 568 EURO 16 741 – 22 321

PROVENANCE

Bonhams, The South African Sale, 21 March 2012, Lot 117. WALL Gallery, Cape Town. EXHIBITED

WALL Gallery, Cape Town, Figure and Ground: A Selection of Paintings by Leading South African Artists, August 2015.

158


110 Conrad Botes b.1969 South Africa

Untitled acrylic on canvas signed bottom right 200.5 x 110 x 5 cm

ZAR 70 000 – 90 000 USD 4 761 – 6 063 GBP 3 424 – 4 403 EURO 3 906 – 5 022

PROVENANCE

Michael Obert Contemporary, Johannesburg.

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111 William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa

Monitor 2012 lithograph and collage signed and numbered 18/35 in pencil along the bottom edge; embossed with The Artists’ Press chop mark bottom right sheet size: 70 x 86 cm

ZAR 90 000 – 120 000 USD 6 063 – 8 084 GBP 4 403 – 5 870 EURO 5 022 – 6 696

160


112 William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa

Traité d’Arithmetique 2007 colour lithograph with letterpress, collage and hand colouring signed and numbered 27/35 in pencil along the bottom margin sheet size: 160 x 122 cm

ZAR 180 000 – 240 000 USD 12 126 – 16 168 GBP 8 806 – 11 741 EURO 10 045 – 13 393

EXHIBITED Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, William Kentridge / What Will Come, 10 November to 14 December 2007, another example from the edition exhibited. LITERATURE McDonald, J, Gregory, B. (2008). William Kentridge: Telegrams From The Nose. Australia: Annandale Galleries, another example from the edition illustrated on p.13.

161


113 Paul du Toit South African 1965–2014

Expanded Canvas Series (01207035) 2012 concrete canvas and polyurethane paint 224 x 271 x 82 cm

ZAR 200 000 – 300 000 USD 13 474 – 20 211 GBP 9 784 – 14 676 EURO 11 161 – 16 741

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EXHIBITED

Nirox, Johannesburg, A slice in time, 26 August to 15 October 2012. Momo, Johannesburg, A slice in time, 23 August to 17 September 2012. LITERATURE

Jamal, A. (2016). PAUL. [s.l.]: PlanetPaul, illustrated in colour on p.114.


Lot 113 on exhibition at Nirox, 2012.

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T E RMS AND CONDITIO NS OF B US INE S S AND R UL E S OF AUC T IO N THIS AGREEMENT COMPLIES WITH THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 45 OF THE CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT 68 OF 2008 1. DEFINITIONS 1.1. The following terms shall have the meanings assigned to them hereunder and cognate expressions shall have corresponding meanings: 1.1.1. “Act” means the Consumer Protection Act No. 68 of 2008 (“CPA”) as read with the Regulations promulgated thereunder in the Government Gazette No. 34180 on 1 April 2011; 1.1.2. ‘Artistic work’ means: 1.1.2.1. any drawing, picture, painting, collage, sculpture, ceramic, print, engraving, lithograph, screen print, etching, monotype, photograph, digitally printed photograph, video, DVD, digital artwork, installation, artist’s book, tapestry, artist designed carpet, performative artwork and any medium recognised as such in the future; 1.1.2.2. any work of craftsmanship and/or artwork which does not fall under 1.1.2.1 as set out in the Copyright Act No. 78 of 1978. 1.1.3. “Aspire” means Aspire Art Auctions (Pty) Ltd (Registration No. 2016/074025/07) incorporated under the laws of South Africa with Principal place of business at: Illovo Edge, Building 3, Ground Floor, 5 Harries Road, Illovo, 2196 1.1.4. “Auction” means any sale whereby a Lot is put up for sale by public auction and auctioned off by Ruarc Peffers on behalf of Aspire or such other auctioneer employed by Aspire from time to time; 1.1.5. “Auctioneer” means Ruarc Peffers or such other representative of Aspire conducting the Auction who warrant these Rules of Auction comply with the Act; 1.1.6. “Bidder” means any person who makes an offer to buy a particular Lot and includes the Buyer of any such Lot. A bid shall be made by a person registered to bid and in possession of an Aspire issued and numbered bidders paddle raising that paddle or indicating a bid in any way meant to be understood that way by the Auctioneer; 1.1.7. “Buyer” means any Bidder who makes a bid or offer for a Lot which has been offered for sale (whether by Private Treaty, Auction or otherwise) and which bid or offer has, subject to a reserve price, been accepted by Aspire and/ or the Seller; 1.1.8. “Business day” means any day other than a Saturday, Sunday, or any other official public holiday in South Africa; 1.1.9. “Buyer’s premium” means the commission payable by the Buyer to Aspire on the sale of a Lot at a rate of: 1.1.9.1. 12% (twelve per cent) calculated on the full Hammer price for purchases above R20,000 (twenty thousand rand), plus VAT payable on that amount; 1.1.9.2. 15% (fifteen per cent) calculated on the full Hammer price for purchases below R20,000 (twenty thousand rand) plus VAT payable on that amount; 1.1.10. “Catalogue” means any brochure, price-list, condition report or any other publication (in whatever medium, including electronic), published by Aspire for the purpose of or in connection with any Auction; 1.1.11. “Forgery” means any imitation of any artistic work made with the intention of misrepresenting the authorship, origin, date, age, period, culture, and/or source of any Lot; 1.1.12. “Hammer price” means the bid or offer made by the Buyer for any Lot that is knocked down by the Auctioneer at a sale of that Lot; 1.1.13. “Lot” means any item or items to be offered for sale as a unit and identified as such by Aspire for sale by way of Auction or by Private Treaty. Each Lot is, unless indicated to the contrary, regarded to be the subject of a separate transaction; 1.1.14. “Parties” means the Bidder, the Buyer, the Seller and Aspire; 1.1.15. “Prime rate” means the publicly quoted base rate of interest (percent, per annum compounded monthly in arrear and calculated on a 365 (three hundred and sixty-five) day year, irrespective of whether or not the year is a leap year) from time to time published by Nedbank Limited, or its successor-in-title, as being its prime overdraft rate plus three comma five percent, as certified by any manager of such bank, whose appointment, authority and designation need not be proved; 1.1.16. “Privacy Policy” means the privacy policy of Aspire attached hereto marked Annexure A; 1.1.17. “Private Treaty” means the sale of any Lot at a previously agreed upon price between the Buyer and the Seller represented by Aspire (that is, not by way of Auction); 1.1.18. “Purchase price” means the Hammer price plus the Buyer’s premium. In case of any Lot being “daggered”, VAT shall be calculated on the sum of the full Hammer price plus the Buyer’s premium. Buyer’s risk in all respects shall apply from the knock down of the

164

Auctioneer’s hammer (and acceptance of the bid [or offer in the case of Private Treaty] if applicable). The Purchase price does not include any transport, or insurance that may be required by the Buyer; 1.1.19. “Recoverable expenses” includes all fees, taxes (including VAT) and any other costs or expenses incurred by Aspire for restoration, conservation, framing, glass replacement and transport of any Lot from a Seller’s premises to Aspire’s premises or for any other reason whatsoever, as agreed between Aspire and the Seller; 1.1.20. “Reserve” means the minimum Hammer price (if any) at which a Lot may be sold at an Auction as agreed (whether in writing or otherwise) and in confidence between the Seller of that Lot and Aspire. All lots are sold subject to a reserve price unless announced otherwise; 1.1.21. “Sale” means the sale of any Lot (whether by way of Auction, Private Treaty or otherwise) and ‘sell’ and ‘sold’ shall have a corresponding meaning; 1.1.22. “Sale proceeds” means the amount due and payable to the Seller for the sale of the relevant Lot, made up of the Hammer price less the applicable Seller’s commission and all Recoverable expenses; 1.1.23. “Seller” means the person named as the Seller of any Lot, being the person that offers the Lot for sale; 1.1.24. “Seller’s commission” means the commission payable by the Seller to Aspire on the sale of a Lot which is payable at a rate of: 1.1.24.1. 12% (twelve per cent) calculated on the full Hammer price for purchases above R20,000 (twenty thousand rand) plus VAT payable on that amount (if any); 1.1.24.2. 15% (fifteen per cent) calculated on the full hammer price for purchases below R20,000 (twenty thousand rand) plus VAT payable on that amount; 1.1.25. “South Africa” means the Republic of South Africa; 1.1.26. “Terms of Business” means the terms and conditions of business and the Rules of Auction as set out in this document; 1.1.27. “VAT” means value added tax levied in terms of the Value Added Tax Act, 1991 as amended from time to time and includes any similar tax which may be enforced in place of VAT from time to time. 2. INTRODUCTION 2.1. Aspire carries on the business of fine art Auctioneers and consultants on the Lots provided by the Sellers. As fine art Auctioneers, Aspire generally acts in the capacity of agent for the Seller. 2.2. Set out in this document are the terms and conditions governing the contractual relationship between Aspire and prospective Bidders, Buyers and Sellers. This document must be read together with: 2.2.1. sale room notices published by Aspire pertaining to the condition, description and/or authenticity of a Lot; and 2.2.2. any announcement made by Aspire and/or the Auctioneer prior to or on the proposed day of sale of any Lot, provided that no changes to the terms set out in a Property Receipt Form shall be made without the prior agreement of Aspire and the Seller. 3. LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK Every Auction is to be governed by section 45 of the CPA and the rules of Auction (the “Rules”) as promulgated by the Minister of Trade and Industry under the Regulations dated 23 April 2010 in Government Gazette No. 33818 on 1 April 2011 (“Regulations”) and any further amendments and/or variations to these Rules and Regulations. 4. GENERAL TERMS OF BUSINESS 4.1. Every bid made shall constitute an offer. Acceptance of the highest bid made, subject to confirmation by the Seller, shall be indicated by the knock down of the hammer or, in the case of sale by Private Treaty, the acceptance of the offer by Aspire or the Seller. In the event that the highest bid does not meet the reserve, it will remain open for acceptance by the Auctioneer or the Seller and for no less than 48 hours after the Auction was concluded. 4.2. In bidding for any Lots, all Bidders confirm that they have not been induced into making any bid or offer by any representative of the Seller and/or Aspire. 4.3. It is the sole responsibility of all prospective Buyers to inspect and satisfy themselves prior to the Auction or Private Treaty as to the condition of the Lot and satisfy themselves accordingly that the Lot matches any description given to them (whether in a Catalogue or otherwise). 4.4. All descriptions and/or illustrations set out in a Catalogue

exist as guidance for the prospective Bidder and do not contain conclusive information as to the colour, pattern, precise characteristics or the damage to a particular Lot to be sold by way of Auction or Private Treaty. 4.5. Neither Aspire nor any of its servants, employees, agents and/or the Auctioneer shall be liable, whether directly or indirectly, for any errors, omissions, incorrect and/or inadequate descriptions or defects or lack of authenticity or lack of ownership or genuineness in any goods Auctioned and sold which are not caused by the wilful or fraudulent conduct of any such person. 4.6. Aspire shall not be held responsible for any incorrect, inaccurate or defective description of the goods listed for sale in the Catalogue or in any condition report, publication, letter, or electronic transmission or to the attribution, origin, date, age, condition and description of the goods sold, and shall not be responsible for any loss, damage, consequential damages and/or patrimonial loss of any kind or nature whatsoever and howsoever arising. 4.7. No warranty, representation or promise on any aspect of any Lot (save for those expressly provided for by the Seller in terms of paragraph 16), whether express, implied or tacit is given by Aspire, its servants, its agents, or its employees, or the Auctioneer or the Seller and accordingly nothing shall be binding or legally enforceable in this regard. 4.8. Any Lot which proves to be a Forgery (which will only be the case if an expert appointed by Aspire for such purposes confirms this in writing) may be returned by the Buyer (as his sole remedy hereunder or at law) to Aspire within 7 (seven) days from the date of Auction or Private Treaty (as the case may be), in the same condition in which it was at the time of the Auction or accompanied by a statement of defects, the number of the Lot, and the date of the Auction or Private Treaty at which it was purchased. If Aspire is satisfied that the item is a Forgery and that the Buyer has and is able to transfer a good and marketable title to the Lot, free from any third-party claims, the sale will be set aside and any amount paid in respect of the Lot and still in the possession of Aspire will be refunded, subject to the express condition that the Buyer will have no rights or claims against Aspire (whether under these Terms of Business, at law or otherwise) if: 4.8.1. the description in the Catalogue at the date of the sale was in accordance with the then generally accepted opinion of scholars and experts or fairly indicated that there was conflict of such opinion; or 4.8.2. the only method of establishing at the date of publication of the Catalogue that the Lot was a Forgery was by means of a scientific process not generally accepted for use until after publication of the Catalogue, or by a process which was unreasonably expensive or impractical. 4.9. Buyer’s claiming (whether in contract, delict or otherwise) under paragraph 4.8 will be limited to the amount paid for a particular Lot and will not extend to any loss or damage of whatsoever nature suffered, or expense incurred by him/ her including but not limited to claims for damages, loss of profit, injury to reputation, mental anguish and suffering etc; 4.10. The benefit of paragraph 4.8 will not be assignable and will rest solely and exclusively with the Buyer who, for the purpose of this condition, will be the only person to whom the original invoice is made out by Aspire in respect of the Lot sold. 4.11. Aspire reserves its right, to refuse admission to any person to its premises or any other premises at which an Auction is to be conducted. Any defaulting bidder or buyer shall be refused access to any event or auction conducted by Aspire and shall remain barred until their default has been cured to the satisfaction of Aspire. 4.12. Any information pertaining to Bidders and Sellers which has been lawfully obtained for the purposes of the Auction and the implementation of any resultant sale shall be kept for purposes of client administration, marketing and as otherwise required by law. The Bidder and the Seller agree to the retention, processing of their personal information and the disclosure of such information to third parties (but only in connection with the sale of any works such as logistics and insurance) for the aforementioned purpose. The Seller’s identity will not be disclosed for purposes other than what is reasonably required for client administration or as required by law. Please see the Privacy Policy for more information on this. 4.13. Aspire has, during the course of any Auction, the sole and absolute discretion, without having to give any reasons therefore, to refuse any bid, withdraw or reoffer Lots for Auction (including after the knock down of the hammer), cancel any sale if the Auctioneer and/or Aspire believes that there may be an error or dispute of any nature whatsoever, and shall have the rights, as it deems fit, to divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots or to put up any Lot for Auction again. 4.14. For any notice required to be given in connection with these Terms of Business and Rules of Auction: 4.14.1. Aspire will first attempt to make contact by telephone,


followed by email, should there be no response, then contact will be attempted by registered post. Any notice that effects the details of the sale of a Lot will be agreed to between Aspire and the Seller prior to the sale of said Lot. If, for any reason whatsoever, Aspire is unable to make contact with a Seller, the relevant Lot will be withdrawn from the sale; 4.14.2. if given by Aspire, shall be delivered by hand, sent by registered post or by email to the address provided to Aspire by the relevant addressee as being the domicilium citandi et executandi of that addressee. Notice shall be deemed to have been received by the person who is required to receive such notice: 4.14.2.1. on the date of delivery, if delivered by hand or email; 4.14.2.2. on the fourth (4th) day from the date of posting, including the date of posting if posted by prepaid registered post from within South Africa, which postage shall be deemed to have been sent on receipt of the post office proof of posting. 4.14.3. if given to Aspire, such written notification must be given to Aspire at its email address as published by Aspire from time to time, whether on any brochure, catalogue or its website. 4.15. The Seller submits to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the South African courts. Each Auction and Private Treaty shall be governed in accordance with the laws of South Africa. 4.16. In the event that any provision of these Terms of Business is found by a court of competent jurisdiction to be unenforceable and of no effect, the remaining provisions of these Terms and Conditions shall not be affected by that determination and shall remain binding and of full force and effect. 4.17. The Buyer and/or Seller, as the case may be, hereby pledge(s) the goods either sold and/or bought as security to Aspire for all amounts which are owing to Aspire. 4.18. Should any Party delay or not exercise their rights it shall not constitute a waiver of such rights or power. If a Party exercises their right or power, it shall not preclude such party from exercising any other right or power which they may have. 4.19. No variation, alteration, consensual termination, representation, condition, term or warranty, relaxation or waiver or release by Aspire, or estoppel against Aspire, or the suspension by Aspire, in respect of these Terms of Business, or any part thereof, shall be of any force or effect unless reduced to writing and signed by Aspire and the Buyer. 4.20. These Terms of Business and Rules of Auction constitute the entire agreement between the Parties. 4.21. The Buyer shall be responsible for the payment of the Seller’s and Aspire’s legal costs, calculated on the scale as between attorney and own client incurred by the Seller and Aspire in enforcing any of its rights or those of its principal whether such rights are exercised by way of legal proceedings or otherwise. 4.22. No Party shall be in breach of contract or liable for any loss of profit or special damages or damage suffered as a result of a force majeure or any other event which falls outside of the Parties’ reasonable control. Notice must be given to all Parties if such an event occurs in order to enable the defaulting Party to remedy their performance. The occurrence of the aforementioned events will not excuse a Party from paying any outstanding amounts owed to any of the other Parties. 5. TERMS RELATING TO THE BUYERS 5.1. Any Buyer and/or Bidders must register his/her identity with Aspire before the commencement of an Auction in accordance with Chapter 1 (one) of the regulations in terms of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2011, which requires the establishment and verification of identity published in Notice No. R. 1595 in Gazette No. 24176 of 20 December 2002. The documents required will include Identity Document or Passport and Proof of Residence. 5.2. Upon registration by the Bidder, the Bidder must acknowledge that they are aware of and agree to be bound by these Terms of Business. All Bidders shall be personally liable for their bids and offers made during any Auction and shall be jointly and severally liable with their principals if acting as agent. 5.3. Any person acting on behalf of a Bidder or Buyer may be required to produce evidence of his/her authority to so act and in a manner that is satisfactory to Aspire in its discretion. 5.4 A Lot shall be sold to the highest bidder (regardless of the perceived or actual value of the Lot) but subject to the reserve or the consent of the Seller if the reserve has not been met. 5.5 No bid may be made for an amount which is lower than the fixed value set by the Auctioneer and any bid may be withdrawn prior to the hammer being struck down. It is the Auctioneer’s discretion to accept or reject a bid that is lower than the standardised incremental amount set by the Auctioneer. The Auctioneer may refuse any bid which does not exceed the previous bid by at least 5% (five per cent) or any such percentage which in the opinion of the Auctioneer

is required. 5.6 Any dispute which should arise regarding the validity of the bid, the identity of the Bidder or between more than one Bidder, shall be resolved at the sole discretion of the Auctioneer. 5.7 Each Bidder is deemed to be acting in their capacity as principal unless Aspire has acknowledged otherwise in writing prior to the commencement of the Auction and the Bidder bidding for another shall be required to produce a letter authorising the Bidder to represent him and the Identity Documents of both persons. 5.8. All Bidders are encouraged to attend any Auction where a Lot is to be sold by Auction. Aspire will endeavour to execute any absentee, written bids and/or telephone bids and online/app bids provided they are, in Aspire’s absolute discretion, received in sufficient time and in legible form as required under these Terms of Business. 5.9 Any bids placed by telephone before an Auction are accepted at the sender’s risk and must, if requested by Aspire, be confirmed in writing to Aspire before the commencement of the Auction. Any person who wishes to bid by telephone during the course of an Auction must make arrangements with Aspire at least 24 (twenty-four) hours before the commencement of the Auction. Aspire shall not be held liable for any communication breakdown or any losses arising thereof. The Buyer consents that any bidding may be recorded at the discretion of Aspire and consents to these Terms of Business. 5.10.The Buyer must make payment in full and collect the purchased Lot immediately after completion of the Auction and no later than 48 (forty-eight) hours after completion of the Auction. On hand over of the Lot to the Buyer (or his representative), the full risk and title (subject to payment in full having been made first) over that Lot shall pass to the Buyer, who shall henceforth be responsible for any loss of and/or damage to and/or decrease in value of any Lots purchased at the Auction or at a Private Treaty sale. Any Lot not collected immediately after the Auction will remain insured for 48 (forty-eight) hours after completion of the Auction. The Seller must be paid in full and the funds cleared before the Lot is handed over to the Buyer. 5.11. If the Buyer has not made payment within 1 (one) week of the Auction Aspire reserves the right to cancel the Sale and to claim damages from the Buyer including but not limited to the Buyers and Sellers premium, storage and insurance costs and the costs of conducting the auction which are estimated at one million rand per auction. 5.12. The collection of any Lot by a third party on behalf of a Buyer must be agreed with Aspire not later than the close of business on the day following the relevant Auction. 6. EXCLUSION OF LIABILITY TO BUYERS OR SELLERS 6.1. No Buyer or Seller shall be entitled to cede, delegate and/or assign all or any of their rights, obligations and/or interests to any third party without the prior written consent of Aspire in terms of these Terms of Business. 6.2. The Buyer accepts that neither Aspire nor the Seller: 6.2.1. shall be liable for any omissions, errors or misrepresentations in any information (whether written or otherwise and whether provided in a Catalogue or otherwise) provided to Bidders, or for any acts and/or omissions in connection with the conduct of any Auction or for any matter relating to the sale of any Lot, including when caused by the negligence of the Seller, Aspire, their respective employees and/ or agents; 6.2.2. gives any guarantee or warranty to Bidders other than those expressly set out in these Terms of Business and any implied conditions, guarantees and warranties are excluded; and 6.2.3. without prejudice to any other provision of these general Terms of Business, any claim against Aspire and/or the seller of a Lot by a Bidder shall be limited to the Hammer price of the relevant Lot. Neither Aspire nor the Seller shall be liable for any loss of profit, indirect or consequential losses. 6.3. A purchased Lot shall be at the Buyer’s risk in all respects from the knock down of the Auctioneer’s hammer (and acceptance of the bid if applicable), whether or not payment has been made, and neither Aspire nor the Seller shall thereafter be liable for, and the Buyer indemnifies Aspire against, any loss or damage of any kind, including as a result of the negligence of Aspire and/or its employees or agents. 6.4. All Buyers are advised to arrange for their own insurance cover for purchased Lots unless agreed otherwise in writing. 6.5. Aspire does not accept any responsibility for any Lots damaged by insect infestation, changes in atmospheric conditions or other conditions outside its control (including damage arising as a result of reasonable wear and tear). Aspire will be responsible for the replacement or repair costs for any frame and glass breakages resulting from the wilful or negligent conduct of any of Aspire’s servants and agents.

bidding on any Lots should he/she believe there may be a dispute of whatever nature (including without limitation a dispute about the validity of any bid, or whether a bid has been made, and whether between two or more bidders or between the Auctioneer and any one or more bidders) or error of whatever nature, and may further take such other action as he/she deems necessary or appropriate. The Auctioneer shall commence and advance the bidding or offers for any Lot in such increments as he/she considers appropriate. 7.2. The Auction is to take place at the stipulated time and no delay shall be permitted to benefit a specific person who is not present but should be present at the Auction. 7.3. The Auctioneer shall be entitled to bid on behalf of the Seller of any lot, up to but not equal to or more than the Reserve, where applicable. 7.4. A contract shall be concluded between the Buyer and Seller once the Auctioneer knocks down the hammer and this shall be the Hammer price accepted by the Auctioneer (after the determination of any dispute that may exist and subject to the Seller’s consent if the reserve price was not achieved). The benefits flowing from this agreement constitute a stipulatio alteri for the benefit of Aspire, which benefits Aspire hereby accepts. Aspire shall not be liable for any breach of the agreement by either the Seller or the Buyer. 8. IMPORT, EXPORT, COPYRIGHT RESTRICTIONS, LICENSES AND QUALITY OF THE GOODS SOLD 8.1. Aspire and the Seller, save for those expressly set out in paragraph 16 of these Terms of Business, make no representation or warranties whether express, implied or tacit pertaining to the authenticity, quality, genuineness, condition, value, origin, ownership of any goods or whether express, implied or tacit as to whether any Lot is subject to import, export, copyright and licence restrictions. It is the sole responsibility of the Buyer to ensure that they acquire the relevant export, import licenses or copyright licenses prior to exporting or importing any Lots. 8.2. Aspire does not in any way undertake to ensure that the Buyer procures the necessary permits required under law, nor are they responsible for any costs incurred in obtaining a license (whether an application for such license was approved or not). 8.3. All Lots which incorporate any material originating from an endangered and/or protected species (including but not limited to ivory and bone) will be marked by a symbol in the description of the Lot in the Catalogue. Aspire does not accept responsibility for a failure to include these marks on the Lots. Any prospective Buyer is to ensure that they received the necessary permission from the relevant regulatory agents, specifically when importing and/or exporting the Lot. A Buyer will be required to acquire a permit from the Department of Nature Conservation prior to exporting the Lot as well as any other export license which may be required by law, including the licences required under the Convention of the International Trade in Endangered Species (“CITES”). Failure to obtain such permits shall not constitute a ground for the cancellation of the sale or the non-payment of any amounts due in terms hereof. 9. ABSENTEE BIDS 9.1. Absentee bids are a service provided by Aspire upon the request of the Buyers. Aspire shall in no way be liable for any errors or omissions in such bidding process. The Purchase price of the Lots will be processed in the same manner as it would be in other bids. 9.2. Where two or more Buyers provide identical bids, the earliest will take precedence. When absentee bids occur by telephone they are accepted at the Buyer’s risk and must be confirmed prior to the sale by letter or e-mail to Aspire. 9.3. All absentee bids shall be registered with Aspire in accordance with Aspire’s procedures and requirements not less than 24 (twenty-four) hours before the Auction and/or the Private Treaty sale. Aspire reserves its right to receive, accept and/or reject any absentee bids if the aforementioned time period has not been satisfied. 9.4. An absentee bidder must register his/her identity in the same way that any other would be required to under these Terms of Business. 10. RESCISSION OF SALE Notwithstanding the provisions above, if, within 7 (seven) days after the relevant Auction or Private Treaty sale, the Buyer makes a claim to rescind the sale due to Forgery and Aspire is satisfied that the claim is justified, Aspire reserves the right to rescind the sale and refund the Buyer any amounts paid to Aspire and still held by Aspire in respect of that sale and the Seller hereby specifically authorises Aspire to do so. 11. PAYMENT AND COLLECTION

7. GENERAL CONDUCT OF THE AUCTION 7.1. The Auctioneer remains in control of the Auction and has the absolute discretion to either withdraw or reoffer any Lots for sale, to accept and refuse bids and/or to reopen the

11.1. The Buyer acknowledges that Aspire acting in its capacity as agent for the Seller of a particular Lot: 11.1.1. That a Buyer’s premium shall be payable to Aspire on the sale of each Lot;

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11.1.2. VAT may be payable on the full Hammer price and the Buyer’s premium, if the Seller is a registered VAT vendor; 11.1.3. Aspire shall also be entitled to a Seller’s commission and/or any other agreed fees for that Lot. 11.2. Upon the knock down of the hammer and acceptance of the price by the Auctioneer (subject to any reserve), the Buyer shall, before delivery of the Lot, pay Aspire the Purchase price immediately after the Lot is sold and should Aspire require, the Buyer shall provide it with their necessary registration details, proof of identity and any further information which Aspire may require. 11.3. All foreign Buyers are required to make arrangement with their banks prior to the Auction date regarding Forex funds as Aspire will only accept payment in South African Rands. Any expenses incurred thereof shall be at the cost of the Buyer. 11.4. The Buyer shall make payment in full to Aspire for all amounts due and payable to Aspire (including the Purchase price of each Lot bought by that Buyer) on completion of the sale but within 48 hours of the date of sale (or on such other date as Aspire and the Buyer may agree upon in writing) in cash, electronic funds transfer (“EFT”), or such other payment method as Aspire may be willing to accept. Any cheque and/or credit card payments must be arranged with Aspire prior to commencement of the Auction. All card purchases are to be settled in full on the date of sale and shall be subject to an administrative merchant fee of 1.5% of the hammer price plus Buyers Premium plus any VAT on such amounts. 11.5. Ownership of a Lot shall not pass to the buyer thereof until Aspire has received settlement of the Purchase price of the respective Lot in full and the funds have cleared. Aspire shall not be obliged to release a Lot to the Buyer prior to receipt in full payment thereof. However, should Aspire agree to release a Lot to the Buyer prior to payment of the full Purchase price, ownership of such Lot shall not pass to the Buyer but shall remain strictly and unconditionally reserved for the Seller, nor shall the Buyer’s obligations to pay the Purchase price be impacted, until such receipt by Aspire of the full Purchase price in cleared funds. 11.6. The refusal of any approval, licence, consent, permit or clearance as required by law shall not affect the Buyer’s obligation to pay for the Lot and any Buyers Premium. 11.7. Any payments made by a Buyer to Aspire may be applied by Aspire towards any amounts owing by the Buyer to Aspire on any account whatsoever and without regard to any directions of the Buyer or his agent. The Buyer shall be and remain responsible for any removal, storage, or other charges for any Lot and must at his own expense ensure that the Lot purchased is immediately removed after the Auction but not until payment of the total amount due to Aspire. All risk of loss or damage to the purchased Lot shall be borne by the Buyer from the moment when the Lot is handed over to the Buyer. Neither Aspire nor its servants or agents shall accordingly be responsible for any loss or damage of any kind, whether caused by negligence or otherwise, from date of the sale of the Lot, whilst the Lot is in their possession or control. 11.8. All packaging and handling of Lots is at the Buyer’s risk and expense, will have to be attended to by the Buyer, and Aspire shall not be liable for any acts or omissions of any packers or shippers. 11.9. If the sale of any Lot is rescinded, set aside or cancelled by a lawful action of the Buyer, and Aspire has accounted to the Seller for the sale proceeds, the Seller shall immediately refund the full sale proceeds to Aspire, who will in turn refund the Purchase price to the Buyer. If there is no sale, there is no commission payable save and except if the sale is cancelled as a result of a breach of either Seller or Buyer. However, if there are Recoverable expenses which have been incurred by Aspire, then the Seller will remain liable to pay these expenses to Aspire. 11.10. Any Lot which has been paid for in full but remains uncollected after 30 (thirty) days of the Auction, following written notice to the Buyer, the Lot then becomes the property of Aspire. Aspire may then resell this property at the best price it can obtain from a willing and able Buyer. If Aspire resells this property it may deduct any expenses incurred in keeping this property from the proceeds of sale after having deducted its commission. Any shortfall arising from the resale shall be at the cost of the Buyer. 11.11. No credit shall be granted to the Buyer without prior written consent from Aspire. Ownership of the Lot shall not pass until such time as the full Purchase price is paid along with any VAT thereon and any other necessary amounts including but not limited to Buyers Premium. 12. OWNERSHIP 12.1. Until such time that the total Purchase price and any Buyers Premium plus VAT has been paid and hand over has taken place, ownership of the purchased goods shall vest with the Seller. 12.2. The collection of the goods/Lots shall be done by the Buyer at their own cost immediately after the Auction has taken place, unless otherwise agreed upon in writing between the Buyer and Aspire. The Buyer shall ensure that any third parties attending to collection for the Buyer have been properly authorised in writing to attend to such collections.

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12.3. Aspire shall not provide any assistance of any nature whatsoever to the Buyer in removing the goods from the premises of Aspire upon the completion of the Auction. However, should Aspire choose to assist with the removal then any Aspire employee or servant shall be deemed to be agents of the Buyer and Aspire shall not be liable for any damage incurred as a result of removing the goods from the premises. 13. BREACH BY THE BUYER 13.1. In the event that the Buyer breaches any provision of these Terms of Business, fails to make payment of the full Purchase price, Buyers Premium or fails to collect the goods bought as provided for in these Terms of Business, Aspire in exercising its discretion and as agent for the Seller will, without any prejudice to any other rights it may have in law, be entitled to exercise one or more of the following remedies set out below. Aspire may: 13.1.1. institute proceedings against the Buyer for any nonpayment and/or any damages incurred as a result of the breach of contract; 13.1.2. cancel the sale of that Lot or any other Lots sold to the defaulting Buyer at the same time or at any other Auction; 13.1.3. resell the Lot or do any such thing that would cause it to be resold by Auction or Private Treaty sale; 13.1.4. remove, store and insure the goods at the sole expense of the defaulting Buyer and if such goods are stored either at Aspire’s premises or any other place as Aspire may require such goods to be stored at, the Buyer shall be responsible for all charges associated therewith; 13.1.5. retain any Lot sold to the same Buyer at the same time, or at any other Auction and only allow the Buyer to take delivery of such goods after all amounts due, owing and payable have been paid by the Buyer to Aspire in terms of these Terms of Business, including interest, storage charges and any other charges; 13.1.6. reject any bid made by or on behalf of the defaulting Buyer at any future Auction; 13.1.7. exercise a right of retention over the goods sold and not to release such goods to the Buyer until such time as full payment has been made to Aspire in accordance with these Terms of Business. For such purpose and in so far as ownership of the Lots may have passed to Aspire, the Buyer hereby pledges such goods to Aspire as security for Aspire’s claim. 13.1.8. charge a reasonable rental fee for each day that the item is stored by Aspire from the date of Auction until the time of collection. 13.1.9. charge interest at a rate of the prime rate plus 3% (three per cent) per month on any outstanding amounts from the date of Auction. 13.1.10. charge the Buyer the full costs of conducting the auction which is estimated at one million rand with a breakdown available on request. 13.2. In the event that Aspire resells any Lot at a subsequent Auction as a result of Aspire exercising their remedy referred to in paragraph 13.1.3 above, the Buyer shall be liable for any loss (if any), should the Lot be resold at an amount lower than the amount for which the Buyer purchased it. The loss shall be calculated as the difference between the resale price and the original price. Aspire shall be entitled to earn commission on any subsequent sale of the same work irrespective of how many times it is sold by them. 14. TERMS RELATING TO THE SELLER 14.1. As per the Seller’s irrevocable instruction, Aspire is instructed to sell at an Auction all objects submitted for sale by the Seller and accepted by Aspire and to sell the same to the relevant Buyer of the Lot of which those objects form part, provided that the bid or offer accepted from that Buyer is equal to or higher than the Reserve (if any) on that Lot (subject always to paragraph 14.4), all on the basis set out in these Terms of Business. 14.2. The Seller also irrevocably consents to Aspire’s ability to bid for any Lot of which any of those objects form part as agent for one or more intending Buyers. 14.3. Aspire is authorised to retain any objects not sold on Auction for a period of 14 (fourteen) days after the Auction for the possible sale of such objects by Aspire by way of Private Treaty or otherwise pursuant to paragraph 14.4. 14.4. Aspire is authorised to offer for sale either by Private Treaty or otherwise, without further instruction or notification to the Seller, within 14 (fourteen) days after the Auction, all or any remaining objects submitted for sale by the Seller and received and accepted by Aspire in accordance with paragraph 14.1, which objects were not sold on Auction. The bid accepted on these items must not be less than the amount that the Seller would have received, had that Lot been sold on Auction at the Reserve (if any) on that Lot taking into account the deduction of the applicable Seller’s commission and Recoverable expenses for which the Seller is liable. 14.5. Both Aspire and the Auctioneer each have the right, to offer an object referred to above for sale under a Lot, to refuse any bid or offer, to divide any Lot, to combine two or more Lots with the prior approval of the relevant Seller(s), to withdraw

any Lot from an Auction, to determine the description of Lots (whether in any Catalogue or otherwise), to store accepted objects at the Auction premises or any other location as he/ she may deem fit and whether or not to seek the opinion of experts. 14.6. Aspire shall not be under any obligation to disclose the name of the Buyer to the Seller, save for the circumstances contemplated elsewhere in these Terms of Business or otherwise required by law. 15. ESTIMATION OF SELLING PRICE AND DESCRIPTION OF GOODS 15.1. Any estimation given by Aspire is an opinion and cannot be relied on as a true reflection of what the final Hammer price will be on the date of the sale and as such is never guaranteed. Aspire has the right to change any estimations at any point in time in agreement with the Seller recorded on the relevant Property Receipt Form. 15.2. The Seller hereby agrees that Aspire may fully rely on any description of the goods or Lots provided to them by the Seller or his agent. 15.3. Aspire shall not be held liable for any error, misstatement or omission in the description of the goods/Lots whether in the Catalogue or otherwise unless such error, misstatement, omission is a direct result of the intentional, misleading and deceptive conduct of Aspire’s employees and/or agents. 16. WARRANTIES AND INDEMNITIES PROVIDED FOR BY THE SELLER 16.1. The Seller hereby warrants to Aspire and the Buyer that: 16.1.1. he/she is the lawful owner of the objects put up for sale or Auction and is authorised to offer such objects up for sale at an Auction; 16.1.2. he/she is legally entitled to transfer title to all such objects and that they will be transferred free of any encumbrances of third-party claims; and 16.1.3. he/she has complied with all requirements necessary, legal or otherwise, for the import (if importing is applicable to the sale) and has notified Aspire in writing of any third parties who have failed to comply with the aforesaid requirements in the past; 16.1.4. the place of origin of the Lot is accurate. 16.1.5. the object forming part of the Lot is capable of being used for the purpose to which it was made and has no defects which are not apparent from any external inspections and that he/she is in possession of any valid approval, license, consent, permit or clearance required by law for the sale of any Lot. 16.2. The Seller hereby indemnifies and shall keep Aspire and the Buyer indemnified against any loss or damage suffered by either party as a result of any breach of any warranty in these Terms of Business. 16.3. The Seller hereby agrees that Aspire may decline to sell any object submitted for sale, irrespective of any previous acceptance by Aspire to sell it, for any reason deemed reasonable and appropriate in its discretion. 17. COMMISSION Subject to the Terms of Business set out in paragraph 17.3 17.1. Any applicable Seller’s commission in respect of each Lot (comprising one or more objects) shall be payable to Aspire by the Seller. 17.2. Any applicable Buyer’s premium in respect of each Lot (comprising one or more objects) shall be payable to Aspire by the Buyer; 17.3. Notwithstanding the authority provided for by the Seller to Aspire to deduct any of the Seller’s commission and any Recoverable expenses (as agreed to by the Seller) for which the Seller is liable from the Hammer price, the Seller shall still be liable for the payment of the Seller’s commission and any Recoverable expenses. 17.4. Notwithstanding the authority provided for by the Buyer to Aspire to deduct any of the Buyer’s premium and any Recoverable expenses (as agreed to by the Seller) for which the Buyer is liable from the Hammer price, the Buyer shall still be liable for the payment of the Buyer’s premium and any Recoverable expenses. 17.5. Aspire reserves the right to deduct and retain the Seller’s commission prior to the sale proceeds being handed over to the Seller, from the amount paid by the Buyer upon receipt of the full Purchase price, or any part thereof. 17.6. Aspire reserves the right to deduct and retain the Buyer’s premium prior to the Purchase price being handed over to the Seller from the Purchase price paid by the Buyer. 18. RESERVES 18.1. All Lots are to be sold with a Reserve, unless otherwise agreed upon between Aspire and Seller in writing prior to the date of Auction. Any changes to a Reserve will require the prior consent of Aspire and the Seller. The Seller acknowledges that unless a reserve is set, Aspire shall not be entitled to bid on behalf of the Seller to protect the integrity of the value of any work being auctioned. 18.2. Where the Auctioneer is of the opinion that the Seller or


any person acting as agent of the Seller, has made a bid on the Lot and above a Reserve that existed on such Lot, they may knock down the Lot to the Seller. The Seller will then be required to pay all expenses which the Buyer is liable for and any expenses which the Seller is liable for along with the Seller’s commission to Aspire. 18.3. In the event that a Reserve exists on a particular Lot, Aspire may sell such Lot at a Hammer price below the Reserve, on the condition that the Seller receives the amount they would have been entitled to, had the sale been concluded at the Reserve. Aspire reserves the right to adjust the Seller’s commission accordingly in order to allow the Seller to receive the amount payable had the Lot been sold at the Reserve. 18.4. Where a Reserve on a Lot does not exist, Aspire shall not be liable for the difference between the Purchase price and the estimated selling range. 19. INSURANCE 19.1. Aspire undertakes to insure all objects to be sold as part of any Lot, at its own expense, unless otherwise agreed to in writing, or otherwise, between the Seller and Aspire. Aspire may, at its discretion, insure any property which is placed under their control for any other purpose for the duration of the time that such property remains on their premises, under their control or in any storage facility elected by them. 19.2. In the event that Aspire is instructed to not insure any property, the Seller shall bear the cost and risk at all times. The Seller also agrees to: 19.2.1. indemnify Aspire for any claims brought against Aspire and/or the Seller for any damage or loss to the Lot, however it may arise. Aspire shall be reimbursed by the Seller for any costs incurred as a result thereof; and 19.2.2. notify the insurer of the existence of the indemnities set out herein. 19.3. The Seller is obliged to collect their unsold property within 30 calendar days after the Auction. Should any property not be collected within this time Aspire reserves the right to discontinue the insurance cover. 20. PAYMENT IN RESPECT OF THE SALE PROCEEDS The proceeds of sale shall be paid as follows: 20.1. Aspire shall make payment to the Seller not later than 20 (twenty) working days after the date of the Auction provided that full cleared payment of the Purchase price for said Lot has been received from the Buyer by Aspire. 20.2. If the Buyer fails to pay the full Purchase price within the allocated time set out in paragraph 11.2, Aspire shall notify the Seller in writing and request instruction on how to proceed. Aspire may at its discretion, decide to assist the Seller with the recovery of any outstanding amount from the Buyer. 20.3. The Seller hereby authorises Aspire to proceed: 20.3.1. to agree to the terms of payment on any outstanding amount; 20.3.2. to remove, store and insure the Lot which has been sold; 20.3.3. to settle any claim by or against the Buyer on such terms as Aspire deems fit and do all such things necessary to collect from the Buyer any outstanding amounts due to the Seller; 20.3.4. to rescind the sale and refund these amounts to the Buyer; 20.3.5. where Aspire pays the Sale proceeds to the Seller prior to receipt of the full Purchase price then ownership shall pass to Aspire; 20.3.6. to obtain a refund from the Seller where the sale of a Lot has been set aside, or cancelled by the Buyer in terms of paragraph 10 above and Aspire has paid the sale proceeds to the Seller. In such instance, the Seller shall be required to refund the full sale proceeds to Aspire, who will then in turn refund the Buyer. Aspire will then make the Lot available for collection to the Seller; and 20.3.7. that any annulment, rescission, cancellation or nullification of the sale in terms of paragraph 10 above shall not extinguish the Seller’s obligation to pay the commission to Aspire and/or to reimburse any expenses incurred by Aspire in respect of this. 21. WITHDRAWAL FEES Written notice must be given to Aspire 7 (seven) days prior to the Auction, where a Seller decides to withdraw a Lot from Auction. Aspire reserves the right to convert any Seller’s commission and Buyer’s premium payable on this Lot, as well as any Recoverable expenses, photography costs, advertising and marketing costs, or any other expenses incurred on a Lot, into withdrawal fees. The amount of this withdrawal fee shall be determined based on the mid-estimate of the selling price of the objects comprising the Lot along with any VAT and expenses incurred thereon given by Aspire. 22. PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATIONS Aspire reserves the right to photograph or otherwise reproduce the images of any Lot put on offer by the Seller for sale and to use such photographs and illustrations as they deem necessary. Aspire undertakes to ensure compliance with the relevant

Copyright laws applicable in their dealings with any and all Lots put up for sale. 23. LOTS WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN SOLD 23.1. Subject to paragraph 14.4 above, upon the receipt of notice from Aspire of any unsold Lots, the Seller agrees to collect any such Lots no later than the 30th (thirtieth) day after receipt of such notice. The Seller must make further arrangement to either have the Lot resold or collect it and pay all agreed Recoverable expenses for which they are liable. 23.2. The Seller shall be liable for all costs, whether it be for storage, transport or otherwise as a result of their failure to collect the Lot. 23.3. If after 3 (three) months of notice being sent to the Seller, Aspire will proceed to sell the Lot by Private Treaty or public Auction on the terms and conditions that they deem fit, without Reserve and Aspire shall be able to deduct from the Hammer price all amounts owing to them including (but not limited to) any storage or transport expenses, any reduced commission from the Auction as well as any other reasonable expenses before the balance is paid over to the Seller. If Aspire is unable to locate the Seller, Aspire shall open a bank account in which Aspire will hold on behalf of the Seller the amount due to the Seller. 23.4. Aspire reserves the right to charge commission on the Purchase price and any expenses incurred in respect of any unsold Lots. 24. AMENDMENT OF THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS 24.1. Aspire may, at any time and from time to time, in its sole discretion, amend, cancel or rescind any provision of these Terms of Business by publication of any such amended Terms of Business (whether on its website or by any other means whatsoever). 24.2. No amendment in terms of paragraph 24.1 above shall be binding on any Party to any Sale which has been entered into as at the date of that amendment unless agreed to by the relevant Parties in terms of paragraph 24.3. 24.3. No: 24.3.1. amendment or consensual cancellation of these Terms of Business or any provision or term hereof; 24.3.2. agreement, bill of exchange or other document issued or executed pursuant to or in terms of these Terms of Business (including, without limitation, any valuation, estimate or reserve issued in terms hereof); 24.3.3. settlement of any dispute arising under these Terms of Business; 24.3.4. extension of time, waiver or relaxation or suspension of or agreement not to enforce or to suspend or postpone the enforcement of any of the provisions or terms of these Terms of Business or of any agreement, bill of exchange or other document issued pursuant to or in terms of these Terms of Business, shall be binding on any Party to any Sale concluded in terms of these Terms of Business unless agreed to by the Parties to that Sale (whether that agreement is recorded in writing or otherwise). PRIVACY POLICY AND THE PROTECTION OF PERSONAL INFORMATION ACT NO. 4 OF 2013 Terms defined in the Terms of Business shall bear the same meaning when used in this Privacy Policy. 1. INFORMATION ASPIRE MAY COLLECT AND PROCESS 1.1. Aspire may use and store the following: 1.1.1. any information received, whether it be from the completion of online forms for registration purposes or otherwise, from any Bidder, Buyer or Seller (including documents filled out in person by any Bidder, Buyer or Seller); 1.1.2. information required to send out marketing material; 1.1.3. any data received from the making of a bid or the posting of any material to Aspire; 1.1.4. any information received from correspondence between Aspire and any Bidder, Buyer or Seller, whether it be by e-mail or otherwise; 1.1.5. information received for the purpose of research, including by conducting surveys; 1.1.6. information received from telephone communications, in person or otherwise in carrying out any transaction and/ or Auction; 1.1.7. general information from the receipt of any hard copy documents in respect of the date of birth, name, address, occupation, interests, credit information (if required by Aspire) and any further personal information of any Bidder, Buyer or Seller obtained by Aspire during the course of conducting its business; 1.1.8. details received from the completion of any contract of sale between Aspire, the Bidder, Buyer and/or Seller; 1.1.9. details from the visits made to Aspire’s website and any resources/information accessed therein; 1.2. the aforesaid data shall not be supplied and distributed to any third person without the consent of the relevant Bidder, Buyer or Seller unless such supply or distribution is required

under law or is reasonably necessary for Aspire to ensure performance of any and all of their obligations under the Terms of Business. Therefore, Aspire shall only use the data collected for internal purposes; 1.3. personal information, whether private or public, shall not be sold, exchanged, transferred, or provided to any other company for any reason whatsoever without the relevant Bidder, Buyer or Seller’s consent, other than for the express purpose of effecting the collection of any purchased Lot. This will not include trusted third parties, who assist Aspire in operating the website, conducting business or servicing the website. All such persons agree to keep the aforesaid personal information confidential; and 1.4. the release of any relevant Bidder, Buyer or Seller’s personal information if any shall be done only in circumstances which Aspire deems fit and necessary to comply with the law or enforce its Terms of Business and/or to protect third parties’ rights, property or safety. 2. ONLINE INFORMATION PROCESSED BY ASPIRE 2.1. Aspire may collect and store information relating to a Bidder, Buyer or Seller’s (“User”) computer, including its IP address, operating system and browser type, in order to assist Aspire with their systems administration from the use of the website and previous transactions with them: 2.2. Cookies (a text file stored on the website’s servers) may be placed on Aspire’s website to collect the information from each User pursuant to: 2.2.1. incorporating each User’s preference and customising the website, business accordingly; 2.2.2. improving customer services; 2.2.3. the acceleration of searches; 2.2.4. automatically storing information relating to the most visited links; 2.2.5. sending updated marketing information (where the User has consented to the receipt thereof). A User has the option to not accept cookies by selecting such option on his/her browser. If a User does so, it may restrict the use of certain links on the website. The sole purpose of the aforesaid cookies is to collect information about Aspire’s website and not gather any personal information of the User. 3. STORAGE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION 3.1. Aspire shall do all such things reasonably necessary to ensure that the security and privacy of all personal information received, is upheld - whether it be from a bid made, a Lot which is purchased or where personal information is stored, recalled or accessed from Aspire’s servers and/or offices. This will include the implementation of measures creating an electronic firewall system, regular virus scanning mechanisms, security patches, vulnerability testing, regular backups, security checks and recovery mechanisms and any other such mechanisms that is reasonably necessary to ensure the protection of personal information. 3.2. Aspire shall ensure that all employees are sufficiently trained in the use of Aspire’s systems to ensure that the protection of all databases containing any personal information is maintained. 3.3. Any information relating to, but not limited to, any personal information, account details and personal addresses of any Bidder, Buyer or Seller shall be encrypted and only accessible by limited authorised personnel and stored either on an electronic server or in a safe area on the premises of Aspire. Each individual with such authorisation shall ensure that all personal information remains confidential and is protected in the manner contemplated in this Privacy Policy. 3.4. After the sale of a Lot, any credit card and EFT details shall not be stored by Aspire. 3.5. Aspire does not send out e-mails requesting the account details of any Bidder, Buyer or Seller. Aspire shall not be liable for any loss suffered as a result of any fraudulent e-mails sent to any Bidder, Buyer or Seller by any third parties or related fraudulent practices by third parties (including the unauthorised use of Aspire’s trademarks and brand names) in order to mislead any prospective Bidder, Buyer or Seller into believing that such third party is affiliated with Aspire; and 3.6. Aspire may send out e-mails in respect of payment for any registration fees (if applicable) and/ or payment with respect to the purchase of a particular Lot placed on Auction. 4. AMENDMENTS TO THE PRIVACY POLICY 4.1. Aspire may, from time to time, in its sole discretion, amend, cancel or rescind any provision of this Privacy Policy by publication of any such amended version (whether on its website or by any other means whatsoever). It is the responsibility of any Bidder, Buyer or Seller to ensure that they are aware, understand and accept these changes before conducting business with Aspire. 5. THIRD PARTY WEBSITES Any links on the website to third party websites are independent of this Privacy Policy. Any third party’s Privacy Policy is separate and Aspire shall not be liable for any information contained therein.

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ARTIST INDEX

Alexander, J Baker, B Battiss, W Bell, D Bester, W Boshoff, W Botes, C Brown, D Catherine, N Chiurai, K Clarke, P Du Toit, P Dumas, M Dung, H V Eastman, P Firmino, T Glover, A Goldblatt, D Goodman, F Gratrix, G Hockney, D Hodgins, R Julien, I Kabiru, C Katz, H Kentridge, W Khoza, B Langa, M Laubser, M Luzamba, Z Machona, G Magadlela, T

1 53 88 69, 70, 93 45 72 110 21 98, 101 23 38 113 26, 57 61 62 11 9 34, 35 66 3 59, 60 4, 55, 63, 86, 97, 109 33 48 78 16, 56, 58, 96, 103, 104, 111, 112 13 22 82 7 64 24, 25

Makamo, N Marx, G Masamvu, M Mason, J Mgoboza, S Moffatt, T Murray, B Ndzube, S Ngatane, E Ngobeni, B Nhlengethwa, S Okeke, CU Pemba, G Pierneef, J Roberts, K Schütz, P Sekoto, G Sibande, M Sibiya, B Siopis, P Sithole, L Skotnes, C Stern, I Stone, S Subotzky, M Taylor, A Tillim, G Timlin, W Victor, D Villa, E Wenning, P

102 95 54 92, 94 5 29, 30, 31, 32 15 6 107, 108 12, 14 99, 100 40, 42 37, 44 79, 80, 81 73 106 39, 43, 74 2 8, 67 27, 28 87 17, 19, 20, 41 10, 83 105 50, 51, 52 46, 47 49 77 66, 68 18, 36, 71, 84, 85, 89, 90, 91 75, 76

A CKNO W LED GE ME NT S PH O TO G RA PH Y R E S E A R C H A N D A U T H ORSH IP

EB | Emma Bedford CJ | Carina Jansen MS | Marc Smith JKS | Joshua Stanley

168

Anthea Pokroy Paris Brummer DETAIL ON PAGE 169

D ESIG N

Jacqui Carney

LT | Lisa Truter

PRO D U CTIO N & PRIN TIN G

MVZ | Marelize van Zyl

Typo, Johannesburg

Lot 24 Turiya Magadlela Ngizokuthanda ngasosonke isikhathi ngoba wena ulithemba lami ii DETAIL ON PAGE 170

Lot 95 Gerhard Marx Untitled


169


170


CATALOGUE SUBSCRIPTIO N

Aspire Art Auctions (Pty) Ltd | www.aspireart.net

Annual Auction Catalogues | 4 catalogues per annum R1000 for hand deliveries in South Africa R2000 for deliveries outside of South Africa Subscriptions are for a one-year period. Send the completed form to accounts@aspireart.net

E-catalogues will be uploaded onto the Aspire website for each auction and will be available as a free download.

Personal subscription

Payment methods

T IT L E

EFT deposit Bank: FNB

NA M E SURNAME

Account: Aspire Art Auctions (Pty) Ltd Account No: 6264 1877 347 Branch code: 250 655

E MA I L A D D R E S S

Branch: Hyde Park

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or HO M E N U M B E R

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SUBURB C IT Y / T O W N P R O V I N C E / S TAT E CODE COUNTRY

171


COM M ISSION/TEL EPHO NE B IDDING F OR M A Commission bid is also referred to as an Absentee or Written bid.

Aspire Art Auctions (Pty) Ltd | www.aspireart.net

SALE TITLE: Modern & Contemporary Art

L OT S

SALE VENUE: 37A Somerset Road | CT

LOT NO.

DESCRIPTION

EMERGENCY BID (HAMMER PRICE)

SALE DATE: 4 March 2021 | 7 pm SALE CODE: AAA | CT 4 MAR 21 Telephone bid

Absentee/Commission/Written bid

Commission bids must be received at least 24 hours prior to commencement of the auction. For dealers, please ensure the billing name and address corresponds with the company VAT number. Aspire cannot re-invoice or re-issue an invoice in a different name from the one listed on this form. Aspire will confirm receipt of all written bids telephonically or by email within one business day.

Please send completed forms to bids@aspireart.net Enquiries: +27 11 243 5243 | +27 71 675 2991 ID N U M B E R B ILL I N G N A M E BI DDI NG I NCREMENTS

AD D R E S S

Bidding generally starts below the low estimate and increases in increments of approximately 10% of the total amount. The auctioneer decides on the increments, and the amount at which bidding starts. The auctioneer may vary increments during the course of the auction at his/ her own discretion.

P R I M A R Y C O N TA C T N U MBER

R10 000–R20 000

R1 000 increments

R20 000–R30 000

R2 000 increments

R30 000–R50 000

R2 000, R5 000, R8 000 increments (i.e R32 000, R35 000, R38 000)

R50 000–R100 000

R5 000 increments

R100 000–R200 000

R10 000 increments

R200 000–R300 000

R20 000 increments

R300 000–R500 000

R20 000, R50 000, R80 000 increments (i.e R320 000, R350 000, R380 000)

For new bidders at Aspire Art Auctions, please attach a copy of the following documents: Proof of identity (ID document, Drivers License or Passport) Proof of current address

R500 000–R1 000 000

R50 000 increments

If bidding on behalf of a third party who has not previously bid at Aspire Art Auctions, please attach the same documents listed above for this bidder, as well as for yourself, accompanied by a signed authorisation from the third party.

I understand that written bids and telephone bids are a free and confidential service. While Aspire will be as careful as can reasonably be expected in processing these bids, Aspire will not be liable for any problems with this service or missed bids.

S E C O N D A R Y C O N TA C T N U MBER E MA I L A D D R E S S

Payment method: EFT

Credit Card

If you are the successful bidder, the full amount payable will be the sum of the hammer price, the buyer’s premium and VAT charged on the premium.

172

>R1 000 000 Repeated in the same proportions as above, or at the auctioneer’s discretion

I accept that if Aspire receives identical written bids on the same lot, the bid received first will take precedence.

I have read and understood this Written/Telephone Bid Form and the Terms and Conditions of Business as printed in the auction catalogue, and agree to be bound by the terms laid out therein. SI GNATURE


Profile for Aspire Art Auctions

Cape Town 4 March 2021 Auction e-Catalogue  

E-catalogue for our 4 March 2021 auction taking place in Cape Town.

Cape Town 4 March 2021 Auction e-Catalogue  

E-catalogue for our 4 March 2021 auction taking place in Cape Town.