Asphalt Pro - September 2019

Page 1

The QC/QA Issue

asphaltPRO PRODUCTION – PROFESSIONALS – PRODUCTS

Kokosing Makes a Good Neighbor

Declare Sustainability

• QC for SMA Aggregates • Full Depth Quality in Iowa • Solve Your Coring Problem

SEPTEMBER 2019 WWW.THEASPHALTPRO.COM


UNMATCHED DESIGN

Heatec has been designing and building tank farms for over 40 years and each project has been unique in some way. That’s because each customer is unique. You have your own business model that may be slightly different or dramatically different from the other guys’. That’s why at Heatec we take a comprehensive approach to designing your tank farm. That means we look at the materials you will be using, all the equipment that needs heat, the piping, and even future plans for expansion. Then we design a system that works for you. And we make it efficient and simple to operate. Heatec is unmatched when it comes to designing heating and storage systems for your asphalt plant. To find out more about our approach, visit us at www. heatec.com or give us a call at 423-821-5200.

H E AT E C , I N C .

an Astec Industries Company

5200 WILSON RD • CHATTANOOGA, TN 37410 USA 800.235.5200 • FAX 423.821.7673 • heatec.com


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CONTENTS

asphaltPRO September 2019

departments

32

Editor’s Letter 6 – Label Asphalt Sustainable

Safety Spotlight 8 – Convey Material Safely By AsphaltPro Staff

Mix it Up 12 – Aggregate Morphology Offers Recommendations for SMAs By Yufeng Liu, Harikrishnan Nair, D. Stephen Lane, Linbing Wang and Wenjuan Sun

Solve Your Problem 18 – Get Unstuck when Sampling By AsphaltPro Staff

Training

26

20 – How to Hear Your Team By John Ball

46

Meet the State Exec: 22 – Massachusetts’ Jim Reger By AsphaltPro Staff

Producer Profile 26 – Industry Incorporates Sustainability at Asphalt Production Plants – Part III By Malcolm Swanson, P.E.

50

International Snapshot 50 – International Milling By Tom Kuennen

Product Gallery 52 – Make More Tons with the Right Parts By AsphaltPro Staff

Off the Mat 60 – Minimize Risk By Jim Loughlin

Here’s How it Works 62 – Dynapac’s MF2500CS Material Feeder

New Tech 66 – Emerging Tech Supports Safety Training Six technologies to assist with safety training efforts From Association of Equipment Manufacturers

Feature articles 32 - Kokosing Keeps Neighbors in Mind By Sarah Redohl 38 – Verify Inbound Quality Integrity of incoming liquid AC determines final mix, dependable life, pavement performance By Lennie Loesch

The QC/QA Issue

asphaltPRO PRODUCTION – PROFESSIONALS – PRODUCTS

Kokosing Makes a Good Neighbor

40 - Use What You Document at the Plant—Part 1 Baseball vs Hot Mix By Ken Monlux 46 – Iowa Builds Perpetual Roads By Darwin Larson and Bill Rosener

Declare Sustainability

• QC for SMA Aggregates • Full Depth Quality in Iowa • Solve Your Coring Problem

SEPTEMBER 2019 WWW.THEASPHALTPRO.COM

on the cover

Kokosing Materials Inc. operates 17 asphalt plants throughout the state of Ohio. When a handful of the sites had close neighbors complain about odors, the Kokosing team turned to Asphalt Solutions’ AS Cherry product to eliminate the worry. See related article on page 32. Photo courtesy of Kokosing Materials.


editor’s Letter Label Asphalt Sustainable

Numbers tell a story. They provide clarity, something measurable and something objective. The article from long-time plant manager Ken Monlux on page 40 drives this point home for assessing, monitoring and possibly revamping plant operations, but let’s look right here at some specific types of numbers that can be used to boost the very selection of an asphalt pavement mix for a project. The asphalt industry finds itself called upon to use environmental labels and declarations concerning our mixes, and the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) sustainability committee has assembled a program to assist. The Emerald Eco-Label is NAPA’s verified Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) tool, designed to allow asphalt mix producers to develop plant-specific, mix-specific EPDs that comply with the product category rules (PCR) for asphalt mixtures. That’s a lot of acronyms to track, so stay with me here. The road-building industry is being called upon to label and assess data that is seen as impactful to the environment. Joseph Shacat, the director of sustainable pavements at NAPA, explained that green rating systems, such as LEED v4, are the primary market drivers behind this movement. At this time, he shared; the city of Portland is now requiring EPDs for concrete. It is in our best interest to be ready to show the EPD of a mix coming out of an asphalt plant at a moment’s notice. Think about what elements go into an asphalt pavement mix. Each of those elements can be tracked and can be assigned a level of energy use or environmental sustainability—a footprint, if you will. That measurable and objective data can then be placed on a label and shared with customers who earn credit for being environmentally responsible when making positive pavement choices for their projects. To earn credits for a green construction project, a contractor has to provide information on—declare—the environmental impact of his product. The mechanism by which he submits the information is the EPD—the Environmental Product Declaration. This has been standardized. It’s the way to communicate the performance or environmental impact of the product. It will quantify the potential environmental impact based on the lifecycle assessment, which is an ISO standards-based method for analyzing the materials, energy use and emissions of a product. This reality is here. The good news is asphalt mixes do tell an environmentally sustainable story. Our industry is not the big bad wolf. By getting on board with EPD labeling, you can make sure your facility is part of the positive narrative. As Shacat explained, the Emerald Eco-Label is a user-friendly, web-based system that is cost-effective. Thus, ours is not a difficult story to tell. Stay Safe,

Sandy Lender

September 2019 • Vol. 12 No. 11

asphaltPRO

602 W. Morrison, Box 6a • Fayette, MO 65248

(573) 823-6297 • www.theasphaltpro.com GROUP PUBLISHER Chris Harrison chris@ theasphaltpro.com PUBLISHER Sally Shoemaker sally@theasphaltpro.com (573) 823-6297 EDITOR Sandy Lender sandy@theasphaltpro.com (239) 272-8613 ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Redohl sarah@theasphaltpro.com (573) 355-9775 MEDIA SALES Cara Owings cara@theasphaltpro.com (660) 537-0778 ART DIRECTOR Kristin Branscom BUSINESS MANAGER Susan Campbell (660) 728-5007

AsphaltPro is published 11 times per year. Writers expressing views in AsphaltPro Magazine or on the AsphaltPro website are professionals with sound, professional advice. Views expressed herein are not necessarily the same as the views of AsphaltPro, thus producers/contractors are still encouraged to use best practices when implementing new advice. SUBSCRIPTION POLICY: Individual subscriptions are available without charge in the United Sates, Canada and Mexico to qualified individuals. One year subscription to non-qualifying Individuals: United States $90, Canada and Mexico $125.00. For the international digital edition, visit theasphaltpro.com/subscribe/.

6 // September 2019



safety spotlight

Convey Material Safely As long as plants and quarries have conveyors to carry material from point A to point B, workers will be required to maintain conveying equipment. Vigilance and training are only two tools in the arsenal against accidents that occur around conveyors, but owners can improve guarding around maintenance points and can reduce the need for some maintenance tasks, such as cleaning. This sounds like a tall order, but it’s more than worth the effort. In the first quarter of this year, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Mine Safety & Health Administration (MSHA) issued a fatality alert that a 46-year-old worker with three years of experience was fatally injured when he lost his balance and fell backwards through a narrow gap between two log washers and landed on a cable tray approximately 12 feet below. The victim was changing drive belts on a log washer motor when his wrench slipped off of a bolt he was tightening, causing the loss of balance. (See the sidebar for MSHA’s list of best practices issued following the incident.) While there are moral and ethical reasons to protect workers around any type of equipment, there are financial reasons to avoid injury for individual companies and the industry overall. During a conveyor safety webinar sponsored by Martin Engineering of Neponset, Illinois, Jerad Heitzler shared some hard truths. “Whenever we have a conveyor accident, we have the risk of changing regulations for guarding conveyors,” he explained. “We see increased citations. We see increased attention from governing bodies. We see increased documentation. We see upgrades to lockout/tagout enforcement. We see upgrades to training plans. And we see lowered employee retention and morale. When we subject employees to accidents, it’s difficult to attract and keep skilled workers.” Heitzler shared the story of a worker whose arm was broken in a pinch point while cleaning a conveyor belt. The workers’ peers went to visit the injured employee in the hospital and the scene was like a company meeting but “with an overwhelming feeling of dread.” Companies combat such horror with a robust safety culture, and with top safety tactics that include a clean work site.

A

BEST PRACTICE TACTICS

Heitzler listed four main areas of best practices when working around conveyors, belts, rollers and return conveyors, etc., that we’ll discuss here. • Proper PPE—While the company is responsible for providing personal protective equipment, each employee is responsible for using it. When working around conveying equipment, employees can’t wear baggy clothing or jewelry. Long hair should be confined. • Policies, Procedures & Protocol—While the company must have policies in place, it is up to each employee to use procedures correctly. It’s wise to enforce more than lockout/tagout. Heitzler listed: Lock it out; tag it out; use test out procedure;

8 // September 2019

and use block out procedure to eliminate stored energy from tension in the conveyor belt. When you lock out, you eliminate the electricity, but the belt remains a giant rubber band of energy. The block out step eliminates the stored energy from the “stretch” becoming a hazard. By using clamps on the belt and securing it to the structure, you physically restrain it and prevent it from moving. Then you can release the tension when work/repair is complete.

Energy and power are not the same. You want to physically restrain a belt, even if the power has been turned off. • Training—Take the time to figure out how your employees learn best, and train in that fashion. Heitzel shared that adult learners often need one-on-one, face-to-face conversations to learn new concepts. Only 15 percent of learners will blindly follow a new concept, he explained, so make sure you’re sharing safety messages with facts and data to back up “why” your policies, procedures and protocol are vital. • Safety Equipment—When training safety concepts, the proper use of safety equipment is vital as well. For example, emergency stop switches can’t be used as the only line of defense at the conveyor belt. The emergency stop switch needs to be tested for slack (you want no more than 12 inches of slack, Heitzel shared) in its cable. The cable de-energizes the conveyor, but the conveyor continues to move until the cable runs out when the switch is tripped. Do your employees understand that hitting the switch doesn’t bring about an immediate stop? When testing the switch, measure, record and report the runout. Inspect the cables and clamps. Inspect the length and location of the stop.

Best Safe Conveyor Practices • Always use fall protection equipment, safety belts and lines, when working at heights and near openings where there is a danger of falling. • Always be aware of your surroundings and any hazards that may be present. • Have properly designed handrails, guards, and covers securely in place at openings through which persons may fall. • Train personnel in safe work procedures regarding the use of handrails and fall protection equipment during maintenance and construction activities and ensure their use. • Conduct workplace examinations to identify and correct hazards prior to performing work. Source: MSHA Fatality Alert


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safety spotlight Other safety equipment that can save a life is the guard. The guard around conveyors should have no sharp edges and should have no pinch point at the hinge. You want the guard to be removed only with a tool to access the belt for maintenance. It has to stand out in color from the equipment it’s “guarding” and it must be a proper distance from the hazard, opening or rotating piece of equipment. Heitzel reminded the audience to test the guard with the acronym A.U.T.O. You should not be able to reach: around, under, through or over a guard.

of keeping dust from piling up. Heitzel suggested aggregate managers look into the following areas where technologies exist. • Reduce carryback • Install proper belt cleaning • Reduce dust around the belt • Use skirting, but don’t over-rely on it alone • Reduce belt sag with proper support • Maintain wear liners It’s possible to mechanically control dust to prevent build-up. By limiting dust, we can reduce the opportunities for maintenance and cleaning-related accidents around conveyors. – BY ASPHALTPRO STAFF

KEEP IT CLEAN

Eliminate the hazard by eliminating the need to climb onto equipment for cleaning. Heitzel shared the story of a worker simply sweeping the floor around an elevated conveyor component. The worker slipped and fell 60 feet to his death. Another terrible fact is that workers shoveling fines have had shovels get stuck in pinch points; before anyone could hit a stop switch, the force pulled the workers to a horrible end. Our industry must adhere to dust mitigation rules and regs, so reducing these accidents begins with reducing the need for cleanup. As an industry, we can do a better job

Connect With Us! Stay in touch with AsphaltPro between issues where you can find how-to content, trends and technology, and industry insight.

Safety Stop Switch Detects Cable Breaks The Model RSB is a “broken-cable” version of the Model RS series of cable operated safety stop switches. This unit is designed to actuate whenever the actuation cable is severed or pulled. This control is designed to act as an emergency stop for conveyors and other moving machinery. The Model RSB is known as a “double-ended” unit and has an external extension spring at the end of each cable run, which maintains constant tension on the pull cable. The spring also helps to compensate for expansion and contraction of the pull cable due to temperature fluctuations. The operating handle is held in the vertical position, using a turn-buckle for adjustment. If the cable is pulled or the cable breaks, the handle rotates and activates the microswitch. In this way, the alarm signal is generated for both conditions: cable pull or cable break. The operating handle must then be manually reset to the center position after the problem has been corrected. For more information, contact Conveyor Components Company at (800) 233-3233.

The Recycling Issue

asphaltPRO O R P lt a h p as Issue The Production

PRODUCTION – PROFESS

IONALS – PRODUCT

PROFES PRODUCTION –

CTS SIONALS – PRODU

E.T. Simonds es Shares Plant Mov

IR-Dry RAP

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Experts Share Their Secrets For Equipment Staging Success

facebook.com/ AsphaltPro

Seal the Southeast

t Feed Sensors • How to Protec te Maintenance • Overlay Ultima ent xt Best Investm • Here’s Your Ne Freight orate Asphalt in • How to Incorp JANUARY 2017 O.COM WWW.THEASPHALTPR

• How to Build an AD A Ramp • How to Rejuvenate Your Recycling • C.W. Matthews Cr ushes Pavement Maintena nce

FEBRUARY 2017 WWW.THEASPHALTPRO.CO M

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theasphaltpro.com 10 // September 2019

The Model RSB cable-operated safety stop switch is available from Conveyor Components Co., Croswell, Michigan.


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mix it up

Aggregate Morphology Offers Recommendations for SMAs Hot-mix asphalt (HMA) pavement mixes are composed of up to approximately 90 to 95 percent mineral aggregates by weight and up to 80 to 90 percent aggregates by volume. The mineral aggregate plays a vital role in the mechanical performance of asphalt pavements. According to the basic material properties and composition of the aggregate skeleton, asphalt concrete mixes can be classified as dense graded or gap graded. Dense-graded mixes, also known as Superpave mixes in Virginia, are asphalt mixes with a uniform distribution of aggregate sizes along the maximum density line. Stone matrix asphalt (SMA) is a gap-graded HMA with a high percentage of coarse aggregate and high asphalt content. Gap-graded mixes are characterized by a non-uniform distribution of aggregate sizes. These mixes contain aggregates retained on the larger and smaller sieves but with little aggregate retained on the middle sieves. As with dense-graded mixes, gap-graded mixes are identified based on nominal maximum aggregate size (NMAS). SMA is the most common gap-graded mix used in Virginia and is composed of a gap-graded aggregate that is intended to maximize rutting resistance and durability with a stable stone-onstone skeleton held together by a rich mixture of asphalt binder, mineral filler and cellulose fibers. SMAs are recommended only for placements in heavy traffic conditions because of their higher cost. The rut resistance of SMA is achieved through the stoneon-stone contact by specifying the coarse aggregate fraction of the mix to be between 70 and 80 percent; durability is enhanced through the rich asphalt mastic. To ensure durability of SMA mixes, a stiff mastic containing a high liquid asphalt content (6.3 percent minimum specified in Virginia for SMA-9.5), a high amount of mineral filler (9 to 11 percent), and a small amount of cellulose fibers (minimum of 0.3 percent) is typically specified. SMA mixes have been used extensively by the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) throughout Virginia since 2003. The field performance of SMA in Virginia has been generally excellent, with reported service lives of 15 to 18 years, according to a paper by McGhee et al in 2010. However, several SMA pavements have experienced premature failures. McGhee et al, in 2010, identified factors related to both pavement structure and material as causes for the poor performance of some VDOT SMA-surfaced pavements. Material-related failures including flushing, rutting and surface distortions were observed at intersections for an SMA-9.5 mix with a performance grade (PG) 70-22 binder. SMA mixes with larger, coarse aggregates (SMA-12.5) appeared to perform better than SMA mixes with finger aggregates. Tests and studies ensued. VDOT adopted a new gradation for SMA-9.5 mixes in 2012. The new gradation, along with the previous gradation, is shown in Table 1, on page 14. The primary change was the reduction of

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the maximum percent passing the No.4 sieve from 40 percent to 32 percent. In addition, minor changes were made with regard to the 3/8-inch and No.200 sieves. The purpose of changing percent passing for the 3/8-inch and No.4 sieves was to coarsen the mixture and improve stone-on-stone contact. An additional requirement placed on coarse aggregates for use in SMA mixes was a limitation on the percentage of particles with a high aspect ratio, commonly referred to as flat and elongated particles. The purpose of this requirement was to avoid extreme shapes that could impair the ability of the aggregate to pack into a stone-on-stone skeleton or break easily during compaction, changing the aggregate gradation. Compliance with the flat and elongated requirements is currently determined by manual measurement of individual particles. Advanced imaging technology with a computer-automated system is a promising tool in providing precise data for aggregate morphological characteristics. With the ability to characterize the aggregate morphology objectively and quantitatively, without tedious human interaction, more effort can be focused on simple performance tests and wheel tracking tests. The laboratory performance-based results can be analyzed to link better the aggregate morphological characteristics with the mechanical performance of asphalt mixes. A better and more scientific understanding of the effect of aggregate morphology on the performance of asphalt mixes is needed to reduce the production costs for mixes and improve long-term pavement performance.

PURPOSE AND SCOPE The purpose of this study was to examine VDOT’s revised grading specs for the design of SMA mixes with smaller aggregates and the impact of aggregate morphology on the structural stability of the mix. A limited suite of aggregates representing the range of particle morphology typical of Virginia sources was characterized using an image analysis system. SMA mixes designed and produced by different contractors using aggregates from different quarries in Virginia were included in the study. SMA mixes and samples of the aggregates used in production were obtained for a lab evaluation of the structural stability and aggregate characteristics of the mixes. The study had a number of objectives. 1. Assess the volumetric properties, binder properties and lab performance of SMA mixes produced under the revised gradation spec. 2. Quantify coarse aggregate morphological characteristics, including sphericity, flatness ratio, elongation ratio, flat and elongated particle ratio, angularity, and texture using an image analysis system and the uncompacted void content.


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mix it up

Table 1. SMA Design Gradation Range 3. Correlate aggregate morphological characteristics captured by image analysis techniques with the mechanical performance of SMA mixes obtained from the lab performance-based tests. 4. Correlate aggregate morphological characteristics captured by image analysis techniques with the uncompacted void content of coarse aggregates. 5. Assess the field performance of these mixes using data from VDOT’s Pavement Management System (PMS). We started with a literature review, searching various transportation-related databases. SMA-9.5 mixes were collected from field projects that were paved in 2013, 2014 and 2015. SMA mixes were produced in accordance with VDOT’s specs for the SMA mix design published in 2016. Virginia aggregates used for mixes quarried at Bealeton, Stuarts Draft, Piney River, Leesburg, Goose Creek, Chantilly and Garrisonville were also collected. The three types of asphalt binder selected were PG70-22, PG76-22 and PG76-28 high polymer. The asphalt binder content in each SMA mix varied around 6.3 to 6.4 percent by weight, except for one mix in which it was 6.8 percent. There were a total of 23 types of coarse aggregate in the SMA mixes. These aggregates mainly included the following rock types: • Aplite • Limestone (No.10 screenings) • Quartzite • Arkose • Diabase • Amphibolite

THE BOTTOM LINE

All SMA-9.5 mixes examined in this study met the criterion of VCAMIX < VCADRC when a breakpoint sieve of 2.38 millimeter (mm) was used for calculation. Most of the SMA-9.5 mixes also met VDOT’s spec for the SMA-12.5 gradation requirement, which shows that using certain gradations, a producer can meet VDOT requirements for both SMA-9.5 and SMA-12.5 mixes. Hence, VCAMIX was calculated based on a 4.75 mm breakpoint sieve (breakpoint for SMA-12.5 mix). Three mixes did not meet the criterion of VCAMIX < VCADRC, indicating loss of stone-onstone contact. The fineness modulus for the gradation (per ASTM C125) (ASTM, 2017) was determined for all mixes and ranged from 5.08 to 5.38. (The literature review found mixes performed poorly in rutting when the fineness modulus was less than 5.0.)

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Volumetric results showed that as the percent passing the 4.75 mm sieve increases, the VMA of the mix decreases and VCAMIX increases. The shape factor results from the improved FTI system, including sphericity and flatness ratio, were in good agreement with manual measurements using a Vernier caliper. Aggregates used in the mixes included in this study were produced in quarries equipped with an array of crushing equipment including jaw, impact, cone and gyratory crushers from a variety of rock types. The aggregates met the flat and elongated particle requirement. Overall, there was no major difference in the dynamic modulus values between different mixes. The flow number results under the unconfined condition varied greatly, indicating the different rutting resistance potentials ENGINEERING of these SMA mixes; flow numbers under the confined condition for all types of SMA mixes were the same. In both the confined and unconfined flow number tests, polymer-modifed binders showed a lower slope compared to PG70-22 binders, indicating better rutting resistance. All mixes showed lower rut values in the APA test than the criterion of 4.0 mm for Virginia’s SMA. Based on beam fatigue testing, SMA mixes with polymer-modiENGINEERING fied binder showed excellent fatigue performance. All mixes showed a maximum number of cycles of 1,200 in the Texas overlay test, suggesting excellent reflection crack resistance of these mixes. Polymer-modified asphalt showed low Jnr values in MSCR testing, indicating better performance of these binders with regard to rutting and the accommodation of temperature variations and extreme loading conditions. ENGINEERING Statistical results showed that the flow number test parameter Log(FN) was correlated with the aggregate morphological characteristics (S, FER, AF and TF). The linear regression analyses between the weighted mean morphological characteristics (S, FER, AF and TF) and the FNS of all SMA mixes were performed with or without grouping FNS data based on performance grade. FNS increased with increased weighted mean FER values and decreased with increased weightENGINEERING ed mean S, AF and TF values. The lower the FNS, the better the rutting performance. Statistical results showed that the fatigue parameter Log(NOC) was correlated with the morphological characteristics (AF and TF).

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mix it up Linear regression analysis indicated that the morphological characteristics correlated well with the uncompacted void content of coarse aggregates with size ranges of 4.75 to 9.5 mm and 9.5 to 12.5 mm. Both regression models for these two aggregate size ranges showed that the uncompacted void content increased with a decrease in angularity for coarse aggregates.

CONCLUSIONS

Using the appropriate breakpoint sieve for the VCAMIX calculation is important for assessing the presence of good stone-onstone contact and a denser coarse aggregate fraction in SMA mixes. SMA requires good stone-on-stone contact of the coarse aggregate to be able to function as a durable and rut-resistant mix. It is important to recognize a distinction between the breakpoint sieve established by the design procedure (Virginia Test Method 99) and what could be called the “effective” breakpoint sieve, the smallest sieve used in the VCAMIX calculation, because the calculation includes only the established breakpoint and larger sieves on which 10 percent or more material is retained. For example, the established breakpoint sieve for the SMA-9.5 mixes is the 2.36 mm sieve; however, for a gradation where less than 10 percent material is retained on the 2.36 mm sieve, the 4.5 mm sieve is the “effective” breakpoint sieve and the material retained on the 2.36 mm sieve is not included in the VCAMIX calculation. The improved FTI system can accurately quantify morphological characteristics of aggregates. The technology is well suited for research work and should be used in studies where aggregate morphology is of interest. However, it is not commercially developed such that it could be implemented for routine practice. SMA mixes consisting of more spherical (equant), less flaky aggregates with more angular and rougher textured surfaces have better rutting resistance. SMA mixes consisting of more angular and rougher textured aggregates have better fatigue characteristics. Among morphological characteristics, flatness ratio, elongation ratio and texture have the greatest effect on uncompacted void content for coarse aggregated retained on the 4.75 mm sieve, whereas elongation ratio and angularity have the greatest effect on void content for coarse aggregates retained on the 9.5 mm sieve. Based on lab test results, with polymer-modified binder, better rutting resistance can be obtained even if the aggregate morphological characteristics are slightly less favorable. From these conclusions, we have the following three recommendations. First, VDOT’s materials division should continue with the revised gradation changes for the SMA 9.5 mix along with other specifications for aggregate and volumetric requirements. If the SMA-9.5 mix also meets the gradation requirement for an SMA12.5 mix, then the VCAMIX criterion should be checked using the 4.75 mm sieve as the breakpoint sieve to ensure stone-on-stone contact. For SMA-9.5 mixes that are not coarse enough to be interchangeable with SMA-12.5 mixes, the 2.36 mm sieve should not be used as the breakpoint sieve. With regard to this first recommendation, no change is needed, as the current VDOT specification included the new gradation change. Selection of the breakpoint sieve is effectively controlled

16 // September 2019

With the ability to characterize the aggregate morphology objectively and quantitatively, without tedious human interaction, more effort can be focused on simple performance tests and wheel tracking tests. in Virginia Test Method 99, wherein the material on the breakpoint sieve is considered as coarse aggregate only if it exceeds 10 percent retained. SMA is very sensitive to changes in the material passing the respective “breakpoint” sieve. Excessive material passing the breakpoint sieve will cause the mix to lose stone-on-stone contact. Implementing this first recommendation will ensure stone-on-stone contact and reduce rutting. Second, VDOT’s material division should encourage the use of polymer-modified binders when the SA-9.5 mix is specified to increase fatigue life and reduce rutting. With regard to this second recommendation, VDOT’s materials division implemented this by making a note in the asphalt mix selection guidelines. Implementing the second recommendation will contribute to increased fatigue and rutting resistance of SMA mixes. Third, VDOT’s materials division and the Virginia Transportation Research Council (VTRC) should consider initiating an investigation to study the feasibility of using an upper limit on the uncompacted void content of aggregates in addition to or as an alternative to the flat and elongated particle requirement. With regard to this third recommendation, a research needs statement will be developed for VTRCs Asphalt Research Advisory Committee to consider at its fall 2019 meeting. The benefit of implementing the third recommendation is the possible adoption of a simpler method to avoid aggregates having excessive aspect ratios. – BY YUFENG LIU, HARIKRISHNAN NAIR, D. STEPHEN LANE, LINBING WANG, AND WENJUAN SUN

This article is provided in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration and the Virginia Transportation Research Council, which is a partnership of the Virginia Department of Transportation and the University of Virginia since 1948. Yufeng Liu is a teaching assistant at Virginia Tech. Harikrishnan Nair, Ph.D., P.E., is a senior research scientist at Virginia Transportation Research Council. D. Stephen Lane is an associate principal research scientist at Virginia Transportation Research Council. Linbing Wang, Ph.D., P.E., is a professor at Virginia Tech. Wenjuan Sun, Ph.D., is a research associate at Lehigh University. They published their final report VTRC 19-R15 “Influence of Aggregate Morphology and Grading on the Performance of 9.5-mm Stone Matric Asphalt Mixtures” May 2019.


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Solve your problem

Get Unstuck when Sampling Taking cores may be as easy as lining up the drill on the areas marked by inspectors and contractors, or it could come with some challenges. If you find the core barrel wobbling or acting as if it’s jammed, you may need to do something as simple as realigning the barrel. Here are some easy fixes for simple problems you may encounter when popping cores for quality control/quality assurance testing.

The Problem:

If the coring rig experiences binding while cutting a core, you could have one of several problems to address. When you pull the core barrel back up and see flakes of rubber, you could be encountering an old membrane that may have been used between layers. The lab manager for AsphaltCONSTRUCTIO ENGINEERING Testing Solutions & Engineering LLC (ATS), Rhonda Hale, CPM, shared that ARMI layers were often used between layers and could contribute to stickiness or binding when coring. If you find yourself meeting resistance, you could be encountering some older, thicker pavement with these types of layers or simply have a twisted core barrel. While ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTIO coring rigs are built to work through tough conditions, Hale offered some suggestions for solving minor problems.

The Solution:

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CONSTRUCTIO

• Make sure the core barrel is perpendicular to the pavement. • Take it slowly and make sure the core barrel is properly lubricated with water and liquid dish soap during the cutting process. ENGINEERING • Watch your core barrel for visible signs of an issue. CONSTRUCTIO • If you feel resistance, back the core barrel out, readjust/ realign if you need to, and begin again. Too much pressure will cause the barrel to bind as well. For more information, contact ATS at (904) 503-5100. – BY ASPHALTPRO STAFF ENGINEERING

Photo of good coring practices provided by ATS 18 // September 2019

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Training

How to Hear Your Team Next month, the magazine staff will publish the annual training directory and publish special links on the training page. It lists the opportunities around the industry to get your crews trained over the winter. While planning ahead is smart; take a look at what you need right now. If you’re looking for a way to help communicate lessons— or just basic instructions—to workers while they’re on the job, you have to cut through the noise on the job. You also have to stay safe. Here’s an idea for safety, ease of communication and training. Invest in quality headsets that block the noise that damages hearing, but allow your workers to communicate easily and hands-free with each other. Hearing protection is a hot button for human resources directors in the construction business. We have to be careful not to block out important sounds when mitigating damaging noise for employees at the plant or in the work zone. The team at The Earle Companies in Farmingdale, New Jersey, uses PowerCom Plus headsets from 3M™ PELTOR™ to let a determined amount of sound get through the protective gear and to let workers communicate with one another. It’s not only a safety measure; it also helps with training and workflow. When I worked onsite with them for training purposes, I could communicate with workers who were on equipment out of shouting distance. That’s the kind of immediate communication your training supervisors and paving foremen often need out on the jobsite. For the two milling crews that came together for the picture you see here, the headsets allow communication between ground personnel and operators high up on a mill platform. When a new worker joins the crew, he has the team in his ear—literally. Getting instructions to workers is easier

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20 // September 2019

TOP: Bryan Kopsic models the 3M™ PELTOR™ PowerCom Plus headset he wears when operating equipment. BOTTOM: In the front from left, The Earle Companies employees Vincent Torres, Jule Johnson, Anthony Scorsone, and Flores Pairol; and in the back from left, Bryant Perez, Sebirano Garcia, and Matt Stapon serve on two milling crews and use headsets to communicate during the shift. Both photos courtesy John Ball of Top Quality Paving for the foreman when he can speak directly into the mouthpiece, rather than waving his arms around to get the new guy’s attention, etc. When you get AsphaltPro next month, look specifically for the training directory section to find the listing of OEMs and service providers who offer training at their schools or in a dealer’s shop. Also think outside the box to invest in training—and safety—tools like headsets that let you get in-

structions to workers wherever they are on the jobsite. – BY JOHN BALL

John Ball is the proprietor of Top Quality Paving and Training, Manchester, New Hampshire. He provides personal on-site paving consulting services around the United States and into Canada. For more information, contact him at (603) 493-1458 or tqpaving@yahoo.com.


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Meet the state exec

Meet the State Exec: Massachusetts’ Jim Reger The Massachusetts Aggregate and Asphalt Pavement Association (MAAPA), Norwood, was first formed in 1935. Now, the association includes 16 producer members, representing roughly 90 percent of the asphalt tons produced in the state, as well as 42 associate members. James (Jim) Reger has been MAAPA’s executive director for four years, and has 34 years of experience in the asphalt industry. AsphaltPro spent time getting to know Reger and learning how MAAPA promotes the asphalt industry in the state of Massachusetts.

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What are the top two or three ways you have increased membership in the association? I solicit potential names of companies from my producer members twice a year. I try to have a fun variety of meetings, social events and golf outings to make it worth joining. What is your favorite method for recruiting new asphalt professionals to the industry in general? I speak at various colleges and try to encourage internships at member operations. I have had a number of people come into the industry and begin very successful careers after internships.

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In what month do you hold your annual meeting? Our annual meeting is held in October or November. What other activities does the state association hold for members as fundraising events? We have two dinner meetings a year and a golf tournament in September. Any funds raised at these events are given to a charitable cause. Do you have a staff that assists in preparing the annual meeting? No, it is a one-man show! About how many member asphalt projects do you visit per year/paving season? I visit between four and five member asphalt projects every year. About how many member asphalt plant tours do you assist/are you a part of per year? If invited, I attend one or two asphalt plant tours each year. About how many member asphalt open house events do you attend per year? All, if invited. About how many state agency or DOT meetings do you attend per year? 30 On a scale of 1 to 5 (1 being none at all; 5 being very much), how much of a threat to your members’ market share /livelihood is the concrete industry in your state? Currently one, but they have filed legislation that

22 // September 2019

TOP: James (Jim) Reger. BOTTOM: Jim Reger has been the executive CONSTRUCTION director of MAAPA for fourENGINEERING years, with 34 years of experience in the asphalt industry.

SERVICE & TRAINING

could make it a four. They are sending bills to local legislatures asking for Life Cycle Cost Analysis to be done on all projects with more than $1 million in paving. Most DOTs do some form of this, but this [bill would make] it mandatory. Despite the costs of doing an LCCA, the concrete pavement people think they can force a DOT to use concrete by playing with the numbers in an LCCA. They make the claim that there isn’t enough solid information on concrete pavement in Massachusetts so therefore to build a history they want the mandate that MassDOT build four projects a year for the next 10 years so they can see how concrete does in the field. Fortunately there have been enough bad results from concrete in the field that the state DOT


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Meet the state exec knows what to expect. Most concrete pavement in the state has been rubblized and repaved with HMA. This is the second time this bill has been filed and we work to oppose this on a daily basis. On a scale of 1 to 5 (1 being none at all; 5 being very much), how much difficulty are your members having in finding qualified workers for their asphalt paving or production crews? Four. Most of the companies are union and they work with their locals for employees, yet it is still very difficult to get and retain qualified workers. Could you give an example of a way your association assists members with workforce development? We are currently the sponsor of an apprentice program for quality control. We are also donating a full QC lab to a local community college and supporting their “pre-apprentice” program for quality control technicians. On a scale of 1 to 5 (1 being none at all; 5 being very much), how involved are your state elected officials in transportation issues such as funding and infrastructure improvements? The transportation committee is highly involved (five); the rest of the legislature is probably a three. There is a big issue regarding mass transit and congested roadways in the state and everyone is aware of the issues.

Reger spends approximately 40 days a year with the legislature talking about funding, asphalt and workforce development.

On a scale of 1 to 5 (1 being none at all; 5 being very much), how involved are your asphalt members in transportation issues such as funding and infrastructure improvements? Three. Most of the effort with the legislature is done by myself representing the industry. Some key members of the board do get directly involved in our lobby efforts. Could you share an example of a time when your state association hosted elected officials to educate them on the need for highway funding, asphalt materials, construction workforce development, etc.? We do not host this type of event but we do attend if a member company is hosting. I spend approximately 40 days a year with the legislature talking about funding, asphalt and workforce development.

Get to Know Jim Reger

What do you find most enjoyable about your job as an executive director of a state association? I like dealing with construction people. I find the men and women in this industry are great people— the kind I like working with. I suppose it comes from working my way up inside a contracting company. I got to see and interact with all levels of personnel and I developed a real feeling for how hard they work and how proud they are of the work they do.

What do you see as the most important part of your job as an executive director of a state association? The most important part of my job is working as a problem solver for the industry.

What has been the most rewarding experience for you during your time as the executive director? Being asked to help my SAPA partners understand some of the details of how contractors bid on projects. I enjoy sharing my knowledge to help others improve.

Why (or how) did you join the asphalt industry? In 1985, I was in the cement industry and one of my customers suggested that I talk with them about joining their asphalt division. I made the switch and concentrated on paving, estimating and sales. I eventually rose to president of the company. I retired in 2011 and eventually joined MAAPA in 2014 as executive director.

What is the most challenging part of your job, and why do you think it’s a challenge in your state? It’s a challenge to try to get a sense of urgency from my members as to the future issues that will confront us. When business is good, everyone is running their operations and not looking down the road at potential problems.

24 // September 2019

Do you have a degree related to the industry? I have a BA in economics from St. Lawrence University and an MBA in management from Southern New Hampshire University. – BY ASPHALTPRO STAFF


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Producer profile

Natural deposits, such as the well-known Trinidad Lake asphalt repository pictured here, do exist, but they are minor sources when compared to the residual of petroleum refining processes. Photo courtesy siempreverde22 AdobeStock.

Industry Incorporates Sustainability At Asphalt Production Plants PART III Editor’s Note: During the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) annual meeting on Marco Island, Florida, February 2019, a committee on which I serve discussed the fact an elected representative had asked our industry how we could improve sustainability. The representative wanted to know how the asphalt industry would work to lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, address climate change and so on. The asphalt industry already works with sustainable practices to lower GHGs and keep an already low carbon footprint in check. Recently, a member of the Astec Inc. family, Malcolm Swanson, P.E., gathered information for an 11-page document outlining some of the industry’s sustainable practices. Part I of the piece appeared in the July edition and Part II in the August edition of AsphaltPro; here we’ll share Part III of Swanson’s paper, in which he gives a deep dive into additional ways to apply sustainable materials use while enhancing your bottom line at the asphalt plant.

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While discussions of energy and materials are going to necessarily intertwine, we focused on energy in Part II of this article series and will focus on sustainability of materials now.

26 // September 2019

There are several different categories of materials in use at any asphalt plant. The incoming raw materials consist of virgin materials and recycled materials. There are also finished materials and waste materials. Almost all of these consist of mineral aggregates (rock and sand) and liquid asphalt cement (AC).

ROCK, SAND, RECYCLED ASPHALT PAVEMENT (RAP)

The whole Earth is made of rock, yet the availability of rock is a concern. A part of the problem is that the requirements for rock for construction of highways that can stand up to heavy truck traffic are very stringent. Access to high quality rock is complicated by land becoming occupied by residential, commercial and industrial uses. As this happens, potential viable quarry sites become scarcer. That is especially true near urban areas where the need for materials is greatest. Also, some geographical regions, like much of Florida, have no good local rock. High quality rock has to be brought in by truck, rail, barge, etc. All of these transportation methods use fuel. As much as is practical, mixes should be designed to use indigenous stone and


sand. However, those materials sometimes will not work for demanding applications. In many cases, there is plenty of good local rock already on roadways that are being resurfaced. Whenever possible, in preparation for resurfacing, the old surface materials (RAP) should be recovered by milling it up and returning it to the asphalt plant. Contractors and DOTs should work together to maximize the use of RAP, thus stretching the remaining available virgin rock further.

LIQUID ASPHALT

Most liquid asphalt is the residual of petroleum refining processes. Natural deposits, such as the well-known Trinidad Lake asphalt repository, do exist, but they are minor sources by comparison. If fossil fuel use diminishes, the availability of liquid AC—also called bitumen—would also diminish. Ironically, the opposite situation—increasing demand for fossil fuels—is also a threat to the liquid AC supply. With increasing oil demand or decreasing supply, at some point, operating coker units that extract more fuels from petroleum refinery residuals, leaving no asphalt, would increase in number and capacity. Because RAP includes both aggregate and high quality AC, maximizing its use will help deal with future shortages of virgin AC.

ASPHALT ROOFING SHINGLES

The asphalt shingles enthusiasm seems to have diminished. Some contractors found them difficult to use. When processing shingles for use, dealing with size reduction and the resulting high moisture content, various problems are encountered. Nevertheless, shingles consist of some good materials, especially liquid asphalt. The asphalt content is about 18 percent in the southern tier of the United States and up to about 22 percent in the northern tier of the United States and Canada. Prepared, processed and incorporated into the mix correctly, shingles contribute to excellent mix and effectively replace some liquid asphalt. In as much as using shingles solves the used shingles disposal problem as well as providing a useful asphalt pavement material, it seems to me we should continue to use them and just keep improving our technology, based on science.

RUBBER TIRES

The accumulation of rubber tires continues to be a problem; however, the asphalt industry alone cannot solve it. We can and do take some of the tires and can make excellent special-purpose mixes with them by incorporating fine rubber powder. Special-purpose pavements can bring in a good return, thus we can contribute to the solution.

PLASTICS

Plastic packaging material rubbish has become a huge environmental problem and may be an opportunity for the asphalt industry. Polymers, as everyone in the industry knows, can be beneficial to asphalt pavements. Plastics are polymers, but not all polymers are created equal.

www.THeAsphaltpro.com // 27


Producer profile

The asphalt industry alone cannot solve the problem of used tires in our landfills, but we have taken on the call to include tire crumb rubber in asphalt mixes with success. Check out the article on Liberty Tire’s SmartMIX at www.TheAsphaltPro.com. Both photos courtesy Liberty Tire Recycling, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania The idea behind waste plastic as an opportunity is that we can somehow break down and put recyclable plastics to beneficial use in pavements. The National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT), the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA), Dow Chemical, and other researchers as far away as India and Australia are working on whether—and how—recycling of plastics into pavements can be done in a way that benefits pavements. The development of the science is still at an early stage according to Dr. Buzz Powell and Dr. Fan Yin, both of NCAT. They emphasized the importance of doing the science before the construction projects. Taking the reverse course could cause project failures that could then lead to the rejection of the whole concept. There are several types of plastics to be considered, but only two ways of incorporating the plastics into the asphalt. The two methods are “wet” and “dry.” The wet method involves blending the plastic into the liquid binder before incorporating the binder into the asphalt mixture. With the dry method, the plastics are introduced as a dry additive directly into the hot aggregate. At this time, plastic bags, which are made of high-density polyethylene (PE-HD), are a primary focus of research for recycling into asphalt. The relatively low melting point of PE-HD is compatible with normal liquid asphalt process temperatures. Introduction by wet

To Plasticize or Not? Dr. Buzz Powell and Dr. Fan Yin, of the National Center for Asphalt Technology, have emphasized the importance of doing the science before doing construction projects with recycled plastics. Taking the reverse course could cause project failures that could then lead to the rejection of the whole concept.

28 // September 2019

method appears to be most likely to succeed; however, just because two materials exist in liquid state within a certain temperature range does not mean that they will automatically blend well. We are all familiar with oil and water. Some chemical additives may be necessary to facilitate blending. The waste materials upon which most research effort is being applied, and those considered most likely to be recyclable to the benefit of asphalt pavements, are these: • High-density polyethylene (PE-HD), commonly used to make grocery bags • Low-density polyethylene (PE-LD), used to make frozen food bags • Polypropylene (PP), used to make microwaveable food containers

CALCIUM HYDROXIDE (CAOH)

Hydrated lime is frequently used for moisture sensitivity (stripping) control. It is made from calcium carbonate (limestone). The process of producing hydrated lime involves the release of carbon dioxide (CO2). That’s the down side, but there is a substantial environmental upside. Lime is not only an effective anti-stripping additive; it is effective at capturing certain pollutants in plant exhaust gases. First, when applied by any means that wets it, including applying it directly to the incoming wet aggregate, it dissociates in the water to CA+ and OH- ions. Then, when exposed to CO2 in the exhaust gas stream, some of the Ca combines with the CO2 to form calcium carbonate (CaCO2), limestone, from whence it came. Lime, introduced into the dryer where it has direct contact with exhaust gases, captures and neutralizes acid-forming compounds. The acids can come from sources such as sulfur in recycled fuel oils (most recycled fuel oils do not contain significant amounts of sulfur) and in ground water (in some areas) and salt in brackish water and in some aggregates. The chlorine in the salt (NaCl), when exposed to the burner flame and the hot, moist environment of the dryer, forms hydrochloric acid (HCl). Sulfur, from any source, will form sulfurous (H2SO3) or sulfuric (H2SO4) acids. The unintended benefits of lime in these situations include significant reduction of corrosion potential (drum, flights,


ductwork, baghouse steel structure and cages, bags, and stack) as well as improved emissions quality.

PLANNING AHEAD MAKES BUSINESS SENSE

As we design plant equipment, we should ensure our design process comes from a human-needs perspective. … This also means that we have to think long term as we design. We have to think all the way to the end-of-life of the equipment. What happens when the equipment is eventually deactivated? At that point, what can be recycled and what can’t? Are recyclable materials easily separated into different material streams or are they so bound together as to hinder the recycling of otherwise recyclable materials? The way we combine different materials in plant components should facilitate the eventual easy separation of different materials into appropriate recycle streams. This will minimize the cost of disassembly and maximize the value of the recycled materials. By the same token, we need to incorporate recycled materials into our designs as much as is practical. Of course, steel and iron castings consist mostly of recycled metals anyway, as does aluminum. Where plastics are used for instance, we should consider things such as the fact that ABS plastic is not biodegradable and is made from fossil fuel sources. PLA plastics are made from biomass sources and are biodegradable. However, ABS has strength and temperature resistance that are superior to those of PLA plastics. These design decisions are not always simple. It should be of considerable interest at this point that almost every action proposed in these three parts of this series to help us become a more sustainable industry also tends to make us more profitable. Pursuing sustainable operations is not something we should resist. To the contrary, it makes sense to embrace it. That does not mean we should jump on every idea that comes along in the name of sustainability, but there is no shortage of known and proven opportunities to become more sustainable that make good sense. In a recent Sunday sermon delivered by my pastor, I learned that there is a psychological phenomenon called “inattentional blindness.” That I didn’t know the name before is probably due to “inattentional deafness.” Most of us have seen an example of inattentional blindness in the “Invisible Gorilla” video illustration of how we miss things that are right in front of us. We often do not see opportunities that are right in front of us. Whatever you call it, it is a thing common to man. If you have been missing some of these very profitable and sustainable opportunities, don’t feel bad. You are not alone. Something else I heard in church recently was that we have the “want to,” but we tend to come up short on the “do it.” If you have been missing out on some great opportunities, maybe you didn’t see it or maybe you did and want to do it, but just haven’t started yet. If saving the planet seems too big to take on, just keep in mind, the dirty little secret about sustainability is that it’s profitable. –BY MALCOLM SWANSON, P.E.

Malcolm Swanson is the vice president, innovative products, for Astec Inc., Chattanooga. For more information, contact Swanson or other members of the Astec team at (423) 867-4210.

www.THeAsphaltpro.com // 29


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Kokosing Keeps Neighbors in Mind BY SARAH REDOHL

K

Kokosing Materials Inc., Fredericktown, Ohio, has nearly 40 years of experience producing asphalt across its 17 asphalt plants throughout the state. So, the company knows a thing or two about being a good neighbor. At its Garfield Heights, Columbia Station and Sheffield plants, Kokosing’s Environmental Manager Ralph Kyanko estimates that some homes are only a few hun-

32 // September 2019

dred yards from the plant. When the company received a few odor complaints back in the early 2000s, they were quick to identify a solution. “We’re very responsive to any complaints and we always have been,” Kyanko said. If a complaint comes in, they contact the plant in question to find out what might have changed that day. Perhaps something unusual is going on. Perhaps they are mak-

ing a special mix. They also look into wind direction and speed. Once the cause has been established and a solution identified (where possible), Kokosing calls the individual back to relay the information. Complaints expressed through the local district of the Environmental Protection Agency are addressed in the same manner. For this particular issue, Kyanko guessed the stronger odor may have been caused


LEFT: Kokosing operates 17 asphalt plants throughout the state of Ohio. ABOVE: Kokosing’s asphalt plant in Columbia Station is one of five plants within the Kokosing family with neighbors nearby. Kokosing uses AS Cherry to eliminate odors that might disturb its neighbors. by an increased use of recycled asphalt. “We operate within our permit limits everywhere and we do our emissions testing to prove it,” Kyanko said, “but odor isn’t something you test for.” The solution was incorporating an odor suppressant, AS Cherry, from Asphalt Solutions Inc., Cape Coral, Florida, to neutralize odors during asphalt production. Kyanko said he has received fewer odor complaints since adding AS Cherry to its liquid asphalt cement (AC). “No one called back to say it smelled good,” he joked, “but not getting complaints? That’s proof it’s working.”

WHAT IS AS CHERRY

AS Cherry is an odor suppressant that encapsulates the light ends within the AC, preventing their evaporation, which causes the odor. Check out AsphaltPro’s article “Store Liquid AC at Proper Temps” on www.theasphaltpro.com for more information about the importance of saving light ends. Asphalt Solutions’ products were born when the company’s founder, A.J. Ronyak, was working at a plant in the late ’90s. Ronyak had been chewing a piece of Winterfresh-flavored gum and thought it might be worthwhile to put a scent like that in asphalt.

AS Cherry and AS Pine can be used in mixes up to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, while Asphalt Solutions’ AS Roofing Material can be used for mix at any temperature. Both AS Cherry and AS Roof Material are odor suppressants, while AS Pine is an odor masking agent.

AS Cherry does not actually contain any cherry products. The particular combination of chemicals used in the product just happens to emit a cherry scent.

www.THeAsphaltpro.com // 33


Kokosing has two terminals. One in Wheelersburg, Ohio, the other, in Mansfield, Ohio. Ronyak recommends starting at one gallon of AS Cherry or AS Pine for every 12,000 gallons of bitumen. Some operations may use less, some may use more, though Ronyak suggests not using more than one gallon per 8,000 gallons of bitumen. When using AS Roofing Material, Ronyak suggests a starting ratio of one gallon of his additive per 10,000 gallons of AC, but no more than one gallon per 6,000 gallons of AC. The National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) has tested Asphalt Solutions’ products and has found that they do not negatively affect the AC, even at application rates up to 20 times the recommended dosage. However, using too much not only needlessly increases production

34 // September 2019

costs, but it can also make the asphalt actually smell like the additive. “A good test is to bring people from offsite to the plant and see if they can smell anything,” Ronyak said. “If the answer is no, you have the right ratio.” However, that wasn’t always the case. Kyanko remembers the first time Kokosing used AS Cherry in the early 2000s. “I remember going outside of the office and the entire area smelled like a bowl of cherries,” he said. Back then, the company used a parallel flow plant versus the counterflow drums it uses today (mostly double barrel Astec plants). Kyanko said the scent isn’t as noticeable with counterflow drums because the liquid AC is added outside of the drying drum. Kokosing’s tanks also have vapor recovery systems, which could also contribute to a reduction in the cherry smell. “Back in the day, there was a bit of a learning curve and people were adding a bit more than was necessary and ending up with cherry-scented asphalt,” Ronyak said. “Now, everyone knows roughly how much to add so there’s no smell—and counterflow plants make a big difference.” However, he adds, some customers, particularly those using AS Pine in pine country, tend to increase their dosage a bit to achieve a pine scent. Despite not smelling as strongly as it once did, Kyanko said AS Cherry still results in a more pleasant smell during asphalt production.

ADD CHERRY TO ASPHALT

Kokosing incorporates AS Cherry at its two terminals, located in Mansfield and Wheelersburg, Ohio. Although many AS Cherry customers add the product at their terminals, Kokosing puts the product in its tankers. This makes it possible to use AS Cherry only at Kokosing’s plants with nearby neighbors. Ronyak said this application method is an ideal way to introduce the additive to the AC, as the tanker itself acts as a mixing unit as it travels between the terminal and the plant. Kokosing uses two to two and a half quarts (0.625 gallons) of AS Cherry per 6,000 gallons of liquid AC, treating an estimated 300 tanker loads each year. “It’s highly concentrated, so it doesn’t take much,” Kyanko said. Ronyak said there is no need to approve the use of Asphalt Solutions’ products with environmental agencies, DOTs, etc. “It doesn’t alter the characteristics of the liquid asphalt at all, other than its odor,” Kyanko said. “Already, that’s such a small amount. Once you’re running the mix, with maybe 4 to 6 percent virgin AC, it becomes an extremely small amount.” Kyanko said the use of AS Cherry has also come in handy when producing mix with blast furnace slag, which can improve skid resistance. Use of slag is popular in


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“Asphalt smells like money to me, but it may not be the same for everyone.”—Ralph Kyanko

The scent of AS Cherry was more prominent when Kokosing used parallel flow plants. Today, it uses counterflow drums, mostly double barrel Astec plants. With this type of plant and its current ratio of AS Cherry, Kyanko said neither the scent of asphalt or cherries persist at the five plants using AS Cherry.

northern Ohio and is required for surface courses by the Ohio Turnpike and Ohio Department of Transportation’s District 12, which includes the Cleveland area and surrounding counties. However, producing asphalt with slag tends to emit a strong odor due to slag’s high sulfur content. “AS Cherry doesn’t completely eliminate the sulfur smell, but it does make it better,” Kyanko said. Kokosing uses AS Cherry, but the product also comes in a pine-scented variety. “We’ve never tried the pine; I guess I just prefer the smell of cherry to pine,” Kyanko joked. “Maybe parts of the country with more pine trees prefer the pine smell.” Scent, as Kyanko points out, is highly subjective. “Asphalt smells like money to me, but it may not be the same for everyone.”

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Verify Inbound Quality INTEGRITY OF INCOMING LIQUID AC DETERMINES FINAL MIX, DEPENDABLE LIFE, PAVEMENT PERFORMANCE

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In recent months, we’ve learned of an increasing issue that affects mix design quality. The liquid asphalt cement (AC) being delivered to the plant is not always what was purchased or intended. This could be due to casual errors—or the mistake can be more sinister—but for the health of the hot mix asphalt (HMA) producer and the industry, it’s important that the liquid AC performance grade that is specified on a government contract and the PG of the liquid exactly follow specifications. They must match. Over 20 plus years ago, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) conducted extensive studies about the need to improve quality in liquid AC. At that time, most people in North America were using AC 20, AC 30, AC 10 or something that was at least black liquid. After FHWA spent over $50 million (which is more like $80 million in 2019), it was determined that there needed to be an entirely different evaluation and grading system for the liquid ACs. After years and studies and testing, it was really the creation and outcome of the PG graded asphalt which, of course, is reflective of temperature range in degrees Celsius. For example, PG58-22, which is the equivalent of 136oF to -7.6oF, means the pavement will see, over the course of the year, a temperature range of this level. Therefore, there are many more grades of PG70-22 and PG76-22. In the mid-2000 teens, it seems as if a number of suppliers have drifted away from this. We don’t intend to cover all the reasons or excuses, but we are suggesting something that was already pretty established in the industry.

SAMPLING COMES IN

Again, going back at least a couple of decades, there was a tremendous use of

38 // September 2019

BY LENNIE LOESCH

Jacketed AC pass-through will not disrupt your inline AC process. Safety latch locks in place ensuring all new samples are fresh from the line. Hi temperature glass allows for viewing fill level. Easy installation into standard 3”or 4” liquid asphalt lines.

The AC Verification Station™ is installed inline between the unloading pump and the AC tanks. Workers have the option to take samples of any liquid material coming in. Illustration courtesy Stansteel/Hotmix Parts waste oil, recycle oil and other fuels to substitute for the more expensive diesel. These were what they called the “bottom of the barrel” or “reclaimed oils.” It didn’t take smart contractors and producers long to figure out they could get a wide inconsistency on the delivery of their waste oil—one day, the burner would run hot from a high BTU content and another day, dramatically lower. Therefore, many, if not most, asphalt producers went to a 100 percent sampling method. They would take a sample of every load of reclaimed or waste fuel that came into their yard, mark it, date it, and have it for selective tests to verify the ingredients as well as the BTU, value, viscosity and more. In some cases, where they had a really bad actor or type of waste fuel delivered, they would have the supplier come back and pump/pick it up or, in some cases, there was litigation because the material was fraudulently misrepresented by the supplier.

The reason that the recycle oil hasn’t been as much of an issue recently is that hundreds if not thousands of companies across North America converted to natural gas as the natural gas fields were producing more and a lower cost fuel source. It can be argued this burns cleaner and presents fewer issues with other equipment such a baghouses, ductwork, the burner and getting complete combustion.

SAMPLE AC

The next important area is the liquid AC being delivered. Several producers over the last five years have expressed concern that there was inconsistency in the liquid AC delivered from their suppliers. Until the last couple of years, it appeared just a fluke or some unknown reason that a shipment had different handling characteristics or that some of the ACs were purchased at a certain grade and type, but performed differently from one another.


For the health of the HMA producer and industry, it’s important that the liquid AC performance grade that is specified on a government contract and the PG of the liquid exactly follow specifications.

ernment agencies are calling for. Over the last couple of years, there have been states that have in their material of mix design formulas 11 different PG grades of asphalt. It seems like a lot, but that is what that agency has decided. We’ve also had reports that it is not uncommon to have a PG88-22 and, in a couple of cases, there have been specified a PG98-22.

The need for the device is greater than ever and there could be a significant financial impact for the hotmix producer if he’s not providing the right liquid and other ingredients. Lennie Loesch is the CEO of Stansteel/Hotmix Parts, Louisville, Kentucky. For more information, contact him at (502) 245-1977.

Some companies had their own methods of thorough quality control (QC) and lab testing. As an experiment, they started taking samples of incoming loads. A number of them reported dramatic findings. In one area of the Midwest, the PG grade of the liquid was way off from what appeared on the bill of lading. This wasn’t true on one load—but on several. After this contractor made the issue known to the supplier and made it clear he would continue to test incoming loads, the consistency cleared up. Another contractor and mix producer in the south had a job running over 50,000 tons of mix on a major highway project. About three weeks after both the eastbound and westbound lanes were paved, one side of the highway was gray and the other black. Upon further investigation, it seemed like they had used different AC suppliers for each set of lanes. Even though they were “delivered the same” AC from the two suppliers, the materials performed differently. They learned that one liquid had a high percentage of re-refined engine oil bottoms (REOB). Another representative of a large asphalt producing company stated that he found the state of Florida actually allows (it is in the specification) up to 8 percent REOB. After some unannounced testing, this contractor found that some of the liquid AC had 12 percent REOB, some 18 percent, and some over 22 percent. Therefore, listening to the contractors and various situations on these projects, Stansteel/Hotmix Parts now supplies a PG-verifying sampling station. The AC Verification Station™ is placed on all inbound material lines between the unloading pump and the AC tanks. It’s developed similarly to the Stansteel Safe-T-Station™ so liquid AC samples can be taken in a safe manner to verify either every load, or at least randomly. This becomes more important with the multiple grades of AC that many gov-

www.THeAsphaltpro.com // 39


Use What You Document at the Plant—Part 1 Baseball vs Hot Mix

L

Like millions of Americans, I enjoy listening to baseball on the radio. One Saturday, I had the game on low, in the background while I was working. The game went into a rain delay, allowing the broadcasters to go into filltime mode. They went on and on with data, tendency, statistics and trends. At that point, I stopped looking at my spreadsheet, turnedup the radio and considered what baseball and hot mix plants have in common. As it turns out, both have access to large amounts of raw data. The volume of data has grown over time with the help of modern technology. Both collect data, with the goal of using it as a method of evaluation. Both work within a highly competitive marketplace. But this is where the two go their different ways. As I sat there and listened to the broadcaster drone on, I was amazed at how baseball looks at, and drills down data in order to make an improvement to the team. This is the starting point in my comparison of the two industries. Fans sometimes forget that baseball is a business. Like all businesses, teams need: a quality product (a winning team) to sell; a requirement to evaluate their performance and make decisions to improve; and to grow their customer base. Sound familiar? It did to me. I asked myself what baseball could teach the hot mix industry about how to use data to improve their business. To learn the lesson of baseball, I turned to Bill James, the father of “Moneyball.” While James did not invent baseball statistics, he discovered there could be a different and better way to collect and analyze data. Looking at the same data in a unique way, he was able to pull out additional and enhanced information. For example, batting average was out, and on-base percentage was in. He was able to see and evaluate talent (the product) in a new way. He put aside the traditional way of evaluating the game and never looked back. The take-away for managers of asphalt plants is to get honest about how we collect and evaluate plant data. A modern hot mix plant, in the course of a production day, will develop a lot of raw data. Some is recorded, some is shown on a dashboard in real time, and other data is in written summaries (end-of-shift reports). In re-

40 // September 2019

BY KEN MONLUX

viewing plant locations throughout the United States, you will find a wide variety of raw data collection methods. The range goes from no collection at all, to companies who collect every bit of raw data. Plants, on either end of that spectrum, have the same ability to evaluate and to improve their operations: None. With that acknowledgment, let’s look at typical types of plant data collected. The basic information ranges from the following. • Tons produced per day or shift • Truck tags: tons shipped per day • Inventory • Quality control • Timecards: daily hours of operation All this raw data is sent to a central location (usually the main office) to be organized, collated, and returned to the plant manager in the form of a summary report. Stated another way, the data flows up and is summarized, and then is distributed down to the plants. It is not uncommon for the formatting of these reports to be geared toward upper management, not the local manager. Some firms have spent large amounts of money to build ever more technical and complicated systems. In an effort to capture every variable in production, they can, if not careful, lose sight of the goal of improvement. They can focus too much on today’s in-vogue data point, or of one particular segment of the operation, and become blind to long-term trends. This traditional method of reporting requires the plant manager to have the ability and the aspiration to perform the needed analysis. The quality of this analysis can differ widely based on a number of factors. • The plant manager’s background: i.e. education, training • Time management: Does the manager make the time to evaluate and unearth the benefits of the report? • The time lag in the daily data collection and the monthly distribution of the report • Desire: Does the manager have the desire to use the report to improve the plant operation? Once again, looking at how most baseball teams now look at data collection, and the ingenious way they analyze the data to get an advantage over other teams, I would like to propose hot mix companies rethink their meth-

od of reporting. What if a hot mix plant report could pivot from a summary format to a logbased document?

LOG-BASED DOCUMENTATION

A log-based document is a daily record of the operations. The log-based system goes beyond the daily plant report. It’s an alternative way to look at distributing information. Similar to traditional reporting, a log-based system uses various platforms and databases to collect information. But that’s where the similarities end. Like in baseball, the log looks at performance, in a new and different way. It is tailored to the local plant site. All plants are different. Even plants of the same design and manufacturer will operate differently. The log-based system is formatted based on “local knowledge” and geared toward local management. A log-based system is not meant to be a replacement of the decision-making responsibility of the managerial team or a financial-based report filled with a massive amount of numbers. It shouldn’t be used to make judgments on the operational decisions. Instead, we can define a log-based system as: • An easy-to-read archive of operational performance; • An interactive communication tool, allowing local management to ask questions, seek advice, or just a sounding board for concerns; • Able to easily reconstruct any given day of operation; • A way to distill data down to five key components or vital signs to highlight success; and • Designed to challenge the manager, to redefine new issues, and challenge again. The vital signs mentioned as part of the log-based system are five bullet points to summarize the plant’s health. They are simple, site-specific and goal-oriented. Each vital sign is constructed to allow local management to make simple changes. They are limited to five to provide quality information without the risk of data overload. Think of them as the top five signs of health a team doctor would collect or assess at each doctor visit the baseball player makes.



The doctor takes the athlete’s blood pressure and oxygen saturation number, has him step on a scale to check his weight, and perhaps takes a blood sample for a white blood cell count. These are the vital signs regularly checked by the doctor; you will decide on the vital signs regularly checked at your plant for the log-based system. In addition to the vital signs, the log-based format has other areas of describing the operations of the plant. • Narrative overview from the plant performance • Recap of conversations between the editor and the manager • Day-to-day summary of weather • Appendix I: Daily Shift Plant Report (an electronic copy of the plant reports by date) • Appendix II: Inventory • Appendix III: List of in-house or outside major projects supplied • Appendix IV: Quality Control spreadsheet, based on data supplied by in-house QC dept To achieve the stated goal of a log-based system, an extra step is needed prior to the report being delivered. This extra step allows the manager to expedite their comprehension of the report.

Numbers alone don’t tell you much unless you can read them in a timely manner. By reviewing on a daily basis, the editor of the log is looking for issues that may hamper the operation. In the task of producing the “Vital Signs,” an independent and experienced professional would review the collected data. This extra step also allows for questionable issues to be discovered in a timely manner. Stated another way, if a question comes up, the manager is notified, and has the ability to adjust in an appropriate time. A log-based system does not make the decisions in the operation; it draws attention to a trend or a process that does not look right.

IN CONCLUSION

Like baseball teams in the mid ’90s, you may be dissatisfied with your data evaluation and analysis reports. If your team doesn’t benefit from your current method of reporting, you may need to reevaluate the current method. Remember that change is hard. This was a difficult lesson for MLB to learn. They got pushback from the players, managers, scouts and even the front office. In a world of traditions, old habits are hard to change. To

PARTS SALESPERSON

Meeker Equipment Co., Inc., an asphalt plant equipment manufacturer and distributor, headquartered in Belleville, PA, is increasing its sales department and has an opening for an additional Parts Salesperson. Meeker Equipment produces material handling equipment, liquid handling equipment and related process equipment for the asphalt, aggregates, concrete, and petroleum industries.This position will sell parts related to the equipment in these industries. This position is responsible for filling orders with existing customers and working to obtain new customers to increase sales volume.They will be responsible for generating the order, purchasing the parts, and scheduling delivery arrangements. Our primary markets are USA and Southern Canada. Minimal travel will be required. This position will require a highly motivated individual with the ability to work independently to solve various challenges. Meeker Equipment offers a competitive salary (based on experience level), commission on sales, health care benefits, 401K plan, paid vacation, and other perks. We are an equal opportunity employer. Please forward your resume, including references, to: Meeker Equipment Co., Inc. Human Resources Department 4381 Front Mountain Road • Belleville, PA 17004

42 // September 2019

be the first, to look at going a different way, is never easy. Working outside the box is never comfortable, but for the ones that are willing, the reward is worth it. It was only when one team took a chance that the rest of the league changed. Now there’s no looking back. Moneyball is the law of the land. Yes, traditional statistics have their place in the locker room and among the fans. However, when the game is on the line, or when they think about making a trade, or evaluating a rookie, teams turn to Moneyball. It may be the same for you. If your management team is willing to rock the boat a little, look at data in a different way, you may find a better path. Given time, your management team will come to trust a log-based system. It’s never bad to have an independent sounding board, someone in your corner to confirm your day-to-day decisions. If given a chance, it will save you time and feature your manager’s abilities. Ken Monlux is an asphalt industry veteran with 30 years experience in all areas of operational management. For more information, contact him at (209) 495-1017 or kenmonlux@yahoo.com.

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Iowa Builds Perpetual Roads BY DARWIN LARSON AND BILL ROSENER

“Two roads diverged in a wood and I, I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.”—Robert Frost

H

Humans are creatures of habit. However, some intrepid municipal engineers in Iowa have chosen to take the road less traveled and have started constructing their new streets with full-depth asphalt. They have

46 // September 2019

found that it is making a significant difference in the overall pavement condition index (PCI) of their streets. Iowa cities have a long history of paving new roadways with Portland concrete cement (PCC) and then using hot-mix asphalt (HMA) as a rehabilitation tool. That approach is changing as more cities across the state of Iowa embrace the use of full-depth

HMA streets. These engineers are constructing, or reconstructing, their streets with a perpetual asphalt pavement design. Perpetual Pavement is an asphalt pavement designed and constructed to last in perpetuity without requiring structural rehabilitation or reconstruction, and needing only periodic surface renewal to address distresses confined to the top layer of the


pavement. The construction of perpetual asphalt streets is fast, economical, and provides a higher ride quality than PCC over the life of the roadway.

DESIGN A PERPETUAL PAVEMENT

The design and construction of a Perpetual Pavement is similar to thick, full-depth HMA pavements, with two distinct differences. First, the Perpetual Pavement is designed thick enough to withstand 100 microstrains at its base layer. This insures that the pavement will not fail due to bottom-up cracking and that the traffic distresses will remain in the surface layer of the pavement. The surface course can be rehabilitated periodically with a simple mill and overlay to provide a smooth, safe driving surface for the traveling public. The second difference is that the asphalt base course is designed with lower air voids, and higher binder content, than the thick HMA pavement to provide a rich, flexible asphalt base. This base course provides extra flexibility to withstand heavy traffic loadings. If these two characteristics are met, the Perpetual Pavement can provide an unlimited life span. As with any pavement design, a strong drainable base and subgrade is needed for optimum performance. Many of the soils in Iowa do not provide a strong enough foundation for long pavement life. A subgrade with a California Bearing Ratio (CBR) of 5 is recommended as the minimum necessary for a pavement to be considered perpetual. Since most of the soils in Iowa do not meet this requirement, the use of a chemically stabilized base or a modified subbase under the pavement may be needed. The use of subdrains on all new construction or major rehabilitation is encouraged to keep moisture away from the pavement’s foundation. As mentioned above, the asphalt base layer needs to be flexible and asphalt-rich to prevent fatigue cracking and infiltration of water. This is accomplished by designing the mix with a target of 3 percent voids. The intermediate asphalt layer(s) need to be strong and durable. The mix should feature stone-on-stone contact and a PG binder that will provide low temperature cracking resistance. The surface course should be designed to provide a rut-resistant, durable wearing surface. A polymerized asphalt binder may be needed depending on the traffic loading and traffic signalization.

LEFT: West Broadway gets a full-depth Perpetual Pavement for a long service life. ABOVE: A full-depth Perpetual Pavement must be thick enough to withstand 100 microstrains at its base layer. The intermediate asphalt layer(s) mix needs to be strong and durable, featuring stone-on-stone contact and a PG binder that will provide low temperature cracking resistance. The surface course should be designed to provide a rut-resistant, durable wearing surface, possibly requiring a polymerized asphalt binder, depending on the traffic loading and traffic signalization. All photos courtesy the Asphalt Paving Association of Iowa

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF LIFE CYCLE

A PCI of 60 to 80 is generally considered “good.” The Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT) uses a PCI of 60 as the trigger for when rehabilitation of a roadway needs to be considered. Although cities would like to maintain their roadway network in a “good” condition, funding issues typically prevent this. Most cities try to address their roadways when they reach “fair” condition, which is represented by a PCI between 40 and 60. For comparison of a PCC roadway and a perpetual asphalt pavement, the I-SAVE Life Cycle Cost Analysis program developed by Iowa State University Professor Dr. Ashley Buss was used. The I-SAVE program uses historical IDOT highway pavement performance data to develop future performance curves for pavement construction and rehabilitation activities. The analysis shown in Figure 1 uses a 100-year analysis period and a PCI of 50 as the point at which rehabilitation or reconstruction would need to occur. IDOT performance curves for new PCC pavement show the first rehabilitation would be required at 35 years at a PCI of 50. Similarly, a new HMA pavement would require its first rehabilitation at year 31 if it was allowed to reach the same level. Over the 100-year period, two asphalt overlays

of the PCC and a reconstruction at year 82 would be necessary. For the perpetual HMA pavement, three mill and fill resurfacings would be necessary over the same 100 years. The total construction cost for the PCC alternative in today’s dollars would be slightly over $1.3 million versus $1.13 million for the Perpetual Pavement. The I-SAVE program shows that the present value costs of the maintenance and rehabilitation of the perpetual asphalt pavement would be approximately $60,000 less than the PCC pavement over identical 100-year periods. This total, added to the savings of $170,000 for the initial construction, brings the total project savings to $230,000 in today’s dollars for the city. In addition to the 19 percent savings, the overall pavement condition and quality of ride to the taxpayers will be higher with the perpetual asphalt pavement. The cost of a street reconstruction is typically five to six times more than the cost of pavement rehabilitation. Perpetual Pavement eliminates the need for costly reconstructions and the negative impact that it has on businesses and home owners. Asphalt is fast to construct initially and is easily rehabilitated with a simple 2- to 3-inch mill and replacement of the surface wearing course. The milled asphalt is recycled into the new

www.THeAsphaltpro.com // 47


Figure 1. I-SAVE Program surface course and provides future value to the owner. The surface rehabilitation can be done at night, or on weekends, to limit the inconvenience to the traveling public. An important benefit of a Perpetual Pavement is that the mill and fill resurfacing never results in a loss of curb exposure and the resulting drainage issues associated with overlaying a PCC street with asphalt. In addition, if the sidewalk curb ramps meet current Americans with Disability Act (ADA) standards, they will not have to be reconstructed as part of a mill and fill operation. Asphalt is resistant to winter brine and salt. These benefits result in significant long-term cost savings for the city.

IOWA CITIES USING PERPETUAL PAVEMENT

City of Waterloo The City of Waterloo has been building fulldepth asphalt pavements since 1984. Their streets have benefited from a local option sales tax (LOST) that was approved by residents in 1992 and has been reapproved by voters at a 70 percent approval rate five times since its adoption. “People know where the money is going and they believe in it,” Waterloo City Engi-

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neer Jamie Knutson said. “It brings in approximately $8.5-9 million a year depending on the economy and it all goes towards roads and infrastructure improvements. It is a Godsend. I’m frightened to think about how bad our streets would be if we didn’t have that money coming in. The town would suffer, the condition of our roads would suffer, and it would directly impact the economic development of this city.” The fact that Waterloo has been building full-depth asphalt streets for over three decades makes them unique, but what really sets this city apart is that they have also been using alternate pavement type bidding for nearly 30 years. “I love the competition it brings to our city projects,” Knutson said. “I always feel we get the best value for our taxpayers.” The results of the alternate bidding went back and forth during the 1990s, but for the past 20 years, the city paving project has gone asphalt. The results of these programs are a case study on how asphalt can perform in a municipal setting in Iowa. “Since the projects have started going asphalt consistently, we have not had to rehabilitate a single asphalt street. We have crack filled and done some light maintenance,

but 20+ years in, they are performing great,” Knutson said. “Last year, we milled off 2 inches and overlaid a full-depth street we had constructed in 1988. We did some curb and gutter repair and ADA ramp repairs at the same time. The street looks brand new and it is 30 years old. We will probably have to mill it off again in another 30 years or so and at that time we will probably have to replace all the concrete curb and driveways, but we will still have all the paving intact. We are truly building Perpetual Pavements.” City of Dubuque The City of Dubuque has a history of using full-depth asphalt in the past, but has recently increased the number and frequency of HMA streets. “We use both pavement types,” said Jon Dienst, civil engineer II for the City of Dubuque. “It depends on the needs of the project and the application that best suits— asphalt or concrete. For example, the 17th St. Reconstruction and the 22nd St. Reconstruction are both on very steep grades. By utilizing asphalt, we are capitalizing on the black asphalt melting the snow and ice faster to give our residents a safer street to drive on in the winter. Our Public Works department was


lobbying for asphalt on these projects because they are capable of doing their own maintenance on the street. We have our own paver and could even do a mill and fill of the surface with our own forces in the future.” When asked about the performance of the city’s existing asphalt streets, Dienst added, “We have a project on W. Locust Street that is over 20 years old and the only maintenance we have done to date is crack seal the street. It is performing extremely well.” Dienst went on to say, “On our new projects, we are building Perpetual Pavements. In the past, we might not have put as much effort into getting the subgrade prepared properly. Not anymore. We are building up the subbase with strong aggregate sections and using subdrains to drain the water away. The construction of these projects has been very successful. We have a good working relationship with our paving contractor and we have partnered together very well to build these streets.” City of Des Moines “It’s all about the speed,” said Dave Kamp, chief design engineer for the City of Des Moines. “Asphalt is fast to construction initially, and it is fast to maintain and to rehabilitate in the future. The quicker the construction occurs, specifically reducing the time residents cannot access their driveway, [the] less impact to the residents and business along a construction project.” Des Moines has been shifting toward full-depth asphalt construction over the past five years with an impressive list of streets that have been completed including: Polk Boulevard, 42nd Street, 31st Street, McKinley Avenue, E. Court Avenue, and in 2019, the reconstruction of Fleur Drive. According to Kamp, asphalt had a poor image in the past due to its use in covering up failing PCC or being under-designed due to budget constraints. “It has taken a while to build up an impressive list of full-depth asphalt projects from the past that have performed exceptionally well. We don’t get asked much anymore on why we chose asphalt for a project, but when we do, we can point to a long history of successes.” The Fleur Drive reconstruction project has been a long time coming and the need to reconstruct the project in a time-

ly fashion weighed heavily in the decision to make asphalt the pavement of choice. “The decision first came down to speed. Second, the physical constraints of the project were not conducive to bringing in a concrete paver. Third, all the intersection tie-ins were going to be asphalt so there was an aesthetic consideration. And finally, we designed this street as a Perpetual Pavement. When it needs to be rehabilitated in 20-some years, we can mill off the top 2 inches and replace it, and have a brand new street with limited impacts to our citizens.” State of the Practice The use of Perpetual Asphalt Pavement continues to grow exponentially across the state of Iowa. In 2019, the cities of Des Moines, Council Bluffs, Dubuque, Clear Lake, Waterloo, Davenport, Cedar Rapids, Fort Dodge, Bettendorf, Clinton and Ames, and many other smaller communities will all construct full-depth asphalt streets. Some of these will be fully designed Perpetual Pavements. Some of them will be strong, traditionally-designed asphalt pavements. The assets that quality-constructed asphalt pavements bring to the table are undeniable. Asphalt is resistant to damage from salt and brine. It is 100 percent recyclable. It is fast to construct and easy to maintain. The cost benefit to municipalities over the life of the pavement makes asphalt the clear choice for Iowa’s cities. Reprinted with permission from the Spring 2019 Iowa Asphalt Report. For more information on building a Perpetual Pavement, please contact the Asphalt Paving Association of Iowa at (515) 233-0015 or visit the Asphalt Pavement Alliance on http:// www.asphaltroads.org/perpetual-pavement/ about-perpetual-pavements/. Darwin Larson, P.E., is the APAI municipal field engineer. He worked for the City of Des Moines in various departments for 36 years. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1976 and became a registered professional engineer in 1980. Bill Rosener is the executive director of APAI. You can learn about his goals in this role: https://theasphaltpro.com/articles/meetstate-exec-william-d-rosener/

www.THeAsphaltpro.com // 49


international snapshot

International Milling I

In Torreón, Mexico, the pavement along the main urban road had to be removed so that a brand new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system can be implemented. The project in one of Mexico’s most important economic and industrial centres included a new, exclusive hydraulic concrete BRT lane plus the rehabilitation of two adjacent asphalt lanes. The project will result in better mobility, increasing traffic safety for city residents. However, before it could build the new lanes, milling contractor Triturados Asfalticos de Torreón S.A de C.V. (TATSA) faced the challenge of milling off the entire pavement at a maximum depth of 10 to 12 inches (25 to 30 centimeters). The W 150 CF was capable of performing the milling work in one single pass, though TATSA sometimes milled off the pavement in two or three passes depending on the requirements of the respective stretch. “These roads are old and in the course of several years, they have been paved over many times without any milling work,” Engineer Gisela Gutiérrez explained. She’s the production coordinator at TATSA. “In some areas, the pavement is even above the level of the footpath.” The entire project covers a length of 15 miles (24.3 kilometers) and includes 5.8 miles (9.3 km) of inner-city lanes in Torreón and 9.3 miles (15 km) of highway between Torreón and Matamoros. The tender stipulated a single milling machine that could work at various locations in the city within the same day. To fulfil this specification and meet the demands of a large-scale project in confined spaces, the contractor chose Wirtgen’s W 150 CF with a 6-foot (1800-mm) milling drum assembly. The W 150 CF can be swiftly relocated on the job site or between contract work sections with a travel speed of up to 4.6 mph (7.5 km/h). “Before participating in this tender, we talked to the applications experts from the Wirtgen Group dealer Construmac and soon agreed that the W 150 CF would be the best solution for this job,” the proprietor of TATSA, Engineer Ruben Tinoco, said. “The ordering authority agreed. After its arrival, the machine immediately convinced us. In the meantime, we have ordered a new model for further projects in Mexico.” Today, work on urban job sites must be completed much faster and more dynamically to minimize the impact on traffic, residents, workers and pedestrians. In Torreón, minimizing the disruption to traffic was an essential goal. According to Tinoco, the plan is similar to those he has seen applied on job sites in Europe. “I spent a holiday in Finland. At 6 p.m., a paving train composed of Wirtgen GROUP machines arrived in front of my hotel in Helsinki. The next morning when I got up, all the equipment was gone and the road was perfectly paved. We want our jobs in Mexico to be carried out just as quickly and efficiently, with minimal impact on traffic and to a high quality.” To achieve optimum milling results, the W 150 CF offers levelling technology. When the surface course is removed, the Level Pro Plus levelling system continually compares the actual milling depth with the current target milling depth. Level Pro Plus is designed to work with a wide variety of sensors—cable, hydraulic cylinder, sonic and slope sensors, or laser and sonic ski sensors, as well as multiplex systems—and to be extended as required. 3D levelling is also possible thanks to integrated interfaces, which are compatible with 3D systems from common manufacturers.

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From left: Engineer Gisela Gutiérrez, production coordinator at TATSA; Engineer Ruben Tinoco, proprietor of Triturados Asfalticos de Torreón S.A de C.V.; and Engineer Liborio Frias Estrada, coordinator for the BRT project in Torreón

LEFT: Simple transport let TATSA move the W 150 CF mill to various locations of the 5.8 miles (9.3 km) of inner-city lanes in Torreón. RIGHT: To increase productivity and area output, the W 150 CF / W 150 CFi can be equipped with 6-foot (1,800-mm) wide milling drums by means of a housing extension. In Torreón, TATSA used the multiplex system. With this system, three sensors on each side of the machine scan the height. The automatic levelling system factors all three measurements into its analysis so that the pre-set target milling depth is met exactly, while ensuring that any unevenness in the road surface is not copied. “Working with the Wirtgen Level Pro Plus levelling system is intuitive and convenient; the result is an evenly milled, level surface,” Engineer Liborio Frias Estrada said. He was the coordinator for the BRT project in Torreón. “This is a crucial factor when it comes to paving the new surface courses and avoiding costly correction measures in the form of asphalt levelling courses. – BY TOM KUENNEN


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product Gallery

Make More Tons with the Right Parts T

This month’s product gallery focuses on the parts and pieces that enhance production of asphalt mix. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and service providers are already gearing up for a busy winter of helping you update and upgrade for 2020. Whether you need a component right now or you’re planning ahead for off-season, the case studies and press releases on the next few pages bring you up to speed on what those providers consider most important for you to know about.

See Plant Components Via the Road Show BY MARK SHREVE, HOTMIX PARTS/ STANSTEEL

The purpose of the Hotmix Parts/Stansteel Road Show is to help inform and educate industry professionals of the numerous products that Hotmix Parts and Stansteel has available to make running their plants much easier. Depending on the region the Road Show Team travels to will determine the products displayed. For instance, if the team is visiting plants in a region that has numerous batch plants they may choose to insert the Accu-shear™ model that is used for warm mix or liquid blending in batch plant applications as opposed to continuous mix applications. Some other devices found in the Road Show are different safety technologies that protect plant personnel while saving them time on the job. The Road Show can easily carry the Precision Pin Pusher™ to show producers. It is designed to break press fit chain connections and push pins out with ease on 4-inch and 6-inch pitch chain, which means one tool for multiple chain sizes. Aside from taking hours off of the job and only needing one tool, it provides other benefits like the hard case for storage and security, and aiding the maintenance team by eliminating the need for torches and hammers, which further reduces safety hazards associated with separating chain.

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The Hotmix Parts/Stansteel Road Show work truck and trailer visit a plant. The Safe-T Station™ is another device that the Road Show carries. It can be used in multiple areas of the plant to sample asphalt cement (AC) in a safe, enclosed environment to prevent burn injuries. This device will fit up to 3-inch or 4-inch thermal jacketed asphalt lines. It allows operators to sample and test AC being off loaded from the truck to verify you are receiving the grade of AC that you ordered from the terminal, that it is the correct grade coming from your AC storage tank. The Safe-T Station also enables you to ensure sure you have the correct foaming/grade coming through the Accu-shear liquid blending device. The Niteowl™ plant alert system never disappoints on the road show, according to the manufacturer. There are thousands of Niteowls throughout the country that many already take advantage of but there are many plants that still rely on physically checking the plant over the weekend or risk coming in to a cold plant on an early morning start up. The Niteowl saves you from plant, paving crew and truck downtime. The Niteowl system is designed to automatically call up to four phone numbers repeatedly until someone is alerted if the temperature of liquid asphalt or hot oil ex-

ceeds the pre-set high or low limits or when the hot oil heater has failed. One of the newer technologies being shown is the Tank Management Series that includes our Accu-level™ for checking the level of tanks or silos without having to leave the control house or climb equipment. The Tank Tracker™ gives you the ability to see levels and temperatures of tanks, from remote locations right over your cell phone. The Tank Manager Total Inventory Management System™ is the total inventory management system storage solution for your plant. The Tank Manager gives you the control to run your business while it runs your tanks. Managing AC tanks can be cumbersome. A lot of time and resources can be used up just instructing workers on how to set the valves in the AC tank farm just to do simple tasks such as transfer from one tank to another. With high accuracy tank level and temperature visibility, the system can provide real time inventory reporting. The screens are visible over the network where inventory can be watched in real time from remote locations. The tank management system can allow the supervisor to have a better source of information that can lead


to more efficient scheduling of AC deliveries. With The Tank Manager Total Inventory Management System, you can select tank sources and tank destinations at the touch of a control on the screen for systems that have actuated valves. A safe and effective method to prevent overflows and spills, visibility into the unloading procedure allows the system to automatically shut off the unloading pump whenever the high preset limit is reached. The integration of lockouts of the agitator control can be done programmatically, eliminating the need for extra starters, contactors and temperature control switches. Also the cycle time and dwell of the agitator can be controlled, eliminating the need for fixed time relays. These are just a few of the items that are displayed in the Hotmix Parts/Stansteel Road Show that the team would be happy to come by and discuss with you at your asphalt plant. Of course, no display can compare to the hundreds of years of knowledge that Hotmix Parts and Stansteel has on their team of hot mix industry veterans. Hotmix Parts and Stansteel deals with any brand or type of asphalt plant and can help with any plant, problem, part or component that is troubling you. For more information, visit www.stansteel.com.

In addition to coordinating the physical plant, Haver & Boecker Niagara offers structural building engineering at the start, including verifiable statics calculation. The company features transportation management, supervision or the complete package: from assembly and electrical installation to plant start-up and optimization. Haver & Boecker Niagara also offers project management, on-site services, operating supplies, components or plant control. Operations also benefit from service and spare parts planning and service contracts. Haver & Boecker Niagara provides crushing plant systems with a variety of components, including impact, jaw, cone or roller crushers, Haver screens or rolling screens, push feeders, apron conveyors, and Haver vibrating feeders. The plant systems work with all peripheral components such as maintenance cranes, de-dusting systems, compressed air systems, hydraulics and hammers. Customers choose from two types of systems—basic or master. Both systems work

with the Haver & Boecker Niagara N-Class vibrating screen. Also included is comprehensive plant documentation on CE requirements and beyond and declaration of conforming with EC directives for machines 2006/42/EG (CE). For more information, contact Kristen Randall at (905) 688-2644.

Reverse Air Baghouse Solves Dust Return Surges

BY JEFF MEEKER, MEEKER EQUIPMENT

Meeker Equipment Co. Inc., Belleville, Pennsylvania, has launched a new reverse air baghouse (Freedom Air) that provides unique control of the turrets, does not require an air compressor and uses stainless steel turrets. Hot air containing fine particles enters the center plenum of the baghouse. The center plenum is tapered so as air moves from one end to the other, the air evenly gets distributed across all bags. The center

Turnkey Solutions Enter Primary Crushing Systems

FROM KRISTEN RANDALL, HAVER & BOECKER

Haver & Boecker Niagara, Münster, Germany, offers primary crushing plants in a wide variety of configurations for pre-crushing, secondary and tertiary crushing in the mining and aggregates industries. The manufacturer highlighted its primary crushing plant systems in at bauma 2019 in Munich. “We’re entrenched in the mining and aggregates industries and are dedicated to each customer’s profitability and success,” said Peter Grotjohann, managing director of the German facility. “We use our industry experience and work closely with each operation to design comprehensive primary crushing plant systems with the highest level of durability, service and flexible design so each customer can find the best plant for their operation.”

The Freedom Air Baghouse from Meeker Equipment www.THeAsphaltpro.com // 53


product Gallery plenum has plasma cut holes across the sidewalls to help with the distribution of air on the bags. On top of the baghouse are multiple (one to four) stainless steel turrets that turn like a carousel. The turrets are used to clean the bags. As dust collects on the bags, clean air passes through and the dust collects on the outside of the bags. Pressure drop begins across the bags. When the turret moves to the row it wants to clean, the pressure rises as fresh outside air flows from the turret to a row of bags and the reverse air blows down the bags from the inside out (high pressure air flows to low pressure). Meeker uses variable frequency drives (VFDs) on the turrets to allow the turrets to move faster or slower depending upon dust loading on the bags. Meeker also allows the turrets to pulse the bags in various configurations. For example, the turrets can pulse in a line 1, 2, and 3 or they can pulse 3, 1, 2 and the system allows to pulse only half of the bags on a turret. This allows

for even flow of dust from the baghouse back to the drum or batch processes. If a turret ever goes off line, the baghouse can still operate. The operator simply takes the selected turret off-line and the plant continues. This is another unique feature of the Meeker Freedom baghouse. For more information, contact Meeker at (888) 333-0323.

Install Your Mind

FROM RELIABLE ASPHALT PRODUCTS

Reliable Asphalt Products Inc., Shelbyville, Kentucky, installs the Minds Suite of Asphalt Plant Control Systems & Automation. MINDS’ automation systems for asphalt plants, emulsion and modified bitumen/asphalt plants, are designed from an operator perspective with the aim of facilitating a quick grasp of the system. State of the art technology enables modern mobile applications like LiveLoader™ or TankFarm™, remote access, dual work-

station access and more. The automation systems are used in hundreds of plants worldwide as their preferred plant control solution. The production-level data forms the foundation that flows up the pipeline to our large-scope job/business management IT tools. For example, Tessera Ticketing is a job ticketing & management software offering efficient ticketing and management software for asphalt plants to handle billing jobs, trucks, haulers, materials. Use standalone or fully integrated with MINDS production systems such as DrumTronic, BatchTronic, and LoadOut. Tessera Ticketing allows users to quickly and easily print tickets/invoices after material has been loaded onto a truck. Tessera supports the ability to store customers, haulers, jobs, materials and trucks. When making a new ticket, all the operator needs to do is select the appropriate customer, job, material, etc. and all of the relevant ticketing information is automatically filled in on the ticket. The software

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54 // September 2019



product Gallery

Tessera Ticketing Screen courtesy Reliable Asphalt Products, Shelbyville, Kentucky takes care of pricing the material, doing any relevant unit conversions, calculating the taxes and making sure that all required information has been selected. • Sell by weight and measure by volume or vice versa • Automatic unit conversion; system adjusts unit price based on units selected by the operator • Comprehensive material pricing rules; price material for specific customer and job • Handles multiple taxes, including tax-ontax; can account for tax increases that automatically take effect at a specified date • Visual ticket layout designer provides ability to accommodate any ticket layout; if we store it, you can print it • Allows use of different ticket layouts for casg sales versus credit sales • Easily design reports to see any piece of data collected on a ticket in a custom report • Free-form ticket fields allow system to capture custom ticketing information with no software changes For more information, contact Len Newton at (502) 303-8896.

Measure Screening Performance

BY MATTHEW ARMSTRONG, MAJOR

MAJOR, of Candiac, Quebec, has introduced the Flex-Mat Sensor, which is a vibration data measurement tool operators can use to review results and fine tune their screen ma-

56 // September 2019

chine without shutting down equipment. The app-controlled vibration analysis sensor enables readings of screen box vibrations within seconds and generates a report that can be sent or reviewed. The simplicity of the system’s design ensures valuable and actionable data without the requirement for a plant shutdown to calibrate the sensor. The Flex-Mat Sensor enables users to measure and—almost immediately—view vibration data. The operator connects the single sensor to the Flex-Mat Sensor app on their phone before placing the sensor on one corner of the machine. The user will continue to move the sensor to each corner of the machine until finished. Once the measurement process is completed, the information will be delivered to the phone in the time it takes to climb down from the machine. Machine information is stored locally for ease of use and viewing in areas with cellular limitations. Once signal is available, the information uploads to MAJOR’s cloud service where it is viewable from a web browser. Historical equipment performance data is also viewable through the cloud. The sensor measures g-force, stroke, rpm and orbit, including lateral movement. Producers can use the data to monitor and fine tune screen box performance as well as make parameter decisions with minimal guesswork. For example, it’s difficult to tell just by looking at it whether a screen that’s supposed to be operating at 800 rpm is operating at 900 rpm because the difference in vibration could be just a few millimeters, but the extra could mean too much carry-

over. The sensor makes that information easy to access. The data can also give indications of what kind of screen media would be most effective on the machine. The sensor kit arrives in professional casing and includes one sensor, instructions, a USB charging cable and instructions on how to download the Vibration app. The app will be available for iOS and Android phones. MAJOR dealers will have access to webinars to help them learn to interpret the gathered data. For more information, contact MAJOR at (450) 659-7681.

Program Conveyor Signal Points FROM CONVEYOR COMPONENTS

The new Model MSD-800 series motion sensing controls from Conveyor Components Company, are designed to offer affordable and reliable protection of indoor and outdoor rotating equipment such as screw conveyors, belt conveyor pulleys, rotary feeders and bucket elevators from costly damage by continuously monitoring rotary speed. The Model MSD alerts the operator of a change in speed by sending a signal to the control unit, which can be used to sound an alarm and/or shut down the equipment completely. By monitoring speed, you can greatly reduce system and equipment downtime by fixing malfunctions such as broken drive gears or belts, over-worked motors, belt overload and other problems before serious damage occurs.



product Gallery The Model MSD is comprised of two distinct components: a control unit and a speed sensor. The Model MSD-800 control unit has a set up menu that can be programmed to indicate two under-speed points or two over-speed points, or one of each. The control unit acts as a digital tachometer that constantly displays the actual rotary speed of the equipment being monitored. The control unit is installed remotely in a control panel where it is free from dust, dirt and vibration and allows the operator to monitor equipment from one central location. The Model MSD-1 speed sensor, which installs directly to the shaft of the rotating equipment to be monitored, is enclosed in a rugged cast aluminum housing that is designed to withstand harsh environments. The sensor detects motion by means of a precision metal disc with slots on its periphery generating electronic pulses as the disc rotates past an infrared light source. These pulses are transmitted to the MSD-800 control unit where the signal is analyzed, and the relays are activated or deactivated at preset signal speeds. The sensor enclosure is weatherproof, dust-tight and meets NEMA Type 3S, 4, 4X classifications. For hazardous environments, MSD-1X explosion proof sensors are available that meet NEMA Type 7, Class I, Groups C & D and NEMA Type 9, Class II, Groups F & G classifications. For more information, contact sales at (810) 679-4211.

Keep Overweight Trucks off the Highway

BY ROBERT MONROE, FAIRBANKS SCALES

New technology simplifies the weighing process, while also allowing maximum flexibility in where a scale can be installed and how it is used. Quarries, trucking companies, logistics facilities and farmers are prime examples of users who would benefit from on-site weighing. While quarries likely already have a static scale as the trucks exit, that can easily be miles of driving from where they are loaded. Preventing overloaded trucks is the most important and expensive need, but at the same time, routinely under loading the trucks can cost the quarry plenty of lost revenue, too. Having the ability to easily install a scale that can maximize loading and ensure legality, near the truck loading zones where adjustments can be made can be a major benefit to the operation. Taking an in-motion axle scale one step further, the AxleSurance system can also be used to help prevent rollovers during the dumping process. An axle scale setup in a side-by-side configuration can ensure the loads are distributed evenly across the truck, preventing the trucks from tipping over when the loads are raised to dump. New to the market is a cost-effective slowspeed axle scale system for those who need to check-weigh loads but lack the space or need for a full-size truck scale. While not a le-

Mind Your Tank Farm FROM MINDS

MINDS Inc., Boisbriand, Quebec, offers the TankFarm app for remote monitoring of liquid tank farms & heating. The plant control is designed to oversee critical operations anywhere the user has cell phone reception. Real-time data is constantly communicated between the plant’s control system and the TankFarm app. It monitors boiler conditions such as hot oil temperature, warm oil temperature, pump status and burner status. If the boiler or tanks aren’t running within set parameters, the user receives an alert on his phone. Warnings are sent as text-based push notifications to a smart phone, while “faults” play a loud sound on the smart phone as well as sending the text notification. For more information, contact (866) 938-1124.

58 // September 2019

The user can monitor bitumen tank settings on his smart phone with the TankFarm app from MINDS Inc.

gal-for-trade scale, the technology is a good investment for customers who want to better manage inventory and reduce their overload risks. Called the AxleSurance Weigh System, the new technology is typically less than half the cost of a new standard 70-foot static truck scale. The new weigh system focuses on simplicity in design and use, reliability, and repeatability. First and foremost, the manufacturer states it is easy to install and easy to use. Many of these scales will be used in remote locations, and users can maintain the scale and make use of its features on their own, without specialized technical personnel. The standard AxleSurance scale is 11 feet wide and arrives in a precast base that measures 12-feet by 8-feet 5-inches by 11-feet 5-inches. The full system comes with an unattended instrument console, remote LED display, data and homerun cable. The scale base’s relatively small footprint allows customers to place the scale in the most convenient location for maximum throughput, not just where they have the space for the long approaches to the static scale. Full concrete approaches are not required, but improve system accuracy. Once installed, the system works best at slow, consistent speed (around 3 miles per hour) and will calculate, display and capture each individual axle as it rolls over the scale. It then sums the weights and prints individual axle and gross weights on the tickets. Tare weights can be pre-stored into the database or recorded with an in/out operation. The system provides axle and gross truck weights that can be displayed, printed and saved. The unattended console is essentially a self-contained control unit that drivers can operate independently. Information management software packages are available in three formats—farm, aggregate, and base. Users can select which one they want to use during startup. Each version is fully customizable, allowing the customer to identify and weigh trucks either as a onepass system (if truck IDs are pre-stored) or two-pass if tare weights must be established. Axle weights, truck ID, and contents are all captured, printed for the driver, and stored in the database for future analysis and integration into the customer’s ERP systems. For more information, visit Fairbanks Scales at https://www.fairbanks.com/.



off the mat

Minimize Risk As with any company or industry, road building comes with potential risks that can have a significant impact on the business. Because of industry risks, there’s a great need to protect the business against significant financial losses due to claims or lawsuits. Keep in mind that even one lawsuit can have a serious impact on your finances. For example, a 2017 accident along Beltway 8 in Houston, Texas, caused the death of 41-year-old Heywood Freeman and his two children. Freeman’s car was hit by another driver while they were trying to drive through a construction zone. Even though the accident was between two motorists, Freeman’s wife has now filed a lawsuit against the construction company, claiming they did not safely manage the traffic flow in a work zone, or post adequate signs to warn drivers of the construction. It’s not just motorists and pedestrians that can get hurt in a work zone. The road workers themselves face tremendous risk. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, between 2011 and 2015 over 600 road workers were killed while on the job in the United States, with 46 percent of those killed after being struck by a car. These are sad reminders of the dangers of working in this industry, and highlight the need to protect your business and your employees.

A

OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT Tapping into a lifetime of experiences EXECUTIVE ADVISOR Budgeting · Logistics · Staffing appraisal Research · Special projects

LOG-BASED DOCUMENTATION Design and set-up · Subscription · Manage and train

MANAGEMENT TRAINING Coaching and mentoring · Recruitment and retention

Ken Monlux

kenmonlux@yahoo.com • 209-495-1017

60 // September 2019

No matter how prepared you think you are, accidents can happen at any time. That’s why it’s crucial to carry adequate insurance to make sure you and your employees are covered. It’s designed to protect your company against significant financial losses, whether from a worker’s compensation claim or a lawsuit. Just one claim can cripple operations and even force a business to shut down. Insurance comes in many types, and each is designed to protect a particular aspect of a company. To choose the right kind of coverage, the key is to know what you’re up against. In the case of a road builder, it’s crucial to assess the needs of the company and the potential risks involved in the industry. Here are a few types of insurance those in the road building industry should have: General Liability insurance—Chances are, you and your employees interact on a daily basis with people such as clients, vendors, subcontractors, and motorists driving through a work zone. Any one of them could experience an injury or loss and if your business is to blame they can file a lawsuit. This type of coverage protects both your business and your employees. It will take care of the medical bills and costs related to property damage due to day-today operations. Business Owner’s policy—If you’re a business owner, you’re subject to liability. You need to make sure you’re protected. The Business Owner’s policy is a combination of the General Liability and Commercial Property insurance, offering savings compared to purchasing the coverage separately. It’s ideal for small and medium-sized businesses because it’s a convenient way to be adequately protected. Worker’s Compensation insurance—Worker safety should always be a top priority; however, accidents can happen at any time. This policy is a legal requirement in most states in the United States; it takes care of the medical expenses and salaries lost of employees who sustain injuries at work. It protects both parties—the business owner against expensive lawsuits, and the employees who will receive benefits in case they get sick or injured at work. Having proper coverages is one method of risk management to minimize the chance of a damaging claim or lawsuit shutting down your business. Carry adequate contractor’s insurance and set up management plans so everyone knows what to do and what to avoid while working. Make safety a priority, not only for the business but also for motorists on the road. – BY JIM LOUGHLIN

Jim Loughlin is an insurance industry veteran with 25 years of experience. He is currently the senior sales director at CoverWallet, a tech company that enables businesses to understand, buy, and manage insurance online. For more information, contact him at (646) 844-9933.


LET’S BUILD A BETTER FUTURE. REGISTRATION NOW OPEN! NSSGA’s Legislative & Policy Forum is the primary advocacy event for members across the aggregates industry to collectively tell the story of our business to policymakers. We have the opportunity to advocate for our interests and against onerous, costly policies and regulations to provide a better business environment for aggregates producers. The face-to-face meetings with members of Congress are your opportunity to give first-hand testament to what your company does, what it provides your local community and how public policies will impact your business – directly to your elected representatives. Join us in Washington, D.C. this November! We will make your appointments with your representatives and coach you on how best to educate your lawmakers on the ways that aggregates matter to America’s success.

We can’t do it alone—we need YOU to Rock D.C.! HYATT REGENCY WASHINGTON ON CAPITOL HILL, WASHINGTON, D.C.

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Here’s how it works

Step 5

Step 1

The operator uses Truck Assist to guide the haul truck driver as he dumps mix into the MTVʼs hopper.

Step 4

An ultrasonic sensor monitors the height of the mix in the paver hopper and will automatically turn off the conveyor if the hopper gets too full.

Step 3 Step 2

A rubber conveyor moves the material from the hopper to the conveyor.

The conveyor delivers mix into the paverʼs hopper.

As the MTV moves down the road, a laser monitors the distance between it and the paver, enabling the machine to adjust its speed automatically.

Step 6

When asphalt sticks to the belt, the operator presses a button to spray release agent on the belt before it passes through the MF2500CS scraper system.

Dynapac’s MF2500CS Material Feeder M

Material transfer vehicles (MTVs) can enable crews to pave continuously and eliminate the possibility of haul trucks bumping the paver. At World of Asphalt 2019, the team at Dynapac, Fort Mill, South Carolina, launched its MF2500CS material feeder to the North America market. With its high capacity of 4,000 tons per hour, the MF2500CS is designed for heavy highway paving contractors. Here’s how it works. When a haul truck arrives, the operator pushes a button to activate Dynapac’s Truck Assist system, which uses a series of colored lights to direct the truck driver. A laser on top of the feeder monitors the distance between the feeder and the truck. When the truck reaches the distance the operator chooses (1.5, 1 or 0.5 feet), the lights will in-

62 // September 2019

struct him to stop. The lights also indicate when to start and stop dumping and when to pull away. If the haul truck driver overflows the feeder’s hopper, track cleaners will direct that material between the MTV’s tracks so it can stay level and continue its straight path down the road. A 4-foot-wide rubber belt moves the material from the hopper toward the conveyor at the back of the machine, transferring up to a 35-ton truckload in as little as 35 seconds. The MF2500CS is also available with an addon swing conveyor for offset feeding applications up to 55 degrees in either direction. If the paver is directly behind the MF2500CS, the operator can use automatic distance control and automatic feed functions. The operator sets a preferred distance

between the feeder and the paver, and a laser located underneath the feeder will monitor that distance. The feeder then adjusts speed to maintain that distance. As the conveyor feeds material into the paver’s hopper, an ultrasonic sensor monitors the height of the mix and will automatically turn off the conveyor if the hopper gets too full. As the paving train moves along, the feeder operator will keep an eye on the belt to ensure it remains clean. If asphalt does stick to the belt, the operator can press a button to spray the belt with release agent; material then passes through the MF2500CS scraper system. For more information, contact Vijayakumar Palanisamy at vijayakumar.palanisamy@ dynapac.com or (303) 248-9040.


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also equipped with self-storing folding support pads to grade, self contained ramping bulkhead on the loading side and tandem axle portability. Each bin is lined with bolt-in UHMW liners. Smico 4’ x 10’ Single Deck Virgin Aggregate Scalping Screen. AND MORE!

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advertiser index Almix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Libra Systems . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Asphalt Drum Mixers . . . . . . .44

Meeker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 42

Asphalt Solutions . . . . . . . . .54

Minds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

Astec, Inc . . 11, 15, 19, 23, 31, 51,

Phoenix Industries . . . . . . . . .59

B & S Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Process Heating . . . . . . . . . .36

CEI Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CWMF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Reliable Asphalt Products . . . . . . . . . Back Cover

E.D. Etnyre . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

Roadtec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Fast-Measure . . . . . . . . . . . .65

Stanstee . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 63

Gencor Industries . . . . . . . . . . 4

Systems Equipment . . . . . 41, 57

Green Patch . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

Tarmac International, Inc . . . . 27

Heatec, Inc . . . Inside Front Cover

Top Quality Paving . . . . . . . . .65

Ingevity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Transtech Systems . . . . . . . . 29

Ken Monlux . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Willow Designs . . . . . . . . . . .65

KPI-JCI-AMS . Inside Back Cover

Wirtgen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

AsphaltPro’s advertiser index is designed for you to have quick access to the manufacturers that can get you the information you need to run your business efficiently. Please support the advertisers that support this magazine and tell them you saw them in AsphaltPro magazine.

www.THeAsphaltpro.com // 65


new tech

Emerging Tech Supports Safety Training Six technologies to assist with safety training efforts.

Safety training continues to be a critical issue in the construction industry, where dangerous situations can be part of the everyday working environment. Abby Ferri is the vice president of national construction practice at Hays Companies, a risk management, insurance and employee benefits advisor based in Minneapolis. With more than 16 years of experience with construction safety, Ferri understands the importance of effective safety training and the increasingly useful role technology can play in that effort. That’s why Ferri will be conducting an “in the field” Safety Tech Trek at the International Construction and Utility Equipment Exposition, or ICUEE, Oct. 1 through 3, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky. She will be walking around the show floor discussing how new equipment and technology can help keep workers safe. Whether or not you plan to attend ICUEE, here are some of Ferri’s top construction safety technologies to keep an eye on.

S

TECHNOLOGY #1:

Wearables and Embedded Technology This technology involves attaching various types of mobile electronics and embedded sensors to the body and personal protective equipment for a wide range of purposes, Ferri said. These include proximity detection, ergonomics, fatigue, overexertion, stress level monitoring, etc. The result is improved worker and jobsite safety.

TECHNOLOGY #2:

IoT (Internet of Things) By combining the real-time data generated by wearables, embedded technology and GPS tracking with the IoT, Big Data can be used to monitor and measure a wide variety of safety performance metrics within the construction industry. According to Ferri, this information can then be used to continuously change and/or strengthen safety programs.

66 // September 2019

TECHNOLOGY #3:

Enterprise Solutions These are designed to integrate multiple facets of jobsite safety through the interchange of information from “connected” workers and a “connected” jobsite, Ferri said. With a sensor network onsite and connected workers enabled by technology, workplace safety is improved because these solutions enable workers to transmit and receive information in real time. Additionally, worker productivity is increased due to the continuous interaction between the environment, information and workers.

TECHNOLOGY #4:

Collision Avoidance Systems Technologies will continue to evolve to further improve construction equipment safety, Ferri said. These include blind-spot coverage, proximity detection alerts, detecting the presence of workers, collision avoidance systems and systems that monitor equipment operators and keep a record of their performance.

TECHNOLOGY #5:

Microlearning Although online safety training has its place, Ferri said it may not work well for those who work in the field. Instead, she recommended microlearning. Basically, microlearning involves breaking down information into compact, focused learning segments. The segments, usually three to five minutes long, are designed to meet a specific learning outcome, Ferri said. The training, which can be viewed on a smartphone or tablet in the field, is easier to process and knowledge retention is increased.

TECHNOLOGY #6:

Mobile Apps It will come as no surprise that mobile applications continue to make it easier to get

safety training and information to workers, while helping safety managers be more efficient and productive. That’s why Ferri rates mobile apps as one of her top six construction safety technologies to keep an eye on.

IMPLEMENT NEW TRAINING TECH

Of course, technology is only one side of the equation. Ferri also noted the importance of implementing new safety training tech effectively. “It is important that the training be interactive because this helps to keep everyone involved,” Ferri said. “People being trained need to have the opportunity to share their experiences and bring their on-the-job knowledge to the training. This is an adult learning principle that says adults benefit most from experiences that are problem based and collaborative.” The trainer also needs to digest what is being shared, understand the group that is taking the training and, if necessary, adjust the learning activities or even the content of the training to make it appropriate and applicable, Ferri said. “Under the lens of training, if there is technology for the sake of using technology, this may not resonate well with the workers,” Ferri said. “But technology that helps them do their jobs better, safer and more efficiently will prove beneficial.” “Despite what some think, technology is for every company,” Ferri said. “It’s a matter of finding what technology works with a company’s culture and can supplement that culture, plus make things easier.” You can see the latest equipment and technology for the utility and construction industries at ICUEE - The Demo Expo, Oct. 1-3, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky. Registration is now open. – FROM ASSOCIATION OF EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS


ProSizer Series

®

ProSizer® 3600 The all new ProSizer® 3600 is a single-load crushing plant for processing virgin aggregate and recycled materials. Its robust 36” x 46” horizontal shaft impactor can be paired with a 5’ x 20’ conventional screen or a 6’ x 18’ high frequency screen to meet your application needs. This crushing plant can be powered by diesel, electric or hybrid power.

ASTEC MOBILE SCREENS

an Astec Industries Company

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