Page 1

ASPECTS OF HANDWRITING Historical, current and scientific publications on handwriting

March 2019 — Issue 1 — ISSN 2628-0515



CONTENT

Handwriting and cultural asset

INHALT

Handwriting and Science ........................................................................................................................3

HandWritingBiblio — the Uniquest selection of publications on „handwriting“ ..................................3 HandWritingBiblio — einzigartige Auswahl an Veröffentlichungen zum Thema „Handschrift“ ............5

Handwriting examination ...........................................................................................................................................................................8 Case study: Six feigned Arabic signatures, one prototype in Arabic print and an Arabic stamp ........8

Graphologisches Gutachten Handschriftendiagnostik .............................................................................................................................23 Aspekte aus Lockowandts Artikel „Der Prozeß der Urteilsbildung in der Schriftpsychologie“ ..........23

Schreibunterricht

Schreibmotorik ........................................................................................................................................................... 29

Schreiben lehren in der ersten Grundschulklasse ..........................................................................29

Imprint

Impressum ...............................................................................................................................................................................33

2


Handwriting and cultural asset

Handwriting and Science

HANDWRITINGBIBLIO — THE UNIQUEST SELECTION OF PUBLIC ATIONS ON „HANDWRITING“ HandWritingBiblio is both a physical and a virtual project for the storage, preservation and sharing of all aspects of handwriting. The idea for the "Memory of Handwriting" project arose from the fact that in recent years the founders were repeatedly given collections in the form of old journals, books and documents on the subject of handwriting by strangers and colleagues as well as their descendants. The founders themselves also have a certain collector's passion. These artefacts, some of which date back to the beginnings of the 20th century, and the handwriting knowledge collected in them were stored in various places comparable to ‘time capsules’. The aim is to make this handwriting knowledge available to present and future generations in order to safeguard this knowledge. The contents range from the learning and teaching of writing through grapho-motor and therapeutic aspects of writing, to findings in forensic analysis or psychological interpretation of writing, to name but a few essential topics. Time capsules have been used for millennia to preserve a piece of the present for the future. Although time capsules are generally regarded as a box of buried treasures, there are many different forms and, above all, intentions with which they are created. For example, time capsules created intentionally or unintentionally, and time capsules with or without a defined opening date. The word ‘time capsule’ was first used in 1937, when a capsule was intentionally prepared for the 1939 New York World's Fair. A shiny, metallic, rocket-shaped time capsule was sunk 18 metres deep into the ground of Flushing Meadows Park. It contains articles of daily use, fabrics and materials, artefacts of literature and art, microfilms with news and scientific findings. It is to be opened exactly in 5,000 years. However, the concept of time capsules does not date back to the 1930s, it is much older. The Gilgamesh Epic is considered the earliest literary work of mankind. The book begins with instructions on how to find a copper box in the cornerstone of the great walls of Uruk. The box contained the stories of the legendary King of Gilgamesh. So the idea of leaving a message for the future in the form of a time capsule is more than 5,000 years old. As for the time capsule HandWritingBiblio - the unique selection of publications on handwriting - the time has now come to open it. Documents, books and records on this subject, and as well handwritings themselves, that were kept under lock and key at various locations, have been transferred to a central location in Munich (Germany), and the project HandWritingBiblio has been launched. The capsules will be opened step by step, content is sorted, recorded electronically, including the corresponding keywords (tagging), and in this way, an academic library will be build up. Since new documents and artefacts are continuously transferred to the HandWritingBiblio, the library is dynamic and can be visited online at any time. And here comes the good news for all virtual library visi3


tors: The content of some already opened and recorded ‘handwritten time capsules’ can be found at https://handwritingbiblio.info/search-handwriting-bibliography. The search by author names, categories (books, journals etc.) or keywords is enabled. If you find something that you want to read or need for your research or publications, just send an e-mail to contact@handwritingbiblio.info and the document will be sent electronically. If you do not have access to the virtual world, you can also make an appointment at the Munich archive and take a physical look at the handwritten time capsules. To ensure that the multiple and various data stored in HandWritingBiblio does not end up in a wild hotchpotch, the issuing of the journal „Aspects of handwriting. Historical, current and scientific publications on handwriting“ has been initiated. You are currently reading the first issue, and in the imprint you can see who is in charge of each area. The purpose of the journal is, on the one hand, to open snapshots of an open time capsule related to handwriting, to provide relevant comments and to make them available in the original language. On the other hand, to encapsulate current books, publications, texts, links, manuscripts, documents, films and much more on the subject of handwriting. All relevant current contributions will be stored in the multilingual HandWritingBiblio and thus become new, catalogued time capsules and messages for the future. Whether and which existing information is further deepened and published in the journal ‘Aspects of handwriting’ or in the blog is decided by those responsible for the HandWritingBiblio project on a caseby-case basis. To summarise, it can be said that the aims of the journal and the HandWritingBiblio archive are based on the UNESCO "Memory of the World" programme for the protection of the document heritage (cf. https://en.unesco.org/programme/mow): 1. Securing the handwritten heritage against memory loss and destruction. 2. Ensuring an all-purpose access to scientific, cultural, historical and psychological documents dealing with the aspects of handwriting. 3. Increasing worldwide awareness of the existence and significance of aspects of the Penmanship as a cultural asset. If you yourself own documents in the form of old or current manuscripts, lectures, books on the subject of handwriting, as well specialist correspondence, or a handwriting collection, and would like to ‘send messages to the future’, you can simply send them to Munich, where they will be digitised, stored in a structured way and made accessible online with the intention of creating new handwriting time capsules for the future. In the end a few practical hints: • The current issue of the journal "Aspects of handwriting. Historical, current and scientific publications on handwriting" can be reached via this link: https://handwritingbiblio.info/journal. Older issues can be purchased under this link: https://issuu.com/aspectsofhandwriting. 4


• If you would like to see the entire contents of the HandWritingBiblio, click on the link https:// handwritingbiblio.info/bibliography. If you would like to search HandWritingBiblio, click on this link: https://handwritingbiblio.info/search-handwriting-bibliography. By clicking on the left bar, you can see all documents already collected in certain categories (Articles, Books, Correspondence, Documents, Doctoral Thesis, Films & Audio, Handwritings, Journals, Manuscripts, Presentations, Press, Reports, Student Works, Websites). If you click on the right bar, you will see all keywords and by clicking on one of them you can view the related entries with details and use the function "cite" to integrate a source for your bibliography. We hope you enjoy reading the first issue, which begins with an interesting English case study on fictitious Arab signatures, progresses with a German article from the time capsule ‘Oskar Lockowandt Archive’ on ‘Judgment Formation in Handwriting Psychology’ and ends with another German article on ‘Teaching Writing in the First Primary School Class’ out of a time capsule from 1973.

HANDWRITIN GBIBLIO — EINZIGARTIGE AUSWAHL AN VERÖFFENTLICHUNGEN ZUM THEMA „HANDSCHRIFT“ HandWritingBiblio ist sowohl ein physisches als auch ein virtuelles Projekt zur Speicherung, Erhaltung und Verbreitung aller Aspekte der Handschrift. Die Idee zum „Memory of the handwriting“-Projekt entstand dadurch, dass den Initiatoren durch Unbekannte und Kollegen sowie deren Nachkommen in den vergangenen Jahren immer wieder Nachlässe in Form alter Zeitschriften, Bücher und Dokumente rund um das Thema „Handschrift“ übergeben wurden. Auch die Initiatoren selbst haben eine gewisse Sammlerleidenschaft. Diese teilweise aus den Anfängen des 20. Jahrhunderts stammenden Artefakte und das darin angesammelte „Handschriftwissen“ wurden an verschiedenen Orten wie in „Zeitkapseln“ konservierten. Zum geeigneten Zeitpunkt soll dieses Handschriftwissen gegenwärtigen und zukünftigen Generationen zugänglich gemacht machen, um dadurch jenes Wissen um die Handschrift in allen Anwendungsbereichen lebendig zu halten. Die Inhalte reichen vom Erlernen und Lehren des Schreibens über graphomotorische und therapeutische Aspekte des Schreibens, bis hin zu Erkenntnissen in forensischen Schriftuntersuchungen oder zur psychologischen Bedeutung des Schreibens, um nur einige wesentliche Themen aufzuzählen. Zeitkapseln werden seit Jahrtausenden verwendet, um ein Stück der Gegenwart für die Zukunft im Sinne von weit entfernten, unbekannten oder noch nicht geborenen Lebewesen zu erhalten. Obwohl Zeitkapseln allgemein als eine Kiste mit vergrabenen Schätzen angesehen werden, gibt es die verschiedensten Formen und vor allem Intentionen, mit denen sie erstellt werden: Absichtlich oder unabsichtlich erstellte Zeitkapseln, Zeitkapseln mit oder ohne ein definiertes Öffnungsdatum. Das Wort „Zeitkapsel“ wurde erstmals 1937 verwendet, als eine Kapsel absichtlich für die New Yorker Weltausstellung 1939 vorbereitet wurde: Eine metallisch glänzende, raketenförmige Zeitkapsel wurde 18 Meter tief im Boden des Flus5


hing-Meadows-Parks versenkt. Darin enthalten sind von Gebrauchsgegenständen über Stoffe und Materialien auch Artefakte aus Literatur und Kunst, Nachrichten auf Mikrofilm und wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse. Geöffnet werden soll sie genau nach 5000 Jahren. Das Konzept von Zeitkapseln stammt jedoch nicht aus den 30er Jahren, es ist viel älter: Das Gilgamesch-Epos gilt als das früheste literarische Werk der Menschheit. Das Buch beginnt mit einer Anleitung, wie man eine Kupferkiste findet, die sich im Grundstein der großen Mauern von Uruk befindet. In der Kiste lagen die Geschichten des legendären Königs Gilgamesch. Also ist die Idee, eine Botschaft für die Zukunft in Form einer „Zeitkapsel“ zu hinterlassen, mehr als 5000 Jahre alt. Was die Zeitkapsel HandWritingBiblio, die einzigartige Auswahl an Veröffentlichungen zum Thema „Handschrift“, betrifft, ist nun der Zeitpunkt der Öffnung gekommen: An unterschiedlichen Orten unter Verschluss gehaltene Dokumente, Bücher und Aufzeichnungen zum Themenbereich Handschrift, aber auch Handschriften selbst, wurden in den vergangenen Monaten an einen zentralen Ort nach München (Deutschland) transferiert und das Projekt HandWritingBiblio wurde gestartet: Hier werden nun Schritt für Schritt die Kapsel) geöffnet, Inhalte sortiert, elektronisch erfasst, inklusive entsprechender Stichworte, und so wird eine wissenschaftliche Bibliothek aufgebaut. Da der HandWritingBiblio kontinuierlich neue Dokumente und Artefakte übergeben werden, handelt es sich also um eine dynamische Bibliothek, die man jederzeit online besuchen kann. Und hier kommt die gute Nachricht für alle virtuellen Bibliotheksbesucher: Der Inhalt einiger bereits geöffneter und erfasster „handschriftlichen Zeitkapseln“ kann auf dieser Website https://handwritingbiblio.info/search-handwriting-bibliography nach Autorennamen, Kategorien (Bücher, Zeitschriften etc.) oder Stichworten gesucht und gefunden werden. Wenn etwas dabei ist, das gerne gelesen oder im Rahmen von Untersuchungen oder Veröffentlichungen benötigt wird, genügt eine E-Mail an contact@handwritingbiblio.info und das Dokument wird elektronisch übermittelt. Wer keinen Zugang zur virtuellen Welt hat, kann die „handschriftlichen Zeitkapseln“ auch physisch unter die Lupe nehmen und einen Termin im Münchner Archiv vereinbaren. Damit die Vielzahl und Vielfalt der in die HandWritingBiblio eingespeisten Informationen nicht in einem wilden Sammelsurium enden, wurde das Journal „Aspects of handwriting. Historical, current and scientific publications on handwriting“ initiiert. Die erste Ausgabe lesen Sie gerade und im Impressum können Sie sehen, wer welche Bereiche betreut. Der Zweck des Journals besteht zum einen darin, Momentaufnahmen einer geöffneten auf die Handschrift bezogenen „Zeitkapsel“ zu zeigen, zu kommentieren und in der jeweiligen Originalsprache bereitzustellen. Zum anderen besteht der Zweck darin, auch aktuelle Bücher, Veröffentlichungen, Texte, Links, Manuskripte, Dokumente, Filme und vieles mehr rund um das Thema „Handschrift“ zu „verkapseln“: Alle relevanten aktuellen Einsendungen werden in der multilingualen HandWritingBiblio erfasst und werden somit zu neuen, katalogisierten Zeitkapseln und damit zu Nachrichten an die Zukunft. Ob und welche vorhandenen Informationen weiter vertieft und verbreitet werden im Journal „Aspects of handwriting“ oder in dem Blog entscheiden die Verantwortlichen der HandWritingBiblio im Einzelfall. Zusammenfassend kann man sagen, dass sich die Ziele des Journals und des Archivs HandWritingBiblio an dem UNESCO-Programm zum Schutz des Dokumentenerbes „Memory of the World“ (vgl. https:// 6


www.unesco.de/kultur-und-natur/weltdokumentenerbe/ weltdokumentenerbe-weltweit, abgerufen am 13.02.2019) orientieren: 1. Sicherung des handschriftlichen Erbes vor Gedächtnisverlust und Zerstörung. 2. Sicherstellen des universellen Zugangs zu wissenschaftlichen, kulturellen, historisch und psychologisch bedeutsamen Dokumenten, die sich mit den Aspekten der Handschrift befassen. 3. Erhöhung des weltweiten Bewusstseins über die Existenz und Bedeutung der Aspekte des Handschriftlichen als Kulturgut. Wenn auch Sie Dokumente in Form von alten oder aktuellen Manuskripten, Vorträgen, Büchern zum Thema „Handschrift“, auch fachlicher Briefwechsel, oder gar Handschriftensammlungen selbst besitzen und „Nachrichten an die Zukunft senden“ möchten, können Sie diese einfach nach München schicken, wo sie digitalisiert, strukturiert aufbewahrt und online zugänglich gemacht werden in der Absicht für die Zukunft weitere „handschriftliche Zeitkapseln“ zu bilden. Am Ende noch ein paar praktische Hinweise:

• Die aktuelle Ausgabe der Zeitschrift „Aspekte der Handschrift. Historische, aktuelle und wissenschaftliche Publikationen zur Handschrift“ ist über diesen Link erreichbar: https://handwritingbiblio.info/ journal. Ältere Ausgaben können nur unter diesem Link erworben werden: https://issuu.com/aspectsofhandwriting.

• Wenn Sie den gesamten Inhalt der HandWritingBiblio sehen möchten, klicken Sie auf den Link https://handwritingbiblio.info/bibliography. Wenn Sie in der HandWritingBiblio suchen möchten, klicken Sie auf diesen Link: https://handwritingbiblio.info/search-handwriting-bibliography. Durch Anklicken des linken Balkens sehen Sie alle bereits gesammelten Dokumente in bestimmten Kategorien (Artikel, Bücher, Korrespondenz, Dokumente, Dissertationen, Filme & Audio, Handschriften, Zeitschriften, Manuskripte, Vorträge, Presse, Berichte, Abschlussarbeiten, Websites). Wenn Sie auf den rechten Balken klicken, sehen Sie alle Schlagworte und durch Klicken auf eines davon können Sie die jeweils zugeordneten Einträge im Detail ansehen und die Funktion „cite“ nutzen, um eine Quelle für Ihre Bibliographie zu integrieren. Nun wünschen wir Ihnen viel Vergnügen beim Lesen der ersten Ausgabe, die mit einer spannenden englischsprachigen Fallstudie über fingierte arabische Unterschriften beginnt, mit einem deutschsprachigen Artikel aus der Zeitkapsel „Oskar Lockowandt Archiv“ zum Thema „Urteilsbildung in der Schriftpsychologie“ fortschreitet und mit einem weiteren deutschsprachigen Beitrag über „Schreiben lehren in der ersten Grundschulklasse“ aus einer Zeitkapsel von 1973 endet.

7


Handwriting examination

C A S E S T U DY: S I X F E I G N E D A R A B I C S I G N AT U R E S , O N E PROTOT YPE IN ARABIC PRINT AND AN ARABIC STAMP by Marianne Nürnberger Completely revised article, published first in the „Journal of The National Association of Document Examiners“, Vol. 28, p. 2-18.

The examination of handwriting in a foreign language is a particular challenge for a handwriting expert. Six signatures of an Arabic name were examined in the course of a court case: signatures X1 and X2 on a bill of exchange, X3 on a deed of gift, on a proxy (X4) for the Austrian suspect N., also two signatures found on the documents of an Austrian association (X5 and X6). Since all of them were in one way or the other provided by the same suspect N., none of them could be classified as „known". Even the Austrian association to which the documents with the signatures X5 and X6 were attributed, had been founded by the suspect N. and his son. X1, X2 and X3 are placed like abstract signatures above a blue stamp with Arabic writing. X4, X5 and X6 consist, in each case, of the written name plus an abstract signature below, which partly looks like an underline. See illustration 1. The sources of the relevant particularities of Arabic writing presented in this case are reports written by the Austrian Arabist and linguist, Mag. Roswitha Irran from Pinkafeld, and by the Austrian university lector for Arabic and sworn-in interpreter for Arabic and English, Mag. Christine Schlager from Graz, respectively. The Austrian university lector for Arabic and Arabic native speaker Mag. Abdullah Bersenji from Graz finally looked through the manuscript. Related facts The bill of exchange in question was for a very large sum (9,560,000 USD). In the course of the lengthy examinations concerning the authenticity of the documents, an accused Austrian, N., made extensive statements concerning the person who had made the Arabic signatures in question. According to him, it was a very rich, very successful Arabic speaking and writing Moslem businessman from Dubai of advanced age who dealt, amongst other things, in precious gems. Extensive international police investigations at home and abroad were unable to find any evidence for the existence of the person allegedly responsible for the signatures being analysed here. A paper was found where N. lived which showed, in Arabic toner print and in Latin capital letters, the name in question, Majid Al Awadi (see illustration 2). Additionally, there were printed transcriptions in Latin letters under the signatures X4, X5 and X6 (see illustration 1). The same basic Arabic forms of the name are to be found on the stamp of the abstract signatures in question, X1, X2, X3, and in the legible parts of the signatures X4, X5, and X6. See illustration 2. The signatures X4, X5 and X6, which are richer in examinable criteria, show more similarities between the signatures X5 and X6 than these two signatures to X4, although all three were dated the same. This

8


N ürnber ger

SSeeiittee 22 vvoonn1 17 7

N ürnber ger N ürnber ger

Seite 2 von 1 7

1 üalso rnber gerthe case ite 2 vonof 1 7 the three signatures. There 1 Abbildung isNAbbildung for the abstract signature-like shapes below the legibleSepart

Abbildung 1

are three Nplausible hypothetical explanations for this: ürnber ger Abbildung 1

Seite 2 von 1 7

Die fraglichen arabischen Unterschriften und der Stempel N ürnber ger Seite 2 von 1 7 Die Die fraglichen arabischen undder derStempel Stempel fraglichen arabischenUnterschriften Unterschriften und

Abbildung I LDie L U Sfraglichen T R A1T I O N arabischen 1 : T H E A RUnterschriften A B I C S I G N A Tund U R Eder S I Stempel N Q U E S T I O N A N D T H E S TA M P Abbildung 1

Die fraglichen arabischen Unterschriften und der Stempel Die fraglichen arabischen Unterschriften und der Stempel N ürnber ger

Seite 2 von 1 7

Originalgröße

vergrößert, ca. 200% X1 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 29.11.1995 Originalgröße vergrößert, ca. 200% h 1995, left: X 1 ( A b s t r a c t Originalgröße s i g n a t u r e a b o v e c o m p a n y s t a m p ) , d a t e dvergrößert, N o v . 2ca. 9 t 200% X1 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 29.11.1995 Originalgröße vergrößert, ca. 200% über Firmenstempel), datiert 29.11.1995 o r i g i n a l s i z e , r i g h tDie : e fraglichen n X1 l a r(Paraphe g e d arabischen Unterschriften und der Stempel Abbildung 1

X1 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 29.11.1995

Originalgröße vergrößert, ca. 200% Originalgröße vergrößert, ca. 200% X1 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 29.11.1995 vergrößert, ca. 200% X1 (Parapheca.über Firmenstempel), datiert 29.11.1995 vergrößert, 200%

X2 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998 X2 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998

vergrößert, ca. 200% X2 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998 vergrößert, ca. 200%

Originalgröße

vergrößert, ca. 200%

X 2 ( A b s t r a c t s i g n a t uX2 r e(Paraphe a b o X1 v e(Paraphe c o müber p aFirmenstempel), n y s t a mdatiert p ) , datiert dated O c t . 3 0 th 1 9 9 8 , e n l a r g e d über Firmenstempel), 30.10.1998 29.11.1995 vergrößert, ca. 200% vergrößert, ca. 200% X2 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998 X2 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998 vergrößert, ca. 200% vergrößert, ca. 200% X3 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998 X3 (Paraphevergrößert, über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998 ca. 200% X2 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998

vergrößert, ca. 200% X3 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998

vergrößert, ca. 200% vergrößert, ca.ca. 200% vergrößert, 200% (Paraphe Firmenstempel), datiert X 3 ( A b s t r a c t s i g n a t uX3 r e X3 a b(Paraphe o v e cüber oüber m pFirmenstempel), aFirmenstempel), n y s t a m pdatiert ) ,datiert d a30.10.1998 t 30.10.1998 e d30.10.1998 O c t . 3 0 th 1 9 9 8 , e n l a r g e d X3 (Paraphe über vergrößert, ca. 200% X3 (Paraphe über Firmenstempel), datiert 30.10.1998

vergrößert, ca. 200% X4 (Schreibrichtung: von links nach rechts), datiert 07.03.1996

vergrößert, ca. 200% X4 (Schreibrichtung: von links nach rechts), datiert 07.03.1996

vergrößert, ca. 200% vergrößert, ca. 200% links datiert X 4 ( w r i t i n g d i r e c tX4 i o n(Schreibrichtung: : fX4 r o(Schreibrichtung: m l e f vergrößert, t tvon o rlinks i g nach h tnach )rechts), , drechts), adatiert t e d07.03.1996 M a r c 07.03.1996 h 7 th 1 9 9 6 , e n l a r g e d von ca. 200% vergrößert, ca. 200% X4 (Schreibrichtung: von links nach rechts), datiert 07.03.1996 X4 (Schreibrichtung: von links nach vergrößert, ca. rechts), 200% datiert 07.03.1996

X4 (Schreibrichtung: links nach rechts), datiert 07.03.1996 aus Kopie, vergrößert, von ca. 200% X5, datiert 07.03.1996

aus Kopie, vergrößert, ca. 200%

aus Kopie, vergrößert, ca. 200% X5,07.03.1996 datiert 07.03.1996 X5, datiert

aus Kopie, vergrößert, ca. 200% aus Kopie, vergrößert, ca. 200% th 1 9 9 6 , e n l a r g e d X 5 f r o m c o p y , d a aus t e X5, dKopie, Mdatiert adatiert rvergrößert, c h07.03.1996 707.03.1996 X5, ca. 200% aus Kopie, vergrößert, ca. X5,200% datiert 07.03.1996 X6, datiert 07.03.1996

aus Kopie,vergrößert, vergrößert, ca. 200% aus Kopie, ca. 200% X6, datiert 07.03.1996 X5, datiert 07.03.1996

aus Kopie, vergrößert, ca. 200% X6, datiert 07.03.1996 aus Kopie, vergrößert, ca. 200% aus Kopie, 07.03.1996 X 6 f r o m c o p y , d a t eaus d X6, M adatiert r cvergrößert, hvergrößert, 7 t h 1 9ca. 9ca. 6200% , 200% enlarged Kopie, X6, datiert 07.03.1996 X6, datiert 07.03.1996

9

aus Kopie, vergrößert, ca. 200%


I L LU S T R AT I O N 2 : D I AG R A M O F R E L AT I O N S B E T W E E N P ROT OT Y P E A N D I M I TAT I O N S , GROUPS OF SIMILARITIES

Printed prototype: Name in Arabic toner print

As part of the stamp (here to X2)

X5

X6

X4

X1

X2

X3

Similarities divide the signatures in two groups: On the left (X2, X4, X1, X2, X3): More rounded shapes and more even stroke in X4, similarity of dimensions in the abstract part of the signature of X4, the isolated abstract signatures X1, X2 and X3. O n t h e r i g h t ( X 5 , X 6 ) : M o r e o v e r a l l a n g u l a r i t y, m o r e o b v i o u s h o l d i n g p o i n t s , m o r e uneven breadth of stroke in the written name-parts of X5 and X6. Similarity of dimensions in the abstract signatures of X5 and X6.

1. The signature X4 was wrongly dated. X4 shows less differentiation between letters, less precision of form and more fluency of movement. Hereby the thesis of backdating for a longer time span presents itself. „Precision of form“, „differentiation of letters“ and „lack of affluence“, all three as a group of signs, hint towards a writer, who is a beginner, someone just learning to write. When precision and differentiation decline while affluence is developing, the writer could have already had more practice

10


by the time he made X41. The degree of difference between X4 and both X5 and X6 is, in my opinion, so extreme that a time lapse of at least some days would have to be an additional factor if the results were from one and the same hand. 2. The signature X4 originated from another hand than the signatures X5 and X6. 3. One must also always consider as a possible cause for the noticeable variance in a series of signatures, the feigned character of the series as a whole. Fake signatures, as has been seen, tend to vary more greatly than genuine signatures due to the lack of the process of automation, when the writing of the forger is substantially different. A similar remarkable difference can be found between the abstract signatures X1, X2 and X3, and the abstract signature part of X4 on the one hand and the abstract signatures under X5 and X6 on the other. The latter are wider and more closely placed under the legible name part, were more clearly not made in one stroke, and have different proportions and angles. The abstract signatures X1, X2 and X3 and the abstract signature part of X4 belong to one group of similarities, whereas the abstract signatures under X5 and X6 belong to a second group of similarities. Similar hypotheses as above may accordingly be applied here: 1. The abstract signature parts and abstract signatures are wrongly dated. To be more precise, the abstract signature parts of X5 and X6 were made either decisively before or decisively after X1, X2, X3, and the abstract part of X4. The readable part of X4 suggests, in the way described above that this part was done after the readable parts of the signatures X5 and X6. Whereas the analysis of the abstract part of X4 does not give a similar clue to its being done prior to or after X5 and X6. This can at least partly be attributed to the fact that the two above mentioned parameters, "differentiation of letter" and "precision of form", cannot play any part in the analysis of the abstract forms (since no letters or customary form is being followed) and that it cannot be proved that the abstract part of the signature X4 is decisively more fluently done than the other abstract signatures. The only thing that can be said is: Since the abstract part of X4 is nonetheless somewhat different from those of X5 and X6 it was either done at another date or ... 2. The abstract signature part of X4 and the abstract signatures X1, X2, X3 originated from another hand than the signatures X5 and X6. 3. Another possible cause for the noticeable variance in the series of the abstract the feigned character of the series as a whole. Evidence for the non-Arabian authorship of the Arabic names and abstract signatures in question and of the printed prototype and the stamp 1. Writing direction Arabic is written from right to left. It will certainly be of general interest to writing experts that, as was mentioned to the author in business correspondence, certain cases are known in Spain where signatures of Arabian names were written in the wrong direction, that is, from left to right, in order to hide their This thesis presupposes that both the other signatures, as also X4, were written from left to right, which is from the copies, neither provable nor refutable. 1

11


true authorship. Mandel (2004:150f) illustrates a completely different kind of exception to the Arabic writing direction. It concerns the domain of the thousand-year-old Arabic artistic calligraphy, where mirror composition (mutanna) is used as a style element to obtain the aesthetic effect of symmetry through duplication of a text in mirrored writing. The signature X4 is the only example in a legible style where the original was available for examination. My co-worker Julian Horky diagnosed the writing direction of X4: under the stereo microscope the writing procedure could be seen from the deposits of ink on the edges of the strokes at certain crossings. It was seen to have been written from left to right, the wrong direction for Arabic. See illustration 3. N ürnber ger

Seite 6 von 1 7

Abbildung 3

I L LU S T R AT I O N 3 : S I M U L AT I O N O F A R A B I C S C R I P T I N R I G H T WA R D W R I T I N G M OV ERechtsläufige Abzeichnung einer arabischen Schrift MENT (ENLARGED) vergrößert, ca 350%

1 2

From X4:

aus X4 Pfeile: Strichrichtung von links nach rechts, entgegen arabischer Schreibrichtung, hellgraue Markierungen: hier ist unter dem Stereomikroskop bei 48-facher Vergrößerung die Strichlagerung dank eines glänzenden Tintenwalls besonders deutlich sichtbar. punktiertes Rechteck: ungefährer Ausschnitt für Foto unten.

Arrows: Direction of stroke from left to right, as opposed to Arabic writing direction. Light grey markings: In marked areas the deposits along the stroke are, due to a shining wall of ink, under the stereomicroscope with an enlargement of 48:1 particularly clearly visible. D o t t e d r e c t a n g l e : R o u g h l y t h e s e c t i o n o f t h e p h o t o b e l o w.

The appliance for the examination of documents, „Docucenter“ (LGK Graz) f r o m t h e c o m p a n y DasNUrkundenprüfungsgerät i k o n , i l l u„ Docucenter“ s t r a t e (LGK s Graz) der Firma Nikon illustriert durch Filterung bei 665 nm im Lumineszenzverfahren den Strichverlauf von links nach rechts, entgegen der arabischen Schreibrichtung, so wie b y f i l t e r i n g w i t h dies 6 6auch 5 nunter m dem i nStereomikroskop, l u m i n eanhand der Abfolge von unzerstörten bzw. durch Durchquerung zerstörten Bereiche der Farbansammlung entlang der Strichränder, ersichtlich war. scence procedure the course of the . stroke from left to right, as opposed to the Arabic writing direction. 2.- Schreibsystem

Die in der gedruckten Vorlage zu den Unterschriften des Namens Majid Al Awadi verwendeten arabischen Buchstaben und Zeichen wurden nach der Arbeit von Mandel (2004) identifiziert und sind Abbildung 4 zu entnehmen.

The photograph shown in Illustration 3 was made on the appliance „Docucenter“ from the firm Nikon. The luminescence procedure shows here with particular plasticity the results gained from the stereomicroscopy.

12


Specialist reference to this simple case of Arabic forgery can be found, amongst other sources, in Ellen (1997:37). Thus, it must be considered proven that X4 can by no means have been the usual signature of an aging Arabian businessman. 2. Writing system The Arabic letters and signs used in the printed prototypes for the signatures of the name Majid Al Awadi were identified through the work of Mandel (2004) and can be seen in illustration 4. Additionally, the stamp of the signatures X1, X2 and X3 shows the word Jawāhirī, which, according to Schlager (2005:1) is derived from the Arabic root „Gem“ and means something like „the one who has to do with gems“. See illustration 5. ILLUS TRATION 4

L ām („l“ in „al“) and ‚ Ayn (guttural sound) as second „a“ o f „ Aw a d i “

Mīm („m“ of „Majid“)

Jīm („j“ of as in „joy“)

„Majid“,

sound Wā w ( „ w “ i n „ A w a d i “ )

Yā ( „ i “ o f „ M a j i d “ )

A l i f ( „ a “ o f „ Aw a d i “ )

Dāl („d“ of „Majid“)

Hamza „al“)

abouve

Alif

D ā l ( „ d “ o f „ Aw a d i “ ) („a“

in

Yā ( e n d „ i “ o f „ A w a d i “ ) . Tw o dots for distinguishing from „a“ are missing under this letter

ILLUS TRATION 5 (ENL ARGED)

The word Jawāhirī from the stamp to X2

13

Yā ( e n d - „ i “ )


The prints, that is the toner print on the fragment of paper and the stamps with the signatures X1, X2, X3 all show, according to Schlager, the Arabic writing form naskh, a form of print which is used in most types of print, as in newspapers and books. The „i“ (the Arabic letter Yā) at the end of the words Awadi and Jawahiri is differently written. As a rule, when Yā is written at the end of a word and without a dot, like here in Awadi, it is pronounced „a“. Actually, Yā is only pronounced „i“ when written with two dots below, as here in Jawahiri. Schlager (ibid.) says that it can happen that the two dots at the end of the word may be omitted, as is frequently the case with commonly used expressions in newspapers, but for a serious businessman it would be unacceptable to have on the one hand a company stamp with variant writing or, on the other, for him to write his own name with negligence. The writing form of the Eastern Arabian region is called ruqc a2 and is different in a number of ways from the nashi which will later be shown in more detail. 3. Clumsiness of writing The printed prototype and the legible parts of the signatures in question are, regarding the style of writing, similar, although Arabic handwriting and print are subject to different rules. Taking into consideration the fact that Arabic writing cannot be individually formed or treated with negligence to the same extent as writing in Europe (Ellen 1997:23), the following signs of weakness in Arabic writing technique may, according to the Arabists Irran (2004), Schlager (2005) and Bersenji occur:

• The punctuation 3 under the handwritten letters of the first part of the name Majid should be missing in the case of a normal signature, but in a written name without actual signature character, as in this case, it should be exactly placed. In X4, X5 and X6, however, it is on the one hand there and misleadingly placed and on the other hand partly missing. See illustration 6.

I L L U S T R AT I O N 6 : I N E X A C T I N S T E A D O F M I S S I N G P U N C T UAT I O N ( O VA L M A R K I N G S ) IN THE HANDWRITINGS

print prototype with correct punctation

X4

X5

X6

correct handwriting with no punctation4

According to Aloyoni (2003:4) there are two styles of handwriting which are in common day to day use in Arabian countries, ruqca and naskh. According to Irran (2004) and Schlager (2005), the only commonly used handwriting in the Eastern Arabian region is ruqca. 2

According to Aloyoni (2003:2). The way the diacritics (additional signs) are used in Arabic is highly valuable in the identification of the author ship of forgeries. 3

4

According to Brustad et al. 2001:121.

14


In Eastern Arabic handwriting (ruqc a), as opposed to print, the two dots above or below a letter are, for the sake of increasing the speed of writing, if at all, only represented by a short stroke. These two dots (that is, the stroke under the Yā in Majid) display, according to Schlager (2005:2f) in X4 the wrong angle of inclination; they should slant from above right to below left or be horizontal. The wrong angle of inclination here could indicate a wrong writing direction. See Illustration 6, marked by arrow and oval. In X5 and X6 the stroke under the Yā seems to be missing and is instead placed under the Jīm (see illustration 6, marked by an oval). The dot under the Jīm is also shifted to the right, below the Mīm (see illustration 6, marked by a circle). Added to that, one can hardly recognise the Jīm in X4 due to the neglected writing style. See Illustration 6.

• The form of a single Arabic letter depends on its context (see illustration 7) that is, whether it is at the beginning, in the middle or at the end of a word. Some letters in the middle must be joined up at the beginning and at the end; others may only be joined up in one direction or not at all. Arabic writing has strict rules with regard to joining up, not joining up and connecting letters. If these are not followed, Arabic texts become illegible. The connection between the Mīm and the Jīm is wrong. Correct versions are shown in illustration 7 and in illustration 8. I L L U S T R A T I O N 7: T H E C O N N E C T I O N O F M Ī M A N D J Ī M

Mīm and Jīm as printed prototype

from X4

from X5

from X6

correct handwriting

The letters Mīm and Jīm as isolated shapes in correct handwriting in Rukc a accor ding to Mandel (2000:76,38)

ILLUS TRATION 8: EXCERPT FROM AN INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC WRITING FROM B R U S T A D E T A L . ( 2 0 01 : 121 ) — C O M P U T E R - G R A P H I C A L L Y E N H A N C E D

15


In the joining of the Mīm and the Jīm in the questioned signatures, there is no change of level of alignment, which is characteristic for the beginning of the letter Jīm. In such a case, according to Schlager (2005:2f), the letters in question in X4 can be read as "m" and "b" (Mīm and Bā), thus the name "Majid" wrongly as e.g. "Mobayed" or "Mobid." This connection is also incorrect in X5 and X6, a further hint towards an attempt that had obviously been made to copy a print prototype.

• To this, Schlager (2005:If) points out that it is, amongst other things, an essential characteristic of nashi, an Arabic printing style, that the letters which have no lower length - that is, in the example shown here, all the letters of the name Majid and in Al Awadi all letters except Wāw and Yā - are all written on the same level of alignment. This is contrary to the writing style, which, to increase the speed of writing, makes use of certain simplifications, and to compensate for this, is written on different levels. According to an illustration by Aloyoni (2003:4) these levels of alignment are a characteristic feature of both the common handwriting styles, ruqca and nasksh. They also occur in Arabic calligraphy. In the questioned signatures, however, the nashi printing style of writing on the same level is imitated at the beginning of the name Majid, which is entirely unusual for common handwriting.

• In the two letters "Mīm at the beginning of the word" and "following Jīm" the Mīm would have to be placed higher, as illustrated as correct writing (see illustration 7) and as shown by an excerpt from a course in Arabic5 (see illustration 8).

• The Mīm at the beginning of the word is represented by a circle which must be written depending on the next letters to the right or to the left. The turning to the left (if written in correct writing direction!) of the curl-in before a Jīm in X5 and X6 is against the rules. See Illustration 9.

ILLUS TRATION 9: EXCERPT FROM AN INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC WRITING FROM B R U S T A D E T A L . ( 2 0 01 : 121 ) — C O R R E C T F O R M O F M Ī M A N D J Ī M A C C O R D I N G T O B R U S T A D E T A L . ( 2 0 01 : 121 )

The consulted Arabists deduce that X5 and X6 could by no means have been made by an adult Arabian person, since it is only in first stages of learning to write Arabic that anticlockwise movements may be used in a Mīm circle, when connected to a Jīm. This is even more so since the natural personal development process of writing Arabic can have hardly any effect on the rules of connection or writing direction, since the slightest degree of variation can cause loss of legibility. Some more examples of the prescribed movement of handwriting in Arabic are shown in illustration 10.

5

A copy of the explanations ol Brustad et al. (2001) was provided by Schlager.

16


I L L U S T R AT I O N 10 : E X A M P L E S O F M O V E M E N T O F T H E W R I T I N G I N A R A B I C B Y A G M O R ( 2 0 0 3 : 94 )

• Some of the questioned letters at the left end of a word such as the Dal at the end of the word Majid in X6 and the Ya (pronounced "i") at the end of the name Al Awadi in X5 and X6, have, differently from X4, a small oblique stroke to (or from, depending of the direction of writing) the right, which is wrong. This superfluous line, according to Schlager (2005:3) and Bersenji, could only have been made by a beginner with little writing practice. To my opinion this may point to the use of a prototype in imitating a quill-pen-like appearance of thick endings (or beginnings, depending on the direction of writing). According to Bersenji, both the letters Dal in X6 are, apart from that, too different from each other to have been made by an adult Arabian. See illustration 11. I L L U S T R A T I O N 11 : F O R M A T I O N O F T W O D A L I N X 6

D a s h e d c i r c l e s : To o d i f f e r e n t o v e r a l l s h a p e o f t h e t w o D a l , a r r o w s : i n c o r r e c t o b l i q u e line 10 (or from) below right

• The Hamza above the Alif is wrongly written; the horizontal closing line to the left is missing. Apart from that, it is not usual in handwriting to place a Hamza above an Alif in the word Al which is being used as an article, unless the word is at the beginning of a sentence. See illustration 12.

• In X5 the writing was broken off after the Lām, which would be very unusual for an Arabic native speaker. See illustration 12, marked by circle.

• The ‘Ayn is not distinctive enough, that is, particularly in X4 it is too similar to a Mīm or a Fā'. See illustration 13.

• The Wāw in X5 was incorrectly added on and runs unusually; the connecting stroke runs above instead of below the loop. See illustration 14.

• The baseline alignment of the legible parts of the signatures in question is not correct. As opposed to European writing, great importance is attached to the baseline alignment in Arabic, and much trouble is taken with it in the process of learning to write. It is an important, difficult to master, and strictly-tobe followed peculiarity of Arabic handwriting. 17


I L L U S T R A T I O N 12 : W R O N G L Y W R I T T E N I N S T E A D O F M I S S I N G H A M Z A A B O V E A L I F I N T H E CO N N E C T I O N A L I F A N D L Ā M A N D A N U N U S UA L S O L D E R I N G AT T H E LOW E R E N D OF LĀM

printed prototype

correct handwriting

X4

I L L U S T R A T I O N 13 : T O O I N D I S T I N C T

printed prototype

correct handwriting6

X4

X5

CAY

X6

N

X5

X6

I L L U S T R A T I O N 14 : I N C O R R E C T A N D S O L D E R E D O N W Ā W I N X 5

printed prototype

correct handwriting7

from X5

4. Types of Arabic signatures According to Aloyoni (2003:5f) there are three main forms of Arabic signatures. Legible signatures (almaguru) of the whole name, as in the forms of X4, X5 and X6, are very rare in Arabian countries (Aloyoni ibid:3. Irran 2004:1). In most Almaguru signatures, only parts of the name are legible. The commonest form of Arabic signature is a one-piece mixture of written and abstract signature, (Irran: ibid., Aloyoni 2003:6), called fermah (Aloyoni ibid.) which as a rule, however, as opposed to the questioned signatures X4, X5 and X6, only contains part of the name, plus an abstract signature joined to the legible part. Illegible abstract signatures (gharmagru), a kind of symbol for the person signing, are also common (Aloyoni 2003:5). This example is taken from the sample of the signature of Mister Majid Alawadi, which he kindly made available for this article. Mister Majid Ala wadi has nothing whatsoever to do with the signatures being treated in this case study. He kindly agreed to help me with it, because of the similarity of the name. 6

7

See footnote 6.

18


Illustration 15 shows three examples of genuine Arabic signatures8 from the hand of an Arabian called Majid Alawadi.9 I L L U S T R A T I O N 15 : T H R E E K I N D S O F G E N U I N E A R A B I C S I G N A T U R E S O F T H E N A M E M A J I D A L AWA D I , A L L F R O M T H E S A M E H A N D

Consonant computer writing

5. Character of stroke, movement in the writing, form10 The abstract signatures in question are not only left unattached to the legible name-parts, they also show no signs in themselves of Arabic origin. The character of the strokes indicates that the abstract signatures start at the left with a long, flat curve, to which some very small, slowly and clumsily-made irregular teeth are attached, followed by a vertical line, which slightly turns to the right and ends in a large garland which drops abruptly down toward the left from the top of the vertical line. There is no sign of any kind of letter whether of Arabic or other origin in it. The absence of letter forms is not unusual for Arabic abstract signatures. What is unusual is the obvious lack of flow in any of the more dierentiated parts of the abstract signatures. The partly slow and uneven way the strokes were made in the originals X1 to X4 and, particularly in X5 and X6 even in the copies visible, obvious adding on at the corners, indicate forgery or fake. Much room is given in specialist literature to such general warning hints of forgery (e.g. Michel 1982: 124. 139. 145, Pfanne 1954:92, Nickel 1996:48-50). The application of more specific research (Lieblich et al. 1975, Shannon 1978) on leftward-trend writing systems shows that the rightward-trend of the fairly dierentiated parts of the abstract signatures indicates an author who is more familiar with our writing system or some writing system related to ours than with the Arabic system. Only the extended end-stroke could eventually be the result of a leftward movement of the pen. End-strokes are strokes of a somewhat less important or (better termed) secondary type, in the sense that they do not constitute letters or meaning and they play a more decorative part in a signature. Their direction very often does not conform with the general writing direction. Therefore, the sole direction of the simple end stroke cannot be judged significant for a cultural classification of the forgery.

8

They represent the three forms of signature used by Mister Majid Alawadi in the last eight years.

Although the name Majid Alawadi is practically consonant with the name Majid Al Awatli of the signatures being examined here, there are more dierences here in the Arabic way of Writing than one may suppose form the Latin transcription. 9

10

Thanks to Dr. Angelika Seibt for her criticism of some formulations in this section.

19


The abstract signatures and names X1, X2, X3, X4, all four examined from the original, all give the typical clumsy, uncertain and in significant parts lifeless general impression of badly made forgeries. Many recognised writing experts have drawn attention to the importance of lifelessness (e.g. Pfanne 1954:92. Michel 1982:139), the lack of automation and spontaneity (Seibt 1999:63), the contradiction between flow of movement and character of stroke (Hoffmann 1989:333) such as an overall simple form executed in slow movement as warning signs of forgery. The intervals, pauses and soldering of lines of the abstract signatures visible under the stereomicroscope, as also the obvious slow, uneven, exactly added-on and carefully drawn lines in parts of all the questioned writings which result in the blunt conclusion of the line and which are also visible in the copies of X5 and X6, speak the same language (see illustration 16).

I L L U S T R A T I O N 16 : C H A N G E O F T E M P O , P O I N T O F H E S I T A T I O N A N D S O L D E R I N G O F L I N E S ( R E S U LT S F RO M T H E O R I G I NA L )

FROM X3, ENLARGED

FROM X4, ENLARGED C O N T I N U O U S A R ROW: P O I N T O F H E S I TAT I O N O R U N C E RTA I N T Y AT T H E B E G I N N I N G O F T H E L I N E A N D S LOW B E G I N N I N G O F T H E L I N E D OT T E D R E C TA N G L E : S O L D E R I N G . 
 DA S H E D A R R OW: D O U G H Y A N D S LOW I N G D OW N S T R O K E T OWA R D T H E R I G H T. 
 D O L L E D A R R OW: D O U G H Y, V E RY S LOW S T R O K E A LO N G T H E WAV Y PA R T O R T H E LINE.

Furthermore, the following signs found in the questioned abstract signatures, which speak against a normal automatic writing process, are described in methodical accordance with the recommendations of specialist literature (e.g. Michel 1892:124, 139, 145, Pfanne 1954:92, Nickel 1996:48-50, Seibt 1999, etc.):

• the arrhythmic change of tempo of the stroke in the very slow passages wherever the slightest steps of differentiation are made, that is at the beginning and the end, where a change of direction takes place and in the wavy line also

20


• widening of the strokes 11, indicating a lack of flow, on some line endings and on many places showing change of direction or other differentiations,

• the soldering always being in different places, • the unmotivated and the slow line endings, • the contradiction between the painted-looking, repeatedly hesitant lines and the simple overall appearance. The low degree of personal imprint in the written parts of the signatures in question, X4, X5 and X6, the lack of homogeneity which can also be seen in the copies of X5 and X6 and the extremely uneven baseline alignment of the legible parts of the signatures contribute to the impression that they are not written by an Arabian adult man whose natural writing is Arabic. Many signs of forgery are to be found particularly in X5 and X612 : lack of spontaneity, massive widening of the strokes, which can indicate change of tempo and pressure13 , wrong connections, breaks in the continuity of the strokes, shakiness, heterogeneity of the irregularities, static appearance of movement in the writing....etc. Additionally, the small circle of the letter Mīm in X5 and X6 is written in the opposite direction to the one in X4. This is a further indication that X4 was made at a different time to X5 and X6, or was written by another person. This phenomenon is not to be expected in genuine signatures, because of the process of automation. The result of the examination From the arguments shown above, it can be seen that all six signatures shown here, ostensibly made by a rich Arabian businessman from Dubai, are feigned, and that the abstract signatures as well as the legible parts of the signatures were not made by an adult Arabic native speaker. It is possible that in spite of the variation between the specimens, all signatures were made by the same person. The stamp of the Signatures X1 to X3 also has variant and unusual writing styles, which a serious Arabian businessman would not tolerate. The absence of punctuation below the last letter in the name on the toner print and the stamp both point to a non-Arabian origin of the stamp, or at least to the low orthographical and cultural standard of the author14.

The parts in the original of the material in question, X1 to X4 all show flat, hardly noticeable signs of pressure. Light dents in single comers of the abstract signatures in question are evidence of pauses. The widening of the strokes in XI to X4 is, therefore, hardly evidence of increased pressure, far more of slowing down of the movement of the writing! 11

Some of the evidence mentioned, particularly the breaks in the continuity of the strokes and the shaky lines are not able to be diagnosed without doubt from the copies, as they could have been simulated by mistakes in the copying. 12

13

See foot note 11.

Bersenji concludes by stating that in Arabian countries company stamps which show neither an address nor any other possibility of establishing contact, as in this case, are absolutely not customary. Apart from that, it is hardly conceivable that an Arabian native speaker would sign a bill of exchange of such great value with only the abstract signatures XI and X2 and not with a fully written name. 14

21


Bibliography Aloyoni, Mohammed (2003). Arabic Handwriting and Signatures. Conference paper for the 60th Conference of ASQDE. San Diego. Brustad, Kirsten; Mahmoud Al-Batal & Abbas Al-Tonsi (2001). Alif Baa - Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds with CD (Audio). Washington D.C: Georgetown University Press. Irran, Roswitha (2004). Arabistische Expertise, unpublished expert opinion on the signatures and prints discussed above. Ellen, David (1997). The Scientific Examination of Documents. Methods and Techniques. London/Bristol: Taylor & Francis. Hecker, Manfred R. (1993). Forensische Handschriftenuntersuchung. Eine systematische Darstellung von Forschung. Begutachtung und Beweiswert. Heidelberg: Kriminalistik Verlag. Hoffmann, Elisabeth (1989). Nachahmung von gestörten Schriften und ihre Erkennung. In: Wolfgang Conrad & Brigitte Stier: Grundlagen. Methoden und Ergebnisse der forensischen Schriftuntersuchung. Festschrift für Lothar Michel. Lübeck: Schmidt Römhild. Lieblich, Amia; Anat Ninio & Sol Kugelmas (1975). Developmental Trends in the Directionality of Drawing in Jewish and Arab Israeli Children. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 6 (4), pp. 504-511. Mandel, Gabriele (2004). Gemalte Gottesworte. Das arabische Alphabet. Geschichte. Stile und kalligraphische Meisterschulen. Wiesbaden. Matrix Verlag. Michel, Lothar (1982). Gerichtliche Schriftvergleichung. Eine Einführung in Grundlagen. Methoden und Praxis. Berlin. New York: Walter de Gruyter. Nickel, Joe (1996). Detecting Forgery. Forensic Investigation of Documents. Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky. Pfanne, Heinrich (1954). Handschriftenvergleichung für Juristen und Kriminalisten. Lübeck: Schmidl-Römhild. Schlager, Christine (2005). Unpublished expert opinion on the signatures and prints discussed above. Seibt, Angelika (1999). Forensische Schriftvergleichung. Einführung in Methode und Praxis. München: Verlag C.H. Beck. Shanon, Betty (1978). Writing Positions in Americans and Israeli. Neuropsychologia 16, pp. 587-591.

Related topics from HandWritingBiblio Michel, L. (1971). Echt oder gefälscht - wie gut kennen wir unsere eigene Unterschrift. Mannheimer Berichte. 2. 25-27. Michel, L. (1969). Schriftvergleichung. In: Sieverts, R. (Hrsg.). Handwörterbuch der Kriminologie. Bd. III. Berlin: de Gruyter. 93-105.

22


Graphologisches Gutachten

Handschriftendiagnostik

ASPEK TE AUS LOC KOWANDT S AR TIKEL „DER PROZEß D E R U R T E I L S B I L D U N G I N D E R S C H R I F T P S YC H O LO G I E “ von Claudia Caspers

In der „Zeitschrift für Menschenkunde“, 37. Jahrgang, Heft 3/1973, S. 135-154, greift der Schriftpsychologe Oskar Lockowandt drei Fragen (S. 135) seiner damaligen Studenten auf: 1. „Wie sind Sie eigentlich zu dieser Aussage gekommen?“ 2. „Warum haben Sie jetzt gerade diesen Eigenschaftsbegriff verwendet?“ 3. „Mit welcher Begründung verteidigen Sie diese Passage in Ihrem Gutachten?“ Auf den Folgeseiten legt Lockowandt seine Beantwortung der Frage, „wie ein Schriftpsychologe zu seinem abschließenden Urteil über einen Menschen (…) kommt“ dar, da ihn das Thema schon seit geraumer Zeit beschäftige, „genau genommen seit dem Beginn meines Psychologie-Studiums. Ich war stets sehr beeindruckt von den Gutachterleistungen, die in unseren praktischen Übungen erbracht wurden. Besonders überzeugt hat mich ein Gutachten, das ein Examenskandidat über eine Handschriftprobe des 28-jährigen Hitler verfaßt hatte (Heiss, 1955). Die diagnostischen Aussagen über diese Person, die der Gutachter in einem Blindgutachten vorgelegt hatte, schienen mir so stimmig und treffend, daß ich fortan ein Interesse entwickelte, den in psychodiagnostisch tätigen Gutachtern ablaufenden verschiedenen Denkprozessen und Gefühlsverläufen auf die Spur zu kommen“ (S. 135). Auf die „völlig falsche Antwort“ geht Lockowandt nicht ein, nämlich, dass graphische Zeichen bestimmte „Deuterelationen“ haben, „die man in Lehrbüchern nachschaut und die man dann in einer spezifischen Auswahl im Gutachten nacheinander aufreiht“ (S. 136). Vielmehr greift Lockowandt drei Punkte, zusammengefasst in Abbildung 1, bei der Beantwortung der Fragen nach dem Prozess der Urteilsbildung in der Schriftpsychologie auf. Dabei zeigt er, dass dieser Prozess ein weitaus „komplizierterer Vorgang“ (S. 136) ist und weit entfernt von der zuvor vereinfachten, unzutreffenden Auffassung. Zu jedem der in Abbildung 1 genannten Punkte werden nachfolgend einige zentrale, weiterhin gültige Aspekte näher beleuchtet werden und mit Zitaten des Autors belegt.

23


Urteilsprozess als kognitive Zeitgestalt

Urteilsbildung in der Schriftpsychologie

Gestaltpsychologische Beschreibung und Erklärung der Urteilsbildung

Denkpsychologische Analyse exemplarischer Gutachtenaussagen Abb. 1: Aspekte der Urteilsbildung in der Schriftpsychologie nach Lockowandt

Urteilsprozess als kognitive Zeitgestalt (S. 136/137) „Der zu untersuchende Arbeitsvorgang hat zwei deutlich erkennbare Grenzen. Er läßt sich daher ohne Mühe als eine zusammenhängende kognitive Zeitgestalt aus dem strukturellen Gesamt des Gutachterdenkens herausheben. In gestaltpsychologischer Terminologie handelt es sich bei der Urteilsbildung um eine mediale Sukzession (vermittelnde Folge), ‚bei welcher durch ein zeitlich ausgedehntes Geschehen, einen Vorgang, ein Gegenstand (ein statisches bzw. simultanes Endgebilde) entsteht, seinen Bestand erweitert, ergänzt, zusätzliche Teile hinzugewinnt‘ (Metzger, 1966). Sie beginnt mit dem Auftrag des Klienten, der für den Gutachter zugleich die Konfrontation mit einem Problem darstellt, und findet ihr allerdings bisweilen nur vorläufiges Ende in der endgültigen Formulierung des Gutachtens.“ Das Prozess des Gutachtenschreibens fängt mit dem Auftrag des Klienten an und endet nicht einfach mit der endgültigen Formulierung des Gutachtens, sondern mit „schriftlich oder mündlich mitgeteilten Gutachten“ und/oder „späteren Rückfragen des Klienten, die eine Erweiterung oder eine intensive Interpretation des Gutachtens notwendig machen“. Zwischen diesen zwei Zeitpunkten läuft ständig eine kognitive Analyse. Denkpsychologische Analyse exemplarischer Gutachtenaussagen (S. 137-140) Lockowandt benennt die fünf primären Einzeloperationen des Denkprozesses, die ein schriftpsychologischer Gutachter verwendet: a. Transposition im Sinne einer „Attributionsanalogie“ als „unmittelbare Übertragung einer Kennzeichnung der Schrift auf die Persönlichkeitseigenschaft“ (S. 137). Darunter fallen alle Eindruckscharaktere, die auf die Persönlichkeit übertragen werden. „Wenn wir annehmen, dass die diagnostische Arbeit die Erkenntnis einer Eigenschaftsstruktur anstrebt, dann erreicht der Gutachter dieses Ziel dadurch, dass er den schriftbeschreibenden Begriff auf psychische Eigenschaft überträgt.“ (…) Die Merkmal-Eigenschaft-Relation wird dabei ‚kurzgeschlossen‘“ (S. 137). b. Differenzierung auf der Ebene des Schriftmerkmals sowie der Persönlichkeitseigenschaften. Dabei handelt es sich um eine genaue Beschreibung der Schriftmerkmalsvarianten in einer Handschrift (z. B. primär linksläufige Hinzufügungen in Form von Einrollungen in der Oberzone und teilweise links24


läufige Einrollungen in der Mittelzone). Die Differenzierung bei Persönlichkeitseigenschaften dient der genaueren Bestimmung und ist „stets explikativ und nicht pleonastisch“, d. h. erklärend und ohne überflüssige Mehrfachnennungen (S. 138). Mit der Differenzierung bildet man Schwerpunkte. Des Weiteren „aber wird auch durch die Anhäufung von weiteren Merkmalsbeziehungen, wie sie bei der Differenzierung zu finden ist, die Beweislast für das gesamte Gutachten erhöht“ (S. 138). In der Antike hieß diese Denkfigur „physiognomischer Syllogismus“ (S. 138). c. Negationen haben die Funktion, zu beschreiben, welche Merkmale und Eigenschaften der Handschrift bzw. dem Schreiber nicht zukommen und setzen ein „dynamisches Persönlichkeitsmodell“ und ein vergleichendes Denkschema voraus (S. 139). Bei Michon, Pophal, Heiss und Wittlich werden Negationen auch „Gegendominanten, Kontrastmerkmale, Gegenmerkmale, Polaritäten“ (S. 139) genannt. „Die Negation setzt ein dynamisches Persönlichkeitsmodell voraus und unterliegt dem Umschlag von Quantität und Qualität. Von zwei Eigenschaften kann nämlich die eine so weitgehend die Persönlichkeit bestimmen, dass die andere mit Sicherheit ausgeschlossen werden muß.“ (S. 139). d. Bei der Denkfigur der Konvergenz (lateinisch convergere „sich annähern“) wird ein Schriftmerkmal genommen, dessen Bedeutung einem anderen bzw. anderen Schriftmerkmalen entspricht. Die Bedeutungszusammenhänge und Gewichte, welche im Rahmen der Differenzierung ausgearbeitet wurden, sind hierbei zu beachten. „Diese Denkfigur setzt unterschiedliche Grade der Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Erkenntnis voraus. Die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Aussage erhöht sich in dem Maße, wie konvergierende Hinweise für sie beigebracht werden können.“ (S. 139). e. Durch die in d) erfolgte Kombination von Merkmalen, die sich gegenseitig verstärken und abstützen, aber auch durch Differenzierungen bzw. Gewichtungen, „die Wirkungszusammenhänge“ und „Ableitungsverhältnisse der einzelnen psychischen Bereiche“ (S. 140) entsteht eine Strukturierung des Gutachtens. Diese Einzeloperationen sind oft „nicht so präzise voneinander (zu) trennen, worin ein Hinweis auf ein vorweg gegebenes ganzheitliches Denkgeschehen liegt“ (S. 141). Darauf geht Lockowandt im Abschnitt „Gestaltpsychologische Beschreibung und Erklärung der Urteilsbildung“ (S. 141-144) ein und schreibt: „Bisher habe ich Detailvorgänge des Prozesses der Urteilsbildung beschrieben. Sie sind in jedem Gutachten regelmäßig anzutreffen. Die Anzahl ist natürlich nicht vollständig, aber es sind doch die hauptsächlichsten Teiloperationen, die zu einer jeden Gutachtenerstellung notwendig sind. Ihre isolierte Darstellung mutet künstlich an, denn sie sind eigentlich Glieder und Komponenten eines Denkverlaufs, der sich in der Wirklichkeit des praktischen Alltags als ein dynamisches Ganzes manifestiert und der immer mehr ist als die Summe seiner Teiloperationen. Auch lassen sich die einzelnen Teiloperationen nicht so präzise voneinander trennen, worin ein Hinweis auf ein vorweg gegebenes ganzheitliches Denkgeschehen liegt. Es ist daher notwendig, jetzt noch einmal auszuholen und den lebendigen Denkverlauf erneut in den Blick zu nehmen, jetzt allerdings in seiner komplexen Gestalt im aktuellen Vollzug. Jetzt sind die Teiloperationen nur Glieder eines zusammenhängenden Ganzen. 25


Die Urteilsfindung in der Diagnose ist ein Fall von Problemlösung. Bei ihr werden Teilinformationen über einen Menschen derart zusammengefügt, daß sie eine approximative Struktur ergeben. Es ist also ein komplizierter Ordnungsprozess, in dem diese Teilinformationen nicht additiv im Sinne einer ‚und- Summe‘ nebeneinander gestellt, sondern vielmehr zentriert werden. Wenn man die Diagnosefindung in dieser Weise als einen Fall von Problemlösungsverhalten definiert, so wie Thorne (1961) das klinische Urteil überhaupt bestimmt, dann besteht die Hauptleistung des Urteilenden in der Tat in der Gewichtung der Daten, der Abschätzung ihrer jeweiligen funktionalen Bedeutung im Ganzen und gegebenenfalls in der gänzlichen Reorganisation der rahmenhaft entworfenen Struktur im Lichte einer neuen Entdeckung, das heißt, sie besteht in einer kontinuierlichen Zentrierung und Umzentrierung des Informationsmaterials. Denn Zentrierung ist als wichtiger denkpsychologischer Faktor ‚die Art und Weise, wie man die Teile, die Einzelheiten in einer Situation, ihre Bedeutung und Rolle als bestimmt im Hinblick auf einen Schwerpunkt, einen Kern oder eine Wurzel erfaßt‘ (Wertheimer).“ Nachdem Lockowandt den Prozess der Urteilsbildung mit den hauptsächlichen Einzeloperationen und in seiner komplexen, ganzheitlichen Gestalt dargestellt hat, widmet er sich dem „Stellenwert dieses Urteilsprozesses in der psychodiagnostischen Methodenlehre“ (S. 144-150). Hier unterschiedet er drei Theorien der Urteilsbildung: a. These von der Erkenntnis durch natürliche Zeichen als Basis der klinischen Urteilsbildung, die auf den Philosophen Thomas Reid (1785) zurückgeht, der davon ausging, dass das Verständnis der Gedanken und Gefühle anderer Menschen nicht durch sinnliche Erfahrung, sondern durch eine unmittelbare „primäre Erkenntnisquelle“ (S. 145) vermittelt wird. „Wir erkennen den anderen durch natürliche Zeichen (natural signs), deren Sinn wir auf intuitivem Wege verstehen“ (S. 145). Diese These „bildete die Basis für die Verstehenspsychologie sowohl in ihrer radikalen Form wie bei Dilthey und Spranger wie auch in ihrer gemäßigten Form wie bei Stern. Sie begründete zugleich die Theorie vom natürlichen Ausdrucksverstehen bei Bell, Piderit, Darwin und auch bei Klages. (…) Diesen Standpunkt hat Klages auch für die Schriftpsychologie verbindlich gemacht, und er hat sie dadurch in eine Richtung gedrängt, die für ihr weiteres Schicksal von großem Nachteil war. Die Handschriftanalyse ist nämlich keineswegs nur eine ausdruckspsychologische Methode, sondern sie ist auch ein psychodiagnostisches Instrument, weil sie, wie Kirchhoff es treffend ausgedrückt hat, ein personabgelöstes ergon ist (…)“ (S. 145/146). b. Pieter B. Bierkens (1968) bringt das „informale Folgern“ ins Spiel, bei dem der Psychodiagnostiker aus einer Vielzahl von konvergierenden Hinweisen auf eine „geringe Anzahl von Dispositionen“ (S. 147) reduziert. Dies ist vergleichbar mit dem Sammeln von Indizien, aus denen am Ende ein (personenabgelöstes) Urteil folgt. Heiss bezeichnet es als „mittelbares Verstehen“. c. Die „statistische Urteilsbildung“ stammt von

26


„den Amerikanern Sarbin, Taft und Bailey (1960) und ist auf dem Boden des Neopositivismus entstanden. Diese philosophische Richtung des sogenannten Wiener Kreises (…) hatte alle philosophische Erkenntnis aus zwei Gründen kritisiert: sie verwendet eine Sprache, die zwar ästhetisch schön ist, aber sinnleer bleibt; zum anderen findet nie eine Nachprüfung ihrer Ergebnisse statt, die auf subjektivem Wege gefunden wurden; bloßes Evidenzgefühl ist für sie noch kein Beweis. Erkenntniskritik ist für sie Sprachkritik und Evidenzkritik (empiristisches Sinnkriterium oder Verifikationsprinzip). Sie bildete die Grundlage für den Behaviorismus und Neobehaviorismus, der die Bewußtseinstatsachen folgerichtig nur in der Form ihrer wahrnehmbaren Korrelate zu erforschen trachtete und Bewußtsein mit dem Verhalten identifizierte“ (S. 147). Die Schriftpsychologie verortete sich traditionell im erkenntnistheoretischen Modell der „Erkenntnis durch natürliche Zeichen“ (S. 149). Mit Pophals „Psychophysiologie der Spannungserscheinungen in der Handschrift“, das Klages mit Unmut erfüllte, entwickelte sich das „mittelbare Verstehen“ als erkenntnistheoretisches Modell (S. 149). Mit diesen beiden Modellen kann man zwar am Prozess der schriftpsychologischen Urteilsbildung teilnehmen, allerdings steht dann noch der Beweis aus, ob ein Urteil auch wirklich zutreffend ist. Um behaupten zu können, ein Urteil sei zutreffend, muss nämlich ein entsprechendes Kriterium angeben, aufgrund dessen man ein Urteil als zutreffend bezeichnen kann. Dieses Kriterium ist in der Psychodiagnostik das „richtig vorausgesagte Verhalten“. „Naturwissenschaftlich formuliert: Erklärung ist richtige Prognose. Schließlich wäre noch zu erwähnen, daß jedes Urteil nur eine mehr oder weniger wahrscheinliche Aussage ist (…)“ (S. 149). Lockowandt war 1973 der Ansicht, dass sich die Schriftpsychologie dem Anspruch des dritten erkenntnistheoretischen Modells, der statistischen Urteilsbildung, die dem Boden des Neopositivismus entspringe, nicht entziehen könne, allerdings habe er „immer den Eindruck gehabt, daß die Schriftpsychologie sich dieser Auseinandersetzung mit der neopositivistischen und neobehavioristischen Erkenntniskritik nicht stellen wollte. Warum wagen wir nicht zu sagen, daß es sicherlich auch Gutachten gibt, die zwar sprachlich elegant formuliert, aber sinnleer sind und die keiner Nachprüfung standhalten würden? Warum wagen wir nicht zu sagen, daß es dieses Problem bei uns gibt, daß wir aber auf dem besten Wege sind, es zu lösen und zwar in einer auch diesen wissenschaftlichen Ansprüchen zureichenden Form (Graphometrie)“ (S. 147)? Die gute Nachricht: Fast 46 Jahre später hat die Schriftpsychologie die historisch bedingte „Feldbeschränkung“ aufgehoben und im Rahmen diverser Untersuchungen in den letzten Jahren begonnen, zu überprüfen, ob ihre Urteile auch wirklich zutreffend sind. Vergleiche hierzu:

• http://www.schriftanalyse-validierung.info/de/completed.php • http://graphologie-news.net/cms/upload/archiv/Computerunterstuetzte_Graphologie_mit__GraphoPro.pdf

• http://graphologie-news.net/cms/upload/archiv/Untersuchung_zur_Validitaet_der_Graphologie.pdf

27


Für alle, die immer noch der Ansicht sind, dass es hinreichend sei, sich ohne statistische Urteilsbildung auf die Aussagen eines erfahrenen Schriftpsychologen mit seinen subjektiven Beobachtungen und seiner gut ausgeprägten Intuition zu verlassen, dem sei die Lektüre des Buches „Schnelles Denken, langsames Denken“ von Daniel Kahnemann empfohlen: Auch die erfahrensten Experten sind nicht vor kognitiven Verzerrungen und schwerwiegenden systematischen Fehlern gefeit.

Referenzen Bierkens, P. B. (1968). Die Urteilsbildung in der Psychodiagnostik. München: Barth. Heiss, R. (1964). Technik, Methodik und Problematik des Gutachtens. In: Heiss, R. (Hrsg.): Psychologische Diagnostik. Handbuch der Psychologie. Band 6. Göttingen: Hogrefe. Kahneman, D. (2012). Schnelles Denken, langsames Denken. München: Siedler. Metzger, W. (1966). Figural-Wahrnehmung. In: Metzger, W. (Hrsg.) (1966): Allgemeine Psychologie. Handbuch der Psychologie, Band 1: Der Aufbau des Erkennens. 1. Halbband: Wahrnehmung und Bewußtsein. Göttingen: Hogrefe. Thorne, F. C. (1961). Clinical judgement. A study of clinical errors. Brandon: Vermont.

Hinweis der Redaktion Der vollständige Text von Oskar Lockowandt ist in HandWritingBiblio gescannt einsehbar.

Verwandte Themen aus der HandWritingBiblio Daul, H. (1966). Das Deuten in der Graphologie. Eine methodologische Untersuchung der Struktur und Prinzipien graphologisch-diagnostischer Interpretation. (Dissertation). Universität Heidelberg, Deutschland. Pohl, U. (1936). Experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Typologie graphologischer Beurteilung. (Diss). Universität Göttingen, Deutschland. Wallner, T. (1972). Die grundlegenden Arbeitshypothesen der Schriftpsychologie und ihre Verifikation. Zeitschrift für experimentelle und angewandte Psychologie, 19, 517-528.

28


Schreibunterricht

Schreibmotorik

SCHREIBEN LEHREN IN DER ERSTEN GRUNDSCHULKLASSE von Katja Rehm

Ortrud Deuser, Volksschullehrerin, hat bei Frau Ilse Scholl Graphologie gelernt. Im September 1973 reichte sie ihre Prüfungsarbeit zur „Erlangung des Graphologischen Diploms der Schule Hirsau“ ein. Ihr Wahlthema: Kind und Schrift. Zum Problem des Schreibenlernens. Ihre Arbeit umfasst über 40 Seiten. Wesentliche Punkte, die mir wichtig und für die heutige Zeit interessant erscheinen, gebe ich hier verkürzt wieder. Das Schreiben zu lehren ist ein viel diskutiertes Thema, das aktuell ist, seit es die allgemeine Schulpflicht gibt. Kind und Schrift. Zum Problem des Schreibenlernens Ein Kind wird Anbeginn seiner Entwicklung begleitet von den Forderungen der Kultur, in die es hineinwächst. Das Kind entfaltet ungehemmte Dynamik, Kultur hingegen verlangt Anpassung und Zügelung. Bei Schulbeginn stehen die Entwicklung von Konzentration und Disziplin im Vordergrund. Sachbezogene, bewußt gestaltete Sprache, das konsequente Erfüllen von Aufgaben, sowie der Umgang mit Schrift stehen im Fokus. Die Schrift ist ein Produkt der Kultur, sie ermöglicht Verständigung, wenn sie korrekt und vernünftig angewendet wird. Ein Kind ist noch wenig vom Verstand gesteuert, seine Dynamik speist sich aus Stimmungen und spontanem Bewegungsausdruck. Das Schreibenlernen bedeutet, die ungesteuerte Bewegung in eine geführte Bewegung zu lenken und objektive Formen nachzugestalten. Die Lehrmethode ist hier von entscheidender Bedeutung. Häufig wird das Kind nur aufgefordert, sich zu bemühen, eine Form nachzumalen. Das kann mitunter sehr schwer sein, da Feinmotorik und Konzentration noch schwach ausgebildet sind. Wenn sich das Kind nun verkrampft, um „schön zu schreiben“, betrifft dies meist nicht nur die Hand, sondern die ganze Person. Viele Kinder können sich nur kurzfristig konzentrieren, sie möchten aber Leistung zeigen. Durch die ungewohnte Anstrengung weicht ihre Schrift mehr und mehr von der Vorlage ab, wirkt verwildert, und ein chaotisches Schriftbild entsteht. Angestrebt wird eine Schrift, die nicht einfach nachahmt, sondern aus innerem Wunsch und Können so und nicht anders gestaltet wird. Die Schrift als Bewegungsgestalt wird angestrebt. Anregungen für den Schreibunterricht Aus dem Feld der rhythmisch-musikalischen Erziehung erhielt Frau Deuser Anregungen. Autoren waren u.a. Amelie Hoellering und Hildegard Tauscher. Diese Erziehung geht davon aus, dass Bewegung eine Brücke ist zwischen Körper und Geist, Eindruck bewirkt Ausdruck. Erlebtes wird ausgedrückt in Bewegung, Mimik, Stimme, Wort, Schreiben. Sie ist eine umfassende Erziehung, die im Menschen angelegte Kräfte lösen und aktivieren möchte, sie führt zum sozialen Handeln und freien Einordnen. Hier kommt die „Schreibbewegungstherapie“ von Magdalene Heermann ins Spiel. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ihre Methode recht ausführlich beschrieben und die konkreten Anwendungen werden vorge29


stellt. Gesteuerte Expansivität, intensive Rhythmisierung und selbst gesteuerte Bewegung sind die lustvoll motivierenden Kräfte, die zum Lernen von Formen und Abläufen herausfordern. Die ersten zwei Monate des ersten Schuljahres benutzte die Autorin großformatige Makulaturblätter und breite Filzstifte, mit denen zwanglos Schwünge (vgl. Abb. 1) gestaltet wurden. So wird der Eigenrhythmus gefunden, spielerisch locker werden Formen erprobt.

ABB. 1: BEISPIEL FÜR „SCHWÜNGE“

Im Turnunterricht spielte der Rhythmus eine tragende Rolle, es wurde getrommelt, improvisiert und rhythmisch gesprochen. Die Bewegungsdynamik eines Zeichens bzw. Buchstabens stand im Mittelpunkt, in der Luft geschwungen, großförmig auf Papier immer wieder übermalt. So wurden anfangs ängstliche Kinder lockerer und konnten sich der Form mit Freude und innerer Beteiligung widmen.

ABB. 2: BEISPIEL FÜR FORMDIFFERENZIERUNG DURCH „RHY THMISIERUNG“

Nach etwa 6 Wochen begannen die Schüler die Formen allmählich zu differenzieren und den Buchstabengestalten anzunähern (vgl. Abb. 2), sie entstanden leicht rechtsschräg und immer häufiger auch weniger raumgreifend. Die großformatigen Blätter wurden z. B. durch Faltung viergeteilt und so Bewegung und Form unmerklich eingegrenzt. Einführung der Schreibschrift Nach zwei Monaten ging Frau Deuser zum Schreiben in Querformat mit Filzstiften in großer einfacher Lineatur über. Jetzt wurden die Kinder mit einer Lineatur konfrontiert, auf die sie jedoch nicht besonders aufmerksam gemacht wurden. Sie sollten zwischen den Linien schreiben. Das Makulaturpapier war noch immer in Gebrauch, vor allem zum Üben der etwas schwierigeren Formen. Die Bewegungsgrundgestalten waren nun bekannt, und der Schwierigkeitsgrad steigerte sich langsam. Arkaden bremsen den Schreibfluss und kamen erst später dazu. Die Buchstaben a, g, d, c, o sind ebenfalls nicht einfach, weil die Schreibbewegung in der gleichen Spur zurücklaufen muss (vgl. Abb. 3). Allmählich waren alle Buchstaben bekannt, und nach kürzeren und längeren Wörtern kamen Texte dazu. Das Aneinanderreihen von Buchstaben erforderte eine erhöhte Konzentration auf die Formgestalt. 30


Die Schreibentwicklung verlief mühelos, und die Eltern, die zum Teil etwas skeptisch waren wegen der langen Zeit des lockeren Kreiselns, waren beeindruckt von der guten Entwicklung zu einer geläufigen, individuellen Schrift. Schluss und Erfahrungsbericht Erstaunlich war, so schreibt die Autorin, die Verschiedenartigkeit der Kinderhandschriften ihrer ersten Klasse. Sie selbst schrieb eine eher gleichbleibende Tafelschrift, die weitgehend der Schriftvorlage entsprach. Schreiberziehung derart angewandt, kann dazu beitragen, die Kinder zu einer eigenständigen Persönlichkeitsentwicklung zu führen. Schrift ist keine leere Form, sondern sie kann Kraft ihrer Formen ein Mittel zur Gestaltung und Ausprägung eigener Kräfte bedeuten.

ABB. 3: BEISPIEL EINES ENT WICKLUNGSVERL AUFS „SCHREIBBEWEGUNGS THERAPIE“

Bibliographie (Auswahl) Feudel, Elfriede (1963): Dynamische Pädagogik. Eine elementare Anleitung für rhythmische Erziehung in der Schule. Mit vielen Zeichnungen. Freiburg i. Br., Basel, Wien: Herder. Hippius-Dürckheim, Maria (1936): Graphischer Ausdruck von Gefühlen. Universität Leipzig, Diss. Hoellering, Amélie (1968): Zur Theorie und Praxis der rhythmischen Erziehung. Ein Grundlehrgang für Heilpädagogen und Erzieher. Berlin-Charlottenburg: Marhold. Müller, Lotte (1953): Schreiberziehung pädagogisch und graphologisch betrachtet. Bad Heilbrunn/Obb.: Klinkhardt. Pulver, Max (1931): Symbolik der Handschrift. Zürich: Orell Füssli. Tauscher, Hildegard (Hrsg.) (1967): Die rhythmisch-musikalische Erziehung in der Heilpädagogik. Berlin-Charlottenburg: Marhold. Weinert, F., Simons, H., Essing, W. (1966): Schreiblehrmethode und Schreibentwicklung: Eine empirische Untersuchung über einige Auswirkungen verschiedener Lehrmethoden des Erstschreibunterrichts auf die Entwicklung des Schreibens im Grundschulalter. Weinheim/Bergstr.: Beltz.

31


Verwandte Themen aus der HandWritingBiblio Becker, Minna (1949): Graphologie der Kinderschrift. Hamburg: Ellermann. Dostal, Karl A. (1956): Schreiberziehung: Theorie und Praxis des Schreibunterrichtes. Wunsiedel, Wels, Zürich: Leitner. Heermann, Magdalene (1965): Schreibbewegungstherapie für entwicklungsgestörte und neurotische Kinder und Jugendliche. Bielefeld: Gieseking. Muth, J., Reinartz, A. (1980). Probleme des Schreibenlernens. Selbstverlag Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

32


Imprint

IMPRINT

Impressum

IMPRESSUM

ISSN 2628-0515

Redaktionsadresse & Verantwortlicher Herausgeber

Editorial address & responsible publisher

Claudia Caspers⎟ Wotanstraße 86⎟ 80639 München⎟ Germany

Mail an die Redaktion

Email to the editors

contact@handwritingbiblio.info

Das ist die Redaktion und für das sind wir verantwortlich This is the editorial office and that is what we are responsible for Claudia Caspers: Redaktionsleitung, Autorin und Pflege des Archivs HandWritingBiblio⎟ Editor, author and maintenance of the HandWritingBiblio archive Rosemarie Gosemärker: Stellvertretende Redaktionsleitung, Autorin sowie Pflege des Archivs HandWritingBiblio⎟ Alternate editor, author and maintenance of the HandWritingBiblio archive Heike Szczendzina: Korrektorin für deutschsprachige Artikel⎟ Proofreader for German articles Dr. Yury Chernov: Autor mit Schwerpunkt russisch- und englischsprachige Artikel, Pflege des Archivs HandWritingBiblio und Korrespondenz Schweiz⎟ Author with focus on Russian and English articles, maintenance of the archive HandWritingBiblio and correspondence Switzerland Katja Rehm: Autorin mit Schwerpunkt „Handschrift lernen und pflegen“ und Korrespondenz Deutschland⎟ Author with focus on "Learning and Maintaining Handwriting" and Correspondence Germany Dr. Marianne Nürnberger: Autorin mit Schwerpunkt „Schriftvergleichung“ und Korrespondenz Österreich⎟ Author with focus on "Forensic Handwriting Analysis" and Correspondence Austria Martin Hastings: Korrektor englischsprachige Artikel, Korrespondenz Großbritannien⎟ Proofreader English Articles, Correspondence Great Britain Shaike Landau: Pflege des Archivs HandWritingBiblio und Korrespondenz Israel⎟ Maintenance of the HandWritingBiblio archive and correspondence Israel

Design, Instandhaltung und technische Betreuung des Journals und der Website Design, maintenance and technical support of the journal and the website Claudia Caspers Dr. Yury Chernov

33

Profile for Aspects of Handwriting

Aspects of Handwriting. Historical, current and scientific publications on handwriting⎟issue 1  

Topics in issue 1: Article on background and practical details of the project "HandWritingBiblio", an online bibliography with a unique sele...

Aspects of Handwriting. Historical, current and scientific publications on handwriting⎟issue 1  

Topics in issue 1: Article on background and practical details of the project "HandWritingBiblio", an online bibliography with a unique sele...