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magazine

asian avenue Connecting Cultures Linking Lives

May 2016 Volume 11 Issue 5

Restaurant Peek

Sushi Mango

2016 Asian American

Heroes of Colorado

Robot

Revolution

exhibit IN DENVER

John Yee

The Unflagging Interpreter of the Flying Tigers


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Happy Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM)! In 1990, George H.W. Bush signed a bill passed by Congress to extend Asian-American Heritage Week to all of May! This is a special month for our community as we celebrate the significant contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Congratulations to the honorees of the 2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado awards: Ramina Kashani, Eun Moredock, Giselle Rushford, Lily Shen, Pam Sweetser; and Bryan Yee who received the Young Hero award. Read more about them and join us at Empress Seafood on June 11 to celebrate the great work they have been doing across Colorado. With the theme of heroism, learn more about how to become your own superhero as well as tips on how to fit a quick workout into the busy hero’s day. In this issue, we also celebrate the 2011 Asian American Hero of Colorado Lifetime Achievement Award recipient John Yee, “The Unflagging Interpreter of the Flying Tigers.” John, a good friend of Asian Avenue magazine, is also a lifelong teacher at the age of 95. We share our sincerest condolences to the family and friends of Jim Hada who passed away peacefully in March. Jim dedicated his life to public service in benefit of the Japanese American community through his involvement and leadership in civic organizations, such as Japanese American Association of Colorado and Japanese American Citizen’s League. He was honored as an Asian American Hero of Colorado in 2009 - an incredible hero to us all! Annie Guo, President Asian Avenue magazine | www.asianavemag.com | aguo@asianavemag.com Editor’s Note: We apologize for this error printed in the March 2016 issue of Asian Avenue magazine. Correction from Book Review, A Kim Jong-Il Production By Paul Fischer: Before he became leader, Kim Jong-Il was the movie-obsessed head of North Korea’s Ministry for Propaganda. Frustrated by the lack of talent for the movie he wanted to make, Kim decided to change that in 1978 by kidnapping the leading South Korean Dictator Director, Shin Sang-Ok, and his ex-wife, the most famous South Korean actress, Choi Eun-hee.

asian avenue magazine

staff & support Publisher & Founder: Christina Yutai Guo President: Annie Guo Editorial and Marketing Manager: Sarah Shirazi Senior Designer: C.G. Yao Graphic Designer/Photographer: Anastasia Yagolnik Copy Editor: Jaime Marston Cook Staff Writer: Patricia Kaowthumrong Staff Writer: Mary Jeneverre Schultz Staff Writer: Brenda Velasquez Marketing Coordinator: Chun Guo Marketing Coordinator: Mai Choua Lee Photographer: Trang Luong Intern: Akemi Tsutsui

advisors group General Counsel: Michael C. Song Patty Coutts, Donna LaVigne, Nestor J. Mercado, Sum C. Nguyen, Alok Sarwal, Tom Shieh, John Yee, Nai-Li Yee, George N. Yoshida

contributing writers Tony Huynh, Jules Nadeau, Alok Sarwal, Tom Shieh

contributing photographers Annick Nadeau, Alok Sarwal, Dao Than, Mimi Tu

on the cover Congratulations to the 2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado (left to right): Ramina Kashani, Lily Shen, Giselle Rushford, Pam Sweetser, and Bryan Yee. Not pictured: Eun Moredock. Photo by Dao Than.

subscriptions

To subscribe, e-mail info@asianavemag.com or visit asianavemag.com/subscribe. A oneyear subscription is $25 for 12 issues, a two-year subscription is 40 for 24 issues. Please make checks or money orders payable to Asian Avenue magazine. For details about special corporate or group rates, please call during business hours: Monday - Friday, 9am to 5pm. Shipping/handling included.

advertising Asian Avenue magazine offers businesses the most cost-effective way to reach consumers in the Denver/Boulder metro areas and beyond. For more information, call during business hours or e-mail us at marketing@asianavemag.com for our media kit and ad rates.

editorial To submit story ideas, letters to the editor or calendar events, e-mail info@asianavemag.com. Asian Avenue magazine (ISSN 1932-1449) reserves all copyrights to this issue. No parts of this edition can be reproduced in any manner without written permission. The views expressed in articles are the authors’ and not necessarily those of Asian Avenue magazine. Authors may have consulting or other business relationships with the companies they discuss.

Published by Asian Avenue Magazine, Inc. P.O. Box 221748 Denver, CO 80222-1748 Tel: 303.937.6888 | info@asianavemag.com

www.asianavemag.com Asian Avenue magazine is in association with the Colorado Asian Culture and Education Network.

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May 2016 | President’s Note


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contents 10

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DENVER EXHIBIT: Robot Revolution opens at DMNS Robot Revolution explores how robots will ultimately be our companions and colleagues, changing how we play, live and work together. The exhibition at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science takes guests into a visionary world where robots are not just a curiosity but a vital asset.

other other funding: funding:

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NOW OPEN

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Cover: 2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado Celebrating the eighth annual Asian American Heroes of Colorado Awards, the Colorado Asian Culture and Education Network congratulates this year’s deserving community leaders in May, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.

Other funding provided by RACO Industrial, Theexhibit David Bohnett designed andand developed by: by: presented in by: exhibit designed developed presented in Denver Denver by: Foundation, The Kaplan Foundation and official airline United Airlines. additional additional major major support: support:

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May 2016 | Table of Contents

exhibit exhibit designed designed and and developed developed by: by:

Restaurant Peek: Sushi Mango Highlands Ranch’s newly remodeled Sushi Mango now has a more spacious dining room, in addition to an outdoor patio, a full bar, and a sleek water fountain. Sushi chef Ray Hoang has over 35 years of experience and is living his dream of operating his very own sushi restaurant alongside his partner, Anh.

exhibit designed and developed by:

presented in Denver by:

EVENT CALENDAR

FEATURE May is water safety month! Read about these helpful tips provided by Water World

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BOOK REVIEW Beijing Bastard: Into the Wilds of a Changing China

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BETTER LIVING Making Time for Exercise in the Life of a Busy Hero by The Fit Asian

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5 Tips to Becoming Your Own Super Hero by Tom Shieh

THEATRE ESPIRIT ASIA Theatre Espirit Asia presents a new production, Animals Out of Paper by Rajiv Joseph

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HEALTH Colorado Alliance for Health Equity and Practice (CAHEP): A credible provider of women’s wellness services

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exhibit exhibit designed designed and and developed developed by: by:

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additional additional major major support: support:

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official airline: official airline:

presented presented inin Denver Denver by: by:

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SPECIAL Feature: John Yee The Unflagging Interpreter of the Flying Tigers 95-year-old John Yee is described as: “John Yee was with the famous Flying Tigers during World War II, not as a pilot but as an interpreter. He became a professor here at Metropolitan State University in Denver. He loves to talk.”

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additional additional major major support: support:

additional additional major major support: support:

Inside Story: Meet Dr. Jeong of Envision Eye Care in Aurora As an optometrist, Dr. Jeong feels passionate about providing not just eye care, but the best eye care “experience.” Her focus at Envision Eye Care is to offer the best patient experience with the guiding philosophy that everyone has the right to better health, vision and style.

Asian Avenue Magazine, Inc. P.O. Box 221748 Denver, CO 80222-1748

Tel: 303.937.6888 Email: info@asianavemag.com

www.asianavemag.com

Find us @AsianAveMag

#AsianAveMag


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NOW OPEN

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official official airline: airline:

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Other funding provided by RACO Industrial, Theexhibit David Bohnett designed andand developed by: by: presented in by: exhibit designed developed presented in Denver Denver by: Foundation, The Kaplan Foundation and official airline United Airlines. additional additional major major support: support: additional major support: additional major support:

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u


events upcoming End of Year Celebration and Award Ceremony at CU Denver

new or gently used Japanese items such as tableware, pottery, dolls, art, kimono, textiles, etc.

Awake Mountain: Music & Dance of Bali Monday, May 9, Show begins at 7:30pm

Denver School of the Arts 7111 Montview Blvd, Denver, CO 80220 Cost: Adults $15, Students/seniors $10 Advance tickets are available for purchase at www.tunasmekar.org and by calling 720-504-3655.

Thursday, May 5, 5pm to 7:30pm

Pilgrimage to Amache

University of Colorado Denver 1201 Larimer St, Denver, CO 80204 Cost: Free, RSVP required at tinyurl.com/GeneralEOY or for more info, contact cudenvercasl@gmail.com. Join the CU Denver Asian American Student Services and Council of Asian Student Leaders as they honor graduating students, recognize outstanding student leaders and celebrate the end of a great year! Dinner will be provided. Semi-formal attire.

JARCC’s All Things Japanese Sale Weekend of May 7 - 8, 11am to 4pm

Tamai Tower, Mezzanine 1905 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80202 Cost: Free to attend; 30% of total sales are donated to Japanese American Resource Center of Colorado Contact Gail Ida for more info or to register as a vendor at gailann.ida@gmail.com ($15 per table) Find unique vintage and contemporary Japanese items at great prices just in time for Mother’s Day. For sellers, this is a great opportunity to sell your

Presented by the Colorado Dragon Boat Festival organizers, the Colorado Dragon Film Festival opens Friday May 20 at 6:00 p.m. with a Special VIP Opening Night Reception and Screening of Uzumasa Limelight, director Ken Ochiai’s bittersweet tribute to the passing of an era in Japan’s samurai films that also pays tribute to Charlie Chaplin’s classic Limelight. The Special VIP Opening Night will also feature traditional Japanese performances and demonstrations, Japanese food and refreshments. The film is being screened with the support of the Consulate General of Japan at Denver.

Saturday, May 21, 6:30am to 6:30pm

Combining the power of ancient dance forms with the exotic sounds of the Balinese gamelan, Tunas Mekar, sponsored in part by the University of Denver Lamont School of Music, will feature the Colorado premiere of Windha’s piece “Jagra Parwata” (awakening of the mountain) along with the “Oleg Tambulilingan” (courtship dance of the bumblebees) and “Baris” (male warrior dance), plus instrumental pieces performed using the modern Gamelan Semaradana orchestra, unique in that it incorporates multiple musical scales within one orchestra.

Business After Hours Denver Broncos Football Club Thursday, May 19, 5:30pm to 8pm

Sports Authority Field at Mile High, East Club Lounge 1701 Bryant St, Denver, CO 80204 Cost: $10 Register at www.denverbusinessexpo.com. The Denver Broncos Football Club cordially invites members of the minority Chambers of Commerce to a community event. Enjoy forming bridges and connections with local community partners and members. Remarks from the Denver Broncos Football Club, Locker Room Tours and Raffle Prizes. Sponsored by multiple chambers in Colorado. Limited to 50 members per chamber.

Pick up at Simpson United Methodist Church and Tri-State Denver Buddhist Temple Reservations for this bus must be made in advance! Space is limited to 150 for dinner. RSVP to amache2016@gmail.com by May 7 and include the number of guests. Each year friends at the Japanese American Association of Colorado organize a pilgrimage from Denver/Arvada to the Amache Museum and Cemetery site in southern Colorado. Buses will pick up attendees from either Simpson United Methodist Church in Arvada at 6am or Tri-State Denver Buddhist Temple in Denver at 6:30 a.m. Lunch will be at Granada Undivided High School. Dinner and overnight accommodations are also available.

Geisha and Concubines Lecture Wednesday, May 25, 12pm to 1pm

Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building Denver Art Museum

Colorado Dragon Film Festival Friday-Sunday, May 20-22

Cost: Asian Art Association members Free; Students/ Teachers $5; DAM members $7; General Public $10 For more info, call 720-913 -0040 or email blittle@denverartmuseum.org. King Center, Auraria Campus 855 Lawrence Way, Denver, 80204 Tickets available at the King Center Box Office. Cost: Individual films are $10; $6 for children, seniors & students with ID Special Opening Night VIP Reception and Screening is $30 each For the full festival schedule visit: www.cdbf.org/new-film-festival.

Join the Asian Art Association for their noon lecture with Dr. Hiroko Johnson, Professor Emeritus of Japanese Art History, San Diego State University, who will present about the early origins of geisha and the profession’s rise and fall reflecting the growth and decline of the samurai warrior class. Dr. Hiroko Johnson is an art historian specializing in Japanese art history. She specializes in Asian art and brought Japanese culture to her students by taking them on annual study tours to Japan. Upcoming Events | asian avenue magazine

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Meet Dr. Jeong of Envision Eye Care

Q&A with Dr. Jeong AAm: How would your patients describe you? Dr. Jeong: Calm, professional and friendly. AAm: What is your favorite eyeglass brand? Dr. Jeong: MYKITA. They are German, well made and well designed. When it comes to glasses, they need to look good and be comfortable at the same time. The functionality of the glasses is very important. MYKITA’s glasses are sturdy, yet very lightweight, and they fit comfortably on your face. I actually wear MYKITA sunglasses myself. AAm: What do you think is the biggest difficulty for Asian patients? Dr. Jeong: I think language barrier is a big factor when it comes to any medical practice. Medical terminology is not something that is understood by everyone so when the doctor tries to explain things to the patient, some things are just lost in translation and the patient leaves not fully understanding their condition.

5001 S. Parker Rd. #204 Aurora, CO 80015

720-507-7004

http://envision-eyecare.com

I

n October 2015, Dr. Yumi Jeong and her husband JK started Envision Eye Care to provide a different kind of eye care services to people living in culturally diverse Aurora and its neighboring areas (e.g., Denver, Centennial, Greenwood Village, Englewood and Parker). Envision Eye Care offers caring, efficient and affordable luxury in a beautifully modern office so that more people can come and take preventative eye care steps. The guiding philosophy at Envision Eye Care is that everyone has the right to better health, vision and style. As an optometrist, Dr. Jeong feels passionate about providing not just eye care, but the best eye care “experience.” Her focus is all about offering the best patient experience from the moment the patient calls in for an appointment to the completion of the visit. In this process, Dr. Jeong aims to enhance the patient’s vision, health and style.

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May 2016 | Inside Story

Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sunday: Closed Dr. Jeong grew up in Colorado; then lived in many different parts of the U.S. and the world. In 2013, she returned to Colorado to live close to the rest of her family members – and worked as part of a large group practice in the Medical Center of Aurora until she decided to start her own practice, Envision Eye Care in 2015. She earned her undergraduate degree in Biology and Psychology from Boston University and graduated with honors from the Illinois College of Optometry. For more than ten years, she has served as a primary optometrist for several independent, regional and national eye care providers. She is currently a member of the American Optometric Association and Colorado Optometric Association. Living in Aurora, Dr. Jeong loves cooking and traveling with her family, including her two sons, Brandon and Sam. She is also an active member of a local church.

For example, I have a lot of Korean speaking patients who received an eye exam elsewhere but they come in to me to get a second opinion. In that sense, knowing the language and being able to explain things is very important because you want to be able to educate them about their condition, and you want to make sure they understand how to treat their condition. Many of my older Korean patients feel more comfortable visiting me because I can communicate to them in Korean. They often treat me like their granddaughter, [she says smiling]. AAm: Why is it important to offer Asian fit glasses? Dr. Jeong: Asians tend to have wider faces and a lower nose bridge. We offer special Asian fit glasses to cater to Asian faces. Some of my Korean patients go all the way to LA to get special Asian fit glasses, but we offer a wide selection here at Envision Eye Care so they don’t have to travel so far. A lot more of the mainstream brands are coming up with the Asian fit glasses as well. AAm: Why do you want to serve the Asian community? Dr. Jeong: I really didn’t think about this before moving to Colorado. But when I moved here, I noticed that there was a need for my services. I think that if I’m able to serve the community and make it better, then I’m happy to fulfill that need. AAm: Why should patients choose Envision Eye Care? Dr. Jeong: I hope that when they come here and by the time they walk out the door, they feel like [Envision Eye Care] is different than other places that they’ve been to. When I take my kids to any kind of doctor, I want to make sure the doctor is competent, caring and thorough enough to take care of my kids well. That’s what I’m looking for, and I feel like I can provide that for my patients. AAm: In your opinion, what’s the best thing about living in Colorado? Dr. Jeong: I love the weather here. Especially in the winter, we’ll have a lot of snow, but it melts so quickly, [she says laughing].


Robot Revolution

Powering up in Denver

Denver Museum of Nature & Science 2001 Colorado Blvd. Denver, CO 80205 Tel: 303-370-6000 Museum open daily: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

They’re here… to help and improve our lives. A new groundbreaking exhibition, Robot Revolution, supported by Google.org is on display at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science through August 7, 2016.

R

obot Revolution explores how robots, created by human ingenuity, will ultimately be our companions and colleagues, changing how we play, live, and work together. The exhibition takes guests into a visionary world where robots are not just a curiosity but a vital asset. The experience comes to life with a collection of cutting-edge robots secured from some of the most innovative global robotics companies and universities. Museum guests receive an extraordinary opportunity to interact with robots that have rarely been shown to the public. From Yume Robo, the climbing robot that traverses up and down a ladder, to the Recon Scout Throwbot XT that can literally be thrown into a dangerous situation to collect vital information, guests will be awed by the breakthroughs and capabilities of these machines. Robot Revolution features fun handson elements, intriguing videos, and thought-provoking questions that delve into various aspects of robotics and offer engaging activities with amazing robot specimens. “Robots are for everyday people, not just scientists and engineers,” said

Steven Lee, curator for the exhibition for the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. “Robots are positively impacting daily life as humans use robotics to achieve more in search and rescue, law enforcement, science exploration, aviation, and medicine. In this exhibition, even guests who think they aren’t interested in robotics will be amazed by the human ingenuity that goes into creating these machines.” Robot Revolution is supported by Google.org with additional major support from The Boeing Company. Other funding provided by RACO Industrial, The David Bohnett Foundation, The Kaplan Foundation, and official airline United Airlines. Robot Revolution is presented in Denver by Avnet.

For more information, visit

www.dmns.org

10 Things to Do 1. Watch soccer ‘bots compete in a match. 2. Experiment with various advanced robot “grippers” to select and pick up objects. 3. Make “eye” contact with ROBOTIS-OP as it follows faces using visual tracking software. 4. Feel PARO, a furry baby seal therapy robot with sensors, respond to your touch. 5. Try a surgical training simulation to see what it is like to perform robotic surgery. 6. Participate in a live stage show about drones and their emerging capabilities. 7. Play 21 with a Yaskwawa/Motoman dualarm robot, and compete with Baxter, a robot developed to work alongside humans in factories, in simultaneous games of tic-tac-toe. 8. Control THES, a snake-like ‘bot that can crawl through pipes and alert humans to leaks or system damages. 9. Try on robot costumes, and play and experiment with Bee-Bots, Snap Circuits, and Cubelets. 10. Watch technicians in action through the glassed-in Robo Garage as they maintain the robots in the exhibition. Denver Exhibit | asian avenue magazine

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JOHN YEE

The Unflagging the Flying

A

deptly steering his walker, John Yee beams as he joins our group of five Mandarin-speaking visitors in the living room. The 95-year-old bespectacled veteran wears a trendy black Eddie Bauer jacket. I sit close to him on the sofa, making sure not to miss a single word that the Flying Tiger survivor has to say. Denver Language School teacher Sherry Chao helped arrange the introduction with John Yee, sharing my background as a Montreal-based reporter with a history as a foreign correspondent in Taiwan. Another Denver friend had briefed me on the living legend saying, “John Yee was with the famous Flying Tigers during World War II, not as a pilot but as an interpreter. He became a professor here at Metropolitan State University in Denver. He loves to talk.” Born in Zhaotong in Yunnan Province, China, Yee went to study at St. Stephen’s College in Hong Kong. The young man became an ideal candidate to assist the Flying Tigers of Commander Claire Chennault, as his expertise in English proved essential to the American aviators. Great believers in education, the nonagenarian and his wife have contributed greatly to Colorado’s understanding of Chinese language and history. Yee joined the University of Colorado’s Department of History Doctoral Program in 1970. Nai Li Yee, (John Yee’s wife), was once the principal of the Colorado Chinese Language School and taught there for 35 years. “We were happily jumping up and down when we heard about Pearl Harbor,” winks the hospitable retiree. At last, in the cockpit of their P-40’s, the American Volunteer Group (AVG) pilots could openly terrorize the Japanese (who bombed Yunnan from Indochina).

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May 2016 | Special Feature


SAN FRANCISCO

Chinatown

EE

ng Interpreter of ing Tigers By Jules Nadeau With his Mandarin-style goatee, the grandfather takes on the air of a philosopher. Yee proudly recites the three prudent Claire Chennault principles he extracted from the strategies of Sun Zi (Sun Tzu): “No dogfight with a Japanese aircraft; fly high and dive; and always operate in tandem.” Halfway through the interview, I try to divert Yee to more personal details. The ex-lecturer continues to elaborate on the Sino-Japanese war. “I must explain the context first. Just like in a restaurant. You sit down first, then the soup. ‘Manman lai!’” Between a comment on Chiang Kai-shek and an anecdote about Franklin D. Roosevelt, I glance at the walls of the cozy Aurora house. Flying Tigers memorabilia are everywhere. Admiring the collection of war trophies, I appreciate the photograph of Yee standing next to the tombstone of Claire Chennault in Commerce, Texas, (the Commander he often met). Another snapshot shows John with Nai Li, his Sichuan-born (Taiwan-raised) wife, standing together in Hong Kong. For a history buff like me who actively pursues research on the American war effort in China, spending time with Master Yee was a highlight of my recent sojourn in the Mile High City. US Veteran Secretary James Nicholson calls him, “a rare human being and an American hero.” In 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper officially proclaimed July 17 as John Yee Day. Not surprisingly, Yee has always been the topflight Denver ambassador to Kunming, Yunnan, one of Denver’s longstanding sister cities. The Flying Tigers will soon make a new buzz. Renowned Hong Kong director John Woo is working on an action film on that saga that should be released in the fall of 2016. A remake of the blackand-white 1942 epic film titled “Flying Tigers” in which the star actor was John Wayne—whose character was nicknamed “Pappy”.

Last fall,Yee received a prestigious medal from the Central Government of the People’s Republic of China, Department of Military Affairs. Photo credit: Mimi Tu, Chinese American Post

John Yee played an integral role in the establishment of City of Kunming Park in Denver (photo from 1997).

Nai Li Yee, wife of John Yee (left) and John Yee (right) Photo credit: Annick Nadeau John Yee | asian avenue magazine

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May is National Water Safety Month

W

ater World, the nation’s largest publically-owned family water park, wants to encourage people in Colorado to prepare for a safe, summer swimming season. It is important to communicate water safety rules and programs to families and individuals of all ages. Whether family summer planning includes water fun at public or private pools, a water park, our state’s beautiful lakes and rivers, or those planning to visit beaches this summer, now is the time to sign up for swim lessons and have conversations about water safety.

10 important water and pool safety tips courtesy of Water World: 1. Never swim alone where no lifeguards are on duty. 
 2. Provide swim lessons for children before third grade if possible. 
 3. Read and discuss safety rules with children upon arrival at a water site. 
 4. Make sure any personal floatation devices are Coast Guard approved. 
 5. Stay in close proximity to your children at all times. 
 6. Wear water shoes to protect feet from hot sidewalks. 
 7. Never bring a sick child (especially a child suffering from diarrhea) to the pool. 
 8. Remind children to avoid ingesting water and to take regular bathroom breaks. 
 9. Change diapers in designated areas only. 
 10. Sun safety: apply sunscreen a half hour before going out into the sun for maximum absorption.
Use sunscreen that is at least 30 SPF – and reapply every two hours. Stay hydrated with water and other clear liquids or sport drinks. Photos courtesy of Water World.

New Rides Water World is debuting two new water attractions in 2016: Cowabunga Beach will be the first ever wave pool specifically designed for boarders, offering an ocean style boogieboarding experience. Riders will enter from one of three beach entry points at one end of the pool and board-surf approximately 100 feet to the beach

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May 2016 | Feature

edge. At least 30 specially-selected freshwater boogie boards will maneuver the continuous three-foot breakers. Water World will be opening Turtle Bay, a mini wave pool designed specifically for toddlers and preschoolers. It will include a turtle-themed 18” deep wave pool that has gentle waves, a waterfall and turtlethemed spray features.


2016

Heroes Colorado’s Asian American

In its eighth year, Colorado Asian Culture and Education Network proudly announces the 2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado:

Ramina Kashani

Founder and Executive Director of Colorado Children’s Noruz Foundation

Eun Moredock (not pictured)

Chair of Korean American Community Foundation of Colorado and Former Chief Information Officer of U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration

Giselle Rushford

National Executive Director of National Federation of Filipino American Associations (NaFFAA) and founder of Philippine American Chamber of Commerce of Colorado

Lily Shen

Vice Chair of Board of Asian Pacific Development Center and President of Colorado Chinese Language School

Pam Sweetser

Founder and Executive Director of Heritage Camps for Adoptive Families and Commissioner of Denver Asian Pacific American Commission

YOUNG HERO Bryan Yee

Story by Patricia

Kaowthumrong

Heroes were selected by a committee comprised of members from OCA Colorado, Asian Chamber of Commerce, Asian Avenue magazine, Asian Pacific Development Center, Miss Asian American Colorado Leadership Program and Mile High Asian Media. Organized by: Colorado Asian Culture and Education Network.

Photos by Dao Than

Committee Member and Leader of National Association of Asian American Professionals Colorado, Society of Asian Scientists & Engineers, and Asian Health Alliance of Colorado

8th annual Asian American Heroes of Colorado Award Ceremony and Brunch Date: Saturday, June 11, 2016 Time: 10 a.m. to noon Location: Empress Seafood Restaurant | 2825 W. Alameda Ave, Denver Tickets: $30 each | $20 for students To purchase tickets:  Checks made payable to CACEN can be sent to: CACEN, P.O. Box 221748, Denver, CO 80222 Or purchase at: www.asianavemag.ticketleap.com/heroes The award ceremony includes a dim sum brunch, recognition of the 2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado. Heroes will give an acceptance speech and share their unique stories of service. Come and be inspired! For questions, call 303-937-6888 or email info@cacenetwork.org. 2016 Asian American Heroes | asian avenue magazine

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YOUNG HERO AWARD BRYAN YEE

Committee Member and Leader of National Association of Asian American Professionals Colorado, Society of Asian Scientists & Engineers, and Asian Health Alliance of Colorado

When Bryan Yee was notified that he nominated for the Asian American Heroes of Colorado award, he declined the honor. “I believe his behavior only aligns further with his humility and the definition of an ‘unsung hero’” says Annie Guo, who nominated Yee for the award. “He volunteers and gives continuously, never asking or expecting anything in return. Many Asian American community leaders and members know who he is because he helps at all types of events, even if he is not a member of the organization.” A Colorado native and engineer by trade, Yee’s current community work focuses around professional development and supporting many of the community and student organizations in Colorado. His previous work includes lifting young lives as a mentor. “To me, achievement is not how successful I am but how successful I empower others to be,” he says “My greatest achievement is the success of everybody else around me.” Guo has volunteered with Yee on many projects since 2008. His past or present roles include professional mentor and membership committee member of Society of Asian Scientists & Engineers Colorado; VP of Programming, membership committee member, and VP of Education for the Toastmaster club of the National Association of Asian American Professionals Colorado; and youth mentor, youth supervisor, and youth leadership trainer for the Asian Pacific Development Center. Yee is not only a volunteer, but a leader and organizer, Guo says. “The ultimate mission of any leader is to lift as many boats as possible, to build a better world via unselfish contribution,” Yee says. “For most of us, our success was achieved in some significant part because of those who have helped along our journey — dedicated parents who provided for us, teachers

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May 2016 | Cover Story

who educated us, mentors who further our career or figures who helped us overcome a struggle.” “It’s a moral responsibility for every one of us to assist others the same way people have previously assisted us, to pay it forward,” says Bryan, whose most important values are altruism, humility and integrity. “Somebody once taught me that nobody is an island — we are all connected to our world,” he says. Most recently, Guo and Yee worked together on the creation of the Asian Health Alliance of Colorado. Yee volunteered to

“To me, achievement is not how successful I am but how successful I empower others to be. My greatest achievement is the success of everybody else around me.” serve as the chair of the committee, led the steering committee for a year and organized the Asian Health Summit. Yee is also very active in NAAAP Colorado and has helped the organization with many events, including the National Leadership Academy, where more than 100 Asian American professionals from across the U.S. came to Colorado. “Receiving this award is incredible, especially given the community excellence that both the past winners and the winners this year constantly demonstrate,” he says. His advice to younger generations is “Only compete against yourself. The only game you need to succeed at is the game of life.”


RAMINA KASHANI Founder and Executive Director of Colorado Children’s Noruz Foundation

Ramina is a rare example of a community and nonprofit leader in the Iranian community. The Colorado Children’s Noruz Foundation is one of the first IranianAmerican led nonprofit organizations in Colorado.

Ramina Kashani’s desire to educate her son and daughter about her and her husband’s Iranian heritage unlimitedly inspired her community involvement. In 2005, Kashani co-founded the Colorado Children’s Noruz Foundation (CCNF) with Marjan Khatibinour (Farzaneh Rostami also joined the organization’s leadership team a few years later). The nonreligious, nonpolitical and nonprofit foundation’s goal is to share beautiful Persian traditions, notably Noruz (the Persian New Year), with younger generations. “Ramina is a rare example of a community and nonprofit leader in the Iranian community,” says Sarah Shirazi, who nominated her for the Asian American Heroes of Colorado award. “The community is roughly 4,700 to 10,000 people in Colorado, and we don’t have many community leaders who are willing to do this type of work and sacrifice so much for the greater good. The CCNF is one of the first Iranian- American led nonprofit organizations in Colorado.” Shirazi is a longtime attendee of the event and began volunteering for CCNF this past year, a 100 percent volunteer-operated entity. The organization hosts an annual Noruz performance for the community every spring, which educates the general public about the Persian New Year. “Countries along the Silk Road have celebrated Noruz for over 5,000 years,” Kashani says. “Noruz is a time of renewal in harmony with nature — a time to set positive intentions for the New Year, a special time to be in the community and celebrate through music, dance, songs, theater, poetry, storytelling and other arts and cultural mediums.” Kashani immigrated to the U.S. from Iran in 1984 when she was 14. She earned her high school and college diplomas in Michigan and moved to Seattle to continue her studies in architecture. She received her master’s degree from the University of Washington and began her architecture career in the Evergreen State. In 2001, she moved to Denver with her husband and started her own firm, concentrating on residential design. “As an architect, I try to make people’s living spaces better for them, and I truly get an enjoyment and satisfaction out of doing so,” Kashani says. “Improvement should not stop just in spaces we live in. I am a huge advocate for one trying to improve oneself regardless of their age. Something that I try to consistently practice myself and teach my children in life is about working hard and constantly trying to improve themselves.” One of Kashani’s greatest achievements is bringing awareness to some of the colorful and beautiful traditions of Persian culture to the community. The annual Noruz performance allows youth ages 3 to 18 to learn about their Persian culture and New Year traditions by putting together dance and music performances for the event. “I feel it is my duty to spread our welcoming, hospitable culture beyond what is broadcasted in the political news,” Kashani says. “As an immigrant, I feel that there were many opportunities that were given to me, which allowed me to be where I am,” she says. “I feel we are so privileged to live in a country where one can believe that with hard work they can achieve what they wish. This is true only because this country is made of people who create opportunities, and I would like to be one of those people.” Her advice to younger generations is to be resourceful and a big advocate for oneself. “The possibilities are endless in this world, and try to think beyond what is just normal to you and around you.” 2016 Asian American Heroes | asian avenue magazine

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Top: Eun Moredock (right) speaks at the Korean American Community Foundation of Colorado Leadership Conference.

Nurturing mentor, inspiring role model for women and passionate volunteer are just a few roles Eun Moredock has fulfilled during her lifetime. For 14 years prior to her retirement, Moredock served as the Chief Information Officer for Western Area Power Administration, one of four Power Marketing Administrations in the U.S. Department of Energy that serves a 15-state region in central and western U.S. “She is a blazing pioneer for woman in the computer science and IT fields and retired top in her profession,” says Soyon Bueno, who nominated Moredock for the Asian American Heroes of Colorado award. “Her achievements have been recognized with numerous agency performance awards, including an award from United States Secretary of Energy for her significant contributions and accomplishments relative to Presidential Management Agenda E-Government initiatives.” Born in South Korea, Moredock has called Colorado home for more than 40 years. She earned her undergraduate degree in mathematics and computer science from Metro State University and a graduate degree in global technology from Denver University. “I am the youngest child of the family and the maverick of the family,” she says. Bueno met Moredock more than two years ago when Moredock became involved with the University of Colorado Denver’s Asian American Student Services Office. As Chair of the Korean American Community Foundation of Colorado (KACFC), Moredock wanted to share KACFC leadership opportunities with students. “Since our meeting, she has been connected with leaders of our Korean American Student Association, and they have had the opportunity to attend leadership workshops and meet the Consul General of the Republic of Korea in San Francisco. Through Eun’s connections, our student leaders have been able to expand their social connection and become more acquainted with prominent Korean American professionals in the community.” Moredock’s other roles include advisor and Chair of the Korean American Community Foundation of Colorado. She also chaired the Korea Renewable and Clean Energy Forums. “I believe that it is my obligation to help others so they have a chance for success,” says Moredock, whose most important values are to trust, respect and care for others.

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May 2016 | Cover Story

EUN MOREDOCK

Chair of Korean American Community Foundation of Colorado and Former Chief Information Officer of U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration She has also served on the board of directors for the Asian Pacific Development Center and Colorado Dragon Boat Festival (CDBF); was a founding member of the Asian American Emerging Leadership Council; and hosted leadership events and educational seminars to educate young Korean Americans about Korean culture and the importance of voting in American society. “I believe she provided a valuable contribution to our AAPI community to raise awareness on how we can influence and have a voice in our government at the county, state and national level,” Bueno says. “I know Eun is passionate about cultivating AAPI leaders and increasing our voice. Moredock’s greatest professional achievement was serving as Senior Executive Service (SES) member for the federal government, a position appointed by the president of the United States. While the federal workforce is comprised of more than two million workers, there are less than 100 Asian Americans in

“I believe that it is my obligation to help others so they have a chance for success. The key concept is for us to build Asian American leaders to play a more influential role in society.” the SES workforce. Other career milestones include being honored by the Secretary of Energy and recognized in in Federal Computer Week magazine as one of the top 100 federal employees cited for outstanding IT leadership. “I am humbled and honored to be a recipient of this prestigious award, and this is a huge reminder to all of us to continue to support organizations, nurture and expand young leadership,” she says. “The key concept is for us to build Asian American leaders to play a more influential role in society.” She encourages younger generations to acquire a good education and network as much as possible; be a volunteer and help others; set goals, lay out plans, execute and measure them. “And along the journey, stretch yourself and don’t be afraid to take a risk,” Moredock says. “Believe in yourself and make it happen.”


GISELLE RUSHFORD

National Executive Director of National Federation of Filipino American Associations and founder of Philippine American Chamber of Commerce of Colorado

Since Giselle Rushford immigrated to the U.S. more than 40 years ago, making a difference in her community has always been her most important priorities. She moved to San Francisco as a teenager and began her community service career as a student activist. In 1972, President Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law in Philippines, limiting the civil liberties of the Fillipino people and fueling Rushford’s activism. “Along with many Asian and American students from the Bay Area, we picketed the San Francisco Philippine Consulate for days, declaring our angst against the Philippine government,” she says. “I was writing, picketing and speaking with whomever cared to listen on righting wrongs when other social justice and parity issues came up over the years. “ In addition to her continual efforts to empower Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities, Rushford established a successful career as a management consultant. Her professional achievements include CEO of Rushford Investments, LLC and consulting principal for Larush Consulting. Rushford settled in Colorado with her family in the 1990s and immediately began offering her skills and talents to the local community. “Although I worked for corporate American and climbed the career ladder from the 70s through the 90s, I have always stayed focus on helping the community,” Rushford says. “If there was a corporate grant to be had to improve our lot, I found it for the community. If there was a gap in providing service, I filled it or became the founder of an organization to provide the service.”

She has a sincere big heart for community service because she wants to make the AAPI communities visible and empowered. Through her advocacy work, she shares information and national issues that impact the AAPI community.

Rushford founded the Filipino American Associations of AT&T Employees and Philippine American Chamber of Commerce of Colorado and serves as the executive director for the National Federation of Filipino American Associations. She also served as the Western region director of the Asian-Pacific American Associations for Advancement of AT&T (a national diversity resource group) and on the board of directors for many organizations, previously the Filipino American Community of Colorado and 4A-Mountain States Chapter, and currently the National Federation of Filipino American Associations Region 5 and Colorado Asian Pacific Health Alliance. “She has a sincere big heart for community service because she wants to make the AAPI communities visible and empowered,” says Gloria Williams, who nominated Rushford for the Asian American Heroes of Colorado award. “Through her advocacy work, she shares information and national issues that impact the AAPI community.” Williams and Rushford became friends while volunteering for many AAPI organizations together in the Denver metro area. Rushford’s volunteer efforts include contributions to organizations like Habitat for Humanity Colorado, Mending Faces, Uplift Internationale, Colorado Dragon Festival and Project Cure. Rushford’s greatest achievement is helping acquire funds with the National Federation of Filipino American Associations Region 5 in 2014 to rebuild a school in Leyte, Philippines that was destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan. “The new school is category 4 typhoon compliant so during a catastrophic storm, the school can also used as a shelter for those in need,” she says. Rushford says she’s humbled and honored to be recognized with other Asian American Heroes of Colorado. “I stepped on the shoulders of those who came before me; otherwise I would not have been able to accomplish as much as I have,” she says. “This is my way of giving back and paying forward to the next generation.” Her advice to younger generations is to “honor your parents and lift as you climb.” 2016 Asian American Heroes | asian avenue magazine

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LILY SHEN

Vice Chair of Board of Asian Pacific Development Center and President of Colorado Chinese Language School

Lily wholeheartedly believes in APDC’s mission to advance the well-being of Asian communities in Colorado, evidenced by her volunteer spirit and her countless hours of community service. 20

May 2016 | Cover Story

Because serving the community has always been her passion, Lily Shen considers herself a servant rather than a hero. “Giving back strengthens the fabric of the family, community and society of which we are members, and it is simply the right thing to do,” she says “In return, we receive so many blessings from it.” Originally from Taiwan, Shen and her family immigrated to the U.S. 35 years ago and founded a home in Colorado. While the Shen family is famed for establishing and successfully operating Littleton Heating and Air Conditioning until 2005, Lily Shen’s many contributions to the Asian American community are also eminent. “Lily has been on the board of the Asian Pacific Development Center (APDC) for more than 15 years,” says Harry Budisidharta, who nominated Shen for the Asian American Heroes of Colorado award. ”As a board member, Lily is a relentless champion of APDC to everyone she encounters, and she always takes the time to explain who we are and the community we serve.” Budisidharta has known Shen for about five years and served with her on the APDC board. They continue to work together on the executive and fundraising committees within APDC. “Lily wholeheartedly believes in APDC’s mission to advance the well-being of Asian communities in Colorado,” Budisidharta says. “This is evidenced by her volunteer spirit and her countless hours of community service.” Shen serves as president of the Colorado Chinese Language School, Colorado Chinese Club and Colorado Chinese Evergreen Society; vice chair of APDC; treasurer of the Asian Roundtable of Colorado; chair of U.S. Congressman Mike Coffman Chinese/Taiwanese Advisor Council; adviser for the Overseas Community Affairs Council for the Republic of China (Taiwan); and vice president of the Rocky Mountain Chinese Society of Science and Engineering. “Lily has spent countless hours educating the community and key decision makers about issues that affect the AAPI communities,” Budisidharta says. “For more than 10 years, Lily has met with key decision makers — such as Congressman Mike Coffman, Senator Udall, Mayor Hancock, Mayor Tauer and the Governor’s Office — to educate them about the AAPI communities. Her dedication and tireless outreach has shone a light on the AAPI communities in Colorado and helped educate many key decision makers.” Shen is also a member of the Asian/Pacific Community Partnership and Asian Performing Arts of Colorado. Among many other honors during her career, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Colorado Behavioral Healthcare Council in 2015 and Activist Award as part of the 21st Annual HRC/Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration in 2007. Shen’s most important values include honesty, integrity and the capacity for forgiveness. One of her greatest achievement is running Littleton Heating and Air Conditioning and selling and retiring from the successful business, she says. “Being recognized by my own community is a tremendous honor,” she says. “The Asian American community and the community at large have allowed me to serve over decades and the numerous awards presented to me are all my proud moments. However, my proudest achievement is raising three beautiful children, who are responsible, independent and loving adults.”


PAM SWEETSER

Founder and Executive Director of Heritage Camps for Adoptive Families and Commissioner of Denver Asian Pacific American Commission

“I have had the great fortune of getting to know so many people in all of Colorado’s various Asian communities, and they have enriched my life beyond compare. Though I am not Asian myself, I sometimes feel like I am!” Pam Sweetser is making the world a better place — one family at a time. Sweetser is the founder and executive director of the Heritage Camps for Adoptive Families (HCAF), a post-adoption resource and advocate for children, adults and their families with diverse heritages. The nonprofit hosts events that provide culturally relevant and family-centered experiences for all ages. “She has created priceless experiences where adoptees can feel comfortable living harmoniously in two worlds,” says Patty Quinn, who nominated Sweetser for the Asian American Heroes of Colorado award. “This is not a ‘job’ for Pam, it’s a 24/7 passion that never rests. She has made a world accepting of all families regardless of how that family became a family. She may be Caucasian on the outside, but Pam has a multicultural heart.” While Quinn has worked with Sweetser as HCAF’s program manager for nine years, she’s considered her a mentor and role model for nearly 20 years. A fourth-generation Denver native, Sweetser has called the Centennial State home for more than 58 years. “As the executive director of Heritage Camps for Adoptive Families, I have had the great fortune of getting to know so many people in all of Colorado’s various Asian communities, and they have enriched my life beyond compare,” she says. “Though I am not Asian myself, I sometimes feel like I am!” Since 1991, HCAF has grown from one summer heritage camp for 60 families with children adopted from Korea to serving nearly 900 families annually from across the nation with 11 heritage camps, and now an Adult Adoptee retreat. “Raising adopted children of another culture can be challenging, especially in the area of helping them understand and re-

tain their identity. For my own children, born in Korea and India, I can’t imagine raising them without those communities by my side,” she says. Sweetser and HCAF have been honored with the Minoru Yasui Volunteer Service Award, Asian Education Advisory Council Community Service Award, Channel 7 Everyday Hero, Asian Pacific Bar Association Minoru Yasui Community Award, Korean American Coalition of the U.S. Bridge Builder Award and the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute’s Angel in Adoption Award. Sweetser also served as member of the Denver Asian Pacific American Commission, on the capital campaign committee of Asian Pacific Development Center and is a current board member for Theater Esprit Asia. “It is important to give back because you receive so much more in return,” she says. “If you find a way to give back that means something to you and to the community, you will find you reap the rewards 1,000 times over!” Sweetser’s greatest achievement is raising two kids into successful adulthood with her husband Dan and founding HCAF 25 years ago. “I am also so lucky in my job to have become a part of so many other Asian communities in Colorado who help our Heritage Camp kids know more about who they are and where they came from,” she says. “This award validates all we have been doing with the camps for 25 years. I am so very honored.” Sweetser’s most important values include being kind, authentic, honest and open to people from all walks of life. She believes in always keeping your cool and having a sense of humor. Her advice for younger generations is: “Never give up on becoming who you really were meant to be.” 2016 Asian American Heroes | asian avenue magazine

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Book Review

Beijing Bastard: Into the Wilds of a Changing China By Val Wang

Reviewed by Mary Jeneverre Schultz

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iving between two worlds can be both a blessing and a curse: the experience is both an unforgettable gift and yet, one still feels like something is missing. Beijing Bastard is the book that reflects those simultaneous, conflicting feelings. The story starts in a suburb of Washington, DC with a young girl enduring her teenage rebellion phase, fighting cultural expectations and defying her parents’ wishes. She later takes off to China, the country her parents fled just before the Communist takeover, further complicating their relationship as a family. Like many young Asian-Americans, author Val Wang grew up feeling pulled in two directions: hoping to measure up to her family’s high standards of achievement, and wanting to create her own place in the world even if it meant engaging in open rebellion of her family’s expectations. An obedient Chinese-American girl, Wang attended Chinese school weekly, took piano lessons and studied martial arts. She learned her share of Chinese culture and still defied her parents by moving to China in her early 20s. Wang reflects, “To them, my decision to move to China was a step backward that would unravel all the work they had invested in my life. They had achieved the Chinese-American dream: steady job, house in the suburbs, children attending good colleges. I was supposed to repeat that pattern.” Wang moved to Beijing in 1988. She lived with distant relatives and struggled to make ends meet by working at a weekly English-language magazine and subtitling an independent low-budget film called Beijing Bastards. “The movie opened an escape hatch into a world opposite the version of China I had grown up with, where we were all nerdy, overachieving droids with no errant desires of our own,” Wang says. Wang also shares the story of her parents making a homecoming trip to China after leaving 50 years prior. Through her parents’ eyes, she experiences the meaning of China of yester years. The book evolves as a social studies exploration through an array of personal testimony: the transformations she sees include the events of September 11, 2001 and the 2008 Beijing Olympics. “The more I saw of the changes sweeping through Beijing, the more I understood about how my parents’ peripatetic lives had left them with a feeling of perpetual instability,” Wang says. “Their decision many years ago to move to a house in the suburbs with no history began to make sense – they wanted to establish a home with a story you were free to write yourselves, a place that would never break your heart.”

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May 2016 | Book Review

This memoir of her adventures is told with an American sense of humor. Anyone who comes from a background of double ethnicities, such as Chinese-Americans, FilipinoAmericans, and Japanese-Americans, can relate to Val Wang’s stories. In Beijing Bastard, she demonstrates her understanding of the country of origin while trying to be a true American. This book is a truly unique and fascinating portrait of a China unknown to most Westerners.

Title: Beijing Bastard: Into the Wilds of Changing China Author: Val Wang Publisher: Gotham Books Connect online: www.Valwang.com Twitter: @Chingchong ISBN: 978-0-698-15699-9


Golden Shanghai Asian Restaurant

● The Best Chinese Restaurant by 710 AM Restaurant Show ● The Best Chinese Restaurant by the 1430 KEZW Restaurant Show ● Voted 2007 Top 100 Chinese Restaurant in the US

1412 S. Parker Rd. A-134 Denver, CO 80231 (303) 743-7666 (303)743-9079 (303)743-8210


Sushi Mango

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May 2016 | Restaurant Peek


Chef and owner, Ray Huy Hoang

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ne of the best things about dining in Highlands Ranch is stumbling upon a restaurant that does something different than the chain restaurants that have tended to dominate the suburbs, one that has retained its loyalty to traditional cuisine but embraced the American emphasis on the customer. Sushi Mango made its debut in Highlands Ranch over three years ago. The 30-seat restaurant eventually outgrew itself and a recent expansion moved the restaurant a few spaces down from the old location with more than twice as much room in the same convenient shopping center. Head chef and owner, Ray Huy Hoang has worked for some of Denver’s best and well-known restaurants including Hapa Sushi, John Holly’s Asian Bistro, Volcano Asian Cuisine and others. Originally from Vietnam, Hoang has over 35 years of experience and is finally living his longtime dream of operating his very own sushi restaurant alongside his partner, Anh. The restaurant has retained its modern atmosphere, with a newly remodeled and spacious dining room. Other new additions include an outdoor patio, a full bar, a sleek water fountain and a variety of flowers and plants that are displayed throughout, which give the space a more tranquil quality coupled with some of the same Buddha accents used in the previous space. For starters try the coconut shrimp, plump shrimp crusted in coconut chunks and deep-fried. Hints of

Article by Sarah Shirazi Photography by Anastasia Yagolnik

Sample Menu Sashimi Starter

lemongrass come through in the sweet dipping sauce. You also cannot go wrong with the rainbow jalapeno sashimi starter, thin slices of salmon, tuna, yellowtail, and mango dressed in citrus soy sauce. Fresh and full of flavor, this dish is another perfect starter. Of special note is the new tuna poki bowl, fresh chopped tuna, with Maui onion, garlic chili oil and seaweed, served on top of jasmine rice. On the other spectrum, you will find an impressive list of teriyaki entrees, bento bowls, noodle dishes, and Japanese fried rice. Chef Ray has added some new rolls to the already extensive list of specialty rolls. The lobster tempura roll is a must try, with lobster, asparagus, cucumber and special house sauce. The combination of flavors and textures make this roll sing. The mango roll is another house specially roll, a perfect balance of sweet and savory, with shrimp tempura, crab meat, avocado, mango and eel sauce. The new outdoor patio will be the perfect spot to enjoy happy hour in the coming summer months. Happy hour is offered from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and includes a generous 20 percent off from the total bill. Lunch is another great time to visit Sushi Mango with a steal of a deal: two sushi rolls for $9.95 or three rolls for $12.95 (only select rolls available for lunch menu deal). At Sushi Mango, there’s something for everyone, and with high quality ingredients and delicious food at affordable prices, it promises to be around for the long haul.

Crispy Rice Spicy Tuna – 4pc, $ 9.95 Rainbow Jalepeno – 7pc, $13.95 Salmon,Tuna,Yellowtail

Salmon Carpacio – 6pcs, $12.95

Chef Special Rolls Bronco Roll – 8pcs, $12.75

Salmon, Cilantro, Jalapeno On top: Spicy Tuna & Aioli

Chef Ray Roll – 8 pcs, $12.25

Smoked Salmon, Cream Cheese, Jalapeno, Deep fried with Aioli and Eel sauce on top

Lollipop Roll (Low Carb) – 8pcs, $11.95 No rice (*) Cucumber wrap, Avocado, Tuna, Salmon, Yellowtail, Crab

Mango Roll – 8pcs, $11.95

Shrimp tempura and Crab meat On top: Avocado and Mango with Eel sauce

West Coast Roll – 8pcs, $12.50

Fried Oysters and Avocado,On top: Mango and Shrimp with Aioli

Bento Boxes Teriyaki Salmon – $12.95

Vegetable Tempura, 4 pieces California Roll

Shrimp – $12.95

Vegetable Tempura, 2 Gyoza, 4 pieces California Roll Noodles

Yaki Soba – $ 9.95

Thin Egg Noodles, Stir Fried with Vegetables

Seafood Spicy Cajun Yaki Udon – $13.95 Thick Noodle Stir Fried with Seafood, Vegetables

9579 S. University Blvd. #150 Highlands Ranch, CO 80126 (720) 348-0773 www.sushi-mango.com Sushi Mango | asian avenue magazine

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M

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FARMERS’ MARKET

MARKET

ON

Saturdays

YOUR CALENDAR

SOUTHWEST PLAZA

Saturdays LAKEWOOD

MAY 7 - OCTOBER 29

JUNE 18 - OCTOBER 1

Sundays

Wednesdays

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Southeast Parking Lot Wadsworth & Bowles 8am-2pm or Sellout

HIGHLANDS RANCH

MAY 8 - OCTOBER 30

Highlands Ranch Town Ctr. 9288 Dorchester St. 10am-2pm or Sellout

9077 W Alameda Ave Alameda & Garrison (Mile Hi Church) 10am-2pm or Sellout

LITTLETON

JUNE 15 - OCTOBER 12

Aspen Grove Lifestyle Ctr. 7301 S. Santa Fe Dr. 10am-2pm or Sellout

Check out our great recipes online! For more information call the Metro Denver Farmers’ Market Hotline

303-887-FARM

www.denverfarmersmarket.com

2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado Award Ceremony + Dim Sum Brunch Saturday, June 11, 2016 10am to 12pm Empress Seafood Restaurant

2200 W. Alameda Ave. #44, Denver, CO 80223 Tickets: $30 Adult $20 Student Award ceremony will include recognition of 2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado, acceptance speeches, acknowledgment of participating organizations, dim sum brunch and more!

For more information, e-mail info@cacenetwork.org or call 303-937-6888.

Tickets at: asianavemag.ticketleap.com/heroes This program is presented by the Colorado Asian Culture and Education Network in collaboration with several APA organizations in Colorado.


Making Time for Exercise in the Life of a Busy Hero

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A hero can take care of others more effectively when they take care of themselves first!

By Tony Huynh

his month, we celebrate the heroes of the community: men and women who go above and beyond to make a difference in the lives of people around them. You probably fit that description yourself. Maybe you are a parent who is present to support your kids at every game and activity. Or perhaps you volunteer at the local animal shelter because you cannot bear to see animals treated poorly or not able to find their “forever home.” Making a difference in others’ lives can be rewarding, and it also can consume a lot of time. When you are busy, one of the first areas of life to be sacrificed is your health and wellness. Even though one hour is only four percent of your day, reserving that time for health and wellness can be a challenge. This month, I give you three techniques to allow you to do more at the gym in less time. 1. Drop Sets - If you are in a hurry, instead of doing three sets of an exercise, do two. However, at the end of the last set, drop the weight by about 25% and do as many reps as you can. You will save some time and get an intense feeling afterwards! 2. Super Sets - Super sets can literally cut your workout time in half: pick two exercises to do back-to-back without rest, and select different muscle groups. Choose bodyweight dips and pull-ups, for example. When you finish your first set of dips, immediately perform your first set of pull-ups. That is one super set. 3. High Intensity Interval Training (or HIIT) – This is your method for accomplishing cardio exercise in a quicker way. I recommend using an elliptical or stationary bike. Start by warming up for 5 minutes at an easy pace and low resistance level. At the 5-minute mark, increase the resistance. It may take some trial and error to find the right balance for you. At that higher resistance, push yourself at maximum exertion for a full 15 seconds. Give it everything you’ve got. Then decrease the resistance down to your warm-up level and slow down for the next 45 seconds. Repeat this for ten minutes and then do a “cool down” for five minutes at a pace similar to the pace used for your warm-up. Next time you are pressed for time, instead of just canceling your workout, try some of these techniques to get you in and out of the gym more quickly.

About the Author

Tony Huynh is a blogger, podcaster, and fitness enthusiast who helps people get the body they want at:

www.thefitasianman.com Twitter/Snapchat/Instagram - TheFitAsianMan Better Living | asian avenue magazine

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5 Tips to Becoming Your Own Super Hero

very society and every story needs heroes. From the time that we’re young, we fantasize about heroes that can pick us up when we’re down, save us when we’re in trouble, and bring light to a dark world. Most fairytales and children’s stories teach us that despite the challenges and obstacles in life, there exists goodness, justice, and rewards for those that persist, solve problems, and pursue virtue. In adulthood, we continue to search for the heroes among us, or find ourselves needing to prove our heroism to another in a difficult moment. The super powers that we glorify often reveal the areas in life in which we wish we had greater abilities: strength, confidence, intelligence, justice, purpose, and compassion. These attributes are not just reserved for certain “special” people; they are truly seeds within each and every one of us that deserve to be nurtured. We are all uniquely gifted. Each one of us can be a hero. Here are 5 tips to each becoming your own super hero:

1. Embrace Who You Are

Being different can sometimes be scary and lonely. Quite often, it takes years to figure out who you are. Spend time discovering your own strengths and abilities. Complete this sentence: “I feel strong, confident and at peace when I am ________.” Nurture your passions and

By Tom Shieh

interests. Remember, you don’t need to like, do, and believe the same things as your peers. Stand out and celebrate your own unique gifts and differences.

2. You Don’t Always Need to Be Liked

We all want to be liked. The truth isn’t always a popular opinion to share or easy for others to hear. We live in a culture that prefers to be politically correct and to sugar coat the issues. Always stand up for the truth, even if that truth and viewpoint isn’t popular. It’s better to be loved by a few people than to sacrifice your integrity to be liked by many. Being a people-pleaser erodes your power.

3. Avoid Your Kryptonite

Complete this sentence: “I feel weak when I am ________.” Whether it is alcohol, drugs, food, work, certain people or environments, we all have something that makes us weak. Even the mighty Superman encountered certain circumstances that muted his powers. If you want to stay strong and healthy in body, mind, and spirit, then you’ll need to be mindful of your Kryptonite and avoid it with courage and purpose.

4. Develop Guiding Principles

Every super hero lives by a set of guiding principles. No matter how daunting the adversity, they handle matters with grace, courage and clear direction. We each need to set our values clearly and firmly. Heroes know what they are worth. What are your “nonnegotiables” in life?

5. Engage in Quality Inner Dialogue

The quality of your life is in the quality of your inner dialogue. What you tell yourself is far more important than someone else’s opinion. Always speak positively and kindly to yourself. Otherwise, you end up being your own villain while you’re trying to be the super hero at the same time.

Connect with Tom:

linkedin.com/in/tomshieh, facebook.com/tomshieh

28

May 2016 | Better Living


Animals Out of Paper Directed by Sam Wood

by Rajiv Joseph

May 7 - June 5, 2016

Fri-Sat 7:30pm | Sun 2pm | + Sat June 4, 2pm No shows Memorial Day weekend Tickets: With advance reservations: $23 adults, $20 seniors/ students, $20 per person for groups 6+ $26 at the door

Theatre Esprit Asia Box Office: 720-492-9479 www.theatre-esprit-asia.org World class origamist Ilana is blocked, artistically and emotionally. Enters fan, dweebish high school math teacher Andy, who persuades her to mentor Suresh, a troubled genius student with attitude to spare, who also happens to be an origami prodigy. In this dramedy, playwright Joseph (Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo) employs the art of paper folding as a metaphor of how this cast of three have enfolded their lives into a labyrinth of creases from which they seek a center as well as an exit. Theatre Espirit Asia (TEA) welcomes Sam Wood as director, most recently of the Vintage Theatre’s Snow Falling on Cedars. Also a newcomer to TEA is Jonathan Slusser, playing Suresh. Mark Pergola returns to TEA for the third time, having stage managed its M. Butterfly and Fermata, but now in the role of Andy. As Ilana, Henry award winner Arlene Rapal returns to TEA, where she was Suzuki in M. Butterfly and last year, played the Engineer in Vintage’s Miss Saigon.

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Theatre Espirit Asia | asian avenue magazine

29


Colorado Alliance for Health Equity and Practice (CAHEP): A credible provider of women’s wellness services Guest Editorial by Alok Sarwal, Executive Director, CAHEP

T

he Colorado Alliance for Health Equity and Practice (CAHEP) was selected by the Susan G. Komen Foundation (SGK) to provide breast health services to Asian Pacific Islanders (API) and recent-immigrant women of Colorado for 2016-17. This will add to the Women’s Wellness Connection (WWC) and patient navigation programs supported by Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and others. One of the top priorities for SGK this year is to support culturally competent and linguistically appropriate breast cancer education and navigation-into-screening programs for the medically uninsured and underserved. CAHEP will provide screening mammograms for those who qualify, and address the increasing trend of later stage diagnosis in the API community with a focus on reducing breast cancer in this uninsured and rarely or not-screened at-risk population. The community wellness fairs continue to reach out to women who may be neglecting their preventive health care. At such events, support is provided to women in need of obtaining health insurance coverage and education about how to best utilize their health plan, including preventive services such as annual mammograms. This work demonstrates CAHEP’s consistent presence and credibility within the API community and work with community leaders. CAHEP has been quite effective in outreach education and screening activities in various health fairs and partnerships such as: 9Health Fair with the Colorado Muslim Society, Chinese and Thai communities of Colorado. Outreach with the Korean, Vietnamese and refugee communities have been effective at the local churches and temples. As we move past the third year of Obamacare implementation, it is apparent that two challenges have emerged: culturally appropriate “linkage to care” for the recently enrolled, and affordability due to enrollment in insurance plans with high deductible costs. Many families obtain insurance but cannot afford to go to their medical providers (doctors) due to the high out-of-pocket costs. Overall, Colorado has done well on the number of people insured, based on data provided by the Colorado Health Institute (below right).

The Chinese community hosted a 9Health Fair on April 9. CAHEP provided Affordable Care Act enrollment with Connect for Health Colorado, women’s wellness services, cardiovascular, bone density and lung function screenings, along with associated education and linkages to providers.

Source: Colorado Health Institute Counting Colorado’s Uninsured:The Latest Estimate

30

May 2016 | Health


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Profile for Asian Avenue magazine

Asian Avenue magazine - May 2016  

Cover: 2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado

Asian Avenue magazine - May 2016  

Cover: 2016 Asian American Heroes of Colorado

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