Page 1

INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

19/6/13

7:59 PM

Page 1

SECURITY

THE MAGAZINE FOR SECURITY PROFESSIONALS

PUBLISHED BY THE AUSTRALIAN SECURITY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

[ M AG A Z I N E ] VOL.18 | ISSUE.3 | JULY 2013

MANAGING REPUTATIONAL CRISES

2013 AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE WINNERS

65 26

PP255003/02390

Q&A WITH NICK BUCKLES

Follow ASIAL now: www.linkedin.com/company/australian-security-industry-association-asial-


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:22 AM

Page 2


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:22 AM

Page 3


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:22 AM

Page 4


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:23 AM

Page 5


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:24 AM

Page 6

CONTENTS VOL.18 | ISSUE.3 | JULY 2013

12

20 2013 AUSTRALIAN SECURITY INDUSTRY AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE WINNERS 08 | President’s message 12 | Security 2013 16 | National Alarm Response Code of Practice 20 | 2013 Australian Security Industry Awards for Winners 26 | Managing Reputational Crises

ASIAL Strategic Partners >

6 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

26 MANAGING REPUTATIONAL CRISES

30 | Interview with former G4S CEO, Nick Buckles 34 | Debt recovery – the basics 36 | University of Western Sydney - Migration from Concept to Integriti 40 | Integrated security solution at the Glenside Hospital

30 Q&A WITH NICK BUCKLES, FORMER CEO, G4S

42 | 44 | 46 | 50 |

Campus Monitoring Centre Certification Listing “You can’t compete with Crooks” Hot Products Calendar of events


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:24 AM

Page 7


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:24 AM

Page 8

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

WORKING FOR THE BETTERMENTOF THE INDUSTRY

J

uly is a big month for the Industry with the Security 2013 Exhibition and Conference to be held in Sydney from the 24th-26th July.The 28th annual event provides an excellent opportunity to view the latest and emerging security technologies, as well as network and socialise with industry colleagues from across the country. On page 12 of this issue you can find further information on the exhibition, conference and gala dinner. July also marks the first year of operation of the Security Technician Certification program, an ASIAL initiative to promote professional recognition for security technicians. Whilst still in its early days, the program has already generated strong interest and enrolments from across the country. In July, the Association will also announce a number of exciting new member benefits and initiatives, so stay tuned for further information. In early May, the Park Hyatt Melbourne was the venue for the 18th Annual Australian Security Industry Awards for Excellence.The evening was a great success and highlighted the tremendous talent that we have in our industry. I would like to congratulate all of the award winners and all of those who nominated. ASIAL continues to work closely with government across the country for the betterment of the industry and the community. For example, the Association is currently working with the Fair Work Ombudsman to develop an education campaign targeting local governments who engage contract security providers.The lowest price mentality encourages a range of unlawful activities and makes it difficult for legitimate operators to compete.

8 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

THE MAGAZINE FOR SECURITY PROFESSIONALS Editorial and Advertising Security Insider is published by The Australian Security Industry Association Limited

ASIAL is seeking to ensure that there is an open and transparent competitive environment where compliant operators can compete in a sustainable manner. Another is the development of a national uniform approach to alarm response procedures in Australia. ASIAL is working with the National Emergency Communications Working Group (comprised of representatives from police, fire and ambulance services from across the country) to minimise the number of reports of false or nongenuine alarm activations to Emergency Service Organisations (ESOs). ESO’s are placed at risk when responding to alarm monitoring centres requests for attendance due to the nature of the emergency response.They also waste valuable time and resources in responding to non-genuine alarm activations. A vital element in the delivery of an efficient and effective alarm monitoring and response service is a strong relationship with Emergency Service Organisations. A national alarm response protocol will significantly resolve conflict in a crisis situation when Monitoring Centres can utilise standard operating procedures in communication with Emergency Service Organisations. This process will also go a long way to managing community expectations across Australia. Finally, I would like to take this opportunity to wish Bob Bruce, a long time ASIAL Director and highly respected industry figure, all the very best as he battles a serious illness. I look forward to seeing many of you at Security 2013.

PO Box 1338 Crows Nest, NSW 1585 Tel: 02 8425 4300 • Fax: 02 8425 4343 Email: communications@asial.com.au Web: www.asial.com.au Publisher

Editor Bryan de Caires | security@asial.com.au Editorial Enquiries communications@asial.com.au Advertising Tania Laird | advertising@asial.com.au Creative Director Martin Costanzo | martin@webfx2.com.au Graphic Design + Prepress Webfx2 Digital | design@webfx2.com.au Editorial Contributors Bruce Blythe, Chris Delaney, Daniel Diermeier, and Patrick Ferguson Print + Distribution Nationwide Advertising Group Published bi-monthly Estimated Readership of 10,000 Views expressed in Security Insider do not necessarily reflect the opinion of ASIAL. Advertising does not imply endorsement by ASIAL, unless otherwise stated with permission. All contributions are welcomed, though the publisher reserves the right to decline to publish or to edit for style, grammar, length and legal reasons. Press Releases to: security@asial.com.au. Internet

references

in

articles, stories

ASIAL does not accept responsibility for misleading views. Copyright©2013 (ASIAL) All rights reserved. Reproduction of Security Insider magazine without permission is strictly prohibited. Security Insider is a subscription based publication, rates and further details can be found at www.asial.com.au.

[Next Issue] SEPTEMBER 2013 ISSN 1442-1720

Kevin McDonald President

and

advertising were correct at the time of printing.


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:24 AM

Page 9


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:24 AM

Page 10


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:24 AM

Page 11


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:24 AM

Page 12

INDUSTRY NeWS

SECURITY 2013 The Security 2013 Exhibition and Conference will be held at the Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre on the 24th-26th July.

CONFERENCE & EXECUTIVE BRIEFINGS Among those confirmed to address the conference include Dr. Anne Speckhard, Adjunct Associate Professor, Georgetown University Medical Centre, Don Randall, Head of Security, Bank of England, Bruce Blythe, Chairman, Crisis Management International and Steve Ronson, Executive Director, Fair Work Ombudsman. The Executive Briefing sessions presented by Bruce Blythe will address ‘Integrating Corporate Security Crisis Management, Emergency Response and Business Continuity’ and ‘Influencing Security Compliant Behaviours’. To register visit www.asial.com.au or email events@asial.com.au

EXHIBITION The exhibition will showcase new and innovative ways of managing security threats, alongside a number of new features. The exhibition opening hours are: • Wednesday 24th July: 9.30am–5.00pm • Thursday 25th July: 9.30am–5.00pm • Friday 26th July: 9.30am–2.30pm

Gold Sponsor

GALA DINNER The Security 2013 Gala Dinner will be held at Doltone House, Pyrmont on Thursday 25 July 2013 from 7pm to 10.30pm. As the industry’s night of nights, the dinner provides an excellent opportunity to network in an informal environment.This year’s dinner will be MC’d by the Logie nominated Comedian Tahir with further entertainment provided by "Unusualist" Ray Crowe. To register visit www.asial.com.au or email events@asial.com.au Platinum Sponsor

To register visit www.securityexpo.com.au

MSS SECURITY – PROUD PLATINUM SPONSOR OF THE SECURITY 2013 GALA DINNER FOR THE FIFTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR. MSS Security is one of Australia’s leading security companies with more than 5,000 employees, approximately $300 million in turnover, and a national infrastructure with offices in the capital cities of all states and territories. MSS Security operates in all market segments and has a customer and staff centric philosophy.This is illustrated by its single point of contact account management program and investment in staff training as an accredited Registered Training Organisation. The company values of Integrity,

12 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

Keynote Speaker Sponsor

Teamwork, Attitude, Performance and Passion were carefully chosen and form the framework for its commitment to outstanding customer service as well as guiding its daily actions.The company has made significant investments in technology to ensure both its internal and external processes deliver outstanding customer service and real time information. MSS prides itself on supporting industry through it’s ongoing involvement with the peak national body, ASIAL.

Entertainment Sponsor


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:27 AM

Page 13


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:27 AM

Page 14

INDUSTRY NeWS

NEVILLE KIELY RECOGNIZED At the recent industry awards for excellence, Neville Kiely was recognized for his contribution to the Association as an active, passionate and tireless supporter of the Association. Neville served as an ASIAL Board Director and chaired the Association’s alarms/electronics sub-committee for more years than he would probably care to remember. Under his leadership the sub-committee achieved many goals and helped raise the level of professionalism within the

electronics sector. Neville has been a pioneer in the bureau alarm monitoring business which offered small alarm installation businesses and manpower companies the opportunity to expand their service level offering, effectively spawning a new market segment and expanding the growth of monitored alarms systems across the country. Neville was presented with a Certification of Appreciation for the contribution to the Association.

ASIAL TAKES TO THE SKIES ASIAL’s ongoing consumer awareness campaign took to the skies in June with advertising appearing in the Qantas The Australian Way magazine and onboard flight entertainment system. Qantas carries over 2.3 million passengers per month, approximately

80% of which are domestic travelers. g es to securin The adverts form part of When it com or business, your home chances. don’t take any ASIAL’s ongoing campaign to promote the ‘mark of distinction’ provided by using an ASIAL ASIAL y… THINK Think securit member which has already reached millions of consumers. and make sure y professional Industry a licensed securit lian Security Always use tion. er of the Austra mark of distinc they are a memb ) – it’s your Limited (ASIAL Association

sial.com.au you visit www.a member near To find an ASIAL

The peak body

for security

s. professional

.au www.asial.com

14 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:27 AM

Page 15


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:27 AM

Page 16

INDUSTRY NeWS

NBN ANALOGUE TELEPHONY PLUG BENCH CONCEPT The NBN Co has advised ASIAL that it is considering establishing a facility where application providers and device manufacturers can test their devices against a wide range of NBN services from a range of NBN Retail Service Providers (RSPs). Application providers and device manufacturers would be able to bring their equipment into the facility and test against all of the participating RSP telephony services. NBN Co does not envisage that participating RSPs will provide testing support to parties

coming into the facility; however RSPs and application providers may wish to work together to conduct subsequent lab testing, field trials, etc. It is envisaged that the NBN Co Plug Bench would provide participants withan insight into compatibility of their product or service with the NBN and various Retail Service Providers. NBN Co is targeting commencement of testing at the facility in Quarter 3, 2013.To gauge interest in the creation of such a facility, NBN Co is inviting expression of interest to test

devices in the NBN Co Plug Bench. If you are interested, please email plugbench@nbnco.com.au and include the following details: your company name, address, technical contact details (name, telephone number and email address), Industry (eg security, medical alarms, payments), industry segment (ie is your organisation a monitoring centre, device manufacturer, installer?) and the number and type of devices that you wish to test.

MEET YOUR FUTURE EMPLOYEES ONLINE A unique new recruitment website launched recently www.employersconnect.com.au offers employers within the security industry the opportunity to meet with potential employees online. According to Employers Connect, employers who sign up will be able to:

16 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

• • • • • •

Reduce recruitment costs Increase hire quality View job seeker profiles Place a basic ad free of charge Have access to jobseekers videos Conduct video conferencing with the jobseeker For more details about this

employment service please email info@employersconnect.com.au


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:27 AM

Page 17


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:27 AM

Page 18


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:27 AM

Page 19


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:27 AM

Page 20

SECURITY AWARDS 2013

2013 AUSTRALIAN SECURITYINDUSTRY AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE As the saying goes ‘winners are grinners’. There was much grinning on shows as the winners of the 18th Australian Security Industry Awards for Excellence were presented at the Park Hyatt Hotel in Melbourne on the 2nd May. Over the following pages, we take a look at the stories behind the winners of the various awards presented on the night. Integrated Security Solution – Projects over $250,000: Blake Systems, Brisbane City Hall Restoration Project

In 2008 Brisbane City Council committed to a $215 million project for the preservation and restoration of the heritage listed City Hall, a building with immense cultural significance for Brisbane, Queensland and the nation. As a People’s place the building requires both open flow and high level access restrictions incorporated into its day to day functionality. Security of the facility had to achieve a highly evolved, integrated, yet unobtrusive controlled environment to protect visitors, tenants, their property, council stall and this major physical asset Following Brisbane City Council’s (BCC) undertaking to preserve and restore the icon that is City Hall, Blake Systems were approved to provide the electronic security facilities as part of the overall restoration project under the control of the lead contractor, Abigroup. Technology: A centrally managed Gallagher access control system running in a virtual environment on the council’s

20 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

data network is installed at over 170 Council facilities used by almost 14,000 card holders. Most of these facilities are also equipped with AXIS IP cameras operating on a Genetec video management platform. Incorporated in the system is the Ekahau WI-FI duress system which differentiates the City Hall solution. It provides BCC with an allocating system that secures assets while removing the need for visible equipment and reduces the potentially labour intensive monitoring of this diverse building.To support this, specified video analytics has been expanded to include moveable objects recognition. At City Hall, the CCTV cameras act as sensors silently watching for out of character changes in defined circumstances. For example, a painting is fitted with a wireless tag that is electronically monitored for movement. These movements are then tracked and the nearest camera is notified to record at a full frame rate.The plan manager feature of the video management system then alerts the control room staff that a situation has occurred and they are able to focus in on a particular area, without the need to monitor all 215 cameras and 127 channels of video analytics at any one time. The advantage of utilising the 127 channels of video analytics with a people counting capability included provision of both a health and safety and a marketing tool for BCC and other tenants (ie the monitoring of traffic flows, grouping of people and visitor destinations as well as the unexpected movement of people or assets and left objects).This high level of integrated analytics both increased the security of the facility and provided cost saving through the reduction of staff required to monitor the system. Project Management Challenges: The staged demolition, re-construction and reoccupation of the building posed a significant constraint on management of

the project in terms of labour requirements and project delivery. Cable access and the need to maintain the aesthetics of the building meant that specified pathways were not always achievable or practical.This was managed by working with BCC and Abigroup to limit the physical and financial impact of these changes. The achievement of excellence on this project is the relationship Blake Systems was able to build with their clients (Abigroup as their direct employer and Brisbane City Council as the end-user). Since first engaging Blake Systems as its principal electronic security solutions provider in 2009, BCC has worked with them to develop a platform for all future systems.The installation at City Hall will be a key node in the city wide security and surveillance network.

Technical Security Solution - Projects under $250,000: Macquarie University, Multi channel emergency communication system

Macquarie University is the first Australian university to introduce a comprehensive emergency alert system across its campuses. In 2012 it implemented the alerts system (alerts.ms.edu.au) to communicate with staff and students in emergency situations. The system can reach staff and students at any of the University’s campuses at any time to provide information and advice on what measures to take to stay safe.These messages can be targeted to small or specialist groups as necessary.The cloud based


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 21

SECURITY AWARDS 2013

technology is used in organisations like the US Armed Forces, it notifies student’s and staff of emergencies via email and SMS notifications to mobile devices such as mobile phones and ipads. Safety is a high priority at Macquarie, with the University taking every measure to ensure its campuses are safe environments for staff and students and is ever conscious of its occupational health and safety requirements and complies with regulatory obligations. Scope of installation: The complexities of a large student body, dispersed campuses and extensive operating hours could only be overcome by a multichannel messaging infrastructure with the ability to disseminate messages via email, text and phone. AtHoc are a leading provider of netcentric mass notification systems and were selected for their ability to integrate with Macquarie’s existing internal systems, but more importantly because the system doesn’t require users or administrators to purchase any additional hardware. Users receive notifications via text to their mobile phones, via text to voice calls at their desk or mobile phone or via existing email accounts. All of these communications can occur simultaneously without any additional effort from the initiator. To ensure this highly integrated multichannel system is used appropriately, the project team set up a number of internal processes. Among the project management challenges encountered during implementation included: • Coordination of resources in significantly separated time zones; • Implementing Macquarie University branding; • Engagement of staff and students to register with the system • Alignment of technology developed in the United States of America AtHoc provided a solution that delivered a number of critical components to the University, including its ease of use and breath of integration with existing university systems.The project team created a web interface for users to manage their details such as mobile phone numbers anytime anywhere.

The launch of alerts.mq.edu.au makes Macquarie the first Australian University with a multichannel emergency broadcast system.

Special Security Project: 13 CABS – TigerTeam

In a world first, Melbourne based 13CABS launched TigerTeam to the public in October 2012 in response to the increase of violent attacks and robberies against Cab Drivers. With the murder of a 25 year veteran Cab Driver in August 2012, 13CABS knew that Cab Driver protection had to be improved and immediate action was required. The 13CABS Management Team set the goals and objectives to enhance the safety of Cab Drivers and selected response vehicles as their obvious choice. The TigerTeam name was selected due to the large population of Indian Cab Drivers with the Bengal Tiger, India’s national animal, selected as the symbol for the TigerTeam.The Bengal tiger represents power, strength, alertness, intelligence and endurance, all traits encompassed by TigerTeams. In a 4 week timeframe, 13CABS fitted out three TigerTeam vehicles in striking livery with the latest safety technology and constant event tracking. The City of Melbourne and Victoria Police supported the security and safety initiative, designed to operate on weekends, public holidays and during major public events, periods in which police response times and resources have traditionally been stretched. The TigerTeam defined as “a group of independent experts assigned to investigate and solve problems” was staffed with taxi industry experts to mediate disputes, and qualified security guards to control escalated situations. In response to a Cab Driver activating their duress alarm, the closest TigerTeam

is allocated to attend whilst the 13CABS Contact Centre monitors the situation through emergency open-mic radio technology, updating the attending Tiger Team and Police as required. When the TigerTeam is not assisting Cab Drivers in distress, they attend cab ranks, major public events, and popular hot spots around Melbourne to promote cab safety with potential passengers. TigerTeam raises awareness of commonly disputed issues before passengers get in cabs, such as mandatory late-night fare prepayment. Statistics and feedback have proven TigerTeam as a valuable resource providing a safer work environment for Cab Drivers. In the initial 3 months assaults on drivers decreased by 33%, with the TigerTeam assisting distressed Cab Drivers in 134 incidents and the request for police assistance from the 13CABS Contact Centre decreased by 53%.

Special Security Event – ACG Security: Australian Open

As the first tennis Grand Slam each year, the Australian Open is probably the most publicised and globally recognised sporting events to take place on Australian shores. Since 2009 ACG Security has been tasked with managing all manpower security services for the prestigious event with the event attendance of 686,606 being only second to the US Open. It is recognised that such an event is subjected to intense scrutiny and any publicity is a reflection of security providers and the security industry in general. ACG takes their responsibility as industry ambassadors seriously and focus their efforts on quality recruitment, training and performance management measures to deliver a professional outcome for their client and Victoria. AGC screen their staff for their ability to effectively communicate

SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 21


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 22

SECURITY AWARDS 2013

with different cultural backgrounds, tourists, children, the elderly and the disabled. The event poses many challenges for the ACG team who are responsible for the security and welfare of all property, patrons and competitors over a 60 day period inclusive of the 14 day event. Flexibility and responsiveness has been a winning quality for ACG, providing the ability to meet the demands of the fluid nature of the event with amendments to schedules, special guests, media commitments and the impact of Melbourne weather providing a challenge at any moment, not to mention the occasional evening match that extends past 2.00am in the morning. The requirement to ensure employees receive proper rotations, adequate rest and weather protection was constant. ACG’s seasoned supervisory team worked hard to make certain that all personnel remained engaged, alert and aware at all times. In addition to the general induction training provided to all staff for the event, supervisors undertook joint induction and training with Melbourne Olympic Parks trust staff to enhance liaison and interaction prior to the event to optimise working relationships. Supervisors also formed part of the Incident Response Teams. The Australian Open courts are different to other sporting events with minimal barrier protection provided between players and the crowd at large. Risk assessment and management forms a specific part of player protection and other risks associated with player escorts and special sponsor events. During the event, ACG provided up to 280 personnel per day during the tournament with a total of 55,000 hours being worked for the duration of the event. With all incidents noted, the Australian Open organisers advised ACG that 2013 was again a year of zero complaints regarding the performance of security. 2013 also recorded an all time low for ejections and assaults, with significant incidents decreasing from previous years by 60%.

22 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

Individual Achievement - Chris Lockwood, G4S Custodial Services

As an employee with G4S for 17 years, Chris is recognised by his line managers as always being the first to assist in any situation where his skillset may be relevant and be involved in any training or new initiatives that develop him and others. As National Operations Training Manager, Chris was deployed to Manus Island for 4 days to finalise and induction training package for guards. Upon his arrival Chris was co-opted for a 3-week stay to help manage rising tensions with transferees on the Island. He willingly obliged to help his colleagues. In an unsolicited email from the islands Operation Manager to senior management in Australia, Chris’s efforts were described: “His scope on the island was simple, check out training and develop the training manual; however he did so much more. In true Locky style, he pitched in everywhere, and I mean everywhere. He assisted in areas I didn’t think someone that “little” could; from response team leader, oncall response team most nights, ECC, scribe and even inducted transferees. Words cannot express how valuable Chris was as a valued team member and as a friend”. Whilst on the Island he co-ordinated high risk extractions, responded to numerous emotionally and mentally challenging self harm incidents whilst also conducting training and inducting transferees. He maintained a high level of performance despite the regular 18 hour days and continued to train local guards for the demanding roles. Back in Australia, Chris continues to lend support and advice to the team on Manus Island. Chris was recognised for his individual and team commitment in a confronting and challenging environment.

Individual achievement – Security Student of the year, Grant Frankel – Melbourne Racing Club

Getting ahead in the security industry can be a challenge. With the thousands of people employed within the industry, management opportunities and a promotion from within the industry are not always readily available. Having worked in the security industry for over 17 years Grant Frankel recognised that to further his career aspirations he needed to bolster his qualifications. It wasn’t that Grant did not hold qualifications or have significant experience. His qualifications and continued professional development were operationally based including defibrillation, oxygen administration, emergency incident response, OH&S, leadership for supervisor training and a couple of Certificate 3 security courses. After reviewing opportunities and recognising his strengths and weaknesses, Grant decided on three different qualifications that could advance his progress in the industry: a Diploma of Security and Risk Management, a Diploma of Occupational Health and Safety and an Advanced Diploma in Public Safety (Emergency Management). In 2012 he completed the three qualifications. With qualifications in hand, Grant saw an opportunity at the Melbourne Racing Club who had advertised for a Security Manager. Grant always had an interest in horse racing and thought that this would be a great next step in his evolution within the security industry.The position involved not only the strategic level decision making and development of the racing clubs security direction, but also a part operational where he would be required to be on course on race days and events to lead the team and increase their knowledge through my


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

19/6/13

12:34 PM

Page 23


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 24

SECURITY AWARDS 2013

experience and qualifications.The qualifications he obtained were invaluable in being able to secure the position.

Security Management - Suzette Po-Williams, Central Monitoring Services Pty Ltd

Central Monitoring Services have been a champion of ‘The Staying Home Leaving Violence’ program that helps women and children escape domestic violence to remain safely in their homes. A 12 month trial period was funded by the Community Services Program (SHLV) Staying Home Leaving Violence, while NSW Police also supplied some resources. The SOS Link Device works via the Central Monitoring Services 24 hour monitoring centre and have been specifically designed for women in a threat situation, using the latest GPS technology to identify their location. A dedicated phone line at the NSW PoliceLink meant that a call for help could be prioritised and a police car dispatched to the exact location of the caller based on the GPS signal received. To date the feedback has been positive, with Suzette Po-Williams from Central Monitoring Services taking a lead role in developing the initiative. The SHLV program was developed in response to evidence that domestic violence is the major reason when women and children become homeless. Working with the police and courts the program aims to remove violent family members. If they choose, the victim and children can stay in the home. Clients receive support services ranging from practical assistance such as installing security measures in their homes and help with financial and personal problems. The program targets women aged over 18 years and their children who 24 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

have separated from a violent partner or family member and choose to remain in their own home or another home of their choice.The project covers eighteen communities across NSW and the trial provided fifty (50) alarms to vulnerable women.The small mobile phone like device sends communications with GPS technology so that Police can quickly locate the victims. The early results are very encouraging, the security devices are already having a real impact on the lives of vulnerable women, allowing them to do simple thing such as visit their local shopping centre or drop their children off to school. The device is a mobile phone combined with a duress button which uses GPS tracking.The duress button sends a GPS signal to Central Monitoring Services concurrent with an automated phone call. A trained operator tries to speak with the client and decides the response level. Central Monitoring Services contacts PoliceLink on a dedicated line as required and a car is sent from the nearest Police station.

Training – Chubb Electronic Security

Chubb Electronic Security in recognising the rapidly changing communications technology landscape has made a clear commitment and statement to the market by upskilling its staff to better serve the needs of clients. As Carl Crowley, Managing Director, Chubb Electronic Security puts it “Chubb is committed to offering our employees the best possible training and personal development to help them succeed within their chosen career path in our industry. We strongly believe by having the best trained and certified technicians in the industry, it enables us to best serve our customers’ needs in this rapidly changing technologylandscap.e”

Staff actively participate in training programs including IT certification, manufacturer certifications, employee scholar program, ACE certification and traineeship programs. Chubb has built a culture around: • Protecting the health and safety of its employees, contractors, customers and the natural environment. • Quality and delivery excellence through the application of Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE) operating principles. • Actively promoting an ethical culture, ensuring awareness of and full compliance with UTC’s “Code of Ethics” • Support life-long learning and development of our people. Chubb is leading the way in the industry with 57 technicians enrolled on the Industry’s Security Technician Certification program.These participants are also enrolled in the Certificate III in Telecommunications to meet future needs and technologies, including the move to fibre through the roll-out of the National Broadband Network. Chubb has more than 50 participants enrolled in the UTC formal education employee scholar program adding to the already 32,500 degrees earned by UTC employees in over 50 countries. With the vast array of high tech product manufacturers in the industry, Chubb’s technicians are provided with the necessary manufacturers training and certification, including recent manufacturers certifications such as 48 Lenel certified technicians (Silver to master level), 54 Gallagher (Cardax) certified technicians/engineers and 15 Interlogix Forcefield certified technicians. Chubb has shown tremendous leadership through its commitment to innovation, ongoing training and continuous improvement. In doing so the company has positioned itself to better meet the future needs of its customers. Nominations open for the 2014 Australian Security Industry Awards for Excellence on 1 October 2013. For more information visit www.asial.com.au Nominationsare open to members and non-members of ASIAL.


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 25


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 26

SECURITY MANAGEMENT

MANAGING REPUTATIONAL CRISES By Bruce T. Blythe and Daniel Diermeier*

Explosions, natural disasters, terrorist attacks kidnappings, data breaches, and extortions are not only security crises, they are also reputational crises: companies and their leaders are being evaluated by an ever more sceptical audience on how well they are handling the event and if they were sufficiently prepared. It is commonly believed that the organisation’s communications or public relations department will handle crisisrelated reputational issues, right? But, to believe communications and public relations departments are the sole mechanisms for addressing reputation during a crisis is incorrect. All high profile crises have a reputational dimension. So, how can corporate security protect and even build organisational reputation?

Thinking From Their Perspectives Even if not tasked directly by senior executives, you can have influence in protecting crisis-related reputation. In order to have effective influence with executives, it is helpful to see things from their perspectives. What is it that executives and board members are most concerned about? One would think shareholder value and financial growth. But, annual surveys with senior executives and board members paint a different picture. Executives and board

26 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

members report they are most concerned about people and reputation. In order to align with executives during crises, it is important to look beyond the normal corporate security silo and adopt an enterprise-wide point of view. Look for ways you can be a trusted advisor to corporate leaders during crises.Too often staff persons focus only on their silos of responsibility and not on protecting the enterprise as a whole. An expanded focus on protecting core assets, including reputation, will align you with the primary concerns of executives and board members. Do this effectively, and the organisation will be protected and your personal reputation will soar.

When is Reputation an Issue? Focus on “reputational red flags.” Watch for the following issues that can indicate reputation may be threatened: • Public outrage • Stakeholder fear • Negative media involvement

• When there is real or perceived harm to people, was the organisation perceived to be at fault? If so, stakeholder blame will focus on to the following issues: o Foreseeable: Should the organisation have foreseen this crisis was going to happen? o Preventable: Could this crisis have been prevented through responsible actions? o Unprepared: Was the organisation unprepared to respond and mitigate the damage? o Unjust: Were there any actions or inactions that were reasonably unfair? o Intentional: Did the organisation do something intentional that caused harm? o Negligent: Was the perceived duty to protect neglected? Multidisciplinary perspectives are important to address these threats. What


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 27

SECURITY MANAGEMENT

“THINK INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE BOX OF CORPORATE SECURITY FOR ANSWERS”

Bruce T. Blythe SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 27


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 28

SECURITY MANAGEMENT

do you see as beneficial reputationbuilding decisions and actions from the vantage of corporate security? Even outside your silo, are there actions you could recommend to protect trust and reputation during a crisis? Think inside and “outside the box” of corporate security for answers. Here’s how.

anticipate the reaction of stakeholders if it is found out through other means than direct communication from the company. Will the rationale for not disclosing the information pass the reasonable person test? Most often, it is better to get bad information all released at one time, than to withhold information that continues to trickle out over time.

Trust Building Components Even though the advantages are obvious, leaders continue to struggle with building and maintaining trust, especially during high-consequence crises. Corporate security professionals should observe if the organisation is maintaining reputational equity through a balanced trust-building crisis response. Research has identified four (4) major factors that influence the level of trust among crisis-involved stakeholders. A balance of each is needed in order to protect reputation. Transparency: Does the audience believe that the company is willfully withholding relevant information? What is considered relevant will depend on the audience, not on the organisation. However, you may fail to reach perceived transparency despite full disclosure.Technical mumbo-jumbo, acronyms, a complex explanation, or legalese, even if it involves disclosing relevant information, will not be considered transparent by the general public. Rather, an audience will assume that a company is hiding behind incomprehensible jargon rather than speaking plainly and in a straightforward manner. There may be times when management does not want to release known information. If this is the case,

Expertise: Perceived lack of expertise can quickly undermine trust. Companies are usually viewed as competent.The public usually does not doubt their ability, but they often doubt their willingness to do the right thing, as was the case following BP’s Gulf oil spill in the U.S. If there is a perceived lack of expertise, bringing in third-party experts with high credibility is one way to address this concern. However it is achieved, a perceived lack of expertise needs to be addressed, whether this perception is accurate or not. There are two universal expectations related to expertise that arise by involved stakeholders when a crisis occurs.These expectations typically lie dormant during normal times.Then when stakeholder harm is perceived or realised, people immediately ask questions about the expertise and preparedness of the organisation and its leaders. Stakeholders will ask,“What did the organisation do to prevent this crisis situation?” If the company appears negligent, dismissive, or incompetent, then outrage will occur. Secondly, stakeholders expect that the company remain prepared to effectively manage a crisis when it occurs, especially when the crisis was considered foreseeable.This holds even if the ultimate cause of the crisis is

external to the company, as in a natural disaster or terrorist attack. Reputation and trust in the company and its leaders will diminish significantly when the expertise to prevent and respond to the crisis is perceived as inadequate. Commitment: The third factor is Commitment. At the end of the day the audience wants make sure that the problem is addressed and, to the extent possible, they are made whole. One problem with this expectation is that in the short-window when an audience is actually paying attention to a crisis it is frequently impossible to establish even the most basic facts, let alone finding a solution. The most powerful and direct way to signal commitment is for leaders to show up in a highly-visible manner and take charge. It demonstrates accountability and sends the message that nothing is more important than resolving this particular crisis. Empathy: The final component, empathy, is often the most important factor of the four and the easiest to miss. Showing empathy is not the same thing as apologising. We show empathy with colleagues at work, neighbors, and family members even if we do not feel responsible. A leader reaching out to perceived victims with warmth and authenticity can be very effective, whether there is an apology or not. As a security manager, look at the broader response during crises. Is the organisation responding with all four areas that build trust and reputation? If not, you have an opportunity to be a strategic advisor to the organisation that brings value beyond the good work you provide as a corporate security director.

* ABOUT THE AUTHORS: Bruce Blythe is an internationally acclaimed crisis management expert. He is chairman of three companies that provide a continuum of crisis preparedness, crisis response, and employee return-to-work services. He is author of Blindsided: A Manager’s Guide to Catastrophic Incidents in the Workplace. He served in US Marine Corps Military Police, as consultant to the FBI, and is a clinical psychologist. Daniel Diermeier (d-diermeier@kellogg.northwestern.edu) is the IBM Distinguished Professor of Regulation and Competitive Practice and Director of the Ford Motor Company Center for Global Citizenship, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. He is the author of the book Reputation Rules: Strategies for Building your Company’s Most Valuable Asset (McGraw-Hill, April 2011).

28 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 29


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:30 AM

Page 30

Q&A

Q&A

WITH

G4S

Nick Buckles

G4S is the world’s largest security company as measured by revenues, with operations in over 125 countries.The company’s business operation ranks as the third largest employer in the world with over 620,000 employees and revenues in excess of £7.5 billion. The company has evolved from a ‘blue collar’ security firm into a wider ranging ‘security solutions’ business through an active acquisition strategy and the development of outsourced business processes related to security and safety risks. A few days prior to bowing out as Chief Executive Officer of G4S, Nick Buckles spoke with Bryan de Caires. He was joined by David Morgan, Group Managing Director, Care and Justice Services, G4S (UK) and Rachel Owens, Strategic Development Director, G4S (Australia and New Zealand). Security Insider (SI): In early 2012 when the UK government announced its plans for police privatization, it was met with a degree of scepticism. A year on what has been achieved? Nick Buckles (NB): In terms of police outsourcing, we probably have the most comprehensive contracts of any with the Lincolnshire Police contract. Police in the United Kingdom have

30 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

grappled with the challenge of how to improve operational efficiency and increase frontline policing. Outsourcing of back office personnel (ie HR, payroll, finance), semi-operational duties (ie recruitment, training) and operational duties (ie managing cells, custody suites, control rooms) provides a solution. In 2012 Lincolnshire Police outsourced 30% of their cost base to G4S, in essence any activity in uniform that was unsworn. What we have managed to do in the first 12 months is take 16% of the costs out. What Lincolnshire Police have done with this cost saving is re-invest it on frontline policing. One of the innovations we have introduced is the branded ‘street to suite’ service which means that if there is an arrest out in the field, we send out one of our team to pick them up and bring them back to the station for processing. What this means is that police are always out their facing the public, they don’t get involved in any of the administration.” The police control room function handling ‘999’ emergency calls was also

outsourced to G4S.The result has been a marked improvement in call reporting, handling, management, processing and dispatch. The fact of the matter is that outsourcing has been a huge success so far in Lincolnshire. Our next iteration in 1218 months will be to bring in hand held devices and other technologies for frontline personnel to improve management information systems and operations. If it is just back office functions that are outsourced the results will be limited.To maximize operational efficiencies and synergies, outsourcing needs to be implemented across the whole organization. The fear among some was that cost efficiencies gained through outsourcing would translate to a cut in the number of frontline police, but this hasn’t been the case. In Lincolnshire, we can categorically say that there are now more police on the beat than there were before we took over. In the past year savings made by


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

4:58 PM

Page 31

Q&A Q&A

Lincolnshire Police, as a result of outsourcing services to G4S, has enabled them to put more than 20 additional police officers on the beat. (SI): So why has Lincolnshire Police’s outsourcing initiative been a success? (NB): The reason we were successful with Lincolnshire was because we tailored the solution to what they wanted.They felt very comfortable with what we were going to do because they were part of the process. So we didn’t come in as a big IT outsourcing company and say we’ll take all of this away, and this is what you’ll get. It was completely and utterly bespoke. The public’s scepticism appears to have more to do with the ideology behind police outsourcing than the security industry’s ability to perform a greater role. The fact of the matter is that since Lincolnshire commenced their outsourcing push, the public have been provided with improved control room operations management, reduced back office costs and increased frontline policing. What is evident is that the public perception of the industry has changed enormously in the UK because of government outsourcing. Whilst regulatory changes introduced a decade ago have created a common minimum standard, change has really come from the security industry moving into government outsourcing.Then, because we were known in government outsourcing, we were then able to move back into police outsourcing. I don’t think we could’ve necessarily made the transition from security straight to police outsourcing, because we wouldn’t have the backoffice capability that we gained through doing some of the government outsourcing work. Ultimately it is about capability and credentials.Track record, references and the ability to convince people that we can export our expertise from the UK to Australia and vice versa. (SI): An interesting aspect of what is happening in the UK is that there has been strong support among senior police (through organisations such as the Association of Chief Police Officers, ACPO) for an extension in the role of private companies in policing. How has this support been achieved?

(NB): Chief Constables have always been open minded because they are not political. If they (Chief Constables) can get investment and improved operational performance given to them and cost reductions, why wouldn’t they? If they are still in charge of operational policing and still have the same rights and controls, why wouldn’t they? They get better service, quicker.That’s one of the things we do in the private sector differently, we can get IT investment in quicker. I sincerely believe that police forces and prisons could reform themselves, but they don’t.The only reason we do it is that we have a contract that we sign that is for 10 years and we are committed to saving 15% a year of their existing cost base. There is no in-house operation that can commit to do that, because what happens if they don’t? There is no imperative for them to do so.”

(SI): So how do you view the opportunities in Australia? (NB): Having spent time speaking with government, we believe there are outsourcing opportunities here. Government is looking for ways to manage costs and innovate.They know in time that the government element of Gross Domestic Product can balloon very quickly. So they are looking at ways to take costs out. It’s early days, but I am quite encouraged by the politicians views on outsourcing, contestability or market testing or whatever we call it actually.To me it’s a third party taking responsibility for the costs and operation of a service and improving it. Certainly prisons will continue to look to the private sector for innovation and cost savings. Immigration detention centres, for example, would be a major opportunity.There may even be opportunities to assist with management

Rachel Owens

of asylum seekers in the community. For example, in the UK where there were multiple suppliers, there are now a few select contractors. We are a prime contractor and manage about 30% of asylum seekers in the UK in two regions. We set up their accommodation and arrange their schooling. We definitely see some opportunities here, if Australian policy develops in this direction of course.

(SI): What are the key drivers for outsourcing in Australia? Rachel Owens (RO): Our message is to get more frontline police officers out on the streets and on the beat; let us look after the support and administration functions.This is one option governments will need to consider as the pressure to reduce costs mount – it is about maintaining dialogue. It is also about seeing if we can translate our successes in the UK to fit the Australian environment. In the UK, the Police force culture has

G4S: Electronic Monitoring (England and Wales) – key contract metrics • For the last 18 years, G4S has provided end to end electronic monitoring services on behalf of the Ministry of Justice. • The world’s largest electronic monitoring contract • 11,000 subjects monitored in the UK alone, across all risk types • Currently 3 out of the 5 contract regions covering the North East and North West, East Midlands,Yorkshire and Humberside, South East and South West. • Dealt with approximately 300,000 curfew orders between January 2007 and July 2011. • Delivered a 12-month rolling service without a single SLA or KPI failure • 8 regional operational hubs. • 1% of caseload is monitoring of terrorist suspects using G4S proprietary GPS tracking technology. • Process more than 30,000 subject incidents per month. • 23,000 field visits per month, including high priority installations and violation response visits. • 24-hour call centre, managing more than 60,000 calls per month. • Enter over 17,000 stakeholder documents per month. • Handled 45 million calls since 2005. • Youngest subject is 10, oldest is 85. • Carried out 1 million home visits since 2005.

David Morgan

SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 31


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

4:58 PM

Page 32

Q&A

Q&A

undergone a significant transformation over the past twenty years. As a result, improvements now need to come from operational efficiencies rather than in employment terms and conditions. Many of the back office activities performed today by sworn police officers in Australia have not been performed by police officers in the UK for many years.The challenge for Australia will be making the transition. (NB): In the UK we’ve civilianized something that was already civilianized – and improved it. So actually there’s a bigger prize here, but probably a bigger change. Given the nature, scope and complexity of activities outsourced, capability, credentials and even size of the contractors does matter.The cost of putting a bid together and a team with the operational expertise makes it very difficult for small players to compete.There is also the bigger issue of if things don’t work out you need to be able to take ownership and stand behind your failure. Something that G4S experienced during the 2012 London Olympics. I hate to bring the Olympics up, but we actually stood behind our contract failure. Nobody else could have done so. Small players will never play in the outsourcing space as far as I’m concerned. Even here where our business is $150-200 million, without the support from the UK and the fact that we take a long term view, it would be quite a challenge to develop the business. David Morgan (DM): It is also the longevity of the deal. In most outsourcing projects you are looking at 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 years.You have to have confidence in your supplier that they have the ability to be able to live with that level of partnership. As a result, the investment that it takes to get that partnership to work requires significant working capital, which by implication means only a small number of players can play in that space. The other issue is the finite supply of subject matter experts. After 20 years of experience, we have been able to grow our own experts who have come up through the ranks, rather than just import experts from the public service. (SI): During the London Olympics the company came under intense scrutiny over its delivery of the Olympic security

32 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

contract. In the aftermath of the games G4S’s own review accepted responsibility for the failure to deliver fully on the Olympic contract.The challenge of putting together a flexible workforce of the magnitude of 10,000 people over a relatively short period of time proved too great a challenge. What are the take outs for the company from their Olympics experience? (NB): There were enormous lessons for us from the London Olympics. I think this was the first time that security for an event of this size was outsourced to the private sector anywhere in the world. Things did go wrong and we were very sorry that they did. A review we carried out after the Games identified failures in management systems and our data monitoring to track the progress of our workforce through a very complex training and accreditation process for dozens of different roles. We have learnt lessons and taken measures which include a more rigorous risk assessment for new contracts and improved contract take-on processes and project management. One of the lessons we have learned is about ramp-up for an event of this size. We were asked originally to supply 2,000 staff and then 7 months before the Games began the demand rose to over 10,000. We had to recruit, train, equip and prepare them all in about 7 months. We were required to create what was, in effect, a very large, pop-up company – all for a month’s work. I am not making excuses, we should have done it. We did get more than 80% of our workforce out and I am very proud of our employees who helped ensure a safe and secure Games; they performed very well and were a credit to the company. (SI): With a global workforce of over 620,000 personnel, how do you ensure quality? (NB): Through hard work. We have minimum standards that we adhere to, then it is culture really, culture and process. We acknowledge that we are not always going to get it right all of the time. We strive to ensure that we are better than those that we compete against. (SI): A challenge faced by many security

providers is addressing the ‘race to the bottom’ mentality where lowest price rather than best value is the key driver. What is your approach to this challenge? (NB): You try and choose customers who do care about quality.That is why our segment strategy is to focus on sectors such as aviation, ports, oil and gas where quality is of high importance and rates are commensurate with the expectations for that higher quality. Given our expertise and experience that is where we try to focus our business. And the clients who appreciate our expertise and experience, and who want higher quality services, are prepared to pay commensurate rates for that. What they are looking for is best value for money.That’s what I think G4S offers and that’s the part of the industry we focus on.There’s no magic story. (SI): What is the company’s strategy to consolidate and maintain growth? (NB): In the next 12 months you will see less acquisition and some divestments. Our focus will be on organic growth, the brand and margins. We’ve got to recycle some funds at the moment, so we will not be as aggressive, but in time we will return to making key acquisitions and expanding… at the moment there is no one we have our eye on. (SI): Having worked in security for over 28 years, what advice do you have for anyone entering the industry today? (NB): It is really to be prepared for a lot of grind. It’s a tough business to be in and you’ve got to find sectors and services that you can differentiate to set you apart from standard ‘manned’ security. It’s a tough, tough business to be in. Our exciting growth areas are in sectors and services where we have less competitors and higher margins. It’s about differentiation and it’s about finding the right customers. Don’t just be a generalist, it’s just too tough. It’s also a good business in terms of culture. I think the service ethos in the security business is incredible, I really do. When you think about how many people we have to reliably get out and deliver on a daily basis, you’ve got to be very good at managing people and very good at inspiring people.That’s the interesting part. The hard part is building margins.


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:33 AM

Page 33


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:33 AM

Page 34

DEBT RECOVERY

DEBT RECOVERYTHE BASICS By Patrick Ferguson, Goldrick Farrell Mullan solicitors

"It is very iniquitous to make me pay my debts - you have no idea of the pain it gives one." Byron, Lord on debt.

Most businesses will on occasion have to chase their customers for payment of overdue invoices or debts. I briefly discuss below some issues & problems involved in chasing debts including, whether in some cases, it would be simply better to write off the debt rather than “ throw good money after bad�.

Time limit & demand Usually the first step in recovering a debt is to write a letter of demand to the debtor either yourself or through your solicitor or debt collection agency.There is a 6 year time limit to recover debts. The 6 years will run from the date on which the debt became due and payable.This period can be extended in certain circumstances if the debtor acknowledges in writing that the debt is still owing and promises to pay it and then fails to do so.Then the 6 year time limit for recovering the debt would run from the date on which the debtor acknowledged the debt as owing. Does the debtor have assets? If your debtor fails to comply with the letter of demand for payment you will then have to decide whether it is

34 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

worthwhile proceeding further. An important factor to consider is whether or not the debtor is likely to have any assets or has the ability to pay the debt. Worthwhile enquiries to make might include a property search to see if the debtor owns real estate, a bankruptcy search to ensure that he is not already bankrupt or that there are not current bankruptcy proceedings against him and company search to ascertain whether there are any current company windup proceedings against the company.

incur in running such a matter. Similarly, in NSW, if the debt is over $10,000 but less than $20,000 then the matter will be heard in the general division of the local Court which will require witnesses to attend to give oral evidence and be cross-examined in the normal way. However, the maximum costs you can get are 25% of the amount of the judgement awarded - a small percentage of your actual legal costs in running such a case in the local Court. There are similar limits in the other States.

Limits on costs recoverable You need to be aware that when recovering smaller debts legal costs you can be awarded by the Courts are extremely limited. For example, in NSW if your debt is less than $10,000 you will have to commence debt recovery proceedings in the small claims division of the local Court. In the small claims division the parties often represent themselves but if you do engage in a lawyer to represent you matter then the maximum amount of legal costs you can be awarded if successful with your claim is currently only $737.36 - a small percentage of the legal costs you will

Where to sue In most cases the creditor and debtor are both located in the same State and the legal proceedings will be commenced there. However, if for example, the creditor is located in Sydney but the debtor is in Melbourne, there may be a risk in suing the debtor in the NSW if the debtor was in fact dealing with the Victorian branch of your company.The Victorian debtor might make an application to the NSW Court to stay the proceedings pursuant to the Service and Execution of Process Act on the grounds that a Court in Victoria is the appropriate venue. When deciding


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:33 AM

Page 35

DEBT RECOVERY

such an application, the NSW Court considers factors such as: • where the parties and their witnesses are resident or situated • where the goods or services were ordered and delivered, the financial circumstances of the parties and • any agreement between the parties concerning which State law applies to the contract. If the Victorian debtor’s application for a stay is successful, then the legal proceedings will be stayed and you will have to recommence debt recovery proceedings in Victoria.This would mean that the legal costs of commencing the legal proceedings in NSW are not recoverable. To assist your chances of recovering your debt and your legal costs and to reduce the chances of a successful application for a stay of proceedings under the Service and Execution of Process Act, I would suggest that you consider having the following in your customers credit applications/terms and conditions of trade: • a provision that the law of your State is the governing law of the contract • a provision that your customer agrees to pay all your debt recovery costs on a solicitor/client basis • in the case of a customer that is a company, that you have signed personal guarantees from the directors of that company

Enforcing your judgement If the debtor does not file a Defence to your claim (in most States 28 days from the date of service of the Court document) you can then immediately apply for default judgement. If a Defence is filed, the claim and defence will be listed for hearing before the Court. If you win and get judgement you then have to try and enforce it. With smaller debts, the enforcement costs may mean that it is not costeffective to do so. For example, legal costs for preparing a bankruptcy notice would be approximately $300 – $400 plus GST, the filing fee is currently $440 and the process server is likely to charge approximately $60 – $90 to personally

serve the bankruptcy notice on the debtor. If, after service of the bankruptcy notice the debtor then pays the debt you cannot recover the costs of issuing and serving the bankruptcy notice (unless you had some provision in your contract with your customer allowing you to do so). If the debtor does not pay and you wish to proceed with a bankruptcy petition then legal costs would be likely to be in the region of $4,000 – $5,000, the Court filing fee is currently $4,375 if the creditor is a listed corporation, $2,915 if a corporation and $1215 if an individual and the process server fee would again likely to be in the region of

Other common methods of enforcing a judgement against a debtor include: • serving a garnishee order on the debtor’s bank (if you know these details) or employer in the case of an individual debtor which requires the bank or employer pay the judgement from the bank account or a percentage of the individual debtor’s salary • an examination summons served on the individual debtor or director of the debtor company requiring them to attend Court to be examined in relation to the assets of the individual or company in question, • a writ of execution which requires the sheriff to attend the debtor’s premises in the hope that he can seize property belonging to the debtor which can be used and sold to pay the debts or part of the debt. These methods of enforcement are much cheaper than bankruptcy or company windup proceedings, but one problem with them is that the debtor can make an application to the Court to pay the judgement debt by instalments and if such an application is granted then enforcement is put on hold as long as the debtor makes the instalment payments by the due date(s).

$60 – $90 (provided of course that the debtor can easily be located and served – the cost would be considerably more if the process server has to make several attempts at service). However, if the debtor pays the debt prior to the hearing of the bankruptcy petition then the Court will dismiss the bankruptcy petition but will order the debtor to pay your costs. For company windup proceedings in the Federal Court legal costs would likely be $4,000 – $5,000, the Court filing fee is currently $1,870 for a listed corporation creditor, $1,245 if a corporation and $515 for an individual or partnership creditor. Publishing the insolvency notice with ASIC will cost $145 from 1 July 2013. If the debtor pays the debt prior to the hearing of the windup application the Court will dismiss the application but order the company to pay your costs.

Tax and GST You may be able to claim a tax deduction or GST adjustment in respect of a bad debt.Your accountant can advise you in relation to this and you can obtain further information from the Australian taxation office website – see Taxation Ruling TR 92/18 and Goods and Services Tax Ruling GSTR 2000/2. About the Author Patrick Ferguson is an associate with Goldrick Farrell Mullan solicitors, Sydney. He has wide experience in debt recovery matters and has acted for several commercial agencies and corporate and individual creditors as well as bankruptcy trustees and liquidators. He can be contacted on 02 9413 2600 or patrick.ferguson@gfm.com.au if you require any further information in relation to recovering debts.

SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 35


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:33 AM

Page 36

ADVERTORIAL

UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN SYDNEY

MIGRATION FROM CONCEPT TO INTEGRITI The first Concept 3000 equipment was installed at the University of Western Sydney (UWS) in late 1999.The decision to choose Concept was made for a variety of reasons, but two of the deal clinchers were that: 1. the robust Concept LAN protocol allowed the university to utilise existing telecom cables between buildings with the implicit cost savings being significant; 2. the new accredited training regime initiated just weeks earlier by Inner Range meant that a pool of properly trained technicians would always be available to install and service the new installation into the future. Inner Range Insight Software was first registered for use at UWS in 2006 and the systems just grew and grew, eventually servicing all five UWS campuses. In 2008, when the old Telecom cables finally began to corrode, the connections between buildings were redirected over the University’s IP infrastructure using the then new Inner Range CLOE (Concept LAN over Ethernet) modules.The systems kept growing without missing a beat. By the middle of 2011, UWS were running separate Insight databases on each of their five campuses and Inner Range were approached at that time to recommend a way of combining all of these databases into one; with both centralised and localised management capability depending on the particular

36 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

functionality required.The timing was ideal as Inner Range were then in the final stages of developing their new Integriti technology platform and it was perfect for the job. Meetings were held and the project was assessed but it soon became evident that the task was not going to be a simple one.These were very busy systems running 24/7. They controlled thousands of doors and monitored security inputs.They were integrated with building management systems and their continuing operation was critical. Where to start? Copies of the five databases were taken and sent to Inner Range where engineers wrote software scripts to analyse and compare the programming of the different systems. One of the major obstacles was the different data structures of the two systems.The Concept system was the premier product of its time but the incredible firepower in the new Integriti platform meant that now so much could be improved.To merely migrate the existing functionality would be to waste the magnificent array of options that Integriti had to offer, but to change things too radically would risk confusion and disruption during the critical change over. What to do? Finally a plan was hatched. Inner Range would act somewhat as a project co-ordinator taking on the work of merging and modifying the various databases. Data migration programs were written to handle the bulk work

and specialised software tools were developed to massage old Concept programming structures to, where possible, make use of the increased flexibility inherent in the new platform. A new server consistent with specifications as advised by Inner Range software engineers was procured and installed at the Parramatta campus under the direction of the University’s IT department. Inner Range support technicians were given remote VPN access to this server and the Integriti software was uploaded to the server and tested. A major objective of the project was to improve data quality across the entire system, and the migration process presented a perfect opportunity to tackle this. User identities could now be merged across all five campuses. So Inner Range engineers devised a number of automated techniques to identify duplicate or invalid records, and then consolidate the amended records into the new global system.This would have been a prohibitive operation to attempt manually and, to the university, it represented a saving of thousands of operator hours. During the data migration process, it became apparent that the Concept systems on site had slowly evolved to perform considerably more than just security and access control functions. Aside from the usual integrations to building management and paging devices, the system had also been


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:33 AM

Page 37

ADVERTORIAL

A major objective of the project was to improve data quality across the entire system, and the migration process presented a perfect opportunity to tackle this.

SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 37


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:33 AM

Page 38

ADVERTORIAL

used as an automation controller in part of a large climate change research project being undertaken by the university.This project known as the Free Air CO2 Enrichment project or F.A.C.E. was right out of left field and totally unexpected, but nevertheless its programming was carefully migrated from Concept Calculated Auxiliaries to Integriti Macros and tested into submission. Re-implementing this logic using Integriti macros was a virtual baptism of fire for the new technology but, in testimony to the versatility of the Integriti structures, on migration day everything ran smoothly. The new Integriti Controllers were backwardly compatible with all of the old Concept LAN modules so the only hardware that would need to be changed to bring these systems into the new millennium was the 32 Concept Controllers. All of the other hardware such as readers, door locks, door controllers and zone expanders could remain in place, however some of the module addresses would have to be changed to be meaningful when connected to an Integriti controller. The new Integriti Controllers were despatched to local installation companies who under the direction of Inner Range support technicians installed them on site alongside the existing Concept Controllers.These new Integriti Controllers were then connected via IP and enrolled on the new Integriti server at Parramatta. Up to this time everything at the university was still running on the old Concept systems, nothing had been touched.The new Integriti system, being the new server and the 32 Integriti controllers, was running completely separately but in an idle state. In order to achieve the migration with virtually no downtime it was planned that both the Concept and Integriti controllers would run side-byside for the period of the migration.The LAN segments from each of the Concept controllers would be cut over one by one to the new Integriti controllers. If the plan worked there would be a seamless migration, with only seconds of downtime as the RS485 LAN was moved from the Concept

38 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

to the Integriti controller. A major advantage of this approach was that it would provide an immediate roll-back strategy should anything go wrong. With the Integriti system now established but still idle, the new merged database was downloaded remotely from Inner Range onto the Integriti server at Parramatta and testing was undertaken to ensure the stability of the new platform and its network. Databases were downloaded into the controllers and modified on line; even remote firmware upgrades were downloaded from the software into the controllers while the system was operational. It was time for the migration to begin. Daniel Joubert, a senior Inner Range support technician, was tasked with coordinating the migration project, with the first campus to move across being Hawkesbury. Daniel liaised with the installation technicians on site as well as the guards and operators who were actively using the system on a day to day basis to try and anticipate any quirks in behaviour patterns or uncover anything that may have been missed. Planning and preparation now complete, it was time to take the plunge and to use Daniel’s own words “We arrived on site at 7am. It was very intimidating seeing the size of the site and I began to have doubts about how easy the migration would be.Three

hours later all the hardware was running flawlessly on the Integriti system, users were accessing doors and guards were using the software to control the site. The entire hardware migration was performed by the LAN simply being swapped over. It really shows how robust a product we have developed in that a diverse range of hardware modules all with different firmware versions were able to come online instantly with just seconds of down time per controller.” The second migration was at the Parramatta campus and buoyed by the success of the first, this operation was undertaken with Daniel Joubert at Inner Range in Melbourne programming the Server remotely on the VPN while liaising by phone with the local installation companies on site to swap the LAN’s. As Daniel states: “The use of the migration tool was fantastic. I was able to migrate an entire Concept database to Integriti with only a few basic settings. At Parramatta I was migrating ten panels at once. Integriti’s flexibility in action centric programming made the automation programming just so much simpler. No more use of multiple calculated auxiliaries to achieve basic functionality, the programmable actions functionality in Integriti allowed us to distil complex automation down to one action. We were able to drive almost any outcome from an input going into


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:33 AM

Page 39

ADVERTORIAL

alarm.The real wow moment for me was seeing the system handle thousands of inputs, doors and areas giving real time status updates for every item on the system designer.” “I was also surprised at how quickly the guards were able to get a handle on the software with only minutes of instruction and in some cases no formal training.This shows just how intuitive a software product we have developed.” At the end of the migration Daniel boasted “We were able to cut over a campus in a single day and were confidently able to leave the site knowing that the system was even more functional and capable than it ever was with Concept and Insight.” All five campuses are now migrated and today the University of Western Sydney is running completely on the new Inner Range Integriti technology platform. Campuses at Campbelltown, Hawkesbury, Bankstown, Parramatta and Penrith, are running on a single system of almost 3,000 doors. Security personnel at all five facilities are controlling doors, assigning user permissions and processing alarms. Team leaders are programming

automated actions and creating global permission groups. Administrators are pouring over their wish lists to use the new power of Integriti to streamline procedures, integrate other systems and deliver new standards of reporting and accountability. There are eleven thousand monitored security inputs across three thousand partitions with twenty thousand active users and another eighty thousand preenrolled and historical users to be imported. Millions of historical review events are there at your fingertips and there is a detailed forensic audit trail logging every activity and change to the system programming; it’s time/date stamped to boot and identifiable by operator. This is a serious enterprise system. It has a demanding 24/7 workload with wildly fluctuating dynamic peak demands yet the system response times are spectacular. System diagnostics show that CPU, RAM and hard disk utilisation are well below server capacity leaving plenty of head room for system expansion. Even then, the multi-server clustering technology inherent in the Integriti software

architecture ensures that capacity and scale will never be a problem for this system. According to Adam Byrne, Director of Campus Safety and Security at the University of Western Sydney, “.......the integration has provided an opportunity for the UWS to be able to manage multiple campuses and access points, secure research and provide crucial business continuity assurance to a University featuring 500+ buildings and over 11,000 rooms. The program is by far the most advanced access control program I have ever worked with and by far the easiest and most intuitive. The demands on access control across our institution are great and the Inner Range solution is for us a perfect fit.” By all accounts Integriti has exceeded the expectations of all stakeholders at the university and they are now discussing future high level integration possibilities with other business applications deployed in their various facilities. With Integriti the possibilities are endless.This is an extraordinary product and we at Inner Range are very proud of it.

SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 39


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:33 AM

Page 40

ADVERTORIAL

INTEGRATED SECURITYSOLUTION ATTHE GLENSIDE HOSPITAL CAMPUS

Energy management specialist and global security leader Schneider Electric has supplied the Glenside Hospital Campus with a state-of-theart integrated security solution to help manage staff and patients safety. The redevelopment project, which includes a new state-of-the-art hospital, will provide purpose-built specialist services tailored especially for modern mental health and drug and alcohol care, delivered as part of a vibrant campus community. Schneider Electric’s innovative solutions implemented across the facility include restricted access and security services, IP video intercom, nurse call, paging, patient tracking, VESDA fire system and CCTV surveillance to the entire campus. The advanced platform also monitors critical building management alarms

40 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

and fire alarms with high level interfaces communicating to a campus wide paging and emailing system. A Clipsal C-Bus energy management system is also integrated into the overall solution, all of which complies with Green Star standards. Through the integration of standalone systems into a smart platform, operators can easily control and monitor activity anywhere and anytime on the campus. They can control the entire security landscape or combined security and building management environment from a single user interface. Once completed, the Glenside Campus will include a new 129-bed mental health and substance abuse hospital, a new 15 bed intermediate care centre, 20 new supported accommodation units, a drug and

alcohol outpatient facility, public open space for community enjoyment, and all linked with green pathways and open space. Schneider Electric’s global experience in healthcare security solutions has helped deliver some of the largest and most complex healthcare projects in Australia and New Zealand including the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne and Lyell McEwin Hospital in Adelaide. For more information, visit www.schneiderelectric.com/security.


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 41

When it comes to securing your home or business, don’t take any chances.

Always use a licensed security professional and make sure they are a member of the Australian Security Industry Association Limited (ASIAL) – it’s your mark of distinction.

Think security… THINK ASIAL To find an ASIAL member near you visit www.asial.com.au

The peak body for security professionals.

www.asial.com.au


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 42

ASIAL Certified Security Monitoring Centres*

Current as at: 12 June 2013

Company (short form name)

Australian Security Industry Association Limited

State

Cert. No.

Grade

WA

379

A2

28 Feb 2014

ADT Security

NSW

404

A1

30 Jun 2014

ADT Security (Data Centre)

NSW

405

A1

30 Jun 2014

ARM Security

WA

402

A1

10 Mar 2015

ART Security

VIC

392

A1

30 Sep 2014

Calamity Monitoring

NSW

383

A1

20 Mar 2014

Central Monitoring Services

NSW

380

B1

21 Mar 2014

Commonwealth Bank of Australia

NSW

389

A1

24 Sep 2014

VIC

391

C2

18 Mar 2014

Glad Security

NSW

398

A1

25 Nov 2014

Golden Electronics

TAS

395

A1

17 Oct 2014

Grade One Monitoring

NSW

378

A1

13 Feb 2014

Grid Security Services

NSW

381

A1

18 Mar 2014

ISS Security

NSW

373

B3

25 Nov 2013

Linfox Armaguard

VIC

393

A1

08 Aug 2014

Mekina Technologies

TAS

399

A1

02 Nov 2014

NSS Group

NSW

384

A1

07 May 2014

Onwatch

NSW

396

B1

31 May 2014

Paul-Tec Australia

NSW

401

A1

01 Aug 2013

Protection Pacific Security

VIC

394

C2

9 Aug 2014

RAA Security Services

SA

400

A1

12 Dec 2014

Secom Australia

NSW

374

A1

14 Dec 2013

Sectrol Security

VIC

369

B2

19 Aug 2013

Allcare Monitoring Services

Energize Australia

Securemonitoring

Expires

VIC

370

A1

23 Nov 2013

NSW

386

A1

04 May 2014

Security Alarm Monitoring Service

SA

387

A1

18 Jun 2014

Sesco Security

WA

364

A1

03 Jun 2013

Signature Security

WA

403

A1

30 Jun 2014

SMC Australia

QLD

372

A1

07 Dec 2013

SMC Australia

VIC

371

A1

16 Dec 2013

SNP Security (Newcastle)

NSW

368

A1

17 Aug 2013

SNP Security (Sydney)

NSW

408

A1

13 Aug 2014

Spectus

WA

406

A1

12 Apr 2015

State Government Protective Security Service

QLD

388

C1

22 May 2014

Westpac Banking Corporation

NSW

382

A1

19 Mar 2014

Woolworths Limited

NSW

397

C1

04 Nov 2014

Securenet Monitoring Services

*The above-listed ASIAL Certified monitoring centres comprise those establishments that have been inspected and graded for compliance with the applicable Australian Standard: AS 2201.2 – 2004. PLEASE NOTE: ASIAL takes no responsibility for listed companies which may change the nature of their operations subsequent to Certification.

42 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

19/6/13

2:14 PM

Page 43


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 44

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

“YOU CAN’T

COMPETE

WITH CROOKS” By Chris Delaney

A constant complaint I receive from members, particularly those operating in the manpower side of our business, is that they find it impossible to compete with other companies going to clients with very low (unbelievably low) rates, that could not possibly allow them to pay employees correctly. With a minimum rate of pay at around $18.00 plus (a skinny) 28% for on costs, a charge out rate of $25.00 per hour gives you a profit of $1.96 per guard per hour. And that doesn’t take into consideration penalty rates for Saturday, Sunday, night work or Public Holidays! How can they do it? What are the authorities doing? Who is to blame? What is ASIAL doing? We need a “level playing field!” In this article Chris Delaney attempts to provide some answers to these most important questions. First, believe it or not, it is not ASIAL’s role to police the industry. We do not give or approve, or for that matter revoke security business licenses. We do not have the legal power to investigate breaches of legislation including underpayment of wages or award conditions and we cannot tell our members what to charge a customer for a security service. However, there are many things that we can do and we do those things with diligence and passion. It is not in our DNA to wait for the phone to ring. We are proactive and we work with the appropriate authorities in every state and territory to protect the

44 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013

interests of members and ensure the authorities do their jobs. Here are some answers to these perennial complaints: We need a “level playing field!!!” We have a level playing field! We don’t need any more regulation in our industry - we are almost regulated out of business. What we do need is for those “umpires or referees” to get out into the “level playing field and start “red carding” the offending players. How can they do it? How can they charge less than it costs to put a security officer on the job? There are a number of ways that it can be done legally, however more often than not it is done illegally. The ways: 1. The security provider developed an Enterprise Bargaining Agreement prior to January 2009 under the old WorkChoices legislation. Most of these agreements (unless otherwise stated) remain in place until varied or rescinded. Often the rates are expressed as a flat rate and can be as low as $18.00 per hour for all hours worked. Perfectly legal, however if you add the on costs like superannuation, annual leave, sick leave, workers compensation etc, it is still hard to make any sort of profit charging $25.00 per hour to the customer. 2. The Security provider uses an ABN holder or subcontractor and pays whatever they can get away with. If it is a genuine Principal

Contractor/Subcontractor relationship that is fine, but more often than not it is a “sham subcontracting” arrangement. Generally speaking if all that comes to the relationship is labour and the subcontractor is under the direction and control of the principal, chances are it is really an employer/employee relationship and the employee is being ripped off. 3. The security provider uses on hire labour. Nothing wrong with that, however, the security provider must be sure that: a. the arrangements between the Labour Hire firm and the on hire employee or contractor are bona fide; b. the employee or contractor is being remunerated lawfully; c. the insurances, including and especially workers compensation are properly covered, remembering that in the event of accident as a PCBU, you may have blame attributed to your business; d. everyone has an appropriate security business and/or personal license. And you still have to wonder how it can be done while paying the minimum award payment. Or the security company is just plain shonky with shonky employees looking for cash in hand to avoid problems with their take home pay, tax and other responsibilities.


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 45

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

What are the authorities doing? Those who can do something about it are the Fair Work Ombudsman (FWO), the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), the licensing Regulator in each state and sometimes the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC). But when it comes to underpaid wages, sham contracting and “phoenixing” FWO is usually the first port of call. From our experience FWO is willing to do something – but is often short on facts and always needs an employee or “contractor” to make a complaint. Of course the employee doesn’t complain because they fear loosing their job, the contractor doesn’t complain because they have either been conned into or have conned themselves into believing they are better off on below award wages, sub standard conditions and no sick or annual leave, working 60 hours a week. FWO can (and does) prosecute employers who underpay wages, but like all other agencies to take extreme action they must have facts, complainants (“warm bodies”) and hard evidence before pursuing a conviction.They often say they need a “warm body” and not just a “smoking gun”. FWO may also pursue convictions against clients who are knowingly in a contravention – like being aware that the employee couldn’t possibly be paid correctly based on the price of the service. (See s550 of the Fair Work Act 2009). Who is to blame? Not surprisingly, everyone is to blame, from the shonky operator prepared to break the law, to the employee who won’t make a complaint to the customer who is only too willing to award a contract to the lowest possible price. Ask the customer if he would underpay his own employees (especially government agencies) and they will be offended at the suggestion.Tell them that it is likely that at $25.00 per hour for a 24/7 service almost invariably means that the

security employee is underpaid and they will tell you that it is not their problem. Then of course the security company that complains that they have missed out on a contract because some shonky has picked it up at less than award rates. Will they tell you who won the contract? No, they don’t want to be a ‘dobber’! Will they find some more facts or try to get that “warm body” so very helpful for the FWO? Too hard! Someone else should solve the problem.

What is ASIAL doing? ASIAL does a lot within its power. We provide accurate and timely advice to members to ensure they are fully aware of their rights and responsibilities. We make available tools, advice and run workshops (especially for SMEs) to enable them to remain compliant and provide potential clients with a professional proposal or tender. ASIAL collaborates with the various agencies, the regulators, police and FWO to ensure they are aware of the issues affecting our industry. We vigorously lobby for changes to regulation and legislation for the betterment of our industry and we are not reticent to let the authorities know what is wrong with the way they approach compliance. It seems that it is a lot easier to fine business license holders for technical breaches but not chase unlicensed operators for more serious breaches.

We are constantly representing the interests of our members individually and collectively with FWO, with which we have developed a strong professional working relationship.

You can compete with crooks – If you are a business, identify those who you know are breaking the law, gather the appropriate facts, come to ASIAL for support and be prepared to put those facts before the appropriate authority. If you are an employee, make sure you know your rights and insist that your pay and conditions are at least the minimum required by law. If not seek help. If you are a bona fide independent contractor do not accept sub standard payments, ensure you are properly compensated for all of the costs to running your business and able to pay employees lawfully. If you are a regulator be prepared to take on the more difficult and more important breaches so that the real shonkys think twice and the industry knows that their licensing fees and taxes are being well directed. If you are an end user, insist that the security provider can prove that they are as compliant as you would be and don’t award contracts on based on price alone. If you are a shonky keep looking over you shoulder because the longer you are out there the more likely it is that you will be caught.

Note: The information provided above is for convenient reference only. ASIAL and Chris Delaney & Associates Pty Ltd provide this information on the basis that it is not to be relied upon in any or all cases, as the circumstances in each matter are specific. Accordingly, we provide this information for general reference only, but we advise you to take no action without prior reference to an Employee Relations professional. ASIAL members can contact Chris Delaney by emailing ir@asial.com.au

SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 45


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 46

HOT PRODUCTS

UniGuard 12 Online Staff Verification System ■ ValuTronics > 1300 133 366 ■ Email > sales@uniguard.com.au ■ Web > www.uniguard.com.au UniGuard 12 Online is the most comprehensive and advanced staff verification software release yet. It’s perfect for automating staff patrol information in one secure and easily accessible place, ready for your revision. UniGuard 12 Online is internet based, meaning you can access it from your desktop PC, tablet device or smartphone anywhere anytime. Its foundation is built around live monitoring and real time feedback will instantly alert you of absent staff or missed calls thus keeping a watchful eye for you at all times. UniGuard 12 is lightning fast and offers innovative packages such as, GPS tracking with live maps, automated task scheduling and much more. With UniGuard 12, keeping track of your staff has never been easier.

iCare Personal Tracker ■ Grade One Monitoring > 1300 723 185 ■ Email > info@grade1.com.au ■ Web > www.grade1.com.au

NEW!

Grade One Monitoring has launched the iCare Personal Tracker. Our Grade A1 monitoring centre now offers the peace of mind of a trackable hand held device utilising the Telstra Next G network. The iCare unit offers a rapid and accurate GPS positioning, 2 way on board communication as well as a geo-fencing solution. iCare monitoring has many benefits including the ideal solution for OH&S/WHS legislation, a safety device for loved ones, immediate notification in the case of a medical emergency as well as GPS tracking for dementia patients. Phone us on 1300 723 185 to discover the full range of features and benefits that the iCare Personal Tracker has to offer for your staff and clients as part of an overall security solution.

Inner Range Integriti Security Management System ■ For more information contact: ■ Web > www.centralsd.com.au ■ Web > www.innerrange.com The INTEGRITI SECURITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is a new generation Integrated Access Control, Security Alarm and Automation System by Inner Range. It is the result of more than 20 years of continuous industry leadership and product development, and just like its famous predecessor (the Concept 4000), Integriti sets new industry standards. Inner Range are confident that Integriti has the capacity to offer solutions that have previously been unachievable in today's exciting yet demanding technology environment. Regardless of the specification, Integriti will tick the box at every level, including almost every redundancy and disaster recovery strategy. Integriti is an enterprise level access control and security solution that delivers a simple and easy to use management system with capabilities and scalability that have previously been unthinkable.

46 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 47

HOT PRODUCTS

NEW Camera Release from FLIR ■ FLIR SYSTEMS Australia > 1300 729 987 | NZ 0800 785 492 ■ Email > info@flir.com.au ■ Web > www.flir.com FLIR Systems, the global leader in thermal imaging cameras has released new fixed mount cameras for the security industry - the FD, FC-Series and the Compact D-Series- which it says take image quality to a new level of clarity and crispness.The FLIR Compact D-Series is now available as a network-enabled enclosure. It can be mounted in ball up and ball down position, giving you more flexibility. The D-Series outdoor dome enclosure provides precision pan/tilt control while providing fully programmable scan patterns and radar slew-to-cue and slew-to-alarm functionality. The extremely affordable FC-Series S network-ready camera is fully enabled for control and operation over digital and analogue networks, FC-Series S thermal imaging cameras are available in high-resolution 640 x 480, and 320 x 240 formats.

NEW!

NEW!

Maximum Camera Value: All-new Sarix IL10 Series Box Cameras and Micro Domes ■ Pelco Australia > +61 2 9125 9310 ■ Email > mark.romer@schneider-electric.com ■ Web > www.pelco.com/sarix The all-new Sarix™ Value Range of mini box and micro dome cameras are high-definition, cost-effective IP network cameras perfect for most any indoor fixed video security application.These cameras produce high-quality, color HD video, and the integrated pre-focused fixed focal length lens makes sharp scene alignment and installation quick and easy. Convenient network connectivity, PoE models, and a simple Web user interface, make for easy plug-and-play finalisation of settings and positioning adjustment. And by delivering industry-leading Sarix image quality, backed by the Pelco™ by Schneider Electric™ satisfaction guarantee, the IL10 series are the value-driven cameras that you can choose with confidence.

Schneider Electric Expands Investment in IP Video with Major Additions to Pelco Line ■ Pelco Australia > +61 2 9125 9310 ■ Email > mark.romer@schneider-electric.com ■ Web > www.pelco.com/sarix Schneider Electric announced a major expansion and commitment to its Pelco IP Video Surveillance product line by announcing the planned rollout of more than 50 new IP cameras in 2013, including the new Sarix IL10 Series mini box and micro dome cameras. Schneider Electric continues to make major investments in IP video, expanding its R&D effort, product line and industry-leading education and training programs to meet the needs of partners and customers. The company has achieved several major milestones in its continuing evolution as an IP market leader, including the expansion of its Fort Collins, Colo. Facility.

NEW!

SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 47


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

4:43 PM

Page 48

HOT PRODUCTS

Videofied’s New Indoor MotionViewer in Colour & Look In ■ Videofied > 1300 46 44 55 ■ Email > info@videofied.com.au ■ Web > www.videofied.com.au Videofied’s new wireless colour Indoor MotionViewer with Look-In App capability will now allow alarm installers to install video alarm verification AND smart phone look-in with one device. Integrating a surveillance look-in capability with the new colour Indoor MotionViewer is just the start of the benefits associated with the newVideofied MotionViewer which also provides; • Up to 5 years battery life • Up to 25 wireless MotionViewers perVideofied alarm system • 4 x faster video | Colour/day, Monochrome/night • Programmable PIR sensitivity | Selectable video qualities • Sleeker design | Police Priority Video Alarm Response capability with video verification

NEW!

Integriti SkyTunnel ■ Central Security Distribution > 1300 319 499 ■ Web > www.centralsd.com.au

Traditionally, enabling connectivity between security devices located within a customer’s LAN and remote installer software has been a headache for integrators. It has involved negotiating with IT departments to allow port and application access through firewalls and routers. With SkyTunnel, if you have an Integriti controller on a customer’s LAN that allows internet access and you have your Integriti CS Installation software on a PC connected to the internet then connectivity between these two devices is achievable in two simple steps without touching Routers or Firewalls!

simPRO Field Mobility ■ simPro > 1300 139 467 ■ Email > sales@simpro.com.au ■ Web > www.simpro.com.au Your time is money and your hours are billable. Cut your travel and admin time down by at least 20% per day per person with simPRO Field Mobility. Our range of simPRO Field Mobility options let you and your staff stay connected and keep your entire system up-to-date with real-time overview of the labour, material and equipment costs incurred, the margin you have applied and the invoiced amount. Our SmartPhone version is optimised for phone sized devices such as Android, Windows Mobile, iPhone and devices such as the Datalogic Elf. Get out and about with simPRO Field Mobility and simplify your business processes so you can spend more time making money, not chasing it.

48 //SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 49

HOT PRODUCTS

Inner Range Rack Mount Enclosure ■ For More Information Contact: ■ Inner Range Melbourne: www.innerrange.com ■ Central Security Distribution: www.centralsd.com.au Inner Range has released a universal Rack Mount Enclosure designed for use with its Concept and Integriti system hardware. Featuring a truly universal design that allows virtually all Inner Range System Controllers or LAN modules to be installed into a 19” rack equipment cabinet without restricting critical access to cabling, termination of connections or access for commissioning and maintenance purposes. Flexible installation options allow the rack mounted drawer to be configured to meet a vast array of specifications, allowing mix & match installation of System Controllers, Universal Expanders, Relay Cards, Access Control Modules, Input Expanders, UniBus Expansion Cards, Multipath Communications Devices and up to 4 Doors of fully Intelligent Access Control.

Patented Latent Image Technology ■ Harcor Security Seals & Bags > +612 9454 4200 ■ Email > sales@harcor.com.au ■ Web > www.harcor.com.au

NEW!

Harcor’s efforts to source and manufacture products that add value and security is continuing. We now introduce to the ASIA – Pacific market Latent Image Technology, giving positive proof of genuine product at the customers fingertips. The use of patented technology to create an invisible image that can only be seen using a special viewer, will give manufacturers instant proof of authenticity and customers the ability to confirm what they are buying is genuine. The technology has already been used on spirit bottles and cosmetics to give positive visual proof of genuine product. Latent Image Labels, Foils and Tapes are available now!

DTU3G/IP ■ SCSI > 1300 555 570 ■ Email > daleacott@securitycommunications.com ■ Web > www.securitycommunications.com SCSI’s DTU3G/IP wireless alarm communicator is Australian made and designed. Dual-SIM technology provides 6 secure paths using Telstra NextG, Optus 3G, Telstra GPRS, Optus GPRS, Ethernet & PSTN. With thousands already sold and installed, the DTU3G/IP has been released to the Australian Security Industry with outstanding success.The combination of multiple, proven communication paths ending the days of nuisance “poll fails” and unwarranted guard attendances. The DTU3G/IP connects to the DirectWireless Network, Australia’s only dedicated and private alarm transmission network. To find out more about the DTU3G/IP, contact SCSI on 1300 555 570.

NEW!

SECURITY INSIDER JULY 2013// 49


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 50

ASIAL NATIONAL CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2013 JULY

JULY

QLD Industry Breakfast Briefing 7.30-9.00am - 17 July 2013, Niche Event Spaces, Stones Corner, Brisbane Speakers include Chris Delaney, ASIAL's IR consultant who will provide an update on important IR developments and Sergeant Christopher Gregory from the Brisbane Central District Liquor Unit, QLD Police will discuss important changes to the QLD Liquor Legislation that impact on security officers and crowd controllers.

Security 2013 Gala Dinner 25 July 2013, Doltone House, Jones Bay Wharf Sydney

Security 2013 Exhibition 24-26 July 2013, Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour to register visit www.securityexpo.com.au Security 2013 Conference & Executive Briefings 24-25 July 2013, Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour

AUGUST VIC - Industry Breakfast Briefing 7.30-9.00am 15 August 2013 Quality Hotel, Batman’s Hill on Collins

SEPTEMBER Dr Anne Speckhard, Adjunct Associate Professor, Georgetown University Medical Centre

SA - Industry Breakfast Briefing 7.30-9.00am 12 September 2013, Sebel Playford Hotel, Adelaide WA - Industry Breakfast Briefing 7.30-9.00am 13 September 2013, Hotel Northbridge, Perth

Don Randall, Head of Security, Bank of England

Bruce Blythe, Chairman, Crisis Management International

ACT - Industry Breakfast Briefing 7.30-9.00am 18 September 2013, Belconnen Premier Inn, Canberra TAS - Industry Breakfast Briefing 7.30-9.00am 19 September 2013, Hobart Function and Convention Centre, Hobart

To find out more register online www.asial.com.au/eventscourses or email events@asial.com.au


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 51


INSIDER_Jun/July 2013 Iss3_52pp

18/6/13

7:37 AM

Page 52

Security Insider June/July 2013  

Security 2013 Exhibition and Conference, July 24-26, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre. Q & A with Nick Buckles former CEO of G4S and...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you