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you SEPTEMBER 1 2012

ASHBURTON’S VON TRAPPS raising four girls on his own

CORIANDER CENTRAL a versatile and must-have herb

BELLY DANCING a fun way to stay in shape

ASHBURTON’S WOMAN OF INFLUENCE ROBIN KILWORTH MUCH MORE THAN A COUNCILLOR Your Ashburton Guardian publication


YOU social scene

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you What’s in

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who’s out and about

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COVER STORY:

Property Brokerrss offices opening

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Ian Walsh (left) and Adam Martin.

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Tim O’Sullivan (left) and Dave Whillans.

Penny Black (left) and Nancy Gomez.

Robin Kilworth P8-9

everyone has a story

Material in YOU is copyright to the Ashburton Guardian and can not be reproduced without the written permission of the publishers

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gardening: dahlias

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men’s fashion: briefs

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fun ways to stay in shape

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is technology bad for kids?

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travel to Bali

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recipes

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who’s out and about

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Rayma White and Tammy Kenny.

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Johnny Watherston and Mark Lemon.

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YOU cover story She might be an instantly recognised public face, best known as a local body politician, but as reporter Sue Newman discovers, there is much more to Robin Kilworth than her life as an Ashburton District councillor.

Above – Brian and Robin Kilworth, walking their way to good health. Right – Robin Kilworth enjoying family time in the kitchen with grandchildren (from left) three-year-old Lulu, Joseph, 6, Jacob, 11, and Poppy, 9. PHOTOS KIRSTY GRAHAM 220812-KG-065


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The powerhouse Robin Kilworth THAT IS

R

obin Kilworth flicks through her diary. It’s crammed with notes, crammed with appointments. Monday, she says, that’s about all that’s free. Welcome to the world of a woman who knows the value of work, community work, most of it unpaid, all of it done simply because she enjoys being involved, being part of the place she calls home. Her motto

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– “if you don’t have a reason to say no, you don’t”. Today she’s best known as a long serving Ashburton District councillor, but there’s a lot more to Robin Kilworth than the public face of a woman who holds a position of power around the council table. Privately, she’s every inch the Kiwi wife, mother and grandmother, but there’s something about Robin

that’s slightly exotic, something that whispers of a gene pool that’s not strictly British stock; her family roots run deep in the soils of Lebanon. Robin is something of an accidental New Zealander; if her grandfather had been able to read English, Australia would be calling her their own today. He left his homeland in search of a new life for his family, leaving the wife he’d married when

she was barely 15, in a small village with their two children. His ship docked, in New Zealand, he thought he’d arrived in Australia and disembarked. It took him five years to carve out a new life, five years before he could send for his wife and children. Robin’s father became the baby of their reunion, their first Kiwi child. The family grew, it flourished and Lebanon became a distant memory. It might not be her memory, but it’s family lore that Robin is determined won’t disappear with her generation and top of her travel list is a trip to the land of her forefathers.


YOU cover story

6 She believes, that for the immigrants who came to New Zealand for a better life and for their descendants, there’s always a small edge that drives them to achieve and succeed in their adopted country. Her dad might have been trained in law but did what many Lebanese immigrants did, became involved in the rag trade. His miniempire grew to include two manufacturing businesses and three shops in Christchurch. Walter Khouri became the complete Kiwi businessman, determined with his wife Connie to raise a Kiwi family. And for his two daughters, Robin and Sandy, he became the person who would have a significant impact on the adults they would become. Robin is a convent girl and proud of it, saying the nuns at St Mary’s and her father were the two strongest influences in her youth. “School was very correct although interestingly I know some former convent girls have a lot of criticism for the nuns because of the disciplined approach to life.” She admired the nuns’ approach to education and their determination to turn young girls into young women who were strong, disciplined and who became good citizens who would contribute to society. In many ways the teaching sisters were charged with a huge responsibility, she said. “Not only were they responsible for the large capital assets of their order, they had to fulfil the requirements of their religious life, train to become teachers and then on top of that they were responsible for the education of hundreds of girls.” And if you look at girls who were educated by nuns, they’re well represented in life’s success stories, Robin said. “Of course not every convent girl will attribute her success to this, but they taught you the value of work and achievement. They weren’t about to let you get away with being anything less than you could be.” Her experience of life as a convent girl is mirrored in Jane Tolerton’s book Convent Girls, a collection of interviews with 17 prominent New Zealanders about their childhood and adolescence with the nuns. It reveals a variety of attitudes towards their days exposed to the smell of candlewax and the rustle of rosary beads and sets out to discover what makes a convent girl different, why they seem to stand out from the crowd. Tolerton identifies several features common to the women she interviews – an irreverent sense of humour, a well-developed sense of social justice, and an ability to stand up and say their piece.

She could have interviewed Robin Kilworth. Regardless of whether women recall those convent years with fondness or not, they always made an impact, she said. “One of the things you realise about the nuns is that they had a way of looking at you as if they could read your mind – and they weren’t often wrong.” There was also the fleeting thought that life in religion could be for her. “I think for a lot of Catholic girls, as a teenager you do think about becoming a nun because at that point in your life the people you admire are nuns.” She thought about it – seriously – and discussed it with her father who was less than enthusiastic. “He said, ‘for goodness sake, give the girls who have a real vocation a break’.” That was the end of that career plan but with no clear replacement in mind, she worked in an accountant’s office by day, studying accountancy at night. “My choice would have been law but dad wouldn’t have a bar of it and he had a big impact on the big decisions in my life.” Fate was to step in, removing any choice. Her father fell ill and Robin was thrust into taking over the family businesses. “By that time he’d given up the factories but I had to step in and run the shops and I really didn’t enjoy that because I simply wasn’t equipped for it.” The experience has led Robin to ensure that whatever she took on after that, she made sure she was well prepared. In some ways her upbringing was far from traditional. While most mothers stayed home, hers had a career. “She worked when we were small in one of dad’s businesses. She’s a cutter and designer and went to design school which was probably unusual then. That meant of course that we wore beautiful clothes. Everything was made by mum.” Robin might not have been overly keen on a career as an accountant, but that stint as a fledgling beanie did mean she met husband to be, Brian. It was the classic working girl meets working boy tale – he was the fellow across the road with the big smile. They married and with marriage came a move to Ashburton – for two years maximum. “I saw myself very much as a city girl. Fortynine years later I’m still here.” Looking back, Robin said she wouldn’t have had any other outcome. “It’s the community. I hadn’t experienced

My choice (of career) would have been law but dad wouldn’t have a bar of it and he had a big impact on the big decisions in my life

anything like that in Christchurch. With children it makes being involved so much easier.” And with four boys spread over eight years there were plenty of community activities on offer. It started off simply enough in 1969 with the Allenton Kindergarten committee, flowed on

into Ashburton Intermediate and St Bede’s College where she became a member of its inaugural board of governors, its first woman member and a deputy chair for six years. And that was just the beginning. The list of organsiations with which she has been involved reads like a community directory. She


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PHOTO KIRSTY GRAHAM 230812-KG-059

Ashburton District councillor Robin Kilworth.

doesn’t like to count committees or organisations, but admits to gaining a huge amount of satisfaction from her growing portfolio of involvement in the education sector. Membership of the Aoraki Polytechnic council is long and ongoing as is her work in the educational side of the Catholic Diocese

of Christchurch. Education is an immensely rewarding area in which to be working, she said. The church has remained a strong part of Robin’s life and typically she’s never been content to be just another parishioner. At both diocese and parish level she’s held

governance positions. But it hasn’t been all serious business. She’s also been choir leader, organist and reader. Post school, Robin renewed her links with St Mary’s, becoming a trustee for the Rose Chapel when it was sold by the order after the school amalgamated with Marian College. That role involved her intimately in the chapel’s renovation. A governance role with Relationship Services absorbed 11 years of her life and she is now a life member of that organisation. But it is as an Ashburton District councillor that people know Robin best. It seems she’s been part of the council team for years, and she has – 18 years by the end of this term in October next year. To anyone who has watched her in action, Robin appears to be perfectly in control, never flustered and never at risk of losing her rag. That’s on the surface. Again, it’s preparation that allows you to keep a cap on your temper – and a bit of deep breathing. Yes, there are times when she gets hugely frustrated, but rarely is there anything to be gained by blowing your stack, she said. She worries about the council and the limited number of people who can make time in their lives to put their names forward as councillors. The job is not well paid, the amount of time involved is huge and day meetings and sub committee meetings mean it’s impossible to also be part of the full time work force. It’s not something for the unprepared, however. “I’m a firm believer in it not being about encouraging more people to stand, it’s about encouraging people to gain some experience first and then stand. If you get the experience first, the job isn’t hard.” Big jobs, big community roles have come and gone, others have stayed, but through it all Robin has remained the centre around which the four Kilworth boys’ lives revolved. With an impressive CV of formidable achievements, Robin might sound like superwoman. She quickly scotches that idea. She’s just an ordinary Kiwi woman who wants to do her bit for her community, she says. And while she might appear confident and in charge, yes, there are things in life that scare her. “I don’t get scared of the big decisons. You work with what you know, work out what your place is in that situation and then work out how the best decisions can be made.” It’s the personal things, the curved balls that life throws at you that are a bit harder to

handle, she says. Things like husband Brian’s cancer, her battle to have a hip replacement, finding she needed two operations and then having the experience come with unexpected complications. In those situations, it’s your faith that gets you through, she says. Her appointment book is never empty and she knows there will still be plenty of opportunities to do new things, to let her name go forward for board or committee positions. Most of the roles Robin has filled have been unpaid, but the rewards come in dozens of intangible ways. She’s learned an immense amount about life and met people she could never otherwise have met. She’s broken new ground on several boards, admitting she may have been chosen as a token woman but knowing that she made a contribution that was equal to her male counterparts. “The calibre of men around many of those board tables was second to none and it was my benefit to be there as the only woman. Some times though, it’s a real responsibility because you’re measured on what you do and you don’t want to be seen as giving women a bad name.” Most of Robin’s work is in heavily male dominated organisations and that means her membership of Ashburton’s Zonta Club is especially important, she said. “I really appreciate the friendship of those women, those meetings are the highlight of my month.” Perhaps surprisingly in that busy schedule, she still finds time for Robin time. And most often that will involve movies. She’s an old movie fan. For her a long haul flight to visit family is an opportunity rather than a burden. It means she can watch at least four movies. She’s a comedy, drama, love story fan, forget horrors and thrillers. She cooks, knits, but gardening, that’s a chore rather than a pleasure. Retirement will only come when she doesn’t enjoy doing the things that now give her great pleasure. “I believe you don’t really retire, you just carry on as long as you can.” Life is busy, but Robin has no intention of slowing down. “I have to admit though, I couldn’t do any of this without Brian. Sometimes he’s happy to have roast of the day at the hotel because I’m not here to cook. It’s a great partnership.” And are there regrets? “The main thing I look back and wish is that I’d studied law.”


everyone has a story YOU

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Ashburton’s own von Trapp family YOU Y OU magazine writer Susan Sandys randomly chooses a number from the phonebook and c ho ttells ells the story of the person who answers.

EEVERYONE HAS A STORY BY SUSAN SANDYS B

A

shburton’s Ken Borland knows that real men do cry. In 1985 his wife Jill died of breast cancer at the age of 41. It was the same year his mother and father passed away. He was left to raise his four daughters, aged from 10 to 17, alone. “There’s no handbook saying this is how you raise four girls, you just do what you think you have got to do,” he said. Living in Nelson at the time, he worked five days a week in his job as a service sales manager for a refrigeration company, coached his daughters’ netball teams on Saturdays, and had to get up before 8am on Sundays

“because that was washing day”. He was both house dad and breadwinner, and the only thing he balked at was ironing. “I still don’t iron.” His girls always had to have the vegetables ready for him to cook when he got home from work. And if he could pop in home from work at lunchtime, he would put the meat on. On Fridays a cleaner from the Cancer Society would visit the house, but wouldn’t go into any rooms if there were clothes on the floor. “Thursday night was always tidy-up-yourroom night.” • Continued next page

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YOU

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PHOTO KIRSTY GRAHAM 240812-KG-059

Retirement is giving Ken Borland time to do all the things he wanted to do when he was working.

He said it was a little like the von Trapp family in the film The Sound of Music, running a tight ship and keeping everyone to routine “except I wasn’t in uniform and I didn’t blow a whistle”. “When you are in a situation like that you can’t go backwards, you have to go forwards,

particularly for the kids. But you learn men do cry, I can tell you.” It was around this time Ken joined the Masonic Lodge. “I guess I joined because my father was a member and all my brothers were. I like the principles of free masonry, they work on help-

ing other people, (it’s an organisation) based on morality. They bring good men into the lodges to make them better men.” Fellow members proved to be an “amazing” support for him during those tough times. His involvement in netball coaching had originated in Invercargill, when he was a

“loudmouth” after watching Jill’s team play netball and “get done like dinners” in one of their matches. He told them they weren’t fit, team members said well how about you make us fit. Ken was coaching rugby at the time (he had been a junior All Black triallist in 1964, and played 32 games for Southland) but rose to the challenge and ran fitness training for them and other club members. Soon his wife’s team moved up to first grade competition and achieved runners up in their first year. A sporting success Ken likes to joke about is the fact he still holds the Southland Boys High School boxing title, his retention of the title helped somewhat by the fact the sport was cancelled the year after he left the school. In 1986 Ken attended his old Central Otago primary school’s 100th jubilee. He wasn’t going to go as it was a long way to travel. But he ended up attending and caught up with his future wife to be. Ken and Barbara had been to Millers Flat Primary School together. At school Barbara had been in the year below Ken. She and her sisters had always looked they were “straight out of a shop” with their mother being a brilliant dressmaker, wearing beautiful ribbons and clothes. “I knew who she was as soon as I saw her.” Barbara, a mother of three daughters, had also lost her partner years earlier, when he was just 31. Ken and Barbara married the following year and this year celebrate 25 years of marriage. Ken joined Ashburton’s Masonic Lodge after he and his new extended family moved to the town in 1991, and today is the deputy district grand master for the South Island. He was service manager and a partner in Ashburton’s Stewart and Holland for 14 years, and retired in 2005. At the age of 69 today he is finding he has time for all the things he had wanted to do when he was working but couldn’t, such as spending more time with his family, going fishing and going on holidays. He still works part time, for Davidson Refrigeration, and for the last six weeks has been working every day, filling in for a fellow employee. He enjoys tending to his Allenton home garden, and puts out stewed apples for dozens of silver eyes. Ken and Barbara are looking forward to all their daughters, who live around New Zealand and two in Australia, and their broods, turning up for his 70th birthday next year. “I would say they will be home then,” Ken said.


great gardens YOU foodies YOU

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There’s a lot to like

dahlias

by Sue Newman

J

ohn Hoogweg is passionate about dahlias. Right now there’s not a sign of the summer and autumn flowering beauties in his garden, but check out his garden shed and they’ll be found, carefully wrapped and individually labelled, sleeping in storage boxes. They might be out of sight but they’re definitely not out of John’s mind. Already he’s planning this year’s displays and the blooms he hopes will win him honours on the show table. But between the end of winter and the show season, there’s a lot of work to be done. And that work applies not just to the dahlia experts, it applies equally to the home gardener hoping to grow halfway decent blooms to brighten borders or pick for the house, he says. Where most people might have half a dozen dahlia tubers growing in their garden, in a good

year John will have 95. He knows each variety, its growth peculiarities and what it can be expected to produce in terms of blooms. With this year’s South Island nationals being held in Ashburton in February, there’s every reason for Ashburton’s dahlia circle members to be going all out as they look ahead to the new planting season, he says. When you plant depends on what you believe. Some dahlia growers like to get a head start on the season, but for John, 10 days either side of Labour weekend is early enough. Let the ground warm up and make sure any hint of a frost has long gone. There’s a lot to like about dahlias, John says. “I’ve always liked them, liked the fact that they’ll flower from January until the frosts come. Not many plants will do that.” And he likes the fact that they come in any size, from miniature to around 1.2 metres in height, in a variety of styles and in just about every colour and shade imaginable. He won’t play favourites,

but admits the water lily style is one that always takes his eye. “I grow them for show and I grow them for enjoyment, but we don’t seem to be getting many young people coming on now wanting to show them,” he says. While it’s not essential that dahlias are lifted each year, for the serious grower lifting, dividing, washing and storing is part of what’s needed to ensure you’ll be growing good, healthy blooms in the coming year. This year it will definitely have paid dividends. “I’m picking this year because it’s been so wet a lot of tubers left in the ground will have rotted,” he said. Come spring, their new beds are composted and fed ready for planting to begin – one stake, two tubers of each variety to improve the odds of having three perfect blooms of each for the show bench later in the season. • Continued next page

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GROWING DAHLIAS The aarrea to be pla Th lantted e sho oul uld d re rece ceiv ivee at leas east thrree or fo ea four fou ur hou ours rs off ful o ulll su unl nlig igght and hav avee pr po ottec e ti tion o fro on om pr prev evai ev aililing ai ngg wind dss. Da d Dahl h iaas willll gro wi row in in alm lmo mos ost an anyy so soil,, bu ut pr pref efer fer er wel ell drraaiineed lo loam oam amy my so soil soil c nd co diiti tio tions. nss. Diig th D thee so oilil ove v r se sevvera vveeraal weeekks befo befo be f ree pllaanti ntin ting an and ad a d a lilitt ttle le cco omp mposst. Avvo A oiid ra r w orr veerry rich riich h ani n ma mall ma maanu n ure re. e. Ad A dd a dr d es e si s ngg of we w llll-b ll-b -ba bal alaan alan nce nce c d gaarr den ffeerti de r lis iser eerr bet etwe etw ween en 10 an and 14 and 14 day ays ays beefore b foree pllaanti fo ntingg.. Fiirm m in a ssttro on ngg sta take akee beeffor ore re pl plan antntt-in ng. g. Pllan Plan a t tub beer 10 10-1 -12 cm m deeeep. p. Wh W hen en pla lant ntt gro n row wtth ha has rreeac has a heed ap appo pr oxxim imat attel ate ely 20 ely 20 cm it it is im impo porttan ant tto o pinc pi pinc ncch h ou out th t e ce cen ntre or tth ntre nt he ggrrow owin ng poin po intt, t, th hiis een ncco ou urrages aggess branc nchi hing ng and m an mo oree fl flo ow weerrss. Wheen Wh n th hee plaant nt reeaacch heess 30 0-45 5cm m hig igh gh ap appl p y tth pl h hee fi firrs rst ti rst tie. e e. At leeaast At astt two wo furrth ther her er ti tiees wi will be requ re requ quir ired ed dur urin i g th t e ggrrow row owin ingg aan nd flow wer e in ingg sseeas ason on n.

He doesn’t bother with trying to breed new varieties. That’s too time consuming when you’re working fulltime. If there’s something new he has his eye on he’s happy to count out the dollars to buy it. Yes, growing show-quality dahlias takes time, but there’s also a huge amount of pleasure involved – you wouldn’t do it otherwise, John says. Ashburton’s dahlia circle is not just about the experts showing best blooms, it’s also for the amateurs. On September 17 the circle will be holding a workshop for the public with demonstrations on tuber dividing and on October 16 there’ll be a sale day where people can buy tubers for their home gardens. For the serious growers, there’ll be a run of monthly table shows but the pinnacle of the year comes in February with the South Island nationals. This is as good as it gets for anyone wanting to view the country’s best or to pit their prize blooms against those of other growers.

PHOTO KIRSTY GRAHAM 240812-KG-088

Dahlia expert John Hoogweg knows that the success of next year’s blooms lies in the care of dormant tubers.


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passion for fashion YOU

Beckham in underwear for the long haul


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D

avid Beckham says he’s in the underwear game for the long haul, with the second set of abs – sorry, ads – for his branded collection with H&M. The English football star’s ads will coincide with a “statue stunt” planned by the retailer, with largerthan-life Beckhams going up in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. New products will be added to the collection later this year. Beckham, 37, said he’s pleased with consumer reaction. “I’m very happy that so far people seem to like it, and the first season was incredibly successful. The challenge is to keep it going and establish a brand that will last many years. That is my ambition,” he wrote in an email to The Associated Press. Beckham was a champion of the London Olympics that just ended, driving the torch to Olympic Stadium in a speedboat along the Thames. “I was incredibly honoured to be part of the team that helped bring the Olympics to my home borough, city and country. I always knew we would put on a fantastic event, but it has exceeded even my most optimistic expectations,” he said. Beckham had hoped to play for Britain’s soccer team, but he wasn’t included in the squad. Beckham said he didn’t have any help getting in shape for the ads, where he was minimally dressed in front of the cameras. “I did nothing different,” he says. “I’m naturally fit, of course, as an athlete, so there is nothing out of the ordinary I do!” – AP

PHOTOS H&M, ALASDAIR MCLELLAN

Left – An underwear collection created and modelled by soccer star David Beckham for H&M.


health YOU

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Smooth moves

to get your groove back W ho said getting fit had to involve sweating it out on the treadmill? Check out these sexy, sociable workouts – they’re a fun way to boost your libido and improve your fitness level.

POLE DANCING Pole dancing has gained huge popularity with gym goers in recent years because of its great fitness benefits. It’s a fun, sexy but tough workout which combines elements of dancing and acrobatics. As this workout requires strong muscles to swing around on the pole and hang upside down, it is ideal for toning your body. It is also a good confidence- and libido-boosting exercise.

STRIP AEROBICS Strip aerobics is a great exercise class for helping you shed your inhibitions as well as burn excess pounds. Combining a cardio workout with stripperlike moves, this sexy workout can help you learn

some moves to use in the bedroom as well as improve your body. Check out Carmen Electra’s Aerobic Striptease DVD, which promises to help you “strip your way to fitness”.

HIGH-HEEL WORKOUT

Ditch the running shoes and slip into your favourite pair of heels for your next workout. Although stilettos are normally a no-no where exercise is concerned, an innovative new fitness class in the US is all about getting active in heels. The high-heel workout endeavours to get you moving comfortably in heels as well as toning your legs and core. Wearing heels boosts your confidence and can also strengthen pelvic muscles, giving your sex life a boost.

SALSA Fancy getting dressed up, learning some sexy moves and burning about 300 calories per half hour? Then salsa dancing could be for you. This dance style

offers a sexy, yet classy, fast-paced workout which can help build stamina and increase overall fitness. Furthermore, if your love life is stuck in a rut, this is a class that can be done with your partner to help inject some excitement into your relationship.

BURLESQUE With props such as fans, feather boas and high heels featuring in burlesque dancing, this provocative form of dance may be the ultimate sexy workout. Taking a burlesque class is a fun and flirty way to burn off the calories and tone your legs, bum and core muscles. The classes also focus on building confidence and helping you to feel comfortable in your skin - although, contrary to what you may think, stripping is not required when taking a class.

BELLY DANCING

If you fancy trying a sexy workout but want something more subtle than pole dancing or burlesque, why not give belly dancing a go? Complete with seductive moves and outfits, belly dancing is all about celebrating the feminine shape and will encourage you to love your curves. Belly dancing is also a great form of aerobic exercise and can help maintain weight loss and a healthy heart as well as tighten core muscles.

HULA HOOP You may think that hula hoops are just for kids, but hula hooping is making a comeback as a fun and effective fitness activity for adults. Hula hooping with a weighted hoop can burn off as many as 100 calories for every 10 minutes and can help tone the waist for sexy, sculpted abs. The exercise also involves a sensual circling of the hips which can help strengthen pelvic muscles and improve your sex life. For more lifestyle news visit www.realbuzz.com


YOU and your children

15

Dangers in distracting kids with tech toys by Aisha Sultan

I

would like to meet the parent not guilty of at least occasionally resorting to smartphone syndrome with a bored, cranky or restless child. We’ve all seen it: Mum or Dad hands a little one an iPhone or similar device and immediately the gadget’s most magical quality manifests: its ability to soothe, nay, hypnotise a child while the parent shops, chats, waits in line or completes any number of tasks made easier by an occupied and relatively quiet child. The portable screen has become a powerful parenting crutch. And, really, what’s the harm in a few games of Angry Birds or Temple Run? Some of those apps actually look educational, with spelling lessons or teaching chess strategy. But psychologist Jim Taylor, author of the book Raising Generation Tech: Prepare Your Children for a Media-fuelled World, argues that we are setting harmful defaults in our young children’s minds with this behaviour. “What the child is learning is that whenever they

get bored or cranky, they will be entertained,” he says. He sees parents giving children too much unguided access to technology at too young an age. All parents need moments of downtime or a break, he says, but these should be an exception rather than the rule. “Most parents put kids in front of screens as a way of medicating them, so (they) don’t have to work as hard,” he says. That can be a difficult truth to accept. As someone who works hard during the school year to enforce strict limits on all types of screentime and media consumption, I’ll be the first to admit it is easier to let tech toys cast their spell. My children recently accompanied me to an hour-long board meeting during which I needed to ensure they would be on their best behaviour. As a hedge against fidgeting, I allowed one child a handheld game device and the other an iPad. Even with the sound turned down on both devices, they were lulled into a techno-coma, spared the real-time experience of what actually was a rather boring meeting (In fact, there may have been an adult or two checking emails or

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sending texts during much of the discussion). Taylor is quick to point out technology on its own is neither good nor bad. A television, computer or phone is value-neutral. It’s how we choose to engage with it that has consequences. We know these devices are changing the ways our brains work yet we don’t know what the long-term impact on our children will be. But there is evidence of harmful effects on attention spans and our ability to focus as our time spent with technology increases. Taylor also raises the question of opportunity costs, suggesting the time spent with technology is time a child is not engaged in potentially healthy behaviour, such as developing their imaginative and creative skills through unassisted play. Furthermore, there is no evidence that the early use of technology is educationally beneficial, he says. “If a kid wants to learn how to play chess, get a chess board. There are better ways to learn, to develop skills, through three-dimensional human interaction and physical manipulation.” He encourages parents to think and discuss the

role they want technology to play in their family’s life. He supports the American Academy of Paediatric recommendation of no screen exposure before the age of two. He suggests an hour a day – after homework and sports and certainly not during dinner – may be a reasonable amount of tech time for some families. But, parents first need to examine their own attitudes and behaviour, he says. If the grown-ups are browsing the internet on their laptops or checking their phones during meals and on trips to the park, that behaviour sends a much more powerful message than the rules we try to establish. In a world ruled by connectivity, it may seem counterintuitive to try to keep our children unplugged for much of their young lives. But those are precisely the years when children will develop their habits, beliefs and attitudes about technology use, Taylor argues. They become hard-wired and are likely to return to the default settings exposed to when they were young, he says. – AAP

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YOU travels

17

Rediscovering Bali’s serenity

worth the effort

by Angela Doland

T

he morning sun turned pools of water in the rice paddies into mirrors. A farmer swung a load of coconuts onto his shoulder. Somewhere, a cow was lowing. The scene should have been perfect, but something was off. After four years, I was back in Bali to relive a memory of a walk through the rice fields near the town of Ubud. My disappointment may have started with the bizarre signposts, on a dirt path in the rice paddies, advertising Italian restaurants and French rotisserie chicken. Or maybe it was the villas sprouting up in the green fields, boasting of infinity pools and yoga workout rooms. With Bali developing so fast, my husband and I realised we would have to look harder this time to rediscover the Indonesian island’s serenity and beauty. We regrouped, got advice from locals, and found our travel pleasures in places we hadn’t known to look for — in a simple meal of fried rice and coconut juice at a deserted beach, and in the treasure bins of an out-of-the-way antiques row. Obviously, nobody heading to Bali expects to find an undiscovered paradise. It’s a longtime favorite of honeymooners, surfers and travelers drawn to its dancing, music and

You g tour Youn urists rel eleasi sing ng bab a y turtles o Kuta beac on ch,, Bal ali,, Indon o essia i .

religion. Though Bali is part of the world’s most populous Muslim nation, Indonesia, most residents practise a form of Hinduism known for elaborate ceremonies and rituals. The tiny island offers a touch of adventure and all the creature comforts. You can hike up a volcano, then come back to your hotel for a cappuccino and a massage. Bali, specifically Ubud, is where Elizabeth Gilbert put the “love” in Eat, Pray, Love, an inspiration for some tourists. But sadly, amid the island’s speedy, haphaz-

ard development, sometimes it can be hard to see past the construction cranes, traffic jams and trash on the southern coast. Even in landlocked Ubud, the island’s supposedly laid-back cultural hub, my taxi got stuck in gridlock outside a Starbucks. It seemed a fitting symbol for a vacation going wrong. To tackle the infrastructure problems, the island’s dingy, overcrowded airport is getting an upgrade. Work is under way on toll roads to ease the traffic, especially bad around the built-up beach party town of Kuta. But the tourism numbers are growing so quickly, it’s hard to imagine how the island will cope. Last year brought 2.75 million foreign visitors, up more than 10 per cent from 2010. Next year, the island will get a publicity boost by hosting two very different international events, the Miss World pageant and the AsiaPacific Economic Cooperation summit. The Jakarta Post reported in July that Bali’s governor expected the number of foreign visitors to nearly double to 5 million by 2015. Domestic visitors should also nearly double to hit 10 million, he said. Though bombings by Islamic militants in 2002 and 2005 in Bali targeted Westerners at nightclubs and beach restaurants, killing a total of 222 people, the violence did not seem to deter visitors in the long term. Some tourists in search of cleaner beaches

and more authenticity are heading to nearby islands, including Lombok. In July, the French newspaper Le Monde published a much-discussed article declaring Bali a has-been under the headline, “Bali, c’est fini?” Yet I would argue that Bali, for all its troubles, still offers something special, if you can forgive its flaws — and if you can get there sooner rather than later. For me, the biggest draw is the intense moments of beauty that bloom up out of nowhere. Every day, you’ll happen upon “canang sari,” which are small, exquisite religious offerings made from leaves, flowers, rice and incense sticks. You’ll see Balinese in sarongs and lace blouses kneeling to pray at their family temples by the roadsides. Whizzing down the road in a scooter at dusk, you might hear a snatch of music from a rehearsing gamelan orchestra — percussive, chiming, mesmerizing. The chairman of Bali’s tourism board, Ida Bagus Ngurah Wijaya, acknowledges the island’s crowding problems but says its culture and temples still distinguish it from other beach destinations. “The culture is still there, even in a place like Kuta,” the party beach, he told me when I called him after my trip. That’s true. But we felt much better about Bali the farther we got from the noise and traffic. – AP


18

advertising feature

Eco living

SPRING by Sheryl Stivens

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DĂŬĞƐƵƌĞLJŽƵŚĂǀĞĂƐŵĂůůĐŽŶƚĂŝŶĞƌĨŽƌĨŽŽĚ ƐĐƌĂƉƐŚĂŶĚLJŝŶLJŽƵƌŬŝƚĐŚĞŶƐŽĂůůƚŚĞĨĂŵŝůLJĐĂŶ ƵƐĞŝƚƌĂƚŚĞƌƚŚĂŶƚŚĞƌƵďďŝƐŚĐŽŶƚĂŝŶĞƌĨŽƌĂŶLJ ŬŝƚĐŚĞŶƚŽǁĞůƐ͕ďƵƩĞƌƉĂƉĞƌ͕ĨƌƵŝƚΘǀĞŐĞƚĂďůĞ ƉĞĞůƐĞƚĐ͘ /ĨLJŽƵŚĂǀĞůŽƚƐŽĨŵĞĂƚŽƌĮƐŚǁĂƐƚĞŝƚ͛ƐĂ ŐŽŽĚŝĚĞĂƚŽŐĞƚĂŽŬĂƐŚŝĨŽŽĚǁĂƐƚĞďƵĐŬĞƚ͘ ŽŬĂƐŚŝŝƐĂƚǁŽďƵĐŬĞƚĐŽŵƉŽƐƚƐLJƐƚĞŵƚŚĂƚ ĨĞƌŵĞŶƚƐƚŚĞĨŽŽĚǁĂƐƚĞʹũƵƐƚůŝŬĞŵĂŬŝŶŐ ǀŝŶĞŐĂƌŽƌLJŽŐŚƵƌƚƐŽƚŚĞƌĞŝƐŶŽƐŵĞůůĂŶĚŝƚ ĐĂŶďĞŬĞƉƚƌŝŐŚƚŝŶƐŝĚĞLJŽƵƌŚŽƵƐĞ͘tŚĞŶLJŽƵ ĂĚĚĨŽŽĚǁĂƐƚĞŽƌŵĞĂƚƚŽƚŚĞďƵĐŬĞƚLJŽƵĂůƐŽ ĂĚĚĂƐĐŽŽƉŽĨŽŬĂƐŚŝŝŶŐǁŚŝĐŚĐŽŶƚĂŝŶƐ ƚŚĞŵŝĐƌŽŽƌŐĂŶŝƐŵƐƚŽĨĞƌŵĞŶƚƚŚĞĨŽŽĚ͘ KŶĐĞƚŚĞďƵĐŬĞƚŝƐĨƵůůŝƚĐĂŶďĞĂĚĚĞĚƚŽLJŽƵƌ ĐŽŵƉŽƐƚďŝŶŽƌďƵƌŝĞĚŝŶLJŽƵƌŐĂƌĚĞŶ͘&ŽƌŚĞůƉ ǁŝƚŚŽŬĂƐŚŝŽŵƉŽƐƟŶŐĐĂůůLJŽƵƌŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ŚĞůƉůŝŶĞϬϴϬϬϲϮϳϴϮϰ͘ /ĨLJŽƵǁŽƵůĚůŝŬĞƚŽƐĞƚƵƉĂǁŽƌŵĨĂƌŵŽƌ ĐŽŵƉŽƐƚďŝŶǁĞĐĂŶĂůƐŽŚĞůƉLJŽƵŐĞƚƐƚĂƌƚĞĚ͘ ZĞƚƵƌŶŝŶŐĂůůLJŽƵƌŬŝƚĐŚĞŶĂŶĚŐĂƌĚĞŶǁĂƐƚĞ ďĂĐŬƚŽƚŚĞĞĂƌƚŚďLJĐŽŵƉŽƐƟŶŐŝƚŝƐŽŶĞŽĨƚŚĞ ŵŽƐƚŝŵƉŽƌƚĂŶƚƚŚŝŶŐƐǁĞĐĂŶĂůůĚŽĞǀĞƌLJĚĂLJ ĂŶĚĂůƐŽƐĂǀĞƐŵŽŶĞLJĂŶĚƌĞĚƵĐĞƐĂŵŽƵŶƚŽĨ ƌƵďďŝƐŚǁĞŚĂǀĞƚŽĚŝƐƉŽƐĞƉůƵƐǁĞĐĂŶƵƐĞ ƚŚĞĐŽŵƉŽƐƚǁĞŵĂŬĞƚŽŐƌŽǁŚĞĂůƚŚLJŽƌŐĂŶŝĐ ǀĞŐĞƚĂďůĞƐ͘

Spring Cleaning – what do we do with household hazardous waste? ƐƚŚĞƐƉƌŝŶŐǁĂƌŵƚŚůŝŌƐŽƵƌĞŶĞƌŐLJůĞǀĞůƐ ǁĞĂƌĞŽŌĞŶƚĞŵƉƚĞĚƚŽĐůĞĂŶŽƵƚƚŚĞŐĂƌĚĞŶ ƐŚĞĚ͕ƚŚĞŐĂƌĂŐĞŽƌƚŚŽƐĞĐƵƉďŽĂƌĚƐƚŚĂƚǁĞ ŚĂǀĞŶ͛ƚůŽŽŬĞĚŝŶƚŽĨŽƌĂǁŚŝůĞ͘ dƵĐŬĞĚĂǁĂLJĐĂŶďĞĂůůƐŽƌƚƐŽĨƚŚŝŶŐƐŝŶĐůƵĚŝŶŐŐĂƌĚĞŶĂŶĚŚŽƵƐĞŚŽůĚĐŚĞŵŝĐĂůƐŝŶŽůĚ ĐŽŶƚĂŝŶĞƌƐ͘^ŽŵĞƟŵĞƐƚŚĞƐĞĐŽŶƚĂŝŶĞƌƐŶŽ ůŽŶŐĞƌŚĂǀĞĂůĂďĞůǁĞĐĂŶƌĞĂĚŽƌŵĂLJŶŽƚďĞ ƚƌƵĞƚŽůĂďĞů͘ DĂŶLJŽĨƚŚĞƉƌŽĚƵĐƚƐĨŽƵŶĚĂƌŽƵŶĚŽƵƌ ŚŽŵĞƐƐƵĐŚĂƐ͕ŐĂƌĚĞŶƉĞƐƟĐŝĚĞƐ͕ŚĞƌďŝĐŝĚĞƐ ŽƌĨƵŶŐŝĐŝĚĞƐ͕ƉŽŽůĐŚĞŵŝĐĂůƐŽƌĞǀĞŶƐŽŵĞ ŚŽƵƐĞŚŽůĚĐůĞĂŶĞƌƐĐĂŶďĞŚĂnjĂƌĚŽƵƐĂŶĚŶĞĞĚ ƚŽďĞĚŝƐƉŽƐĞĚŽĨĐĂƌĞĨƵůůLJ͘ ,ĂnjĂƌĚŽƵƐƉƌŽĚƵĐƚƐĐĂŶďĞŇĂŵŵĂďůĞŽƌ

ǀĞƌLJĐŽƌƌŽƐŝǀĞĂŶĚĐĂŶĐĂƵƐĞŚĂƌŵƚŽƉĞŽƉůĞ͕ ĂŶŝŵĂůƐ͕ĂŶĚŽƵƌĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚ͘ƵƌLJŝŶŐŚĂnjĂƌĚŽƵƐǁĂƐƚĞĐĂŶĐĂƵƐĞƚŚĞƐŽŝůĂŶĚŐƌŽƵŶĚǁĂƚĞƌ ƚŽďĞĐŽŶƚĂŵŝŶĂƚĞĚ͘ƵƌŶŝŶŐǁĂƐƚĞŽƌƉůĂƐƟĐƐ ĐĂŶŽŌĞŶĐĂƵƐĞƚŽdžŝĐĂŝƌƉŽůůƵƟŽŶ͘ /ĨLJŽƵŚĂǀĞĐŽŶƚĂŝŶĞƌƐŽĨŚŽƵƐĞŚŽůĚŚĂnjĂƌĚŽƵƐƉƌŽĚƵĐƚƐƚŽĚŝƐƉŽƐĞŽĨƵƉƚŽϮϬůŝƚƌĞƐŝŶ ƐŝnjĞƉůĞĂƐĞĚƌŽƉƚŚĞŵŽīĨŽƌƐĂĨĞƐƚŽƌĂŐĞĂŶĚ ĚŝƐƉŽƐĂůĂƚƚŚĞƐŚďƵƌƚŽŶZĞƐŽƵƌĐĞZĞĐŽǀĞƌLJ WĂƌŬŽƉĞƌĂƚĞĚďLJDĂƐƚĂŐĂƌĚ͘ This service is supported by the Ashburton District Council. If you have any ƋƵĞƐƟŽŶƐ&ƌĞĞƉŚŽŶĞϬϴϬϬϲϮϳϴϮϰŽƌĞŵĂŝů ůůĞLJΛŵĂƐƚĂŐĂƌĚ͘ĐŽ͘Ŷnj

YOU eco living


YOU eco living

advertising feature

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Do you RECYCLE your Household Batteries? They come in all shapes and sizes and are in our watches, games, cameras, ĮƌĞĂůĂƌŵƐ͕ŚĞĂƌŝŶŐĂŝĚƐĂŶĚĂůůƐŽƌƚƐŽĨ gadgets. We all seem to use more and ŵŽƌĞďĂƩĞƌŝĞƐŝŶŽƵƌŚŽŵĞƐ͕ƐĐŚŽŽůƐ and work places. ďĂƩĞƌLJŝƐĂŶĞůĞĐƚƌŽĐŚĞŵŝĐĂůĚĞǀŝĐĞǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞĂďŝůŝƚLJƚŽĐŽŶǀĞƌƚĐŚĞŵŝĐĂůĞŶĞƌŐLJƚŽ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐĂůĞŶĞƌŐLJƚŽƉƌŽǀŝĚĞƉŽǁĞƌƚŽ ĞůĞĐƚƌŽŶŝĐĚĞǀŝĐĞƐ͘

/ŶƐŝĚĞĂďĂƩĞƌLJ͕ŚĞĂǀLJŵĞƚĂůƐƌĞĂĐƚǁŝƚŚ ĐŚĞŵŝĐĂůĞůĞĐƚƌŽůLJƚĞƚŽƉƌŽĚƵĐĞƚŚĞďĂƩĞƌLJ͛Ɛ ƉŽǁĞƌ͘ĂƩĞƌŝĞƐĐŽŶƚĂŝŶŚĞĂǀLJŵĞƚĂůƐƐƵĐŚĂƐ ŵĞƌĐƵƌLJ͕ůĞĂĚ͕ĐĂĚŵŝƵŵ͕ĂŶĚŶŝĐŬĞů͕ǁŚŝĐŚĐĂŶ ĐŽŶƚĂŵŝŶĂƚĞƚŚĞĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚǁŚĞŶďĂƩĞƌŝĞƐ ĂƌĞŝŵƉƌŽƉĞƌůLJĚŝƐƉŽƐĞĚŽĨ͘tŚĞŶŝŶĐŝŶĞƌĂƚĞĚ͕ ĐĞƌƚĂŝŶŵĞƚĂůƐŵŝŐŚƚďĞƌĞůĞĂƐĞĚŝŶƚŽƚŚĞĂŝƌ ŽƌĐĂŶĐŽŶĐĞŶƚƌĂƚĞŝŶƚŚĞĂƐŚƉƌŽĚƵĐĞĚďLJƚŚĞ ĐŽŵďƵƐƟŽŶƉƌŽĐĞƐƐ͘ /ŶůĂŶĚĮůůƐ͕ŚĞĂǀLJŵĞƚĂůƐŚĂǀĞƚŚĞƉŽƚĞŶƟĂůƚŽ ůĞĂĐŚƐůŽǁůLJŝŶƚŽƐŽŝů͕ŐƌŽƵŶĚǁĂƚĞƌŽƌ ƐƵƌĨĂĐĞǁĂƚĞƌ͘

^ŽĚŽƚŚĞƌŝŐŚƚƚŚŝŶŐ͘ƌŽƉŽī ĂůůLJŽƵƌďĂƩĞƌŝĞƐĨŽƌƌĞĐLJĐůŝŶŐ ĂƚƚŚĞDĂƐƚĂŐĂƌĚ ZĞĐLJĐůŝŶŐ^ŚĞĚ͘ ĂƩĞƌŝĞƐĂƌĞŚĂnjĂƌĚŽƵƐ͕ƐŽ ĐĂŶŶŽƚďĞĐŽůůĞĐƚĞĚŝŶLJŽƵƌ ŬĞƌďƐŝĚĞƌĞĐLJĐůŝŶŐďŝŶ͘

ĂƩĞƌŝĞƐŵĂLJƉƌŽĚƵĐĞƚŚĞĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐ ƉŽƚĞŶƟĂůƉƌŽďůĞŵƐŽƌŚĂnjĂƌĚƐ͗ ͻWŽůůƵƚĞƚŚĞůĂŬĞƐĂŶĚƐƚƌĞĂŵƐĂƐƚŚĞŵĞƚĂůƐ ǀĂƉŽƌŝnjĞŝŶƚŽƚŚĞĂŝƌǁŚĞŶďƵƌŶĞĚ͘ ͻŽŶƚƌŝďƵƚĞƚŽŚĞĂǀLJŵĞƚĂůƐƚŚĂƚƉŽƚĞŶƟĂůůLJ ŵĂLJůĞĂĐŚĨƌŽŵƐŽůŝĚǁĂƐƚĞůĂŶĚĮůůƐ͘ ͻdžƉŽƐĞƚŚĞĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚĂŶĚǁĂƚĞƌƚŽůĞĂĚ ĂŶĚĂĐŝĚ͘ ͻŽŶƚĂŝŶƐƚƌŽŶŐĐŽƌƌŽƐŝǀĞĂĐŝĚƐ͘ ͻDĂLJĐĂƵƐĞďƵƌŶƐŽƌĚĂŶŐĞƌƚŽĞLJĞƐĂŶĚƐŬŝŶ͘

Ashburton’s Eco Education Centre 6adc\h^YZi]ZBVhiV\VgY8dbbjc^inGZXnXa^c\H]ZY!GVc\ZGdVY# See our range of Eco displays including the hungry Worm Bin as seen at Ellerslie Flower Show and the Rainwater Harvesting Barrel. Our Education Team are not at the Eco Education Centre every day. Contact us; Free phone 0800 627824 or email bholley@mastagard.co.nz or sherylstivens@gmail.com ™ ;dg]Zael^i]Xdbedhi^c\!gZjh^c\VcYgZXnXa^c\ ™ IdWdd`Vi^bZ[dgV\j^YZYidjg[dgndjg\gdjedghX]dda ™ IdWdd`ndjgeaVXZVidjgcZmi;G::VcY:6HN8dbedhi\VgYZc9Zbd#

Supported by Ashburton District Council

Recycle special waste carefully ™ JhZYd^a ™ 7ViiZg^Zh ™ EV^ci ™ ;ajdgZhXZciijWZhVcYWjaWh ™ :aZXigdc^XlVhiZVcYIKÉh ™ =djhZ]daY]VoVgYdjhlVhiZ 9gdei]Zbd[[Vii]Z6h]Wjgidc GZhdjgXZGZXdkZgnEVg`#


YOU food

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Coriander the

C

oriander is one of the most versatile and must-have herbs. It’s an annual that’s often known as cilantro and can be grown year round in a sunny position. Make sure you water it well and often to stop it going to seed and fertilise it regularly and it will reward you for months with fragrant, delicious leaves to pick and use in salads, cooked dishes, sauces and salsas.

Fish with coriander 1kg white fish fillets sea salt and freshly ground black pepper extra virgin olive oil juice of 1 lemon 1/2C fish or chicken stock 1/4 C dry white wine 2T finely chopped coriander 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed • Preheat oven to 180°C • Lie fish in a shallow baking dish • Sprinkle with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, olive oil and lemon juice • In a small saucepan bring the fish stock and wine to the boil • Reduce by half and add the coriander and garlic • Pour over the fish. Bake for 7 minutes until fish is cooked through

Potato salad with coriander dressing 600g small potatoes, washed 2 T olive oil 1 red capsicum, thickly sliced lengthways 2 bunches asparagus ½ C flat-leaf parsley leaves 2 T lemon juice Fresh coriander yoghurt ½ C natural yoghurt ½ C chopped fresh coriander • Cook potatoes until tender, slice thickly and drizzle with small amount of oil • Brush capsicum and asparagus with small amount of oil • Cook on grill for 2 min each side or until tender

• Place potatoes, capsicum, asparagus and parsley in a large bowl • Drizzle with lemon juice and leftover oil. Toss to combine • Combine the yoghurt and chopped fresh coriander

Lamb rump with mint, coriander and basil sauce 1 lamb rump 1 T avocado oil 1 t garlic salt Freshly ground black pepper • Rub lamb rump with avocado oil and sprinkle with garlic salt and pepper • Bake at 200 degrees C for 35 to 40 minutes • Rest, covered, for 15 minutes • Cut into slices and serve with mint, coriander and basil sauce and green salad

Mint, coriander and basil sauce 1 C fresh coriander leaves 1 C fresh basil leaves 1 C fresh mint leaves 1 long red chilli 2 t sugar 3 T raspberry vinegar ½ C hot water 1 t iodised salt Freshly ground black pepper • Chop coriander, basil and mint leaves finely • Cut chilli in half lengthways, Remove seeds and chop chilli finely • Mix herbs with chilli, sugar, vinegar, hot water, salt and pepper

herb MUST-HAVE


YOU

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Smoked salmon ticks all the boxes S moked salmon is one of the most popular seafood delicacies found on the supermarket shelves. While it might be more expensive than some deli treats, you only need a little to have a big impact. There are two distinct smoking processes. Hot smoking cooks the flesh at 80-100°C, turning it moist, flaky and opaque while infusing it with a wood-smoke aroma and flavour. Cold-smoked salmon, available in rosy-pink translucent slices, is infused with smoke at a lower temperature, no more than 30°C, and is delicately flavoured. Both are packed ready to eat. Salmon is widely acknowledged as a food that not only tastes good but is also good for you – naturally rich source of long chain omega-3s, which have important heart health benefits. It’s believed to be beneficial for the joints and for maintaining a healthy mind at all of life’s stages.

Potato rosti with smoked salmon

3 large potatoes (about 700g) 2 T chives, chopped 60g butter, melted 1/4 C olive oil Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 8 slices smoked salmon (about 200g) Fresh herbs to serve 4 lemon wedges Crème fraiche Dill sprigs

• Preheat oven to 150°C • Peel potatoes, grate and squeeze out any excess liquid • Place grated potato in a bowl and mix in the chives, melted butter, salt and pepper • Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium/high heat • Spoon 1 1/2 tablespoons of mixture into the pan for each cake and fry until golden on both sides. Drain on paper towels and place in oven to keep warm until all cakes are made • Serve two potato cakes on each plate. Top with tsp of crème fraiche • Curl two slices of salmon on each stack

• Decorate with dill sprig and serve with a lemon wedge

Smoked salmon canapés

3T creme fraiche 2 T Dijon mustard 1 T honey 1 T freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 T fresh dill, minced (plus more for garnish) Sliced wholemeal bread 500g thinly sliced smoked salmon • In a small bowl, combine creme fraiche, mustard, honey, lemon juice and dill • Chill at least 4 hours, until serving time • Cut crusts from wholemeal bread • Use a 1-1/2-inch round cookie cutter to cut bread into circles. Lightly toast • Spread mixture on to wholemeal • Top with a piece of salmon and garnish with dill

Smoked salmon pasta 1 1/2 C grated gruyere cheese 1/3 C chopped fresh parsley 2 t ground black pepper 500g dried spaghetti 600ml cream 1C dry white wine 1 small garlic clove, thinly sliced ½ C capers ½ C pitted black olives 1 t salt and freshly ground black pepper

200g smoked salmon slices cut into strips

• Combine the cheese, parsley, pepper and lemon rind in a small bowl and set aside • Cook the spaghetti in a large saucepan of salted boiling water • Drain, return to the saucepan and cover to keep warm • Place the cream, wine and garlic in a large frying pan and bring to simmer • Simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes • Add the capers • Simmer, uncovered for 2 minutes or until the sauce thickens slightly • Remove from the heat and stir in the salt • Pour the sauce into the saucepan with the spaghetti and toss to combine • Add smoked salmon strips and half the cheese mixture and toss well • Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary • Divide the pasta among warmed serving plates or bowls • Serve accompanied by the remaining cheese mixture

Smoked salmon and potato salad with dill Serves 2 400g baby potatoes 125ml (1/2 cup) greek yoghurt (soured cream) 1 small garlic clove, crushed 1 tsp lemon juice salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 handful fresh dill, chopped 1 spring onion, chopped 170g smoked salmon, torn into small pieces • Wash the potatoes, put them in a small pot and cover with water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the potatoes are soft, about 10 minutes or so. • Meanwhile, prepare the yoghurt dressing. In a small bowl, combine the yoghurt, garlic, lemon juice and season with salt and pepper. Stir in about half of the dill. • Strain the potatoes and let them sit for a while to cool down. Arrange potatoes and salmon on plates, sprinkle with the remaining dill and spring onion. Finally, spoon over the yoghurt dressing and serve.


YOU social scene

22 Braide ed Rivers

240812-KG-116 PHOTOS KIRSTY GRAHAM 240812-KG-121

Michelle and Victor Schikker.

Above (from left) – Steph King, Kim Wall and Zoe McCormick.

240812-KG-125

Above – Matt Harris and Jamie Stone. 240812-KG-118

240812-KG-127

Above left (from left) – Grace Paardekooper, Ange Harris, Johnny Doyle. Above – Michael Coote, Greg Cook and Shane Gerken. Left – Jason Gregory and Callum Brown. Right – Cathy Langley and Nina Kickhefer. 240812-KG-122

240812-KG-128


YOU

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Steve Carr (left), Giles Beal and Nicky Cameron.

From left – Robert Grice, Izzy Grice, Andy Innes.

From left – Julia Robins, Sharyn Woodhouse, Phillipa Waters, Marie Vanderwed, Victoria Hood.

From left – Kelsey Jackson, Nicole Ferguson, Lisa Wilson, Hayley Bennett.

From left – Jenny Gill, Kerry Ford, Liz Grant, Helen Behrns, Merryn Jones.

Plainss Ladies Prob bus 20 0th h anniversary

Betty Joyce (left) and Noeline Murdoch.

270812-TM-011

270812-TM-010

PHOTOS TETSURO MITOMO 270812-TM-009

Shona Thomas (left) and Joy Jaine.

Marion Marshall (left) and Anne Marsden.


T PLUS GE

24 MONTHS

ON EVERYTHING OVER $499 EASYPAY OPTION MEANS ALL YOU PAY IS THE ADVERTISED PRICE PLUS INSURANCE AND CREDIT FEES. CONDITIONS APPLY. SEE BELOW FOR DETAILS.

TRADE-IN AND/OR SAVE ON A HUGE RANGE OF FURNITURE & APPLIANCES!

HURRY, MUST END SUNDAY! KDL46EX720 46” FULL HD 1080P 200HZ BRAVIA 3D LED TV s$)NTEGRATED&ULL($$ FEATURESABUILT IN$4RANSMITTER s3KYPE©2EADYREQUIRES3KYPE©CAMERA#-5 "2 s"2!6)!)NTERNET6IDEO"2!6)!)NTERNET7IDGETS s7IRELESS,!.2EADY7I &I$IRECTREQUIRES7I &IADAPTOR 57! "2 s%DGE,%$BACKLIGHT3+5

46”

LESS THAN $16 PER WEEK

SIESTA 3RR + R + R LOUNGE SUITE 99

4RADE INISFORYOUROLDTELEVISIONINGOODWORKINGOVERALLCONDITION

LESS THAN $18 PER WEEK

OR

9 9 $269 $3699

99

9

WOW! RECLIN 4 ERS

LESS THAN $27 PER WEEK

$1000 WITH -IN* E TRAD

TRADE-INS WELCOME

42” s#INEMA$s,%$0LUS s4RU-OTION(Zs-ICRO0IXEL#ONTROL s3MART46WITH-AGIC2EMOTE)NCLUDED s$ $#ONVERSIONs$UAL0LAYs7I&I"UILT)N sX($-)sX53" 3+5

99

$500 W I TH E-IN* TRAD

4RADE INISFORYOUROLDTELEVISIONINGOODWORKINGOVERALLCONDITION

LM6700 42” CINEMA 3D SMART TV

OR

9 9 4 1 $ $1999

4RADE INISFORYOUROLDLOUNGE suite in good overall condition

50'2!$%9/52/,$&52.)452%!00,)!.#%34/3/-%4().'.%7 %&&)#)%.42%,)!",%

OR

9 4 7 1 $ $2099

99

99

$350 W I TH E-IN* TRAD

99

Luxury Pillow top combined with Sleepyhead’s famous Truflex advanced Spring System ensures great comfort, support and excellent lasting qualities.

4RADE INISFORYOUROLDBEDINGOOD overall condition

LESS THAN $10 PER WEEK

OR

$899 $1699

PAEDICREST SOFT QUEENSIZE MATTRESS & BASE

99

$800 WITH -IN* E TRAD

EVERYTHING FOR YOUR HOME PROUDLY MADE IN NEW ZEALAND

38 Kermode St, ASHBURTON Ph: 307 9110 EASYPAY® OPTION MEANS ALL YOU PAY IS THE ADVERTISED PRICE PLUS INSURANCE & CREDIT FEES. EASYPAY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF SMITHS CITY (SOUTHERN) LIMITED. MINIMUM PURCHASE FOR EASYPAY® OPTION IS $499 (OTHER PAYMENT OPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE LESS THAN $499). ALL FINANCE OFFERS ARE SUBJECT TO NORMAL CREDIT GRANTING PROCEDURES. AN INSURANCE CHARGE AND CREDIT FEES ARE REQUIRED. A DEPOSIT MAY BE REQUIRED ON COMPUTERS, MOBILE PHONES, CAR AUDIO PRODUCTS AND NEW ACCOUNTS. INTEREST IS CHARGED FROM THE DATE OF PURCHASE, HOWEVER IF YOU COMPLETE THE ACCOUNT IN FULL WITHIN THE EASYPAY® OPTION PERIOD ALL YOU PAY IS THE ADVERTISED PRICE PLUS THE CREDIT FEES AND INSURANCE CHARGE. WEEKLY PAYMENTS IF STATED ARE BASED ON A 36 MONTH TERM AND INCLUDE BOOKING AND CREDIT FEES, INSURANCE & INTEREST CHARGE. APPLE PRODUCTS, SELECTED COMPUTERS, GAME CONSOLES & SOME PROMOTIONAL ITEMS ARE NOT AVAILABLE IN CONJUNCTION WITH DISCOUNT OR EASYPAY® OPTIONS OFFERS. UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED, DISPLAY ACCESSORIES ARE NOT INCLUDED. DEPENDING ON COLOUR AND COMBINATION, SOME LOUNGE FURNITURE MAY HAVE TO BE ORDERED TO CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS. ALL OFFERS AND PRICES IN THIS ADVERTISEMENT ARE VALID FOR A MAXIMUM OF SEVEN DAYS FROM THE DATE OF PUBLICATION OR WHILE STOCKS LAST. SOME PRODUCTS MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN SOME STORES.

9216KJ

YOU1  

Ashburton Guardian YOU

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