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you

PHOTO JOSEPH JOHNSON 21132102-JJ-012

MARCH 2 2013

magazine

Your Ashburton Guardian publication

DREAMS OF NASHVILLE TOUR GUIDES SETTLE DOWN From life on the road to home life

RECIPES

Eggplant – Purple perfection


2

What’s in

Publisher

Ashburton Guardian Co Ltd

307-7900 l ashburtonguardian.co.nz

you

YOU social scene Fashion with Flair

magazine P2-3 

who’s out and about

P4-7

COVER STORY:



Liam Kennedy-Clark

P10-11

everyone’s got a story

Material in YOU is copyright to the Ashburton Guardian and can not be reproduced without the written permission of the publishers

P12-13

do it yourself

P14-15

new faces

P16-17

just for foodies

P18

Above – Jan Stewart and Jill Duder.

Above (from left) – Karen Jones, Linda Edge and Lindy Peck.

boredom busters for dogs

P20-21

women in business

P22-23

who’s out and about



230213-TM-252 PHOTOS TETSURO MITOMO 230213-TM-258

COVER PHOTO

Liam has converted his bedroom into a music room. 230213-TM-244

230213-TM-259

Above – Barbara McLauchlan and Joan Barr. Above left – Jennie Holmes and Margaret Guthrie. Left – Margaret Leech and Rhonda Ross.

Editorial contact Lisa Fenwick • 307-7929 lisa.f@theguardian.co.nz

Advertising contact Desme Daniels • 307-7974 desme.d@theguardian.co.nz 230213-TM-257




3 Left – Viv Strong and Mary Harrison. Right – Irene Johnston and Val Cartwright. Below – Dorothy Whitford and Debbie Cumberland.

230213-TM-253

230213-TM-254

230213-TM-246

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YOU cover story

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He has country-style good looks, and is an undoubted star on the South Island country music scene. It’s an achievement all the more remarkable considering Liam Kennedy-Clark lives with severe asthma and was almost killed by meningitis as a baby. Susan Sandys reports.

Ashburton 15-year-old Liam KennedyClark has Nashville in his sights. PHOTOS JOSEPH JOHNSON 21132102-JJ-010




Nashville in young country star’s sights L

iam Kennedy-Clark gives a very definite “no” when asked if country music is seen as cool by his friends. It’s a “no” which comes with a shake of the head, and is followed by a laugh. It is not a big deal to him that his friends and peers at Ashburton College think country music is all big hats, checked shirts and twanging riffs. And it does not stop the 15-year-old from pursuing his dream of one day being a country music star and making it to Nashville. Mum Nicky traces Liam’s love of singing and music back to his preschool years. At the age of four she remembers he was in a group of children at preschool when he tried on a costume, grabbed a microphone “and just started singing for these kids”. She bought him a mini keyboard, and when the family went camping he would walk around the grounds playing it. He had to wait for his adult teeth to grow before he could join the Ashburton Silver Band, so at the age of eight he was in, playing the trumpet. He was an early pipe band fan, and his family would dutifully take him along to see performances in the Ashburton Domain. He learned classical piano in those early years, and has since picked up the guitar, harmonica, bass, drums and other instruments.

He attended children’s theatre classes where someone suggested to Nicky she enrol him in singing lessons. He enrolled with singing tutor Barbara Thomas in Ashburton and completed several years training recently. In his teenage years Liam’s passion for music and performing only grew stronger, and he asked his little brother if he could move his bed into his room, so he could turn his own room into a music room. “I kind of talked him into it,” Liam said. But six-year-old Tate thinks it is cool sharing with his big brother, and likes listening to the songs coming from Liam’s music room. The latest development has been turning the room, where Liam spends most of his time before and after school, into a recording studio. A friend helped Liam with the right computer software and he is able to overlay his work on various instruments to make his own backing tracks. A proficient song writer himself, Liam has recently teamed up with lyricist Dave Palmer of the West Coast to increase his range. A DJ fan of his in Invercargill plays them on the radio in the southern city, and Liam would love to see other radio stations follow suit. continued over page

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YOU cover story

6 Liam said country music is all the things to him other genres are not. Mainstream music on the radio today is mainly just “noise”, although he also likes classic pop from the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s, as well as classic rock and rock ‘n roll. He does not like some of the more mainstream country style singing such as that by Taylor Swift, and is more into the likes of Brooks and Dunn, Alan Jackson, Brad Paisley and Keith Urban. He traces his love of the genre back to his early childhood, when he would listen to Johnny Cash and other artists which his grandparents would play as he and his family holidayed with them. “To me it’s really good music. I think country music is one of the genres that can be done without having keyboards and computers,” he said. And it’s that authenticity that Liam is sold on. When it comes to song writing, he has given love songs a miss, wanting to focus more on what is real to him, avoiding the clichéd phrases that songwriters can fall into. Some of his own titles include The Mine’s Afire, about the Pike River mining disaster; Not Where They Belong, about New Zealand and Australian soldiers in Afghanistan; Country Life, about growing up in a small town; The Quake, about the Christchurch earthquakes and their after affects; You’re Who I Want To Be, a tribute to his stepfather Mark and One Heartbeat Away, about telling a friend you will be there when they need you. Liam’s twin sister Maggie said her friends were nothing like Liam’s when it came to their perception of country music. She said artists such as Taylor Swift and the Dixie Chicks had given a modern and popular twist to the genre. “The girls are kind of into the country, the newer country,” she said. And when it comes to dress style for the fashion-conscious teenagers, both Liam and Maggie like country style clothes. For Maggie, who is more the sporty type and loves her netball, she is mainly into surf wear. But she also likes the “gypsy country” look, while her brother is more of a country style purist and loves his long-sleeved modern country shirts, denim jeans and cowboy boots. Liam and Maggie are close as brother and sister, which is just as well, as Maggie and the rest of the family have had to give up their own schedules many a time for Liam’s busy country competition and performance schedule.

8 00 JJ 210 32 1 21

Liam Kennedy-Clark and his twin sister Maggie are both country music fans.

She missed the college’s athletics prelims last month, for example, as the family travelled to an event. “I’m really proud of him,” Maggie said, and she said she had met many friends through the country music scene. Liam said a highlight of the past year had been a trip to the annual Tamworth Country

Music Festival in January. Competing against some of Australasia’s best, he received a raft of awards including runner-up junior male vocalist in the Country Music Association of Australia (CCMA) competition and overall runner-up in the Aristocrat competition. He had needed at least $1700 for flights, train rides and accommodation, and raised

this by busking in his spare time at the Ashburton Farmers’ Market and on local streets, as well as singing at various corporate and private events. It is a familiar scenario for the teenager, who has similarly raised funds to buy most of his musical instruments. continued next page


 Liam is looking forward to another trip to Tamworth in July, to attend the CCMA Academy of Country Music. He won the privilege of undertaking a course at the academy when he was awarded the Camerata Scholarship at the Best of the West awards at Westport, run by the Buller Country Music Club, last year. On the South Island country music scene Liam is an undoubted star, having won many a competition. Nationally he basked in the limelight last year in New Zealand’s Got Talent when he auditioned online and ended up being one of just five wild card entrants to win a televised audition. He sang one of his originals, impressing the celebrity judges. He has also auditioned for the X Factor, of which filming is under way. One of his goals in life is to make it to Nashville and perform in the Grand Ole Opry, a once per month concert, renowned for featuring new stars, superstars, and legends of country music. In the meantime he is just taking things as they come. He gets phone calls regularly from South Island country event organisers seeking a performer. He expects he will stay at school until Year 13 and may then go on to study music or performance, depending on what opportunities come along in the meantime. Liam’s musical achievements are all the more impressive considering he has suffered from severe asthma since being diagnosed at the age of two, and is a survivor of the killer meningitis bug. Liam and Maggie were born nine weeks early and Liam weighed only three pounds. “He was so incredibly tiny but was a strong wee fighter,” Nicky remembers. Then at the age of nine weeks, on his original due date, bacterial meningitis hit. Doctors suspected it started in his chest, and they informed his family that if he did survive he could end up either being deaf, blind or brain damaged. “It was a very long 48 hours wait to see if, or how well, he was going to survive,” Nicky said. Three years of follow-up appointments at Christchurch paediatrics proved he had

7 PHOTOS JOSEPH JOHNSON

Liam Kennedy-Clark doesn’t let much stand in his way when it comes to his beloved country music. 21132102-JJ-002

21132102-JJ-004 PHOTOS SUPPLIED

Liam, with twin sister Maggie, bounced back from meningitis with no long-term effects.

miraculously come through with no long-term effects. For his asthma, Liam uses a preventative inhaler every day but still generally ends up in Christchurch Hospital’s high dependency unit for a day or two once per year. Last year he also had to have his appendix

Liam performing an impromptu concert as a four-year-old at preschool.

Liam (centre) in a children’s theatrical production of Fiddler on the Roof when he was eight.

removed. Liam believes he is growing out of his asthma, and does not let it or anything else stop him from performing and competing. Nicky said her son had looked like “death warmed up” after getting out of hospital on

a Wednesday last year, but by the time Friday rolled around he was off to Oamaru for a country music competition. “I thought he’s never going to do it, but he got up and performed and won overall,” she said.


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YOU house of travel

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ou step off the plane and into another world, you are greeted by the warm air and instead of a surly customs officer you will be met with a brilliant smile and a welcoming ‘Aloha’. It’s the sort of destination you go to to relax, you will find yourself slipping into the rhythm of Hawaii and words like peace, love and happiness will perfectly describe the Hawaiian vibe you are feeling.

House of Travel recommends: •

Situated on 9 hectares in Racecourse Road is Ashburton’s premier lifestyle resort village for people aged 60 years and over. Expressions of interest are invited for this fabulous complex which is currently under construction and will eventually provide 107 two-andthree bedroom villas, 10 age care units and a 70 to 80 bed hospital with attached dementia units. The hub of the village will be Lochlea Lodge the community centre for all residents and their visitors. A lot of thought has gone into the design of the lodge, and it will provide many indoor and outdoor facilities such as residents’ lounge, library, workshops, bowling green, barbecue area, putting green, indoor swimming pool & spa, gymnasium and much more. This gated complex will provide a safe and secure living environment and is situated on the north-west side of Ashburton, an idyllic semi-rural location with mountain views and the resort is only an hour’s drive to Christchurch and Timaru.

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Harbour, paying tribute to those who lost their lives in the tragedy. • Let the Ali’I Kai Catamaran Dinner Cruise take you on a panoramic tour while you enjoy the setting sun and a buffet dinner. • Step back in time at a genuine Hawaiian Lua’a. Enjoy a delicious feast and be entertained by a fabulous Polynesian show, all set in a replica “Hawaiian Village” that incorporates Hawaiian art and craft making. Alongside this is the truly magical atmosphere that Hawaii depicts. The tropical climate and famous Aloha spirit really makes you feel at ease and relaxed. You’re worlds away from the hustle and bustle of East Street! And on your last night, as you watch the sun sink into the Pacific, you’ll wish you could stay a little longer! With both Air New Zealand and Hawaiian Airlines now flying into Honolulu it is even easier to get there! The team at House of Travel know all the right places to stay and things to do that fit in with your budget and ideas. Talk to them today to plan your dream Hawaiian getaway.

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House of Travel Ashburton 196 East Street, Ashburton P: 3 307 8760 | E: ashburton@hot.co.nz CONDITIONS: Ticket taxes and surcharges are included in the advertised prices and are correct as at 26 Feb 13 but may vary due to subsequent tax and surcharge increases and exchange rates • Prices are per person in NZ dollars for cash or cheque purchase only • Costs include a prepaid Passenger Service Charge per adult which replaces the New Zealand departure fee • Prices include 6 nights accommodation as specified • Packages based on return Economy class airfares flying Hawaiian Airlines from Auckland to Honolulu reservations in L class • Travel commenced and completed as specified for sales to 15 Mar 13, or until packages are sold, whichever occurs first • Accommodation Ratings are based on House of Travel Ratings and is a guide only to the overall quality of the property • Capacity limitations may apply on some flights • Should L class not be available in one or both directions the following surcharges will apply – K class $60 per adult/$45 per child, H class $160 per adult/$120 per child or M class $210 per adult/$158 per child • Surcharge prices are one way for travel from Auckland • For travel from other New Zealand domestic airports, please ask your House of Travel consultant • Full payment is required with 14 days of reservation and no later than 4.59pm 15 Mar 13 or until packages are sold out, whichever occurs first • Flights and accommodation are limited and are subject to availability at time of booking • Amendment and cancellation fees apply – please ask your House of Travel consultant.


everyone’s gotYOU a storyfoodies YOU

12 10

From world traveller to

home life H

in Methven

aving furniture and a vege patch is a novelty for Sarah Crawford of Methven. Before settling in Methven, she and partner Hendrik were overland tour guides for about 10 years. They drove groups through Africa, the Middle East and South America, living out of backpacks and sleeping in tents. The trips were anything from two weeks to six months, and the clientele ranged from large groups of Australians on “big party benders” to families. The latter they enjoyed most, being able to show the children just how different life was in less fortunate countries. Sarah went through five passports in those 10 years, as passing through various countries they quickly filled up with stamps. “This one I have got now will be the first one that will ever expire,” she said. Not that she and Hendrik plan on giving up overland tour guiding. They took a group of friends to Africa last year and plan to make a trip every couple of years. Their 22-month-old daughter Tara went with them, so at the age of one she got to see elephants, lions and zebra. It was while undertaking her “standard OE” about 12 years ago that Sarah, from Auckland, got into overland touring. In London a friend of-

YOU magazine writer Susan Sandys randomly chooses a number from the phonebook and tells the story of the person who answers.

EVERYONE HAS A STORY BY SUSAN SANDYS fered her a discounted trip as a passenger from Kathmandu to Cairo. “When I got back I said – ‘I would never do that’.” It was the “constantness” of being on the road all the time, but after two months she decided it would be better to be busy than not, so she undertook mechanics training and got a truck driving licence. Her first guiding job was as a trainee tour leader on a four-week trip through South America. She saw the Inca Trail, the Great Peruvian Desert and the jungles of Equador. About 10 years ago she met fellow guide Hendrik from South Africa, and the pair have been on the road in a truck or Landcruiser just about ever since. “We would have two weeks between trips

and then start again,” Sarah said. “We lived full-time out of backpacks. That’s why it’s lovely to come to New Zealand and buy a house and to be able to close drawers.” When the couple came to New Zealand a couple of years ago they headed for North Canterbury where Hendrik had contracting work. They ended up in Methven, attracted by the skiing, skydiving and other activities. The family of three has two Jack Russells – Tosca and Muzungu, the latter meaning white man in Swahili. Sarah enjoys family life in the town and she potters in her vegetable garden, is a swim tutor at the Methven swimming school, and is secretary of Methven Plunket. “Methven, it’s a melting pot of all sorts of different people and nationalities here,” she said.




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Methven’s Sarah Crawford, with daughter Tara, is loving family life in Methven after 10 years of driving across some of the world’s major continents. PHOTO ERIN WALKER 220213-EW-015


do it yourself YOU

12

To oil/stain or to varnish

B

oth oil/stain and varnish offer your timber excellent protection from the elements with varying looks and finishes. What best suits your timber depends on your taste of colours - dark or light grain - a shiny or natural finish, where the timber is, its application and of course how often you want to maintain it. Armed with the answers to the above questions, enhancing your timber becomes the perfect DIY project. There are a variety of stains and oils on the market which will protect timber while also enhancing its natural look. Not only will they bring out the natural lustre and grain, they also offer excellent protection from the elements and help prolong the life of the timber. Stains change the colour of timber, while oils and clears enhance the natural grain. Both are available for both exterior and interior uses. They also come in both water-based and oilbased, just like paints, and each has its own use. Water-based technology has come a long way, it is easier to apply, more durable and it lasts as long as traditional oils. As in all applications, preparation is important. The surface you want to coat should be thoroughly cleaned and prepared to ensure a longer lasting finish. When choosing stain colours, remember the shade may be different to that shown and will be dependent on the timber and porosity. As a general rule, the lighter the stain colour the more it will be affected by the colour of your timber. Darker colours are obtained by multiple coats and each additional coat will

Shane Woods Ordinary Kiwi bloke Shane ‘Woodsy’ Woods is handy around the house with a hammer. Each month we’ll check in on what his latest DIY project has been.

intensify the colour. Most stains darken as they dry and weather. Oil stains penetrate and are absorbed by the timber and become part of the wood rather than remain on the surface, making it ideal for exteriors and our harsh conditions. Oil-based stains require regular coats to maintain durability, but done every few years there is little or no preparation required, just keep the oil up to it and it carries on looking great. Linseed oil is a slow-drying, water-resistant oil with preservative properties. It is one of the oldest penetrating finishes for wood and mostly used for protection of exterior doors or furniture. However, it tends to become sticky in humid weather. Danish oil is also a penetrating finish and is mostly used on interior doors and trim. Danish oil is a combination of Tung oil and varnish with the addition of pigment for colour. Varnish on the other hand is the most traditionally used finishing material for wood surfaces. It is used as protection and decoration of interior wood surfaces. Varnish is a mixture of resins, drying oils, driers and thinners.

Varnish or polyurethane finishes are durable and protective and are available in waterbased or oil-based finishes. It gives a clear wood finish, and comes in both matt and glossy. It gives timber a rich and natural finish that enhances the grain and texture of the surface. Polyurethane-based finishes are durable, scratch-proof and stain resistant, ideal for bench tops, floors, interior doors and timber Although available in marine grade varnish has limited uses in our exterior conditions, sun is its enemy and when it deteriorates the exposed timber discolours, looks awful and becomes a big job to repair. On exterior timber that has been previously varnished, it is worth biting the bullet as the long-term solution is to use a penetrating oil but firstly the varnish needs to be completely removed by sanding or chemical stripping. The end result depends on the surface being dry and free from all dust, dirt, wax, grease or oil before the finishing product is applied. If necessary wash with household detergent or sugar soap. Exposed nail heads, especially if not galvanised, should be punched below the surface and filled. To avoid smearing putty into the grain, apply a coat of stain or finish before filling the holes. Fill holes with an exterior grade putty, colour matched to your finish to prevent rust stains, then sand smooth. Sanding is the most important thing in surface preparation - especially when a clear finish is wanted. continued next page


YOU



13 PHOTOS SUPPLIED

Far left – Oil/stain is ideal for exterior doors and timber. Above – As with any job preparation is the key. Woodsy gives the door a thorough sand. Left – Woodsy applies the first coat of penetrating oil to an exterior door.

Always sand along the grain – sanding across the grain will leave scratches. Before using a stain, check the colour on a part of the timber which doesn’t show. If the colour appears too strong, thin the stain according to instructions. Read the label on the product for penetration, re-coating and drying times. Varying temperatures can affect drying and timber staining ef-

fects. Many finishes can be applied by using a quality brush, while traditional stains are better wiped on with a clean, soft cloth. If applying by brush always brush well out along the length of the timber when using an oil-based stain. Stains applied by cloth pad should be wiped on liberally along the grain. Do only one section at a time, ensuring that

the stain isn’t rubbed out too thinly or a streaky appearance may result. When the surface has been stained and while it is still quite wet, wipe lightly along the grain with a clean soft cloth to remove any excess. The time to do this can vary. Some stains should be wiped off straight away, while others can be left from one to three minutes, depending on the weather.


YOU new faces

14

From London

to

and W

PHOTOS EMILY MOORE 250213-EM-011

by Sam Morton

atching the Hammers from afar is the life Chris Oakley leads today. Growing up in Barking in North London, the West Ham Football Club was his local team and his passion for football will die hard. Extravagant ticket prices have often kept him away from the stands back home, but the games are always witnessed on the box – highlight reels or live. Chris arrived in Ashburton last year, starting a new life 18,000km away from his homeland. Shifting with his Kiwi wife Melanie and their six-year-old daughter Bella, Chris and his family haven’t looked back and already have plans to firmly root themselves to the district by buying a house. His job as the Ashburton Guardian’s web editor, co-ordinating and looking after Guardianonline.co.nz keeps him on his toes and he says he is thriving in this environment. Meanwhile, Melanie promptly secured a job at Netherby School and Bella travels to the same school each day – though to a different classroom. His daughter is enjoying the new lifestyle and her new school life. His wife is also settling in well, learning the ropes fast and enjoying being back in her




15

Ashvegas lovin’ it home country. For Chris though, computers have featured in his life since the late 80s. It was the era of computers and he knew back then it was a good industry to get involved in. The choice appears to have served him well. Chris spent 19 years with Barking and Dagenham Council working in their IT department offering computer support. But that’s all in the past and now his future is in New Zealand. He loves Ashburton and says anyone that doesn’t needs to open their eyes. “What’s not to like?” Chris said. “The place is fantastic, we’re all really enjoying living here and the facilities Ashburton has. There’s a domain right over the road and the school class sizes are great. From our point of view we can’t see why some people moan about the place.” The lifestyle is certainly worlds apart from London, where the hustle and bustle and high levels of crime were the norm. However, despite that difference Chris has been stunned by another sector of life – how much dearer clothing and food are here. “It was amazing to see how much a shirt cost here compared to England, it’s incredible,” he said. “But overall the lifestyle balances itself out and I think it’s great all round.”

And like any move to the other side of the world, regular visits to friends and family has proved geographically tough. “I miss not being able to go down the road and visit them, but that’s all part of the territory

when you move to a place like New Zealand,” Chris said. “A lot of people gave me quite a bit of stick when they found out I was moving here, but I’m pleased to report Ashburton has been nothing like they said it would be – it’s much the opposite.” For now though, Chris has turned his attention to his fitness levels and hopes to join a local football club to stun the world with his blistering pace and unmatched ball skills previously seen only at Barcelona.

250213-EM-022

New chapter: Ashburton Guardian web editor Chris Oakley is enjoying his new life in New Zealand. His wife Melanie and their six-year-old daughter moved to Ashburton last year, so the trio could start a new life in Melanie’s homeland. (Football courteous of Stirling Sports.)


YOU food

16

Experience the joys of

eggplant

A

di. While it is treated as a vegetable, eggplant is actually a fruit. It has a mild taste and is typically cooked with stronger flavours such as garlic, tomatoes, onions, herbs and spices. Several varieties of eggplant are available in New Zealand. Skin colours range from a

NE

W

lso known as the aubergine, eggplant is very common in Southern European countries where it is highly prized. The Greeks put eggplant in a traditional recipe called moussaka, the French in their traditional recipe, ratatouille, and the Turks in imam bayil-

deep purple, almost black, to a light purple with creamy streaks to an all white. The most common variety is the deep purple pearshaped eggplant. When buying eggplant, look for glossy, blemish-free skin that is firm to the touch and is showing no signs of withering.

Decay appears as dark brown spots on the surface and should be avoided as these eggplants will deteriorate rapidly. Eggplants should be heavy in relation to size.

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! y a d o t t i e t s a T

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Ashburton

Corner Moore & West Streets Ashburton Phone 03 307 6183


YOU



17 Eggplant and eggs 1 cup water 4 tomatoes, skinned and diced 2 medium eggplants, diced 1 red onion, chopped salt and black pepper to taste 4 eggs ½ C grated cheese ¼ C chopped fresh parsley Place water in a saucepan, add tomatoes, eggplant, onion, salt and pepper to taste. Bring to the boil and simmer until the eggplant is just tender. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Divide the mixture into 4 ramekins and make a hollow in the centre. Break an egg into the hollow and place in preheated oven and cook until the egg white is almost set. Sprinkle with the grated cheese and cook until the cheese has melted and the egg white set. Serve garnished with parsley.

Eggplant stack 2 eggplants ¼ pumpkin, seeded, peeled and cut into 1 cm slices 2 red peppers, seeded and each cut into three pieces 1 lge onion, peeled and cut into six slices 6 medium-sized flat mushrooms 2 tomatoes, sliced 6 T basil pesto 6 T grated paremsan 4 T olive oil Salt to season Pepper to season Preheat oven to 180°C. Cut the eggplant into roughly 1cm thick slices, you will need 18 in total. Spread sliced eggplant, pumpkin and onion in a single layer in roasting dishes. Sprinkle with a little salt and oil and bake for 15 minutes then set aside to cool.

Then do the same for the mushrooms and peppers and bake for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Place a baking sheet on an oven tray and assemble stack: a slice of eggplant, then some parmesan, a slice of pumpkin, some pesto, a slice of onion. Top with eggplant, parmesan, a slice of tomato, a mushroom, more pesto, a red pepper. Finish with the remaining slices of eggplant and finally sprinkle with parmesan. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes then serve.

Eggplant and salami tapas 1 medium eggplant, cut into 8 thin slices lengthwise vegetable oil for brushing 8 thin slices salami 6 T olive oil 2 T lemon juice 1 T capers, drained, chopped salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste Heat a ridged stove-top grill pan until hot. Brush eggplant slices with oil. Cook 2-3 minutes each side. Remove from pan. Place a slice of salami on a slice of eggplant. Roll up eggplant slice and secure with a bamboo skewer. Place in a shallow dish. Repeat until 8 rolls are

made. Mix olive oil, lemon juice, capers and seasoning together and pour over rolls. Cover and marinate for at least 2 hours. Serve with crusty bread.

Eggplant stuffed with lamb and feta 2 large eggplants, halved lengthwise 1/4 C (65ml) olive oil 500g lamb mince 1 small onion, chopped 1/2 green pepper, chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 t ground cinnamon 1/2 t ground allspice 1 t ground black pepper 1 1/4 C tomato pasta sauce 230g feta cheese, crumbled 2 eggs, beaten 1/2 C (60g) dry breadcrumbs 60g grated mozzarella cheese Preheat oven to 200°C. Line a baking tray with aluminium foil. Brush the cut surfaces of the eggplant halves with half of the olive oil. Place cut-side-up onto the baking tray, and place into the oven. Bake the eggplant for 30 minutes until tender. Remove and allow to cool slightly. Scoop out the flesh, leaving the shells 1cm thick. Remove as many of the seeds as you can then coarsely chop the flesh. Place into a large mixing bowl. Heat the remaining olive oil in a frypan over medium-high heat. Add the lamb mince and cook for a few minutes until it begins to crumble. Stir in the onion, green pepper, garlic, cinnamon, allspice and black pepper. Cook until the onion has softened and the lamb is no longer pink, about 5 minutes. Place the meat mixture into the bowl with the eggplant. Stir in the pasta sauce, feta cheese, eggs and breadcrumbs until well mixed. Evenly divide the lamb mixture into the eggplant shells then return the eggplant to the oven. Bake for 10 minutes then sprinkle with the mozzarella. Reduce the oven temperature to 190°C. Bake until the filling has set and the mozzarella has turned golden brown, about 25 minutes more.


18

vetent YOU

advertising feature

Boredom busters

for your dog

By Suzanna Macilquham

W

e all have to leave our dogs on their own sometimes and with going back to work and getting the kids back to school after the holidays this can be a stressful time for anyone, including your pet. Whether you got a new dog for Christmas or he has been in the family for years, dogs are great companions, but they take a great deal of care and a dog left alone for extended periods of time can develop behaviour challenges, such as separation anxiety. This can lead to the destruction of your beloved garden or home. Why do dogs get bored? Put yourself in your dog’s shoes, imagine watching the same TV show day in day out, that‘s how they feel with the same toys and the

same boring old fence every day until you get home. Dogs were bred to work and hunt, but many dogs in this day and age are left alone for long periods of time. They still need to be stimulated and allowed to burn off their natural energy. So here are a few tips on how to keep your dog entertained while he’s home alone and to protect your beloved garden, furniture or your favourite pair of shoes! •

Tyres and inner tubes can be used as many different toys for your dog. Hang one from a tree with a short rope then attach another rope through the bottom of the tyre to teach your dog how to tug on it to get the tyre swinging. They are also a great place to hide treats as they need to push the tyre around to get to

E E R F

• •

them. For smaller dogs, hide food and treats throughout your house or backyard and let your dog “hunt” them down. Introduce food-dispensing toys at your dogs, you can find many different types of “puzzle” toys are your local vet or pet store, these help stimulate your dog’s brain as they have to work hard on figuring out how to get their treats. A plastic clam shell can be used for a paddling pool; these are great on hot days. Even if your dog doesn’t usually like to swim they enjoy cooling their feet or tummy in a shallow pool. Reward your dog by taking it for a long walk at night, not only does this benefit you but your dog too.

welcome pack when you sign up with us

Come in and meet our friendly team and when you sign up as a new customer with your pet we’ll give you a FREE welcome pack valued at over $130! Included are vouchers for discounted flea treatments, microchipping and worming tablets, and FREE pet food!

Find us on

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ph 308 2321 www.vetent.co.nz


YOU nbs

advertising feature

Scary things

I

t’s amazing the things that happen in life and what we think of people and how we react to all sorts of things. These thoughts came flooding in at a time I couldn’t sleep, not normally a problem but tonight I seem to have this problem, I have a bit of the flu, something I haven’t had in years and this is probably the cause. But as I was laying awake I thought of a client that came to see me the other day. She was very tired and hadn’t slept all night and to be fair to her she kind of looked like she hadn’t slept for a while. The poor woman was all worried about coming to see the bank manager. I remember years ago when I went into lending, our manager used to make the odd client wait a while for him and I think this was to initimidate.

I personally don’t like that way of dealing with people, as you must respect everyone and treat them how you want to be treated. Give them the time and make them comfortable. When it comes to borrowing money there is always the fear, what happens if I can’t repay the loan? Could I lose my home and my life savings? All these things can build up in people’s minds and create anxiety. Sometimes circumstances do change which you have no control over and this can effect you financially. When these things happen we are vulnerable and if we can’t meet our commitments we feel like we’re judged because we can’t meet our commitments. This is when a good bank manager comes into play and protects both the bank’s interests and the client’s. People have these feelings when they come

to borrow money for the first time because they don’t really understand a lot about lending and what the process is. This is why you have to spend time and give them the respect and explain it to them and not talk jargon because it can be a scary time. When your client walks out they will hopefully clearly understand the process and what is happening. Scary stuff if you sat down and just talked Fixed or Floating Rate, Mortgage Protection Insurance, Application Fees, Break Rates, Mortgage Document, Loan Agreement, Priority Sum, Solicitor’s Certificate, Income Protection Insurance. If you mentioned all of this at once your poor client would be running out the door and not wanting to come back. It is enough to make you not sleep at night before you go to see the bank manager.

19 19

But really we’re not all that bad and I’m sure we’re not all that scary either, so not all our clients don’t sleep the night before they come to see us. Thinking of that I think it is time to get some sleep. Scary stuff really.

John Moore Branch Manager NBS Ashburton

4.40

Term Investment

ASHBURTON

Day to day

banking services

All of our accounts include the options using automated banking services Internet, ATM, Phone Banking or personal NBS counter service. *Rate current at 15/02/13 and is subject to change. A Prospectus, Disclosure Statement, and Investment Statement for Term Investments are available upon request, free of charge from any NBS Branch or may be viewed at www.nbs.co.nz. NBS Terms & Conditions apply, Minimum deposit $5,000.00. NBS is not a Registered Bank. NBS has a BB+ (stable) credit rating from Fitch Ratings.

John Moore

Branch Manager

Kiley Sparrows & Amanda Mackenzie Customer Service Officers

%P.A. 12 MONTHS

Term Investments Home Loans Transactional Loans Small Business Banking Agribusiness Foreign Exchange

324 East Street | 03 307 6380 | www.nbs.co.nz


20

women in business YOU

advertising feature

Understanding beasts

T

by Amanda Wright

here is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a person. Winston Churchill uttered those famous words among many others, and anyone who has lived, breathed and dreamt horses will unequivocally agree. People who are passionate about horses all say they were born that way and the desire to own their own horse is all-consuming. The emotional attachment can be just as strong as with their own family. Born in Wellington Jenny Paterson didn’t grow up on a farm or with horses. Her parents were very ‘un-horsey’ but like many young girls she had that strong drive to ride horses. Jenny’s parents owned a beach house on the Kapiti Coast where many years of fond memories were made and cherished. Adjacent was a small dairy farm with a pony, and the farmer was more than happy for the local children to take turns riding. This is where Jenny’s true love of horses began. “It was whichever kid in the district who got

to the pony first that was allowed to ride it for the day, so often I was up at 4:30am just to make sure I was first there. I would have been about 9 or 10 when I first learnt how to ride, and I loved it so much that I continued from there,” Jenny said. As Jenny’s riding skills developed she pursued a style of competition known as Western, taking many championship prizes with her along the way. Any horse has the ability to compete in Western, but the quarter horse is particularly dominant in this field, due to having powerful hindquarters to hold challenging positions such as a sliding stop. The horse also needs co-ordination and have an excellent temperament to perform with both speed and precision. Jenny spent several summers in California with some quarter horse trainers and became very fond of the breed. Her now large collection of 17 horses consists of some lovely quarter horses plus a variety of other horses rescued from various desperate situations. The art of riding, training and managing a horse is known as horsemanship, and is fundamental to ensure a horse is safe and

of beauty

enjoyable to ride. Jenny originally studied Parelli Natural Horsemanship, which focuses on helping people understand their horses; including what motivates them, frightens them, gives them pleasure, and how they operate in their natural settings. After a few years as an instructor she moved on to study with Dr Deb Bennett and Buck Brannaman. “The art of fine horsemanship is something you get hooked on. The more you work with horses and understand them, the more intelligent they are. “Words like ‘naughty’, ‘resistant’, ‘no dirt’, and so on will simply disappear from your vocabulary. In fact you will cringe whenever you hear them. You will come to realise that horses are never wrong and you will strive to make a connection with even the most aloof and disturbed horses,” Jenny said. Horse ownership is a lifestyle that will change everything you know. That means it’s not an easy decision; and it’s not a relationship to enter into lightly. The costs and realities of owning a horse make it a substantial challenge, even when your heart is entirely in it. It is a huge responsibility as Ray Hunt pointed out:

“One careless moment by us can cripple a horse for life”. When you feel your horse is ‘misbehaving’ or problems such as spooking, head-flicking or bucking occur, it is easy to get discouraged and lose focus on what may really be the issue. “The way a horse is kept, raised and trained will inherently dictate how the horse will behave. I have seen many people buy a horse, sell it because it misbehaves, then buy another only to have the same problems occur. When you’re on your third, fourth or fifth ‘bad horse’, it is certainly the time to look at what you may be doing wrong. Horsemanship is not about blaming or labelling the horse. “No horse wants to misbehave and they certainly don’t want to be difficult, they just want to be OK. When you have the right set-up, looking after the horse becomes easy, they become amenable and the process of training and riding becomes fun again,” Jenny said. Jenny taught horsemanship throughout New Zealand for at least 15 years and met hundreds of people and their horses, many of whom came along to her lessons because they had ‘problem’ horses. She travelled to America to meet Buck

Provide it TM


YOU women in business Brannaman, a master horseman and a leading practitioner within the realms of fine horsemanship with numerous published books and DVDs. She invited him to New Zealand to conduct a number of clinics in both the North and South Islands which have attracted both national and international attention. Despite surrounding herself with some of the world’s most knowledgeable mentors, Jenny felt there was still something lacking in certain circumstances. Her revelation happened during a very tough year. Jenny’s sister had been diagnosed with breast cancer and had been fighting the battle for four years. They went down all of the normal pathways to try and beat the disease and one area Jenny looked into passionately was nutrition. Jenny has a BSc in zoology and biology, so understood the theories that she explored, and she became engrossed in the subject. Unfortunately her sister lost her battle, which left Jenny heartbroken. In a cruel twist of fate Jenny suffered a double blow that year, also losing her favourite horse to colic, an all too common tragedy among horses. As she began to investigate why her horse had succumbed to colic, Jenny had her ‘penny drop’ moment. The research and learning she had put towards her sister’s nutrition also made sense in relation to her horse. She began to realise that a lot of the characteristics displayed by ‘naughty’ horses were possibly the result of poor nutrition and the physiological imbalances this can cause. Fortunately she had the advantage of knowing a large group of horse owners from her teaching days willing to try new ideas and products. Then she had the benefit of observing, comparing and learning from them all. “I’m almost 60, I’ve lived most of my life with horses and it took me this long to fully understand how to deliver the complete package to help a horse become 100% ok. “There are many factors to consider to achieve this seemingly elusive goal, but nutrition and mineral balances trump them all. Horses were never meant to be confined behind fences eating re-growth grass. When changes in the season and weather cause an imbalance of nutrients in the grass, this is when the horse can develop serious issues.

advertising feature

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“The grass theory can be inconvenient to horse owners who are looking for a ‘quick fix’ to get their horse right, but I’ve come to understand that it’s not about getting the horse right, it’s about getting it right for the horse, and this can take some time for people to wrap their head around,” Jenny said. Jenny’s research has led to the development of a range of equine nutrition supplements called “Provide It”. For horses lacking in essential nutrition, these predominantly organic vitamins and minerals can be economically combined with plain feeds like chaffs, beets, oats and barley to help correct the imbalance the horse is subjected to from its pasture grass. “Horses are designed to consume a constant trickle of coarse fibrous material 18 to 20 hours per day, not high production green grass commonly fed to dairy cows and other livestock. The greater part of your horses feed should consist of mature horse friendly grass, hay, chaffs and beet products. “One of the best things you can do for your horse is to add top quality vitamins and minerals that are for New Zealand horses. This is the most natural thing you can do next to supplying water.” The body malfunctions as soon as there is an imbalance of these nutrients, consequently many people misread, misjudge and misdiagnose their horse. “You can’t fix mineral deficiencies with anything except minerals. Therefore it is logical to start with getting this aspect of the diet right for at least a month, then treat what’s left. There won’t be much left. You will save a lot of money and heartache by following some simple recommendations. “My experience is that most people are genuinely doing their best by their horses and they welcome any information that will help them and their horse in any way. I can assist horse owners to determine whether their pasture is contributing to their horse being ‘grass affected’ and teach them how to make sure the horse is safe to ride,” Jenny said. You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it participate in synchronised diving. Jenny Paterson with her quarter horse “Posh” - the perfect example of a calm and healthy horse. PHOTO EDEN KIRK-WILLIAMS


YOU social scene

22 Ashburton Business Association website launch

PHOTO ERIN WALKER 200213-EW-012

Above (from left) – Bob McDonald, Neil Chapman and Diane Rawlinson.

200213-EW-011

Above – Josh Aberhart and Fifi Fakapelea. 200213-EW-017

200213-EW-013

Above – Christina Tudor and Matt Rollinson. Below – Wendy Robertson and Robert Breen.

200213-EW-014

Above – Willy Meade and Andrea Pearce. Below – Howard Mahere and Sam Morton. 200213-EW-016

200213-EW-015


YOU



23 Right – Kevin Soster and John Moore. Below – Mike Hanson and Paul Wylie.

200213-EW-019

200213-EW-018

Above – Darren Jones and Tony Corbett.

200213-EW-020

Has your windscreen got a chip or a crack? Need to fix it quickly and effectively! Call Owen or Wayne at Wilson’s Windscreens and get the best advice to repair or replace your windscreen. 200213-EW-021

Above – Helen Shore-Taylor and Renee Pickles. Left – Pam and Manny Sim.

They’re here for your emergency! Your premises or ours! 152 Wills Street, Ashburton Ph 03 308 8485 Mobile 0274 345 636


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You - 2 March 2013  

Ashburton Guardian - You

You - 2 March 2013  

Ashburton Guardian - You