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NOURISHED INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

BOUNTY VOLUME 9 SUMMER / FALL 2016

$9.99 INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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© 2016 Nourished Magazine by ashaINK LLC All rights reserved. No part of this book many be reproduced in any form, or, by any means, without the prior written permission of the publisher, excepting brief quotations in connection with reviews written specifically for inclusion in other magazines or newspapers. For permission to reprint or distribute, write to the editor. nourished@ashaink.com

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NOURISHED VOLUME 9

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“My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite. ― William Shakespeare

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HELLO!

H

ere comes August with it’s langurous days that hold the promise of indulgence. Many of us go away on vacation, blissfully leaving behind the worries of home and work, seeking the comforts of

rustic throwback or luxurious unwinding. In either form, it is the hope of a different experience than the everyday that keeps the spirits up and soul uplifted. If only there was some way to capture that spirit, and, infuse it into the everyday?

T

hat is the quest I have been turning over and over in my mind. While putting together this issue that quest became a continuous undercurrent. In an attempt to seek answers to my own question, I have

meandered around things that hold Summer dear and draws it as a long sigh well into Fall. Foods that manage to pull our minds out, of the routines of the day, and, provide a bright and vibrant bridge to fun and frolic.

A

s with every year, this season’s issue again focuses on make ahead ideas, stocked pantries and versatility to fill a bountiful table that giveth again and again. Bounty is a word oft repeated around

harvest. Depending on which part of the world you are in that may be different times of the year. Yet, the singularity of Summer bridging into Fall, is the undeniable abundance in variety that is available to us as eaters. It is almost a Romanic decadence, yet a plesaure that can be indulged utterly without guilt!!

C

ontinuing the theme of guiltless pleasures, the feature story explores a fast growing agricultural

sector that actually embodies a lot of good, most of all, for the environment! In

an era when literally every form of agriculture is under attack for its attempts to cater to increased demand, oyster farming scales up head held high, in the secure knowledge of not only being sustainable but in a visceral way, defining the ultimate feel-good luxury of this season!

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nd, whether you sup on just oysters or are fond of more hearty grilled meats, a glass of wine is a must accompaniment! This is the season of backyard barbeques and sizzling grills and we keep your glass

filled with wines that have the panache to stand up to the richness of casual banter and fairytale nights.

Asha Publisher, Editor at large

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Contributors Asha Yoganandan Writer, Photographer

C

urious about people and cultures, Asha explores their diversity through the lens of food. A sustainability advocate, she is passionate about communicating the importance of cooking as a life skill and as a way of preserving heritages.

Grigor Licul Wine Connoisseur

G

rigor is a lifelong student of the science and romance of wine. As an everyday epicure, he operates where enthusiasm meets expertise.

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Sea to Plate: Oyster Farming Page 10

Buying Oysters Page 15

Pairing Wines for the Grill Page 17

RECIPES Page 21

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TABLE OF RECIPES GF - Gluten Free; Vn - Vegan; Vg - Vegetarian; * - Suggestions for restricted diet included

PANTRY Smoky Honey Salsa

GF, Vg, Vn

22

Fresh Strawberry Sauce

GF, Vg, Vn

23

24 Hour Kimchi

GF, Vg, Vn

25

Black Tea Cured Salmon

GF, Vg, Vn

26

Sumac Tzatziki

GF, Vg, Vn

27

Vg

31

GF, Vg

33

GF

35

GF, Vg

39

Roast Chicken Salad with Summer Vegetables

GF

41

Greek Baked Sardines

GF

43

Strawberry Milk with mint Cream

GF, Vg

46

Oat and Almond Blueberry Cake

GF, Vg

47

Raspberry Lemon Semifreddo

Vg, GF

48

BRUNCH Leek + Red Pepper Scones Sunshine Smoothie Zucchini Cakes + Smoked Salmon + Tahini Sauce

MEALS Tomato Tart with Millet Crust

DESSERTS

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SEA TO PLATE : OYSTER FARMING

With only 1% of market for oysters catered by wild catch from the sea, oyster farming has become a way of filling the void and meeting eater demand. Farming offers a more consistent and dependable supply, and mollusk farming in particular, is naturally sustainable and has a positive impact on the environment.

STORY: Asha

PHOTOS: Asha

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NOT ALL FARMING WAS MADE EQUAL .....

W

ith a market of over $12Bn annual and 8.3% growth rate, aquaculture is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. As I researched for this article, I was surprised to find that the bulk of aquaculture consists of farming

for bivalve mollusks such as oysters, clams, and mussels. Salmon, other fin fish, and, shrimp farming account only for a third of the whole industry. Yet, in many ways, the latter create the loudest noise from environmentalists, and has put aquaculture as a whole under the zoom lens. Even though farmed salmon is now included in the list of sustainable fish, lack of transparency across the supply chain has kept the industry in a throttle hold battle with advocacy groups. Set against this indutry backdrop is an accelerating market appetite for mollusks, particularly, oysters. Oysters are seen as the quintessential food for upscale and carefree living; From backyard gatherings to instagrammed lunches, from rooftop cocktail hours to formal business diners, the oyster has always served as both an elegant as well as an hegemonic start. Yet, harvests of native oysters are now 1% or less of historical levels due to harvesting, disease, changes in water quality, and other factors. Most of all, the availability of wild caught oysters is consistent in neither quantity and quality. Oyster farming thus fills a void and fortunately is not just sustainable across the supply chain, but, also environmentally accretive To understand more about the practicalities of oyster farming and catering to the end customer, I interviewed Perry Raso, who owns and operated the Matunuck Oyster Farm as well as a well known seafood restaurant adjoining the farm, Matunuck Oyster Bar in Rhode island. This article draws on that interview and our own research.

Oyster farming was practiced by the ancient Romans as early as the 1st century BC on the Italian peninsula and later in Britain for export to Rome. The French oyster industry has relied on aquacultured oysters since the late 18th century. But, industrialized aquaculture with its large scale production and democratized access is only a couple of decades old. Oyster farming has grown organically with demand and with improvements in both farming technology as well as a better understanding of the needed balance with the environment and a longterm perspective.

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A Brief Story of the Oyster

O

ysters naturally grow in estuarine bodies of brackish water. They are filter feeders, grazing on microscopic plants, called phytoplanktons. Phytoplanktons photosynthesize during the day and multiply, rather rapidly,

and when the sun goes down, these micro plants respirate, drawing oxygen from the water. They compete with the supply available to all aquatic organisms in the water body and because estuaries typically do not have heavy water currents, these phytoplanktons can procreate easily with little disturbance. Unchecked, they can cover the entire surface of the water, blocking sunlight penetration beneath the surface, and, choking the oxygen supply for other organisms in the ecosystem.

B

y feeding on these micro plants, oysters provide the karmic balance needed to keep the water ecosystem in functioning order. They essentially increase dissolved oxygen available for other aquatic organisms thereby

enabling biodiversity. In a nub, that is the reason why oyster farming is a particularly sustainable form of aquaculture! A single oyster can filter 24-96 liters a day(1-4 liters per hour)1. The particulate matter oysters remove are sand, clay,

silt, detritus, and phytoplankton.

Where and How of Oyster Farming

I

n the US, oysters are farmed along both coasts. Farming begins at hatcheries with spawning tanks with a controlled environment, temperature and salinity of the water, to induce spawning and fertilization. Female

spawning oysters lay 8 million gametes(egg) and males release enough milt (sperm) to try to fertilize the eggs. Eggs that are fertilized seek something with calcium bicarbonate to attach themselves to, which, in these seed farms are sheets with calcium bicarbonate on the floor of the spawning tanks. Growers buy these sheets when the oysters are a few months old to seed their farm estuaries. Farms are typically based in protected lagoons with steady, salt water, either natural or manmade (by building a wall and creating a break in the flow to the sea). Farmers typically choose one of two common methods of breeding for growth - Rack and Bag or Sea Floor grown. In the former, seed oysters are placed in plastic bags that are shaken once in a while to help the oysters move around a bit and induce growth. The Sea Floor technique bears a closer resemblance to the sea process and leaves them undisturbed for several years until the oysters reach a marketable size.

I

n both methods, the seed oysters attach to themselves to the calcified floor created from the previous crops. Shells of shucked oysters of yester years are distrubuted on the floor of the farm to create a natural calcified

oyster reef that provides a space for new seeds to attach. Over years, this three dimensional oyster shell reef enables a whole new marine ecosystem to thrive. The reef itself provides an habitat for fish to lay eggs, grow and hide from larger predators. The live oyster work of feeding on the microplants reduces turbidity in the water, increasing sunlight penetration and enables sustenance of more aquatic life at deeper depths. INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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The oyster farm built by Hyacinthe Boeuf in the Ile de RĂŠ gave a significant boost to modern oyster farming. After obtaining the rights to a part of the coast he built a wall to make a reservoir and break the strength of the current. The wall was in some time covered with spat (baby oysters still shelling) coming spontaneously from the sea. Through this facilitated yet natural process, he was able to farm 2000 baby oysters per square metre.2

Getting from the Sea to your Table Growing seasons are typically two to three years long. During this time farmers focus on creating a consistent, quality crop. The rack and bag method allows for greater control on the final product. The bags are periodically shaken, forcing the oysters to open and close their shells, working their adductor muscles. Every time the muscle is used glycogen is released, making the meat sweeter. Shells of young oysters are also curled, which, contrary to immediate reaction is actually beneficial for the oyster. Curling allows the shell to grow thicker and slows the rate of growth, creating a cup that makes the oyster easier to shuck. Around the two year mark, when the most of the oysters are of marketable age, bags of oysters are emptied in a rotating drum that separates the oysters by size into different buckets. Those still too small for the market are dropped back into the farm to continue growing. The rest are packed by size and variety, and, shipped to buyers. The most important consideration in this industry across the supply chain is consistency of product. From farmer to chef the goal is to get oysters of similar size and flavor to the table. It is easier to sell oysters that are expected to be a certain size for a type for both the farmer as well as the chef. 1 Rice, M.A.(2000). Environmental Impacts of Shellfish Aquaculture: Filter Feeding to Control Eutrophication. Environment Cape Cod. 1(1) 77-86.) 2 Toussaint-Samat, Maguelonne (2009-03-25). A History of Food. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 9781444305142. INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Farmer Perry Raso of Matunuck Oyster Farm, shaking the bags in rack of growing oysters. Below: Grown oysters sifted through a turning drum that buckets the shellfish by size.

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Tips from A Farmer .....

F

ind the full interview online; Below are a few eater tips he shared.

ASK QUESTIONS I would ask the server or the restaurant house how the oysters were grown. If they are grown in rack and bag like mine, they will be sweeter. Sea floor ones tend to be more briny in flavor because they are not disturbed as much and have more calcium on their shell. USE A GEOGRAPHIC GUIDE FOR TASTE Oysters taste very different depending on where they are grown and pretty similar in waters around a region. The mineralogy of the water, the currents as well as the biomass of each ecosystem, affects the types of oyster species found. So, the taste and size of an oyster, even within a given variety / species, can distinctly vary even along the same coast. So, if you know you like New England oysters, you will most likely enjoy oysters from the same region. But, if you are in the mood for something different, pick a completely different region! Oysters from South Carolina will taste different from those in New England simply because the Southern waters are warmer than the North East.

*To read the full interview and get more details on oyster farming including data sources, get the story online at INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING 15 www.nourishedmag.com


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HIT THE GRILL... POUR THE WINE! In the relaxed and causual setting of open air and fire cooking and eating, the wines to serve should not be too nuanced. Choose solid midprice wines with a superlative flavor profile spectrum. STORY: Grigor Licul

PHOTOS: Asha Yoganandan

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I

t’s summertime! Ignore your stoves and revert to cooking at its primal form – alfresco, on the grill! Aside from being one of life’s great pleasures, preparing food over an open fire allows it to develop richer, deeper flavors and

delightful scents. These savors, and often overpowering seasonings used, are the reason they are difficult to easily

pair with wine. Certainly, a grilled steak calls for a ‘big’ red wine, but some other grilling season favorites make wine seem less than indispensable. However, I am of the persuasion that wine is always a desirable part of the meal; so put the sodas and beers aside, and reach confidently for the corkscrew. There are grilled dishes and wines beyond count, and it is easy to be overwhlemed. It is my intent to provide guiding principles that will encourage you to be adventurous and embrace a successful experimentation while avoiding much of the frustration of disastrous pairing blunders. A good wine pairing needs to strike a balance between the body and weight of the wine and that of the food. A basic rule of thumb is light wines with light foods, progressively increasing the weight of both in parallel. In that order, from lighter to richer tasting grilling favorites:

FISH

T

o drink wine with fish is a matter of course. Since grilled fish has a subtle taste, it mostly calls for a white wine accompaniment. If you are grilling a more delicate fish such as red snapper, cod, or a flaky freshwater

fish, the wine served should be a fresh white wine. Since I am not a big fan of gentle whites, but prefer more assertive varieties, I suggest serving a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. These wines carry a good balance of freshness and fruity aromas, are broad and versatile, and, certainly won’t break the bank for the pleasure. Richer tasting fish such as salmon and sardines are packed with fatty acids, and they stand well to grilling and smoking. You may choose to serve these fish with a rosé or a lighter-to- medium bodied red wine. There is a variety of options among Bordeaux style wines, especially if they prominently feature Malbec or Merlot in the blend. Red wines tend to emphasize the flavors of the fish rather than cutting them. So, if the fish is not your favorite, opt for hearty, mineral whites. I suggest Austrian whites for a pleasant pairing - a bottle of versatile Grüner Veltliner, rich in spicy notes to bridge the flavors of the fish, and with a nice citrusy character that livens the fatty aspects of it.

FOWL

T

he humble chicken is often prepared so blandly that part-time vegetarians consider it a viable option too! But charcoal provides a nice depth of flavor to both drumstick and breasts, making them salty and smoky. I like

to pair grilled chicken with sparkling wines. Keeping in mind that serving costly Champagne at a barbeque may be rightfully perceived as pretentious and fiscally irresponsible, opt for cheaper bubblys such as Spanish Cava or a number or Californian sparkling wines. In this pairing, it is acidity you are after, not sweetness. So make sure to choose a sparkling wine on the drier, brut side. If you find that grilled chicken overpowers your wine, go for a red sparkling wine such as a dry Lambrusco.

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Other fowl such as duck, quail or goose, make less frequent appearances at the grill. But if you are serving meats richer in flavor complexity, such as duck, choose a full bodied white or a medium-bodied red wine. For example, aromatic Pinot Noir wines are a great option as they are not as high in tannins, and have a nice acidity to cut through the fatty notes of the meat. Another great all-around wine is Beaujolais – light and fruity on the palate, full of lively acidity, and easy on the wallet. It is of note that pairing pork with wine is more similar to pairing fowl with wine than the stronger, red meats. On one end of the spectrum try a medium dry Chardonnay or Alsatian Gewürztraminer, while on the other end acidic red Italian or Spanish wines will do nicely.

BEEF AND LAMB It is a matter of science, not simply taste, to pair grilled beef and lamb with red wines. These meats contain a good amount of fat and develop a substantial flavor when prepared on a grill. You need a strong wine with cojones to stand up to them. A good rule of thumb is to choose your reds from a warm wine-country that features grilled beef or lamb heavily in their respective local cuisines. Hence, a classic pairing is a Californian Cabernet Sauvignon with steak, and an Australian Syrah with lamb. The singular black berry richness, and, considerable amount of alcohol in these wines help release and accentuate the flavors of the meat with every breath you exhale! For a wide variety of seasoned meats: middle-eastern style kebabs, sausages, brisket, or barbequed ribs, you can confidently choose a red wine from the Balkans. In my experience, Vranac, a Balkan autochthone variety, is a superlative wine of strength and spicy scent. It is hard to explain its effect in chemical terms; these wines have a style of their own – they are warm with a pronounced spicy flavor, yet straightforward and powerful. While never coarse or ill bred, they may break the legs under you; these wines often hover above 15% alcohol. Among my favorite producers of said wines is Bovin from Macedonia, little known, yet readily available in the US.

The point of commonality among all of the suggested wines is that they are fairly singular and direct. The wines you choose to serve with grilled foods should not be very nuanced. That risks upsetting the casual context of open air dining with an air of oppressive refinement, while also diminishing the depth of these wines overpowered by the deep smokiness of fire grilled foods. Yet, the wines you choose must not be cheap, sweet or flat ones either.

The best union is with solid wines in the middle of the price range, with a superlative flavor profile spectrum.

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THE PANTRY

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Smoky Honey Salsa

A bottle of crisp, dry Vinho Verde and a big bowl of salsa and chips makes a great start to any Summer evening!

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Smoky Honey Salsa There isn’t a lot going on here; a plump tomato, a small onion, some lemon juice and some smoky chili flakes. In that is a world of joy enveloped in a bowl and surrounded by crunchy goodness. And, any leftover salsa makes a great pairing for eggs! (Recipe on page 31) INGREDIENTS 1 big, ripe beef steak tomato, diced small 1/2 medium red onion, diced fine 1 tsp chipotle chilli flakes 2 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp honey salt to taste

DIRECTIONS 1.

Whisk together the honey, salt and lemon juice.

2.

Add the ripe tomato and onion into a bowl. Sprinkle the chilli flakes on top.

3.

Pour the honey mix over this and gently combine.

4.

Let sit for 5-10 minutes for the seasoning to flavor the mix. Some water will separate. If you prefer your salsa drier, strain the mix and transfer the salsa to a bowl to serve.

5.

Reserve the liquid for cooking, it makes a great sauce!

Fresh Strawberry Sauce Juicy, plump strawberries are the beginnings of many an happy ending in this season! Keeping a stock of fresh strawberry sauce means refreshing strawberry milk (Recipe on page 46), strawberry ice cream or a simply fresh sauce over pancakes and ice creams, on demand!! INGREDIENTS 1 pint of fresh, ripe strawberries 3 T sugar 1/4 tsp salt

DIRECTIONS 1.

Trim and roughly chop the starberries. Sprinkle the sugar over them in a bowl.

2.

Refrigerate and them the berreis macerate and marinade for a few hours, preferrably overnight. The longer the berries stay in their own juice, the better this sauce gets!

3.

When ready, ourre tinto a smooth sauce.

4.

Bottle an store for whatever use your heart desires.

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Strawberry Sauce

Bringing back memories of childhood! This recipe is great for adults and children alike....

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24 Hour Kimchi INGREDIENTS 1 napa cabbage, cut into one inch cubes 1/2 cup salt 6 cups water 1 tablespoon light brown sugar 8 garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp cayenne pepper 3 tsp chilli flake 3 T fish sauce

DIRECTIONS 1. Boil water in a pan. In a large bowl, add the cabbage and the salt. Pour the water all over and let the cabbage sit in the salt water for 30 minutes. 2. Drain the cabbage and rinse well. 3. Add all the rest of the ingredients and rub them well into the cabbage, massaging them evenly through the mix. 4. Transfer to a glass container with tight lid. Cover and store in a dark spot undisturbed for atleast 24 hours. The longer you let it marinade, the deeper the flavor gets as the fermentation continues. 5.

4 T white vinegar 4 T vegetable oil Total Prep Time: 30 minutes Total Proof Time: 24-48 hours

6. 7.

Open the jar to degas. You can now either pack into smaller containers or transfer as is to the fridge. The kimchi will keep aging but slowly. You can use this in stir fry, spring rolls, dumplings or just as a savory and very healthy snack.

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Black Tea Smoked Salmon Smoked slamon is one of the eternal elites on a brunch table. More than any other cured fish, the salmon commands attention not just for the elgance of its flavor but also for the vibrance of its color. The high tailed prices reflect the preciousness of this in our minds. Home curing a piece of salmon is not only cost-effective; it is very easy and gives you a ready supply of a whimsy of flavors! INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1 lb salmon, skin on

1.

Line a bowl that just fits the piece of salmon with cling wrap

3 T light brown sugar

leaving a lot of overhang to wrap over the salmon. Lay the

3 T salt

salmon skin side down in a tightly fitting bowl. 2.

3 T ground pepper

marinade evenly over top and sides of the salmon.

5 tsp black tea 3.

zest of 1 lime

4. Total Prep Time: 10 minutes Yield: 1 lb

Wrap in cling wrap around the salmon tightly. Place in the fridge and weight down with cans of beans or jam.

2 tsp walnut oil, to finish

Rest Time: 3-4 days

Mix all the marinade ingredients together and spread the

Drian any liquid that is released after 24 hours, checking everyday for three days.

5.

After atleast three days, unwrap and gently press on the flesh. It should be firm and darker - orange rather than pink.

6.

Rinse the fish clean of the marinade. Pat dry and rub in the walnut oil. Wrap and store in the fridge.

7.

To serve cut very thin slices on the bias with a sharp knife.

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Sumac Tzatziki

INGREDIENTS 1-1/2 cups strained yogurt 2 Persian cucumbers 1 fat clove of garlic 1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp sumac 2 tsp olive oil Total Prep Time: 10 minutes Yield: 1-1/2 cups

DIRECTIONS 1. Grate the cucumber using the medium fine setting. Using either a potato ricer or just some cheese cloth, squeeze the water out into a bowl. Reserve this water for use in juices or in cooking. 2. Finely grate the garlic into the cucumber. Add salt and let sit for a few minutes. Squeeze any water that seperates. 3. In a bowl, add the yogurt, cucumber and garlic mix and toss to mix. The yogurt will loosen a little as you mix. Season with salt. 4. Add half the sumac and olive oil and mix. 5. Transfer to serving dish and garnish with remaining sumac and olive oil and refrigerate 6. Serve cold or store covered in the refrigerator and it will stay for up to a week!

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BRUNCH

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Leek and Red Pepper Scones INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Leek + Red Pepper Scones Leeks, onions, garlic are all darlings of this season. While they are available throughout the year, thanks to cold storage, this is the season to best enjoy the tender shoots of all of these alliums. The green shoots of new onions and delicate layers of spring and summer leeks are subtle enough to eat raw but when gently roasted in butter, the aromas and flavors are rather decadent. The recipe below is a basic scone recipe that works well with any ‘dry’ flavor additions. Try them with garlic scape, scallions, garlic shoots or onion shoots. For a complete brunch, these scones are fantastic used like a biscuit to sandwich scrambled eggs seasoned with hot salsa (page 23) and plumped buttery avocado slices. Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 25 minutes Serves: A Family!

DIRECTIONS 1.

Preheat oven to 375 F.

2.

In a frying pan, saute with leeks in butter until golden brown and caramelized. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature.

INGREDIENTS 1 cup flour 6 T cold butter 1 tsp baking soda 1 egg 7 T buttermilk 1 leek

3.

In a bowl, sift together flour and baking soda. Run the butter into the mix to make a coarse meal.

4.

Make a well in the center and crack the egg into it. Pour in buttermilk and with a fork whisk to mix it with the egg.

5.

Start bringing in the flour from the sides and gather into a dough ball. It will be slightly wet, as you want it to be. If

3 T chopped red pepper 2 T butter + more for brushing salt and pepper as needed

you find it too dry, add a few drops of buttermilk or water. 6.

Dust the kitchen surface generously with flour. Dump the dough on to the center and gently tap into a disk using the base of your palm. If it cracks, use wet fingers to gather it back into the disk.

7.

Cut shapes as you like or simply make 4 wedges. Brush the top with melted butter.

8.

Bake for 10 minutes at 375F. Then lower the temperature to 350 F and continue baking for another 10-12 minutes until golden on top. Serve hot or at room temperature.

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Sunshine Smoothie INGREDIENTS 2 ripe nectarines 1 apple 1 cup pineapple chunks, loosely piled 1/4 cup oats 2 T almond butter 1 cup yogurt or just water

DIRECTIONS 1. Cut the fruit into rough chunks. 2. Add all the ingredients to the blender and pulse on high speed until everything is fully pureed. 3. Pour into two smoothie jars. Freeze for 30 minutes to chill thoroughly if serving immediately. Else refrigerate as long as needed. 4. Smoothie can be stored up to 48 hours in the fridge.

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Zucchini Cakes, Smoked Salmon + Tahini Sauce Savory pancakes are coming into their own these days. Drawing on ethinic cuisines, like the Jewish latkes, provides so much inspiration for everyday newness on the dinner/brunch table. These zucchini pancakes are one of my favorites especially because there is no flour in them. For adults and kids alike, it feels like playing hookey with your vegetables! For a full meal assembly serve the zucchini pancakes with slices of Black Tea Cured Salmon (page 26) and dashes of tahini sauce. Prep Time: 10 minutes

DIRECTIONS

Cook Time: 10 minutes

1.

Serves: A Family!

Squeeze water out of the grated zucchini, reserving the liquid for a later use in a juice or in cooking.

2. INGREDIENTS

Using your hand seperate out and air the strands. Add the rest of the ingredients and make a batter using a fork.

For the zucchini pancakes:

3.

Let the batter sit for 15 minutes.

2 medium zucchinis, grated

4.

While the batter rests, whisk together the tahini sauce

1 egg

ingredients to a smooth emulsion. Refrigerate until

1 T potato starch

ready to use. If you are fan of tahini sauce, you can make

salt to taste

this in bulk and store in the refrigerator for up to a week!

pepper as needed

5.

Oil to cook.

When ready, heat some oil in a frying pan. Scoop a 1/4 cup of zucchini batter onto the heated oil and using the back of the measuring cup smooth into a flat disk.

For the tahini yogurt sauce:

6.

Let is cook and brown on the side for 1 minute. Flip

1/2 cup plain yogurt

over and cook on the other side for 2 minutes. Remove

1 T tahini

to a plate .

2 tsp lemon juice

7.

Repeat with the rest of the batter.

salt per taste

8.

To assemble, spread a tiny bit of mustard on each zucchini cake, top with the slices of salmon and pour

4 eggs

some tahini sauce. Finish with a fried egg each and serve immediately.

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MEALS

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Soy Glazed Salmon Recipes on Page 37 and 39

Fire roasted corn on the cob is one of Summer’s simplest pleasures. Try it withjust butter and salt or if you are in the mood for more depth, garlic scape pesto or with grated parmesan cheese!

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Tomato Tart

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Tomato Tart with Millet Crust The millet and moong flours have just the right boldness to man up to the saucy fullness of the tomato. It is almost a needed intervention, lest you get ungrounded by the fatal attractiveness of the sun kissed slices.

Active Prep Time: 10 minutes Passive Prep Time: 25 minutes Active Cook Time: 30 minutes Serves: Two as main or four as an starter

DIRECTIONS 1.

To make the crust, in a bowl, sift together the flours, salt, baking soda and potato starch.

2.

Add the butter and rub into the flours until a crumbly mixture is formed.

3.

Make a well in the center and crack the egg into it. Whisk the egg lightly. Add the buttermilk and thyme in.

INGREDIENTS

4.

For the crust: 1/2 cup red millet flour 1/2 cup whole mung bean flour 1 T potato starch

Bring the ingredients into a dough ball gently kneading them together.

5.

Set aside for a few minutes.

6.

Grease an 8 inch tart pan and press the dough into the bottom and up the sides as evenly as possible.

1 tsp baking soda

Refrigerate the crust while you prepare the filling or

5 T butter, room temperature 1 egg 2 T buttermilk 2 tsp, thyme leaves

upto 20 minutes. 7.

Pre heat the oven to 375F.

8.

Whisk together the eggs and then add the yogurt to incorporate. Season with salt and pepper.

sea salt for taste

9.

Spread the pesto into base of cooled crust.

10. Pour the custard filling over and then layer the tomato

For the filling:

slices on top as you wish.

4 eggs

11. Bake for 30 minutes until crust is golden and custard is

1/4 cup yogurt

set.

3 T fresh pesto assortment of ripe tomato slices ( I used beef steak, yellow, and cherry tomatoes)

12. Let cool for a few minutes, garnish with basil and cheese. Serve warm or cold!!

Basil leaves to garnish

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Roast Chicken Salad

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Roast Chicken Summer Salad For the chicken, generosity with butter/fat serves a good way of crisping the skin and flavoring the meat. For this method, simply rub butter (flavored of not) under the skin all over the bird. You can certainly slide in any herbs or seasoning you wish but the simplest is a mix of salt and pepper. Finish the top with spices you like. Roast at 450 F for as long as it takes to get done, which is about 20 minutes per pound. Err on the lower side and test about 15 minutes before that time calculation with a thermometer. When the thickest part of the bird, reads 185 F or so, remove from oven, cover and rest for atleast 15 minutes. Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 2 hours Serves: A Family!

DIRECTIONS 1.

Over direct fire char the corn on all sides. Immediately butter it and sprinkle salt. Set aside.

2.

While the corn cooks, reduce the jus to half the volume and reserve.

INGREDIENTS 1/2 cup of shredded roast chicken 1/4 cup jus from the roast chicken 3 medium new potatoes, diced into 1 inch cubes 1/3 snow peas, shelled 1 shallot or a small onion, minced

3.

Meanwhile, in a pan, saute the onion in oil and when soft, add the peas.

4.

Season with salt and pepper and stir gently until the peas start to just wrinkle.

5.

Remove from heat and transfer to a bowl.

6.

Steam the potatoes until soft. Add a little oil to the peas

mesclun or other green

pan and return to stove. Saute the potatoes with salt until

1 corn

browned on outside.

For the pumpkin pesto:

7.

To arrange the salad leaves at the base of the platter.

8.

Pile half the peas around, then the potatoes and the

1 cup basil leaves (with stem, if you cut from a plant)

shredded chicken. 9.

1/2 cup pumpkin seeds 1 clove of garlic

Spread pesto on the corn, cut in quarters and place around the platter.

10. Finish with the remaining peas and pour the reduced jus

1/4 cup olive oil salt and pepper as needed

over for dressing. 11. Serve immediately.

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Greek Baked Sardines

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Baked Sardines A classic Greek dish, the simple seasoning somehow manages to convert the fatty and rather fishy sardines into a decadence that is nearly more-ish! Fresh sardines are abundant in this season and the temptation may be to get the larger sized fish. Yet, for flavor the tiny sardines work best in this dish as their bones are softer and much easier to eat. This dish is usually served as an appetizer with bread or rice. I would recommend pairing with some greens and sauteed vegetables.

Prep Time: 30 minutes up to 2 days

DIRECTIONS

Cook Time: 20 minutes

1.

Serves: A Family! Plus leftovers if a couple

Clean the sardines, removing the guts and scales. If the fish is larger, slit the belly lengthwise and gently peel away the back bone. You can also discard the heads.

2.

and fillet the fish.

INGREDIENTS 4 sardines

3.

Marinade + seasoning:

4.

3 T fresh parsley leaves juice of 1 lemon 1/4 cup olive oil salt as needed

In a bowl, mix together the marinade ingredients together.

3 cloves garlic 3 tsp dried oregano

If you prefer not doing this, ask your fish seller to clean

In a baking dish, arrange the fish in one layer. Pour the marinade evenly over the fist.

5.

Refrigerate for 30 minutes to an hour.

6.

Place in an oven pre-heated to 350 F.

7.

Bake the sardines for 20 minutes, until the flesh is firm and the juices from the fish are running out.

8.

Serve immediately on a bed of sauteed spinach and vegetables with a side of rice or bread.

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AFTER MEALS

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Oat and Almond Blueberry Cake Recipe on Page 47

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Strawberry Milk + Mint Cream INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1 cup of whole milk

1.

Pulse together the strawberry sauce and whole milk on low

1/2 cup heavy cream

speed. Add the cream and give it a couple of pulses to just

6 T strawberry sauce (Recipe on page 34)

incorporate.

few drops of mint bitters

2.

until soft peaks. Add several drops of mint bitters and

2 tsp sugar fresh strawberries to top handful of ice cubes

In a bowl, whip together the remaining cream and the sugar. continue to whip to stiff peaks.

3.

Divide ice into two tall glassses. Divide the strawberry milk into them and the top with a generous portion of the miny whipped cream

4.

Serve immediately.

Summer brings back memories of childhood. Strawberry milk is the perfect drink for those long hot afternoons and reliving your childhood with your childre!

Prep Time: 5 minutes Serves: You plus One!

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Oat and Almond Blueberry Cake INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

3/4 cup oat flour

1.

Pre heat oven to 375F.

3/4 cup almond flour

2.

In a bowl, whip butter with the sugar until pale. Add

1 tsp baking soda

yolks one at a time and beat to incorporate. Add almond

2 eggs, seperated

milk and mix well.

2/3 cup light muscovado sugar

3.

Sift together the flours and baking soda. Add to the liquid mixture in thirds, folding each time until just combined.

6 T salted butter, room temperature 4 T almond milk

4.

In a separate bowl, whip the whites to stiff peaks.

1-1/2 tsp vanilla extract

5.

Fold a third into the batter to loosen it. Fold batter into the remaining whipped whites in quick yet gently strokes.

a pile of blueberries 6.

on top. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes until golden on top

Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 30 -35 minutes Serves: A Family

Pour into in a prepared pan and pile on the blueberries and springy to touch.

7.

Cool on rack for 15 minutes, before slicing.

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Raspberry Lemon Semifreddo INGREDIENTS 3 eggs seperated 2/3 cup caster sugar 2/3 cup heavy cream 1-1/4 cup raspberries 1-1/2 T sugar

DIRECTIONS 1. Sprinkle the tablespoon and half of sugar over the raspberries and then them marinade for 2 hours. Mash by hand to make a coarse puree. 2. In a large bowl, beat the egg whites till stiff. 3. In another bowl, add sugar to the yolks and whisk for a few minutes until ribbons form and trail. 4. In a third bowl, beat the cream to stiff peaks. Fold the cream into the yolks and gently fold the whites into the mix, just until incorporated. 5. Line a loaf tin with clingwrap. Pour a third of the custard mix at the base. Freeze for 10 minutes. Spread half the rapeberry puree on top. Repeat the custard an raspberry layers until done. 6. Freeze for 4-6 hours. To serve, unmold and let sit for a few minutes before cutting into slices.

Prep Time: 15 minutes Cool Time: 4-6 hours This preparation does not fully cook the eggs although it does cure them. It is therefore recommended that you use the freshest and most ‘natural’ eggs you can find. Nevertheless, it may not be good for consumption by women.LIVING INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. pregnant UNPROCESSED

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Š 2016 ashaINK LLC

Editor: Asha Yoganandan

NOURISHED is quarterly food magazine published by ashaINK LLC. All content in this publication is copyrighted to ashaINK LLC, and, its founder, Asha Yoganandan.

Recipes: Asha Yoganandan Photographer: Asha Yoganandan Creative Design: Asha Yoganandan For advertising and sponsorship queries, contact nourished@ashaink.com

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form, or, by any means, without the prior written permission of the publisher, excepting brief quotations in connection with reviews written specifically for inclusion in other magazines or newspapers.

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NOURISHED Issue 9 - BOUNTY  

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