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NOURISHED

REBIRTH VOLUME 1

SPRING 2014


Š 2014 Nourished Magazine

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All rights reserved. No part of this book many be reproduced in any form, or, by any means, without the prior written permission of the publisher, excepting brief quotations in connection with reviews written specifically for inclusion in other magazines or newspapers. For permission to reprint or distribute, write to the editor.

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nourished@ashaink.com 646-480-7021

! Printed in USA !


NOURISHED


Spring is the time of plans and projects. -Leo Tolstoy


NOURISHED

Spring 2014

WELCOME

! To say that I am thrilled to be launching this quarterly food magazine is an understatement! !

Over the last several years, as I chronicled my food adventures on my blog, and gained a deeper understanding of the complex and, ultimately, exciting world of food, I have had a growing passion for being involved with it, more than simply as a hobbyist.

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This magazine is one of my endeavors to give back to you, what I have gained through personal triumphs and disasters - a deep respect for that which nourishes us and binds our families and communities. The idea for such a periodical germinated from a desire to connect directly with many more of you, and, spread the idea of looking at food beyond mere consumption, into the world of appreciation and joy.

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Through these quarterly series, I hope to provide you with information for making educated food choices. I also wish to steer you to cook seasonal, with inspired recipes that impress, and, prove that eating this way need be neither limiting nor unidimensional.

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Every issue will include stories, recipes and photographs to encourage a seasonable and sustainable way of eating while remaining wholesome and healthful. My pledge to you in this endeavor is to bring you up close with real food around the world with limited distractions.

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This inaugural Spring issue, timed with rebirth, focuses on awakening. The feature piece “Eating From The Land” explores the debate on sustainability with a realistic lens and also sets the tone for what this magazine stands for. We take a closer look at the “hero” ingredients of the season, be it the crisp spear of asparagus or the luscious delicacy of a spring lamb or the succulence of a ripe strawberry. I have aimed to celebrate the virtues of these ingredients, uncluttered by spices or add-ons, yet, creating complete plates. Every recipe has been created keeping in mind the essence of this season - crisp, warm, sweet.

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I hope that you will join me in this new journey and will find that it is a fun and incredibly satisfying ride! - Asha Editor at large

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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EATING FROM THE LAND

The pursuit of seasonal and local is one of continuing controversy and one that in today’s reality begs the redefinition of sustainability even. STORY: Asha

PHOTOGRAPHY: Asha 6


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Spring 2014

The virtues of food lie in its nakedness and that of man in his senses

Even a generation ago, in many places around the world, there would not have been a question, much less a debate on this subject. The choices were minimalistic with availability driven by logistics, economics and natural forces. Eating local was neither trendy nor a healthy alternative but simply the way things were.

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This was before globalization, the opening of trade markets and economies to the flow of capital and goods across boundaries. Today, even the most assiduously culturistic nations cannot avoid being bedazzled by the bounty, just outside their boundaries, that was previously beyond reach, not forbidden, but unknown.

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Less than two decades ago, in India, the rich, middle class and poor shopped at the same local vegetable stands, butchers who slaughtered the meat the day of, fisherwoman who peddled their fresh catch of the day. The differences lay in the quantity and cut rather than the experience. Today, there is a marked differentiation between the haves and have nots with the influx of supermarket chains and a Westernized approach to one stop shopping. Indeed, it is a story of status not-quo. This is a story endlessly repeated across the world.

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The convenience of the aptly named ‘convenience store’ is perhaps its single biggest value as well as the single largest barrier for any conversation on seasonality or sustainability. These stores, be it of any scale or ideological origin, give the food shopper a feeling of being a ‘sophisticated’ buyer, without the baggage of understanding the product. Everything is labelled, cleaned, parceled and proportioned appropriately. Or, so one assumes.

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As countlessly recounted by various authors, scientific and otherwise, the real and unseen costs of such transactions have been on rising trajectory. Yet, statistics makes not a convincing argument against human desire for simplifying life. Objective as they are, numbers do not sufficiently make a personal case for making a radical shift to what most of the world sees as a “reverse gearing”, to wit, back to the land.

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And, while we carry on in a pursuit of ease and desire, the capitalist nature of the markets we live in thrive in stocking the shelves deeper and higher taunting the time-pressed eater to ride, what has by now become, the well-paved road. Going back to the way of eating that was a century past seems not only tedious but painfully boring.

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Yet, what if there was a middle ground? What if we could make small changes such that the whole is larger the sum of individual parts? What if we can find a way of eating that sustainably keeps us engaged with our food? What if the desire to be sustainable need not be counterweighted by tedium?

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I truly believe this can be done. To do that, there are few adages to keep in mind.

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CHOOSE THE FRESHEST AND THE BEST What defines a food to belong to that superlative category? It is bounded by individual circumstances. Not all of us have access to farms or farmers markets. More often we only have the option of a bag of greens that was packaged with inert gases and shipped from California. It does not matter. What matters is how it tastes. Good tasting food needs little work and comes together effortlessly taking away much of the stress of cooking.

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The simplest test to the quality of food is eating it on its own. If it tastes anything but good, and definitely not bad, then you are half way to being happy. Often, you will come across food that tastes, of nothing. Usually, this means that it comes from an over processed source; An industrial system with non-rotational cropping, overused land drained of its natural minerals, animals not reared as nature intended them.

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TRUST YOURSELF
 As redundant as that sounds, many times, we believe what we are told about how something should taster be, from potatoes to wine, rather than how it really feels to us. However, nothing matters more than your individual opinion on the food. The old adage of one man’s meat, may be a stretch here, but the ideology is the same. Building trust in how your body responds is a small shortcut to understanding foods and how to consume them.

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ENGAGE ALL YOUR SENSES My first rule of thumb is defense. Any pre-packaged food that has weird sounding ingredients is not something I want in my basket. That easily clears out the vast majority of distractions to shopping for real food. To trust labels is in effect to disengage from the process of buying food and overriding the natural self-preserving nature of our senses, of sight, smell and touch. While taste may be acquire, the roles of the other senses are intuitive or learnt.

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EAT WITH PLEASURE Eating food for the pleasure of it rather than the sake of it, makes eating well an effortless endeavor. As with anything that you take pleasure in, there is an automatic response to build an active interest in the subject. It naturally leads to greater curiosity and understanding and a desire to want to be more involved and engaged. The fruit of this ‘labor’ is indeed the sweet joy of appreciation, yours and everyone else you touch.

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THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

At the end of all this, there is still a nagging question, the veritable elephant in the room - Where does one find time for all this today? Ah! that eternal question can be simply answered by “Make the time�. But the reality of survival and by that the constant pressures to extend working hours leaves little negotiation room and threatens the sustainability of any good intentions. I find that the simplest ways to address this are

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GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK It is ok to not be tied by rules and adages. The pledge to eat well begins with making it and desire to hold true to it. It may start with just a day a week until you find that it is easy enough to fall into it for most of the week. Yet, I would caution against adopting it as a regimen without the veto to indulge occasionally. I attest that when you have learnt to trust and tune in to your body, it will naturally gravitate towards wellness and make it easier to stay the course despite time constraints.

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BUILD A SUPPORT SYSTEM Lack of individual time is a reason to build a food community, where effort as well as the outcomes are shared. Diving the labor, be it with family, friends or neighbors, not only makes it easier and healthier for everyone but also rekindles the joy of engaging more at a personal level - one that has benefits beyond food.

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TABLE OF RECIPES THE PANTRY Spotted Dog (Irish Soda Bread)

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Homemade Tahini Sauce

14

Garlic Scape Pesto

14

BRUNCH Fennel Ham & Quail Egg Bruschetta

16

Chocolate & Banana Stuffed French Toast

17

MEALS Ramp and Cheese Drop Scones

19

Garlic SautĂŠed Asparagus

20

Quinoa and Potato Burgers

21

Stuffed Baked Dorade

22

Sardine Pate

23

Chicken and Fresh Peas Pot Pie

24

Scallops and Sweet Potatoes

25

Spring Lamb Chops

26

AFTER MEALS Strawberry Buttermilk Cake

28

Rhubarb and Almond Pannacotta

29

Sinless Dark Chocolate Truffles

30

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Spring 2014

THE PANTRY

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Spring 2014

Spotted Dog (Irish Soda Bread) The Irish soda bread is a classic typically made with whole wheat flour. For special occasions, a variation of it, made with white flour, egg and some raisins, is served. This bread is more cake like in texture, dotted with raisins - Railway Cake or Spotted Dog.

DIRECTIONS 1.

Preheat oven to 425F.

2.

In a large bowl, sift flour, salt, sugar and baking soda.

3.

Add the raisins. Fluff the mixture to add airiness to the loaf that makes the soda bread as light as it is famed to be.

4.

Mix the egg and buttermilk. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour the liquid into it.

5.

Using one hand with the fingers open and stiff, mix in a full circle drawing in the flour mixture from the sides of the bowl. The dough should be soft, not too wet or sticky.

6.

Servings: 1 loaf

As with all soda breads, do not over mix the

Prep Time: 5 minutes

dough. Mix it quickly and gently. When the

Cook Time: 30 minutes

dough comes together, turn it out on to a wellfloured baking pan.

INGREDIENTS

7.

Wash and dry your hands. With lightly floured

3-1/2 cups organic, unbleached white flour

fingers, gently shape the dough. Using a sharp

1-1/2 tsp baking soda

knife, score the dough into four triangles.

1 tsp salt

8.

2 tsp sugar

Place the pan in the oven and immediately turn the heat down to 400F.

2/3 cup raisins

9.

Bake for about 35 minutes until golden on top

1 organic egg

and the bread makes a hollow sound when

1-1/3 cups buttermilk (organic, non-ultra

tapped on the bottom.

pasteurized)

10. Wrap in cloth and cool before slicing. INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Sauces & Spreads Homemade Tahini Sauce Homemade tahini sauce can be used as spreads on toast, to make falafel and hummus at will. Nut paste can be stored in the refrigerator for at least a month.

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INGREDIENTS 1.

1 cup white sesame seeds, unroasted

2.

pinch of sea salt to taste

3.

1/3 cup fresh olive oil

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DIRECTIONS 1.

Preheat the oven 325F.

2.

Spread the sesame seeds evenly in a baking tray and gently roast them in an oven at 325F turning them over every 5 or so minutes until they are lightly browned, about 15 minutes.

3.

Process the seeds while still warm until you get a crumbly meal mix. Continue pureeing while streaming in the olive oil until a smooth, creamy paste forms.

4.

Add the salt and pulse to mix. Transfer to an airtight container and cool to room temperature.

Garlic Scape Pesto Scapes are the young shoots of the garlic bulb that are mild in flavor and can be used in place of garlic.

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INGREDIENTS 1.

2 cups fresh basil, rinsed and cleaned

2.

4 garlic scapes, roughly chopped

3.

1/4 cup pine nuts, roasted

4.

1/2 cup grapeseed oil

5.

1/3 cup grated fresh parmeggiano regianno

6.

salt and pepper to taste

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DIRECTIONS 1.

Process scapes, basil and nuts to a coarse paste (~1 min).

2.

Switch to mode to pulse and slowly drizzle in the oil to create an emulsion.

3.

Remove to a bowl and season to taste.

4.

Fold in cheese and serve.

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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BRUNCH

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Fennel Ham & Quail Egg Bruschetta

Easy yet flavorful, this simple bruschetta gets its punch from the fennel that is characteristic of Spring stretching into Summer. It makes an elegant appetizer or a light brunch.

Servings: 8 pieces

DIRECTIONS

Prep Time: 5 minutes

1.

Drizzle olive oil on bread slices and toast. Set aside.

Cook Time: 15 minutes

2.

SautĂŠ the fennel in a little oil until soft and just turning brown, seasoning with salt and pepper.

INGREDIENTS 1 Italian loaf, sliced on deep bias (8 slices) 1 fennel bulb, sliced thin using a mandolin 1/4 lb Serrano ham, sliced thin 8 quail eggs Balsamic Vinegar for drizzling salt, pepper and olive oil as needed

3.

Divide the caramelized fennel onto the crostinis.

4.

Wrap each slice and topping with a slice of ham. Arrange on serving plate

5.

Fry the eggs. They take 30 seconds.

6.

Top each crostini with a fried quail egg, sprinkle with salt and drizzle a touch of balsamic vinegar.

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Chocolate & Banana Stuffed French Toast French Toast is the classic slow brunch!Crisp on the outside, custardy in the center. The secrets for the perfect texture are, a bit of patience, and, two very important steps.

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First, the bread needs soak in the egg mixture so it seeps into the center. Second, finish the toast in the oven so it cooks like a pudding.

DIRECTIONS 1.

Preheat oven to 350F.

2.

Whisk together the eggs, milk, nutmeg, cinnamon and honey.

3.

Pour at the bottom of shallow baking dish. Place the brioche slices in one layer. Let it rest for 5 minutes. Flip over the slices and soak for at least 30 minutes.

4.

Heat a heavy bottom pan. On low heat melt the butter.

5.

Servings: 2 persons Prep Time: 40 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes

crust. Flip over and finish frying. 6.

Place slices in one layer in baking dish and bake for 30 minutes.

7.

INGREDIENTS

Place slices in one layer and fry to get a brown

While the toast finishes cooking, melt the

1 ripe banana, sliced

chocolate and cream over a double boiler.

4 oz dark chocolate

Allow to just cool.

3 T cream + 1/3 cup whole milk

8.

Once the toast is ready, spread chocolate sauce generously over each slice.

4 eggs 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg

9.

over another for each plate.

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon 10.

1 T honey

Arrange banana slices on top. Stack one slice Serve garnished with toasted nuts, coconut

4 T butter

flakes, mint or berries. Drizzle warm honey

4 thick slices of brioche or challah

over, if you like.

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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MEALS

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Spring 2014

Ramp and Cheese Drop Scones Ramps belong to the onion family and are native to North America. They are, perhaps, one of the few indigenous wild produce still preserved here.

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These wild leeks are delicate plants that add a robust flavor to dishes. Much like spring onions, the whole plant is edible with the leaves being milder in flavor than the bulb.

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Scones are a great way of enjoying the flavor. They make for a perfect snack or accompaniment to Sunday brunch.

DIRECTIONS

! Servings: 6 scones Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes INGREDIENTS

1.

Preheat oven to 425F.

2.

Mix all the ingredients together, the batter should be thick.

3.

Drop a good sized dollop of the batter on a baking tray or you can use a cupcake pan to size.

4.

50g chickpea flour

Bake in the oven for 15 or so minutes until golden brown on top.

50g whole wheat pastry flour

5.

Serve warm with butter and jam.

60g cold butter, cut into 1/4 inch cubes 1/3 cup butter milk 6 ramps, stem and leaves chopped 2 T grated pecorino (any aged cheese) 1 tsp baking powder

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Garlic Sautéed Asparagus Asparagus is the quintessential Spring produce that most people are familiar with. They are relished for their crunch as well as a slightly sweet flavor that is reminiscent of the season in itself.

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The delicate stalks can overcook very easily taking away all that is appealing about biting into its juicy stalk.

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Fresh spears can be eaten raw, when sliced thin. The best way to cook them is to do a quick blanch or a light sauté to really sear.

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The recipe here is for a simple saute that works well as a side to spring lamb or a very New York style brunch with eggs Benedict!

DIRECTIONS 1.

Add the oil and garlic slices in a cold cast iron pan large enough to hold all the spears in one layer.

Servings: 3-4 persons Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes

2.

Over low heat, gently sauté the garlic, teasing the flavor out of them into the oil.

3.

Cut the thick ends of the asparagus and place them in a single layer in the pan.

INGREDIENTS

4.

Leave them be for two minutes.

1 bunch young asparagus stems

5.

Rock the pan over the flame to turn the asparagus or turn them over using forceps.

2 cloves of garlic, sliced thin 3 T freshly grated Parmesan cheese

6.

Cook for another minute or so, uncovered.

oil to saute + sea salt for seasoning

7.

Remove spears from pan onto the serving plate. If you don’t like garlic much, remove the slices before serving.

8.

Grate parmesan cheese over the spears and serve.

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Quinoa and Potato Burgers

These burgers are a great vegetarian alternative to the classic comfort food. Stuffed with new potatoes and crumbly cheese they make a satisfying bite. This is a burgers perfect for urban kitchens and weekday dinners. Servings: 8 patties Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 30-40 minutes Before you chop, start the oven at 400F. INGREDIENTS 1 cup uncooked quinoa 2 cloves of garlic, minced 1 small onion, diced fine 2-3 new potatoes, diced to 1/2 inch cubes 1 carrot grated 1/3 cup crumble aged cheese such as Feta 2 T Dijon mustard 1 cup vegetable stock + 2 cups of water 1/4 cup coconut flour for coating Salt, pepper and oil as needed

DIRECTIONS 1. Cook quinoa with garlic and liquids until tender (~20 mins). 2. Meanwhile drizzle oil on the potatoes and onion, season with salt and pepper and roast until cooked ( ~15 mins). 3. When everything is cooked, mix together all the remaining ingredients and set aside for 5 mins to firm up. 4. Divide the mixture into 8 portions and using your palms create patties. 5. If you find that mixture is too loose to form the patties, add coconut flour or other gluten free (or regular) flour 1 tablespoon at a time. 6. Heat oil in skillet. Coat both sides of the patty in coconut flour and sear.

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Stuffed Baked Dorade Dorade is a Mediterranean fish typically found in the Mediterranean Sea and the eastern coastal regions of the North Atlantic Ocean. It is a small fish with tender white flesh with a shimmering, silvery skin. When grilled or braised it has a rich, succulent, meaty flavor, similar to that of pompano or red snapper.

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The flesh of the Dorade pairs nicely with citrus as the last of the season’s oranges hit the market.

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Fish prepared with this recipe can be paired fluffy couscous or tabouleh.

DIRECTIONS

Servings: 2 persons Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes

1.

Preheat oven to 375F.

2.

In a pan lightly caramelize the fennel and season with salt and pepper.

3.

Remove the fennel from heat and cool to room temperature.

INGREDIENTS

4.

Mix in the fennel fronds, olives and cilantro.

1 medium dorade, cleaned, deboned and butterflied

5.

Clean the fish, brush oil on all sides and season with salt and pepper.

1/2 medium fennel bulb, sliced fine 3 T fennel fronds, chopped

6.

Gently arrange the stuffing in the fish cavity and line the orange slices on top of the stuffing.

3 T chopped fresh cilantro or flat leaf parsley 2 T chopped pitted, black olives (oil cured)

7.

Close the fish and tie with kitchen string.

salt and pepper to taste

8.

Bake at 375F for 20-25 minutes until the flesh is

3-4 thin orange slices

flaked but not dry.

oil as needed INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Sardine Pate

Sardines are abundant in Spring and Summer. Pâté can be stored in refrigerator for 3 days, or frozen up to a month.

Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes

DIRECTIONS 1.

Preheat the oven to 350F.

2.

Place sardines in a shallow dish, drizzle olive oil, salt, and pepper.

INGREDIENTS 4 whole sardines, cleaned and butterflied 4 T shaved and diced fennel 4 T cilantro, minced 1 tsp sumac, or smoky paprika or z’atar 1 oz butter, at room temperature 1.5 T lemon olive oil freshly-squeezed lemon juice salt and pepper as needed

3.

Bake for ~6 minutes until flaky and just cooked. Cool to room temperature.

4.

Add the rest of the ingredients, except lemon juice, process to chunky mixture.

5.

Squeeze a bit of lemon juice and taste, adjusting seasoning

6.

Fill the mixture into molds and chill for at least 8 hours or overnight.

7.

Bring back to room temperature and serve with toasted

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Chicken and Fresh Peas Pot Pie Young Chickens are born in April and become ready for the market in 6-8 weeks. As the weather warms not only does the body crave lighter meat, eating chicken and fish through Spring and Summer is a seasonal and sustainable food strategy.

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This pie is especially nutritious as I used both the peas and pod in the filling. When using the pods, choose the young, juiciest of them and peel off the fibrous inner skin that is not palatable.

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This pie can be prepared ahead of time, frozen and baked when desired. Before baking, let the crust thaw to cool but not frozen.

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Fully cooked pies will last for 3-4 days in the fridge. DIRECTIONS 1.

Pre heat oven to 375 degrees.

2.

Saute the leeks and garlic until soft. Season with salt, pepper and cumin powder.

3.

Add carrots and cook until just soft. Add the peas, pod and chicken and toss of a few minutes.

4. Servings: 2 individual portion pies or one 8 inch Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes

aside. 5.

Roll out the dough for the crust to fit the baking dish. Crimp the edges around the rim of the pan.

6.

INGREDIENTS

Transfer the filling into the pie pans and set

If you are freezing for later, at this point, let the pies come to room temperature, wrap in plastic

1.

1 pie/tart crust

2.

1 leek, diced

3.

3 cloves of garlic, minced

4.

3 spring carrots, chopped

5.

1/2 cup shredded cooked chicken

6.

a good handful of freshly shelled peas

7.

pods cleaned and diced

8.

1 tsp cumin powder

9.

oil, salt and fresh cracked pepper as needed

wrap or tin foil and store in the freezer for unto a month. 7.

Brush the top with egg wash and bake for 30 minutes until the crust is golden.

8.

Cool on rack for a few minutes. Serve warm.

9.

If storing for eating later in the week, bring the pie to room temperature, wrap in foil and refrigerate. Reheat at 350F for 15 minutes.

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Scallops and Sweet Potatoes

Diver Scallops are one of the "Best Choice" in the list of sustainable fish for the North East. This dish is a whimsical play on the shape, texture and sweet flavors of the mussel and vegetable and served on a bed of radish pesto, in a nose to tail approach for the Spring vegetable. Servings: 2 persons Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes INGREDIENTS 8 Diver scallops fresh, unfrozen 2 Asian sweet potato 1 navel orange , peeled and sliced 2 radishes sprouts for garnish (optional) 1 bunch radish leaves 2 T almonds, toasted 3 T olive oil 2 T peanut oil for searing 1/4 cup mild white vinegar

DIRECTIONS 1. Peel sweet potato and pare into a cylinder of about the same thickness of the scallops. Slice into inch thick rounds. 2. Cook potatoes until al dente ~5 mins. Set aside. 3. Blanch radish leaves, puree with oil & almonds. 4. Thinly slice the radishes, soak in vinegar and salt for about 15 mins. 5. Place scallops and potatoes in one layer in a skillet. Cook on medium-high for one minute on each side until seared brown. 6. Spread radish pesto on the plate and arrange orange slices over it. Place the scallops and sweet potatoes, sprinkle pickled radish and top with the sprouts. 7. Squeeze orange juice all over and serve immediately.

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Spring Lamb Chops "Spring" lamb originally refers to the English Dorset breed that gave birth in Fall, fed its offspring on milk through Winter and, then, on the first early grass of Spring, making for succulent, tender flesh.

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These days, while we can purchase lamb meat year round, tradition of Spring continues. Opt for pasture raised animals that are not only more flavorful than commercial corn fed ones, but, also humanely raised.

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In seasoning the meat, the finest salt you have and sparingly.These chops are wonderful with polenta and pan braised Swiss Chard.

DIRECTIONS 1.

Mix the marinade ingredients and set aside for 10 minutes to allow the flavors to meld together.

2.

Meanwhile wash and pat dry the chops.

3.

Rub the marinade on both sides of the chops and let rest for 30 minutes up to over night.

4.

When ready to cook, heat a heavy bottomed pan

Servings: for 2

(cast iron or stainless streel) with a light drizzle

Prep Time: 40 minutes

of olive oil over medium-high flame.

Cook Time: 5-8 minutes

5.

Arrange the chops in one layer and let them cook undisturbed for two minutes.

INGREDIENTS 6 baby lamb rib chops

6.

to check the sear. If it is good enough turn all

3 cloves of garlic, minced 1 T parsley, minced 1/2 tsp maldon salt or fleur de sel

the chops over. I 7.

f not, leave them cook on the side for another minute. Cook on the other side for 3-4 minutes

1/2 to 1 tsp fresh cracked pepper based on your

depending on the thickness of the chop for a

taste 1 T fruity olive oil for searing

Gently lift the first chop you placed in the pan

medium-rare finish. 8.

For medium finish, continue cooking for 2 more minutes.

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AFTER MEALS

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Strawberry Buttermilk Cake Strawberries begin to appear in the farmers market in late Spring (end of May). Plump strawberries are perfect for eating as is. If you find your berries are shy of being ripe, baking is a great way to draw out their sweetness.

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This cake is deliberately simple to let the flavor of the berry come through. The buttermilk balances well with the sweetness of the berries.

Servings: one 8 inch cake Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20-25 minutes INGREDIENTS 1 cup flour 4.5 T butter, softened 1/2 cup sugar + 2 T sugar for the meringue 1/2 tsp lemon zest 1/2 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp vanilla paste 2 egg yolks + 1 egg white 1/2 cup well-shaken buttermilk 1/4 tsp salt handful of chopped fresh strawberries

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 400째F. Butter and flour a 8 inch round cake pan. 2. Mix the dry ingredients together. 3. Cream together butter and 1/2 cup of sugar until pale and fluffy, about 2 minutes, then beat in vanilla. Add the egg yolks and beat well. 4. At low speed, mix in flour mixture in 3 batches, alternating with buttermilk mixture until just combined. 5. Set aside and whip the egg whites till frothy. Gently drizzle in the sugar and continue whipping until the meringue holds stiff peaks. 6. Fold about a 1/3 of the meringue into the batter to loosen it. Gently fold the remaining whites just until you no longer see any white streaks, about 25 strokes. 7. Spoon batter into cake pan, smoothing top. Scatter strawberry pieces over the top. 8. Bake for about 20-25 minutes, until cake is golden and a wooden pick inserted into center comes out clean. 9. Cool in pan 10 minutes, then turn out onto a rack and cool to warm, 10 to 15 minutes more.

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Rhubarb and Almond Pannacotta

Rhubarb is THE spring fruit in the North East. The delicate stalk have a sweet yet tart flavor. They maintain their textural integrity even when cooked. The best ones to buy, for this dessert, are the ruby red stalks. Green stems do not ripen at home. If you find stalks that are part green, reserve the green parts to make jam.

Servings: 2 persons

DIRECTIONS

Prep Time: 10 minutes

1.

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Sprinkle the gelatin over half the almond milk and let bloom for 10 minutes.

2.

Meanwhile, bring the rhubarb, rum, water and sugar/honey to

INGREDIENTS

boil. Reduce heat to simmer and cook for five more minutes.

1/2 cup chopped rhubarb

Set aside to let the poached fruit cool entirely.

1 T dark rum

3.

When completely cooled, divide fruit and liquid into molds.

2 T water

4.

Warm the gelatin milk gently (do not boil) to dissolve the

1 tsp sugar/honey

gelatin. Mix in the remaining milk. Stir in the cardamom.

1/2 cup almond milk, cold, divided

5.

1/4 tsp crushed cardamom pods 1/2 tsp gelatin

Pour half the mixture on top of the rhubarb into each of the containers.

6.

Let the Pannacotta set for 4 hours or overnight. Serve cold.

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Sinless Dark Chocolate Truffles Chocolate belongs to all seasons. These gluten and dairy free truffles are in line with the lightness of Spring, yet, elegant and luxurious.

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Truffles can be customized to be kid friendly or adult biased. A couple of teaspoons of your favorite liquor mixed in creates a delight to the palate. Recommended liquors are Grand Marnier, brandy, aged rums and smooth whiskeys.

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Since these truffles have no added fat element, oil, butter or cream, they have a longer shelf life. But, since they do contain nuts, they are best stored in an airtight container in the fridge, but, definitely, not frozen.

DIRECTIONS 1.

Process together the dates, almond meal, water or nut milk, salt and cocoa.

2.

It should come together as a paste of the consistency to make balls.

Servings: 12 truffles

3.

If it is thinner, add a teaspoon more flour.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

4.

Refrigerate for 5 minutes.

CoolTime: 10 minutes

5.

Melt the dark chocolate for 2-3 minutes over low heat. Set aside to cool.

INGREDIENTS 1/2 cup unsweetened almond meal 2 T cocoa powder + more for dusting 4 mejdhool dates 2 tsp water or almond milk 1/4 tsp sea salt 2 oz 72% dark chocolate chopped

6.

Roll the truffle filling paste into small balls of 1 inch diameter

7.

Coat the balls in cocoa powered by rolling in it.

8.

Pour over the molten chocolate and refrigerate for 10 minutes.

9.

Store in the refrigerator until serving time.

10. Bring out the truffles to room temperature on the counter for 30 minutes before serving.

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING

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Spring 2014

INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING


NOURISHED

Spring 2014

! ! Š 2014 Asha INK ! NOURISHED is published by Asha as part of FoodLY, a subsidiary of Asha INK. !

All content in this publication is copyrighted to Asha INK, and, its founder, Asha Pagdiwalla. All rights reserved. No part of this book many be reproduced in any form, or, by any means, without the prior written permission of the publisher, excepting brief quotations in connection with reviews written specifically for inclusion in other magazines or newspapers.

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Editor: Asha Recipes: Asha +FoodLY Photographer: Asha Creative Design: Asha

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INSPIRED COOKING. WHOLESOME EATING. UNPROCESSED LIVING


Nourished spring 2014 issue 1