104th Annual Meeting and Conference Academic Program Journal

Page 1

The Association For The Study Of African American Life And History®

104th Annual Meeting and Conference ACADEMIC PROGRAM JOURNAL

BLACK HISTORY THEME: BLACK MIGRATIONS

OCTOBER 226, 2019 EMBASSY SUITES BY HILTON CHARLESTON AIRPORT HOTEL & CONVENTION CENTER IN NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. ASALH.ORG #ASALH #ASALH2019 #CARTERGWOODSON



OFFICERS Dr. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, President Mrs. Barbara Spencer Dunn, Vice President for Membership Dr. Lionel Kimble, Jr., Vice President for Programs Mr. Gilbert A. Smith, Treasurer Dr. Karsonya Wise Whitehead, Secretary Ms. Sylvia Y. Cyrus, Executive Director

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL MEMBERS Mr. Jeffrey A. Banks Professor Gloria J. Browne- Marshall Dr. Sundiata Kieta Cha-Jua Ms. Zende Lamar Clark Mrs. LaNesha DeBardelaben Dr. Natanya P. Duncan Dr. Sheila Y. Flemming-Hunter Dr. Bettye J. Gardner Dr. Jarvis Ray Givens Dr. Cheryl Renee Gooch Dr. Robert L. Harris, Jr. Ms. Aaisha Haykal

Dear Conference Participants: It is my great honor to welcome you to the 104th annual conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) in Charleston, South Carolina. And what a wonderful place to meet. No city in the United States has a richer African American heritage. The 2019 ASALH theme “Black Migrations” carries profound symbolic meaning in the context of the history of Charleston and the state of South Carolina in regard to physical and cultural migrations and the journey to freedom. ASALH is ever mindful of the way the city itself exemplifies with sharp historical clarity the long and diverse journeys of all African-descended people in the United States. We love you, Charleston! African American life in Charleston begins with the story of the forced migration of Africans during the Middle Passage. The largest number of enslaved Africans came into America through the port of Charleston. Migration continued to define Charleston’s African American life in other significant ways. We find in Charleston evidence of cultural migration in the form of rice cultivation, music, basketmaking, the Gullah language and traditions, and blacksmiths’ ironwork that reflect African roots. The journey from enslavement to emancipation, made possible by the Civil War, began in Charleston at Fort Sumter. After the war, African Americans here in 1865 were the first to recognize what would become Memorial Day in honor of the Union dead. Black churches and their congregations have traveled through time in this city from the days of Denmark Vesey to Mother Emanuel AME Church today. Across time, black Charlestonians and other South Carolinians have fought for racial equality through the courts, civil rights activism, union organizing, and through their votes. Yet, this freedom journey is far from over. As James Weldon Johnson put to verse: “We have come over a way that with tears has been watered. We have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered.” We meet in Charleston in 2019 to reaffirm our history of 400 Years of Perseverance along the stony roads of America. And in remembrance of Charleston’s martyrs to racism in June 2015, we commit ourselves to the centuries-long journey to freedom and justice for all. The ASALH leadership extends its deepest gratitude to all who have made our 104th conference possible. The president and members of the Charleston branch of ASALH as well as the coordinator and members of the Local Arrangements Committee, the Chair and members of the Host Committee, and the many volunteers have worked with tremendous zeal and commitment to make possible this exciting and inspiring conference. The co-chairs and members of the Academic Program Committee, the Film Festival, the chair and committee members of the ASALH National Conference Oversight Committee, Social Media Committee, and the entire ASALH staff have tirelessly planned and met over the past year to make this conference intellectually stimulating and personally enjoyable.

Ms. Gladys W. Mack

Finally, with heartfelt appreciation, we thank the individual and institutional donors, the corporate sponsors, and our Conference Honorary Chairs, whose generosity on so many levels enable ASALH to tell the story of the contribution of people of African descent to the United States and world.

Mrs. Susan Simms Marsh, Esq.

Sincerely,

Dr. Anton D. House Dr. Eric Jackson

Mr. Moses Massenburg Dr. Edna Greene Medford Dr. Annette C. Palmer Rev. Anita M. Shepherd Dr. Gladys Vaughn

Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham ASALH National President


COMMITTEES & CHAIRS HONORARY CHAIRS

Congressman James E. Clyburn

Former Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr.

Anita Zucker, CEO The InterTech Group, Inc.

Brenda Lauderback Chair, BOD, Denny’s

Julio Hernandez Clemson University, Chief of Staff for the Division of Inclusion and Equity

HOST COMMITTEE

CHAIR OF THE CONFERENCE HOST COMMITTEE

CO-CHAIR OF THE CONFERENCE HOST COMMITTEE

Rev. Nelson B. Rivers, III

F. Renêe Gaters

Mr. Jeff Banks

Mr. Nigel Redden / General Director, Spoleto Festival USA

Ms. Julia-Ellen Craft Davis

Dr. David E. Rivers

Ms. Dena Davis

Mr. John Rivers, Jr.

Dr. Barbara D. Dilligard

Rev. and Mrs. Nelson B. Rivers, III (Carolyn)

Dr. William Marvin Dulaney

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Roberts (Candace) / JJR Development, LLC

Dr. Natanya Duncan

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Scott (Rita)

Atty. F. Renêe Gaters / Law Offices of F. Renêe Gaters, LLC

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Seidler (Margaret) / Seidler & Associates, LLC

Mr. and Mrs. Darrin Goss (Vee) Mr. William Dudley Gregorie Dr. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham Mr. and Mrs. Jerome C. Harris (Dr. Gwendolyn L.) Rev. and Mrs. Jerry Harrison (Dorothy) William E. Kennard and Deborah Kennedy Kennard Ms. Brenda Lauderback Ms. Gladys Mack Ms. Julie Monroe Ms. Stacia Murphy

4

Dr. Daniel M. Smith, Jr. Dr. Maxine Smith Brigadier General (Retired) and Mrs. Henry L. Taylor Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Watson (Michele) Major General and Mrs. Leo V. Williams, III (Vicki) Mr. and Mrs. Roger E. Williams (Marjorie) Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Consolidated/Mr. Kevin Gadson, Jr. Charleston Women’s Wellness Center


COMMITTEES & CHAIRS LOCAL ARRANGMENTS COMMITTEE Dr. Bernard (Bernie) Powers, LAC Co-Chair

Julia-Ellen Craft Davis, LAC Co-Chair

Dr. Maxine Smith, LAC Coordinator

Volunteer Recruitment and

Entertainment Subcommittee

Ms. Lacy Bryant

Deployment

Dr. Karen Chandler, Co-Chair

Ms. Danielle Caradine

Dr. Gwendy Harris

Mr. Ty Collins, Co-Chair

Mrs. Reba Hough-Martin

Volunteer Communication and Office Staffing

Ms. La’Sheia Oubre

Public Relations/Marketing

Mrs. Sharon Randall

Erike LeGendre, Co-Chair Marj Kenney-Williams, Co-Chair

Ms. Tonya Collins

Ms. Keshia Colleton

Mrs. Crystal Rouse Mrs. Erica Taylor

Volunteer Team Members

Mr. Damon Fordham

Institutional Outreach

Mr. James (Jim) Etheredge

Ms. Trudy Grant

Dr. Marguerite Archie-Hudson, Co-Chair

Mr. Jerome Harris

Ms. Radia Heyward

Ms. Evelyn (Evie) Nadel, Co-Chair

Ms. Emily-Elise Martin

Mrs. Ashley Krejci-Shaw

Ms. Julie Monroe

Mr. Davion Petty

Mrs. Vicki Davis Williams

Mr. Michael Whack

Program Subcommittee

Public School Outreach

Atty. F. Renêe Gaters (Co-Chair)

Dr. Louester A.S. Robinson, Chair

Ms. Dena Davis (Outreach Chair)

Ms. Julia-Ellen Craft Davis

Dr. Teresa Smith, Co-Chair

Dr. Marvin Dulaney (Student Poster

Mr. William Dudley Gregorie

Dr. M. Evelyn Fields

Contest Chair)

Mrs. Dorothy G. Harrison

Mr. Harlan Greene

Mrs. Michele English-Watson (Teacher’s

Mrs. Rita Scott

Ms. Aaisha Haykal

Workshop Chair)

Dr. Maxine Smith

Ms. Moryah Jackson

Mr. Dennis Muhammad (Youth Day Chair)

Mr. Donald West

Ms. Jennifer Brown

Host Committee (Fundraising & Advertisers) Rev. Nelson B. Rivers, III (Chair)

Dr. Susan Millar Williams

CONFERENCE OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE Jeff Banks, Chair

Charles Ferrell

Erika LeGendre

Anita Shepherd

Sylvia Cyrus

Robert L. Harris, Jr

Lopez Matthews

Gilbert Smith

Julia-Ellen Davis

Aaisha Haykal

Edna Medford

Maxine Smith

William Dulaney

Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham

Zebulon Miletsky

Gladys Vaughn

Natanya Duncan

Eric Jackson

Davion Petty

Marj Kenney Williams

Barbara Spencer Dunn

Lionel Kimble

Bernard Powers

ACADEMIC PROGRAM COMMITTEE Chair: Zebulon Vance Miletsky, Stony Brook University

Co-Chair: Natanya Duncan, Lehigh University

Hilary N. Green, University of Alabama

Simon Balto, University of Iowa

Ida E Jones, Morgan State University

Johnnieque Love, University of Maryland

Markeysha Dawn Davis, University of Hartford

Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston

Tara White, WCCS Rose C. Thevenin, Florida Memorial University Eric R Jackson, Northern Kentucky University

Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, University of Illinois Jarvis R. Givens, Harvard University

Michael Blum, Independent Scholar

Gregory Lamont Mixon, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Devin Fergus, University of Missouri

Shawn Alexander, University of Kansas

LaShawn Harris, Michigan State University

Ronald Williams, University of North Carolina

Jeffrey Helgeson, Texas State University Derrick White, Dartmouth College

Patrick Jones, University of NebraskaLincoln

5


Dear Conference Participants, The Academic Program Committee would like to welcome you to the 104th Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History! We are proud to gather here in Charleston, South Carolina under the 2019 National Black History Theme, ‘’Black Migrations” which spotlights the movement to new destinations that subsequently changed the social, political and economic realities for Africans and African descended peoples. These shifts in thought, location, religious practices and exposure to new peoples shaped and framed the vastness of their migration experiences. The migration patterns of Africans and African descended peoples included relocation from southern farms to southern cities; transition from the South to the Northeast, Midwest, and West and from the Caribbean to US cities; along with emigration to Africa and Europe. These multifaceted migrations resulted in a more diverse and stratified interracial and intra-racial population amid a changing social and cultural milieu. Migrations cultivated grassroots social justice organizations throughout the rural South through the urban North and the burgeoning Midwest; The emergence of both Black industrial workers and Black entrepreneurs coupled with the growing number and variety of faith based spaces and new music forms like ragtime, blues, and jazz helped temper responses to both government edicts and social customs that were designed to inhibit the opportunities migration appeared to promise many. The theme Black Migrations equally lends itself to the exploration of other spatial and social perspectives, with attention to “new” African Americans because of the burgeoning African and Caribbean population in the US; African Americans’ return to the South; racial suburbanization; inner-city hyper-ghettoization; health and environment; civil rights and protest activism; electoral politics; mass incarceration; and dynamic cultural production. 2019 also marks the commemoration of “400 Years of Perseverance” against enslavement. As such, we have assembled panels and papers that more fully interrogate this legacy of cultural and human theft and forced migration while honoring the resistance and resilience of black people throughout the diaspora. As we commemorate the 400th Anniversary of the arrival of Africans in North America, it is most fitting that we do so here in Charleston, South Carolina. Most recently, Charleston was the site of the culmination of America’s never ending battle with an unreconciled past on June 17, 2015 when worshippers at the historic Mother Bethel A.M.E. fell prey to the lingering sickness of known as white nationalism. Home to a diverse and vibrant African-American population and to one of the largest free black populations in the antebellum period-- we mark our 104th Conference and the “Year of Return” in this city--both a bellwether for our times and a crucible of American and African-American history. The Academic Program Committee leadership extends its deepest gratitude to our National President, the Vice Presidents and members of the Executive Council, the Executive Director, and all the committee chairs and heads whose hard work has made this conference possible. It is a pleasure to serve this grand organization and help in some small way to realize the vision of our founder Carter G. Woodson--in the 21st Century, and well into the future. We hope you will be inspired, encouraged, informed and enthralled with all that we have planned for you. Onward!

Dr. Zebulon Vance Miletsky, Chair Academic Program Committee

Natanya Duncan, Co-Chair Academic Program Committee


ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN LIFE AND HISTORY, INC.

2225 Georgia Ave., NW, Suite 331, Washington, DC 20059 Phone (202) 238-5910 Fax (202) 986-1506 Website: www.asalh.org • Email: info@asalh.net

uncil of the Association for the Study of African American Dear ASALH Conference Attendee: ur 99th Annual Convention. As we explore this year’s Welcome the to 104rd Annual andon Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, where we will hts in America, we to hope inspire youMeeting to reflect the explore the theme, “Black Migrations.”

The response from our members and friends to our decision to meet in North Charleston has been overwhelming. The Charleston Area Branch

ed, “There is no such force in the world as the force of a lead by President Julia-Ellen Davis has amassed a fantastic team of individuals who are anxious to share the rich culture and history in the oul cannot be permanently chained.” While the brutal Charleston area. The Thursday Tour sold out so quickly that we added extra buses. Our luncheon speakers and other event contributors are was continually used to sever black morale, the united effort “special to Charleston.” They lend their local experiences and personal heritages that will enrich our experience this year and expose us to their ormed a foundation of hope perseverance that is still South Carolina roots.and You will appreciate each person’s contributions as they relay their stories. ounteract systems of oppression people of African descent ed Convention andyear thefor National Association This ismovement the inaugural the Awards Banquet. for This change in format has been designed to hold a special event dedicated to and focusing on ASALH’s greatest. AACP) that provided African Americans a platform to st of the world.

Special thanks go to Julia Ellen Davis and Bernard Powers, Local Arrangements Co-Chairs; Maxine Smith, Local Arrangements Committee Harris and Tonya Collins, Volunteer Coordinators and their team; Congressman James E. Clyburn, Former Mayor Joseph Annual Coordinator; Convention Gwendy in Memphis, Tennessee, a city rich P. Riley, Jr., Anita Zucker, Brenda Lauderback, Julio Hernandez, Honorary Conference Chairs and to ASALH members, Branch members and he assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. dramatically community members who teamed up to provide the needed support for this conference.

th

emains a thriving site of civil rights activism and economic you explore historicgrateful grounds, we encourage you toIII, Chair of the Conference Host Committee and Attorney F. Renêe Gaters, Co-Chair of We these are extremely to Rev. Nelson B. Rivers, began their on Beale (including W.C. Handy,and our sponsors whose resources and networks have been invaluable in promoting and thecareers Conference Host Street Committee; the host committee that werefunding writtenthis at the LorraineSpecial Motel,commendations the site of Dr.go to the Host Committee who from the onset planned to secure funding above and beyond our conference. hope thatexpectations. you are able Itoappreciate experience that Memphis has the all phenomenal effort contributed by the Host Committee. Thank you for your service and support. ings deeply enrich your convention experience.

At the 105th Annual Meeting and Conference which will be held from September 23-27, 2020, in Montgomery, Alabama we will explore “African Americans The Vote.” Thehard history of to voting and voter rights is important every year, but particularly important during presidential elections. am Committee for itsand leadership and work We encourage all to get out the vote and get out and vote. Review the Save the Date documents to submit proposals, advertise, exhibit, and enters this year. We are confident that all who attend will be participate in the 2020 Conference.

y expositions and dialogues that will transpire. A special members of Honorary Committee for furthering the in Montgomery, Alabama, the site of the 2020 conference. Special thanks go to Bertis Wethe have also begun work on organizing a branch Local Arrangements Committee, extend a deep English in Montgomery andwe Ms. Majella Hamilton in Birmingham for the work that they are doing to form branches in Alabama to support our edicated service. conference.

Our leadership also deserves special thanks. nts, and volunteers, know that your timeless effortsJeff areBanks has done an outstanding job of leading the Conference Organizing Committee again this The Executive Council, consultants and volunteers have given their time, talent and treasures to ensure that this is a great nd extendyear. a special thank you to our Advisory corporateBoard, sponsors, event. The Academic Program Committee lead by Chair Zebulon Miletsky and Co-chair Natanya Duncan have done an amazing job in creating e helped to make this convention possible.

the program for this year. Their work and that of their committee are greatly appreciated. Special thanks go to the hard-working staff of ASALH. Crystal Bowell, Byron Dunn, Rachelle Eloizin, Oksana Reed, Petra Williams, Adrena Ifill and Kay Phillips. You have been tireless in your for standing with ASALH through a challenging time. We support, and it is most appreciated.

powers you to empower others, and we hope to see you next Atlanta, Georgia. Of course, I also extend a special thanks to each of you for your continued support. Our association needs involved members who accept the challenge of the ASALH mission.

In the spirit of our founder, Dr. Carter G. Woodson,

Sylvia Y. Cyrus Sylvia Y. Cyrus Executive Director

ASALH Executive Director

e, history and culture to the global community...ASALH Mission


CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR EDITORS

JOURNAL OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

PERO DAGBOVIE

BLACK HISTORY BULLETIN

ALICIA MOORE

LA VONNE NEAL

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 14TH ANNIVERSARY AS EDITORS!

FIRE!!! THE MULTIMEDIA JOURNAL OF BLACK STUDIES

MARILYN THOMAS HOUSTON CONGRATULATIONS ON PROVIDING DYNAMIC AND EXCITING FORMS OF SCHOLARSHIP!


SPONSORS

9


TABLE OF CONTENTS PRESIDENT’S LETTER 3 CONFERENCE COMMITTEES 4 OUR EDITORS 8 SPONSORS 9 ADVERTISERS 11 AUTHORS BOOK SIGNING 21 CONVENTION EXHIBITORS & MARKETPLACE 23 CONVENTION/HOTEL MAPS 25 FILM FESTIVAL 25 SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE 26 PARTICIPANT INDEX 29 SESSION INDEX WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2019 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2019

34 37 52 69 84

WE’VE GONE GREEN! THE 104TH ANNUAL MEETING AND CONFERENCE SOUVENIR JOURNAL CAN BE FOUND DIGITALLY ON WWW.ASALH.ORG/JOURNAL

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA #ASALH2019 #ASALH #CARTERGWOODSON TWITTER @ASALH

INSTAGRAM @ASALH_BHM

FACEBOOK ASALH.BLACKHISTORY

NOTICE OF FILMING AND PHOTOGRAPHY When you enter an ASALH event or program, you enter an area where photography, audio, and video recording may occur. By entering the event premises, you consent to interview(s), photography, audio recording, video recording and its/their release, publication, exhibition, or reproduction to be used for news, web casts, promotional purposes, telecasts, advertising, inclusion on websites, social media, or any other purpose by ASALH and its affiliates and representatives. Images, photos and/or videos may be used to promote similar ASALH events in the future, highlight the event and exhibit the capabilities of ASALH. You release ASALH, its officers and employees, and each and all persons involved from any liability connected with the taking, recording, digitizing, or publication and use of interviews, photographs, computer images, video and/or or sound recordings. By entering the event premises, you waive all rights you may have to any claims for payment or royalties in connection with any use, exhibition, streaming, web casting, televising, or other publication of these materials, regardless of the purpose or sponsoring of such use, exhibiting, broadcasting, web casting, or other publication irrespective of whether a fee for admission or sponsorship is charged. You also waive any right to inspect or approve any photo, video, or audio recording taken by ASALH or the person or entity designated to do so by ASALH. You have been fully informed of your consent, waiver of liability, and release upon entering the event.

10


SOUVENIR JOURNAL ADVERTISERS MICHAEL HALPERIN

International Publishers

The Center for Education and Juvenile Justice, Inc.

Keiga Dance Company

Myers Education Press

Magnolia Plantation & Gardens

Joyce Jefferson Creates Stories and Songs

The Marshall University Woodson Lyceum

Al-Gilmore

Mary Joseph Insurance Agency, Inc. State Farm

AARP

Medical University of South Carolina

Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

Mitchelville Preservation Project Fund

African American History and Culture Association

Monthly Review Press from John Mage

Alabama Department of Archives and History

Library Company of Philadelphia

Myers Education Press

Dr. Anne S. Pruitt-Logan

National Association of African-American Studies

Avery Institute of Afro-American History and Culture

National Council for Black Studies

BEOJ

National Parks Conservation Association

Cannon Partners, LLC

North Carolina A&T State University Department of History

Carter G. Woodson Branch of ASALH

Oni Lasana Productions

Charleston Area Convention & Vistors Bureau Charleston County Aviation Authority

Reconstruction Beaufort the Second Founding of America

Charleston Southern University

South Carolina Education Lottery

City of North Charleston

Stanford University Press

Clemson University, Division of Inclusion and Equity

Tabernacle Baptist Church-Harriet Tubman Monument Fund

College of Charleston

The Citadel

College of Charleston Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture

The Intertech Group, Inc.

Columbia University, African American & African Diaspora Studies Department

The University of Chicago Press

Cornell University Press Cumulus Radio Station Group Charleston Denny’s Hungry for Education Dominion Energy Foundation Emanuel AMEC Equal Justice Initiative Gamma Lambda Boule Harvard University International African American Museum International Longshoremen’s Association

The University of Arkansas Press University Press of Mississippi The Washington Informer Newspaper Thoreau Society University of Georgia Press University of Illinois Press University of Massachusetts Press University of NC Press University Press of Florida University Press of Kentucky Virginia Theological Seminary YWCA Greater Charleston

11











AUTHOR’S BOOK SIGNING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019, 6:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Takeia Anthony The Universal Ethiopian Students’ Association, 19271948: Mobilizing Diaspora Martha Bireda The Womb Rebellion Nemata Blyden African American and Africa Charlie Bolton Fugitivism: Escaping Slavery in the lower Mississippi Valley, 1820-1860 Alphonso Brown A Gullah Guide to Charleston Ronald Briscoe My Daddy is Everything! Arthur Burnett Pieces Never Missing Theresa Canada Desegregation of the New York City Schools: A Story of The Silk Stocking Sisters Glenn Chambers From the Banana Zones to the Big Easy: West Indian and Central American Immigration to New Orleans, 1910-1940 Lee Chavous Dreams of My Ancestors James E. Cheek Williams and Jenkins, Halifax County, North Carolina: A Legacy of Africans, Natives and European Immigrants in the United States Elizabeth Cobbs The Tubman Command, A Novel

Elista Istre Creoles of South Louisiana: Three Centuries Strong Eric Jackson Let Freedom Ring for Everyone: The Diversity of Our Nation Andre Johnson The Struggle over Black Lives Matter and All Lives Matter Marlen Jones Secrets Untold Melvina F. Jones Roxboro Roots: North Carolina Families Leave Their Imprint on America’s Story Jeffrey R.Kerr-Ritchie Rebellious Passage: The Creole Revolt and America’s Coastal Slave Trade Tiffany Lee Voices of the Race Riots: Beyond the Red Summer Josephine Bolling McCall The Penalty for Success: My Father was Lynched in Lowndes County Alabama John H. McClendon III Black Christology and the Quest for Authenticity: A Philosophical appraisal Al Miller Tourists Can Say the Darndest Things: Exploring Historic Charleston, South Carolina

Karen Cook-Bell Claiming Freedom

Ruth Miller Slavery to Civil Rights: A Walking Tour of African-American Charleston

Stephanie Deutsch You Need a School House, Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South

Traci Parker Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement: Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights from the 1930s to the 1980s

Lewis Diuguid Our Fathers Making Black Men

Alicea Peyton The Evolution of Land-Use Enforcement (The Storefront Church Movement)

Angela Dodson Remember the Ladies Cicero Milton Fain Black Huntington: An Appalachian Story Jelani Favors Shelter in a Time of Storm: How Black Colleges Fostered Generations of Leadership and Activism

Anita D. Russell I Wanna See Laney’s House Julie L. Seely Skinny House- A Memoir of Family Daniel Smith African-Americans and Charleston Histories Intertwined

Jonathan B. Fenderson Building the Black Arts Movement: Hoyt Fuller and the Cultural Politics of the 1960s

Joleene Maddox Snider Claiming Sunday: The Story of a Texas Slave Community

Stephen Ferguson and John McClendon African American Philosophers and Philosophy: An Introduction to the History, Concepts, and Contemporary Issues

Carl Suddler Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York

Minuette Floyd A Place to Worship Gary Ford Constance Baker Motley One Woman Fight for Civil Rights and Equal Justice Under Law Damon Fordham True Stories of Black South Carolina Dr. Al Fraser To Be or not...to Bop - Memoirs Dizzy Gillespie Pauline J. Furman When God Shows Up on the Couch LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson A Guide to Researching African American Ancestors in Laurens County, South Carolina and Selected Finding Aids

Duann Thomas-Mathis Maplehill Elizabeth Todd-Breland A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago Since the 1960s Kelenne Tuitt Be Irie – A Caribbean Handbook to Develop Healthy Habits” Rebecca Tuuri Strategic Sisterhood: The National Council of Negro Women in the Black Freedom Struggle Louis Venters A History of the Baha’i Faith in South Carolina Dekalb Walcott Black Heroes of Fire

Shennette Garrett-Scott Banking on Freedom: Black Women in U.S. Finance before the New Deal

Derrick White Blood, Sweat and Tears: Jake Gaither, Florida A&M, and the History of Black College Football

Carroll Green Almost Heaven It Wasn’t Even Close A Legacy of Love

Greg Wiggan Dreaming of a Place Called Home: Local and International Perspectives on Teacher Education and School Diversity

Angel Harriott Journey to the Sea Islands: Gullah Geechee Good! Katrina Hazzard Jookin’: The Rise of Social Dance Formations in African American Culture Tekla Ali Hopkins-Johnson Free Radical: Ernest Chambers, Black Power, and the Politics of Race

Junius Williams Unfinished Agenda Urban Politics in the Era of Black Power Sonja Williams Word Warrior: Richard Durham, Radio, and Freedom

21



EXHIBITORS

CONVENTION EXHIBITORS & MARKETPLACE

FEATURING QUALITY SMALL BUSINESS VENDORS, ACADEMIC PRESSES AND MORE

A fantastic group of exhibitors and vendors has been lined up for the 104th Conference. Come prepared for a great shopping and educational experience. Some exhibitors are interested in job and manuscript candidates so visit often. The exhibit area is free and open to the public. The exhibit hall is located on the 1st and 2nd Floor of the Convention Center and the hours are as follows.

Thursday from Noon - 9:00 p.m. Friday 8 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Booths 1-37 are on the first floor. Booths 38-50 are on the second floor.

AARP - Booth 29A

National Park Service - Booth 45

African Art Market Place - Booth 20

National Parks Conservation Association Booth 44

Alkebu-Lan Images - Booth 17 & 18 Another Phase - Booth 21 Association Book Exhibit - Booth 30 Baylor University Press - Booth 1-4 BBM Gifts International - Booth 28 Cathy’s Global - Booth 22

Ohio University Press - Booth 12 Pathfinder Press - Booth 6 Saxx Apparel - Booth 25 Something For Everybody - Booth 19 The Citadel - Booth 42 The Elegant Elephant - Booth 24

Charleston Area Convention and Visitors Bureau - Booth 37

The Foundation International - Booth 26

Charleston County School District - Booth 38

The Scholars Choice - Booth 9

College of Charleston - Booth 48

The University of Arkansas Press - Booth 7

Cornell University Press - Booth 1-4

The University of Chicago Press - Booth 31 & 32

Department of African American Studies - AFRO PWW/ FIRE!!!: The Multimedia - Booth 15

University of Georgia Press - Booth 1-4

Dominion Energy - Booth 50

University of Massachusetts Press - Booth 8

Drums of Humanity - Booth 35

University of North Carolina Press - Booth 13

E.O.T.O. Books - Booth 40

University of Notre Dame Press - Booth 1-4

Equal Justice Initiative - Booth 41

University of South Carolina Press - Booth 14

Heritage International Fashions - Booth 23

University of Virginia Press - Booth 1-4

McFarland Publishing - Booth 39

University Press of Florida - Booth 34

Medical University of South Carolina - Booth 49

University Press of Kentucky - Booth 11

Monticello - Booth 46

University Press of Mississippi - Booth 5

Montgomery Center and Visitors Bureau Booth 36

YBI African Apparel - Booth 27

National Association for Interpretation Booth 47

University of Illinois Press - Booth 33

Zee Crafts - Booth 29

23


ASALH STAFF & VOLUNTEERS

ASALH STAFF Sylvia Y. Cyrus Executive Director Crystal Boswell Operations Manager Byron Dunn Membership Clerk Conference Staff Rachelle Eloizin Oksana Reed Marc Pavan Petra Williams-Omoleye

24

BLACK HISTORY BULLETIN Lavonne Neal Co-Editor Alicia Moore Co-Editor

FIRE!!! THE MULTIMEDIA JOURNAL OF BLACK STUDIES Marilyn M. Thomas-Houston Editor

CONSULTANTS Taylor & Hov, Black History Month Luncheon Gaynelle Jackson, Conference Planner Kay Phillips, NPS Project Manager Clifton Johnson, Graphic Designer Rory Gruler, Spot Web Design

VOLUNTEERS Curtis Baylor Jamila Benson Ann Crawford Carl M. Dunn Louis Hicks Cheryl Gresham Vernon Jackson Sharita Jacobs-Thompson Regina Lewis Christine McNair Oliver McNair Valerie Maholmes Burnis Morris Mary Nobles-Jackson Darlene Oliver Chris Omoleye Joshua Terry James Thompson Velma Williams


FILM FESTIVAL

Convention Center, 1st – CC – Ballroom C1 – 1st floor – AV Room Film Festival is FREE and open to the public. Each film will be followed by a discussion with a scholar, filmmaker—and in some cases—the subjects of the films themselves. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. ZORA NEALE HURSTON: JUMP AT THE SUN 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. BEYOND THE FIELDS: SLAVERY AT MIDDLETON PLACE 8:15 p.m. – 10:15 p.m. HOMECOMING: THE STRUGGLE OF BLACKS TO OWN

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. RALPH ELLISON: AN AMERICAN JOURNEY 10:15 p.m. – 12:00 p.m. DIRT AND DEEDS IN MISSISSIPPI 12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. BOSS: THE BLACK EXPERIENCE IN BUSINESS 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. WILD WOMEN DON’T HAVE THE BLUES 7:15 p.m. – 9:45 p.m. STRANGE FRUIT: THE FAMOUS SONG AND ITS STORY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. UNNATURAL CAUSES: IS INEQUALITY MAKING US SICK EPISODE I 10:15 p.m. – 11:45 p.m. RALPH BUNCHE: AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. THE APOLLO 2:15 p.m. – 3:50 p.m. WHILE I BREATHE I HOPE: A FILM ABOUT BAKARI SELLERS 7:15 p.m. – 9:45 p.m. ASALH FILM SHORTS

HOTEL MAP

25


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2019 Conference Registration

1:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Convention Center – 1st floor, Pre-Registration – Ballroom A Foyer, Onsite Registration – Meeting Room 3

Pre-Conference African American Heritage Bus Tour: Sponsored by National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom and Dominion Energy

7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Bus will load at the Convention Center entrance near the flagpole

ASALH Executive Council Meeting* (Members Welcome)

9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Ballroom C2 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Wednesday Sessions* (New to the 2019 Conference) 2:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.

Convention Center – 2nd floor

NPS Forum, A People Moving: How the National Park Service and Preservationists Tell the Story of Black Migrations, Sponsored by the National Park Conservation Association*

4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Ballroom C1 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Opening Night Reception, Sponsored by the National Park Conservation Association

7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Ballroom B – Convention Center – 1st floor

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Convention Center – 1st floor, Pre-Registration – Ballroom A Foyer, Onsite Registration – Meeting Room 3

7:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Bus will load at the Convention Center entrance near the flagpole

Teachers Workshop (Registration Required)

8:00 a.m. – 3:50 p.m.

Ballrooms C2/C3 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Session I

8:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

Various Rooms, Convention Center – 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

Session II

10:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Various Rooms, Convention Center – 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

Thursday Luncheon: Jonathan Green, Ambassador of the Arts for the City of Charleston: The Legacy of the Lowcountry Rice Culture

12:00 noon – 1:45 p.m. Ballroom B – Convention Center – 1st floor

Exhibit Area Open*

12:00 noon – 9:00 p.m.

Ballroom Foyer – Convention Center – 1st floor

Session III

2:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.

Various Rooms, Convention Center – 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

Film Festival*

2:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Meeting Room 1 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Black Migrations Plenary Session: Moving, Marching, and Making the Beat: A Century of African American Migrations*

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Ballroom A – Convention Center – 1st floor

Authors’ Book Signing*

6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Ballroom C4 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Journal of African American History Reception: Co-Sponsored by The University of Chicago Press and Michigan State University – History Department

8:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.

Ballroom B – Convention Center – 1st floor

Conference Registration

8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Convention Center – 1st floor, Pre-Registration – Ballroom A Foyer, Onsite Registration – Meeting Room 3

Exhibit Area Open*

8:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Ballroom Foyer – Convention Center – 1st floor

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 Conference Registration African American Heritage Bus Tour - SOLD OUT Sponsored by Dominion Energy

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019

* Free and Open to the Public

26


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 (CONTINUED) Youth Day: Sponsored by Blackbaud and Charleston Southern University

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

This is a closed off-site event

Film Festival*

9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Meeting Room 1 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Session I

8:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

Various Rooms, Convention Center – 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

Session II

10:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Various Rooms, Convention Center – 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

Friday Luncheon: Bible Study (The Story of the Mother Emanuel AME Massacre in Charleston, SC)

12:00 noon – 1:45 p.m.

Ballroom B – Convention Center – 1st floor

Session III

2:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.

Various Rooms, Convention Center – 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

ASALH Members Business Meeting* (Members encouraged to attend)

4:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

Ballroom A – Convention Center – 1st floor

Friday Night Out: Lowcountry Evening of Entertainment featuring Quiana Parler and Friends, 9:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m. Reception, 7:30 p.m. – 8:45 p.m.

6:30 p.m. – 11:30 p.m.

Memminger Auditorium, Buses load: 6:30 p.m. Convention Center entrance near flagpole; Buses depart: 7:00 p.m.; Buses return to hotel: 8:30 p.m., 8:45 p.m., 10:00 p.m., 11:00 p.m.

Open Mic Emcee Kevin “Moose” Anderson

10:00 p.m. – midnight

Convention Center – Ballroom C-3

Conference Registration

8:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Convention Center – 1st floor, Pre-Registration – Ballroom A Foyer, Onsite Registration – Meeting Room 3

Exhibit Area Open*

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Ballroom Foyer – Convention Center – 1st floor

ASALH Branch Workshop*

8:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Ballroom C2 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Film Festival*

9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Meeting Room 1 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Session I

8:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

Various Rooms Convention Center – 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

Session II

10:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Various Rooms Convention Center – 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

Carter G. Woodson Luncheon: Pero G. Dagbovie, Editor, The Journal of African American History (JAAH)

12 noon – 1:45 p.m.

Ballroom A – Convention Center – 1st floor

Session III

2:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.

Various Rooms, Convention Center - 1st and 2nd floor, Embassy Suites Hotel

400 Years of Perseverance Plenary Session: Stolen from Africa But Making Black Lives Matter*

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Ballroom A – Convention Center – 1st floor

ASALH Awards Banquet Entertainment: Oscar Rivers Quartet and Miss Michael Miller

7:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.

Ballroom B – Convention Center – 1st floor

ASALH Ecumenical Breakfast: Dr. Norvel Goff, Presiding Elder, Edisto District

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Ballroom C1/C2 – Convention Center – 1st floor

Post-Conference African American Heritage Bus Tour: Sponsored by National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom and Dominion Energy & Community Foundation

9:30 a.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Bus will load at the Convention Center entrance near the flagpole

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2019

* Free and Open to the Public

27



PARTICIPANT INDEX (Numbers following names indicate session numbers)

Abston, Emanuel Jordan, 122 Acey, David L., 224 Acey, Yvonne B., 224 Acker, Daniel, 225 Adams, Col Terrence, 226 Adams-Bass, Valerie, 098 Adderley, Laura Rosanne, 008 Adejumo, Vincent, 177 Adeniyi “Nira”, Keshad Adeniyi “Ife”, 047 Akehinmi, Krystal D. F., 046 Alahmed, Nadia, 087 Alcenat, Westenley, 058 Alcime, Ivon, 064 Alexander, Je’Lon, 089 Alexander, Kerri Lee, 196 Alexander, Shawn, 015, 038 Allen, Madge, 125 Allen, Marcus, 145, 205 Allen, Michael, 097 Allen, Virginia, 176 Allison, Donnetrice, 052 Allison, Waridibo Evelyn, 178 Alridge, Derrick P., 219 Alvarez, Amy, 046 Alyass, Kenneth, 191 Anderson-Douoning, Jolivette J., 120 Andress, Lauri, 046 Ansley, John, 201 Anthony, TaKeia, 028, 080 Araujo, Ana Lucia, 166 Arenson, Adam, 153 Ash, Jennifer S., 182 Ashford, Evan Howard, 185 Aubel, Maraci G., 064 Audain, Mekala, 029 Augustine, Jean, 153 Awokoya, Janet, 072, 208 Baham, Eva Semien, 008 Bailey, Dorothy, 158 Bailey, Ronald W., 189 Ball, Erica L., 107, 109, 191, 200 Balto, Simon, 015, 139, 186 Banda, Mtalika “Mtali”, 070 Banks, Ingrid, 094 Banks, Jeffrey A., 003, 224 Baraka, Ayana, 143 Barnes, Andwatta, 208 Bascomb, Lia T., 192 Baxter, Faith, 026 Bell, Cynthia, 054 Bender, Kimberly, 019, 125 Benjamin, Michael, 123 Benton, Rev. Byron, 201 Bernier, Julia Wallace, 124 Berry, Jessica R., 012 Berry, Mary Frances, 038, 137

Beutin, Lyndsey, 081 Bireda, Ph.D., Martha Russell, 077, 080 Bivens, Joy, 007 Blackman, Dexter, 030 Blair, Lyndsey, 214 Bland, Robert, 142 Blockston, Charles C., 224 Blum, Michael, 015 Blyden, Nemata Amelia, 051, 080, 123 Bolton, Charlie, 080 Bonastia, Christopher, 140 Bond, Mattison, 101 Bond, Zanice, 064 Bonner, Christopher, 038 Boone, Beverly, 057, 126 Boone, Kiara, 067 Boose, Donelle R., 030 Boston, Nicholas, 140 Bowles, John P., 165 Boyd, Kendra D., 063 Boyd, Stacy, 126, 152 Boykin, Peter, 075 Bracey, John H., 070, 131 Bratton, Lisa, 064, 183 Breed, Aisha Carmel, 125 Brimmer, Brandi, 138 Bristow, Margaret Bernice Smith, 122 Brooks, Kalia, 216 Brown, Alphonso, 080 Brown, Carolynne Hitter, 024 Brown, Keisha Alexandria, 105 Brown, LaShawna J., 089 Brown, Louise, 010 Brown, Miyoshi, 113 Brown, Nikki Lynn Marie, 141, 215 Brown, Prince, 052, 176 Brown, Thomas, 169 Browne-Marshall, Gloria J., 003, 037, 221 Buchanan, Heather, 027 Buck, Krista M., 211 Bunzey, Tyler, 167 Burden-Stelly, Charisse, 192 Burgher, Denise, 114 Burkholder, Zoe, 077 Burnham-Williams, Willette S., 224 Butina-Sutton, Heather, 011 Butler, Nancy, 104 Butler, Tamara, 104 Byrd, Brandon, 109 Calhoun, Daron Lee, 045 Calloway, Alexis, 125 Cameron, Christopher, 038, 109 Campbell, Amanda J., 183 Campbell, Marne, 035 Campbell, Sonny, 168 Canada, Theresa, 080

Canada, Tracie, 210 Carew, Joy Gleason, 062, 208 Carey, Joanna Elizabeth, 024 Carlton, Morgan, 063 Carrier, Toni, 211 Carter, Bryan, 213 Carter-Daboiku, Omopé, 050, 158, 188, 219 Carter-David, Siobhan, 075, 200 Castledine, Jacqueline, 033 Cha-Jua, Sundiata Keita, 003, 015, 137, 192 Chambers, Glenn, 065, 080, 149 Chambers, Joshua I., 173 Chandler, Karen, 201 Chandler, Kassandra Agee, 171 Chandler, Kimberly, 206 Chapple, Reggie, 134 Charbonnette, W Constinia, 046 Charron, Katherine, 032, 036 Chavous, Lee, 080 Cheek, James E., 080 Childs, Kiara, 167 Chitty, Dawn, 095 Chopra, Ruma, 153 Clark, Zende Larmar, 003 Clay, Elonda, 213 Clemons, Ashley D., 126 Clemons, Kristal Moore, 034, 141 Clinton, Miranda, 028 Clyburn, Congressman James E., 221, 224 Cobbs, Elizabeth, 055, 080 Cole, Alyssa Patryce, 178 Coleman, Dwain, 114 Coleman, Loren Saxton, 090 Coleman, Marcus, 090 Coleman, Vedet R., 108 Coleman-King, Chonika, 072, 098 Collins, Kathy Marsh, 224 Conner, Mycah Lynn, 099 Connolly, Nathan, 139 Cook, DeAnza, 186 Cook-Bell, Karen, 080, 169 Cooke, Nicole A., 041 Cooper, Afua, 123 Cooper, Heather, 114 Cooper Owens, Deirdre, 166 Coursen, Elizabeth Huntoon, 211 Cross, Kelly, 017 Crowe, Larry, 050, 119, 188 Crumley, Jaimie D., 151 Cumberbatch, Prudence, 066 Cunningham, Maya, 117 Currie, Netisha, 148 Cyrus, Sylvia Y., 003, 014, 155, 158, 178, 224 Dabney, Mark, 050 Dagbovie, Pero, 083, 120, 201

29


PARTICIPANT INDEX (Numbers following names indicate session numbers)

Dagbovie-Mullins, Sika, 113 Dance, Eola, 020, 108 Daniels, Ron, 137 Darity, William A., 137 Davidson, Christina, 091 Davis, Christina, 092 Davis, Dionti, 096 Davis, Gigi, 047 Davis, Jametta, 148 Davis, Joshua, 180 Davis, Julia-Ellen, 014 Davis, Markeysha Dawn, 015, 075 Davis, Patricia, 143, 165 Davis, StaLynn, 206 Dawson-House, Dawn Marie, 009 DeBardelaben, LaNesha, 003 Debnam, Jewell, 039 deChantal, Julie, 209 DeCuir, Sharlene Sinegal, 215 Desinord, Shafantae, 020 Deutsch, Stephanie, 013, 080 Dickerson, Christina Marie, 091 Dickerson, Dennis Clark, 091 Diggs, Constance L., 077 Di Lorenzo, Anthony, 119 Diuguid, Lewis Walter, 080, 202 Dixon, Kellie “Kelli”, 112 Dixon-McKnight, O. Jennifer, 199 Dodson, Angela, 080 Dodson, Heidi, 138 Domby, Adam, 049 Donaldson, Le’Trice D., 187, 206 Dong, Cheryl, 118 Dorsey, Allison, 071 Dotson, Jerome Kern, 052 Duke, Eric D., 197 Dulaney, W. Marvin, 009 Dunbar, Erica Armstrong, 107, 200, 222 Duncan, Natanya, 003, 015, 094, 200, 222 Dunn, Barbara Spencer, 003, 068, 155, 158, 201, 204, 224 Duster, Michelle, 185 DuVernay, Jina, 125, 181 Dykes, DeWitt, 031 Eaves, Shannon, 008 Eddins, Crystal, 124, 169 Edinboro, Dellyssa, 062, 114 Edwards, Anne Marie, 112 Edwards, J. Marlena, 149 Ekeh, Olivia, 117 Ekong, Enimini, 013 Elder, Wiil, 134 el-Hakim, Khalid, 088 Elliott, Mary, 020, 047, 108 Erby, Brandon, 150 Evans, Stephanie Y., 062, 197

30

Ewing, K. T., 092 Fain, Cicero Milton, 080, 111 Fairfax, Colita, 037 Favors, Jelani, 080 Felker-Kantor, Max, 186 Fenderson, Jonathon, 032, 080 Fergus, Devin, 015 Ferguson, Stephen C., 073, 080 Fett, Sharla, 164 Fields, M. Evelyn, 201 Fields-Black, Edda L., 055 Finkenbine, Roy, 029 Finley, Cheryl, 216 Fiorello-Omotosho, Ariana, 207 Fisher, Vivian Njeri, 170 Flanagan, Neil, 069, 125 Fleming, Julius, 025 Flemming-Hunter, Sheila, 003, 037, 179, 224 Flewellyn, Barbara W., 165 Flewellyn, Valada Sanquenetta, 165 Flippin, William Edward, 128 Flores-Clemons, Raquel, 088 Flowers, Deidre B., 182 Floyd, Minuette Byers, 080 Ford, Gary, 080 Ford, Tanisha, 217 Fordham, Damon L., 080 Forney, Kayla Cherise, 125 Fortuna, Vlademiro, 221 Foster, Brian, 206 Foundation, Middleton Place, 081 Fowler, Paul E., 070 Fox, Nathalie, 089 Fox, Regix, 113 Francis, Hannah, 190 Francis, Theodore, 048 Franklin, John W., 013, 194 Franklin, Karen Roberts, 194 Franklin, V.P., 035, 137, 215 Franks, Dorothy J., 204 Fraser, Al, 080 Frazier, Nishani, 180 Freeman, Tyrone McKinley, 214 Furman, Pauline J., 080 Gaithers, Beau D. J., 124 Gaiusbayode, Gabriel “Gabe” Ekundayo, 173 Gannaway, Jada, 028 Gardner, Bettye J., 003, 068 Garrett-Nelson, LaBrenda, 080, 144 Garrett-Scott, Shennette, 074, 080, 094, 107, 132, 145, 177, 200 Garrison, Marcia, 075, 125, 176 Garry, Vanessa, 076 Gaskin, Frances, 125 Gaters, F. Renêe, 226

Gatson, Torren, 011, 172 Gault, Erika D., 213 Gee, Michele, 134 Generett, Gretchen Givens, 034 Genovese, Holly, 036 Gigantino, James, 207 Giles, Kelly, 209 Gill, Tiffany, 074 Gillis, Hazel D., 125 Gill-Sadler, Randi Karin, 025 Gipson, Maurice, 177 Gist, Conra, 017, 185 Gittens, Rhana A., 019 Givens, Jarvis R., 003, 015, 150 Goddard, Richlyn Faye, 177 Goffe, Tao Leigh, 058 Goff Sr., Rev. Norvel, 226 Goldberg, David, 193 Gomez, Jonathan, 065 Gonzalez, Jose Ivan, 022 Gooch, Cheryl Renee, 003 Goode, Dolores Ernestine, 125 Goodier, Susan, 203 Goodwin, Daleah, 092 Goodwine, Queen Quet Marquetta L., 012, 156 Gordon, Ernestine J., 125 Gordon, Michelle Y., 122 Gordon-Nembhard, Jessica, 192 Gore, Dayo F., 042 Gospel Choir, The College of Charleston, 226 Gourrier, Francis, 050 Graham, Bria, 130 Graham, Melvin, 129 Grant, Sharon J., 091 Gray Fischer, Anne, 186 Greason, Walter, 175 Green, Carroll, 080 Green, Damita Drayton, 144 Green, Dana, 026 Green, Hilary N., 015, 049, 142, 147, 180 Green, Jonathan, 054 Green, Kathleen, 104 Green, Sharony, 061 Greene II, Robert Jerome, 036, 147 Greenwood, Janette Thomas, 207 Gregorie, William Dudley, 129 Griffin, Farah Jasmine, 079 Grigg, Jeff W., 055 Gross, Kali, 200 Gruesser, John Cullen, 174 Guran, Letitia, 189 Hale, Jon, 116 Hall, Susan, 214 Ham, Debra Newman, 144


PARTICIPANT INDEX (Numbers following names indicate session numbers)

Hamilton, Kenneth M., 071 Hammack, Maria Esther, 107, 166, 200 Hammond-Ford, Lauren, 051 Hancock, Scott, 152 Hankins, Rebecca Louise, 041, 171, 181 Hardy, Everett, 177 Harley, Sharon, 216 Harper, Jim, 019, 026 Harriot, Jannie, 009, 069 Harriott, Angel, 080 Harris, Christina Afia, 062 Harris, DeLisa Minor, 108 Harris, Renard, 129 Harris, LaShawn, 015, 093, 113, 120, 166 Harris, Robert L., 003 Harris, Sheena, 092 Harrison, Christy Garrison, 179 Harrison, Dorothy G., 224 Harrison, Milmon Ferdinand, 184 Hartman, Ian, 119 Hayden, Bob, 022, 076, 126 Haykal, Aaisha, 003, 015, 045, 125, 136, 211 Hazzard, Katrina, 080 Helgeson, Jeffrey, 015, 175 Henley, Lauren Nicole, 210 Henry, Natasha, 153 Henry Allison, Aldra, 204 Herschthal, Eric, 164 Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks, 003, 014, 054, 137, 155, 158, 201, 224 Hildebrand, Reginald, 091 Hill, Karlos, 019 Hill, Kiara, 146 Hill, Kimberly D., 050 Hill Butler, Deidre, 066 Hine, Darlene Clark, 131 Hine, William, 110 Hines, Alisha J., 169 Hobson, Maurice J., 079, 089 Hodges, Heather, 054, 130 Hodges, Kenneth Folden, 055 Hoffman, Diane M., 098 Hogarth, Rana, 164 Holden, Vanessa M., 169 Hollis, Deborah, 041, 170, 181 Holloman, Catherine, 125 Holloway, Kali, 078 Holm, Charles, 030 Holmes, Donald, 167 Holt, Hunter, 103, 219 Holt, Jr., Isaac J., 054 Hood, Malon Ariel, 173 Hooker, Ernest, 205 Hope, Jeanelle Kevina, 105 Hopkins-Johnson, Tekla Ali, 080 Hopkinson, Natalie, 090

Horne, Abigail, 043 Horne, Gerald, 042 Horton, Alexander, 070 House, Anton Decore, 003, 154 Howard, Jasmin Chantel, 182 Howard, Philip A., 051 Huddle, Mark Andrew, 039 Hudson, Julie, 048 Hughes, Katherine C., 172 Hurst, Jon, 102 Hutchins, Gabrielle, 148 Istre, Elista, 080, 168 Istre, Moriah, 168 Iyengar, Malathi, 051 Jackson, Asha Hiwate, 031 Jackson, Eric R., 003, 015, 080 Jackson, Ramon, 009 Jackson, Shirley A., 053 Jacobs Thompson, Sharita, 093 James, Raphael, 014 Jamison, Felicia, 071, 107, 200 Jaquez, Christina, 102 Jeffers-Coly, Phyllis Marie, 102 Jefferson, Alison Rose, 044 Jelks, Randal, 120, 212 Jenkins, Charlotte, 130 Jenkins, Destin, 193 Jenrich, Marissa A., 035 Jensen, Faye, 007 Johns, Glynis M., 053 Johnson, Alexis Monique, 116, 219 Johnson, Andre E., 080, 122, 206 Johnson, Charles, 026, 101 Johnson, Deanda, 013, 029 Johnson, Kristen, 173 Johnson, Thelma M., 125 Johnson, Violet M., 149 Jolly, Jallicia, 210 Jones, Aubrey P., 063 Jones, Homer, 100 Jones, Ida E., 015, 127, 144, 224 Jones, Marlene, 080 Jones, Martha S., 038, 182 Jones, Melvina F., 080 Jones, Patrick, 015, 175 Jones, Stephanie P., 114 Jones-Branch, Cherisse, 071, 107, 119, 200 Jones Compaore, Jacqueline, 052 Jordan, Jamon, 060, 063 Joseph, Courtney Pierre, 008 Kanter, Rabbi Greg, 226 Kaplan, Hannah, 070 Kaut, Mila, 114 Kazembe, Lasana, 126

Kelley, Blair, 118, 166 Kelly, Brian, 099 Kerr-Ritchie, Jeffrey Robert, 020, 047, 080, 123, 196 Key, Andre, 073 Kimble, Lionel, 003, 015, 079, 134, 155 Kinard, Joy, 108, 194 King, Kristopher, 014 King, LaGarrett, 059 King, Nicelma, 184 King, Shannon, 024 Kirkland, Tarabu, 067 Klanderud, Jessica D., 105, 107, 200 Knight, Felice, 008 Knox, Mr. Antonio, 224 Koch, Cecilia, 204 Koch, Joe, 204 Krauthamer, Barbara, 038 Krinitsky, Nora, 139 Kwoba, Brian, 206 Lanier, Michelle, 190 La Roche, Ramona, 052 LaRoche, Cheryl Janifer, 029, 055 Lasser, Carol, 141 Lauderback, Brenda, 014 Law, Matthew, 099 Lee, Tiffany B., 080, 082 Leggs, Brent, 013 Lentz-Smith, Adriane, 032 Lewis, Janaka, 066 Lewis, Jasmine, 112 Lewis, Mark M., 212 Lewis, Nghana, 113 Lewis, Regina, 017 Lewis, Sarah, 224 Lewis, Thabiti, 115 L.Garrison, Lloyd, 176 Ligon, Tina Louise, 148 Lilton, Deborah, 170 Lima da Silva, Alexandra, 151 Lindsey, Lydia, 057 Lindsey, Treva, 094, 141 Linker, Destiney, 209 Logan, Ayaba, 181 Long, J. Grahame, 011 Lopez, Alyssa, 093 Love, Johnnieque, 015, 125, 170, 181 Lovett, Laura, 209 Lowe, Turkiya, 002, 068 MacDonald, Owen Joseph, 051 Mack, Gladys, 003 Maddox, Tyesha, 149 Maginn, Andrew, 119 Makalani, Minkah, 058 Malone, Shoji, 094

31


PARTICIPANT INDEX (Numbers following names indicate session numbers)

Manigault-Bryant, James, 163 Manley, Ruby, 089 Manning, Eric S.C., 129 Marchiel, Rebecca, 193 Marolda, Kenneth Gerard, 125 Martin, Kameelah, 007 Martin, II, Frank C., 110 Masiki, Trent, 022 Mason, Ann, 125 Mason, Michael Gerard, 096, 119 Massenburg, Moses J., 003 Matthews, Lopez, 034, 059, 096, 108 Maxson, Stanley, 138 McCall, Josephine, 080 McCammack, Brian, 163 McClendon III, John H., 073 McCommons, Jillean, 053 McCoy, Austin, 036 McCullum, Kristan, 103, 219 McDaniels III, Ph.D., Pellom, 069, 122 McGee, Vikki, 168 McGill, Joseph, 007 McInnis, Jarvis, 025 McLetchie, Alison, 110 McPherson, Natasha L., 184 Medford, Edna Greene, 003 Meeks, Roshad, 150 Middleton, Rev. Kylon, 226 Milam Brooks, K., 053 Miletsky, Zebulon Vance, 015, 175, 207 Militz-Frielink,, Sarah, 017 Miller, Michael, 224 Miller, Ruth, 080 Mills, JeriDell, 204 Milteer, Warren, 121 Mitchell, Kevin Eugene, 130 Mitchell, Phylissa, 096 Mixon, Gregory Lamont, 015, 124, 174 Mollins, Sophie, 070 Momon, Tiffany Nicole, 011, 172 Montgomery, Dorothy, 077 Moore, Alicia, 017 Moore, Ariel Nicole, 057 Moore, Celeste Day, 109 Moore, Mignon R., 094 Morgan, Lynda J., 137 Morris, Burnis R., 111 Morris, Sammie L., 171 Morrison, Tara, 201 Moten, Crystal M., 024, 217 Mount, Guy Emerson, 049, 109, 147 Muhammad, Dennis, 075 Muhitch, Kevin J., 185 Murch, Donna, 193 Murphy, Kameika, 097 Murray, Carolyn, 129 Musgrove, George Derek, 090, 218

32

Myrick-Harris, Clarrisa Myrick, 053 Narayanan, Pavithra, 115 National Parks, Conservation Association, 013 Neal, La Vonne I., 017 Neal, Mark Anthony, 212 Neal, Misha, 212 Nelson, Brenda, 129 Nelson, Christine B., 010 Nelson, Nichole, 040, 140 Neumann, Alexis Broderick, 142 Newberry, Kymberly, 117 Newby-Alexander, Cassandra, 037, 221 Newport, Melanie, 139 Nichols, Elaine, 097 Nichter, Matthew, 223 Ogbar, Jeffery O.G., 184 Okoro, Nneka, 057 Olivarius, Kathryn, 164 O’Neal, Brittany, 073 Oratokhai, Clifford, 047 Packer, Tiffany, 061 Palmer, Annette C., 003, 155, 224 Parker, Alison, 203 Parker, Traci, 075, 080, 146 Parkinson, Robert, 033 Parler and Friends, Quiana, 156 Parrott, Joseph, 123 Parry, Tyler D., 191 Parsard, Kaneesha, 025 Patterson, Charmayne, 197 Patterson, Cynthia Lee, 044 Patterson, Valerie Lyles, 077 Pedescleaux, Desiree, 179 Pestaina, Khary, 195 Petty, Adrienne M., 071 Petty, Davion, 110 Peyton, Alicea, 039, 080 Phillips, Kenvi, 108 Phillips-Cunningham, Danielle T., 116 Pihos, Peter, 186 Pilgrim, Danya, 121 Pinney, Amy J., 100 Pinnick, Timothy N., 076 Pinsker, Matthew, 029 Pitre, Abul, 198 Placido, Sandy, 065 Polite, Don, 195 Poplin, Eric, 068 Potorti, Mary E, 162 Powers, Jr., Bernard, 007, 099, 224 Pratcher II, Anthony Charles, 040 Prosper, Sony, 096 Pruitt, Bernadette, 174 Pumphrey, Shelby Ray, 142

Quainoo, Matthew, 196 Quarles-Burnely, Naima, 188 Rabb, Madeline, 212 Rabe, Robert “Rob”, 111 Ramsey, Sonya, 066 Ray, Charles J., 102 Reed, Marquita R., 172 Reid, Marquel, 089 Render, Brandon, 118 Rich-Rice, Kim, 125 Rickford, Russell, 192 Riley, Joe, 129 Rivers, Nelson, 224 Rivers Jazz Quartet, The Oscar, 224 Roane, J.T., 120, 163 Roberts, Christopher, 058 Robinson, Brian, 205 Robinson, Cecelia, 125 Robinson, Deborah, 208 Robinson, Gwendolyn Ivory, 176 Robinson, Josephine, 104 Robinson, Spade, 143 Rogers, Ajena, 013 Rogers, Dennis, 044, 157 Rolinson, Mary G., 042 Romine, David, 032 Rorie, Lauren, 195 Rosa, Andrew, 032 Rosario, Ivan, 070 Ross, Nytesia, 204 Rudolph, Kerstin, 075 Ruffins, Fath Davis, 095 Russell, Anita D., 080 Sanders, Crystal R., 079, 182 Sandy, Julia, 033 Sanya, Brenda N., 123 Savage, Barbara, 042 Schlabach, Betsy, 093 Scott, Darius, 138 Scott, Elsie L., 179 Scott, Khirsten, 150 Scott, Michelle R., 135, 210 Scott, Pat, 204 Sears, Stephanie, 197 Seely, Julie L., 080 Selden, Brigadier General Sally, 014 Sellers, Bakari, 220, 224 Sengstacke Rice, Myiti, 079 SenGupta, Gunja, 216 Shabazz, Amilcar, 174 Shakir, Ameenah, 046 Shaw, Stephanie, 203 Shaw, Todd, 179 Shell, Christopher M., 195 Shepard, Robert, 114


PARTICIPANT INDEX (Numbers following names indicate session numbers)

Shepherd, Anita Moore, 003 Sheppard, Polly, 129 Shields, David S., 130 Shonekan, Stephanie Uka, 117, 146 Simmons, Lakisha, 217 Simmons-Hutchins, Brenda R., 224 Simpson, Amari T., 053, 143 Simms Marsh, Susan, 003, 158 Skjellum, Hannah, 167 Slade, Juana, 178, 201 Slaughter, Christine, 098 Smallwood, Arwin, 101, 205 Smardz Frost, Karolyn, 153 Smethurst, James, 117, 146 Smith, Daniel, 080 Smith, Gilbert, 003, 155, 158 Smith, Marshanda, 131 Smith, Maxine, 226 Smith, Shanna Louise, 148 Snider, Joleene “Jo” Maddox, 080, 204 Spears, Alan, 013, 014 Spencer Adams, Tessa, 156 Springle, Kimberly, 069 Stanton, Robert, 194 Steinbock-Pratt, Sarah, 147 Steptoe, Tyina, 040, 174 Stevenson, Brenda E., 035, 221 Stewart, James B., 137, 192 Stewart, Shawanda, 048 Stiefel, Barry Louis, 072 Stinson, Jennifer Kirsten, 125 Strayhorn, Joshua, 065 Strecker, Damien, 022 Stubbs, Rebecca, 101 Sturkey, William, 049 Sublett Knight, Angela, 115 Summey, Keith, 014 Surratt, Greg, 129 Swails, D’Ondre, 030 Swinton, Rev. William, 129 Talley-Matthews, Sheikia, 103 Tandy, Kisha, 214 Taylor, Deitrah Joye, 100 Taylor, Jennifer R., 067 Taylor, Karen Denise, 043, 069 Taylor, Keeanga-Yamahtta, 139, 140, 193, 218 Taylor, Kieran W., 010 Taylor, Ula Y., 032, 074 Taylor, Valerie, 148 Taylor Smith, Tiffany, 173 Teague, Janira, 035 Teasdell, Annette, 072, 125 Tecklenburg, John, 156 Thevenin, Rose C., 015, 051, 195 Thomas, Felicia, 055, 121, 189 Thomas, Najmah, 012

Thomas-Houston, Marilyn Miller, 189 Thompson, Albert, 196 Thompson, Tyechia, 189 Thompson, Valarie, 112 Thorpe, Angela, 190 Thurston, Courtnie N., 125 Tillis, Gina, 048 Tindal, Brenda, 136 Todd-Breland, Elizabeth, 080, 200 Toh, Eunice, 044 Torres, Bianki, 117 Toscano, Ellyn M., 216 Tounsel, Christopher, 072 Tounsel, Timeka Nicol, 183 Towne, Carlie, 012 Trent, Mary, 116 Trotter, Joe W., 079 Troy, Alexis, 026 Tucker, Erinn D., 030, 044 Tucker-Price, Cori, 065 Tuitt, Kelenne, 080 Turner, Nicole Myers, 142 Turner, Sasha, 164 Tuuri, Rebecca, 080, 090 Underwood, JaMarcus, 031 Vann, Brenda, 125 Vaughn, Gladys Gary, 003 Vela, David, 014 Venters, Louis, 080, 201 von Daacke, Kirt, 049 Wade, Jasmine, 184 Walcott, Dekalb, 080 Walker, Krista Lorraine, 125 Walker, Sheila, 037 Wall, Cheryl A., 216 Walton, David Mathew, 104 Wang, Chenyu, 098, 219 Ward, Jervette, 092 Warren Hill, Laura, 024 Washington, Carolyn, 113 Washington, Imam Hamid, 054 Washington, Margaret, 203 Waters, Brandi, 210 Watkins-Kenney, Sarah, 190 Watson, Jamal, 033 Watson, Larry D., 009 Watson-Vandiver, Marcia, 103 Waugh, Dwana, 133 Weaver, Harold “Hal” Dodson, 105 Webster, Crystal Lynn, 151 Weimer, Keith, 096 Wellman, Darien, 205 Wells, Brandy Thomas, 105, 195 Wells, Maleah Aujenae, 173 West, Donald, 045 West, James, 032 West, Lori M., 152

West-Olatungi, Cirecie A., 215 Weston, Guy-Oreido, 072, 125 Weston, Joan, 212 Wharton-Beck, Aura, 152 Whipper, Lucille, 045 White, Carolyn, 156 White, Clark Deaconbluz, 039 White, Deborah Gray, 049 White, Derrick, 015, 080 White, Linda Crichlow, 144 White, Monica, 163 White, Tara, 015, 175 Wiggan, Greg, 072, 103 Wiley, Amaela T., 076 Wiley, Amber N., 068 Williams, Arzelia, 125 Williams, Audrey Perry, 125 Williams, Carmen Lanos, 117 Williams, Jeffery, 050 Williams, Junius, 080 Williams, Karyn L., 046 Williams, Lauren, 198 Williams, Lillian S., 203 Williams, Robert Franks, 151 Williams, Ronald, 015, 218 Williams, Sonja, 077, 080 Williams, Teona, 163 Williamson, Terrion L., 217 Willis, Ajanae, 101 Willis, Deborah, 216 Wilson, Carlton, 057, 155 Wilson, Christina S., 046 Wilson, Evelyn L., 121 Wilson, Francille Rusan, 042, 074 Wilson, Tiana, 118 Wilson-Carr, Nicole, 046 Winford, Brandon K., 074, 145 Wingfield-Smith, Danielle, 219 Wise Whitehead, Karsonya, 003, 017, 155, 185 Woods, Cheylon Karrina, 088, 136, 170 Wooten, Terrance, 094 Wright, Clarence, 156 Wright, Joshua K., 034 Wright Rigueur, Leah, 218 Xie, Yi, 105 Yezou, Cecile Florence, 146 Young, Jason, 106 Young, Lisa, 040 Young, Paulette C., 216 Zehyoue, Elijah, 020 Zelaya, Karla, 022

33


SESSION INDEX Wednesday, October 2, 2019 001.

7:00 am to 4:30 pm

Tour

CC - Convention Center Entrance by the Flag Pole

PRE-CONFERENCE “RECONSTRUCTION/GULLAH BEAUFORT ” AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE BUS TOUR. Sponsored by Dominion Energy and the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom

002.

8:30 am to 4:00 pm

Meeting

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE TRAINING. Moderator: Turkiya Lowe, National Park Service

003.

9:30 am to 3:30 pm

Meeting

CC - Ballroom C2 – 1st floor - AV Room

ASALH EXECUTIVE COUNCIL MEETING. Chair: Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, ASALH President & Harvard University Sylvia Y. Cyrus, ASALH Executive Director Jeffrey A. Banks, ASALH Executive Council & Margaret & Robert Garner Branch (Cincinnati) Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, John Jay College / ASALH Executive Council Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, ASALH Executive Council & University of Illinois Zende Larmar Clark, ASALH Executive Council & Manhattan Branch LaNesha DeBardelaben, ASALH Executive Council Natanya Duncan, Lehigh University Barbara Spencer Dunn, ASALH Vice President for Membership Sheila Flemming-Hunter, ASALH Executive Council & Black Rose Foundation for Children Bettye J. Gardner, ASALH Executive Council Jarvis R. Givens, ASALH Executive Council & Harvard University Cheryl Renee Gooch, ASALH Executive Council Robert L. Harris, Africana Studies and Research Center Cornell University Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston Anton Decore House, ASALH Executive Council & Delaware State University Eric R. Jackson, Northern Kentucky University & ASALH Executive Council Lionel Kimble, ASALH Vice President for Programs, Chicago State University Gladys Mack, ASALH Executive Council Susan Sims Marsh, ASALH Executive Council Moses J. Massenburg, Michigan State University Edna Greene Medford, Howard University Annette C. Palmer, Morgan State University Anita Moore Shepherd, ASALH Executive Council & James Weldon Johnson Branch Gilbert Smith, ASALH Treasurer Gladys Gary Vaughn, ASALH Executive Council Karsonya Wise Whitehead, ASALH Secretary, Loyola University Maryland 004.

1:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Registration

CC - Ballroom Foyer A– 1st floor

WEDNESDAY CONFERENCE REGISTRATION. 005.

1:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Registration

CC - Meeting Room 3 – 1st floor

WEDNESDAY ONSITE CONFERENCE REGISTRATION.

34


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2019 006.

1:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Registration CC - Meeting Room 03 – 1st floor - Onsite Registration WEDNESDAY ONSITE REGISTRATION.

007.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 06 – 2nd floor - AV Room

MAGNIFYING THE POWER OF PLACE IN CHARLESTON THROUGH AFRICAN AMERICAN PUBLIC HISTORY. Chair: Dr. Kameelah Martin, Director, African American Studies, College of Charleston Presenters: Joy Bivens, International African American Museum Dr. Faye Jensen, Executive Director, South Carolina Historical Society Joseph McGill, Slave Dwelling Project Bernard Powers, Jr., College of Charleston, Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston 008.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

KISSING COUSINS: THE CHARLESTON-NEW ORLEANS CONNECTION VIA THE AFRICAN DIASPORA. Chair: Courtney Pierre Joseph, Lake Forest College Participants: The African Diaspora Reflected in Migrations Between Charleston and New Orleans. Laura Rosanne Adderley, Tulane University The Curious Relations of Charleston and New Orleans: The Marriages of Gaillards and Bahams. Eva Semien Baham, Dillard University Charleston-New Orleans Migrations: Black Families in Slavery and Freedom. Felice Knight, The Citadel Commentator: Shannon Eaves, College of Charleston 009.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Workshop

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

CONFERENCE WORKSHOP: THE SOUTH CAROLINA AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE COMMISSION: A MODEL FOR PRESERVING THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Chair: W. Marvin Dulaney, ASALH Marvin Dulaney Branch (Dallas/Ft. Worth) Leaders: Jannie Harriot, South Carolina African American Heritage Commission Ramon Jackson, South Carolina African American Heritage Commission Dawn Marie Dawson-House, SC Dept of Parks, Recreation & Tourism Larry D. Watson, South Carolina State University 010.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2018

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

I AM SOMEBODY: THE CHARLESTON HOSPITAL STRIKE, 1969. Moderator: Kieran W. Taylor, 1966 Commentators: Louise Brown, Local 1199B/Strike Veteran Christine B. Nelson, ILA Local 1422/Health Care Worker

35 35


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2019 011.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

FOOTSTEPS IN THE DARK: USING MATERIAL CULTURE TO ILLUMINATE THE MOVEMENTS OF THE ENSLAVED IN CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA. Chair: Tiffany Nicole Momon, Middle Tennessee State University Participants: The Emancipation of Quash: Reconstructing the Charles Pinckney Mansion Through the Skill of Master Carpenter John Williams. Tiffany Nicole Momon, Middle Tennessee State University Conceptualizing Black Movement in Charleston, South Carolina: Slave Badges and their Impact on the Formation of Culture. Torren Gatson, Middle Tennessee State University Remnants Realized: Re-thinking African American Wares in Charleston. J. Grahame Long, The Charleston Museum Struggling to Hear the Huckster’s Call: Finding the Voices of Charleston’s Black Entrepreneurs, 1800-1850. Heather Butina-Sutton, University of Houston Commentator: Torren Gatson, Middle Tennessee State University 012.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

HISTORICAL EFFECTS OF MIGRATION ON GULLAH/GEECHEE CULTURAL CONTINUATION. Chair: Queen Quet Marquetta L. Goodwine, Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition Presenters: Carlie Towne, Gullah/Geechee Angel Network Jessica R. Berry, South Carolina State University Najmah Thomas, University of South Carolina Beaufort 013.

4:30 pm to 6:30 pm

Plenary Session

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

NPS FORUM: A PEOPLE MOVING: HOW THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE AND PRESERVATIONISTS TELL THE STORY OF BLACK MIGRATIONS. Moderator: Alan Spears, NPCA Conservation Association National Parks, National Parks Conservation Association Presenters: Brent Leggs, African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund of the Trust for Historic Preservation Stephanie Deutsch, Independent Scholar Enimini Ekong, National Park Service John W. Franklin, Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture Deanda Johnson, National Park Service Ajena Rogers, NPS, Maggie Walker National Historic Site (VA) 014.

7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Reception

CC - Ballroom B - 1st Floor

OPENING NIGHT RECEPTION WEDNESDAY. Emcee: Mr. Raphael James, News Anchor, WCSC-TV, Channel 5 (CBS) Participant: Mr. David Vela, National Park Service Acting Deputy Director of Operations Greetings: Dr. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, ASALH President & Dean of the History Department, Harvard University Mayor Keith Summey, City of North Charleston Ms. Julia-Ellen Craft Davis, LAC Co-Chair and Charleston Area Branch President Brigadier General Sally Selden, Ph.D., SPHR, The Citadel (The Military College of South Carolina) Ms. Brenda Lauderback, Chair, Board of Directors, Denny’s Inc. Welcome: Ms. Sylvia Y. Cyrus, Executive Director, ASALH Mr. Kristopher King, Preservation Society of Charleston Welcome and Occasion: Mr. Alan Spears, National Parks Conservation Association

36


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 015.

9:00 pm to 11:00 pm

Meeting

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

MEETING OF THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM COMMITTEE. Chairs: Zebulon Vance Miletsky, Stony Brook University Natanya Duncan, Lehigh University Participant: Hilary N. Green, University of Alabama Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University Markeysha Dawn Davis, University of Hartford Tara White, WCCS Rose C. Thevenin, Florida Memorial University Eric R. Jackson, Northern Kentucky University & ASALH Executive Council Simon Balto, University of Iowa Johnnieque Love, University of Maryland Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston Michael Blum, Independent Scholar Devin Fergus, University of Missouri LaShawn Harris, Michigan State University Jeffrey Helgeson, Texas State University Derrick White, Dartmouth College Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, ASALH Executive Council & University of Illinois Jarvis R. Givens, ASALH Executive Council & Harvard University Gregory Lamont Mixon, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Shawn Alexander, University of Kansas Ronald Williams, University of North Carolina Patrick Jones, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Leader: Lionel Kimble, ASALH Vice President for Programs, Chicago State University

Thursday, October 3, 2019 016.

7:00 am to 11:45 am

Tour

CC - Convention Center Entrance by the Flag Pole

BLACK HISTORY AND GULLAH GEECHEE CULTURE TOUR OF CHARLESTON. Sponsored by Dominion Energy and the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom

017.

8:00 am to 3:50 pm

Teacher’s Workshop

CC - Ballroom C2/C3 – 1st floor - AV Room

TEACHER’S WORKSHOP. Teacher’s Workshop Facilitators: La Vonne I. Neal, Northern Illinois University Alicia Moore, Southwestern University Regina Lewis, Pikes Peak Community College Karsonya Wise Whitehead, ASALH Secretary, Loyola University Maryland Sarah Militz-Frielink,, Sanford School of Medicine of The University of South Dakota Conra Gist, University of Houston Kelly Cross, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 018.

8:00 am to 8:30 pm

Registration

CC - Ballroom Foyer A

THURSDAY CONFERENCE REGISTRATION.

37


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 019.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Ballroom A - 1st Floor

REIGN AND RIOT: BLACK WALL STREETS AND THE PAUCITY OF PUBLIC MEMORY. Chair: Rhana A. Gittens, Georgia State University Participants: The Tulsa Massacre: An Illustrated History. Karlos Hill, University of Oklahoma Black Durham: An Often Forgotten Black Wall Street. Jim Harper, North Carolina Central University Commentator: Kimberly Bender, Heurich House Museum 020.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

IN SLAVERY AND FREEDOM: EXPLORING MIGRATION IN THE AFRICAN DIASPORA. Chair: Jeffrey Robert Kerr-Ritchie, Howard University Participants: Eola Dance, “Captive or Bound?” Contesting the Legal Status of Africans in the Chesapeake 1619 –1661. Eola Dance, National Park Service The Problem of Race in Liberia and the US. Elijah Zehyoue, Howard University African Americans versus Haitian Americans in the modern United States. Shafantae Desinord, Howard University Commentator: Mary Elliott, Howard University 021.

8:30 am to 11:00 am

Teacher’s Workshop

CC - Meeting Room 01 – 1st floor - AV Room

TEACHER’S WORKSHOP STUDENT SESSION. 022.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

MATTERS OF STATE: TRANSNATIONAL NOTIONS OF RACE. Chair: Bob Hayden, President, Martha’s Vineyard Branch Participants: Arturo Alfonso Schomburg: The Transnational Sherlock Holmes of Black History. Jose Ivan Gonzalez, University of Massachusetts Amherst “I do not believe that white [people] are dew-drops just exhaled from the skies”: Early Black Writers on Performative White Allyship. Karla Zelaya, University of North Alabama Edler Hawkins: Community Builder and Civil Rights Activist. Damien Strecker, Fordham University Clarence Clyde Ferguson, Jr: The First African American Ambassador to Uganda, 1970-1972. Trent Masiki, Boston University Commentator: Bob Hayden, President, Martha’s Vineyard Branch 023.

8:30 am to 8:30 pm

Registration CC - Meeting Room 03 – 2nd floor - Onsite Registration THURSDAY ONSITE REGISTRATION.

024.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

MIGRATION AND MOBILITY AT MIDCENTURY: NEW PATHS TO ACTIVISM. Chair: Shannon King, Wooster College Participants: Migration and (Im)Mobility: Stories of Struggle and Resistance in the “Black Midwest”. Crystal M. Moten, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History Migrants Remaking the North: Activism in Rochester, NY, 1940-1970. Laura Warren Hill, Bloomfield College Benjamin A Quarles Intellectual Migration 1953-1978. Joanna Elizabeth Carey, Morgan State University Black Migrations Before the Great Migration. Carolynne Hitter Brown, Gordon-Conwell Seminary Commentator: Shannon King, Wooster College

38


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 025.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK TEXTUAL MIGRATION: LITERATURE, PERFORMANCE AND PRINT CULTURE IN THE BLACK DIASPORA. Chair: Randi Karin Gill-Sadler, Lafayette College Participants: “To form connection”: the Creole woman after West Indian Emancipation. Kaneesha Parsard, University of Chicago Travel, Translation and Black Feminist Ties: Black Transnational Literary Networks in the 1980s. Randi Karin Gill-Sadler, Lafayette College “On the Limits of Transnationalism: Toward a Theory of Blackness and the Nation State”. Julius Fleming, University of Maryland A Corporate Plantation Reading Public: Labor, Literacy, and Diaspora in the Global Black South. Jarvis McInnis, Duke University Commentator: Jarvis McInnis, Duke University 026.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 06 – 2nd floor - AV Room

A HISTORICAL ASSESSMENT UPON THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF DURHAM: BLACK PHYSICIANS, BLACK WOMEN JUDGES, AND A STALWART COMMUNITY ACTIVIST. Chair: Charles Johnson, North Carolina Central University Participants: A History of Black Physicians from Black Medical Schools in Durham. Dana Green, North Carolina Central University Black Women in a Progressive Durham: The History of Durham’s Six African American Women District Court Judges. Alexis Troy, North Carolina Central University Intelligence is the Torch of Wisdom: Dr. E. Lavonia Allison, Black Durham’s Crusader for Justice, 1941-2014. Faith Baxter, North Carolina Central University Commentator: Jim Harper, North Carolina Central University 027.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 07 – 2nd floor - AV Room

MIGRATION AND URBAN RENEWAL IN DETROIT: SCREENING OF WHEN THE SWAN SINGS ON HASTINGS (2019). Commentator: Heather Buchanan, AUXmedia LLC 028.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

MIGRATION AND BLACK INTELLECTUALISM. Chair: TaKeia Anthony, North Carolina Central University Participants: Pan-Africanism: Garvey Vs. Du Bois. Jada Gannaway, North Carolina Central University The Early Black Left and the Black Panther Party. Miranda Clinton, North Carolina Central University Commentator: TaKeia Anthony, North Carolina Central University 029.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

JOURNEYING TOWARDS FREEDOM: THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD AS MIGRATION. Chair: Deanda Johnson, National Park Service Participants: Intersecting Migrations: Freedom Seekers, Native Americans, and the Underground Railroad in Eastern Wisconsin. Roy Finkenbine, University of Detroit Mercy “Slave Stampedes”: The Forgotten Migration Phenomenon. Matthew Pinsker, Dickinson College Fugitive Slaves during the Texas Revolution, 1835–1836. Mekala Audain, The College of New Jersey Commentator: Cheryl Janifer LaRoche, University of Maryland College Park

39


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 030.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

RECLAIMING ONE’S SELF: THE MAKING AND TAKING OF BLACK POWER. Chair: Dr. Erinn D. Tucker, Georgetown SCS - Global Hospitality Leadership Participants: Migrations Made a Movement: A Black Power History of Washington, D.C. Donelle R Boose, American University Black Power/Soft Power: Violence in Radical Historiography. D’Ondre Swails, Brown University Countering ’The Revolt of the Black Athlete”: The Civil Rights-Black Power Revolution in Sports, Media Repression, and the Resolve of Harry Edwards and the OPHR. Dexter Blackman, Morgan State University Rev. George W. and Annie R. Woodbey: Love, Faith, and Black Populism, 1874-1901. Charles Holm, University of Texas at Austin Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 031.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

TO STAY OR TO LEAVE: MIGRATING AND REMAINING IN THE FACE OF RACIAL TERRORISM. Chair: DeWitt Dykes, Oakland University Participants: African American Out-migration from a Southwest Georgia Community. JaMarcus Underwood, Jack Hadley Black History Museum Black Migration: The Audacity to Protect One’s Humanity. Asha Hiwate Jackson, Morgan State University Commentator: DeWitt Dykes, Oakland University 032.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

BIOGRAPHY AND BLACK HISTORY. Chair: Adriane Lentz-Smith, Duke University Presenters: David Romine, Duke University Andrew Rosa, Western Kentucky University Katherine Charron, North Carolina State University Ula Y. Taylor, University of California Berkeley Jonathon Fenderson, Washington University of St. Louis James West, Northumbria University, UK 033.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

THE GEOGRAPHY OF RACE AND RIGHTS IN 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN CITIES. Chair: Robert Parkinson, Binghamton University Participants: The Black Press: Advocating for Gender and Racial Equality during the Civil Rights Movement. Jamal Watson, University of Massachusetts Amherst Intersections of Food and Gender in the New Orleans Civil Rights Movement. Jacqueline Castledine, University of Massachusetts Amherst Closing the Distance: Black New Yorkers and the Power of Place. Julia Sandy, Shepherd University Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH

40


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 034.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

“TELL THEM WE ARE RISING”: AN ORAL HISTORY OF THE VIRGINIA INTERSCHOLASTIC ASSOCIATION, 1954-1970. Chair: Lopez Matthews, Howard University Presenters: Joshua K. Wright, University of Maryland Eastern Shore Kristal Moore Clemons, Virginia State University Gretchen Givens Generett, Duquesne University Lopez Matthews, Howard University 035.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Paper Session

Ideation – Embassy Suites

WOMEN FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM IN URBAN AMERICA: THREE HISTORIC CASE STUDIES. Chair: Brenda E. Stevenson, UCLA Participants: Winning and Expanding Black Freedom as Migrants in the American West: The Stories of Biddy Mason and Hannah Embers. Marne Campbell, Loyola Marymount University Gender and Expanding the Status of Freedom in New York City: Black Women from Jamaica and the American South During the Era of the Great Migration. Janira Teague, Norfolk State University Rioting and Respectability: Black Women and the New York City Draft Riots of 1863. Marissa A. Jenrich, UCLA Commentator: V.P. Franklin, Former Editor, Journal of African American History 036.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

Wando – Embassy Suites

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND MEMORY OF THE RADICAL 1970s. Chair: Katherine Charron, North Carolina State University Participants: The Mind of the Black South: African American Radicalism Tackles the Post-Civil Rights Era South, 1968-1980. Robert Jerome Greene II, Claflin University Organizing Against the Criminal State: Examining Articulations of Radical Criminology During the 1970s. Austin McCoy, Auburn University YA Literature as Protest: The Hate U Give and the Reconfiguration of Black Power. Holly Genovese, University of Texas at Austin Commentator: Katherine Charron, North Carolina State University

037.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Ballroom A - 1st Floor

KEY SESSION: 1619 AFRICAN ARRIVAL - THEN, WHAT?: THEIR STATUS IN LAW AND SOCIETY. Chair: Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, John Jay College / ASALH Executive Council Presenters: Cassandra Newby-Alexander, Norfolk State University Sheila Flemming-Hunter, ASALH Executive Council & Black Rose Foundation for Children Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, John Jay College / ASALH Executive Council Colita Fairfax, Norfolk State Sheila Walker, Afrodiaspora, Inc.

41


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 038.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

AUTHOR MEETS CRITIC: MARTHA JONES’ BIRTHRIGHT CITIZENS: A HISTORY OF RACE AND RIGHTS IN ANTEBELLUM AMERICA. Chair: Shawn Alexander, University of Kansas Presenters: Mary Frances Berry, University of Pennsylvania Christopher Bonner, University of Maryland Christopher Cameron, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Martha S. Jones, Johns Hopkins University Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts Amherst 039.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS. Chair: Clark Deaconbluz White, Blues Chattanooga Participants: The Evolution of Land-Use Enforcement Related to The Religious Storefront Church Movement. Alicea Peyton, Dominican University The Rise and Fall of the ‘Catfish Empire:’ The Failure of Black Capitalism in Hancock County, GA, 1966-1976. Mark Andrew Huddle, Georgia College Charleston Unchanged: Migration and the New York Roots of the 1969 Charleston Hospital Workers’ Strike. Jewell Debnam, Morgan State University Commentators: ASALH Audience, ASALH 040.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

A PLACE TO CALL MY OWN: URBAN MIGRATION AND BLACK METROPOLITAN HISTORY. Chair: Tyina Steptoe, University of Arizona Presenters: Lisa Young, College of Charleston Anthony Charles Pratcher II, Brown University Nichole Nelson, Yale University 041.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

IN MIGRATION: VOICES OF WRITERS OF COLOR. Chair: Deborah Hollis, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries Participants: The Interracial Books for Children Bulletin – A Bibliography Project. Nicole A. Cooke, School of Library and Information Science, University of South Carolina Revisiting the Uncovering of Black Feminist Writers. Rebecca Louise Hankins, Texas A&M University Mapping Diversity Rhetoric in Academic Libraries. Deborah Hollis, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries Commentator: Deborah Hollis, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries

42


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 042.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 06 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK WOMEN INTELLECTUALS IN COLD WAR ASIA. Chair: Francille Rusan Wilson, University of Southern California, ABWH Director Participants: Merze Tate’s Anti-Imperialist Thought on Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. Barbara Savage, University of Pennsylvania Integrating the US Academy via Defeated Japan, 1951-1953: Sensei Mabel M. Smythe and the Institute of International Education during the early Cold War. Mary G. Rolinson, Georgia State University Teaching for the Revolutions: Vicki Garvin’s Lesson Plans at the Shanghai Institute, the Chinese Revolution and the US Black Liberation Struggle. Dayo F. Gore, University of California, San Diego Commentator: Gerald Horne, University of Houston 043.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 07 – 2nd floor - AV Room

IN THE FACE OF WHAT REMEMBER: ORAL HISTORIES OF 409 AND 555 EDGECOMBE AVENUE. Moderator: Abigail Horne, Hampden-Sydney College Participant: Karen Denise Taylor, Teachers College/While We Are Still Here 044.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

BLACK TRAVEL BEFORE AND AFTER THE GREEN BOOK. Chair: Alison Rose Jefferson, Independent Scholar/Public Historian Participants: “Notes of Travel” in the A.M.E. Church Review 1903-1912: A Precursor to The Green Book? Cynthia Lee Patterson, University of South Florida The Green Book: A Blueprint for Black Wealth Creation and the Black Consumer. Dr. Erinn D. Tucker, Georgetown SCS - Global Hospitality Leadership; Dennis Rogers, Washington, D.C. The Green Book: Documenting Black Mobility During Jim Crow. Eunice Toh, Penn State University Commentator: Alison Rose Jefferson, Independent Scholar/Public Historian 045.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

AVERY: THE SPIRIT THAT WOULD NOT DIE, 1865-2015. Chair: Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston Presenters: Lucille Whipper, Avery Institute Board Donald West, Trident Technical College Daron Lee Calhoun, College of Charleston Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston 046.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

“HER VIEW FROM THE MOUNTAINTOP: ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL BLACK WOMEN MIGRANTS TO MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA”. Chair: Ameenah Shakir, Florida A&M University Presenters: Krystal D. F. Akehinmi, Tennessee Technological University Lauri Andress, West Virginia University Amy Alvarez, West Virginia University W Constinia Charbonnette, West Virginia University Karyn L. Williams, ASALH Nicole Wilson-Carr, West Virginia University Medicine Christina S. Wilson, West Virginia University School of Medicine

43


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 047.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

FREEDOM MOVEMENTS: MIGRATION AND BLACK AGENCY IN THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE. Chair: Jeffrey Robert Kerr-Ritchie, Howard University Participants: Striking for Freedom: The Stono Rebellion and Movement to the Spanish Colonies. Gigi Davis, Howard University Complex Migration: Contraband Camps, Confinement and Control. Keshad Adeniyi “Ife” Adeniyi “Nira”, Howard University Moving On: African American Women and Migration at the Intersection of Race and Gender. Clifford Oratokhai, Howard University Commentator: Mary Elliott, Howard University 048.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

E(RACE)-ING BLACK SPACE: THE HISTORIC AND CONTEMPORARY DYNAMICS OF RACIAL DISPLACEMENT AND DISPOSSESSION. Chair: Gina Tillis, University of Texas at Austin Participants: The Struggle is Real: A Case of Black Landowners’ Land Dispossession and the Manifestation of Racism in America. Shawanda Stewart, Huston-Tillotson University Black Migration: Leaving the South and Moving North--Body, Mind and Spirit. Julie Hudson, Huston-Tillotson University Black Land Matters: Tucker’s Town and Touristic Gentrification in the British Colony of Bermuda. Theodore Francis, HustonTillotson University Contextualizing the urban HBCU community: Implications of the anti-Black urban plan to displace the historically Black neighborhood. Gina Tillis, University of Texas at Austin Commentator: Gina Tillis, University of Texas at Austin 049.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK PUBLIC HISTORY AT AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES. Chair: Deborah Gray White, Rutgers University Presenters: Adam Domby, College of Charleston Hilary N. Green, University of Alabama Guy Emerson Mount, Auburn University William Sturkey, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Kirt Von Daacke, University of Virginia 050.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

MIGRATION AND MEMORY. Chair: Jeffery Williams, University of South Carolina Participants: “Colored Lawyer, Topeka, Kansas”: Elisha Scott Biblical Hell Raiser. Jeffery Williams, University of South Carolina Little Africa, HogBottom, and “Walking The Nickel”: Dayton’s Iconic Black Settlements. Omopé Carter-Daboiku, Paul Laurence Dunbar Branch; Larry Crowe, Independent Scholar Moving Beyond Industry: Scholarships That Funded the Great Migration. Francis Gourrier, Kenyon College We Had All We Needed: The African American Presence in Buffalo, NY. Mark Dabney, SUNY Buffalo State. Y.W.C.A. Responses to Racist Violence Against African American Urban Migrants, 1945 to 1955. Kimberly D. Hill, University of Texas at Dallas Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH

44


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 051.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

Cooper – Embassy Suites

DETAILING THE HISTORY OF 20TH-CENTURY TRANSNATIONAL BLACK RADICALISM: HIDDEN STORIES AND CRITICAL LESSONS OF DIASPORIC BLACK ACTIVISM. Chair: Nemata Amelia Blyden, George Washington University Participants: “Santo Domingo Is Already Tied Hand and Foot […] But Haiti Is Proud”. Lauren Hammond-Ford, Augustana College Through the Prism of the Harlem Ashram: Afro-Asian-Caribbean Connections in Transnational Circulation. Malathi Iyengar, College of San Mateo Transnational Labor Ideologies Among Former Black Jamaican Emigrant Workers Who Returned to Jamaica 1933-1938. Philip A Howard, University of Houston Revolutionary TransNationalism: The Revolutionary Action Movement in Brazil and the United States. Owen Joseph MacDonald, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Commentator: Rose C. Thevenin, Florida Memorial University 052.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

Ideation – Embassy Suites

MOVE & STICK: FEEDING THE SOUL, MIND & BODY ACROSS THE DIASPORA. Chair: Donnetrice Allison, Stockton University Participants: Crossing the Pond: The Negro Press and the Lure of Europe During the Harlem Renaissance. Jacqueline Jones Compaore, Francis Marion University Sugah en mi tank: Hoppin’ John, Johnny Cakes, Bammy and Cou Cou. Ramona La Roche, AARLCC Broward County Libraries Fighting the “Silent Killer”: Hypertension, Diet and Black Radical Politics in the 1970s. Jerome Kern Dotson, University of Arizona, Africana Studies Program Commentator: Prince Brown, Professor Emeritus 053.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

Wando – Embassy Suites

THE POWER OF BLACK HISTORY IN “WHITE” PLACES: FIGHTING THE ERASURE OF BLACK COMMUNITY HISTORIES ACROSS THE UNITED STATES. Chair: Clarrisa Myrick Myrick-Harris, Lincoln University Participants: Black Power in Appalachia: The Black Appalachian Commission. Jillean McCommons, University of Kentucky Black Scranton Project: Archiving the Black Heritage of Scranton, Pennsylvania. Glynis M. Johns, Rutgers University Black Studies in a White Utopia: The Dystopian Effects of Migration and Outmigration. Shirley A. Jackson, Portland State University Black Roots: Addressing Heritage and Lineage through the Usability an App. K Milam Brooks, University of Illinois at Chicago; Amari T. Simpson, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 054.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Luncheon

CC - Ballroom B - 1st Floor

JONATHAN GREEN LUNCHEON. Emcee: Mrs. Cynthia Alston Bell, Senior Marketing Consultant, Cumulus Media Invocation & Grace: Rev. Dr. Isaac J. Holt, Jr., Pastor, Royal Missionary Baptist Church Greetings: Ms. Heather Hodges, Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Dr. Gerrita Postlewait, Superintendent, Charleston County School District Ms. Dot Scott, President, Charleston Branch, NAACP Welcome and Occasion: Dr. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, President of ASALH & Dean of the History Department, Harvard University Introducer: Mrs. Rita Scott, Retired General Manager, WCSC-TV (Channel 5) Guest Speaker: Mr. Jonathan Green, Ambassador of the Arts for the City of Charleston Closing Minister: Imam Hamid Washington, Masjid Al-Jami Ar-Rasheed

45


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 055.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Roundtable

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

LUNCHTIME LEARN: STEAL AWAY TO FREEDOM: HARRIET TUBMAN AND THE COMBAHEE RIVER RAID. Chair: Felicia Thomas, Morgan State University Presenters: Elizabeth Cobbs, Texas A&M University Jeff W. Grigg, Independent Scholar Kenneth Folden Hodges, Harriet Tubman Monument Edda L. Fields-Black, Carnegie Mellon University Cheryl Janifer LaRoche, University of Maryland College Park 056.

12:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Exhibitor

CC - Ballroom Foyer B

THURSDAY EXHIBITORS Please support our exhibitors. For a list, visit page 25. 057.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

LEARNING LUNCH: AFROEUROPEANS’ BLACK CULTURE AND IDENTITIES IN THE DIGITAL AGE. Chair: Lydia Lindsey, North Carolina Central University Presenters: Lydia Lindsey, North Carolina Central University Carlton Wilson, North Carolina Central University Ariel Nicole Moore, North Carolina Central University Beverly Boone, North Carolina Central Univ Nneka Okoro, North Carolina Central University 058.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Workshop

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

LEARNING LUNCH - BLACK OBJECT LESSONS: DIASPORIC VERNACULAR ARCHIVES AND MATERIAL CULTURE. Leaders: Tao Leigh Goffe, Cornell University Minkah Makalani, University of Texas Westenley Alcenat, Fordham University Christopher Roberts, Brown University 059.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Workshop

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

LEARNING LUNCH: TEACHING THE MIDDLE PASSAGE. Chair: Lopez Matthews, Howard University Leader: LaGarrett King, University of Missouri

060.

1:45 pm to 1:55 pm

Pop-up Talk

CC - Meeting Room 07 - Outside

WOODSON WORKS: FOR TRAVELIN’ PEOPLE: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE GREEN BOOK IN DETROIT. Presenter: Jamon Jordan, Black Scroll Network History & Tours 061.

2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

ZORA NEALE HURSTON: JUMP AT THE SUN. Moderators: Tiffany Packer, Florida A&M University Sharony Green, University of Alabama

46


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 062.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 01 – 1st floor - AV Room

“BLACK PASSPORTS”: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON BLACK TRAVEL AND MIGRATIONS ABROAD. Chair: Stephanie Y. Evans, Georgia State University Participants: Digital Pan-Africanism: How Online Communities are Creating New Opportunities for African American Travel. Christina Afia Harris, Temple University Exploring the Intersection of Black Women’s Travel Abroad and Black Education Thought. Dellyssa Edinboro, University of Iowa Migration, Black Agency and the Soviets. Joy Gleason Carew, University of Louisville Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 063.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

DETROIT DREAMS: THE AUTOMOBILE AND MIGRATIONS TO THE MOTOR CITY. Chair: Jamon Jordan, Black Scroll Network History & Tours Participants: The Automobile: The Escape Mechanism for the Great Migration. Aubrey P. Jones, Virginia Union University Mothering the Race: Racial Uplift and Motherhood in Interwar Detroit. Morgan Carlton, University of Michigan The Great Migration, The U.N.I.A., and Black Business Growth in Detroit, Michigan. Kendra D. Boyd, York University Commentator: Jamon Jordan, Black Scroll Network History & Tours 064.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

“(IM)MIGRATION STORIES IN ACADEMIC SETTINGS FROM HAITI, BRAZIL, AND THE U.S.” Chair: Dr. Lisa Bratton, Tuskegee University Participants: “Black (Un)Like Me”: When Students’ National Origin and Linguistic History Trumped Race in 1940s Baltimore.” Zanice Bond, Tuskegee University “Examining Culturally Responsive Teaching in Business and Educational Settings in the South Coast of Haiti.” Ivon Alcime, Alabama State University “Afro-Brazilian Women Educators’ Interconnected Struggles in Higher Education.” Maraci G Aubel, University of Kansas Commentator: Dr. Lisa Bratton, Tuskegee University 065.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

REMAKING RELIGION AFTER MIGRATION: ENTREPRENEURSHIP, CLASS CONFLICT, AND MUSICAL MODERNISM IN THE BLACK MIGRATION EXPERIENCE. Chair: Glenn Chambers, Michigan State University Participants: Biddy Mason’s Zion: Religion and Black Urban Life in Los Angeles, 1851-1906. Cori Tucker-Price, Harvard University This Ain’t Our Church: An Analysis of Intra-racial relations in Chicago. Joshua Strayhorn, Duke University Modernism, Migration, and Black Religious Music: Thomas A. Dorsey and Contemporary Gospel during the Great Migration. Jonathan Gomez, Harvard University Commentator: Sandy Placido, Oberlin College

47


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 066.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 06 – 2nd floor - AV Room

MIGRATION AS FREEDOM, OPPORTUNITY, AND REVITALIZATION: BLACK WOMEN COMMUNITY INSTITUTION BUILDERS IN THE SOUTH, 1890-2010. Chair: Prudence Cumberbatch, Brooklyn College Participants: Lucy Craft Laney and the Lessons of Freedom, 1890s-1930s. Janaka Lewis, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Restoring What’s Lost: Bertha Maxwell-Roddey, The Creation of the Afro-American Cultural and Service Center, Educational Activism and the Impact of Reverse Migration in Charlotte. Sonya Ramsey, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Revitalized Community: Nashville’s Bordeaux Neighborhood Since the 2010 Flood- Ruby Baker, Restoring a Community Residential Association to Impact Community Recovery. Deidre Hill Butler, Union College Commentator: Prudence Cumberbatch, Brooklyn College 067.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 07 – 2nd floor - AV Room

LYNCHING IN AMERICA: THE GREAT MIGRATION. Commentators: Jennifer R. Taylor, Equal Justice Initiative Kiara Boone, Equal Justice Initiative Tarabu Kirkland, 100 Years From Mississippi 068.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Special Session

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

REVISITING AFRICAN AMERICAN SITES: PLACES WITH POWERFUL AND PROVOCATIVE STORIES TO TELL. Moderator: Bettye J Gardner, ASALH Executive Council Participants: Master Cooperative Agreement National Park Service and ASALH. Turkiya Lowe, National Park Service Carter G. Woodson Home NHL Update. Amber N. Wiley, Woodson Home National Historic Site Cowpens National Battlefield. Eric Poplin, Cowpens National Battlefield Commentator: Barbara Spencer Dunn, ASALH Vice President for Membership 069.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BRIDGING BLACK EDUCATION NARRATIVES-NORTH AND SOUTH- THROUGH ARCHIVES, DIGITAL MEDIA, MUSEUMS, AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION. Chair: Neil Flanagan, Independent Scholar Participants: Rapid Response Collecting: DC Public School Museum’s Commitment to Preserving Black Educational Legacies. Kimberly Springle, Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives Blazing the Path: Establishing a Foundation for Preserving South Carolina’s Black Cultural Heritage. Jannie Harriot, South Carolina African American Heritage Commission Illuminating the Voices and Impact of Black Educators. Pellom McDaniels III, Ph.D., Emory University, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, & Rare Book Library School Stories and their Communities: The Harlem Education History Project. Karen Denise Taylor, Teachers College/While We Are Still Here Commentator: Kimberly Springle, Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives

48


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 070.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

LIVING BLACK POWER, LEARNING BLACK POWER. Chair: John H. Bracey, University of Massachusetts Amherst Presenters: Alexander Horton, University of Massachusetts Mtalika “Mtali” Banda, University of Massachusetts Amherst Sophie Mollins, University of Massachusetts Amherst Paul E. Fowler, University of Massachusetts Amherst Ivan Rosario, University of Massachusetts Amherst Hannah Kaplan, University of Massachusetts Amherst 071.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

FREEDOM TO FARM: AFRICAN AMERICAN LANDOWNING WOMEN AND MEN FROM RECONSTRUCTION TO JIM CROW. Chair: Kenneth M Hamilton, Southern Methodist University Participants: The Family Farm and Keeping House: Black Women Landowners in Liberty County, Georgia, 1870-1900. Felicia Jamison, University of Maryland College Park Road Warriors: Recapturing Free(d) Black Labor in McIntosh County Georgia. Allison Dorsey, Swarthmore College From City to Country: Black Urbanites and the Quest for Land in South Carolina. Adrienne M. Petty, College of William & Mary Commentator: Cherisse Jones-Branch, Arkansas State University 072.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

K.O.S.: KNOWLEDGE OF SELF. Chair: Guy-Oreido Weston, Rutgers University Participants: Fugitives No More: A Comparative Study of Maroon Heritage Preservation. Barry Louis Stiefel, College of Charleston Negro Canaan: Tuskegee, Leigh Hunt, and the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. Christopher Tounsel, Pennsylvania State University Theorizing the Global Potential and Oppression of Black Diasporic Groups: Introducing BlackCrit. Chonika Coleman-King, University of Tennessee; Janet Awokoya, California Lutheran University “Re-membering” The Teachings of PtahHotep: Educational Implications of the Oldest Book in the World. Annette Teasdell, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Greg Wiggan, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 073.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

INTELLECTUAL MIGRATIONS AND THE HISTORY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY AND PHILOSOPHERS. Chair: Stephen C Ferguson, North Carolina State University Participants: The Definition of African American Philosophy: Historical Dimensions on Intellectual Migration. John H. McClendon III, Michigan State University Beyond Alain Locke: Discovery, Recovery, and Reconstruction of African American Philosophy. Stephen C. Ferguson, North Carolina State University William R. Jones’ Contribution to African American Philosophy. Brittany O’Neal, Lehman College Commentators: Andre Key, Claflin University Brittany O’Neal, Lehman College

49


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 074.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

AUTHOR MEETS THE CRITICS: BANKING ON FREEDOM: BLACK WOMEN IN U. S. FINANCE BEFORE THE NEW DEAL. Chair: Tiffany Gill, University of Delaware Presenters: Francille Rusan Wilson, University of Southern California Brandon K. Winford, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Shennette Garrett-Scott, University of Mississippi Ula Y. Taylor, University of California Berkeley 075.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Paper Session

Cooper – Embassy Suites

MIGRATION STORIES AND IMAGINED FREEDOMS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN WRITINGS FROM THE MID WEST TO THE URBAN NORTH. Chair: Marcia Garrison, ASALH Margaret and Robert Garner Branch (Cincinnati) Participants: Imagined Horizons in African-American Art: Migrations between Space and Time in Search of Liberation. Markeysha Dawn Davis, University of Hartford The Street as a Place of Multiethnic Encounters and Migration in Turn-of-the-Century African American Literature. Kerstin Rudolph, Catawba College Black Migrations Fueling The Nation of Islam In the West. Dennis Muhammad, n/a The Boykin and Whittaker Family Legacy: The Benefactors from the Great Migration. Peter Boykin, Wayne County Community College District From Black Mecca to Urban Countryside: Black Migration to the Soundview Section of the Bronx. Siobhan Carter-David, Southern Connecticut State University Commentator: Traci Parker, University of Massachusetts Amherst 076.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Paper Session

Ideation – Embassy Suites

RACE, PLACE AND SPACE AND THE MIGRATION OF AFRICAN PEOPLES. Chair: Amaela T Wiley, Howard University Participants: A Drum Major for Black Adult Education: Alain L. Locke. Bob Hayden, President, Martha’s Vineyard Branch Migration and the African American Coal Miner: Findings from Three Late Nineteenth Century Communities. Timothy N. Pinnick, Independent Scholar Persistence, Politics, and Politeness: Strategies Used by African American Networks’ to Develop K-16 Educational Institutions in the Segregated St. Louis Middle-Class Neighborhood—The Ville. Vanessa Garry, University of Missouri-St. Louis The Great Migrations: How The Black Press Covered and Influenced Movements for Freedom and Advancement Via Migration. Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 077.

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Paper Session

Wando – Embassy Suites

SEEKING FREEDOM IN MANY LANDS: MULTIETHNIC BLACK (INTRA-)MIGRATION, COMMUNITY BUILDING, AND ACTIVISM FROM THE SOUTH TO THE NORTH. Chair: Constance L. Diggs, Nyack College/Alliance Theological Seminary Participants: “Geecheesau – Bicultural South to South and South to North Migrations in Sunny South Florida. Valerie Lyles Patterson, Florida International University The Little Town That Unity Built. Martha Russell Bireda, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte Oona Weary Ones, Com on Home and Rest. Dorothy Montgomery, Charleston; Sonja Williams, Howard University Commentator: Zoe Burkholder, Montclair State University

50


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2019 078.

3:35 pm to 3:45 pm

Pop-up Talk

CC - Outside Ballroom A

WOODSON WORKS: CONFEDERATE STATUES, AFRICAN-AMERICAN TERROR AND THE BLACK EXODUS NORTHWARD. Presenter: Kali Holloway, “The Make It Right” project 079.

4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Plenary Session

CC - Ballroom A - 1st Floor

PLENARY: MOVING, MARCHING WHILE MAKING THE BEAT: A CENTURY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN MIGRATIONS. Moderator: Lionel Kimble, ASALH Vice President for Programs, Chicago State University Presenters: Joe W. Trotter, Carnegie Mellon University Farah Jasmine Griffin, Columbia University Crystal R. Sanders, Pennsylvania State University Maurice J. Hobson, Georgia State University Myiti Sengstacke Rice, President and CEO Robert Sengstacke Abbott Foundation 080.

6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Authors Book Signing

Pre-Function-C4, 1st Floor

AUTHORS’ BOOK SIGNING THURSDAY. Authors: Takeia Anthony The Universal Ethiopian Students’ Association, 1927-1948: Mobilizing Diaspora Martha Bireda The Womb Rebellion Nemata Blyden African American and Africa Charlie Bolton Fugitivism: Escaping Slavery in the lower Mississippi Valley, 1820-1860 Alphonso Brown A Gullah Guide to Charleston Theresa Canada Desegregation of the New York City Schools: A Story of The Silk Stocking Sisters Glenn Chambers From the Banana Zones to the Big Easy: West Indian and Central American Immigration to New Orleans, 19101940 Lee Chavous Dreams of My Ancestors James E. Cheek Williams and Jenkins, Halifax County, North Carolina: A Legacy of Africans, Natives and European Immigrants in the United States Elizabeth Cobbs The Tubman Command, A Novel Karen Cook-Bell Claiming Freedom Stephanie Deutsch You Need a School House, Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South Lewis Diuguid Our Fathers Making Black Men Angela Dodson Remember the Ladies Cicero Milton Fain Black Huntington: An Appalachian Story Jelani Favors Shelter in a Time of Storm: How Black Colleges Fostered Generations of Leadership and Activism Jonathan B. Fenderson Building the Black Arts Movement: Hoyt Fuller and the Cultural Politics of the 1960s Stephen C. Ferguson African American Philosophers and Philosophy: An Introduction to the History, Concepts, and Contemporary Issues Minuette Floyd A Place to Worship Gary Ford Constance Baker Motley One Woman Fight for Civil Rights and Equal Justice Under Law Damon Fordham True Stories of Black South Carolina Dr. Al Fraser, To Be, or not…to Bop LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, A Guide to Researching African American Ancestors in Laurens County, South Carolina and Selected Finding Aids Shennette Garrett-Scott, Banking on Freedom: Black Women in U.S. Finance before the New Deal Carroll Green, Almost Heaven It Wasn’t Even Close A Legacy of Love Angel Harriott, Journey to the Sea Islands: Gullah Geechee Good! Katrina Hazzard, Jookin’: The Rise of Social Dance Formations in African American Culture Tekla Ali Hopkins-Johnson, FREE RADICAL Ernest Chambers, Black Power, and the Politics of Race Elista Istre, Creoles of South Louisiana: Three Centuries Strong Pauline J. Furman When God Shows Up on the Couch

51


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 Eric R. Jackson Let Freedom Ring for Everyone: The Diversity of Our Nation Andre E. Johnson The Struggle over Black Lives Matter and All Lives Matter Marlene Jones Secrets Untold Melvina F. Jones Roxboro Roots: North Carolina Families Leave Their Imprint on America’s Story Jeffrey R. Kerr-Ritchie Rebellious Passage: The Creole Revolt and America’s Coastal Slave Trade Tiffany B. Lee Voices of the Race Riots: Beyond the Red Summer Josephine Bolling McCall The Penalty For Success: My Father was Lynched in Lowndes Alabama Ruth Miller Slavery to Civil Rights: A Walking Tour of African-American Charleston Traci Parker Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement: Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights from the 1930s to the 1980s Alicea Peyton The Evolution of Land-Use Enforcement (The Storefront Church Movement) Anita D. Russell I Wanna See Laney’s House Julie L. Seely Skinny House- A Memoir of Family Daniel Smith African-Americans and Charleston Histories Intertwined Joleene Maddox Snider Claiming Sunday: The Story of a Texas Slave Community Carl Suddler Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York Elizabeth Todd-Breland A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago Since the 1960s Dr. Kelenne Tuitt Be Irie – A Caribbean Handbook to Develop Healthy Habits”” Rebecca Tuuri Strategic Sisterhood: The National Council of Negro Women in the Black Freedom Struggle Louis Venters A History of the Baha’i Faith in South Carolina Dekalb Walcott Black Heroes of Fire Derrick White Blood, Sweat and Tears: Jake Gaither, Florida A&M, and the History of Black College Football Junius Williams Unfinished Agenda Urban Politics in the Era of Black Power Sonja Williams Word Warrior: Richard Durham, Radio, and Freedom 081.

6:30 pm to 8:00 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

BEYOND THE FIELDS: SLAVERY AT MIDDLETON PLACE. Moderator: Lyndsey Beutin, Oberlin College Discussant: Middleton Place Foundation, Charleston, SC

082.

8:15 pm to 10:15 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

HOMECOMING: THE STRUGGLE OF BLACKS TO OWN LAND IN THE SOUTH. Moderator: Tiffany B. Lee, Harris Stowe State University

083.

8:30 pm to 10:30 pm

Reception

CC - Ballroom B - 1st Floor

JAAH RECEPTION. Editor: Pero Dagbovie, Michigan State University

Friday, October 4, 2019 084.

8:00 am to 8:00 pm

Registration

CC - Ballroom Foyer A - 1st Floor

FRIDAY CONFERENCE REGISTRATION. 085.

8:00 am to 6:30 pm

Exhibitor

CC - Ballroom Foyer B

FRIDAY EXHIBITORS. Please support our exhibitors. For a list, visit page 25. 086.

8:00 am to 8:00 pm

Registration CC - Meeting Room 03 – 2nd floor - Onsite Registration FRIDAY ONSITE REGISTRATION.

52


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 087.

8:30 am to 10:00 am

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

RALPH ELLISON: AN AMERICAN JOURNEY. Moderator: Nadia Alahmed, Dickinson College 088.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Ballroom C2 – 1st floor - AV Room

BLACK HISTORY 101 MOBILE MUSEUM AND THE BLACK MUSEUM MOVEMENT. Chair: Cheylon Karrina Woods, Ernest J. Gaines Center, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Participants: Black History 101 Mobile Museum. Khalid el-Hakim, Black History 101 Mobile Museum Black Museum Movement. Cheylon Karrina Woods, Ernest J. Gaines Center, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Documenting the Black Experience. Raquel Flores-Clemons, Chicago State University Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 089.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Ballroom C3 – 1st floor - AV Room

NEW DIRECTIONS IN THE BLACK NEW SOUTH: HEALTH AND POLITICS IN ATLANTA. Chair: Maurice J. Hobson, Georgia State University Participants: The Quest for Black Self-Determination: The Atlanta Vine City Project and Its Early Contribution to the Black Power Movement. Je’Lon Alexander, Georgia State University Black Masculinity: Death by Diet. Marquel Reid, Georgia State University Funk Jazz: The Movement, The Music, the Marketing. Nathalie Fox, Georgia State University And If I Should Die Before I Wake: Black Women, Lay Midwives, and the Maternal Health Care System. Ruby Manley, Georgia State University Silent but Deadly: Exploring the Commodification and Controlling of Black Athletes in Football with Sickle Cell Trait. LaShawna J. Brown, Presenter Commentator: Maurice J. Hobson, Georgia State University 090.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 01 – 1st floor - AV Room

MIGRATION AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF SELF AND CITY IN WASHINGTON, D.C. Chair: George Derek Musgrove, University of Maryland, Baltimore County Participants: Mississippi Activist Migrations to Washington, D.C. and the Leveraging of Black Political Power in the 1960s. Rebecca Tuuri, University of Southern Mississippi D.C.’s Mayor For Life Is An Outsider: Navigating spatial boundaries from Mississippi to D.C. Loren Saxton Coleman, University of Southern Mississippi Moving On: Exploring How the Globe Printing Co. Clientele Turned Black. Natalie Hopkinson, Howard University Commentator: Marcus Coleman, University of Southern Mississippi 091.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

MIGRATIONS: NEW TRAJECTORIES IN WRITING AME CHURCH HISTORY. Chair: Dennis Clark Dickerson, Vanderbilt University Participants: Of Mite and Men: Black Migrants, AME Missionaries, and the Island of Hispaniola. Christina Davidson, Harvard University Annie Keel and the AME Migration to the Indian Territory. Christina Marie Dickerson, Quinnipiac University The Expansion and Transformation of the AME Church in Jamaica. Sharon J. Grant, Hood Theological Seminary Commentator: Reginald Hildebrand, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

53


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 092.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 06 – 2nd floor - AV Room

WANDERING WOMEN: THE IMPACT OF BLACK WOMEN’S MIGRATION ON EDUCATION AND THE ARTS. Chair: Christina Davis, Savannah State University Presenters: K. T. Ewing, Tennessee State University Daleah Goodwin, Warren Wilson College Sheena Harris, Tuskegee University Jervette Ward, Mississippi State University 093.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

LABOR, LEISURE, AND SURVIVAL: BLACK WOMEN IN THE URBAN NORTH. Chair: Sharita Jacobs Thompson, Independent Scholar Participants: Beyond the Shooting: Eleanor Gray Bumpurs, Identity Erasure & Family Activism against Police Violence. LaShawn Harris, Michigan State University Black Women’s Supernaturalist Labor in Chicago’s Policy Gambling Industry. Betsy Schlabach, Earlham College “Too Strict to Live”: Black Women and Moviegoing in Early 20th Century New York.”. Alyssa Lopez, Michigan State University Commentator: Sharita Jacobs Thompson, Independent Scholar 094.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

KEY SESSION: “MIGRATION MATTERS: BLACK WOMEN AND THE SHIFTING POLITICS OF RACE, SPACE, AND PLACE.” Chair: Shoji Malone, University of Maryland - College Park Participants: “From Pressing Combs to Flat Irons: Black Beauty Salons as Sites of Migratory Politics”. Ingrid Banks, University of California, Santa Barbara “A Good, Strong, Hustling Woman”: The St. Luke Finance Corporation and Financing the New Negro Woman in Harlem. Shennette Garrett-Scott, University of Mississippi “The Unmaking of Chocolate City.” Treva Lindsey, The Ohio State University “Queering the Great Migration: Black Women, Same-Sex Desire, and (Be)longing Otherwise” . Terrance Wooten, University of California, Santa Barbara Black Sexual Minority Women and the Great Migration: A Search for Sexual Autonomy and Economic Freedom. Mignon R. Moore, Barnard College, Columbia University Commentator: Natanya Duncan, Lehigh University 095.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 07 – 2nd floor - AV Room

FROM SLAVERY TO THE WHITE HOUSE: THE CIVIL WAR ANCESTORS OF MICHELLE OBAMA. Commentators: Fath Davis Ruffins, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Dawn Chitty, African American Civil War Museum 096. 8:30 am to 9:50 am Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

MEETING FACULTY AND STUDENTS WHERE THEY ARE: A LAYERED APPROACH TO INTEGRATING BLACK ORAL HISTORIES ACROSS THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE. Chair: Sony Prosper, University of Virginia Presenters: Michael Gerard Mason, University of Virginia Lopez Matthews, Howard University Phylissa Mitchell, University of Virginia Keith Weimer, University of Virginia Dionti Davis, The HistoryMakers

54


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 097.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

SULLIVAN ISLAND THE UNTOLD STORY OF AFRICAN ARRIVAL. Chair: Michael Allen, National Park Service, Charleston S.C. (Retired) Presenters: Kameika Murphy, Stockton University Elaine Nichols, Smithsonian NMAAHC Michael Allen, National Park Service, Charleston S.C. (Retired) 098.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

BLACKED, RACED, AND/OR NEOLIBERALIZED? PERSPECTIVES ON IDENTITY AMONG AFRICAN AND CARIBBEAN IMMIGRANT STUDENTS IN U.S. SCHOOLS. Chair: Valerie Adams-Bass, University of Virginia Participants: Black Immigration and US Schools: Trends and Emergent Issues. Chenyu Wang, University of Virginia The Role of Social Media in Identity Formation among African and Caribbean Immigrant Teenagers. Christine Slaughter, University of Virginia A Differnt Kind of Black: From Racial Encounters to Racial Socialization The Experience of Caribbean and African Immigrant Students. Valerie Adams-Bass, University of Virginia The Cultural Construction of Race and Difference among Caribbean and African Immigrant Youth at School. Diane M. Hoffman, University of Virginia Commentator: Chonika Coleman-King, University of Tennessee 099.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK AGENCY, MOBILITY AND FLIGHT AT THE ‘NEW BIRTH OF FREEDOM’. Chair: Bernard Powers, Jr., College of Charleston, Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston Participants: Wars for Place-Making and the Flipside of Mobility in Westward Freedpeople’s Camps. Mycah Lynn Conner, Harvard University Debating Exodus in the Reconstruction South: Changing Attitudes among the Republican Grassroots. Brian Kelly, Queen’s University Belfast [After Slavery Project] ‘Liberia Fever’ in the Deep South: African-American Emigration Organizing After Reconstruction, 1877 – 1885. Matthew Law, Clark University Commentator: Bernard Powers, Jr., College of Charleston, Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston 100.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

PERFORMING SANKOFA: REGINA TAYLOR’S CROWNS AT GEORGIA COLLEGE. Chair: Deitrah Joye Taylor, Georgia College Participants: Crowning Glory: Liberation in a Diverse African Diaspora. Deitrah Joye Taylor, Georgia College Uncracking the Egg: A Choreographic Approach to Sankofa. Homer Jones, Georgia College Commentators: Homer Jones, Georgia College Amy J. Pinney, Georgia College

55


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 101.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK LIFE IN 20TH CENTURY RURAL NORTH CAROLINA. Chair: Charles Johnson, North Carolina Central University Participants: Mothers of Many: Retelling the Story of Black Women Educators in Bertie County, North Carolina. Mattison Bond, North Carolina Central University The Prototype for Black Municipal Prosperity: Princeville, NC and the Making of America’s First Black Town. Ajanae Willis, North Carolina Central University An Historical Analysis of the Roles of Blacks in Rural Western North Carolina and Beyond. Rebecca Stubbs, North Carolina Central University Commentator: Arwin Smallwood, North Carolina A&T State University 102.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

FOR BLACK FOLKS WHO CONSIDERED WEST AFRICA WHEN WAKANDA WAS NO LONGER ENOUGH: A ROUNDTABLE ON HEALING, RESTORATION, RESILIENCE & RESISTANCE. Chair: Phyllis Marie Jeffers-Coly, Diasporic Soul Participant: African American Culture Schools: An Intervention Revisited for the 21st Century. Charles J Ray, ASALH Bronx Branch Presenters: Christina Jaquez, East Orange Public School District/Kean University Phyllis Marie Jeffers-Coly, Diasporic Soul Jon Hurst, Wilberforce University 103.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

Cooper – Embassy Suites

MOVIN’ ON UP?: EXPLORING BLACK MIGRATION AND EDUCATION IN THE U.S. Chair: Greg Wiggan, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Participants: The History of Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Black Migration: Implications for Educators and Schools. Marcia WatsonVandiver, Towson University Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: How Teachers Can Teach the New Majority in Public Schools. Sheikia Talley-Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Before and After the Mall: Runaway Growth, Displacement, and Education in Williamson County, TN, 1967-2005. Hunter Holt, University of Virginia Coal, Class, and the Appalachian Color Line: an Analysis of Race and Education in Southeastern Kentucky, 1950-1970. Kristan McCullum, University of Virginia Commentator: Greg Wiggan, University of North Carolina at Charlotte 104.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Paper Session

Ideation – Embassy Suites

“`I LEFT AND CAME BACK’: SOUTHERN/NORTHERN MOVEMENTS AND BLACK FEMINIST ARCHIPELAGOES.” Chair: David Mathew Walton, University of North Carolina at Pembroke Presenters: Nancy Butler, BlackGirlLand Project Kathleen Green, Resident St. John’s Island Josephine Robinson, Resident St. John’s Island Tamara Butler, Michigan State University Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH

56


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 105.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Paper Session

Wando – Embassy Suites

SOJOURNERS AND SOLDIERS: AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST AND EASTERN EUROPE. Chair: Brandy Thomas Wells, Oklahoma State University Participants: Becoming American: Chinese ‘Sojourners’ and African Americans’ Battle for Inclusion in a White Republic. Yi Xie, Emory University Biography as Solidarity: Margo Okazawa-Rey, Transnational Feminism, and Afro-Asian Activist Scholarship. Jeanelle Kevina Hope, University of California, Davis Black African Students in Red Russia. Harold “Hal” Dodson Weaver, Harvard University-Hutchins Center for African and African American Research Militarized and Black: African American Soldiers in East Asia. Keisha Alexandria Brown, Tennessee State University Commentator: Jessica D. Klanderud, Berea College

106.

9:50 am to 10:05 am

Pop-up Talk

CC - Outside Ballroom A – 1st floor

WOODSON WORKS: A NEGRO AND BY CONSEQUENCE, AN ALIEN: 1619 AND THE ORIGINS OF BLACK FUGITIVITY. Presenter: Jason Young, University of Michigan 107.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Meeting

CC - Ballroom A - 1st Floor

ABWH BUSINESS MEETING SESSION. Chair: Erica Armstrong Dunbar, ABWH National Director, Rutgers University Leaders: Shennette Garrett-Scott, University of Mississippi Jessica D Klanderud, Berea College Felicia Jamison, University of Maryland College Park Erica L. Ball, Occidental College Cherisse Jones-Branch, Arkansas State University Maria Esther Hammack, University of Texas at Austin 108.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Ballroom C2 – 1st floor - AV Room

INFORMATION/LIBRARY SESSION: DOCUMENTING THE BLACK MIGRATION IN THE PUBLIC SPHERE. Chair: Vedet R. Coleman, Association of African American Museums Presenters: Lopez Matthews, Howard University Joy Kinard, National Park Service Eola Dance, National Park Service Kenvi Phillips, Harvard University - Schlesinger LibraryMary Elliott, Howard University DeLisa Minor Harris, Fisk University 109.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Ballroom C3 – 1st floor - AV Room

NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE BLACK INTELLECTUAL TRADITION. Chair: Erica L. Ball, Occidental College Presenters: Christopher Cameron, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Brandon Byrd, Vanderbilt University Celeste Day Moore, Hamilton College Guy Emerson Mount, Auburn University

57


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 110.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 01 – 1st floor - AV Room

NEGOTIATING HISTORY: LEGACY, CULTURE, AND INTERPRETATION IN THE CONTEXT OF THE HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY. Chair: Frank C. Martin, II, South Carolina State University Participants: Migration, Interpretation, & Legacy: Collecting for the Patrimony of an HBCU. Frank C. Martin, II, South Carolina State University Structuring Identity: The I. P. Stanback Museum as a Catalyst for Civic Engagement. Davion Petty, South Carolina State University Migration, Social Mobility & Social Stratification: The HBCU and The Other Elite. Alison McLetchie, Claflin University The Orangeburg Massacre: 50 Years Later: Migration, New Ideas, and Student Radicalization. William Hine, South Carolina State University Commentator: William Hine, South Carolina State University 111.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

BLACK MIGRATIONS: THE CARTER G. WOODSON CENTURY, POLITICAL SHIFT IN AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICS IN THE 1930S, AND BLACK LIVES IN CENTRAL APPALACHIA, 1871-1929. Chair: Burnis R. Morris, Dr. Carter G. Woodson Lyceum, Marshall University Participants: The Carter G. Woodson Century. Burnis R Morris, Dr. Carter G. Woodson Lyceum, Marshall University; Cicero Milton FAIN, College of Southern Maryland; Robert “Rob” Rabe, Marshall University Political Shift in American Politics in the 1930s. Robert “Rob” Rabe, Marshall University Black Lives in Central Appalachia, 1871-1929. Cicero Milton FAIN, College of Southern Maryland Commentator: Burnis R Morris, Dr. Carter G. Woodson Lyceum, Marshall University 112.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 06 – 2nd floor - AV Room

THE NEW MIGRATION: TELLING OUR STORIES IN THE DIGITAL SPACE. Chair: Anne Marie Edwards, Northern Illinois University Presenters: Anne Marie Edwards, Northern Illinois University Kellie “Kelli” Dixon, North Carolina A&T State University Jasmine Lewis, Harris-Stowe State University Valarie Thompson, University of Oklahoma 113.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK GIRL MOVES. Chair: Carolyn Washington, University at Buffalo Participants: 21st Century Black Health & Wellness: The Cardi B “Remix.” Nghana Lewis, Tulane University When Madness Makes Sense: Mobility in Contemporary African American Literature and Performance. Regix Fox, Grand Valley State University Girls on the Move: An Examination of Black Girl Genius Week. Miyoshi Brown, Metcalfe Community Academy, Chicago Public Schools Black Girl Magic in Contemporary Speculative Texts. Sika Dagbovie-Mullins, Florida Atlantic University Commentator: LaShawn Harris, Michigan State University

58


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 114.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 06 – 2nd floor - AV Room

THE COLORED CONVENTIONS OF IOWA DIGITAL PROJECT. Chair: Denise Burgher, University of Delaware Presenters: Dwain Coleman, University of Iowa Heather Cooper, University of Iowa Dellyssa Edinboro, University of Iowa Stephanie P. Jones, Grinnell College Robert Shepard, University of Iowa Mila Kaut, University of Iowa, IA-CCP (*Note that this session is out of sequnece.) 115.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 07 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BAM! CHICAGO’S BLACK ARTS MOVEMENT. Moderator: Angela Sublett Knight, University of Missouri - Kansas City Participant: Thabiti Lewis, Washington State University Vancouver Pavithra Narayanan, Washington State University Vancouver 116.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

EDUCATION AND MIGRATION: PEDAGOGICAL STRATEGIES TOWARD LIBERATION. Chair: Jon Hale, University of South Carolina “Higher Education for Liberation:” Southern Migrants and the Birth of Predominantly Black Institutions. Alexis Monique Johnson, University of Virginia Participants: “Encircled: Private Self-Expression in the 1860s Photograph Album of International Abolitionist, Mother, Wife and Fugitive Slave Ellen Craft”. Mary Trent, College of Charleston “A Tower of Strength in the Labor World”: Domestic Worker Organizing and the National Trade School for Women and Girls in Washington D.C. Danielle T. Phillips-Cunningham, Texas Woman’s University “Behold the Land”: The Education of Black High School Activists in the American South. Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 117.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK MUSIC AND CULTURE: RECLAIMING TIME, SPACE, GENRE, AND MEANING. Chair: Carmen Lanos Williams, Arkansas State University Participants: The #BAM Movement: Decolonizing and Reclaiming the Black American Music Known as Jazz. Maya Cunningham, University of Massachusetts Amherst Vocal Hauntings: The Long Civil Rights in Sound and Glory. Bianki Torres, University of Massachusetts Amherst Things Fall Apart: A Comparative Analysis of the State of Black Diaspora Life according to Achebe and The Roots. Stephanie Uka Shonekan, University of Massachusetts Amherst You look Nothing Like Your Mother. You Look Everything Like Your Mother: Ray Charles, Beyoncé & Soul’s Southern Landscape. Olivia Ekeh, University of Massachusetts Amherst Tying Knots: Politics in Contemporary African Visual Art From Mor Faye’s Senegal to the Congolese Lubumbashi Movement. Kymberly Newberry, University of Massachusetts Amherst Commentators: James Smethurst, University of Massachusetts Amherst ASALH Audience, ASALH

59


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 118.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

BLACK PANTHER PARTY IN RETROSPECTIVE: HISTORY, MEMORY AND LEGACY. Chair: Blair Kelley, North Carolina State University Participants: Land, Bread, and Housing: The Memory of the Black Panther Party in the New South. Cheryl Dong, North Carolina State University From the Black Panther Party to the Movement For Black Lives: Black Radicalism in the Mainstream Media. Brandon Render, University of Texas at Austin Dismantling Intersectional Oppressions: Black Women’s Partnered Activism in the Black Panther Party and the Third World Women’s Alliance. Tiana Wilson, University of Texas at Austin Commentator: Blair Kelley, North Carolina State University 119.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK AMERICA ON THE MOVE: 20TH CENTURY BLACK MIGRATION AND ITS CONSEQUENCES. Chair: Larry Crowe, Independent Scholar Participants: From Home to the Ivory Tower: Mapping Geographic Routes to the College Presidency. Michael Gerard Mason, University of Virginia Black Migration in Alaska: Limits and Opportunities in the so-called “Last Frontier”. Ian Hartman, University of Alaska Anchorage “One Way Ticket”: Blues and the Great Migration. Anthony Di Lorenzo, Savannah State University “Inequality” In Immigration: Black migrants from the French Caribbean during the long Nineteenth-Century. Andrew Maginn, Howard University Commentator: Cherisse Jones-Branch, Arkansas State University 120.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Workshop

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

DR. FELIX ARMFIELD SERIES FOR EMERGING SCHOLARS II : HOW TO GET PUBLISHED: A PANEL ON ACADEMIC & BLOG PUBLISHING. Chair: Jolivette J Anderson-Douoning, Purdue University Presenters: Randal Jelks, The University of Kansas J.T. Roane, University of Cincinnati Pero Dagbovie, Michigan State University LaShawn Harris, Michigan State University 121.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

FINDING FREEDOM IN A SLAVE SOCIETY: FREE PEOPLE OF COLOR IN THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY UNITED STATES. Chair: Felicia Thomas, Morgan State University Participants: Moving in Freedom: Migrations in the Nineteenth-Century Catering Trade. Danya Pilgrim, Temple University Side by Side: Free People of Color in Plantation Country, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, 1820-1860. Evelyn L. Wilson, Southern University Law Center Finding a Place in the South: Free People of Color in the Slave Economy. Warren Milteer, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH

60


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 122.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

ACADEMIC PROFILES OF CARTER G. WOODSON. Chair: Emanuel Jordan Abston, Clayton State University & Emory University Participants: A Nation in Waiting: African American Identity Formation and the Unintended Consequences of WWI. Pellom McDaniels III, Emory University, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, & Rare Book Library Carter G. Woodson and the Rhetoric of Oratory. Andre E. Johnson, University of Memphis Woodson? Scott? Wilkerson? Who Best Tells Our Great Migration History Story? Dr. Margaret Bernice Smith Bristow, Hampton University Commentator: Michelle Y. Gordon, Emory University 123.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

Cooper – Embassy Suites

EXTENDING THE DIASPORA: AFRICAN AND AFRICAN-AMERICAN TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATIONS AND IMMIGRATION IN THE MODERN ERA. Chair: Jeffrey Robert Kerr-Ritchie, Howard University Participants: African immigrants in America: 1890 -1945. Nemata Amelia Blyden, George Washington University Invoking the Lynch Law: African American Migration to Alberta. Afua Cooper, Dalhousie University Pan-African Struggles, U.S. Policy: Charles Diggs and Portuguese African Liberation. Joseph Parrott, Ohio State University, History Department Routed Discontinuities: Black Transnational Alliances, the African Airlift program and “new” African Americans. Brenda N. Sanya, Colgate University Commentator: Michael Benjamin, Georgia Southern University 124.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

Ideation – Embassy Suites

“19TH CENTURY FREEDOM SEEKERS: FREE WOMBS, MIGRATIONS, SELF-PURCHASE, AND MILITIAS.” Chair: Crystal Eddins, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Participants: “In Search of Freedom and Citizenship – African American Migration to Mexico across the Gulf in the Early Nineteenth Century.” Beau D. J. Gaithers, Winston-Salem State University “Self-Purchase and Slavery’s Law.” Julia Wallace Bernier, University of North Alabama “Carolina’s Militiamen: Creating the North Carolina and South Carolina Militia after the Civil War”. Gregory Lamont Mixon, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Commentator: Crystal Eddins, University of North Carolina at Charlotte 125.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Poster Session

Pre-Function-C4, 1st Floor

ASALH POSTER SESSION - FRIDAY. All are welcome to engage with and provide feedback on the posters of ASALH Branches and scholars. Each presenter will be next to their poster to dicuss their research and branch activities. Judge: Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston Participants: A Hidden Gem in the Diamond State: The Internal Migration of Emancipated African Americans in Arkansas from Delta Region Counties to Jefferson County. Kim Rich-Rice, The University of Texas at Arlington “An Antebellum ‘Green Book’ for ‘Free Colored’ Midwestern-Southern Migrants: Mapping James Roberts’s 1830 Letter”. Jennifer Kirsten Stinson, Saginaw Valley State University ASALH-Phila Heritage :Going North Branch Poster: Catherine Holloman, Gloria Johnson. Catherine Holloman, ASALH Philadelphia Heritage Black Migrations:African American Migrations from the South to Kansas City, Missouri. Brenda Vann, Greater Kansas City Black History Study Group-Branch

61


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 Black Women, Mass Incarceration, and Reclaiming Public Space. Arzelia Williams, Michigan State University Celebrating 75 years of History. Ernestine J Gordon, Our Authors Study Club of Los Angeles, Inc. Edna B. McKenzie Branch 2019 Activity. Ann Mason, Edna B. McKenzie Branch ASALH - Pittsburgh Exploring Timbuctoo through Census Records and Coverage from the New Jersey Mirror. Guy-Oreido Weston, Rutgers University Homeward Bound! The Influence of Reverse Black Migration on Urban Education in the South. Annette Teasdell, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Alexis Calloway, University of North Carolina at Charlotte “How Did The Great Migration Impact American Society?” Cecelia Robinson, Greater Kansas City Black History Study GroupBranch Human Library: Connecting With Your Community and Branch Library. Johnnieque Love, University of Maryland; Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston Interview with Dr. Aubrey Spencer Escoffery. Audrey Perry Williams, Hampton Roads Branch ASALH James Weldon Johnson Branch Black Migrations Activities. Hazel D. Gillis, James Weldon Johnson Branch Lakeland’s Legacy: The Value of Black Land and Community in Maryland. Courtnie N. Thurston, Morgan State University Margaret and Robert Garner Cincinnati Branch 2019 Pictorial. Marcia Garrison, ASALH Margaret and Robert Garner Branch (Cincinnati) Migration Within a Migration. Dolores Ernestine Goode, Martha’s Vineyard Branch; Frances Gaskin, RN President and Founder Frances Christian Gaskin, Inc. Racial Discrimination in Charleston’s Subdivisions as found in Surviving Deed Restrictions and Neighborhood Covenants. Kenneth Gerard Marolda, College of Charleston The Great Migration and the Harlem Renaissance. Audrey Perry Williams, Hampton Roads Branch ASALH The Journey of African Americans. Hazel D. Gillis, James Weldon Johnson Branch The Reconfiguration of the Self in Toni Morrison’s Jazz. Aisha Carmel Breed, Texas Southern University The State of the American Mind: The Black American. Kayla Cherise Forney, North Carolina A&T State University Unearthing the Existence of Black LG Individuals in the History of Education. Krista Lorraine Walker, University of Iowa We Were Always Here: The Langmuir Collection a curated photograph compilation of African Americans during the Great Migration. Jina DuVernay, Stuart A. Rose MARBL Emory University Belmont: The lost plan for a Black Chevy Chase. Kimberly Bender, Heurich House Museum; Neil Flanagan, Independent Scholar Migration within a Migration Part 2. Dolores Ernestine Goode, Martha’s Vineyard Branch; Frances Gaskin, RN President and Founder Frances Christian Gaskin, Inc. Black Migration Theme and of 400 Years of African American Perseverance at Martha’s Vineyard. Thelma M. Johnson, President of the Martha’s Vineyard Branch Interview with Mr. Robert Hayden. Thelma M. Johnson, President of the Martha’s Vineyard Branch Looking Backward: Moving Forward. Madge Allen, ASALH Manhattan Branch The Jesuits of Georgetown and the Legacy of Slavery: An Interview with Dr. Onita Estes-Hicks. Madge Allen, ASALH Manhattan Branch 126.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

Wando – Embassy Suites

WORDS ARE LIKE LIGHTENING: THE LITERARY MIGRATIONS OF BLACK AUTHORS IN THE MID 20TH CENTURY. Chair: Bob Hayden, President, Martha’s Vineyard Branch Participants: Black Bottom Detroit’s Metaphysical Migratory Movements in “Paradise Blue” & “Elegies for Paradise Valley”. Ashley D. Clemons, University of Florida Homosociality in Washington’s Fences and Jenkins’s If Beale Street Could Talk. Stacy Boyd, University of West Georgia Words are Our Weapons: The Black Aesthetic, Critical Praxis, and the Unfinished Business of Black Arts Activism. Lasana Kazembe, Indiana University-Indianapolis Mind of John Lewis: The Intellectual Makings of a Human Rights Leader. Beverly Boone, North Carolina Central Univ Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 127.

10:15 am to 12:00 pm

ASALH Film Festival DIRT AND DEEDS IN MISSISSIPPI.

Moderator: Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University

62

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 128.

11:50 am to 12:00 pm

Pop-up Talk

CC - Meeting Room 07 - Hallway

WOODSON WORKS: GEORGE LIELE: SETTING THE STAGE FOR ETHIOPIANISM, BLACK CONSCIOUSNESS AND LIBERATION THEOLOGY. Presenter: William Edward Flippin, Emmanuel Lutheran Church 129.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Luncheon

CC - Ballroom B - 1st Floor

EMANUEL NINE PANEL LUNCHEON - BIBLE STUDY (THE STORY OF THE MOTHER EMANUEL AME CHURCH MASSACRE IN CHARLESTON, SC). Emcee: Ms. Carolyn Murray, News Anchor, WCBD-TV, Channel 2 (NBC) Opening Minister: Rev. Dr. William Swinton, Pastor, Ebenezer AME Church Greetings: Former Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., City of Charleston Dr. Rénard Harris, Associate Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer, College of Charleston Moderator: Councilman William Dudley Gregorie, lost a family member, Susie J. Jackson Panelists: Rev. Eric S. C. Manning, Pastor, Mother Emanuel AMEC Rev. Dr. Brenda Nelson, ministerial staff at MEAMEC 2015-2019, lost a best friend, Rev. DePayne Middleton-Doctor Mrs. Polly Sheppard, one of the adult survivors Mr. Melvin Graham, brother of Cynthia Graham Hurd Closing Minister: Pastor Greg Surratt, Founder, Seacoast Church 130.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

LEARNING LUNCH: A DISCUSSION ON GULLAH GEECHEE FOODWAYS. Chairs: Bria Graham, Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission David S. Shields, University of South Carolina Presenters: Charlotte Jenkins, Independent Scholar Kevin Eugene Mitchell, Culinary Institute of Charleston Heather Hodges, Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission 131. 12:00 pm to 1:45 pm Workshop

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

LEARNING LUNCH- DR. FELIX ARMFIELD SERIES FOR EMERGING SCHOLARS SESSION I: “AND WHO ARE YOU? WHAT DO YOU DO?”. Leaders: John H. Bracey, University of Massachusetts Amherst Darlene Clark Hine, Michigan State University Marshanda Smith, Michigan State University 132.

12:15 pm to 1:45 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

BOSS: THE BLACK EXPERIENCE IN BUSINESS. Moderator: Shennette Garrett-Scott, University of Mississippi 133.

1:50 pm to 2:00 pm

Pop-up Talk

CC - Meeting Room 07 - Hallway

WOODSON WORKS: CHAPEL HILL HIGH SCHOOL BLACK STUDENT PROTESTS OF 1969. Presenter: Dwana Waugh, Sweet Briar College

63


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 134.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Workshop

CC - Ballroom A - 1st Floor

ALCATRAZ AS A SITE TO EXAMINE MASS INCARCERATION IN THE UNITED STATES. Leaders: Reggie Chapple, National Park Service Wiil Elder, National Park Service, Golden Gate National Recreation Area Michele Gee, National Park Service, Golden Gate National Recreation Area Lionel Kimble, ASALH Vice President for Programs, Chicago State University 135.

2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

WILD WOMEN DON’T HAVE THE BLUES. Moderator: Michelle R. Scott, University of Maryland - Baltimore County 136.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Meeting

CC - Ballroom C2 – 1st floor - AV Room

INFORMATION PROFESSIONALS OF ASALH MEMBERSHIP MEETING. Chair: Cheylon Karrina Woods, Ernest J. Gaines Center, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Participants: IP of ASALH Business Meeting. Cheylon Karrina Woods, Ernest J. Gaines Center, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Engagement and Education in Museums. Brenda Tindal, Detroit Historical Society Commentator: Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston 137.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Presidential Session

CC - Ballroom C3 – 1st floor - AV Room

PRESIDENTIAL SESSION: REPARATIONS DEMANDS AND MOVEMENTS IN THE 21ST CENTURY. Chair: V.P. Franklin, Former Editor, Journal of African American History Welcome: Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, ASALH President & Harvard University Presenters: Mary Frances Berry, University of Pennsylvania James B. Stewart, Pennsylvania State University Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, ASALH Executive Council & University of Illinois Lynda J. Morgan, Mount Holyoke College William A. Darity, Duke University Ron Daniels, National African American Reparations Commission 138.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 01 – 1st floor - AV Room

MAPPING AS METHODOLOGY: TRACING AFRICAN AMERICAN MIGRATION AND MOBILITY IN THE UPPER SOUTH. Chair: Darius Scott, University of North Carolina Participants: Poor Black Women and the Making of Modern Black Political Communities. Brandi Brimmer, Spelman College Following the River: Black Migration and Social Networks within the Mississippi River Delta Region. Heidi Dodson, University at Buffalo “Filed in Good Faith”: Black Social Networks and the U.S. Pension Bureau in Late Nineteenth-Century, Nashville. Stanley Maxson, University of Maryland Commentator: Darius Scott, University of North Carolina

64


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 139.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

AUTHOR MEETS CRITICS: SIMON BALTO, OCCUPIED TERRITORY: POLICING BLACK CHICAGO FROM RED SUMMER TO BLACK POWER. Chair: Nora Krinitsky, University of Michigan Presenters: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Princeton University Nathan Connolly, Johns Hopkins University Melanie Newport, University of Connecticut Simon Balto, University of Iowa 140.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING BLACK COMMUNITIES IN MULTI-RACIAL LOCALES. Chair: Christopher Bonastia, Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center Participants: Ivor Cummings and the Making and Unmaking of Black Brixton (1948 - 2011). Nicholas Boston, Lehman College (CUNY) “A Nice, Integrated Town”: Racial Tension in a New Jersey Suburb. Nichole Nelson, Yale University Ocean Hill-Brownsville: A Multi-Racial Vision of Community? Christopher Bonastia, Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center Commentators: Christopher Bonastia, Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Princeton University 141.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN AND POLITICAL PARTISANSHIP BETWEEN THE WORLD WARS. Chair: Treva Lindsey, The Ohio State University Participants: Lethia Cousins Fleming, the Republican Party and African American Women after the 19th Amendment. Carol Lasser, Oberlin College Black Women’s Political Activism After World War One. Nikki Lynn Marie Brown, University of Kentucky Black Women’s Activism, Chicago, and the Great Migration. Kristal Moore Clemons, Virginia State University Commentator: Treva Lindsey, The Ohio State University 142.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

NEW PERSPECTIVES ON AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE RECONSTRUCTION ERA. Chair: Hilary N. Green, University of Alabama Participants: “Scars of the Trade: Reconstructing the Black Family after Emancipation.” Alexis Broderick Neumann, University of Pennsylvania “The Beaufort Machine: Robert Smalls, South Carolina’s ‘Black District,’ and the Afterlife of Reconstruction.” Robert Bland, St. Johns University Ellen Coy, Deposed Baptist and Public Nuisance: Race, Gender and Involuntary Commitment in Black Richmond. Shelby Ray Pumphrey, Michigan State University Commentator: Nicole Myers Turner, Virginia Commonwealth University (*Note that this session is out of sequnece.)

65


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 143.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 07 – 2nd floor - AV Room

VIRTUAL REALITY AS A TOOL TO MITIGATING TRAUMA IN THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY. Moderator: Amari T. Simpson, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign Participant: Ayana Baraka, Filmmaker Spade Robinson, Writer Participant: From Postracial to “Most” Racial: Black Online Blogs, Territoriality and Power. Patricia Davis, Georgia State University 144.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

USING GENEALOGY IN HISTORICAL RESEARCH. Chair: Debra Newman Ham, Morgan State University Participants: The Genealogical Proof Standard: The Universal Application of Genealogy Standards to African American Families With Antebellum Roots. LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, Trustee, Board For Certification of Genealogists, Registrar General, Sons and Daughters of the United States Middle Passage Following the Trails Left by Migration and DNA. Damita Drayton Green, Yesteryear Perspectives, LLC From the British West Indies, to Washington, DC, Using Genealogical Records to Track One Circuitous Migrant. Linda Crichlow White, President, Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society, James Dent Walker Chapter Commentator: Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University 145.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

#BLACKBANKSMATTER: TEACHING BLACK BANKING HISTORY. Chair: Shennette Garrett-Scott, University of Mississippi Participants: Antebellum Black Banking Practices. Marcus Allen, North Carolina A&T State University Gendered Economic Practices and Activism from the Civil War to WWII. Shennette Garrett-Scott, University of Mississippi Economics of the Black Freedom Struggle. Brandon K Winford, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 146.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

KEY SESSION: “A STURDY BLACK BRIDGE THAT I CROSSED OVER, ON”: BLACK WOMEN AND BLACK POLITICAL AND CULTURAL FREEDOM MOVEMENTS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. Chair: Stephanie Uka Shonekan, University of Massachusetts Amherst Participants: Josephine Edwards and the Black Arts Movement in Springfield, MA. Kiara Hill, University of Massachusetts Amherst African American Women, Sexual Politics, and the Civil Rights Movement. Traci Parker, University of Massachusetts Amherst Red Microphone: Amina Baraka, Amiri Baraka, and Black Arts Newark. James Smethurst, University of Massachusetts Amherst “Silenced but Not Forgotten”: Southern Black Women’s Sexual Assault & Activism in the Early 20th Century. Cecile Florence Yezou, University of Massachusetts Amherst Commentator: Stephanie Uka Shonekan, University of Massachusetts Amherst

66


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 147.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK MIGRATION AND THE RETHINKING OF RACE, CLASS, AND IDENTITY. Chair: Robert Jerome Greene II, Claflin University Participants: From Alabama to Africa: Missionaries and Cultivating Their Alma Mater’s Educational Vision Abroad. Hilary N. Green, University of Alabama Virtual Migrations to the Black Pacific: Afro-Pessimism, Afrofuturism, and the Construction of a Black Imaginary. Guy Emerson Mount, Auburn University “No Sitting on the Fence”: Race, National Identity, and the Transpacific Migrations of Elizabeth Calloway. Sarah Steinbock-Pratt, University of Alabama Commentator: Robert Jerome Greene II, Claflin University 148.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

MIGRATIONS OF THE MIND: THE MIGRATORY IMPACT ON CULTURE & COMMUNITY. Chair: Valerie Taylor, University of Las Vegas, Nevada Participants: Migration & Memory in the Borderland: Kentucky African American Literature. Shanna Louise Smith, Jackson State University “Moving on Up the Eastside”: Black Migration Narratives from the Carolinas to Connecticut. Jametta Davis, National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) All Aboard: Caribbean H2 Workers meets Jim Crow. Gabrielle Hutchins, National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Bright Past, Brighter Future: Another Tale of Middletown. Tina Louise Ligon, National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Commentator: Netisha Currie, National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) 149.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK IN A NEW LAND: CARIBBEAN MIGRATION AND CONTESTED CONSTRUCTIONS OF BLACKNESS IN THE 20TH CENTURY U.S. Chair: Violet M. Johnson, Texas A & M University Participants: Playing “Out, While In”: The Caribbean Roots of Eric Dolphy and Redefining Freedom in Modern Jazz, 1958 – 1964. Glenn Chambers, Michigan State University “Everybody Was Like a Cousin”: West Indian Familial Networks as Engaged Community Practices in Early Twentieth Century New England. J. Marlena Edwards, Pennsylvania State University Complicating Blackness: Caribbean Immigrant Social Organizations and the Construction of a Transnational Black American Identity. Tyesha Maddox, Fordham University Commentator: Violet M. Johnson, Texas A & M University 150. 2:00 pm to 3:50 pm Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

MISSISSIPPI IN THE GREAT MIGRATION NARRATIVE. Chair: Jarvis R. Givens, ASALH Executive Council & Harvard University Participants: A Reading of Etheridge Knight’s The Sun Came: A Response to Mississippi Migrants. Roshad Meeks, Tufts University HBCUs and Hush Harbor Rhetorics: Space, Identity, and Memory. Khirsten Scott, University of Pittsburgh Raised in Chicago, but Trained for Mississippi: Emmett Till’s Education on the Jim Crow South. Brandon Erby, Penn State University Commentator: Jarvis R. Givens, ASALH Executive Council & Harvard University

67


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 151.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Paper Session

Cooper – Embassy Suites

MIGRATIONS OF THE SPIRIT: AFRICANA EXPRESSIONS OF FAITH. Chair: Alexandra Lima da Silva, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro Participants: Called In and Called Out: Zilpha Elaw’s Spiritual Freedom Journey. Jaimie D. Crumley, University of California, Los Angeles Feeling in the Darkness: Quaker Reactions to Early Contact with Enslaved People. Robert Franks Williams, University of Massachusetts Amherst Commentator: Crystal Lynn Webster, University of Texas at San Antonio 152.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Paper Session

Ideation – Embassy Suites

MIGRATING WOMEN AND THE STORY OF THEIR ACTIVISMS. Chair: Stacy Boyd, University of West Georgia Participants: African American Government Girls: Unspoken and Restorative Narratives of the Great Migration. Aura Wharton-Beck, University of St. Thomas From Caribbean to Black American: Testing Black Bourgeoisie in One Family’s Story. Scott Hancock, Gettysburg College Black Migrations and the Life of Dr. Margaret T. G. Burroughs: A Transnational Legacy. Lori M. West, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 153.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

Wando – Embassy Suites

GOING TO A PROMISED LAND?: FOUR HUNDRED YEARS OF FREE AND ENSLAVED BLACK MIGRATIONS INTO AND OUT OF CANADA. Chair: Jean Augustine, Independent Scholar Participants: Borderless Bondage: The Forced Migration of Enslaved Africans from New York into Canada. Natasha Henry, York University Migration of enslaved people in the British colonial Maritimes. Ruma Chopra, San Jose State University Digging for the Promised Land: The Archaeology of Black Transnationalism in the Great Lakes Borderland. Karolyn Smardz Frost, Acadia and Dalhousie Universities, Nova Scotia Crossing the Border after the Underground Railroad: African North Americans Returning from Canada. Adam Arenson, Manhattan College Commentator: Jean Augustine, Independent Scholar 154.

3:45 pm to 3:55 pm

Pop-up Talk

CC - Outside Ballroom A

WOODSON WORKS: THE GRAND FOUNTAIN, UNITED ORDER OF TRUE REFORMERS - THE GUIDE. Presenter: Anton Decore House, ASALH Executive Council & Delaware State University 155.

4:00 pm to 6:15 pm

Meeting

ASALH BUSINESS MEETING. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, ASALH National President Barbara Spencer Dunn, ASALH Vice President for Membership Lionel Kimble, ASALH Vice President for Programs, Chicago State University Karsonya Wise Whitehead, ASALH Secretary, Loyola University Maryland Gilbert Smith, ASALH Treasurer Sylvia Y. Cyrus, ASALH Executive Director Annette C. Palmer, Morgan State University Carlton Wilson, North Carolina Central University

68

CC - Ballroom A - 1st Floor


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 156.

7:00 pm to 11:00 pm

Reception (7-8:30pm)

Reception

Memminger Auditorium –Downtown Charleston

FRIDAY RECEPTION AND NIGHT OUT.

Emcee: Ms. Tessa Spencer, Morning News Anchor, WCIV-TV, Channel 4 (ABC) & Radio Host, Magic 107.3, Cumulus Media Opening Entertainment: Carolyn White, Gullah Storyteller Greetings: Mayor John J. Tecklenburg, City of Charleston Queen Quet (Marquetta L. Goodwine), Chieftess of the Gullah Geechee Nation Clarence Wright, Southern Division Manager, Gas Operations, Dominion Energy Evening Entertainment (9-11pm): Quiana Parler & Friends 157.

7:15 pm to 9:45 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

STRANGE FRUIT: THE FAMOUS SONG AND ITS STORY. Moderator: Dennis Rogers, Washington, D.C.

Saturday, October 5, 2019 158.

8:00 am to 11:45 am

Workshop

CC - Ballroom C2 – 1st floor - AV Room

ASALH BRANCH WORKSHOP. Opening Statement: Barbara Spencer Dunn, ASALH Vice President for Membership Role Call: Dorothy Bailey, Co-Chair, National Membership Committee, Prince Georges County Branch of ASALH (MD) Greetings: Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, ASALH President & Harvard University Presentations: Non-profit update: Gilbert Smith, ASALH Treasurer Risk Management: Susan Simms Marsh, Co-Chair Governance Committee, ASALH Executive Council Protocol for Submitting Dues, Reports, and Review of Branch Reporting Tool: Sylvia Y. Cyrus, ASALH Executive Director Geneaology and its Meaning Today: Omopé Carter-Daboiku, Paul Laurence Dunbar Branch 159.

8:00 am to 7:30 pm

160.

8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Registration

CC - Ballroom Foyer A

SATURDAY PRE-CONFERENCE REGISTRATION. Exhibitor

CC - Ballroom Foyer B

SATURDAY EXHIBITORS. Please support our exhibitors. For a list, visit page 25. 161.

8:00 am to 7:30 pm

Registration CC - Meeting Room 03 – 2nd floor - Onsite Registration SATURDAY ONSITE REGISTRATION.

162.

8:30 am to 10:00 am

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

UNNATURAL CAUSES: IS INEQUALITY MAKING US SICK. Moderator: Mary E. Potorti, Emerson College and MCPHS University

69


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 163.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Ballroom C3 – 1st floor - AV Room

HAZARDOUS ECOLOGIES: TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL INJUSTICE IN THE BLACK ENVIRONMENT. Chair: Teona Williams, Yale University Participants: Freedom Farmers: Black Agricultural Cooperatives Building Sustainable Communities. Monica White, University of WisconsinMadison Militarism’s Machines of Black Entombment—Tallevast, Florida in American Environmental History. James Manigault-Bryant, Williams College Black Ecologies and the Infrastructures of Abstraction in Tidewater Virginia. J.T. Roane, University of Cincinnati The Sierra Club, Black Urbanites, and the Roots of Environmental Justice. Brian McCammack, Lake Forest College Commentator: Teona Williams, Yale University 164.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 01 – 1st floor - AV Room

THE SCIENCE OF SLAVERY: SCIENCE, MEDICINE, AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE EARLY AMERICAN REPUBLIC. Chair: Sharla Fett, Occidental College Participants: The Disease Frontier: The Louisiana Purchase and Black Immunity. Kathryn Olivarius, Stanford University Pathologizing Blackness: Medicine and Biopower in the Anglo-Atlantic World. Rana Hogarth, University of Illinois - UrbanaChampaign Rethinking Benjamin Banneker: Avid Astronomer, Reluctant Abolitionist. Eric Herschthal, The Ohio State University Commentator: Sasha Turner, Quinnipiac University 165.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

PUBLIC HISTORIES. Chair: Patricia Davis, Georgia State University Participants: Collective Experiences of Diaspora and Displacement in the Art of Sargent Johnson. John P. Bowles, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Icabod Flewellen, Forefather of the Black Museum Movement. Barbara W. Flewellyn, Independent Scholar; Valada Sanquenetta Flewellyn, EYESEEIMAGES Media Our Stories in Steel: A Rhetorical/Spatial Analysis of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Patricia Davis, Georgia State University Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 166.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK WOMEN & SOCIAL MEDIA. Chair: Deirdre Cooper Owens, Queens College, CUNY Presenters: Blair Kelley, North Carolina State University Maria Esther Hammack, University of Texas at Austin LaShawn Harris, Michigan State University Ana Lucia Araujo, Howard University

70


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 167.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

TRANSHISTORICAL BLACK WOMEN’S RHETORICS: CONTINUITY AND RUPTURE. Chair: Tyler Bunzey, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Participants: Lyrical Autobiography in Phillis Wheatley’s “On Being Brought from Africa to America”. Donald Holmes, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Speaking from “Shack” to “Ship” to “South”: Helga Crane’s Queer Rhetorical Journey in Quicksand. Hannah Skjellum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill “It’s So Relatable It’s Scary”: How Black Women Formulate a Black Feminist Counterpublic while Live-tweeting Grown-ish. Kiara Childs, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Commentator: Tyler Bunzey, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 168.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 07 – 2nd floor - AV Room

MUSICAL MIGRATIONS: LOUISIANA CREOLES AND THE AMERICAN SOUTH. Moderator: Moriah Istre, Fleurish Films Participant: Elista Istre, Creoles of South Louisiana: Three Centuries Strong Vikki McGee, Vikki McGee Band Sonny Campbell, Vikki McGee Band 169.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

ENSLAVED WOMEN, MIGRATION, AND FUGITIVITY. Chair: Vanessa M Holden, University of Kentucky Participants: “A Mulatto Woman Named Margaret”: Black Women and Fugitivity in Pre-Revolutionary America. Karen Cook Bell, Bowie State University ‘Rejoice! Your wombs will not beget slaves!’ Motherhood, Marronnage, and Reproductive Justice in Eighteenth Century Saint Domingue. Crystal Eddins, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Fugitive Slave Women in Eighteenth Century South Carolina. Thomas Brown, Virginia Wesleyan University “Never Go Out of the City”: Black Women’s Navigation of the Law and Customs of Slavery and Freedom in the Upper South. Alisha J. Hines, Wake Forest University Commentator: Vanessa M Holden, University of Kentucky 170.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

BLACK BIBLIOPHILES: GOING TO THE “VIRTUAL WALL” GROUP II. Chair: Johnnieque Love, University of Maryland Presenters: Vivian Njeri Fisher, Enoch Pratt Free Library Deborah Hollis, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries Johnnieque Love, University of Maryland Cheylon Karrina Woods, Ernest J. Gaines Center, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Deborah Lilton, Vanderbilt University

71


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 171.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

HOMECOMING QUEEN: STRATEGIES FOR DEVELOPING HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS AND COLLABORATIONS. Chair: Rebecca Louise Hankins, Texas A&M University Participants: If You Build Them, They Will Come. Rebecca Louise Hankins, Texas A&M University A Queen’s Journey to Archival Peace. Kassandra Agee Chandler, Systematic Design Consultants Purdue University: Race and its Historical Impact on the Academy. Sammie L Morris, Purdue University Commentators: Kassandra Agee Chandler, Systematic Design Consultants Sammie L. Morris, Purdue University 172.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

MIGRATIONS AND MATERIAL CULTURE THROUGHOUT THE LOWCOUNTRY. Chair: Torren Gatson, Middle Tennessee State University Participants: The Sound of the Great Migration. Marquita R. Reed, Middle Tennessee State University “Southern Make”: An American Story – The Movement of Edgefield District Stoneware. Katherine C. Hughes, The Metropolitan Museum of Art The Migration of Knowledge: African American Craftsmen and the Transmission of Skill. Tiffany Nicole Momon, Middle Tennessee State University Commentator: Torren Gatson, Middle Tennessee State University 173.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

THE BLACK EXPERIENCE AT A PWI AND HBCU. Chair: Maleah Aujenae Wells, University of Dayton Presenters: Gabriel “Gabe” Ekundayo Gaiusbayode, University of Dayton Malon Ariel Hood, University of Dayton Kristen Johnson, Central State University Joshua I. Chambers, University of Dayton Tiffany Taylor Smith, University of Dayton 174.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

“SOUTHBOUND: THE OTHER GREAT MIGRATION, 1865-1970”. Chair: Amilcar Shabazz, University of Massachusetts Amherst Participants: “Sutton E. Griggs and the Great Migration”. John Cullen Gruesser, Sam Houston State University “The New Negro Moves Forward: Double V and the Second Great Migration in Texas”. Bernadette Pruitt, Sam Houston State University “The Drag Blues: Traveling Troupes and Southern Queer Performance”. Tyina Steptoe, University of Arizona Commentator: Gregory Lamont Mixon, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

72


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 175.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 6 – 2nd floor - AV Room

KEY SESSION: THE SHIFTING TERRAIN OF BLACK FREEDOM MOVEMENT STUDIES. Chair: Patrick Jones, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Presenters: Zebulon Vance Miletsky, Stony Brook University Walter Greason, Monmouth University Jeffrey Helgeson, Texas State University Patrick Jones, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Tara White, WCCS 176.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

THE BLACK MIGRATORY EXPERIENCE IN EDUCATION “FROM FREEDOM SCHOOLS TO COLLEGE.” Chair: Marcia Garrison, ASALH Margaret and Robert Garner Branch (Cincinnati) Presenters: Gwendolyn Ivory Robinson, Scholar/Branch Member Virginia Allen, Educator/Branch Member Prince Brown, Professor Emeritus Lloyd L.Garrison, Educator/Branch Member 177.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

Cooper – Embassy Suites

THE QUEST FOR BLACK POWER. Chair: Shennette Garrett-Scott, University of Mississippi Participants: Beyond Little Rock: Black Power at Arkansas PWIs. Maurice Gipson, University of Mississippi Making Black Power Pay: The Philadelphia Federation of Negro Women’s Clubs Building and Loan Association of Philadelphia, 1916-1930. Everett Hardy, Lehigh University “We Bajan Yankees” - The United Sons & Daughters of the Islands in Atlantic City, NJ. Richlyn Faye Goddard, Stockton University Economic Principles of Black Nationalism in the Post Obama Era. Vincent Adejumo, Research Mentor Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 178.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

Executive Board Room - Embassy Suites

AARP SPECIAL SESSION ON HEALTHCARE ADVOCACY. Chair: Sylvia Y. Cyrus, ASALH Executive Director Participants: Waridibo Evelyn Allison, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio Alyssa Patryce Cole, University of Kansas Juana Slade, AnMed Health 179.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Roundtable

Ideation – Embassy Suites

BLACK MIGRATIONS FROM HBCUS TO PWIS. Chair: Sheila Flemming-Hunter, ASALH Executive Council & Black Rose Foundation for Children Presenters: Elsie L. Scott, Howard University Todd Shaw, University of South Carolina Desiree Pedescleaux, Spelman College Christy Garrison Harrison, Atlanta Metropolitan State College

73


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 180.

8:30 am to 9:50 am

Panel Session

Wando – Embassy Suites

HOW TO EAT AND DRINK TO LIVE: BLACK EPISTEMOLOGY AND RELATIONSHIP TO FOOD FROM SLAVERY TO THE 1960S. Chair: Nishani Frazier, Miami University Participants: Cherry Bounce: A Historian’s Journey to Understanding Enslaved Distillers’ Expertise. Hilary N. Green, University of Alabama Vegetarians in the Black Freedom Struggle: A Forgotten History. Joshua Davis, University of Baltimore Cooking With Black Nationalism: Black Spiritual and Folkloric Connections to Food. Nishani Frazier, Miami University Commentator: Hilary N. Green, University of Alabama 181.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Ballroom C3 – 1st floor - AV Room

ASK AN ASALH INFORMATION PROFESSIONAL ROUND TABLE. Chair: Deborah Hollis, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries Presenters: Rebecca Louise Hankins, Texas A&M University Johnnieque Love, University of Maryland Deborah Hollis, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries Jina DuVernay, Stuart A Rose MARBL Emory University Ayaba Logan, Medical University of South Carolina 182.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 01 – 1st floor - AV Room

BENNETT COLLEGE: SISTERHOOD, SOUL, AND THE SEARCH FOR A WOMAN’S PLACE. Chair: Crystal R. Sanders, Pennsylvania State University Participants: Beyond the Greensboro Four: Examining Bennett College Student Activism and Popular Narratives of the Greensboro Sit-Ins. Jasmin Chantel Howard, Michigan State University “We No Longer Want to be ‘Lily-White Young Ladies,’ But We Want to be ‘Black Souls Sisters’”: Black Women and Activism at Bennett College, 1965-1975. Jennifer S. Ash, University of Illinois Chicago Radical Ideology in a Woman’s Proper Place: The Home Making Institute at Bennett College for Women, 1927-1967. Deidre B. Flowers, ABC Commentator: Lisa Bratton, Tuskegee University 183.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

GENDERED READINGS: BLACK WOMEN’S MIGRATORY NARRATIVES. Chair: Lisa Bratton, Tuskegee Univeristy Participants: Black Girl Magic and the (In)visibility of Pain. Timeka Nicol Tounsel, Pennsylvania State University Menstrual Moments: A Look at How Dangarembga, Kincaid, and Morrison Bleed. Amanda J Campbell, Winthrop University Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH

74


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 184.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

BLACK MIGRATIONS WESTWARD TO CALIFORNIA. Chair: Natasha L McPherson, University of California, Riverside Participants: Black Women and the California Dream: from Califia Through the Great Migrations to the Present. Nicelma King, University of California, Davis “Before There Were Green Books: On Navigating the Dangers of ‘Traveling While Black’ Through America as Hostile Territory”. Milmon Ferdinand Harrison, University of California, Davis “‘Because the “Negroes” Were Coming Down the Street’: Protest in Black California in the Neoliberal Era”. Jasmine Wade, University of California, Davis The Rise and Retreat of Black Los Angeles: Migrations, Gentrification, Class and Community. 1970-2010. Jeffery O.G. Ogbar, University of Connecticut Commentator: Milmon Ferdinand Harrison, University of California, Davis 185.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

LOOKING BACK, REACHING FORWARD: AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE VOTE. Chair: Conra Gist, University of Houston Participants: From the Suffrage Movement to the Women’s March Black Women Have Fought for Inclusion. Michelle Duster, Columbia College Chicago I’d like to think we’re a little more enlightened’: Deindustrialization and the Politics of Prison Expansion, 1975-1996.” Kevin J. Muhitch, University of Maryland - Baltimore County “Standing My Ground: Voting, Citizenship, and Migration in Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, 1890-1920”. Evan Howard Ashford, State University of New York, College at Oneonta Commentator: Karsonya Wise Whitehead, ASALH Secretary, Loyola University Maryland 186.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 06 – 2nd floor - AV Room

KEY SESSION: RETHINKING POLICE POWER AND AFRICAN AMERICAN RESISTANCE THROUGH THE LENS OF POLICING LOS ANGELES. Chair: Simon Balto, University of Iowa Presenters: Simon Balto, University of Iowa Max Felker-Kantor, Ball State University Anne Gray Fischer, Indiana University DeAnza Cook, Harvard University Peter Pihos, Western Washington University 187.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Media Session

CC - Meeting Room 07 – 2nd floor - AV Room

PARIS NOIR: AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE CITY OF LIGHT. Moderator: Le’Trice D Donaldson, University of Wisconsin Stout 188.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 08 – 2nd floor

USING DIGITAL NARRATIVES TO TELL OUR MIGRATION STORIES. Chair: Omopé Carter-Daboiku, Paul Laurence Dunbar Branch Participants: “The Great Migration: A Brief Overview in Context”. Naima Quarles-Burnely, Paul Laurence Dunbar Branch “History Keeper.” Omopé Carter-Daboiku, Paul Laurence Dunbar Branch Black Pathways to Dayton. Larry Crowe, Independent Scholar Commentator: Larry Crowe, Independent Scholar

75


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 189.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

DOCUMENTING AND THEORIZING MOVEMENT ACROSS TIME AND SPACE: DIGITAL TOOLS AND BLACK MIGRATIONS. Chair: Felicia Thomas, Morgan State University Participants: “Theorizing the Meaning of Movements Across the African Diaspora: The Study of the “Slave(ry) Trade” and the Rise of the West”. Ronald W. Bailey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Routes of Love and Paris Noir in Jake Lamar’s Rendezvous Eighteenth. Tyechia Thompson, Virginia Tech Writing Across Cultures: Langston Hughes Between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. Letitia Guran, North Carolina A&T State University Bridging the Diasporic and Digital Divides in Black Studies: iBlack Studies, a Digital Documentation Project. Marilyn Miller Thomas-Houston, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Editor of Fire!!! Commentator: Ronald W. Bailey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 190.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

REVEALING AND RETELLING HIDDEN HISTORIES AS DISCOVERED THROUGH ARCHIVAL AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH OF ONE SHIP WITH TWO NAMES: QUEEN ANNE’S REVENGE (A PIRATE SHIP) AND LA CONCORDE (A SLAVE SHIP). Chair: Angela Thorpe, NC African American Heritage Commission Participants: Review of Archival and Archaeological Research (1997-2018) of NC State Shipwreck 31CR314: One Ship with Two Names – Queen Anne’s Revenge (1717-1718) and La Concorde (1710-1717). Sarah Watkins-Kenney, NC Office of State Archaeology: Archaeologist Supervisor/Chief Conservator, Queen Anne’s Revenge Conservation Lab A Tale of One Ship with Two Names: Opportunities Presented by an 18th Century Shipwreck for Wide Ranging Research, with Reference to Global Black Migrations. Hannah Francis, Rice University (PhD Candidate, Dept. of History)/NC African American Heritage Commission: History Research Fellow, “A Tale of Two Ships” Project Beyond Blackbeard: Employing a Multi-Disciplinary, Community-Based Methodology to Reveal and Re-Frame Popular Narratives around a North Carolina Shipwreck. Angela Thorpe, NC African American Heritage Commission Commentator: Michelle Lanier, Director, NC Division of State Historic Sites & Properties 191.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

REFLECTIONS ON ANTI-BLACK VIOLENCE AND AMERICAN PUBLIC MEMORY. Chair: Kenneth Alyass, Harvard University Participants: The Politics of Pain: Violence in Popular Representations of Slavery. Erica L. Ball, Occidental College “I Can’t be Scared of No Dog”: Visualizing Canines and Anti-Black Violence. Tyler D. Parry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 192.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

KEY SESSION: BLACK AWAKENING IN CAPITALIST AMERICA AT FIFTY. Chair: Charisse Burden-Stelly, Carleton College Presenters: Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, ASALH Executive Council & University of Illinois Jessica Gordon-Nembhard, John Jay College of Criminal Justice James B. Stewart, Pennsylvania State University Russell Rickford, Cornell University Lia T. Bascomb, Georgia State University

76


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 193.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

AUTHOR MEETS CRITICS: KEEANGA YAMATTHA TAYLOR, RACE FOR PROFIT: HOW BANKS AND THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY UNDERMINED BLACK HOMEOWNERSHIP. Chair: David Goldberg, Wayne State University Presenters: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Princeton University Donna Murch, Rutgers University Destin Jenkins, University of Chicago Rebecca Marchiel, University of Mississippi 194.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 14 - 2nd floor - AV Room

REMEMBERING OUR ROOTS: THE INFLUENCE OF EDUCATION AND IT’S IMPACT ON BLACK FAMILIES DURING THE ERA OF THE GREAT MIGRATION. Chair: Robert Stanton, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Participants: The Migration from Greenwood, South Carolina for the Kinard’s. Joy Kinard, National Park Service Migration to Washington, D.C. from Tulsa, Oklahoma of the Franklins. John W. Franklin, Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture The Roberts Family Migration from Hume, Virginia. Karen Roberts Franklin, Businesswoman and Researcher Commentator: Robert Stanton, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 195.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Paper Session

Cooper – Embassy Suites

MIGRATING, MELDING AND MOVEMENT MAKING: THE UPBUILDING OF THE BLACK DIASPORA. Chair: Rose C. Thevenin, Florida Memorial University Participants: In Search of a Name Worthy of Respect: the Campaign to Present the Truth about the Name “Negro,” 1960-1971. Khary Pestaina, Florida International University Isabel Gonzalez and the Puerto Rican Insular Cases: Policing Race, Gender, and Citizenship under the U.S. Jim Crow Empire. Don Polite, University of South Carolina Movement, Migrations, and Roommates: Louise Thompson Patterson & Sue Bailey Thurman in the 1920s-1930s. Brandy Thomas Wells, Oklahoma State University Richard Hilton Tobitt: Political Activism, Leisure, and West Indian Community building in New York City, 1930-1942. Christopher M Shell, Michigan State University ‘She Did it for the Culture’: Black Women Artists and their Ideas About Race in the 1920s. Lauren Rorie, Monmouth University Commentator: ASALH Audience, ASALH 196.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Panel Session

Ideation – Embassy Suites

TITLE: ‘WHAT’S IN A NAME’: INEQUALITIES OF DEFINITION AND THE MIGRATION OF IDEOLOGY IN AMERICAN DEMOCRATIC DISCOURSE. Chair: Jeffrey Robert Kerr-Ritchie, Howard University Participants: “Say Her Name: Black Women and the Politics of Invisibility in American Patriotism”. Kerri Lee Alexander, Howard University “African Americans, Military Propaganda, and Unrest in a time of National Security Anxiety”. Albert Thompson, Northern Virginia Community College “Religion Reconstructed: The Political and Ethical Implications of Theological Rhetoric in the Post-Reconstruction era”. Matthew Quainoo, Howard University Commentator: Jeffrey Robert Kerr-Ritchie, Howard University

77


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 197.

10:00 am to 11:45 am

Roundtable

Wando – Embassy Suites

REFLECTIONS & ASPIRATIONS: TEACHING & RESEARCH AT HBCUS IN THE 21ST CENTURY. Chair: Eric D. Duke, Clark Atlanta University Presenters: Eric D. Duke, Clark Atlanta University Stephanie Y. Evans, Georgia State University Charmayne Patterson, Clark Atlanta University Stephanie Sears, Clark Atlanta University 198.

10:15 am to 11:45 am

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

RALPH BUNCHE: AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY. Moderator: Abul Pitre, Fayetteville State University Lauren Williams, Auburn University 199.

11:45 am to 12:00 pm

Pop-up Talk

CC - Meeting Room 07 - Outside

WOODSON WORKS: WOMEN AND THE CHARLESTON HOSPITAL STRIKE. Presenter: O. Jennifer Dixon-McKnight, Winthrop University 200.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Luncheon

CC - Ballroom A - 1st Floor

ABWH LUNCHEON. Erica Armstrong Dunbar, ABWH National Director, Rutgers University Shennette Garrett-Scott, University of Mississippi Natanya Duncan, Lehigh University Jessica D. Klanderud, Berea College Felicia Jamison, University of Maryland College Park Kali Gross, Rutgers University Erica L. Ball, Occidental College Cherisse Jones-Branch, Arkansas State University Elizabeth Todd-Breland, UIC Siobhan Carter-David, Southern Connecticut State University Maria Esther Hammack, University of Texas at Austin 201.

12:00 pm to 1:45 pm

Luncheon

CC - Ballroom B - 1st Floor

SATURDAY CARTER G. WOODSON LUNCHEON. Emcee: Dr. Karen Chandler, Director and Associate Professor of Arts Management, College of Charleston Invocation & Grace: Rev. Dr. Byron Benton, Pastor, Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church Greetings: Dr. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, ASALH President & Dean, History Department, Harvard University Ms. Tara Morrison, National Park Service Jo Pauling-Jones, AARP South Carolina Dr. M. Evelyn Fields, South Carolina State University Mr. John Ansley, Sire Archon, Gamma Lambda Boule, Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity Introduction of the Speaker: Mrs. Barbara Spencer Dunn, ASALH Vice President for Membership Speaker: Dr. Pero G. Dagbovie, Distinguished Professor of History and Associate Dean in the Graduate School, Michigan State University Closing Prayer: Dr. Louis Venters, Associate Professor of History, Francis Marion University & a Bahá’í Faith Member

78


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 202.

12:00 pm to 2:00 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

THE APOLLO. Moderator: Lewis Walter Diuguid, Independent Scholar 203.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Ballroom B - 1st Floor

“ILLUMINATING BLACK WOMEN’S ACTIVISM AS WE HONOR THE MEMORY OF ROSALYN TERBORG-PENN”. Chair: Stephanie Shaw, The Ohio State University Participants: “Abolition, Woman’s Rights, and Suffrage: Revising the Antebellum Narrative”. Margaret Washington, Cornell University “Mary Church Terrell and Black Women’s Cross-Class Collaborations”. Alison Parker, University of Delaware “Mary Talbert: At the Forefront of Activism in Buffalo, NY”. Lillian S. Williams, University at Buffalo “Hester Jeffrey and Broad Networks of Black Women’s Activism”. Susan Goodier, SUNY Oneonta Commentator: Stephanie Shaw, The Ohio State University 204.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Special Session

CC - Ballroom C2 – 1st floor - AV Room

THE MAKING OF A LEGACY: THE 1865 MIGRATION FROM THE MONTE VERDI PLANTATION AND IT’S MEANING TODAY. Moderator: Barbara Spencer Dunn, ASALH Vice President for Membership Participants: A History All Our Own: How Our Stories Weave Us Together. Dorothy J Franks, ASALH Ownership of a Legacy: It’s Meaning, It’s Past and it’s Relationship to our Present—A Proud Legacy. Cecilia Koch, Presenter; Joe Koch, Presenter The Essence of a Moment in Time: How I Produced the film and What It Meant To Me. Nytesia Ross, ASALH Commentator: JeriDell Mills, ASALH 204.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Ballroom C2 – 1st floor - AV Room

CLAIMING SUNDAY: WHAT THE STORY OF A TEXAS SLAVE COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTES TO SCHOLARSHIP ON SLAVERY--A MIGRATION OF THE MIND. Chair: Barbara Spencer Dunn, ASALH Vice President for Membership Participant: Joleene “Jo” Maddox Snider, Texas State University Aldra Henry Allison, ASALH Pat Scott, ASALH Commentator: Nytesia Ross, ASALH 205.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Ballroom C3 – 1st floor - AV Room

THE RED SUMMER OF 1919 AND ITS IMPACT ON WWI VETERANS AND BLACK MIGRATION. Chair: Arwin Smallwood, North Carolina A&T State University Presenters: Darien Wellman, North Carolina A&T State University Marcus Allen, North Carolina A&T State University Ernest Hooker, North Carolina A&T State University Brian Robinson, North Carolina A&T State University

79


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 206.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 01 – 1st floor - AV Room

THE (IR)RELEVANCY OF BLACK LIBERATION THEOLOGY IN THE FIELDS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND BLACK STUDIES. Chair: Le’Trice D Donaldson, University of Wisconsin Stout Presenters: Andre E Johnson, University of Memphis StaLynn Davis, University of Memphis Le’Trice D Donaldson, University of Wisconsin Stout Brian Foster, University of Mississippi Kimberly Chandler, University of Mississippi Brian Kwoba, University of Memphis 207.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Paper Session

CC - Meeting Room 02 – 1st floor

NORTHERN EXPOSURE: VISIONS OF FREEDOM, SLAVERY & DIASPORA IN NEW ENGLAND. Chair: Zebulon Vance Miletsky, Stony Brook University Participants: Conquering Loss, Celebrating Achievement: The Use of Photography by A Southern Migrant Family, c.1900. Janette Thomas Greenwood, CLARK UNIVERSITY “Keepin’ Still and Mindin’ Things”: The Revolutionary Link Between Afro-American Agency and Autonomy and the Rise of Black Abolitionism in Massachusetts, 1763-1811. Ariana Fiorello-Omotosho, Simmons University Recovering the Memory of Northern Slavery. James Gigantino, University of Arkansas Commentator: Zebulon Vance Miletsky, Stony Brook University 208.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 04 – 2nd floor - AV Room

WE ARE A PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: BLACK MIGRATION AT HOME AND ABROAD. Chair: Deborah Robinson, #WeGlobal: African Americans Living Abroad Research and Education Organization Participants: Black Migration to the USSR/Russia: Taking a Chance on a New Type of Society. Joy Gleason Carew, University of Louisville Exploring the Identities of Black American Women K-12 Teachers in the U.A.E. Andwatta Barnes, University of Michigan “Go back to Africa!” “We dey go!”: The Return Migration of 1.5 and Second Generation Africans. Janet Awokoya, California Lutheran University Commentator: Deborah Robinson, #WeGlobal: African Americans Living Abroad Research and Education Organization 209.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 05 – 2nd floor - AV Room

“IT’S OUR MOVEMENT NOW”: BLACK WOMEN’S POLITICS AND THE 1977 NATIONAL WOMEN’S CONFERENCE. Chair: Laura Lovett, University of Massachusetts Amherst Participants: Beyond Combahee: Barbara Smith and Black Feminism. Julie deChantal, Georgia Southern University Wages for Housework: Johnnie Tillmon and the Welfare as a Women’s Issue. Laura Lovett, University of Massachusetts Amherst African American Women in the Current Political Moment. Kelly Giles, University of Massachusetts Amherst Commentator: Destiney Linker, University of Massachusetts Amherst

80


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 210.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 14 – 2nd floor - AV Room

VIOLENCE AGAINST BLACK BODIES: ON THE FIELD, IN THE FIELD, AND FROM THE FIELD. Chair: Michelle R Scott, University of Maryland - Baltimore County Participants: Colonial Ordering: Black Geographies of Disability in Caribbean Colombia. Brandi Waters, Yale University Riding the Rails: Murder and Madness in Rice Country, 1909-1912. Lauren Nicole Henley, University of Texas at Austin Black Caribbeans & The Transnational Political Dimensions of HIV/AIDS. Jallicia Jolly, University of Michigan Black Players, Quotidian Violence, and the Ordering of College Football. Tracie Canada, University of Virginia Commentator: Michelle R. Scott, University of Maryland - Baltimore County 211.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Workshop

CC - Meeting Room 09 – 2nd floor - AV Room

LOCATING YOUR FAMILY IN THE RECORDS. Chair: Krista M Buck, W. Marvin Dulaney Branch, TX Participants: Locating family records locally. Toni Carrier, International African American Museum Role of the Archivist/Archives. Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston America’s Great Migration: How to tell Your Family’s Story and Why You Should. Elizabeth Huntoon Coursen, Independent Scholar Commentator: Aaisha Haykal, College of Charleston 212.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 10 – 2nd floor

SEA DEVILS: THE RISE OF THE COMPETITIVE BLACK SWIMMER. Chair: Randal Jelks, The University of Kansas Participants: Swimming Competitively and Doing Gender While Black. Misha Neal, University of Illinois, Chicago They Are the Dream Deferred: Competitive Swimming in the DMV”. Mark M. Lewis, MVP Dolphins Sea Devils in the Bayou: Johnnie Means and the Rise of the Black Competitive Swimmer in the Dirty South. Joan Weston, Houston Community College Five Bobs, Sixteen Medals and Seven Decades Later. Madeline Rabb, Madeline Rabb Inc Commentator: Mark Anthony Neal, Duke University 213.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Workshop

CC - Meeting Room 11 – 2nd floor - AV Room

FROM DIGITAL HUMANITIES TO DIGITAL AFRICANA STUDIES, IN THEORY AND IN PRACTICE. Leaders: Elonda Clay, VU University Amsterdam Erika D. Gault, University of Arizona Bryan Carter, University of Arizona 214.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 12 – 2nd floor

FROM LOUISIANA TO NEW YORK: THE MIGRATION AND JOURNEY OF MADAM C. J. WALKER, 1867-1919. Chair: Tyrone McKinley Freeman, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy Presenters: Tyrone McKinley Freeman, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy Susan Hall, Indiana Historical Society Kisha Tandy, Indiana State Museum Lyndsey Blair, Indiana Historical Society

81


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 215.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

CC - Meeting Room 13 – 2nd floor - AV Room

YOUTH AND CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVISM IN LOUISIANA: INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES. Chair: V.P. Franklin, Former Editor, Journal of African American History Participants: Catalyst for Change: Children, Youth, and Civil Rights Activism in Louisiana. Sharlene Sinegal DeCuir, Xavier University Use of an Interdisciplinary Framework for Cultural Competence in a History-Counseling Collaboration. Cirecie A. West-Olatungi, Xavier University Using the Digital Humanities to Preserve the Oral Histories of Louisiana Civil Rights Youth Activists. Nikki Lynn Marie Brown, University of Kentucky Commentator: V.P. Franklin, Former Editor, Journal of African American History 216.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

CC - Meeting Room 06 - 2nd floor - AV Room

WOMEN AND MIGRATION: RESPONSES IN ART AND HISTORY. Chairs: Deborah Willis, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU Ellyn M Toscano, NYU Tisch School Presenters: Sharon Harley, African American Studies Department University of Maryland College Park Gunja SenGupta, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, CUNY Cheryl A. Wall, Rutgers University Kalia Brooks, Independent Curator/Adjunct Professor, NYU Paulette C. Young, Cultural Anthropologist and Curator in the Creative Arts of Africa and the African Diaspora/ Independent Scholar Cheryl Finley, Cornell University 217.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Roundtable

Cooper – Embassy Suites

REIMAGINING THE “HEARTLAND”: BLACK WOMEN, VIOLENCE, AND MIGRATION TO THE JIM CROW MIDWEST. Chair: Lakisha Simmons, University of Michigan Presenters: Crystal M. Moten, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History Tanisha Ford, University of Delaware Terrion L. Williamson, University of Minnesota 218.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Panel Session

Ideation – Embassy Suites

KEY SESSION: MOVEMENTS AND MOMENTS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICS IN THE 1980S AND 1990S. Chair: Leah Wright Rigueur, Harvard Kennedy School of Government Participants: “The Black Power Resurgence: Rethinking Black Politics in the 1980s and early 1990s”. George Derek Musgrove, University of Maryland, Baltimore County “TransAfrica, the Congressional Black Caucus, and the Haitian Refugee Crisis, 1991-1994”. Ronald Williams, University of North Carolina Generation Black. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Princeton University Commentator: Leah Wright Rigueur, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

82


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019 219.

2:00 pm to 3:50 pm

Workshop

Wando – Embassy Suites

ORAL HISTORY, BLACK TEACHERS, AND THE MEANING OF ACTIVISM. Chair: Omopé Carter-Daboiku, Paul Laurence Dunbar Branch Leaders: Derrick P. Alridge, University of Virginia Danielle Wingfield-Smith, University of Virginia Chenyu Wang, University of Virginia Hunter Holt, University of Virginia Alexis Monique Johnson, University of Virginia Kristan McCullum, University of Virginia 220.

2:15 pm to 3:50 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

WHILE I BREATHE I HOPE: A FILM ABOUT BAKARI SELLERS. Moderator: Bakari Sellers, CNN 221.

4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Plenary Session

CC - Ballroom A - 1st Floor

PLENARY: 400 YEARS OF PERSEVERANCE: STOLEN FROM AFRICA BUT MAKING BLACK LIVES MATTER. Chair: Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, John Jay College / ASALH Executive Council Presenters: Congressman James E. Clyburn, US House of Representatives 6th District of South Carolina Brenda E. Stevenson, UCLA Cassandra Newby-Alexander, Norfolk State University Vlademiro Fortuna, Director, National Museum of Slavery of Angola 222.

6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Reception

Wando – Embassy Suites

ABWH GRADUATE RECEPTION. Leader: Erica Armstrong Dunbar, Director 223.

7:00 pm to 8:20 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

BROTHER OUTSIDER: THE LIFE OF BAYARD RUSTIN. Moderator: Matthew Nichter, Rollins College 224.

7:30 pm to 10:30 pm

Banquet

CC - Ballroom B - 1st Floor

SATURDAY AWARDS BANQUET. Emcee: Mr. Bakari T. Sellers, Esq., Strom Law Firm, LLC & CNN Commentator Welcome: Dr. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, ASALH President & Dean, History Department, Harvard University Greeters: Dr. Sheila Flemming-Hunter, ASALH Executive Council & Black Rose Foundation for Children Mr. Antonio F. Knox, Sr., Immediate Past (40th) Grand Basileus, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Dr. Bernard Powers, LAC Co-Chair & Professor Emeritus, College of Charleston Dr. Willette S. Burnham Williams, Associate Vice President & Chief Diversity Officer, Medical University of South Carolina Mrs. Dorothy G. Harrison, CAO, Charleston Water System Presenters of Awards: Mr. Jeffrey A. Banks, ASALH Executive Council & Robert Garner Branch (Cincinnati) Dr. Willliam Seraile, ASALH Manhattan Branch Ms. Johnnieque Love, University of Maryland Dr. Lionel Kimble, ASALH Vice President for Programs, Chicago State University

83


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2019 Dr. Annette C. Palmer, Morgan State University Dr. Natanya Duncan, Lehigh University Professor Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, John Jay College / ASALH Executive Council Mrs. Barbara Spencer Dunn, ASALH Vice President for Membership 2019 Annual Meeting and Conference Awardees: Congressman James E. Clyburn, U.S. House of Representative, 6th District of South Carolina Rev. Nelson B. Rivers, III, Pastor, Charity Missionary Baptist Church & Vice President, Religious Affairs and External Relations, National Action Network Dr. Ida E. Jones, Historian & Archivist, Morgan State University Dr. Brenda R. Simmons-Hutchins, Independent Educational Consultant Dr. Bernard Powers, Jr., Director, Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston, College of Charleston Mr. David L. Acey, Memphis Area Branch of ASALH Mrs. Yvonne B. Acey, Memphis Branch of ASALH Charles C. Blockston, Bibliophile, Historian, Author Dr. Tiffany Packer, Florida A& M University Dr. Sarah Lewis, Harvard University The Honorable Robert Stanton, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Closing Remarks: Ms. Sylvia Y. Cyrus, ASALH Executive Director Entertainment: Oscar Rivers Jazz Quartet and Little Miss Michael Miller accompanied by Mrs. Kathy Marsh Collins 225.

8:30 pm to 10:00 pm

ASALH Film Festival

CC - Ballroom C1 – 1st floor - AV Room

ASALH FILM SHORTS. Moderator: Daniel Acker, Independent Scholar

Sunday, October 6, 2019 226.

8:00 am to 9:30 am

Breakfast

CC - Ballroom C1/C2 – 1st floor

ASALH ECUMENICAL BREAKFAST. Emcee: Dr. Maxine Smith, LAC Coordinator & Member, Charleston Area Branch Invocation & Grace: Rabbi Greg Kanter, KKBE Greetings: Col. Terrence Adams, Commander of the 628th Air Base Wing and Joint Base Charleston, SC Musical Selection: College of Charleston Gospel Choir Introduction of the Speaker: Attorney F. Renêe Gaters, Law Offices of F. Renêe Gaters Speaker: Rev. Dr. Norvel Goff, Sr., Presiding Elder, Edisto District, AME Churches, South Carolina Musical Selection: College of Charleston Gospel Choir Closing Prayer: Rev. Dr. Kylon Middleton, Pastor, Mount Zion AME Church, Charleston, SC 227.

10:30 am to 4:30 pm

Tour

CC - Convention Center Entrance by the Flag Pole

POST-CONFERENCE AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE BUS TOUR. Sponsored by Dominion Energy and the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom

84



CALL FOR PAPERS

2020 BLACK HISTORY THEME: AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE VOTE 105TH ANNUAL MEETING AND CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 23-27, 2020 • RENAISSANCE MONTGOMERY HOTEL & SPA • MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA ASALH’s 2020 theme comes as the nation marks the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment (1920) and celebrates the sesquicentennial of the Fifteenth Amendment (1870). These constitutional amendments reshaped the American political landscape as the with the culmination of suffrage for women and granted the right of black men to the ballot after the Civil War. The theme speaks, therefore, to the ongoing struggle on the part of both black men and black women for the right to vote. The national discussion that centered around the struggles of African Americans and the vote has a rich and long history, which begins at the turn of the nineteenth century during the age in the era of the Early Republic. It was here we see states passing laws that democratized the vote for white men while disfranchising free black men. Thus, even before the Civil War, black men petitioned their legislatures and the US Congress, seeking to be recognized as voters. With the conclusion of the war, states still found ways to circumvent the Constitution and prevent blacks from voting. Poll taxes, literacy tests, fraud and intimidation all turned African Americans away from the polls. Until the Supreme Court struck it down in 1915, many states used the “grandfather clause” to keep descendants of slaves out of elections. The clause said you could not vote unless your grandfather had voted -- an impossibility for most people whose ancestors were slaves. Tensions between abolitionists and women’s suffragists first surfaced in the aftermath of the Civil War, while black disfranchisement laws in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries undermined the guarantees in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments for the great majority of southern blacks until the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The important contribution of black suffragists occurred not only within the larger women’s movement, but within the larger black voting rights movement. The suffragist movement was not without its own issues - some suffragettes were unwilling to entertain the notion of allowing black women the right to vote. There was resentment in the suffrage movement over the 15th Amendment and the fact that black men were given the right to vote before women. This drove a considerable wedge between her and suffragists like Ida B. Wells. Other suffragettes felt violence was the best way to get their point across, which led to some group members being arrested and serving jail time. Through voting-rights campaigns and legal suits from the turn of the twentieth century to the mid-1960s, African Americans made their voices heard as to the importance of the vote. Indeed the fight for black voting rights continues in the courts today. The theme of the vote should also include the rise of black elected and appointed officials at the local and national levels, campaigns for equal rights legislation, as well as the role of blacks in traditional and alternative political parties. The Academic Program Committee seeks a diverse slate of presenters and panels representing a variety of professional and institutional backgrounds, perspectives, and voices. We are interested in detailed, comprehensive, and descriptive proposals that outline the theme, scope, and aim of participants. The committee particularly seeks presentations that probe the traditional fields of economic, political, diplomatic, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women’s/gender history as well as southern, Appalachian, and western history; along with the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LBGT, and queer history; environmental and public history; African American intellectual history; carceral state studies; and transnational and global studies across all fields, topics, and thematic emphases. We encourage proposals from scholars working across a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in Black history, life and culture. We seek to foster a space of inclusion in the ASALH program and encourage submissions from anyone interested in presenting including: historians, students, new professionals, first-time presenters, activists, and practitioners from allied professions. Deadlines for submission of proposals are as follows: Submissions will be accepted up to Early Bird submission, which is March 1, 2020. After this date, the committee will accept all submissions until the deadline of April 1, 2020.


HISTORIC PLACES ARE MEMORIES MADE REAL How can we preserve the

JOURNEYS AND STRUGGLES OF OUR ANCESTORS? Follow in the footsteps of our ancestors and lead the way into the future, by experiencing authentic learning at a historic site. Historic sites memorialize and commemorate the places where history was made. Learn the stories of the millions of African Americans who migrated throughout the United States. Help preserve and protect historic sites. Please join ACHP Expert Member Robert G. Stanton as he moderates the panel:

Remembering Our Roots: The Influence of Education and its Impact on Black Families during the Era of the Great Migration

The Illinois Central Railroad was a major carrier of African Americans migrating north from southern states in search of better living conditions and jobs. This photo shows the Illinois Central Rail Road Station in 1918. (Chicago History Museum; W. T. Barnum, photographer) LEARN MORE AT WWW.ACHP.GOV The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation promotes the preservation, enhancement, and sustainable use of our nation’s diverse historic resources, and advises the President and the Congress on national historic preservation policy.


NPCA is proud to support the Association for the Study of African American Life and History’s 104th Annual Meeting. Please be sure to attend our Wednesday, October 2nd opening plenary session:

A People Moving: How the National Park Service and Preservationists Tell the Story of Black Migrations

Featuring: John W. Franklin, National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution (retired). Brent Leggs, Executive Director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund of the Trust for Historic Preservation. Stephanie Deutsch, Author of the book “You Need a Schoolhouse: Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South.” Enimini Ekong, Superintendent of Nicodemus National Historic Site (KS)

Deanda Johnson, Midwest Regional Manager of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program (NPS) Ajena Rogers, Supervisory Park Ranger at Maggie Walker National Historic Site (VA) Moderator: Alan Spears, Cultural Resources Director – National Parks Conservation Association Greeter: Madeleine Starkey, Senior Executive Assistant – National Parks Conservation Association From 4:30 to 6:30pm in Ballroom C1 – Convention Center, 1st Floor

100YEARS NPCA.ORG


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.